WorldWideScience

Sample records for clinical pet application

  1. Clinical PET application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Hong, Song W.; Choi, Chang W.; Yang, Seong Dae [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea)

    1997-12-01

    PET gives various methabolic images, and is very important, new diagnostic modality in clinical oncology. In Korea Cancer Center Hospital, PET is installed as a research tool of long-mid-term atomic research project. For the efficient use of PET for clinical and research projects, income from the patients should be managed to get the raw material, equipment, manpower, and also for the clinical PET research. 1. Support the clinical application of PET in oncology. 2. Budgetary management of income, costs for raw material, equipment, manpower, and the clinical PET research project. In this year, 250 cases of PET images were obtained, which resulted total income of 180,000,000 won. 50,000,000 won was deposited for the 1998 PET clinical research. Second year PET clinical research should be managed under unified project. Increased demand for {sup 18}FDG in and outside KCCH need more than 2 times production of {sup 18}FDG in a day purchase of HPLC pump and {sup 68}Ga pin source which was delayed due to economic crisis, should be done early in 1998. (author). 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Clinical applications of PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Ngoc Ha

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the evolution of PET, PET/CT focusing on the technical aspects, PET radiopharmaceutical developments and current clinical applications as well. The newest technologic advances have been reviewed, including improved crystal design, acquisition modes, reconstruction algorithms, etc. These advancements will continue to improve contrast, decrease noise, and increase resolution. Combined PET/CT system provides faster attenuation correction and useful anatomic correlation to PET functional information. A number of new radiopharmaceuticals used for PET imaging have been developed, however, FDG have been considered as the principal PET radiotracer. The current clinical applications of PET and PET/CT are widespread and include oncology, cardiology and neurology. (author)

  3. PET/MRI. Methodology and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrio, Ignasi [Autonomous Univ. of Barcelona, Hospital Sant Pau (Spain). Dept. Medicina Nuclear; Ros, Pablo (ed.) [Univ. Hospitals Case, Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-04-01

    Provides detailed information on the methodology and equipment of MRI-PET. Covers a wide range of clinical applications in oncology, cardiology, and neurology. Written by an international group of experts in MRI and PET. PET/MRI is an exciting novel diagnostic imaging modality that combines the precise anatomic and physiologic information provided by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the molecular data obtained with positron emission tomography (PET). PET/MRI offers the promise of a simplified work flow, reduced radiation, whole-body imaging with superior soft tissue contrast, and time of flight physiologic information. It has been described as the pathway to molecular imaging in medicine. In compiling this textbook, the editors have brought together a truly international group of experts in MRI and PET. The book is divided into two parts. The first part covers methodology and equipment and comprises chapters on basic molecular medicine, development of specific contrast agents, MR attenuation and validation, quantitative MRI and PET motion correction, and technical implications for both MRI and PET. The second part of the book focuses on clinical applications in oncology, cardiology, and neurology. Imaging of major neoplasms, including lymphomas and tumors of the breast, prostate, and head and neck, is covered in individual chapters. Further chapters address functional and metabolic cardiovascular examinations and major central nervous system applications such as brain tumors and dementias. Risks, safety aspects, and healthcare costs and impacts are also discussed. This book will be of interest to all radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians who wish to learn more about the latest developments in this important emerging imaging modality and its applications.

  4. Clinical application of PET in abdominal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Chang Woon

    2002-01-01

    Clinical application of positron emission tomography (PET) is rapidly increasing for the detection and staging of cancer at whole-body studies performed with the glucose analogue tracer 2-[fluorine-18]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FG). Although FDG PET cannot match the anatomic resolution of conventional imaging techniques in the liver and the other abdominal organs, it is particularly useful for identification and characterization of the entire body simultaneously. FDG PET can show foci of metastatic disease that may not be apparent at conventional anatomic imaging and can aid in the characterizing of indeterminate soft-tissue masses. Most abdominal cancer requires surgical management. FGD PET can improve the selection of patients for surgical treatment and thereby reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with inappropriate surgery. FDG PET is also useful for the early detection of recurrence and the monitoring of therapeutic effect. The abdominal cancers, such as gastroesophageal cancer, colorectal cancer, liver cancer and pancreatic cancer, are common malignancies in Korea, and PET is one of the most promising and useful methodologies for the management of abdominal cancers

  5. An overview of PET/MR, focused on clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Onofrio Antonio; Masch, William Roger; Catana, Ciprian; Mahmood, Umar; Sahani, Dushyant Vasudeo; Gee, Michael Stanley; Menezes, Leon; Soricelli, Andrea; Salvatore, Marco; Gervais, Debra; Rosen, Bruce Robert

    2017-02-01

    Hybrid PET/MR scanners are innovative imaging devices that simultaneously or sequentially acquire and fuse anatomical and functional data from magnetic resonance (MR) with metabolic information from positron emission tomography (PET) (Delso et al. in J Nucl Med 52:1914-1922, 2011; Zaidi et al. in Phys Med Biol 56:3091-3106, 2011). Hybrid PET/MR scanners have the potential to greatly impact not only on medical research but also, and more importantly, on patient management. Although their clinical applications are still under investigation, the increased worldwide availability of PET/MR scanners, and the growing published literature are important determinants in their rising utilization for primarily clinical applications. In this manuscript, we provide a summary of the physical features of PET/MR, including its limitations, which are most relevant to clinical PET/MR implementation and to interpretation. Thereafter, we discuss the most important current and emergent clinical applications of such hybrid technology in the abdomen and pelvis, both in the field of oncologic and non-oncologic imaging, and we provide, when possible, a comparison with clinically consolidated imaging techniques, like for example PET/CT.

  6. Clinical Applications of FDG PET and PET/CT in Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Al-Ibraheem

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available 18F-FDG PET plays an increasing role in diagnosis and management planning of head and neck cancer. Hybrid PET/CT has promoted the field of molecular imaging in head and neck cancer. This modality is particular relevant in the head and neck region, given the complex anatomy and variable physiologic FDG uptake patterns. The vast majority of 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT applications in head and neck cancer related to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Clinical applications of 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT in head and neck cancer include diagnosis of distant metastases, identification of synchronous 2nd primaries, detection of carcinoma of unknown primary and detection of residual or recurrent disease. Emerging applications are precise delineation of the tumor volume for radiation treatment planning, monitoring treatment, and providing prognostic information. The clinical role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in N0 disease is limited which is in line with findings of other imaging modalities. MRI is usually used for T staging with an intense discussion concerning the preferable imaging modality for regional lymph node staging as PET/CT, MRI, and multi-slice spiral CT are all improving rapidly. Is this review, we summarize recent literature on 18F-FDG PET and PET/CT imaging of head and neck cancer.

  7. Clinical application of SPECT and PET in cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ra, Young Shin

    2003-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography(SPECT) and positron emission tomography(PET) are modern imaging techniques that allow for both qualitative are quantitative assessment of hemodynamic changes in cerebrovascular diseases. SPECT has been becoming an indispensable method to investigate regional cerebral blood flow because equipment and isotope are easily available in most general hospitals. Acetazolamide stress SPECT has also been proved to be useful to evaluate the cerebrovascular reserve of occlusive cerebrovascular diseases and to select surgical candidate. PET has gained wide spread clinical use in the evaluation of the hemodynamic and metabolic consequences of extracranial or intracranial arterial obstructive disease despite its complexity and limited availability. PET has been established as an invaluable tool in the pathophysilogy investigation of acute ischemic stroke. The potentials, limitations, and clinical applications of SPECT and PET in various cerebrovascular diseases will be discussed in this article with reviews of literatures

  8. Clinical application of SPECT and PET in cerebrovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ra, Young Shin [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-02-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography(SPECT) and positron emission tomography(PET) are modern imaging techniques that allow for both qualitative are quantitative assessment of hemodynamic changes in cerebrovascular diseases. SPECT has been becoming an indispensable method to investigate regional cerebral blood flow because equipment and isotope are easily available in most general hospitals. Acetazolamide stress SPECT has also been proved to be useful to evaluate the cerebrovascular reserve of occlusive cerebrovascular diseases and to select surgical candidate. PET has gained wide spread clinical use in the evaluation of the hemodynamic and metabolic consequences of extracranial or intracranial arterial obstructive disease despite its complexity and limited availability. PET has been established as an invaluable tool in the pathophysilogy investigation of acute ischemic stroke. The potentials, limitations, and clinical applications of SPECT and PET in various cerebrovascular diseases will be discussed in this article with reviews of literatures.

  9. Clinical Application of 18F-FDG PET in Epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yu Kyeong

    2008-01-01

    FDG PET has been used as a diagnostic tool for localization of seizure focus for last 2-3 decades. In this article, the clinical usefulness of FDG PET in the management of patients with epilepsy has been reviewed, which provided the evidences to justify the medicare reimbursement for FDG PET in management of patients with epilepsy. Literature review demonstrated that FDG PET provides an important information in localization of seizure focus and determination whether a patients is a surgical candidate or not. FDG PET has been reported to have high diagnostic performance in localization of seizure focus in neocortical epilepsy as well as temporal lobe epilepsy regardless of the presence of structural lesion on MRI. Particularly, FDG PET can provide the additional information when the results from standard diagnositic modality such as interictal or video-monitored EEG, and MRI are inconclusive or discordant, and make to avoid invasive study. Furthermore, the presence of hypometabolism and extent of metabolic extent has been reported as an important predictor for seizure free outcome. However, studies suggested that more accurate localization and better surgical outcome could be expected with multimodal approach by combination of EEG, MRI, and functional studies using FDG PET or perfusion SPECT rather than using a single diagnostic modality in management of patients with epilepsy. Complementary use of FDG PET in management of epilepsy is worth for good surgical outcome in epilepsy patients

  10. The clinical application of PET/CT: a contemporary review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, Z.; Partridge, M.; Trapp, J.V.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The combination of positron emission tomography (PET) scanners and x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanners into a single PET CT scanner has resulted in significant improvements in the diagnosis and staging of disease, particularly in the field of oncology. A decade on from the publication of the details of the first PET/CT scanner, we review the technology and applications of the modality. We examine the design aspects of combining two different imaging types into a single scanner, and the artefacts produced such as attenuation correction, motion and CT truncation artefacts. The article also provides a discussion and literature review of the applications of PET/CT to date, covering detection of tumours, radiotherapy treatment planning, patient management, and applications external to the field of oncology.

  11. MO-FG-207-03: Maximizing the Utility of Integrated PET/MRI in Clinical Applications

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    Behr, S. [University of California (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The use of integrated PET/MRI systems in clinical applications can best benefit from understanding their technological advances and limitations. The currently available clinical PET/MRI systems have their own characteristics. Thorough analyses of existing technical data and evaluation of necessary performance metrics for quality assurances could be conducted to optimize application-specific PET/MRI protocols. This Symposium will focus on technical advances and limitations of clinical PET/MRI systems, and how this exciting imaging modality can be utilized in applications that can benefit from both PET and MRI. Learning Objectives: To understand the technological advances of clinical PET/MRI systems To correctly identify clinical applications that can benefit from PET/MRI To understand ongoing work to further improve the current PET/MRI technology Floris Jansen is a GE Healthcare employee.

  12. MO-FG-207-03: Maximizing the Utility of Integrated PET/MRI in Clinical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behr, S.

    2015-01-01

    The use of integrated PET/MRI systems in clinical applications can best benefit from understanding their technological advances and limitations. The currently available clinical PET/MRI systems have their own characteristics. Thorough analyses of existing technical data and evaluation of necessary performance metrics for quality assurances could be conducted to optimize application-specific PET/MRI protocols. This Symposium will focus on technical advances and limitations of clinical PET/MRI systems, and how this exciting imaging modality can be utilized in applications that can benefit from both PET and MRI. Learning Objectives: To understand the technological advances of clinical PET/MRI systems To correctly identify clinical applications that can benefit from PET/MRI To understand ongoing work to further improve the current PET/MRI technology Floris Jansen is a GE Healthcare employee

  13. Resolution improvement of brain PET images using prior information from MRI: clinical application on refractory epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva-Rodríguez, Jesus; Tsoumpas, Charalampos; Aguiar, Pablo; Cortes, Julia; Urdaneta, Jesus Lopez

    2015-01-01

    An important counterpart of clinical Positron Emission Tomography (PET) for early diagnosis of neurological diseases is its low resolution. This is particularly important when evaluating diseases related to small hypometabolisms such as epilepsy. The last years, new hybrid systems combining PET with Magnetic Resonance (MR) has been increasingly used for several different clinical applications. One of the advantages of MR is the production of high spatial resolution images and a potential application of PET-MR imaging is the improvement of PET resolution using MR information. A potential advantage of resolution recovery of PET images is the enhancement of contrast delivering at the same time better detectability of small lesions or hypometabolic areas and more accurate quantification over these areas. Recently, Shidahara et al (2009) proposed a new method using wavelet transforms in order to produce PET images with higher resolution. We optimised Shidahara’s method (SFS-RR) to take into account possible shortcomings on the particular clinical datasets, and applied it to a group of patients diagnosed with refractory epilepsy. FDG-PET and MRI images were acquired sequentially and then co-registered using software tools. A complete evaluation of the PET/MR images was performed before and after the correction, including different parameters related with PET quantification, such as atlas-based metabolism asymmetry coefficients and Statistical Parametric Mapping results comparing to a database of 87 healthy subjects. Furthermore, an experienced physician analyzed the results of non-corrected and corrected images in order to evaluate improvements of detectability on a visual inspection. Clinical outcome was used as a gold standard. SFS-RR demonstrated to have a positive impact on clinical diagnosis of small hypometabolisms. New lesions were detected providing additional clinically relevant information on the visual inspection. SPM sensitivity for the detection of small

  14. Resolution improvement of brain PET images using prior information from MRI: clinical application on refractory epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva-Rodríguez, Jesus [Instituto de Investigaciones Sanitarias (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Tsoumpas, Charalampos [University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Aguiar, Pablo; Cortes, Julia [Nuclear Medicine Department, University Hospital (CHUS), Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Urdaneta, Jesus Lopez [Instituto de Investigaciones Sanitarias (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2015-05-18

    An important counterpart of clinical Positron Emission Tomography (PET) for early diagnosis of neurological diseases is its low resolution. This is particularly important when evaluating diseases related to small hypometabolisms such as epilepsy. The last years, new hybrid systems combining PET with Magnetic Resonance (MR) has been increasingly used for several different clinical applications. One of the advantages of MR is the production of high spatial resolution images and a potential application of PET-MR imaging is the improvement of PET resolution using MR information. A potential advantage of resolution recovery of PET images is the enhancement of contrast delivering at the same time better detectability of small lesions or hypometabolic areas and more accurate quantification over these areas. Recently, Shidahara et al (2009) proposed a new method using wavelet transforms in order to produce PET images with higher resolution. We optimised Shidahara’s method (SFS-RR) to take into account possible shortcomings on the particular clinical datasets, and applied it to a group of patients diagnosed with refractory epilepsy. FDG-PET and MRI images were acquired sequentially and then co-registered using software tools. A complete evaluation of the PET/MR images was performed before and after the correction, including different parameters related with PET quantification, such as atlas-based metabolism asymmetry coefficients and Statistical Parametric Mapping results comparing to a database of 87 healthy subjects. Furthermore, an experienced physician analyzed the results of non-corrected and corrected images in order to evaluate improvements of detectability on a visual inspection. Clinical outcome was used as a gold standard. SFS-RR demonstrated to have a positive impact on clinical diagnosis of small hypometabolisms. New lesions were detected providing additional clinically relevant information on the visual inspection. SPM sensitivity for the detection of small

  15. [Clinical evaluation of female pelvic tumors : Application fields of integrated PET/MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grueneisen, J; Umutlu, L

    2016-07-01

    Integrated positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning has recently become established in clinical imaging. Various studies have demonstrated the great potential of this new hybrid imaging procedure for applications in the field of oncology and the diagnostics of inflammatory processes. With initial studies demonstrating the feasibility and high diagnostic potential of PET/MRI comparable to PET-computed tomography (CT), the focus of future studies should be on the identification of application fields with a potential diagnostic benefit of PET/MRI over other established diagnostic tools. Both MRI and PET/CT are widely used in the diagnostic algorithms for malignancies of the female pelvis. A simultaneous acquisition of PET and MRI data within a single examination provides complementary information which can be used for a more comprehensive evaluation of the primary tumor as well as for whole body staging. Therefore, the aim of this article is to outline potential clinical applications of integrated PET/MRI for the diagnostic work-up of primary or recurrent gynecological neoplasms of the female pelvis.

  16. Clinical application of early PET-CT imaging after radiofrequency ablation of liver neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhaoyu; Chang Zhihui; Lu Zaiming; Xin Jun; Wang Xiaoming; Guo Qiyong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the application of early 18 F-FDG PET-CT imaging after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of hepatic malignancies. Methods: Fifteen patients with liver tumors (five hepatocellular carcinoma, ten colorectal cancer liver metastasis) underwent RFA as part of clinical management. The lesions were all hypermetabolic on PET-CT performed within 2 weeks prior to RFA. All subjects underwent 18 F-FDG PET-CT (early PET-CT) within 24 hours after RFA. Total photopenia, focal uptake, and rim-shaped uptake were regarded as complete ablation, residual tumor, and inflammation, respectively. Follow-up PET-CT scans were performed as the reference standard. Results: Twelve patients showed total photopenia at the ablation site on the early PET-CT scan, and in all of these patients, total photopenia at the ablation sites was seen on the follow-up PET-CT scans. Two patients had focal uptake at the ablation sites on the early PET-CT scan, and both of these foci increased in size and intensity, which were compatible with residual tumors at the time of ablation. Only one patient had rim-shaped uptake on the early PET-CT scan. The rim-shaped uptake disappeared on PET-CT performed 3 months later, which indicated the nature of inflammation. Conclusions: There is infrequent inflammatory uptake at the RFA site of liver tumors on 18 F-FDG PET-CT if scanning is performed within 24 hours after ablation. Thus, early PET- CT has the potential to evaluate the efficacy of an RFA procedure by indicating tumor-free as total photopenia and residual tumors as focal uptake. (authors)

  17. Clinical Application of F-18 FDG PET (PET/CT) in Colo-rectal and Anal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byung Il

    2008-01-01

    In the management of colo-retal and anal cancer, accurate staging, treatment evaluation, early detection of recurrence are main clinical problems. F-18 FDG PET (PET/CT) has been reported as useful in the management of colo-rectal and anal cancer because that PET has high diagnostic performance comparing to conventional studies. In case of liver metastases, for confirmation of no extrahepatic metastases, in case of high risk of metastasis, for avoiding unnecessary operation, PET (PET/CT) is expected more useful. In anal cancer, PET is expected useful in lymph node staging. For the early prediction of chemotherapy or radiation therapy effect PET has been reported as useful, also. In early detection of recurrence by PET, cost-benefit advantages has been suggested, also. PET/CT is expected to have higher diagnostic performance than PET alone

  18. 'Serial review on clinical PET tracers'. Application of health insurance of [15O]oxygen PET and [18F]FDG-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torizuka, Kanji

    2009-01-01

    As regards the application required for health insurance of PET, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare indicates the following procedures: first, request a permission to the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare for the clinical use of the automatic synthetic instrument for PET drug, approved according to the Pharmaceutical Affairs Law. Second, put into practice the use of PET test, under the highly advanced medicine premises. Then, in case of gathered positive results, the health insurance is approved for this PET test. Thus, following the above mentioned procedures, first, the use of [ 15 O] oxygen PET was approved in April 1996. Second, the use of [ 18 F]FDG-PET was approved in 12 different diseases: epilepsy, ischemic heart disease and 10 different types of cancer, in April 2002. Third, in April 2006, a additional 3 types of cancer were approved. Now, we are in the process to get the health insurance of all kinds of malignant tumors (cancer and sarcoma) except for the early gastric cancer. (author)

  19. Clinical Application of F-18 FDG PET (PET/CT) in Malignancy of Unknown Origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byung Il

    2008-01-01

    Diagnosis of primary origin site in the management of malignancy of unknown origin (MUO) is the most important issue. According to the histopathologic subtype of primary lesion, specialized treatment can be given and survival gain is expected. F-18 FDG PET (PET/CT) has been estimated as useful in detection of primary lesion with high sensitivity and moderate specificity. F-18 FDG PET (PET/CT) study before conventional studies is also recommended because it has high diagnostic performance compared to conventional studies. Although there has few data, F-18 FDG PET (PET/CT) is expected to be useful in diagnosis of recurrence, restaging, evaluation of treatment effect, considering that PET (PET/CT) has been reported as useful in other malignancies

  20. Clinical applications of PET-CT in nuclear medicine to medical specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-08-01

    This regional training course about Clinical Applications of PET-Tc in nuclear medicine include: imaging, pathology, scintigraphy, computed tomography, radiology, endoscopy, magnetic resonance, biopsy, and histology. It also describes pathologies and diseases of organs and bone structures such as: musculoskeletal and osseous damage, tumors, fibroids, metastasize, neoplasm, adenopathies and cancer of liver, brain, glands, kidney, neck, thorax, lungs, uterus, ovaries, craniums, hypophysis etc

  1. Clinical Application of 18F-FDG PET in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Joon Young

    2008-01-01

    This review focuses on the clinical use of 18 F-FDG PET to evaluate solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). When SPN or mass without calcification is found on chest X-ray or CT, 18 F-FDG PET is an effective modality to differentiate benign from malignant lesions. For initial staging of NSCLC, 18 F-FDG PET is useful, and proved to be cost-effective in several countries. 18 F-FDG PET is useful for detecting recurrence, restaging and evaluating residual tumor after curative therapy in NSCLC. For therapy response assessment, 18 F-FDG PET may be effective after chemotherapy or radiation therapy. 18 F-FDG PET is useful to predict pathological response after neoadjuvant therapy in NSCLC. For radiation therapy planning, 18 F-FDG PET may be helpful, but requires further investigations. PET/CT is better for evaluating NSCLC than conventional PET

  2. PET applications in pediatrics

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    Shulkin, B. L. [Ann Arbor, Univ. of Michigan Medical Center (United States). Pediatric Nuclear Medicine Section

    1997-12-01

    This article summarizes the major PET studies which have been performed in pediatric patients to elucidate and characterize diseases and normal development. Issues special for the application of the technique in children, such as dosimetry, patient preparation, and image acquisition are discussed. Studies of central nervous system (CNS) development and pathology, including epilepsy, intraventricular hemorrhage, neonatal asphyxia, tumors, and effects on the CNS from treatment of other tumors are reviewed. These have contributed information fundamental to their understanding of CNS development and pathology. PET investigations into the pathophysiology of congenital heart disease have begun and hold great promise to aid their understanding of these conditions. The second major area in which PET has been applied is the study of non CNS neoplasms. Neuroblastoma has been investigated with tracers which explore basic biochemical features which characterize this tumor, as well as with tracers which explore biochemical events relatively specific for this malignancy. Other common and uncommon tumors of childhood are discussed. The PET technique has been shown useful for answering questions of clinical relevance for the management of these uncommon neoplasms. PET is likely to continue to aid their understanding of many pediatric diseases and may gain more widespread clinical acceptance as the technology continues to disseminate rapidly.

  3. Clinical evaluation of female pelvic tumors. Application fields of integrated PET/MRI; Lokal- und Ganzkoerperdiagnostik weiblicher Beckentumore. Anwendungsfelder der integrierten PET-MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grueneisen, J.; Umutlu, L. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Institut fuer diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Essen (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    Integrated positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning has recently become established in clinical imaging. Various studies have demonstrated the great potential of this new hybrid imaging procedure for applications in the field of oncology and the diagnostics of inflammatory processes. With initial studies demonstrating the feasibility and high diagnostic potential of PET/MRI comparable to PET-computed tomography (CT), the focus of future studies should be on the identification of application fields with a potential diagnostic benefit of PET/MRI over other established diagnostic tools. Both MRI and PET/CT are widely used in the diagnostic algorithms for malignancies of the female pelvis. A simultaneous acquisition of PET and MRI data within a single examination provides complementary information which can be used for a more comprehensive evaluation of the primary tumor as well as for whole body staging. Therefore, the aim of this article is to outline potential clinical applications of integrated PET/MRI for the diagnostic work-up of primary or recurrent gynecological neoplasms of the female pelvis. (orig.) [German] Integrierte Positronenemissionstomographie-Magnetresonanztomographen (PET-MRT) stehen seit wenigen Jahren fuer die klinische Diagnostik zur Verfuegung. Diverse Arbeiten konnten bereits das grosse Potenzial dieser neuen hybriden Bildgebungsmodalitaet zur Anwendung in der onkologischen und inflammatorischen Diagnostik aufzeigen. Nachdem initiale Studien die Durchfuehrbarkeit und diagnostische Vergleichbarkeit der PET-MRT zur etablierten PET-Computertomographie (PET-CT) gezeigt haben, sollte fuer eine Implementierung in der Routinediagnostik der Fokus zukuenftiger Studien darin liegen, eindeutige Indikationen zu definieren, in denen die simultane PET-MRT-Bildgebung einen definitiven Vorteil verglichen mit den etablierten diagnostischen Verfahren bietet. Sowohl die MRT als auch die PET-CT finden bereits eine

  4. PET with three-dimensional data sampling and its clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, M.; Tashiro, M.; Ishii, K.; Kubota, K.; Fujimoto, T.

    2000-01-01

    3D-PET (Positron Emission Tomography with tree-dimensional data acquisition capacity) is a powerful tool for whole-body imaging of metabolism in human in vivo. Thanks its high sensitivity, high-quality images are obtained with reduced radiation exposure to patients. In order to facilitate the use of 3D-PET in clinical practice, our PET system is connected to a super-computer (SX4, NEC, Japan) for data processing and image-reconstruction using 3D-reprojection-backprojection algorithm. The impact of this imaging system emerged immediately in ontological applications. Localization and assessment of spread of malignant tumors can be made by injection of appropriate radiotracers, 18 F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose usually, and scanning whole body with sequential patient coach movement. We have extended this technique to the analysis of brain of patients having cancer, because psychological and psychiatrical abnormalities have been reported frequent in these patients. The results clearly showed abnormality in brain glucose metabolism in cancer patients, the metabolic reduction was noted in lower medial frontal cortex, hippocampus, amygdaloid cortex, and cingulate cortex. The reductions were significantly correlated with scores of depressiveness. 3D PET is a currently ideal tool to evacuate metabolic abnormalities such as cancer in the whole-body. (author)

  5. Clinical Application of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in Multiple Myeloma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Su Jin; Choi, Joon Young [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    This review focuses on the clinical use of {sup 18}F-FDG PET to evaluate multiple myeloma. {sup 18}F-FDG PET is useful for diagnosis, staging of multiple myeloma and differential diagnosis of myeloma related disease such as monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance or plasmacytoma. For therapy response, {sup 18}F-FDG PET may be effective after chemotherapy for multiple myeloma and radiotherapy for plasmacytoma.

  6. Clinical Application of 18F-FDG PET in Multiple Myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Su Jin; Choi, Joon Young

    2009-01-01

    This review focuses on the clinical use of 18 F-FDG PET to evaluate multiple myeloma. 18 F-FDG PET is useful for diagnosis, staging of multiple myeloma and differential diagnosis of myeloma related disease such as monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance or plasmacytoma. For therapy response, 18 F-FDG PET may be effective after chemotherapy for multiple myeloma and radiotherapy for plasmacytoma

  7. Clinical Application of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in Testicular Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Joon Kee [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    {sup 18}F-FDG PET has a higher diagnostic accuracy than CT in initial staging of testicular cancer. In seminoma, it can discriminate residual tumor from necrosis/fibrosis or mature teratoma. {sup 18}F-FDG PET is also useful for the response evaluation of chemotherapy. However, there's no clinical evidence for the use of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of testicular cancer.

  8. Clinical Application of 18F-FDG PET in Alzheimer's Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Young Hoon

    2008-01-01

    PET of the cerebral metabolic rate of glucose is increasingly used to support the clinical diagnosis in the examination of patients with suspected major neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease. 18 F-FDG PET has been reported to have high diagnostic performance, especially, very high sensitivity in the diagnosis and clinical assessment of therapeutic efficacy. According to clinical research data hitherto, 18 F-FDG PET is expected to be an effective diagnostic tool in early and differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Since 2004, Medicare covers 18 F-FDG PET scans for the differential diagnosis of fronto-temporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) under specific requirements; or, its use in a CMS approved practical clinical trial focused on the utility of 18 F-FDG PET in the diagnosis or treatment of dementing neurodegenerative diseases

  9. Clinical Application of 18F-FDG PET in Pancreas Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Won Jun

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence of pancreas cancer is increasing. Due to difficulty in detecting early stage disease, the prognosis of pancreas cancer is known to be poor. Clinical use of FDG PET in pancreas has been reported. FDG PET showed good performance in diagnosing pancreas cancer, and is expected to be useful in staging and detecting recurrence

  10. Pet in Clinical oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunsche, A.; Grossman, G.; Santana, M.; Santana, C.; Halkar, R.; Garcia, E.

    2003-01-01

    The utility of the PET (positron emission tomography in clinical oncology has been recognized for more than two decades, locating it as a sensible technique for the diagnosis and the prognosis stratification of the oncology patients. The sensitivity and specificity of the PET in comparation to other image studies have demonstrated to be greater. For some years, there was a restriction of PET because of the high cost of the equipment and the cyclotrons. Nevertheless, the relation of cost/benefits is considered as a priority as this technique offers important clinical information. In this article the results observed when using it in diverse types of cancer, as well as the effectiveness shown in the pre-operating evaluation, the evaluation of residual disease, diagnosis of recurrences, pursuit and prognosis stratification of the patients with cancer. (The author)

  11. Clinical PET/MR Imaging in Oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Andreas; Torigian, Drew A.

    2016-01-01

    . The question, therefore, arises regarding what the future clinical applications of PET/MR imaging will be. In this article, the authors discuss ways in which PET/MR imaging may be used in future applications that justify the added cost, predominantly focusing on oncologic applications. The authors suggest...

  12. Clinical Application of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in Epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yu Kyeong [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    FDG PET has been used as a diagnostic tool for localization of seizure focus for last 2-3 decades. In this article, the clinical usefulness of FDG PET in the management of patients with epilepsy has been reviewed, which provided the evidences to justify the medicare reimbursement for FDG PET in management of patients with epilepsy. Literature review demonstrated that FDG PET provides an important information in localization of seizure focus and determination whether a patients is a surgical candidate or not. FDG PET has been reported to have high diagnostic performance in localization of seizure focus in neocortical epilepsy as well as temporal lobe epilepsy regardless of the presence of structural lesion on MRI. Particularly, FDG PET can provide the additional information when the results from standard diagnositic modality such as interictal or video-monitored EEG, and MRI are inconclusive or discordant, and make to avoid invasive study. Furthermore, the presence of hypometabolism and extent of metabolic extent has been reported as an important predictor for seizure free outcome. However, studies suggested that more accurate localization and better surgical outcome could be expected with multimodal approach by combination of EEG, MRI, and functional studies using FDG PET or perfusion SPECT rather than using a single diagnostic modality in management of patients with epilepsy. Complementary use of FDG PET in management of epilepsy is worth for good surgical outcome in epilepsy patients.

  13. The first PET scanner made in China and its clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Guohong; Chen Weichang; Yan Jue; Ma Bucheng; Li Weiping

    1996-01-01

    The structure and technical indices of PET scanner (PET-B01) are described. It is applied to do the clinical research work by using the positron 68 Ga-citrate and 68 Ga-BAT-TECH in 34 human bodies. All of them have not any symptoms or signs of chemical toxicity and radioactive hazard. 68 Ga-Citrate PET images can be applied to make differential diagnosis on hepatoma or lung cancer; among 28 cases, the coincidence rate is 0.927. It is confirmed that the malignant tumor is encapsulated or divergent

  14. PET/CT-guided biopsies of metabolically active bone lesions: applications and clinical impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klaeser, Bernd; Wartenberg, Jan; Weitzel, Thilo; Krause, Thomas [Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Wiskirchen, Jakub [Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); University Hospital Tuebingen, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, and Nuclear Medicine, Tuebingen (Germany); Schmid, Ralph A. [Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Mueller, Michel D. [Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland)

    2010-11-15

    In a minority of cases a definite diagnosis and stage grouping in cancer patients is not possible based on the imaging information of PET/CT. We report our experience with percutaneous PET/CT-guided bone biopsies to histologically verify the aetiology of hypermetabolic bone lesions. We retrospectively reviewed the data of 20 consecutive patients who underwent multimodal image-guided bone biopsies using a dedicated PET/CT system in a step-by-step technique. Technical and clinical success rates of PET/CT-guided biopsies were evaluated. Questionnaires were sent to the referring physicians to assess the impact of biopsies on patient management and to check the clinical need for PET/CT-guided biopsies. Clinical indications for biopsy were to histologically verify the aetiology of metabolically active bone lesions without a morphological correlate confirming the suspicion of metastases in 15 patients, to determine the origin of suspected metastases in 3 patients and to evaluate the appropriateness of targeted therapy options in 2 patients. Biopsies were technically successful in all patients. In 19 of 20 patients a definite histological diagnosis was possible. No complications or adverse effects occurred. The result of PET/CT-guided bone biopsies determined a change of the planned treatment in overall 56% of patients, with intramodality changes, e.g. chemotherapy with palliative instead of curative intent, and intermodality changes, e.g. systemic therapy instead of surgery, in 22 and 50%, respectively. PET/CT-guided bone biopsies are a promising alternative to conventional techniques to make metabolically active bone lesions - especially without a distinctive morphological correlate - accessible for histological verification. PET/CT-guided biopsies had a major clinical impact in patients who otherwise cannot be reliably stage grouped at the time of treatment decisions. (orig.)

  15. Respiratory Motion Management in PET/CT: Applications and Clinical Usefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Luca; Ponti, Elena De; Morzenti, Sabrina; Spadavecchia, Chiara; Crivellaro, Cinzia

    2017-01-01

    Breathing movement can introduce heavy bias in both image quality and quantitation in PET/CT. The aim of this paper is a review of the literature to evaluate the benefit of respiratory gating in terms of image quality, quantification and lesion detectability. A review of the literature published in the last 10 years and dealing with gated PET/CT technique has been performed, focusing on improvement in quantification, lesion detectability and diagnostic accuracy in neoplastic lesion. In addition, the improvement in the definition of radiotherapy planning has been evaluated. There is a consistent increase of the Standardized Uptake Value (SUV) in gated PET images when compared to ungated ones, particularly for lesions located in liver and in lung. Respiratory gating can also increase sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of PET/CT. Gated PET/CT can be used for radiation therapy planning, reducing the uncertainty in target definition, optimizing the volume to be treated and reducing the possibility of "missing" during the dose delivery. Moreover, new technologies, able to define the movement of lesions and organs directly from the PET sinogram, can solve some problems that currently are limiting the clinical use of gated PET/CT (i.e.: extended acquisition time, radiation exposure). The published literature demonstrated that respiratory gating PET/CT is a valid technique to improve quantification, lesion detectability of lung and liver tumors and can better define the radiotherapy planning of moving lesions and organs. If new technical improvements for motion compensation will be clinically validated, gated technique could be applied routinely in any PET/CT scan. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Clinical Nononcologic Applications of PET/CT and PET/MRI in Musculoskeletal, Orthopedic, and Rheumatologic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholamrezanezhad, Ali; Basques, Kyle; Batouli, Ali; Matcuk, George; Alavi, Abass; Jadvar, Hossein

    2018-06-01

    With improvements in PET/CT and PET/MRI over the last decade, as well as increased understanding of the pathophysiology of musculoskeletal diseases, there is an emerging potential for PET as a primary or complementary modality in the management of rheumatologic and orthopedic conditions. We discuss the role of PET/CT and PET/MRI in nononcologic musculoskeletal disorders, including inflammatory and infectious conditions and postoperative complications. There is great potential for an increased role for PET to serve as a primary or complementary modality in the management of orthopedic and rheumatologic disorders.

  17. Clinical impact of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) on oncological patients and their potentially application context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, O.

    2006-01-01

    (PET) Positron Emission Tomography is a technique of nuclear medicine that has ability of detecting cancer through mechanisms based on molecular alterations of neoplastic processes. This review describes the PET Oncology applications and discusses the potential application of this technology in the sanitary and national academic framework . The most widely used in Oncology plotter is an analogue of laglucosa labelled with fluo: 18F-2-fluoro-2-Deoxy-D-glucose (FDG). In this way, the PET detects tumour retention of FDG, due to the highest glycolytic of cancer cells. In addition, the PET allow the study of the entire body at the same exploratory and some teams are coupled to systems of axial tomography (PET-CT). By ET-FDG, it is possible to diagnose, staging and restaged the majority of cancers, with diagnostic accuracy close to 90 per cent higher than the values provided by the conventional imaging techniques such. It is also possible to know early response to cancer treatments and obtain relevant medical prognosis information. (author) [es

  18. High throughput static and dynamic small animal imaging using clinical PET/CT: potential preclinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aide, Nicolas; Desmonts, Cedric; Agostini, Denis; Bardet, Stephane; Bouvard, Gerard; Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu; Roselt, Peter; Neels, Oliver; Beyer, Thomas; Kinross, Kathryn; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate state-of-the-art clinical PET/CT technology in performing static and dynamic imaging of several mice simultaneously. A mouse-sized phantom was imaged mimicking simultaneous imaging of three mice with computation of recovery coefficients (RCs) and spillover ratios (SORs). Fifteen mice harbouring abdominal or subcutaneous tumours were imaged on clinical PET/CT with point spread function (PSF) reconstruction after injection of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose or [18F]fluorothymidine. Three of these mice were imaged alone and simultaneously at radial positions -5, 0 and 5 cm. The remaining 12 tumour-bearing mice were imaged in groups of 3 to establish the quantitative accuracy of PET data using ex vivo gamma counting as the reference. Finally, a dynamic scan was performed in three mice simultaneously after the injection of 68 Ga-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). For typical lesion sizes of 7-8 mm phantom experiments indicated RCs of 0.42 and 0.76 for ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) and PSF reconstruction, respectively. For PSF reconstruction, SOR air and SOR water were 5.3 and 7.5%, respectively. A strong correlation (r 2 = 0.97, p 2 = 0.98; slope = 0.89, p 2 = 0.96; slope = 0.62, p 68 Ga-EDTA dynamic acquisition. New generation clinical PET/CT can be used for simultaneous imaging of multiple small animals in experiments requiring high throughput and where a dedicated small animal PET system is not available. (orig.)

  19. Clinical application of PET/CT imaging in search of the primary carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Yaping; Liu Gang; Li Miao

    2004-01-01

    Full text: To explore the clinical value of PET/CT scanning in search of the primary carcinoma, we selected 4 patients who were subjected to PET/CT examination during Oct. 2002 to Dec. 2002. The primary lesion in all these patients was not detected. One of them had metastasis to liver, one had metastases in both lungs and the other two were having metastases to the bones. 18F-FDG in doses of 5.55MBq / kg body weight was injected to a fasting patient (at least 6 hours). PET/CT whole body examination was done using Discovery LS-PET/CT (GE Medical System, U.S.A.) 40-60 minutes later. In the first patient with metastasis to liver, primary lesion was localized in the transverse colon near the liver. The PET/CT showed multiple high radioactive uptake lesions of different sizes in the liver. No obvious change in position of the colon uptake was seen on the delayed images. After PET/CT, barium examination showed thinned cavity of the colon near the liver with coarse ankylosis of colon wall just like saw tooth. The mucous membrane was destroyed. Of the two patients with metastases in the bone, first - a 31 years old, was diagnosed to have primary lung cancer with multiple metastases to the liver and the bones. PET/CT showed high radioactive uptake in the inferior left lobe near the hilum with irregular shaped uneven distribution. A round high radioactive uptake area of 1.82 x 1.84 x 1.46cm size was also seen in the right lobe of the liver having clear edge and uneven distribution. The destroyed bones (L-10, L-11, L-12, T-1 and ala ossis i lii) showed high radioactive uptake. Second patient, 57-year male was diagnosed to have malignant lymphoma. PET/CT fusion showed high radioactive uptake in the marrow of whole body. Few destroyed parts of bones were also seen on CT images. Several cervical and the thoracic vertebrae as well as the ninth rib showed irregular radioactive accumulation with clear edges and well-distributed tracer raising the possibility of multiple myeloma or

  20. Clinical application and progress of PET and PET-CT for differential diagnosis of the benign or malignant pulmonary nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xuemei; Wang Meiling; Wang Xiangcheng

    2010-01-01

    To differential diagnosis the benign or malignant of pulmonary nodules is a medical difficult problem. As the development of medical imaging equipment and technology, PET-CT can identified benign or malignant lesions of pulmonary nodules though changes of metabolism. Researches about PET-CT for differential diagnosis pulmonary nodules benign or malignant are reviewed. (authors)

  1. Dynamic whole body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Lodge, Martin A.; Tahari, Abdel K.; Zhou, Y.; Wahl, Richard L.; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-01-01

    Static whole body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ~15–20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole body PET acquisition protocol of ~45min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6-min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (6 passes x 7 bed positions, each scanned for 45sec). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares (OLS) Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of 10 different clinically

  2. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Lodge, Martin A; Tahari, Abdel K; Zhou, Y; Wahl, Richard L; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-10-21

    Static whole-body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single-bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ~15-20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole-body PET acquisition protocol of ~45 min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6 min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (six passes × seven bed positions, each scanned for 45 s). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of ten different clinically

  3. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Lodge, Martin A; Tahari, Abdel K; Zhou, Y; Wahl, Richard L; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-01-01

    Static whole-body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single-bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ∼15–20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole-body PET acquisition protocol of ∼45 min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6 min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (six passes × seven bed positions, each scanned for 45 s). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate K i and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of ten different

  4. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Lodge, Martin A.; Tahari, Abdel K.; Zhou, Y.; Wahl, Richard L.; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-10-01

    Static whole-body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single-bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ˜15-20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole-body PET acquisition protocol of ˜45 min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6 min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (six passes × seven bed positions, each scanned for 45 s). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of ten different clinically

  5. FDG PET/CT in infection and inflammation—current and emerging clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidyanathan, S.; Patel, C.N.; Scarsbrook, A.F.; Chowdhury, F.U.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with the glucose analogue, 2-[ 18 F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG), is an evolving hybrid imaging technique in the evaluation of an important and diverse group of pathological conditions, which are characterised by infection and aseptic inflammation. With a rapidly expanding body of evidence, it is being increasingly recognised that, in addition to its established role in oncological imaging, FDG PET/CT also has clinical utility in suspected infection and inflammation. The technique can identify the source of infection or inflammation in a timely fashion ahead of morphological changes on conventional anatomical imaging techniques, such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), map the extent and severity of disease, identify sites for tissue sampling, and assess therapy response. FDG PET/CT exhibits distinct advantages over traditional radionuclide imaging techniques in terms of shorter duration of examination, higher spatial resolution, non-invasive nature of acquisition, ability to perform quantitative analyses, and the provision of a synergistic combination of functional and anatomical imaging. With the use of illustrative clinico-radiological cases, this article discusses the current and emerging evidence for the use of FDG PET/CT in a broad spectrum of disorders, such as fever of unknown origin, sarcoidosis, large vessel vasculitis, musculoskeletal infections, joint prosthesis or implant-related complications, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related infections, and miscellaneous indications, such as IgG4-related systemic disease. It will also briefly summarise the role of more novel tracers such as FDG-labelled leukocytes and gallium-68 PET tracers in this arena

  6. SU-F-I-55: Performance Evaluation of Digital PET/CT: Medical Physics Basis for the Clinical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J; Knopp, MV; Miller, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Replacement of conventional PMT-based detector with next generation digital photon counting (DPC) detector is a technology leap for PET imaging. This study evaluated the performance and characteristics of the DPC system and its stability within a 1 year time window following its installation focusing on the medical physics basis for clinical applications. Methods: A digital PET/CT scanner using 1:1 coupling of 23,040 crystal: detector elements was introduced and became operational at OSU. We tested and evaluated system performance and characteristics using NEMA NU2-2012. System stabilities in timing resolution, energy resolution, detector temperature and humidity (T&H) were monitored over 1-yr. Timing, energy and spatial resolution were characterized across clinically relevant count rate range. CQIE uniformity PET and NEMA IEC-Body PET with hot spheres varying with sizes and contrasts were performed. PET reconstructed in standard(4mm), High(2mm) and Ultra-High(1mm) definitions were evaluated. Results: NEMA results showed PET spatial resolution (mm-FWHM) from 4.01&4.14 at 1cm to 5.82&6.17 at 20cm in transverse & axial. 322±3ps timing and 11.0% energy resolution were measured. 5.7kcps/MBq system sensitivity with 24kcps/MBq effective sensitivity was obtained. The peak-NECR was ∼171kcps with the effective peak-NECR >650kcps@50kBq/mL. Scatter fraction was ∼30%, and the maximum trues was >900kcps. NEMA IQ demonstrated hot sphere contrast ranging from ∼62%±2%(10mm) to ∼88%±2%(22mm), cold sphere contrast of ∼86%±2%(28mm) and ∼89%±3%(37mm) and excellent uniformity. Monitoring 1-yr stability, it revealed ∼1% change in timing, ±0.4% change in energy resolution, and <10% variations in T&H. CQIE PET gave <3% SUV variances in axial. 60%–100% recovery coefficients across sphere sizes and contrast levels were achieved. Conclusion: Characteristics and stability of the next generation DPC PET detector system over an 1-yr time window was excellent and

  7. SU-F-I-55: Performance Evaluation of Digital PET/CT: Medical Physics Basis for the Clinical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J; Knopp, MV [The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Miller, M [Philips Healthcare, Highland Heights, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Replacement of conventional PMT-based detector with next generation digital photon counting (DPC) detector is a technology leap for PET imaging. This study evaluated the performance and characteristics of the DPC system and its stability within a 1 year time window following its installation focusing on the medical physics basis for clinical applications. Methods: A digital PET/CT scanner using 1:1 coupling of 23,040 crystal: detector elements was introduced and became operational at OSU. We tested and evaluated system performance and characteristics using NEMA NU2-2012. System stabilities in timing resolution, energy resolution, detector temperature and humidity (T&H) were monitored over 1-yr. Timing, energy and spatial resolution were characterized across clinically relevant count rate range. CQIE uniformity PET and NEMA IEC-Body PET with hot spheres varying with sizes and contrasts were performed. PET reconstructed in standard(4mm), High(2mm) and Ultra-High(1mm) definitions were evaluated. Results: NEMA results showed PET spatial resolution (mm-FWHM) from 4.01&4.14 at 1cm to 5.82&6.17 at 20cm in transverse & axial. 322±3ps timing and 11.0% energy resolution were measured. 5.7kcps/MBq system sensitivity with 24kcps/MBq effective sensitivity was obtained. The peak-NECR was ∼171kcps with the effective peak-NECR >650kcps@50kBq/mL. Scatter fraction was ∼30%, and the maximum trues was >900kcps. NEMA IQ demonstrated hot sphere contrast ranging from ∼62%±2%(10mm) to ∼88%±2%(22mm), cold sphere contrast of ∼86%±2%(28mm) and ∼89%±3%(37mm) and excellent uniformity. Monitoring 1-yr stability, it revealed ∼1% change in timing, ±0.4% change in energy resolution, and <10% variations in T&H. CQIE PET gave <3% SUV variances in axial. 60%–100% recovery coefficients across sphere sizes and contrast levels were achieved. Conclusion: Characteristics and stability of the next generation DPC PET detector system over an 1-yr time window was excellent and

  8. Medical application of PET technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, C. W.; An, S. H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Yang, S. D.; Jun, G. S. and others

    1999-04-01

    We performed following studies using PET technology: 1. Clinical usefulness of [ 18 F]FDG whole body PET in malignant disease 2. Clinical usefulness of quantitative evaluation of F-18-FDG 3. Pilot study of C-11 methionine PET in brain tumor 4. PET study in patients with Parkinson's disease 5. A study on the clinical myocardial PET image. PET gives various metabolic information for the living human body, and is very important, new diagnostic modality. The PET study will give us the information of cancer patients such as early detection of cancer, staging, recurrence detection and characterization of cancer. The quantitative analysis using PET could be applied to evaluate the pathophysiology of various diseases and develop new drugs and develop new radiopharmaceuticals

  9. Medical application of PET technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, C. W.; An, S. H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Yang, S. D.; Jun, G. S. and others

    1999-04-01

    We performed following studies using PET technology: 1. Clinical usefulness of [{sup 18}F]FDG whole body PET in malignant disease 2. Clinical usefulness of quantitative evaluation of F-18-FDG 3. Pilot study of C-11 methionine PET in brain tumor 4. PET study in patients with Parkinson's disease 5. A study on the clinical myocardial PET image. PET gives various metabolic information for the living human body, and is very important, new diagnostic modality. The PET study will give us the information of cancer patients such as early detection of cancer, staging, recurrence detection and characterization of cancer. The quantitative analysis using PET could be applied to evaluate the pathophysiology of various diseases and develop new drugs and develop new radiopharmaceuticals.

  10. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and its application in clinical diagnosis and functional brain organization studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grabowska, A.; Krolicki, L.

    1997-01-01

    Recent advances in positron emission tomography (PET) and other brain-imaging techniques have made it possible to visualize the working brain while the human subject is thinking, speaking or planning an action. PET provides researches with an opportunity to infer the neuroanatomy of a given function. Subjects either inhale or are injected with a radioactive material that binds to a physiologically active compound in the body. This serves as a tracer of blood flow and metabolic processes that reflect the activation of a given structure by emitting gamma rays which may be detected through a tomograph. PET research has produced findings that extend our knowledge on several important issues such as cerebral representation of language, perception, attention or memory. It has also proven to be an important source of information for clinical diagnosis of various neurological and psychiatric diseases. The present article provides a short review of main achievements in those fields. However, functional brain imaging is not exempt from methodological and theoretical difficulties. The main limitations of the method have been outlined. (author)

  11. The application of PET in endocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Zhibin

    2003-01-01

    There are wide application of PET in endocrine tumors, including thyroid cancer, parathyroid adenoma, pheochromocytoma and neuroblastoma. Many papers concluded that in diagnosing endocrine tumors, PET does not show apparent advantages comparing with traditional radionuclide imaging methods. But as a useful complementary method, its clinical value has been recognized

  12. PET/MRI for Neurological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Ciprian; Drzezga, Alexander; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter; Rosen, Bruce R.

    2013-01-01

    PET and MRI provide complementary information in the study of the human brain. Simultaneous PET/MR data acquisition allows the spatial and temporal correlation of the measured signals, opening up opportunities impossible to realize using stand-alone instruments. This paper reviews the methodological improvements and potential neurological and psychiatric applications of this novel technology. We first present methods for improving the performance and information content of each modality by using the information provided by the other technique. On the PET side, we discuss methods that use the simultaneously acquired MR data to improve the PET data quantification. On the MR side, we present how improved PET quantification could be used to validate a number of MR techniques. Finally, we describe promising research, translational and clinical applications that could benefit from these advanced tools. PMID:23143086

  13. PET/MRI for neurologic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Ciprian; Drzezga, Alexander; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter; Rosen, Bruce R

    2012-12-01

    PET and MRI provide complementary information in the study of the human brain. Simultaneous PET/MRI data acquisition allows the spatial and temporal correlation of the measured signals, creating opportunities impossible to realize using stand-alone instruments. This paper reviews the methodologic improvements and potential neurologic and psychiatric applications of this novel technology. We first present methods for improving the performance and information content of each modality by using the information provided by the other technique. On the PET side, we discuss methods that use the simultaneously acquired MRI data to improve the PET data quantification. On the MRI side, we present how improved PET quantification can be used to validate several MRI techniques. Finally, we describe promising research, translational, and clinical applications that can benefit from these advanced tools.

  14. Practical Considerations for Clinical PET/MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgano, Samuel; Viets, Zachary; Fowler, Kathryn; Gore, Lael; Thomas, John V; McNamara, Michelle; McConathy, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    Clinical PET/MR imaging is currently performed at a number of centers around the world as part of routine standard of care. This article focuses on issues and considerations for a clinical PET/MR imaging program, focusing on routine standard-of-care studies. Although local factors influence how clinical PET/MR imaging is implemented, the approaches and considerations described here intend to apply to most clinical programs. PET/MR imaging provides many more options than PET/computed tomography with diagnostic advantages for certain clinical applications but with added complexity. A recurring theme is matching the PET/MR imaging protocol to the clinical application to balance diagnostic accuracy with efficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical Application of 18F-FDG PET in Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Mi Jin; Kim, Tae Sung; Hwang, Hee Sung

    2008-01-01

    PET or PET/CT detects only less than 50% of early gastric cancer and 62-98% of advanced gastric cancer. Therefore, mass screening programs are recommended for all adults over the age of 40 for early detection and early treatment of gastric cancer through endoscopy or various radiological tests. The most important step after diagnosis of gastric cancer is accurate staging, which mainly evaluates tumor resectability to avoid unnecessary surgery. Important factors that affect tumor resectability are whether the tumor can be separated from adjacent organs or important blood vessels, the extent of lymph node metastasis, presence of peritoneal metastasis, or distant organ metastasis. To evaluate the extent of local tumor invasion, anatomical imaging that has superior spatial resolution is essential. There are a few studies on prognostic significance of FDG uptake with inconsistent results between them. In spite of lower sensitivity for lymph node staging, the specificity of CT and PET are very high, and the specificity for PET tends to be higher than that for CT. Limited data published so far show that PET seems less useful in the detection of lung and bone metastasis. In the evaluation of pleural or peritoneal metastasis, PET seems very specific but insensitive as well. When FDG uptake of primary tumor is low, distant metastasis also tends to show low FDG uptake reducing its detection on PET. There are only a few data available in the evaluation of recurrence detection and treatment response using FDG PET or PET/CT

  16. Clinical Application of 18F-FDG PET in Ovarian Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, So Won; Kim, Seok Ki

    2008-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is often fatal since it is difficult to diagnose early and recurrence is quite frequent despite successful implementation of cytoreductive surgery and chemotherapy, thus exact diagnosis and early detection of recurrence are crucial to patient management. For pre-treatment staging, FDG PET could be helpful in a limited patient group possessing high risks of ovarian cancer. Besides, FDG PET could be recommended to patients with a high suspicion of recurrence i.e. rise of CA-125, especially in cases of conventional diagnostic imaging modalities presenting no evidence of disease because FDG PET provides critical information for treatment planning such as recurrence site or pattern. In order to expand the use of FDG PET to general population at staging or routine surveillance of ovarian cancer, more investigation is needed. The usefulness of FDG PET in evaluating treatment response and prognosis of ovarian cancer has not yet been determined, but it has been reported that FDG PET could evaluate treatment response early and show a close relationship with overall survival. PET/CT has been actively adopted in management of ovarian cancer. Not only in detecting tumor recurrence and evaluating treatment response but also in pre-treatment staging, FDG PET/CT is expected to play a role due to available anatomical information

  17. Clinical Application of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in Nonmelanomatous Skin Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Joon Kee [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Nonmelanomatous skin cancer includes basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, merkel cell carcinoma and dermatofibrosarcoma protuberance. So far, there have been a few reports that {sup 18}F-FDG PET was useful in the evaluation of metastasis and therapeutic response in nonmelanomatous skin cancer, however, those are very weak evidences. Therefore, further studies on the usefulness of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in nonmelanomatous skin cancer are required.

  18. Clinical Application of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in Malignant Mesothelioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Jeong [Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) has a poor prognosis and a strong association with exposure to asbestos. Although there are not generally accepted guidelines for treatment of MPM, recent reports suggest that multimodality therapy combining chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery can improve the survival of patients with MPM. Therefore exact staging is required to decide the best treatment option. However, it is well known that there are many difficulties in determining precise preoperative stage, predicting prognosis, and monitoring response to therapy with conventional imaging modalities such as CT and MRI in MPM. Recently PET with {sup 18}F-FDG comes into the spotlight as an important staging method. There is increasing evidence that PET is superior to other conventional imaging modalities in diagnosis and staging of MPM. Particularly PET/CT improves the diagnostic and staging accuracy over PET or CT alone in MPM because it provides anatomic imaging data as well as functional information. PET and PET/CT are also useful for monitoring response to therapy and SUV is reported as a prognostic factor in MPM.

  19. Clinical Application of 18F-FDG PET in Parkinson's Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Hyoung; Chung, Yong An

    2008-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. It is slowly progressive disease that affects a small area of cells in the mid brain known as the substantia nigra. Gradual degeneration of these cells causes a reduction in a vital chemical known as dopamine. In the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, it has difficulty in biopsy and limits in radiologic modalities. 18F-FDG PET shows various findings from normal to diffuse decrement of FDG uptake. 18 F-FDG PET is expected to be a evaluation tool in the treatment of Parkinson's disease

  20. PET measurements of myocardial blood flow post myocardial infarction: Relationship to invasive and cardiac magnetic resonance studies and potential clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewirtz, Henry

    2017-12-01

    This review focuses on clinical studies concerning assessment of coronary microvascular and conduit vessel function primarily in the context of acute and sub acute myocardial infarction (MI). The ability of quantitative PET measurements of myocardial blood flow (MBF) to delineate underlying pathophysiology and assist in clinical decision making in this setting is discussed. Likewise, considered are physiological metrics fractional flow reserve, coronary flow reserve, index of microvascular resistance (FFR, CFR, IMR) obtained from invasive studies performed in the cardiac catheterization laboratory, typically at the time of PCI for MI. The role both of invasive studies and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging in assessing microvascular function, a key determinant of prognosis, is reviewed. The interface between quantitative PET MBF measurements and underlying pathophysiology, as demonstrated both by invasive and CMR methodology, is discussed in the context of optimal interpretation of the quantitative PET MBF exam and its potential clinical applications.

  1. PET imaging in pediatric neuroradiology: current and future applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sunhee; Salamon, Noriko; Jackson, Hollie A.; Blueml, Stefan; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2010-01-01

    Molecular imaging with positron emitting tomography (PET) is widely accepted as an essential part of the diagnosis and evaluation of neoplastic and non-neoplastic disease processes. PET has expanded its role from the research domain into clinical application for oncology, cardiology and neuropsychiatry. More recently, PET is being used as a clinical molecular imaging tool in pediatric neuroimaging. PET is considered an accurate and noninvasive method to study brain activity and to understand pediatric neurological disease processes. In this review, specific examples of the clinical use of PET are given with respect to pediatric neuroimaging. The current use of co-registration of PET with MR imaging is exemplified in regard to pediatric epilepsy. The current use of PET/CT in the evaluation of head and neck lymphoma and pediatric brain tumors is also reviewed. Emerging technologies including PET/MRI and neuroreceptor imaging are discussed. (orig.)

  2. PET imaging in pediatric neuroradiology: current and future applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sunhee [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Salamon, Noriko [UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Radiology, Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Jackson, Hollie A.; Blueml, Stefan [Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Radiology, Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Panigrahy, Ashok [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Radiology, Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Molecular imaging with positron emitting tomography (PET) is widely accepted as an essential part of the diagnosis and evaluation of neoplastic and non-neoplastic disease processes. PET has expanded its role from the research domain into clinical application for oncology, cardiology and neuropsychiatry. More recently, PET is being used as a clinical molecular imaging tool in pediatric neuroimaging. PET is considered an accurate and noninvasive method to study brain activity and to understand pediatric neurological disease processes. In this review, specific examples of the clinical use of PET are given with respect to pediatric neuroimaging. The current use of co-registration of PET with MR imaging is exemplified in regard to pediatric epilepsy. The current use of PET/CT in the evaluation of head and neck lymphoma and pediatric brain tumors is also reviewed. Emerging technologies including PET/MRI and neuroreceptor imaging are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Positron emission tomography (PET) for oncologic applications in oral region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shozushima, Masanori; Terasaki, Kazunori

    2004-01-01

    A rapidly emerging clinical application of positron emission tomography (PET) is the detection of cancer with radionuclide tracer, because it provides information unavailable by ultrasound, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. The most commonly used radiotracer for PET oncologic imaging is fluorine-18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG). Early studies show PET has potential value in viewing the region of the tumor, detecting, staging, grading, monitoring response to anticancer therapy, and differentiating recurrent or residual disease from post treatment changes. However, limitations of FDG-PET in the head and neck region, namely, physiological FDG uptake in the salivary glands and palatine tonsils, have been reported, increasing the false-positive rates in image interpretation. This review was designed to address these distinctions of oral cancer PET imaging: specialization of PET equipment, cancer cell metabolism, proliferation and tracers, clinical diagnosis of oral cancer with PET, pitfalls in oncologic diagnosis with FDG-PET imaging. (author)

  4. Towards enhanced PET quantification in clinical oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaidi, Habib; Karakatsanis, Nicolas

    2018-01-01

    is still a matter of debate. Quantitative PET has advanced elegantly during the last two decades and is now reaching the maturity required for clinical exploitation, particularly in oncology where it has the capability to open many avenues for clinical diagnosis, assessment of response to treatment...... and therapy planning. Therefore, the preservation and further enhancement of the quantitative features of PET imaging is crucial to ensure that the full clinical value of PET imaging modality is utilized in clinical oncology. Recent advancements in PET technology and methodology have paved the way for faster...... PET acquisitions of enhanced sensitivity to support the clinical translation of highly quantitative 4D parametric imaging methods in clinical oncology. In this report, we provide an overview of recent advances and future trends in quantitative PET imaging in the context of clinical oncology. The pros...

  5. PET/CT image registration: Preliminary tests for its application to clinical dosimetry in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banos-Capilla, M. C.; Garcia, M. A.; Bea, J.; Pla, C.; Larrea, L.; Lopez, E.

    2007-01-01

    The quality of dosimetry in radiotherapy treatment requires the accurate delimitation of the gross tumor volume. This can be achieved by complementing the anatomical detail provided by CT images through fusion with other imaging modalities that provide additional metabolic and physiological information. Therefore, use of multiple imaging modalities for radiotherapy treatment planning requires an accurate image registration method. This work describes tests carried out on a Discovery LS positron emission/computed tomography (PET/CT) system by General Electric Medical Systems (GEMS), for its later use to obtain images to delimit the target in radiotherapy treatment. Several phantoms have been used to verify image correlation, in combination with fiducial markers, which were used as a system of external landmarks. We analyzed the geometrical accuracy of two different fusion methods with the images obtained with these phantoms. We first studied the fusion method used by the PET/CT system by GEMS (hardware fusion) on the basis that there is satisfactory coincidence between the reconstruction centers in CT and PET systems; and secondly the fiducial fusion, a registration method, by means of least-squares fitting algorithm of a landmark points system. The study concluded with the verification of the centroid position of some phantom components in both imaging modalities. Centroids were estimated through a calculation similar to center-of-mass, weighted by the value of the CT number and the uptake intensity in PET. The mean deviations found for the hardware fusion method were: vertical bar Δx vertical bar ±σ=3.3 mm±1.0 mm and vertical bar Δy vertical bar ±σ=3.6 mm±1.0 mm. These values were substantially improved upon applying fiducial fusion based on external landmark points: vertical bar Δx vertical bar ±σ=0.7 mm±0.8 mm and vertical bar Δy vertical bar ±σ=0.3 mm±1.7 mm. We also noted that differences found for each of the fusion methods were similar for

  6. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT quantification in head and neck squamous cell cancer: principles, technical issues and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manca, Gianpiero; Volterrani, Duccio [University Hospital of Pisa, Regional Center of Nuclear Medicine, Pisa (Italy); Vanzi, Eleonora [University Hospital of Siena, Service of Medical Physics, Siena (Italy); Rubello, Domenico; Grassetto, Gaia [Santa Maria della Misericordia Rovigo Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rovigo (Italy); Giammarile, Francesco [Faculte Charles Merieux, Medecine Nucleaire, Centre Hospitalier and Biophysique, Lyon (France); Wong, Ka Kit [University of Michigan Hospital, Nuclear Medicine/Radiology Department, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Nuclear Medicine Service, Department of Veterans Affairs Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Perkins, Alan C. [University of Nottingham, Department of Radiological Sciences, School of Medicine, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Colletti, Patrick M. [Southern University of California, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-07-15

    {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC). The major clinical applications of this method include diagnosing an unknown primary tumour, identifying regional lymph node involvement and distant metastases, and providing prognostic information. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT is also used for precise delineation of the tumour volume for radiation therapy planning and dose painting, and for treatment response monitoring, by detecting residual or recurrent disease. Most of these applications would benefit from a quantitative approach to the disease, but the quantitative capability of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT is still underused in HNSCC. Innovations in PET/CT technology promise to overcome the issues that until now have hindered the employment of dynamic procedures in clinical practice and have limited ''quantification'' to the evaluation of standardized uptake values (SUV), de facto a semiquantitative parameter, the limits of which are well known to the nuclear medicine community. In this paper the principles of quantitative imaging and the related technical issues are reviewed so that professionals involved in HNSCC management can reflect on the advantages of ''true'' quantification. A discussion is then presented on how semiquantitative information is currently used in clinical {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT applications in HNSCC, by discussing the improvements that could be obtained with more advanced and ''personalized'' quantification techniques. (orig.)

  7. The biological application of small animal PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, Ralph

    2001-01-01

    The short history of small animal PET is reviewed in the context of its application in the laboratory. Early work has demonstrated a role for the technique in both drug development and in the in vivo monitoring of neuroreceptor function with time. As spatial resolution approaches 1 mm, challenges in quantification remain. However, the ability to carry out animal PET studies that are analogous to human PET will form an important bridge between laboratory and clinical sciences

  8. Cost-effective analysis of PET application in NSCLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Aichun; Liu Jianjun; Sun Xiaoguang; Shi Yiping; Huang Gang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of PET and CT application for diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in China. Methods: Using decision analysis method the diagnostic efficiency of PET and CT for diagnosis of NSCLC in china was analysed. And also the value of cost for accurate diagnosis (CAD), cost for accurate staging (CAS) and cost for effective therapy (CAT) was calculated. Results: (1) For the accurate diagnosis, CT was much more cost-effective than PET. (2) For the accurate staging, CT was still more cost-effective than PET. (3) For the all over diagnostic and therapeutic cost, PET was more cost-effective than CT. (4) The priority of PET to CT was for the diagnosis of stage I NSCLC. Conclusion: For the management of NSCLC patient in China, CT is more cost-effective for screening, whereas PET for clinical staging and monitoring therapeutic effect. (authors)

  9. Development and application of PET-MRI image fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Jianhua; Zhao Jinhua; Qiao Wenli

    2011-01-01

    The emerging and growing in popularity of PET-CT scanner brings us the convenience and cognizes the advantages such as diagnosis, staging, curative effect evaluation and prognosis for malignant tumor. And the PET-MRI installing maybe a new upsurge when the machine gradually mature, because of the MRI examination without the radiation exposure and with the higher soft tissue resolution. This paper summarized the developing course of image fusion technology and some researches of clinical application about PET-MRI at present, in order to help people to understand the functions and know its wide application of the upcoming new instrument, mainly focuses the application on the central nervous system and some soft tissue lesions. And before PET-MRI popularization, people can still carry out some researches of various image fusion and clinical application on the current equipment. (authors)

  10. Application of PET in brain tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, June Key

    2002-01-01

    The annual incidence of primary brain tumors is 7-19 cases per 100,000 people. The unique capacity of visualizing biochemical processes allows PET to determine functional metabolic activities of the brain tumors. Like other malignant tumors, F-18 FDG has been used commonly in the imaging of brain tumors. FDG PET is valuable in grading malignancy, predicting prognosis, monitoring treatment, differentiating tumor recurrence from radiation nucrosis, and detecting primary lesion in metastatric brain tumors. Among amino acids labeled with positron emitters, C-11 methionine is used clinically.Tumor delineation is much better with methionine PET than with FDG PET. Low grade gliomas, in particular, are better evaluated with methionine than with FDG. PET opens another dimension in brain tumor imaging. PET imaging has clearly entered the clinical area with a profound impact on patient care in many indications

  11. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and breast cancer in clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavayssiere, Robert; Cabee, Anne-Elizabeth; Filmont, Jean-Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    The landscape of oncologic practice has changed deeply during the past few years and there is now a need, through a multidisciplinary approach, for imaging to provide accurate evaluation of morphology and function and to guide treatment (Image Guided Therapy). Increasing emphasis has been put on Position Emission Tomography (PET) role in various cancers among clinicians and patients despite a general context of healthcare expenditure limitation. Positron Emission Tomography has currently a limited role in breast cancer, but also general radiologists and specialists should be aware of these indications, especially when staging aggressive cancers and looking for recurrence. Currently, the hybrid systems associating PET and Computed Tomography (CT) and in the same device [Rohren EM, Turkington TG, Coleman RE. Clinical applications of PET in oncology. Radiology 2004;231:305-32; Blodgett TM, Meltzer CM, Townsend DW. PET/CT: form and function. Radiology 2007;242:360-85; von Schulthess GK, Steinert HC, Hany TF. Integrated PET/CT: current applications and futures directions. Radiology 2006;238(2):405-22], or PET-CT, are more commonly used and the two techniques are adding their potentialities. Other techniques, MRI in particular, may also compete with PET in some instance and as far as ionizing radiations dose limitation is considered, some breast cancers becoming some form of a chronic disease. Breast cancer is a very complex, non-uniform, disease and molecular imaging at large may contribute to a better knowledge and to new drugs development. Ongoing research, Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and new tracers, are likely to bring improvements in patient care [Kelloff GJ, Hoffman JM, Johnson B, et al. Progress and promise of FDG-PET Imaging for cancer patient management and oncologic drug development. Clin Cancer Res 2005;1(April (8)): 2005

  12. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and breast cancer in clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavayssiere, Robert [Centre d' Imagerie Paris-Nord, 1, avenue Charles Peguy, 95200 Sarcelles (France); Institut du Sein Henri Hartmann (ISHH), 1, rue des Dames Augustines, 92200 Neuilly sur Seine (France)], E-mail: cab.lav@wanadoo.fr; Cabee, Anne-Elizabeth [Centre d' Imagerie Paris-Nord, 1, avenue Charles Peguy, 95200 Sarcelles (France); Institut du Sein Henri Hartmann (ISHH), 1, rue des Dames Augustines, 92200 Neuilly sur Seine (France); Centre RMX, 80, avenue Felix Faure, 75105 Paris (France); Filmont, Jean-Emmanuel [Institut du Sein Henri Hartmann (ISHH), 1, rue des Dames Augustines, 92200 Neuilly sur Seine (France); American Hospital of Paris, Nuclear Medicine, 63, boulevard Victor Hugo - BP 109, 92202 Neuilly sur Seine Cedex (France)

    2009-01-15

    The landscape of oncologic practice has changed deeply during the past few years and there is now a need, through a multidisciplinary approach, for imaging to provide accurate evaluation of morphology and function and to guide treatment (Image Guided Therapy). Increasing emphasis has been put on Position Emission Tomography (PET) role in various cancers among clinicians and patients despite a general context of healthcare expenditure limitation. Positron Emission Tomography has currently a limited role in breast cancer, but also general radiologists and specialists should be aware of these indications, especially when staging aggressive cancers and looking for recurrence. Currently, the hybrid systems associating PET and Computed Tomography (CT) and in the same device [Rohren EM, Turkington TG, Coleman RE. Clinical applications of PET in oncology. Radiology 2004;231:305-32; Blodgett TM, Meltzer CM, Townsend DW. PET/CT: form and function. Radiology 2007;242:360-85; von Schulthess GK, Steinert HC, Hany TF. Integrated PET/CT: current applications and futures directions. Radiology 2006;238(2):405-22], or PET-CT, are more commonly used and the two techniques are adding their potentialities. Other techniques, MRI in particular, may also compete with PET in some instance and as far as ionizing radiations dose limitation is considered, some breast cancers becoming some form of a chronic disease. Breast cancer is a very complex, non-uniform, disease and molecular imaging at large may contribute to a better knowledge and to new drugs development. Ongoing research, Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and new tracers, are likely to bring improvements in patient care [Kelloff GJ, Hoffman JM, Johnson B, et al. Progress and promise of FDG-PET Imaging for cancer patient management and oncologic drug development. Clin Cancer Res 2005;1(April (8)): 2005].

  13. Approaches using molecular imaging technology - use of PET in clinical microdose studies§

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Claudia C.; Langer, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging uses minute amounts of radiolabeled drug tracers and thereby meets the criteria for clinical microdose studies. The advantage of PET, when compared to other analytical methods used in microdose studies, is that the pharmacokinetics (PK) of a drug can be determined in the tissue targeted for drug treatment. PET microdosing already offers interesting applications in clinical oncology and in the development of central nervous system pharmaceuticals and ...

  14. TH-A-17A-01: Innovation in PET Instrumentation and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, M [Siemens Healthcare, Knoxville, Tennessee (United States); Miyaoka, R [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Shao, Y [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Innovation in PET instrumentation has led to the new millennium revolutionary imaging applications for diagnosis, therapeutic guidance, and development of new molecular imaging probes, etc. However, after several decades innovations, will the advances of PET technology and applications continue with the same trend and pace? What will be the next big thing beyond the PET/CT, PET/MRI, and Time-of-flight PET? How will the PET instrumentation and imaging performance be further improved by novel detector research and advanced imaging system development? Or will the development of new algorithms and methodologies extend the limit of current instrumentation and leapfrog the imaging quality and quantification for practical applications? The objective of this session is to present an overview of current status and advances in the PET instrumentation and applications with speakers from leading academic institutes and a major medical imaging company. Presenting with both academic research projects and commercial technology developments, this session will provide a glimpse of some latest advances and challenges in the field, such as using semiconductor photon-sensor based PET detectors to improve performance and enable new applications, as well as the technology trend that may lead to the next breakthrough in PET imaging for clinical and preclinical applications. Both imaging and image-guided therapy subjects will be discussed. Learning Objectives: Describe the latest innovations in PET instrumentation and applications Understand the driven force behind the PET instrumentation innovation and development Learn the trend of PET technology development for applications.

  15. TH-A-17A-01: Innovation in PET Instrumentation and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, M; Miyaoka, R; Shao, Y

    2014-01-01

    Innovation in PET instrumentation has led to the new millennium revolutionary imaging applications for diagnosis, therapeutic guidance, and development of new molecular imaging probes, etc. However, after several decades innovations, will the advances of PET technology and applications continue with the same trend and pace? What will be the next big thing beyond the PET/CT, PET/MRI, and Time-of-flight PET? How will the PET instrumentation and imaging performance be further improved by novel detector research and advanced imaging system development? Or will the development of new algorithms and methodologies extend the limit of current instrumentation and leapfrog the imaging quality and quantification for practical applications? The objective of this session is to present an overview of current status and advances in the PET instrumentation and applications with speakers from leading academic institutes and a major medical imaging company. Presenting with both academic research projects and commercial technology developments, this session will provide a glimpse of some latest advances and challenges in the field, such as using semiconductor photon-sensor based PET detectors to improve performance and enable new applications, as well as the technology trend that may lead to the next breakthrough in PET imaging for clinical and preclinical applications. Both imaging and image-guided therapy subjects will be discussed. Learning Objectives: Describe the latest innovations in PET instrumentation and applications Understand the driven force behind the PET instrumentation innovation and development Learn the trend of PET technology development for applications

  16. Automated radiochemical processing for clinical PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padgett, H.C.; Schmidt, D.G.; Bida, G.T.; Wieland, B.W.; Pekrul, E.; Kingsbury, W.G.

    1991-01-01

    With the recent emergence of positron emission tomography (PET) as a viable clinical tool, there is a need for a convenient, cost-effective source of the positron emitter-labeled radiotracers labeled with carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15, and fluorine-18. These short-lived radioisotopes are accelerator produced and thus, require a cyclotron and radiochemistry processing instrumentation that can be operated 3 in a clinical environment by competant technicians. The basic goal is to ensure safety and reliability while setting new standards for economy and ease of operation. The Siemens Radioisotope Delivery System (RDS 112) is a fully automated system dedicated to the production and delivery of positron-emitter labeled precursors and radiochemicals required to support a clinical PET imaging program. Thus, the entire RDS can be thought of as an automated radiochemical processing apparatus

  17. Clinical PET activities in European and Asia-Oceanian Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashiro, Manabu; Ito, Masatoshi; Yamaguchi, Keiichiro; Kubota, Kazuo; Fujimoto, Toshihiko; Sasaki, Hidetada; Moser, E.

    2001-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis using positron emission tomography (PET) requires high costs. Therefore, sociomedical evaluation is very important for spread of clinical PET. In this report, sociomedical situation in European and Asia-Oceanian countries, especially concerning transportation of 18 F-FDG and reimbursement of medical costs for clinical PET indications, is reported. It seems that UK, Germany and Belgium are the most advanced in clinical PET in Europe. In these countries, many PET investigations are reimbursed though systems are different among the countries. In UK, both public and private insurance gives authorization for clinical PET to some extent. In Germany, private health insurance companies give authorization but public insurance has not. In Belgium, private health insurance does not exist and public insurance gives authorization for clinical PET. Other European countries seem to be in transitional stages. Transportation of 18 F-FDG has been already started in almost every country in Europe and Asia-Oceania. In Japan, neither transportation of FDG nor full reimbursement of clinical PET has not started yet and this situation seems to be exceptional. To promote clinical PET in Japan, there is the need of at least establishing a list of clinical indications for PET investigations and establishing commercial-based 18 F-FDG supplying system. They could be regarded as a kind of infrastructure for spread of clinical PET. (author)

  18. Small animal PET and its applications in biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Feichan

    2004-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medical imaging technique that permits the use of positron-labeled molecular imaging probes for non-invasive assays of biochemical processes. As the leading technology in nuclear medicine, PET has extended its applications from the clinical field to the study of small laboratory animals. In recent years, the development of new detector technology has dramatically improved the spatial resolution and image quality of small animal PET scanner, which is being used increasingly as a basic tool in modern biomedical research. In particular, small animal PET will play an important role in drug discovery and development, in the study of small animal models of human diseases, in characterizing gene expression and in many other ways. (authors)

  19. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs

  20. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs.

  1. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET.

  2. [Microdose clinical trial--impact of PET molecular imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Tsuneo; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2010-10-01

    Microdose (MD) clinical trial and exploratory IND study including sub-therapeutic dose and therapeutic dose which are higher than microdoses are expected to bring about innovations in drug development. The outlines of guidances for microdose clinical trial and ICH-M3 (R2) issued by the MHLW in June, 2008, and February, 2010, are first explained, respectively, and some examples of their application to clinical developments of therapeutic drugs in the infection and cancer fields are introduced. Especially, thanks to the progress of molecular imaging research, a new field of drug development is explored by using imaging biomarkers for efficacy or safety evaluation which visualize biomarkers by PET imaging agents. Finally, the roadmap for drug development in infection and cancer fields utilizing PET molecular imaging is discussed.

  3. Clinical usefulness of PET in the management of oral cancer. Comparison between FDG-PET and MET-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Yoshimasa; Saitoh, Masaaki; Nakamura, Mikiko

    2007-01-01

    Inductive chemoradiotherapy has played an important role in preserving organs and functions in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). To determine whether a reduced form of surgery should be performed after chemoradiotherapy, accurate evaluation of residual tumor cells is essential. We investigated the clinical value of positron emission tomography with 18 F labeled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) in the management of oral SCCs. Forty-five patients underwent two FDG-PET studies, one prior to and one at 6 weeks after the chemoradiotherapy. Pretreatment FDG-PET was useful in predicting the response to treatment. Posttreatment FDG-PET could evaluate residual viable cells and prognosis. Organ preservation may be feasible based on PET evaluation. Hence FDG-PET is a valuable tool in the treatment of oral cancer. 11 C-Methionine (MET) is another promising tracer for PET that can be used to assess metabolic demand for amino acids in cancer cells. A MET-PET and FDG-PET study was performed during the same period to investigate diagnostic accuracy in 40 oral malignancies. Sensitivity and positive predictive value of MET-PET were 95% and 100%, respectively, and were comparable with those of FDG-PET. Further study is required to determine the diagnostic significance of MET-PET in evaluating response to chemoradiotherapy. (author)

  4. Quantification of 18F-FDG PET images using probabilistic brain atlas: clinical application in temporal lobe epilepsy patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Keon Wook; Lee, Dong Soo; Cho, Jae Hoon; Lee, Jae Sung; Yeo, Jeong Seok; Lee, Sang Gun; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul

    2000-01-01

    A probabilistic atlas of the human brain (Statistical Probability Anatomical Maps: SPAM) was developed by the international consortium for brain mapping (ICBM). After calculating the counts in volume of interest (VOI) using the product of probability of SPAM images and counts in FDG images, asymmetric indexes(AI) were calculated and used for finding epileptogenic zones in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). FDG PET images from 28 surgically confirmed TLE patients and 12 age-matched controls were spatially normalized to the averaged brain MRI atlas of ICBM. The counts from normalized PET images were multiplied with the probability of 12 VOIs (superior temporal gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus, hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, and amygdala in each hemisphere) of SPAM images of Montreal Neurological Institute. Finally AI was calculated on each pair of VOI, and compared with visual assessment. If AI was deviated more than 2 standard deviation of normal controls, we considered epileptogenic zones were found successfully. The counts of VOIs in normal controls were symmetric (AI 0.05) except those of inferior temporal gyrus (p<0.01). AIs in 5 pairs of VOI excluding inferior temporal gyrus were deviated to one side in TLE (p<0.05). Lateralization was correct in 23/28 of patients by AI, but all of 28 were consistent with visual inspection. In 3 patients with normal AI was symmetric on visual inspection. In 2 patients falsely lateralized using AI, metabolism was also decreased visually on contra-lateral side. Asymmetric index obtained by the product of statistical probability anatomical map and FDG PET correlated well with visual assessment in TLE patients. SPAM is useful for quantification of VOIs in functional images

  5. Quantification of {sup 18}F-FDG PET images using probabilistic brain atlas: clinical application in temporal lobe epilepsy patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Keon Wook; Lee, Dong Soo; Cho, Jae Hoon; Lee, Jae Sung; Yeo, Jeong Seok; Lee, Sang Gun; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-07-01

    A probabilistic atlas of the human brain (Statistical Probability Anatomical Maps: SPAM) was developed by the international consortium for brain mapping (ICBM). After calculating the counts in volume of interest (VOI) using the product of probability of SPAM images and counts in FDG images, asymmetric indexes(AI) were calculated and used for finding epileptogenic zones in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). FDG PET images from 28 surgically confirmed TLE patients and 12 age-matched controls were spatially normalized to the averaged brain MRI atlas of ICBM. The counts from normalized PET images were multiplied with the probability of 12 VOIs (superior temporal gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus, hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, and amygdala in each hemisphere) of SPAM images of Montreal Neurological Institute. Finally AI was calculated on each pair of VOI, and compared with visual assessment. If AI was deviated more than 2 standard deviation of normal controls, we considered epileptogenic zones were found successfully. The counts of VOIs in normal controls were symmetric (AI <6%, paired t-test p>0.05) except those of inferior temporal gyrus (p<0.01). AIs in 5 pairs of VOI excluding inferior temporal gyrus were deviated to one side in TLE (p<0.05). Lateralization was correct in 23/28 of patients by AI, but all of 28 were consistent with visual inspection. In 3 patients with normal AI was symmetric on visual inspection. In 2 patients falsely lateralized using AI, metabolism was also decreased visually on contra-lateral side. Asymmetric index obtained by the product of statistical probability anatomical map and FDG PET correlated well with visual assessment in TLE patients. SPAM is useful for quantification of VOIs in functional images.

  6. Clinical PET/CT Atlas: A Casebook of Imaging in Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Integrated positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has evolved since its introduction into the commercial market more than a decade ago. It is now a key procedure, particularly in oncological imaging. Over the last years in routine clinical service, PET/CT has had a significant impact on diagnosis, treatment planning, staging, therapy, and monitoring of treatment response and has therefore played an important role in the care of cancer patients. The high sensitivity from the PET component and the specificity of the CT component give this hybrid imaging modality the unique characteristics that make PET/CT, even after over 10 years of clinical use, one of the fastest growing imaging modalities worldwide. This publication combines over 90 comprehensive cases covering all major indications of fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG)-PET/CT as well as some cases of clinically relevant special tracers. The cases provide an overview of what the specific disease can look like in PET/CT, the typical pattern of the disease’s spread as well as likely pitfalls and teaching points. This PET/CT Atlas will allow professionals interested in PET/CT imaging to embrace the variety of oncological imaging by providing clinically relevant teaching files on the effectiveness and diagnostic quality of FDG-PET/CT imaging in routine applications

  7. Impact of F-18 FDG-PET for the Clinical Multidisciplinary Evaluation of Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prakash, Vineet; Vestergård, Karsten; Frost, Majbritt

    PURPOSE            Dementia is a challenging clinical diagnosis. Compared with conventional clinical evaluations, F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET has been reported to improve not only the diagnostic accuracy of dementia but also help better define the underlying  type. This is because FDG PET d...... or Frontotemporal dementia.                       CLINICAL RELEVANCE/APPLICATION            F18-FDG Brain PET with visual and automated analyses can be valuable  in a diagnostic algorithim for the work up of dementia when the cause is uncertain.......PURPOSE            Dementia is a challenging clinical diagnosis. Compared with conventional clinical evaluations, F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET has been reported to improve not only the diagnostic accuracy of dementia but also help better define the underlying  type. This is because FDG PET...... patients had FDG-PET scans with visual and automated analyses. At a multidisciplinary meeting attended by a neuroradiologist and PET specialist, a pre-PET diagnosis, type of dementia and management plan was composed by a neurologist on the basis of clinical assessment, MRI, neuropsychometry...

  8. Clinical application of in vivo treatment delivery verification based on PET/CT imaging of positron activity induced at high energy photon therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janek Strååt, Sara; Andreassen, Björn; Jonsson, Cathrine; Noz, Marilyn E.; Maguire, Gerald Q., Jr.; Näfstadius, Peder; Näslund, Ingemar; Schoenahl, Frederic; Brahme, Anders

    2013-08-01

    20 times lower than that of a patient undergoing standard 18F-FDG treatment. When using a combination of short lived nuclides such as 15O (half-life: 2 min) and 11C (half-life: 20 min) with low activity it is not optimal to use clinical reconstruction protocols. Thus, it might be desirable to further optimize reconstruction parameters as well as to address hardware improvements in realizing in vivo treatment verification with PET/CT in the future. A significant improvement with regard to 15O imaging could also be expected by having the PET/CT unit located close to the radiation treatment room.

  9. Clinical PET/CT imaging. Promises and misconceptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czernin, J.; Auerbach, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    PET/CT is now established as the most important imaging tool in oncology. PET/CT stages and restages cancer with a higher accuracy than PET or CT alone. The sometimes irrational approach to combine state of the art PET with the highest end CT devices should give way to a more reasonable equipment design tailored towards the specific clinical indications in well-defined patient populations. The continuing success of molecular PET/CT now depends more upon advances in molecular imaging with the introduction of targeted imaging probes for individualized therapy approaches in cancer patients and less upon technological advances of imaging equipment. (orig.)

  10. Approaches using molecular imaging technology -- use of PET in clinical microdose studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Claudia C; Langer, Oliver

    2011-06-19

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging uses minute amounts of radiolabeled drug tracers and thereby meets the criteria for clinical microdose studies. The advantage of PET, when compared to other analytical methods used in microdose studies, is that the pharmacokinetics (PK) of a drug can be determined in the tissue targeted for drug treatment. PET microdosing already offers interesting applications in clinical oncology and in the development of central nervous system pharmaceuticals and is extending its range of application to many other fields of pharmaceutical medicine. Although requirements for preclinical safety testing for microdose studies have been cut down by regulatory authorities, radiopharmaceuticals increasingly need to be produced under good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions, which increases the costs of PET microdosing studies. Further challenges in PET microdosing include combining PET with other ultrasensitive analytical methods, such as accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), to gain plasma PK data of drugs, beyond the short PET examination periods. Finally, conducting clinical PET studies with radiolabeled drugs both at micro- and therapeutic doses is encouraged to answer the question of dose linearity in clinical microdosing. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Approaches using molecular imaging technology - use of PET in clinical microdose studies§

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Claudia C; Langer, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging uses minute amounts of radiolabeled drug tracers and thereby meets the criteria for clinical microdose studies. The advantage of PET, when compared to other analytical methods used in microdose studies, is that the pharmacokinetics (PK) of a drug can be determined in the tissue targeted for drug treatment. PET microdosing already offers interesting applications in clinical oncology and in the development of central nervous system pharmaceuticals and is extending its range of application to many other fields of pharmaceutical medicine. Although requirements for preclinical safety testing for microdose studies have been cut down by regulatory authorities, radiopharmaceuticals increasingly need to be produced under good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions, which increases the costs of PET microdosing studies. Further challenges in PET microdosing include combining PET with other ultrasensitive analytical methods, such as accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), to gain plasma PK data of drugs, beyond the short PET examination periods. Finally, conducting clinical PET studies with radiolabeled drugs both at micro- and therapeutic doses is encouraged to answer the question of dose linearity in clinical microdosing. PMID:20887762

  12. MicroPET imaging and transgenic models: a blueprint for Alzheimer's disease clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Eduardo R; Parent, Maxime J; Cuello, A Claudio; Gauthier, Serge; Rosa-Neto, Pedro

    2014-11-01

    Over the past decades, developments in neuroimaging have significantly contributed to the understanding of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathophysiology. Specifically, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agents targeting amyloid deposition have provided unprecedented opportunities for refining in vivo diagnosis, monitoring disease propagation, and advancing AD clinical trials. Furthermore, the use of a miniaturized version of PET (microPET) in transgenic (Tg) animals has been a successful strategy for accelerating the development of novel radiopharmaceuticals. However, advanced applications of microPET focusing on the longitudinal propagation of AD pathophysiology or therapeutic strategies remain in their infancy. This review highlights what we have learned from microPET imaging in Tg models displaying amyloid and tau pathology, and anticipates cutting-edge applications with high translational value to clinical research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of a PET Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Imaging Agent: Preclinical Translation for Future Clinical Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    are those of the author(s) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy or decision unless so designated by...phase 0) application to the FDA by the end of the funding period. The small molecule imaging agents under study home to prostate specific membrane...funding period. The small molecule imaging agents under study home to prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) that is prevalent on a majority of

  14. Cyclotron-produced radioisotopes and their clinical use at the Austin PET Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tochon-Danguy, H.J. [Centre for PET, Melbourne, VIC (Australia). Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre

    1997-12-31

    A Centre for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has been established within the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre in Melbourne. PET is a non-invasive technique based on the use of biologically relevant compounds labelled with short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides such as carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18. The basic equipment consists of a medical cyclotron (10 MeV proton and 5 MeV deuteron), six lead-shielded hot cells with associated radiochemistry facilities and a whole body PET scanner. During its first five years of operation, the Melbourne PET Centre, has pursued a strong radiolabelling development program, leading to an ambitious clinical program in neurology, oncology and cardiology. This presentation will describe the basic principles of the PET technique and review the cyclotron-produced radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals. Radiolabelling development programs and clinical applications are also addressed. 30 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig.

  15. Cyclotron-produced radioisotopes and their clinical use at the Austin PET Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tochon-Danguy, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    A Centre for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has been established within the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre in Melbourne. PET is a non-invasive technique based on the use of biologically relevant compounds labelled with short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides such as carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18. The basic equipment consists of a medical cyclotron (10 MeV proton and 5 MeV deuteron), six lead-shielded hot cells with associated radiochemistry facilities and a whole body PET scanner. During its first five years of operation, the Melbourne PET Centre, has pursued a strong radiolabelling development program, leading to an ambitious clinical program in neurology, oncology and cardiology. This presentation will describe the basic principles of the PET technique and review the cyclotron-produced radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals. Radiolabelling development programs and clinical applications are also addressed

  16. Application of PET in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chun

    2003-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease of central nervous system that causes progressive cognitive and memory deterioration in the elderly people. Affected brains of AD patients are characterized by the presence of senile plaques (SP) and neurofilbrillary tangles (NFT). The review will focus on the application of positron emission tomography (PET) in the diagnosis, progression prediction, treatment and evaluation of neurotransmission activity of AD

  17. Report on the development and application of PET/CT in mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yumei; Chen, Ruohua; Zhou, Xiang; Liu, Jianjun; Huang, Gang

    2017-09-08

    To examine the development and application of systems combining positron emission and x-ray-computed tomography systems (PET/CTs) in mainland China. Using a questionnaire, we surveyed Chinese medical institutions on a variety topics relating to their PET/CT systems and its use. The respondents had PET/CTs installed and in clinical use before 31 December 2015. We examined the clinical scenarios to which Chinese PET/CTs were applied by reviewing the related Chinese and international literature from the start of 1995 to the end of 2013; these papers were found by searching the Wanfang and PubMed databases, respectively. The data were then classified and analyzed statistically. At the end of 2015, there were 240 PET/CTs and 101 medical cyclotrons in mainland China. The total number of PET studies performed in 2015 was 469,364. The main clinical applications of PET were found to be diagnostic fludeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) imaging and oncological imaging. A minority of PET/CT studies were performed using 11 C-choline and other imaging agents. The number of papers relating to clinical use of PET/CT in mainland China increased each year over the period of study, in both the Chinese and international literature. Despite this progress, important problems were also apparent, including unbalanced regional development and the limited quality of the research. This study provides detailed information for understanding the development PET/CT technology in mainland China, along with its geographical distribution and clinical application. It may thus prove a useful reference for all those involved in planning the future of PET/CT in China.

  18. Initial clinical test of a breast-PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Koren, Courtney; Schreiman, Judith S.; Majewski, Stan; Marano, Gary D.; Abraham, Jame; Kurian, Sobha; Hazard, Hannah; Filburn, Shannon

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this initial clinical study was to test a new positron emission/tomography imager and biopsy system (PEM/PET) in a small group of selected subjects to assess its clinical imaging capabilities. Specifically, the main task of this study is to determine whether the new system can successfully be used to produce images of known breast cancer and compare them to those acquired by standard techniques. The PEM/PET system consists of two pairs of rotating radiation detectors located beneath a patient table. The scanner has a spatial resolution of ∼2 mm in all three dimensions. The subjects consisted of five patients diagnosed with locally advanced breast cancer ranging in age from 40 to 55 years old scheduled for pre-treatment, conventional whole body PET imaging with F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). The primary lesions were at least 2 cm in diameter. The images from the PEM/PET system demonstrated that this system is capable of identifying some lesions not visible in standard mammograms. Furthermore, while the relatively large lesions imaged in this study where all visualised by a standard whole body PET/CT scanner, some of the morphology of the tumours (ductal infiltration, for example) was better defined with the PEM/PET system. Significantly, these images were obtained immediately following a standard whole body PET scan. The initial testing of the new PEM/PET system demonstrated that the new system is capable of producing good quality breast-PET images compared standard methods.

  19. Total-Body PET: Maximizing Sensitivity to Create New Opportunities for Clinical Research and Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Simon R; Jones, Terry; Karp, Joel S; Qi, Jinyi; Moses, William W; Badawi, Ramsey D

    2018-01-01

    PET is widely considered the most sensitive technique available for noninvasively studying physiology, metabolism, and molecular pathways in the living human being. However, the utility of PET, being a photon-deficient modality, remains constrained by factors including low signal-to-noise ratio, long imaging times, and concerns about radiation dose. Two developments offer the potential to dramatically increase the effective sensitivity of PET. First by increasing the geometric coverage to encompass the entire body, sensitivity can be increased by a factor of about 40 for total-body imaging or a factor of about 4-5 for imaging a single organ such as the brain or heart. The world's first total-body PET/CT scanner is currently under construction to demonstrate how this step change in sensitivity affects the way PET is used both in clinical research and in patient care. Second, there is the future prospect of significant improvements in timing resolution that could lead to further effective sensitivity gains. When combined with total-body PET, this could produce overall sensitivity gains of more than 2 orders of magnitude compared with existing state-of-the-art systems. In this article, we discuss the benefits of increasing body coverage, describe our efforts to develop a first-generation total-body PET/CT scanner, discuss selected application areas for total-body PET, and project the impact of further improvements in time-of-flight PET. © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  20. Using PET for therapy monitoring in oncological clinical trials: challenges ahead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deroose, C.M.; Stroobants, S.; Liu, Y.; Shankar, L.K.; Bourguet, P.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular imaging with PET has emerged as a powerful imaging tool in the clinical care of oncological patients. Assessing therapy response is a prime application of PET and so the integration of PET into multicentre trials can offer valuable scientific insights and shape future clinical practice. However, there are a number of logistic and methodological challenges that have to be dealt with. These range from availability and regulatory compliance of the PET radiopharmaceutical to availability of scan time for research purposes. Standardization of imaging and reconstruction protocols, quality control, image processing and analysis are of paramount importance. Strategies for harmonization of the final image and the quantification result are available and can be implemented within the scope of multicentre accreditation programmes. Data analysis can be performed either locally or by centralized review. Response assessment can be done visually or using more quantitative approaches, depending on the research question. Large-scale real-time centralized review can be achieved using web-based solutions. Specific challenges for the future are inclusion of PET/MRI scanners in multicentre trials and the incorporation of radiomic analyses. Inclusion of PET in multicentre trials is a necessity to guarantee the further development of PET for routine clinical care and may yield very valuable scientific insights. (orig.)

  1. Using PET for therapy monitoring in oncological clinical trials: challenges ahead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deroose, C.M. [UZ Leuven, Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Leuven (Belgium); European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Imaging Group, Leuven (Belgium); Stroobants, S. [European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Imaging Group, Leuven (Belgium); University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Antwerp, Edegem (Belgium); Liu, Y. [European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Imaging Group, Leuven (Belgium); EORTC Headquarters, Brussels (Belgium); Shankar, L.K. [National Cancer Institute, Diagnostic Imaging Branch, Cancer Imaging Program, Bethesda, MD (United States); Bourguet, P. [European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Imaging Group, Leuven (Belgium); University of Rennes 1, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rennes (France)

    2017-08-15

    Molecular imaging with PET has emerged as a powerful imaging tool in the clinical care of oncological patients. Assessing therapy response is a prime application of PET and so the integration of PET into multicentre trials can offer valuable scientific insights and shape future clinical practice. However, there are a number of logistic and methodological challenges that have to be dealt with. These range from availability and regulatory compliance of the PET radiopharmaceutical to availability of scan time for research purposes. Standardization of imaging and reconstruction protocols, quality control, image processing and analysis are of paramount importance. Strategies for harmonization of the final image and the quantification result are available and can be implemented within the scope of multicentre accreditation programmes. Data analysis can be performed either locally or by centralized review. Response assessment can be done visually or using more quantitative approaches, depending on the research question. Large-scale real-time centralized review can be achieved using web-based solutions. Specific challenges for the future are inclusion of PET/MRI scanners in multicentre trials and the incorporation of radiomic analyses. Inclusion of PET in multicentre trials is a necessity to guarantee the further development of PET for routine clinical care and may yield very valuable scientific insights. (orig.)

  2. Application of PET and PET/CT imaging for cancer screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yenkung; Hu Fenglan; Shen Yehyou; Liao, A.C.; Hung, T.Z.; Su, Chentau; Chen Liangkuang

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential application of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and PET/CT for cancer screening in asymptomatic individuals. Methods: The subjects consisted of 3631 physical check up examinees (1947 men, 1684 women; mean age ±SD, 52.1±8.2 y) with non-specific medical histories. Whole-body FDG PET (or PET/CT), ultrasound and tumor markers were performed on all patients. Focal hypermetabolic areas with intensities equal to or exceeding the level of FDG uptake in the brain and bladder were considered abnormal and interpreted as neoplasia. Follow-up periods were longer than one year. Results: Among the 3631 FDG PET (including 1687 PET/CT), ultrasound and tumor markers examinations, malignant tumors were discovered in 47 examinees (1.29%). PET findings were true-positive in 38 of the 47 cancers (80.9%). In addition, 32 of the 47 cancers were performed with the PET-CT scan. PET detected cancer lesions in 28 of the 32 examinees. However, the CT detected cancer lesions in only 15 of 32 examinees. Conclusion: The sensitivity of FDG PET in the detection of a wide variety of cancers is high. Most cancer can be detected with FDG PET in a resectable stage. CT of the PET/CT for localization and characteristics of the lesion shows an increased specificity of the PET scan. Using ultrasound and tumor markers may complement the PET scan in cancer screening for hepatic and urologic neoplasms. (authors)

  3. The performance and application of 18F-FDG PET/CT in diagnosis of tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Junqi

    2004-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) inline scanner combined with high performance PET and CT have been introduced to clinical in recent years. The application of PET/CT in oncology are rapid increasing. The addition of CT to PET offers many advantages, including obtaining a fast and relatively accurate transmission map, shortening the duration of the examination, adding precise anatomical information to PET imaging, and providing additional diagnostic information. However, using CT for attenuation correction can led to some artifacts; quantitative measurements may be altered, high density IV and oral metallic objects may produce artifacts, and the registration of PET and CT may occasionally suboptimal. In head and neck tumor PET/CT offers particular potential advantages as well as abdomen and pelvic tumor. Even in the thorax, which the physical movement may produce unsatisfactory results, offers some advantages also. Preliminary results of PET/CT over PET or CT in oncology are very encouraging. It is clear the PET/CT fusion technology has an more and more impact on both diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of patient management

  4. Guide to clinical PET in oncology: Improving clinical management of cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has an approximately 50 year-history. It was developed as a tool of medical science to quantitatively measure metabolic rates of bio-substances in vivo and in particular the number of receptors in neuroscience. Until the late 1990s PET was, in most cases, research oriented activity. In 2001, positron emission tomography/X ray computed tomography (PET/CT) hybrid imaging system became commercially available. An era of clinical PET then emerged, in which PET images were utilized for clinical practice in the treatment and diagnosis of cancer patients. PET imaging could recognize areas of abnormal metabolic behaviour of cancers in vivo, and the addition of CT imaging underlines the site of malignancy. More accurate and precise interpretation of cancer lesions can therefore be performed by PET/CT imaging than PET or CT imaging alone. Clinical PET, in particular with fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG), has already proven itself to have considerable value in oncology. The indications include malignant lymphoma and melanoma, head and neck cancers, oesophageal cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer and colorectal cancer, and it is still being expanded. The roles of clinical PET could be for 1) preoperative staging of cancers, 2) differentiation between residual tumour and scarring, 3) demonstration of suspected recurrences, 4) monitoring response to therapy, 5) prognosis and 6) radiotherapy treatment planning. Clinical PET can be used to illustrate exactly which treatment should be applied for a cancer patient as well as where surgeons should operate and where radiation oncologists should target radiation therapy. An almost exponential rise in the introduction of clinical PET, as well as the installation of PET/CT has been seen throughout the world. Clinical PET is currently viewed as the most powerful diagnostic tool in its field. This IAEA-TECDOC presents an overview of clinical PET for cancer patients and a relevant source of

  5. Potential Applications of PET/MR Imaging in Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratib, Osman; Nkoulou, René

    2014-06-01

    Recent advances in hybrid PET/MR imaging have opened new perspectives for cardiovascular applications. Although cardiac MR imaging has gained wider adoption for routine clinical applications, PET images remain the reference in many applications for which objective analysis of metabolic and physiologic parameters is needed. In particular, in cardiovascular diseases-more specifically, coronary artery disease-the use of quantitative and measurable parameters in a reproducible way is essential for the management of therapeutic decisions and patient follow-up. Functional MR images and dynamic assessment of myocardial perfusion from transit of intravascular contrast medium can provide useful criteria for identifying areas of decreased myocardial perfusion or for assessing tissue viability from late contrast enhancement of scar tissue. PET images, however, will provide more quantitative data on true tissue perfusion and metabolism. Quantitative myocardial flow can also lead to accurate assessment of coronary flow reserve. The combination of both modalities will therefore provide complementary data that can be expected to improve the accuracy and reproducibility of diagnostic procedures. But the true potential of hybrid PET/MR imaging may reside in applications beyond the domain of coronary artery disease. The combination of both modalities in assessment of other cardiac diseases such as inflammation and of other systemic diseases can also be envisioned. It is also predicted that the 2 modalities combined could help characterize atherosclerotic plaques and differentiate plaques with a high risk of rupture from stable plaques. In the future, the development of new tracers will also open new perspectives in evaluating myocardial remodeling and in assessing the kinetics of stem cell therapy in myocardial infarction. New tracers will also provide new means for evaluating alterations in cardiac innervation, angiogenesis, and even the assessment of reporter gene technologies

  6. Clinical Usefulness of 18F-fluoride Bone PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Ji Yeon; Lee, Won Woo; Lee, Byung Chul; Kim, Sang Eun; So, Young

    2010-01-01

    18 F-fluoride bone positron emission tomography (PET) has been reported as a useful bone imaging modality. However, no clinical bone PET study had been performed previously in Korea. The authors investigated the usefulness of 18 F-fluoride bone PET in Korean patients with malignant or benign bone disease. Eighteen consecutive patients (eight women, ten men; mean age, 55±12 years) who had undergone 18 F-fluoride bone PET for the evaluation of bone metastasis (n=13) or benign bone lesions (n=5) were included. The interpretation of bone lesions on 18 F-fluoride bone PET was determined by consensus of two nuclear medicine physicians, and final results were confirmed using combination of all imaging studies and/or clinical follow-up. The analysis was performed on the basis of lesion group. Thirteen patients with malignant disease had 15 lesion groups, among which seven were confirmed as metastatic bone lesions and eight were confirmed as non-metastatic lesions. 18 F-fluoride bone PET correctly identified six of seven metastatic lesions (sensitivity, 86%), and seven of eight non-metastatic lesions (specificity, 88%). On the other hand, five patients with benign conditions had five bone lesion groups; four were confirmed as benign bone diseases and the other one was confirmed as not a bone lesion. 18 F-fluoride bone PET showed correct results in all the five lesion groups. 18 F-fluoride bone PET showed promising potential for bone imaging in Korean patients with malignant diseases as well as with various benign bone conditions. Therefore, further studies are required on the diagnostic performance and cost-effectiveness of 18 F-fluoride bone PET.

  7. Application of PET in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Dong Young

    2002-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an imaging method that employs radionuclide and tomography techniques. Since 1995, we applied PET not only to the diagnosis of breast cancer but also to the detection of abnormalities in the augmented breast and to the detection of metastasis. Until 2001, we evaluated 242 breast cases by PET at PET center of Seoul National University Hospital. Our group has reported serially at the international journals. In the firtst report, PET showed high sensitivity for detecting breast cancer, both the primary and axillary node metastasis. A total of 27 patients underwent breast operations based on PET results at Seoul National University Hospital from 1995 to 1996. The diagnostic accuracy of PET were 97% for the primary tumor mass and 96% for axillary lymph node metastasis. In case of the breast augmented, PET also showed excellent diagnostic results for primary breast cancer and axillary lymph node metastasis where mammography and ultrasound could not diagnose properly. PET also had outstanding results in the detection of recurrent or metastatic breast cancer(sensitivity 94%, specificity 80%, accuracy 89%). In addition, our study gave some evidence that PET could be applied further to evaluate the growth rate of tumors by measuring SUV, and finally to prognosticated the disease. PET could also be applied to evaluate the response after chemotherapy to measure its metabolic rate and size. In conclsion, PET is a highly sensitive, accurate diagnostic tool for breast cancer of primary lesion in various conditions including metastasis

  8. PET and PET/CT with radiolabeled choline in prostate cancer: a critical reappraisal of 20 years of clinical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovacchini, Giampiero; Giovannini, Elisabetta; Leoncini, Rossella; Riondato, Mattia; Ciarmiello, Andrea [S. Andrea Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, La Spezia (Italy)

    2017-09-15

    We here aim to provide a comprehensive and critical review of the literature concerning the clinical applications of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with radiolabeled choline in patients with prostate cancer (PCa). We will initially briefly summarize the historical context that brought to the synthesis of [{sup 11}C]choline, which occurred exactly 20 years ago. We have arbitrarily grouped the clinical studies in three different periods, according to the year in which they were published and according to their relation with their applications in urology, radiotherapy and oncology. Studies at initial staging and, more extensively, studies in patients with biochemical failure, as well as factors predicting positive PET/CT will be reviewed. The capability of PET/CT with radiolabeled choline to provide prognostic information on PCa-specific survival will also be examined. The last sections will be devoted to the use of radiolabeled choline for monitoring the response to androgen deprivation therapy, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. The accuracy and the limits of the technique will be discussed according to the information available from standard validation processes, including biopsy or histology. The clinical impact of the technique will be discussed on the basis of changes induced in the management of patients and in the evaluation of the response to therapy. Current indications to PET/CT, as officially endorsed by guidelines, or as routinely performed in the clinical practice will be illustrated. Emphasis will be made on methodological factors that might have influenced the results of the studies or their interpretation. Finally, we will briefly highlight the potential role of positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance and of new radiotracers for PCa imaging. (orig.)

  9. Clinical evaluation of PET image quality as a function of acquisition time in a new TOF-PET/MR compared to TOF-PET/CT - initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeimpekis, Konstantinos; Huellner, Martin; De Galiza Barbosa, Felipe; Ter Voert, Edwin; Davison, Helen; Delso, Gaspar; Veit-Haibach, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The recently available integrated PET/MR imaging can offer significant additional advances in clinical imaging. The purpose of this study was to compare the PET performance between a PET/CT scanner and an integrated TOF-PET/MR scanner concerning image quality parameters and quantification in terms of SUV as a function of acquisition time (a surrogate of dose). Five brain and five whole body patients were included in the study. The PET/CT scan was used as a reference and the PET/MR acquisition time was consecutively adjusted, taking into account the decay between the scans in order to expose both systems to the same amount of emitted signal. The acquisition times were then retrospectively reduced to assess the performance of the PET/MRI for lower count rates. Image quality, image sharpness, artifacts and noise were evaluated. SUV measurements were taken in the liver and in white matter to compare quantification. Quantitative evaluation showed good correlation between PET/CT and PET/MR brain SUVs. Liver correlation was lower, with uptake underestimation in PET/MR, partially justified by bio-redistribution. The clinical evaluation showed that PET/MR offers higher image quality and sharpness with lower levels of noise and artefacts compared to PET/CT with reduced acquisition times for whole body scans, while for brain scans there is no significant difference. The PET-component of the TOF-PET/MR showed higher image quality compared to PET/CT as tested with reduced imaging times. However, these results account mainly for body imaging, while no significant difference were found in brain imaging. This overall higher image quality suggests that the acquisition time or injected activity can be reduced by at least 37% on the PET/MR scanner.

  10. Clinical evaluation of PET image quality as a function of acquisition time in a new TOF-PET/MR compared to TOF-PET/CT - initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeimpekis, Konstantinos; Huellner, Martin; De Galiza Barbosa, Felipe; Ter Voert, Edwin; Davison, Helen; Delso, Gaspar; Veit-Haibach, Patrick [Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-05-18

    The recently available integrated PET/MR imaging can offer significant additional advances in clinical imaging. The purpose of this study was to compare the PET performance between a PET/CT scanner and an integrated TOF-PET/MR scanner concerning image quality parameters and quantification in terms of SUV as a function of acquisition time (a surrogate of dose). Five brain and five whole body patients were included in the study. The PET/CT scan was used as a reference and the PET/MR acquisition time was consecutively adjusted, taking into account the decay between the scans in order to expose both systems to the same amount of emitted signal. The acquisition times were then retrospectively reduced to assess the performance of the PET/MRI for lower count rates. Image quality, image sharpness, artifacts and noise were evaluated. SUV measurements were taken in the liver and in white matter to compare quantification. Quantitative evaluation showed good correlation between PET/CT and PET/MR brain SUVs. Liver correlation was lower, with uptake underestimation in PET/MR, partially justified by bio-redistribution. The clinical evaluation showed that PET/MR offers higher image quality and sharpness with lower levels of noise and artefacts compared to PET/CT with reduced acquisition times for whole body scans, while for brain scans there is no significant difference. The PET-component of the TOF-PET/MR showed higher image quality compared to PET/CT as tested with reduced imaging times. However, these results account mainly for body imaging, while no significant difference were found in brain imaging. This overall higher image quality suggests that the acquisition time or injected activity can be reduced by at least 37% on the PET/MR scanner.

  11. PET/MRI: a novel hybrid imaging technique: major clinical indications and preliminary experience in Brazil; PET/RM: um novo metodo de imagem hibrida: principais indicacoes clinicas e experiencia preliminar no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitor, Taise; Martins, Karine Minaif; Ionescu, Tudor Mihai and others, E-mail: taisevitor@gmail.com [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, medical imaging with hybrid techniques has widely accepted and employed in clinical routine. PET/MRI offers significant advantages, including excellent contrast and resolution and reduced ionizing radiation, as compared to well-established PET/ CT. Therefore, PET/MRI is a promising modality for oncologic imaging of some regions, such as brain, head and neck, liver and pelvis. This article set out to analyze clinical conditions that could benefit from PET/MRI imaging based on our caseload. The potential of PET/MRI to become the imaging modality of choice for assessment of neurologic and oncologic conditions associated with soft tissues is highlighted. Clinical aspects of PET/MRI and its application to clinical cases are illustrated with examples extracted from the authors' preliminary experience. (author)

  12. The application value of PET-CT in the diagnosis of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Haitao

    2005-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women in most of countries. During the past decades, the application of PET with 18 f-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glocuse ( 18 F-FDG) has remarkably improved the management of breast cancer. Nevertheless, due to anatomical localisation of 18 F-FDG uptake was difficult, the clinical interpretation of 18 F-FDG PET scan could not be exactly. A novel combined PET-CT system has largely improved the capacity of sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of breast cancer. In this artiacal we focus on the application value of PET-CT to breast cancer diagnosis, with respect to dissease re-staging, treatment monitoring, preoperative staging and radiotherapy planning. (authors)

  13. PET/MRI: a novel hybrid imaging technique. Major clinical indications and preliminary experience in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitor, Taise; Martins, Karine Minaif; Ionescu, Tudor Mihai; Cunha, Marcelo Livorsi da; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb; Garcia, Marcio Ricardo Taveira; Wagner, Jairo; Campos, Guilherme de Carvalho; Nogueira, Solange Amorim; Guerra, Elaine Gonçalves; Amaro, Edson

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, medical imaging with hybrid techniques has widely accepted and employed in clinical routine. PET/MRI offers significant advantages, including excellent contrast and resolution and reduced ionizing radiation, as compared to well-established PET/CT. Therefore, PET/MRI is a promising modality for oncologic imaging of some regions, such as brain, head and neck, liver and pelvis. This article set out to analyze clinical conditions that could benefit from PET/MRI imaging based on our caseload. The potential of PET/MRI to become the imaging modality of choice for assessment of neurologic and oncologic conditions associated with soft tissues is highlighted. Clinical aspects of PET/MRI and its application to clinical cases are illustrated with examples extracted from the authors' preliminary experience. RESUMO Nos últimos anos, imagens médicas com tecnologias híbridas tornaram-se amplamente aceitas e utilizadas na prática clínica. O PET/RM possui vantagens importantes, incluindo excelentes contrastes e resolução, e menor radiação ionizante, em comparação ao PET/TC. Por isto, é uma modalidade promissora para exames de imagem de pacientes oncológicos, para avaliar o cérebro, cabeça e pescoço, o fígado e a pelve. O objetivo deste artigo foi analisar as situações clínicas que se beneficiariam de exames de PET/RM a partir de uma casuística. Destacamos o potencial desta técnica se tornar o método de imagem de escolha para doenças neurológicas e oncológicas que envolvam partes moles. Os aspectos clínicos de PET/RM e sua aplicação aos casos clínicos são ilustrados com exemplos da experiência inicial dos autores.

  14. Clinical Evaluation of PET Image Quality as a Function of Acquisition Time in a New TOF-PET/MRI Compared to TOF-PET/CT--Initial Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeimpekis, Konstantinos G; Barbosa, Felipe; Hüllner, Martin; ter Voert, Edwin; Davison, Helen; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Delso, Gaspar

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare only the performance of the PET component between a TOF-PET/CT (henceforth noted as PET/CT) scanner and an integrated TOF-PET/MRI (henceforth noted as PET/MRI) scanner concerning image quality parameters and quantification in terms of standardized uptake value (SUV) as a function of acquisition time (a surrogate of dose). The CT and MR image quality were not assessed, and that is beyond the scope of this study. Five brain and five whole-body patients were included in the study. The PET/CT scan was used as a reference and the PET/MRI acquisition time was consecutively adjusted, taking into account the decay between the scans in order to expose both systems to the same amount of the emitted signal. The acquisition times were then retrospectively reduced to assess the performance of the PET/MRI for lower count rates. Image quality, image sharpness, artifacts, and noise were evaluated. SUV measurements were taken in the liver and in the white matter to compare quantification. Quantitative evaluation showed strong correlation between PET/CT and PET/MRI brain SUVs. Liver correlation was good, however, with lower uptake estimation in PET/MRI, partially justified by bio-redistribution. The clinical evaluation showed that PET/MRI offers higher image quality and sharpness with lower levels of noise and artifacts compared to PET/CT with reduced acquisition times for whole-body scans while for brain scans there is no significant difference. The TOF-PET/MRI showed higher image quality compared to TOF-PET/CT as tested with reduced imaging times. However, this result accounts mainly for body imaging, while no significant differences were found in brain imaging.

  15. PET: the importance of physicists for the clinical arena

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    David Townsend giving a seminar at CERN on 9 February. The past few years have seen significant advances in the development of instrumentation for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The recent appearance of combined PET and Computed Tomography (CT) scanners that can simultaneously image both anatomy and function is of particular importance. This was the main subject of "Advances in PET imaging: from physics to physician", a seminar presented at CERN by David Townsend on Wednesday 9 February  and organized by the TT and PH groups. David Townsend, who started his career at CERN in the 1970s, is now Professor at the Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Medical Center (Knoxville, TN). Recipient of the 2004 Clinical Scientist of the Year Award, he is an internationally renowned researcher and PET physicist, with over 25 years of experience in the field. His 1999 image of the year, an award from the Society of Nuclear Medicine in the US, was produced using a combined state-of-the art PET and a true d...

  16. Changing patterns of clinical PET use - 5 years on

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binns, D.; Hicks, R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Increasing clinical awareness and acceptance of the clinical role of positron emission tomography (PET) has the potential to alter patterns of referral. To assess whether patterns of referral are changing in response to greater experience with this technique, we reviewed indications of new referrals to our facility for each of the past 5 years of operation. Of more than 6,183 studies performed since our facility began operation in September 1996, 4,401 were initial referrals. Of these referrals the most common indications were carcinoma of the lung (n = 970, 22.0 %), colorectal cancer (n = 631, 14.3 %), malignant melanoma (n = 506, 11.5 %), genito-urinary tract cancer (n = 427, 9.7 %), epilepsy (n = 366, 8.3 %), and lymphoma (n = 351, 8.0 %). Referrals for all these indications, other than malignant melanoma, continued to grow in absolute terms throughout the 5 year interval but in relative terms only lung cancer maintained a similar proportion of scans reflecting an expansion of other referral indications. Evaluation of intractable partial complex seizures demonstrated the most marked growth in both absolute and relative terms. Conversely, malignant melanoma referrals declined as patients with thick melanoma began to have sentinel lymph node biopsy rather than PET as their initial staging investigation. Our experience suggests that clinical PET referrals reflect the expanding evidence-base regarding both the strengths and weaknesses of PET. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  17. PET/CT applications in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva González, Juan Perfecto; Martínez Ramírez, Aldo; Baum, Richard Paul

    2017-01-01

    PET means Positron Emission Tomography, it is a nuclear medicine technique in which radiopharmaceuticals labeled with positron emitters are used to obtain biochemical-metabolic images of the human body. The use of PET / CT contributes to obtain multimodal images that combine anatomical and metabolic information, allowing a more reliable diagnosis of a tumor or local or distant metastases in an organ or tissue. Other multimodal devices combine metabolic imaging with nuclear magnetic resonance. PET/CT is mainly used in Oncology (85-90%), Neurology, Cardiology, Inflammation and Infection although it is currently also used in different medical and surgical pathologies. The present work is aimed at showing what PET/CT is and how useful it is in Oncology. (author)

  18. Joint estimation of activity and attenuation for PET using pragmatic MR-based prior: application to clinical TOF PET/MR whole-body data for FDG and non-FDG tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sangtae; Cheng, Lishui; Shanbhag, Dattesh D.; Qian, Hua; Kaushik, Sandeep S.; Jansen, Floris P.; Wiesinger, Florian

    2018-02-01

    Accurate and robust attenuation correction remains challenging in hybrid PET/MR particularly for torsos because it is difficult to segment bones, lungs and internal air in MR images. Additionally, MR suffers from susceptibility artifacts when a metallic implant is present. Recently, joint estimation (JE) of activity and attenuation based on PET data, also known as maximum likelihood reconstruction of activity and attenuation, has gained considerable interest because of (1) its promise to address the challenges in MR-based attenuation correction (MRAC), and (2) recent advances in time-of-flight (TOF) technology, which is known to be the key to the success of JE. In this paper, we implement a JE algorithm using an MR-based prior and evaluate the algorithm using whole-body PET/MR patient data, for both FDG and non-FDG tracers, acquired from GE SIGNA PET/MR scanners with TOF capability. The weight of the MR-based prior is spatially modulated, based on MR signal strength, to control the balance between MRAC and JE. Large prior weights are used in strong MR signal regions such as soft tissue and fat (i.e. MR tissue classification with a high degree of certainty) and small weights are used in low MR signal regions (i.e. MR tissue classification with a low degree of certainty). The MR-based prior is pragmatic in the sense that it is convex and does not require training or population statistics while exploiting synergies between MRAC and JE. We demonstrate the JE algorithm has the potential to improve the robustness and accuracy of MRAC by recovering the attenuation of metallic implants, internal air and some bones and by better delineating lung boundaries, not only for FDG but also for more specific non-FDG tracers such as 68Ga-DOTATOC and 18F-Fluoride.

  19. Additive value of amyloid-PET in routine cases of clinical dementia work-up after FDG-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brendel, Matthias; Schnabel, Jonas; Wagner, Leonie; Brendel, Eva; Meyer-Wilmes, Johanna; Unterrainer, Marcus; Schoenecker, Sonja; Prix, Catharina; Ackl, Nibal; Schildan, Andreas; Patt, Marianne; Barthel, Henryk; Sabri, Osama; Catak, Cihan; Pogarell, Oliver; Levin, Johannes; Danek, Adrian; Buerger, Katharina; Bartenstein, Peter; Rominger, Axel

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, several [ 18 F]-labeled amyloid-PET tracers have been developed and have obtained clinical approval. Despite their widespread scientific use, studies in routine clinical settings are limited. We therefore investigated the impact of [ 18 F]-florbetaben (FBB)-PET on the diagnostic management of patients with suspected dementia that was still unclarified after [ 18 F]-fluordeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET. All subjects were referred in-house with a suspected dementia syndrome due to neurodegenerative disease. After undergoing an FDG-PET exam, the cases were discussed by the interdisciplinary dementia board, where the most likely diagnosis as well as potential differential diagnoses were documented. Because of persistent diagnostic uncertainty, the patients received an additional FBB-PET exam. Results were interpreted visually and classified as amyloid-positive or amyloid-negative, and we then compared the individual clinical diagnoses before and after additional FBB-PET. A total of 107 patients (mean age 69.4 ± 9.7y) were included in the study. The FBB-PET was rated as amyloid-positive in 65/107. In 83% of the formerly unclear cases, a final diagnosis was reached through FBB-PET, and the most likely prior diagnosis was changed in 28% of cases. The highest impact was observed for distinguishing Alzheimer's dementia (AD) from fronto-temporal dementia (FTLD), where FBB-PET altered the most likely diagnosis in 41% of cases. FBB-PET has a high additive value in establishing a final diagnosis in suspected dementia cases when prior investigations such as FDG-PET are inconclusive. The differentiation between AD and FTLD was particularly facilitated by amyloid-PET, predicting a considerable impact on patient management, especially in the light of upcoming disease-modifying therapies. (orig.)

  20. Additive value of amyloid-PET in routine cases of clinical dementia work-up after FDG-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brendel, Matthias; Schnabel, Jonas; Wagner, Leonie; Brendel, Eva; Meyer-Wilmes, Johanna; Unterrainer, Marcus [University Hospital, LMU Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Schoenecker, Sonja; Prix, Catharina; Ackl, Nibal [University Hospital, LMU Munich, Department of Neurology, Munich (Germany); Schildan, Andreas; Patt, Marianne; Barthel, Henryk; Sabri, Osama [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Catak, Cihan [Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen, Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research, Munich (Germany); Pogarell, Oliver [University Hospital, LMU Munich, Department of Psychiatry, Munich (Germany); Levin, Johannes; Danek, Adrian [University Hospital, LMU Munich, Department of Neurology, Munich (Germany); DZNE - German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Munich (Germany); Buerger, Katharina [Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen, Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research, Munich (Germany); DZNE - German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Munich (Germany); Bartenstein, Peter; Rominger, Axel [University Hospital, LMU Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Munich Cluster for Systems Neurology (SyNergy), Munich (Germany)

    2017-12-15

    In recent years, several [{sup 18}F]-labeled amyloid-PET tracers have been developed and have obtained clinical approval. Despite their widespread scientific use, studies in routine clinical settings are limited. We therefore investigated the impact of [{sup 18}F]-florbetaben (FBB)-PET on the diagnostic management of patients with suspected dementia that was still unclarified after [{sup 18}F]-fluordeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET. All subjects were referred in-house with a suspected dementia syndrome due to neurodegenerative disease. After undergoing an FDG-PET exam, the cases were discussed by the interdisciplinary dementia board, where the most likely diagnosis as well as potential differential diagnoses were documented. Because of persistent diagnostic uncertainty, the patients received an additional FBB-PET exam. Results were interpreted visually and classified as amyloid-positive or amyloid-negative, and we then compared the individual clinical diagnoses before and after additional FBB-PET. A total of 107 patients (mean age 69.4 ± 9.7y) were included in the study. The FBB-PET was rated as amyloid-positive in 65/107. In 83% of the formerly unclear cases, a final diagnosis was reached through FBB-PET, and the most likely prior diagnosis was changed in 28% of cases. The highest impact was observed for distinguishing Alzheimer's dementia (AD) from fronto-temporal dementia (FTLD), where FBB-PET altered the most likely diagnosis in 41% of cases. FBB-PET has a high additive value in establishing a final diagnosis in suspected dementia cases when prior investigations such as FDG-PET are inconclusive. The differentiation between AD and FTLD was particularly facilitated by amyloid-PET, predicting a considerable impact on patient management, especially in the light of upcoming disease-modifying therapies. (orig.)

  1. Clinical evaluation of TOF versus non-TOF on PET artifacts in simultaneous PET/MR: a dual centre experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voert, Edwin E.G.W. ter [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Veit-Haibach, Patrick [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Ahn, Sangtae [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Wiesinger, Florian [GE Global Research, Muenchen (Germany); Khalighi, M.M.; Delso, Gaspar [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI (United States); Levin, Craig S. [Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford, CA (United States); Iagaru, Andrei H. [Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Stanford, CA (United States); Zaharchuk, Greg [Stanford University, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Huellner, Martin [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Department of Neuroradiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-07-15

    Our objective was to determine clinically the value of time-of-flight (TOF) information in reducing PET artifacts and improving PET image quality and accuracy in simultaneous TOF PET/MR scanning. A total 65 patients who underwent a comparative scan in a simultaneous TOF PET/MR scanner were included. TOF and non-TOF PET images were reconstructed, clinically examined, compared and scored. PET imaging artifacts were categorized as large or small implant-related artifacts, as dental implant-related artifacts, and as implant-unrelated artifacts. Differences in image quality, especially those related to (implant) artifacts, were assessed using a scale ranging from 0 (no artifact) to 4 (severe artifact). A total of 87 image artifacts were found and evaluated. Four patients had large and eight patients small implant-related artifacts, 27 patients had dental implants/fillings, and 48 patients had implant-unrelated artifacts. The average score was 1.14 ± 0.82 for non-TOF PET images and 0.53 ± 0.66 for TOF images (p < 0.01) indicating that artifacts were less noticeable when TOF information was included. Our study indicates that PET image artifacts are significantly mitigated with integration of TOF information in simultaneous PET/MR. The impact is predominantly seen in patients with significant artifacts due to metal implants. (orig.)

  2. Oncological applications of 18F-FDG PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Lin

    2000-01-01

    Considering normal distribution of 18 F-FDG in human body, 18 F-FDG imaging using PET can be applied to brain tumors, colorectal cancer, lymphoma, melanoma, lung cancer and head and neck cancer. The author briefly focuses on application of 18 F-FDG PET imaging to breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, musculoskeletal neoplasms, endocrine neoplasms, genitourinary neoplasms, esophageal and gastric carcinomas

  3. PET application in psychiatry and psychopharmacology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suhara, Tetsuya [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    In the last few decades diagnostic and research tools in the medical field have made great advances, yet psychiatry has lacked sufficiently sensitive tools to measure the aberration of brain functions. Recently however, the development of Positron emission tomography (PET) techniques has made it possible to measure changes in neurochemical components in mental disorders and the effect of psychoactive drugs in living human brain. Most of the advancement in the psychiatric field has came from the development psychoactive drugs. Brain research involving identification of neurotransmission is largely based on compounds developed in psychopharmacology. Some of these compounds have been radiolabelled and used as radioligands for quantitative examination of neuroreceptors and other aspects of neurotransmission. Using PET, radioligand binding can now be examined in the human brain in vivo. PET techniques also allow examination of an unlabelled drug by examination of its interaction with a radioligand. So one potential of PET in psychiatry is to investigate the mechanism of psychoactive drugs. Antidepressants modulate serotonin transmission by inhibiting serotonin reuptake from the synaptic cleft. High affinity [{sup 3}H]imipramine binding sites in mammalian brain have been labelled to investigate serotonin transporters in living human brain by PET. Cyanoimipramine which is described as a potent serotonin reuptake inhibitor, was labelled with {sup 11}C. In a PET experiment with 6 healthy human subjects, a high accumulation of [{sup 11}C]cyanoimipramine was found in the thalamus and striatum and lowest accumulation was observed in the cerebellum, a region relatively void of serotonin transporters. The thalamus to cerebellum ratio was about 2 at 90 min after the injection of the tracer. Recently, [{sup 11}C]McN5652-X has been introduced as a better tracer for serotonin transporter imaging. Employing [{sup 11}C]McN5652-X in a PET study of 7 healthy human subjects, a high

  4. PET application in psychiatry and psychopharmacology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhara, Tetsuya

    1999-01-01

    In the last few decades diagnostic and research tools in the medical field have made great advances, yet psychiatry has lacked sufficiently sensitive tools to measure the aberration of brain functions. Recently however, the development of Positron emission tomography (PET) techniques has made it possible to measure changes in neurochemical components in mental disorders and the effect of psychoactive drugs in living human brain. Most of the advancement in the psychiatric field has came from the development psychoactive drugs. Brain research involving identification of neurotransmission is largely based on compounds developed in psychopharmacology. Some of these compounds have been radiolabelled and used as radioligands for quantitative examination of neuroreceptors and other aspects of neurotransmission. Using PET, radioligand binding can now be examined in the human brain in vivo. PET techniques also allow examination of an unlabelled drug by examination of its interaction with a radioligand. So one potential of PET in psychiatry is to investigate the mechanism of psychoactive drugs. Antidepressants modulate serotonin transmission by inhibiting serotonin reuptake from the synaptic cleft. High affinity [ 3 H]imipramine binding sites in mammalian brain have been labelled to investigate serotonin transporters in living human brain by PET. Cyanoimipramine which is described as a potent serotonin reuptake inhibitor, was labelled with 11 C. In a PET experiment with 6 healthy human subjects, a high accumulation of [ 11 C]cyanoimipramine was found in the thalamus and striatum and lowest accumulation was observed in the cerebellum, a region relatively void of serotonin transporters. The thalamus to cerebellum ratio was about 2 at 90 min after the injection of the tracer. Recently, [ 11 C]McN5652-X has been introduced as a better tracer for serotonin transporter imaging. Employing [ 11 C]McN5652-X in a PET study of 7 healthy human subjects, a high accumulation was observed

  5. FDG PET and CT in locally advanced adenocarcinomas of the distal oesophagus. Clinical relevance of a discordant PET finding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahl, A.; Wieder, H.; Schwaiger, M.; Weber, W.A.; Stollfuss, J.; Ott, K.; Fink, U.

    2005-01-01

    Aim: the incidence of adenocarcinomas of the distal oesophagus (ADE) has dramatically increased in Western countries. The clinical importance of a FDG PET finding discordant with CT was determined in patients with locally advanced ADE. In addition, tumour standardized uptake values (SUV) were correlated with patient survival. Patients, methods: 40 consecutive patients were analyzed retrospectively. All patients underwent an attenuation corrected FDG PET scan (neck, chest, abdomen) and contrast enhanced helical CT of the chest and abdomen. PET and CT scans were reviewed independently and concomitantly with respect to metastases in predefined lymph node sites and organs. Any discordance between PET and CT was assessed for clinical relevance. Clinical relevance was defined as a change in the overall therapeutic concept (curative vs. palliative). Follow-up imaging and histological evaluation served as the gold standard. Mean tumour SUVs were determined by 1.5 cm regions of interest placed over the tumour's maximum. Results: when read independently from the CT scan FDG PET indicated a clinically relevant change in tumour stage in 9/40 patients (23%) and a non-relevant change in 11/40 patients (28%). PET was correct in 5/9 patients (56%) with clinically relevant discordances. In 4/9 patients PET was incorrect (3 false positive due to suspicion of MI-lymph nodes or lung metastases, 1 false negative in disseminated liver metastases). With concomitant reading, PET indicated a clinically relevant change in tumour stage in 6/40 patients (15%) and a non-relevant change in 5/40 patients (13%). PET was correct in 5/6 patients (83%) with clinically relevant discordances. The patient with disseminated liver disease remained the single false negative. Overall, the benefit from PET was based on its higher diagnostic accuracy at organ sites. Tumour SUV did not correlate with patient survival. Conclusion: about half of discordances between FDG PET and CT are clinically relevant

  6. PET in neuro-oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelcke, U; Leenders, K.L.

    This article reviews possible clinical applications of positron emission tomography (PET) in brain tumor patients. PET allows quantitative assessment of brain tumor pathophysiology and biochemistry. It therefore provides different information about tumors when compared to histological or

  7. Clinical evaluation of the radiolanthanide terbium-152: first-in-human PET/CT with 152Tb-DOTATOC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Richard P; Singh, Aviral; Benešová, Martina; Vermeulen, Christiaan; Gnesin, Silvano; Köster, Ulli; Johnston, Karl; Müller, Dirk; Senftleben, Stefan; Kulkarni, Harshad R; Türler, Andreas; Schibli, Roger; Prior, John O; van der Meulen, Nicholas P; Müller, Cristina

    2017-10-31

    The existence of theragnostic pairs of radionuclides allows the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Radiolanthanides, such as 177 Lu, are successfully used for therapeutic purposes; however, a perfect diagnostic match is currently not available for clinical use. A unique, multi-disciplinary study was performed using 152 Tb (T 1/2 = 17.5 h, Eβ + average = 1140 keV, Iβ + = 20.3%), which resulted in the first-in-human PET/CT images with this promising radionuclide. For this purpose, 152 Tb was produced via a spallation process followed by mass separation at ISOLDE, CERN. The chemical separation and quality control, performed at PSI, resulted in a pure product in sufficient yields. Clinical PET phantom studies revealed an increased image noise level, because of the smaller β + branching ratio of 152 Tb as compared to standard PET nuclides at matched activity concentrations; however, the expected recovery would be comparable at matched signal-to-noise ratios in clinical PET. 152 Tb was used for labeling DOTATOC, at Zentralklinik Bad Berka, and administered to a patient for a first-in-human clinical study. PET scans were performed over a period of 24 h, allowing the visualization of even small metastases with increased tumor-to-background contrast over time. Based on the results obtained in this work, it can be deduced that PET/CT imaging with 152 Tb-labeled targeting agents has promise for clinical application and may be particularly interesting for pre-therapeutic dosimetry.

  8. 18F-FDG PET of the hands with a dedicated high-resolution PEM system (arthro-PET): correlation with PET/CT, radiography and clinical parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhlanga, Joyce C; Carrino, John A; Lodge, Martin; Wang, Hao; Wahl, Richard L

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively determine the feasibility and compare the novel use of a positron emission mammography (PEM) scanner with standard PET/CT for evaluating hand osteoarthritis (OA) with (18)F-FDG. Institutional review board approval and written informed consent were obtained for this HIPAA-compliant prospective study in which 14 adults referred for oncological (18)F-FDG PET/CT underwent dedicated hand PET/CT followed by arthro-PET using the PEM device. Hand radiographs were obtained and scored for the presence and severity of OA. Summed qualitative and quantitative joint glycolytic scores for each modality were compared with the findings on plain radiography and clinical features. Eight patients with clinical and/or radiographic evidence of OA comprised the OA group (mean age 73 ± 7.7 years). Six patients served as the control group (53.7 ± 9.3 years). Arthro-PET quantitative and qualitative joint glycolytic scores were highly correlated with PET/CT findings in the OA patients (r = 0.86. p = 0.007; r = 0.94, p = 0.001). Qualitative arthro-PET and PET/CT joint scores were significantly higher in the OA patients than in controls (38.7 ± 6.6 vs. 32.2 ± 0.4, p = 0.02; 37.5 ± 5.4 vs. 32.2 ± 0.4, p = 0.03, respectively). Quantitative arthro-PET and PET/CT maximum SUV-lean joint scores were higher in the OA patients, although they did not reach statistical significance (20.8 ± 4.2 vs. 18 ± 1.8, p = 0.13; 22.8 ± 5.38 vs. 20.1 ± 1.54, p = 0.21). By definition, OA patients had higher radiographic joint scores than controls (30.9 ± 31.3 vs. 0, p = 0.03). Hand imaging using a small field of view PEM system (arthro-PET) with FDG is feasible, performing comparably to PET/CT in assessing metabolic joint activity. Arthro-PET and PET/CT showed higher joint FDG uptake in OA. Further exploration of arthro-PET in arthritis management is warranted.

  9. 18F-FDG PET of the hands with a dedicated high-resolution PEM system (arthro-PET): correlation with PET/CT, radiography and clinical parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mhlanga, Joyce C.; Lodge, Martin; Carrino, John A.; Wang, Hao; Wahl, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively determine the feasibility and compare the novel use of a positron emission mammography (PEM) scanner with standard PET/CT for evaluating hand osteoarthritis (OA) with 18 F-FDG. Institutional review board approval and written informed consent were obtained for this HIPAA-compliant prospective study in which 14 adults referred for oncological 18 F-FDG PET/CT underwent dedicated hand PET/CT followed by arthro-PET using the PEM device. Hand radiographs were obtained and scored for the presence and severity of OA. Summed qualitative and quantitative joint glycolytic scores for each modality were compared with the findings on plain radiography and clinical features. Eight patients with clinical and/or radiographic evidence of OA comprised the OA group (mean age 73 ± 7.7 years). Six patients served as the control group (53.7 ± 9.3 years). Arthro-PET quantitative and qualitative joint glycolytic scores were highly correlated with PET/CT findings in the OA patients (r = 0.86. p = 0.007; r = 0.94, p = 0.001). Qualitative arthro-PET and PET/CT joint scores were significantly higher in the OA patients than in controls (38.7 ± 6.6 vs. 32.2 ± 0.4, p = 0.02; 37.5 ± 5.4 vs. 32.2 ± 0.4, p = 0.03, respectively). Quantitative arthro-PET and PET/CT maximum SUV-lean joint scores were higher in the OA patients, although they did not reach statistical significance (20.8 ± 4.2 vs. 18 ± 1.8, p = 0.13; 22.8 ± 5.38 vs. 20.1 ± 1.54, p= 0.21). By definition, OA patients had higher radiographic joint scores than controls (30.9 ± 31.3 vs. 0, p = 0.03). Hand imaging using a small field of view PEM system (arthro-PET) with FDG is feasible, performing comparably to PET/CT in assessing metabolic joint activity. Arthro-PET and PET/CT showed higher joint FDG uptake in OA. Further exploration of arthro-PET in arthritis management is warranted. (orig.)

  10. Image artifacts from MR-based attenuation correction in clinical, whole-body PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Sune H; Holm, Søren; Hansen, Adam E

    2013-01-01

    Integrated whole-body PET/MRI tomographs have become available. PET/MR imaging has the potential to supplement, or even replace combined PET/CT imaging in selected clinical indications. However, this is true only if methodological pitfalls and image artifacts arising from novel MR-based attenuation...

  11. The application of PET/CT in immunoglobulin G4-related disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Huiwei; Zhao Jun

    2013-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related disease is a kind of new systemic entity characterized by mass-forming lesions in various organs that consist of lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates and fibrosclerosis with numerous IgG4-positive plasma cells. PET/CT has been widely used in clinical as a whole body examination that earned plenty of successful experience, especially in multiple locations and organs cancer such as lymphoma. PET/CT also has a potential application in IgG4-related diseases as its feature of systemic. (authors)

  12. The Landscape of Clinical Trials Evaluating the Theranostic Role of PET Imaging in Oncology: Insights from an Analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Pei; Lv, Jia-Wei; Liu, Xu; Zhang, Yuan; Guo, Ying; Lin, Ai-Hua; Sun, Ying; Mao, Yan-Ping; Ma, Jun

    2017-01-01

    In the war on cancer marked by personalized medicine, positron emission tomography (PET)-based theranostic strategy is playing an increasingly important role. Well-designed clinical trials are of great significance for validating the PET applications and ensuring evidence-based cancer care. This study aimed to provide a comprehensive landscape of the characteristics of PET clinical trials using the substantial resource of ClinicalTrials.gov database. We identified 25,599 oncology trials registered with ClinicalTrials.gov in the last ten-year period (October 2005-September 2015). They were systematically reviewed to validate classification into 519 PET trials and 25,080 other oncology trials used for comparison. We found that PET trials were predominantly phase 1-2 studies (86.2%) and were more likely to be single-arm (78.9% vs. 57.9%, P oncology trials. Furthermore, PET trials were small in scale, generally enrolling fewer than 100 participants (20.3% vs. 25.7% for other oncology trials, P = 0.014), which might be too small to detect a significant theranostic effect. The funding support from industry or National Institutes of Health shrunk over time (both decreased by about 5%), and PET trials were more likely to be conducted in only one region lacking international collaboration (97.0% vs. 89.3% for other oncology trials, P oncology are not receiving the attention or efforts necessary to generate high-quality evidence. Advancing the clinical application of PET imaging will require a concerted effort to improve the quality of trials. PMID:28042342

  13. Application of raclopride PET in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Weihong

    2004-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a kind of degenerative disease afflicting middle-aged and older people, accompanied by abnormal D 2 receptor function resulted from dopamine deficiency. Raclopride is an ideal tracer because of its high selectivity and affinity to D 2 receptor. 11 C-raclopride PET can directly show the distribution and density of D 2 receptor on molecular level that it's of great importance in the analysis of the illness state and dopamine mechanism of sequential movement, movement-fluctuation complication, medicine and surgical therapy. (authors)

  14. The application of PET-CT in gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xian Weijun; Feng Yanlin

    2009-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a mesenchymal neoplasm of uncertain malignant potential that arises predominantly in the gastrointestinal tract. Due to lack of specific physical signs, imagin g-x examination is an important auxiliary means in diagnosing gastrointestinal stromal tumor. Compared to other conventional imaging examinations, PET-CT has demonstrated unique superiority in staging, response evaluation and follow-up of gastrointestinal stromal tumor. And now it presents an overview of the application valuation of PET-CT and related imaging technology in gastrointestinal stromal tumor as follow. (authors)

  15. High-resolution dynamic imaging and quantitative analysis of lung cancer xenografts in nude mice using clinical PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying Yi; Wang, Kai; Xu, Zuo Yu; Song, Yan; Wang, Chu Nan; Zhang, Chong Qing; Sun, Xi Lin; Shen, Bao Zhong

    2017-08-08

    Considering the general application of dedicated small-animal positron emission tomography/computed tomography is limited, an acceptable alternative in many situations might be clinical PET/CT. To estimate the feasibility of using clinical PET/CT with [F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose for high-resolution dynamic imaging and quantitative analysis of cancer xenografts in nude mice. Dynamic clinical PET/CT scans were performed on xenografts for 60 min after injection with [F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Scans were reconstructed with or without SharpIR method in two phases. And mice were sacrificed to extracting major organs and tumors, using ex vivo γ-counting as a reference. Strikingly, we observed that the image quality and the correlation between the all quantitive data from clinical PET/CT and the ex vivo counting was better with the SharpIR reconstructions than without. Our data demonstrate that clinical PET/CT scanner with SharpIR reconstruction is a valuable tool for imaging small animals in preclinical cancer research, offering dynamic imaging parameters, good image quality and accurate data quatification.

  16. Fluorinated tropinyl esters for application with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emran, A.M.; Cherif, A.; Yang, D.J.; Flynn, D.D.

    1993-01-01

    Regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (MAR) number and function occurs with various exogenous chemicals and pathological conditions. Use of positron emission tomography (PET) has potential in investigating MAR in living humans. This requires synthesis of appropriate radiolabelled tracers with high affinity and high specific activity. Several analogs of atropine and tropacocaine, including fluorinated derivatives, were synthesized and evaluated for their MAR binding affinity. Specific structural alterations correlated with changes in receptor affinity. Substitution was directed primarily on aromatic rings of the acid moieties. In vitro binding assays demonstrated that molecular substitution on some of the compounds retained significant affinity for MAR. Changing the acid moiety on these molecules resulted in a change in MAR affinity. Substitution o the aromatic ring of the acid moiety was also associated with change in receptor affinity. Preliminary radiofluorination has been successful. These compounds provide new tools to study MAR dynamics in the living human brain

  17. DosedPet application for Nuclear Medicine: Calculation of the volume of medication needed for PET/CT patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Pedro Augusto do; Rodrigues, Araken dos S. Werneck

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the application (APP) DosePet that calculates the amount of medicament for PET / CT in patients according to the predetermined radiation dose. The software has been designed using the web MIT App Inventor2 tool for Android platform. The application allows the workers to simulate the amount of radiation still existing in the facilities after the applications, increasing security and reducing exposures, and enable greater efficiency in the use of the radiopharmaceutical. (author)

  18. The clinical impact of PET scanning in patients with melanoma: A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalff, V.; Hicks, R.J.; Binns, D.S.; Henderson, M.A.; Ainslie, J.; Jenner, D.A.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Small series have shown that PET scanning using F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), can quite accurately stage patients melanoma. At this Institute these patients are only sent for PET imaging if they have high risk melanomas ( >3 Clarke's grade primaries) or there remains any significant doubt as to their clinical staging or management after the completion of conventional screening. This prospective study examines how PET scan findings influenced the clinical management decisions in 53 patients (29 males, mean age 54±13 yrs: range 31-81 yrs) Referring doctors were asked to indicate reason for the PET scan, stage their patients on the basis of all their current investigations, and to indicate their management plans prior to PET scanning. Follow-up of subsequent patient management at 2-4 weeks post PET scan was then obtained and compared to pre PET plans. PET was used to stage 26 patients, restage 17, follow-up 5, assess recurrence in 3, and other in 2 patients. To date follow-up has shown that in 32/49 (65%) patients PET was used to triage patients to locoregional surgery (10 patients), radical radiotherapy (5 patients), or to continuing follow-up only (17 patients). Three further high risk patients with negative PET scans had sentinel mode biopsy. In only 13 patients was management already determined, with planned treatment being changed in 6. Four patients have not had their post PET scan review yet. To date proven false negative PET scans have occurred in 3 cases, 2 sentinel node biopsies showed microscopic disease, and one scan incorrectly labelled gall-bladder melanoma as hydro-nephrotic kidney. Interestingly in 3 cases, PET discovered other unsuspected tumours (rectum x 2, plasmacytoma). PET scanning has been incorporated into routine management to triage most high risk patients, but it still alters interventions in half of those patients where management has already been planned. PET clearly misses small volume disease, the importance of which is

  19. PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariager, Rasmus Mølgaard; Schmidt, Regin; Heiberg, Morten Rievers

    PET handler om den hemmelige tjenestes arbejde under den kolde krig 1945-1989. Her fortæller Regin Schmidt, Rasmus Mariager og Morten Heiberg om de mest dramatiske og interessante sager fra PET's arkiv. PET er på flere måder en udemokratisk institution, der er sat til at vogte over demokratiet....... Dens virksomhed er skjult for offentligheden, den overvåger borgernes aktiviteter, og den registrerer følsomme personoplysninger. Historien om PET rejser spørgsmålet om, hvad man skal gøre, når befolkningen i et demokrati er kritisk indstillet over for overvågningen af lovlige politiske aktiviteter......, mens myndighederne mener, at det er nødvendigt for at beskytte demokratiet. PET er på en gang en fortælling om konkrete aktioner og begivenheder i PET's arbejde og et stykke Danmarkshistorie. Det handler om overvågning, spioner, politisk ekstremisme og international terrorisme.  ...

  20. Recent Advances in the Development and Application of Radiolabeled Kinase Inhibitors for PET Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim Bernard-Gauthier

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 20 years, intensive investigation and multiple clinical successes targeting protein kinases, mostly for cancer treatment, have identified small molecule kinase inhibitors as a prominent therapeutic class. In the course of those investigations, radiolabeled kinase inhibitors for positron emission tomography (PET imaging have been synthesized and evaluated as diagnostic imaging probes for cancer characterization. Given that inhibitor coverage of the kinome is continuously expanding, in vivo PET imaging will likely find increasing applications for therapy monitoring and receptor density studies both in- and outside of oncological conditions. Early investigated radiolabeled inhibitors, which are mostly based on clinically approved tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI isotopologues, have now entered clinical trials. Novel radioligands for cancer and PET neuroimaging originating from novel but relevant target kinases are currently being explored in preclinical studies. This article reviews the literature involving radiotracer design, radiochemistry approaches, biological tracer evaluation and nuclear imaging results of radiolabeled kinase inhibitors for PET reported between 2010 and mid-2015. Aspects regarding the usefulness of pursuing selective vs. promiscuous inhibitor scaffolds and the inherent challenges associated with intracellular enzyme imaging will be discussed.

  1. Gamma camera based FDG PET in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, C. H.

    2002-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography(PET) was introduced as a research tool in the 1970s and it took about 20 years before PET became an useful clinical imaging modality. In the USA, insurance coverage for PET procedures in the 1990s was the turning point, I believe, for this progress. Initially PET was used in neurology but recently more than 80% of PET procedures are in oncological applications. I firmly believe, in the 21st century, one can not manage cancer patients properly without PET and PET is very important medical imaging modality in basic and clinical sciences. PET is grouped into 2 categories; conventional (c) and gamma camera based ( CB ) PET. CB PET is more readily available utilizing dual-head gamma cameras and commercially available FDG to many medical centers at low cost to patients. In fact there are more CB PET in operation than cPET in the USA. CB PET is inferior to cPET in its performance but clinical studies in oncology is feasible without expensive infrastructures such as staffing, rooms and equipments. At Ajou university Hospital, CBPET was installed in late 1997 for the first time in Korea as well as in Asia and the system has been used successfully and effectively in oncological applications. Our was the fourth PET operation in Korea and I believe this may have been instrumental for other institutions got interested in clinical PET. The following is a brief description of our clinical experience of FDG CBPET in oncology

  2. Value of integrated PET/CT in clinical staging of patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jun; Guan Yihui; Zuo Chuantao; Hua Fengchun; Lin Xiangtong

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the value of combined fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) in patients with lung cancer, and to compare the results of PET/CT with those of FDG PET and CT alone. Methods: Forty-two patients were studied in this group. 3D whole body images were acquired using Siemens Biograph Sensetionl6 PET/CT scanner. Attenuation corrected PET images, CT and fusion images were interpreted. Reports were compared for each patient including identified the number of lesions, their anatomical localization and certainty of diagnosis. Results: PET/CT increased the number of lesions reported as being definitely abnormal or normal (+22%). In 12 patients (28.6%), the PET/CT report positively impacted surgical management when compared to the PET report alone. 6 patients were correctly downstaged negating further treatment or imaging, 3 patient was upstaged to inoperable and in another 3 ones improved localization by PET/CT led to an altered surgical incision with decreased morbidity. Lesion-based evaluation showed sensitivity for regional lymph node involvement of 61% for CT alone, 88% for FDG PET alone, and 96% for integrated PET/CT imaging respectively. In addition, PET/CT could identify some benign disease, including lung tuberculosis, cyst of liver and kidney, calculus etc. Conclusion: PET/CT improves anatomical localization and increases the certainty in reporting abnormal and normal lesions. PET/CT imaging is superior to CT alone and has additional benefit over FDG PET alone, and is accurate in clinical staging for lung cancer. (authors)

  3. Clinical utility of FDG-PET for the clinical diagnosis in MCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbizu, Javier; Festari, Cristina; Altomare, Daniele; Walker, Zuzana; Bouwman, Femke; Rivolta, Jasmine; Orini, Stefania; Barthel, Henryk; Agosta, Federica; Drzezga, Alexander; Nestor, Peter; Boccardi, Marina; Frisoni, Giovanni Battista; Nobili, Flavio

    2018-04-27

    We aim to report the quality of accuracy studies investigating the utility of [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET in supporting the diagnosis of prodromal Alzheimer's Disease (AD), frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and prodromal dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects, and the corresponding recommendations made by a panel of experts. Seven panellist, four from the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, and three from the European Academy of Neurology, produced recommendations taking into consideration the incremental value of FDG-PET, as added on clinical-neuropsychological examination, to ascertain the aetiology of MCI (AD, FTLD or DLB). A literature search using harmonized population, intervention, comparison, and outcome (PICO) strings was performed, and an evidence assessment consistent with the European Federation of Neurological Societies guidance was provided. The consensual recommendation was achieved based on Delphi rounds. Fifty-four papers reported the comparison of interest. The selected papers allowed the identification of FDG patterns that characterized MCI due to AD, FTLD and DLB. While clinical outcome studies supporting the diagnosis of MCI due to AD showed varying accuracies (ranging from 58 to 100%) and varying areas under the receiver-operator characteristic curves (0.66 to 0.97), no respective data were identified for MCI due to FTLD or for MCI due to DLB. However, the high negative predictive value of FDG-PET and the existence of different disease-specific patterns of hypometabolism support the consensus recommendations for the clinical use of this imaging technique in MCI subjects. FDG-PET has clinical utility on a fair level of evidence in detecting MCI due to AD. Although promising also in detecting MCI due to FTLD and MCI due to DLB, more research is needed to ultimately judge the clinical utility of FDG-PET in these entities.

  4. Initial evaluation of a practical PET respiratory motion correction method in clinical simultaneous PET/MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manber, Richard; Thielemans, Kris; Hutton, Brian; Barnes, Anna; Ourselin, Sebastien; Arridge, Simon; O’Meara, Celia; Atkinson, David

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory motion during PET acquisitions can cause image artefacts, with sharpness and tracer quantification adversely affected due to count ‘smearing’. Motion correction by registration of PET gates becomes increasingly difficult with shorter scan times and less counts. The advent of simultaneous PET/MRI scanners allows the use of high spatial resolution MRI to capture motion states during respiration [1, 2]. In this work, we use a respiratory signal derived from the PET list-mode data [3, ], with no requirement for an external device or MR sequence modifications.

  5. Focuss algorithm application in kinetic compartment modeling for PET tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xinrui; Bao Shanglian

    2004-01-01

    Molecular imaging is in the process of becoming. Its application mostly depends on the molecular discovery process of imaging probes and drugs, from the mouse to the patient, from research to clinical practice. Positron emission tomography (PET) can non-invasively monitor . pharmacokinetic and functional processes of drugs in intact organisms at tracer concentrations by kinetic modeling. It has been known that for all biological systems, linear or nonlinear, if the system is injected by a tracer in a steady state, the distribution of the tracer follows the kinetics of a linear compartmental system, which has sums of exponential solutions. Based on the general compartmental description of the tracer's fate in vivo, we presented a novel kinetic modeling approach for the quantification of in vivo tracer studies with dynamic positron emission tomography (PET), which can determine a parsimonious model consisting with the measured data. This kinetic modeling technique allows for estimation of parametric images from a voxel based analysis and requires no a priori decision about the tracer's fate in vivo, instead determining the most appropriate model from the information contained within the kinetic data. Choosing a set of exponential functions, convolved with the plasma input function, as basis functions, the time activity curve of a region or a pixel can be written as a linear combination of the basis functions with corresponding coefficients. The number of non-zero coefficients returned corresponds to the model order which is related to the number of tissue compartments. The system macro parameters are simply determined using the focal underdetermined system solver (FOCUSS) algorithm. The FOCUSS algorithm is a nonparametric algorithm for finding localized energy solutions from limited data and is a recursive linear estimation procedure. FOCUSS algorithm usually converges very fast, so demands a few iterations. The effectiveness is verified by simulation and clinical

  6. The application of PET/MRI in pancreatic neoplasms%PET/MRI在胰腺肿瘤中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李旭东; 林晓珠

    2018-01-01

    PET/MRI是一种将PET和MRI融合的新型影像诊断技术,其整合了PET提供的人体生理代谢、分子信息和MRI提供的功能及解剖形态信息.相较于CT,MRI具有更高的软组织对比度,可多参数成像,且无辐射.PET/MRI在胰腺癌病灶检测、 术前分期和预后评估方面优于PET/CT.68Ga标记的生长抑素受体显像剂PET/MRI能够提高胰腺神经内分泌肿瘤的检测和诊断能力.新型显像剂的研发和应用能够提高胰腺肿瘤PET/MRI的特异性和精准性.就PET/MRI在胰腺癌的诊断、分期及疗效监测的应用价值及其对胰腺神经内分泌肿瘤的研究进展予以综述.%PET/MRI is a new medical imaging technology that can obtain hybrid images of PET and MRI simultane-ously,which integrates human physiological metabolism and molecular information from PET with functional and anatomical information from MRI.MRI has many advantages compared with computed tomography (CT),such as better soft tissue contrast, multiple parameters and no radiation.Researches showed that PET/MRI is superior to PET/CT in the detection, preoperative staging and prognosis of pancreatic cancers. PET/MRI using Somatostatin(SST) receptor with 68-Gallium (68Ga)-labeled can enhance the detection and diagnosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. The application of newly developed contrast media can improve specificity and accuracy of PET/MRI in diagnosing pancreatic tumors.In this paper, the values of PET/MRI in di-agnosis, staging and evaluating therapeutic effect in pancreatic cancer and progress of PET/MRI researches in pancreatic neu-roendocrine tumors were reviewed.

  7. 4D offline PET-based treatment verification in ion beam therapy. Experimental and clinical evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurz, Christopher

    2014-06-12

    Due to the accessible sharp dose gradients, external beam radiotherapy with protons and heavier ions enables a highly conformal adaptation of the delivered dose to arbitrarily shaped tumour volumes. However, this high conformity is accompanied by an increased sensitivity to potential uncertainties, e.g., due to changes in the patient anatomy. Additional challenges are imposed by respiratory motion which does not only lead to rapid changes of the patient anatomy, but, in the cased of actively scanned ions beams, also to the formation of dose inhomogeneities. Therefore, it is highly desirable to verify the actual application of the treatment and to detect possible deviations with respect to the planned irradiation. At present, the only clinically implemented approach for a close-in-time verification of single treatment fractions is based on detecting the distribution of β{sup +}-emitter formed in nuclear fragmentation reactions during the irradiation by means of positron emission tomography (PET). For this purpose, a commercial PET/CT (computed tomography) scanner has been installed directly next to the treatment rooms at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT). Up to present, the application of this treatment verification technique is, however, still limited to static target volumes. This thesis aimed at investigating the feasibility and performance of PET-based treatment verification under consideration of organ motion. In experimental irradiation studies with moving phantoms, not only the practicability of PET-based treatment monitoring for moving targets, using a commercial PET/CT device, could be shown for the first time, but also the potential of this technique to detect motion-related deviations from the planned treatment with sub-millimetre accuracy. The first application to four exemplary hepato-cellular carcinoma patient cases under substantially more challenging clinical conditions indicated potential for improvement by taking organ motion into

  8. 4D offline PET-based treatment verification in ion beam therapy. Experimental and clinical evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurz, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Due to the accessible sharp dose gradients, external beam radiotherapy with protons and heavier ions enables a highly conformal adaptation of the delivered dose to arbitrarily shaped tumour volumes. However, this high conformity is accompanied by an increased sensitivity to potential uncertainties, e.g., due to changes in the patient anatomy. Additional challenges are imposed by respiratory motion which does not only lead to rapid changes of the patient anatomy, but, in the cased of actively scanned ions beams, also to the formation of dose inhomogeneities. Therefore, it is highly desirable to verify the actual application of the treatment and to detect possible deviations with respect to the planned irradiation. At present, the only clinically implemented approach for a close-in-time verification of single treatment fractions is based on detecting the distribution of β + -emitter formed in nuclear fragmentation reactions during the irradiation by means of positron emission tomography (PET). For this purpose, a commercial PET/CT (computed tomography) scanner has been installed directly next to the treatment rooms at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT). Up to present, the application of this treatment verification technique is, however, still limited to static target volumes. This thesis aimed at investigating the feasibility and performance of PET-based treatment verification under consideration of organ motion. In experimental irradiation studies with moving phantoms, not only the practicability of PET-based treatment monitoring for moving targets, using a commercial PET/CT device, could be shown for the first time, but also the potential of this technique to detect motion-related deviations from the planned treatment with sub-millimetre accuracy. The first application to four exemplary hepato-cellular carcinoma patient cases under substantially more challenging clinical conditions indicated potential for improvement by taking organ motion into

  9. Accuracy of a clinical PET/CT vs. a preclinical μPET system for monitoring treatment effects in tumour xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmowski, Karin [Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Department of Pneumology and Critical Care Medicine, Thoraxklinik Heidelberg, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Winz, Oliver [Department of Nuclear Medicine, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Rix, Anne; Bzyl, Jessica [Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Behrendt, Florian F.; Verburg, Frederic A.; Mottaghy, Felix M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Palmowski, Moritz, E-mail: mpalmowski@ukaachen.de [Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Department of Nuclear Medicine, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Academic Radiology Baden Baden, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Small animal imaging is of growing importance for preclinical research and drug development. Tumour xenografts implanted in mice can be visualized with a clinical PET/CT (cPET); however, it is unclear whether early treatment effects can be monitored. Thus, we investigated the accuracy of a cPET versus a preclinical μPET using {sup 18}F-FDG for assessing early treatment effects. Materials and methods: The spatial resolution and the quantitative accuracy of a clinical and preclinical PET were evaluated in phantom experiments. To investigate the sensitivity for assessing treatment response, A431 tumour xenografts were implanted in nude mice. Glucose metabolism was measured in untreated controls and in two therapy groups (either one or four days of antiangiogenic treatment). Data was validated by γ-counting of explanted tissues. Results: In phantom experiments, cPET enabled reliable separation of boreholes ≥ 5 mm whereas μPET visualized boreholes ≥ 2 mm. In animal studies, μPET provided significantly higher tumour-to-muscle ratios for untreated control tumours than cPET (3.41 ± 0.87 vs. 1.60 ± .0.28, respectively; p < 0.01). During treatment, cPET detected significant therapy effects at day 4 (p < 0.05) whereas μPET revealed highly significant therapy effects even at day one (p < 0.01). Correspondingly, γ-counting of explanted tumours indicated significant therapy effects at day one and highly significant treatment response at day 4. Correlation with γ-counting was good for cPET (r = 0.74; p < 0.01) and excellent for μPET (r = 0.85; p < 0.01). Conclusion: Clinical PET is suited to investigate tumour xenografts ≥ 5 mm at an advanced time-point of treatment. For imaging smaller tumours or for the sensitive assessment of very early therapy effects, μPET should be preferred.

  10. AUTOMATION FOR THE SYNTHESIS AND APPLICATION OF PET RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexoff, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    The development of automated systems supporting the production and application of PET radiopharmaceuticals has been an important focus of researchers since the first successes of using carbon-11 (Comar et al., 1979) and fluorine-18 (Reivich et al., 1979) labeled compounds to visualize functional activity of the human brain. These initial successes of imaging the human brain soon led to applications in the human heart (Schelbert et al., 1980), and quickly radiochemists began to see the importance of automation to support PET studies in humans (Lambrecht, 1982; Langstrom et al., 1983). Driven by the necessity of controlling processes emanating high fluxes of 511 KeV photons, and by the tedium of repetitive syntheses for carrying out these human PET investigations, academic and government scientists have designed, developed and tested many useful and novel automated systems in the past twenty years. These systems, originally designed primarily by radiochemists, not only carry out effectively the tasks they were designed for, but also demonstrate significant engineering innovation in the field of laboratory automation

  11. FDG PET/CT findings in a clinically diagnosed case of childhood autism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manglunia, Ashmi S.; Puranik, Ameya D.

    2016-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder with multifactorial etiology and varied presentation, in which early diagnosis is crucial to the implementation of early treatment. A 6-year-old child clinically diagnosed with autism, and a normal magnetic resonance imaging underwent dedicated 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose brain positron emission tomography (PET) as an ancillary investigation. PET image showed diffuse bilateral temporal hypometabolism. Although PET imaging is currently not indicated in the evaluation of autism, characteristic imaging patterns on PET can provide corroborative information and increase the diagnostic confidence for the same

  12. Is FDG-PET a useful tool in clinical practice for diagnosing corticobasal ganglionic degeneration?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coulier, IMF; de Vries, JJ; Leenders, KL

    2003-01-01

    Seven consecutive patients were suspected to suffer from corticobasal ganglionic degeneration (CBGD) and were studied with F-[18]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET imaging of the brain. At the time of their FDG-PET scan, 4 of 7 patients fulfilled the clinical criteria of CBGD as proposed by Lang and

  13. Generalized whole-body Patlak parametric imaging for enhanced quantification in clinical PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Zhou, Yun; Lodge, Martin A.; Casey, Michael E.; Wahl, Richard L.; Zaidi, Habib; Rahmim, Arman

    2015-01-01

    We recently developed a dynamic multi-bed PET data acquisition framework to translate the quantitative benefits of Patlak voxel-wise analysis to the domain of routine clinical whole-body (WB) imaging. The standard Patlak (sPatlak) linear graphical analysis assumes irreversible PET tracer uptake,

  14. Improved clinical staging of esophageal cancer with FDG-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Hwan; Choi, Joon Young; Lee, Kyung Soo; Choi, Yong Soo; Lee, Eun Jeong; Chung, Hyun Woo; Lee, Su Jin; Lee, Kyung Han; Shim, Young Mog; Kim, Byung Tae

    2004-01-01

    Since preoperative staging in esophageal cancer is important in both therapy and prognosis, there had been many efforts to improve its accuracy. Recent studies indicate that whole body FDG-PET has high sensitivity in detection of metastasis in esophageal cancer. Therefore, we added FDG-PET to other conventional methods in staging esophageal cancer to evaluate the usefulness of this method. Subjects were 142 esophageal cancer patients (average 62.3±8.3 yrs) who received CT and PET just before operation. First, we compared N stage and M stage of the CT or PET with those of the post-operative results. Then we compared the stage according to the EUS (T stage) and CT (N and M stage) or EUS (T stage) and CT and PET (N and M stage) to that according to the post-operative results. Among 142 patients, surgical staging of 69 were N0 and 73 were N1. In M staging, 128 were M0 and 14 were M1. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of N staging were 35.6%, 89.9%, 62.0% with CT and 58.9%, 71.0%, 64.7% with PET, respectively. In M staging, 14.3%, 96.9%, 88.7% with CT and 50.0%, 94.5%, 90.1% with PET, respectively. The concordances of [EUS+CT] and [EUS+CT+PET] with post-operative results were 41.2% and 54.6%, respectively and there was significant improvement of staging with additional PET scan (p<0.005). The concordance of [EUS+CT+PET] with post-operative result was significantly increased compared to that of [EUS+CT]. Thus, the addition of FDG-PET with other conventional methods may enable more accurate preoperative staging

  15. The application of PET and PET-CT in cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Jianmin; Pan Liping; Li Dongxue

    2007-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the common malignancies in woman, 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) PET is a well-established method for detecting, staging, cancer recurrence, therapeutic response and prognosis of cervical cancer. PET-CT can accurately locate the anatomical sites of tracer uptake and improve the diagnostic accuraccy of PET. (authors)

  16. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technology in the application of PET/CT whole body scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xin Jun; Zhao Zhoushe; Li Hong; Lu Zhe; Wu Wenkai; Guo Qiyong

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To improve image quality of low dose CT in whole body PET/CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) technology. Methods: Twice CT scans were performed with GE water model,scan parameters were: 120 kV, 120 and 300 mA respectively. In addition, 30 subjects treated with PET/CT were selected randomly, whole body PET/CT were performed after 18 F-FDG injection of 3.70 MBq/kg, Sharp IR+time of flight + VUE Point HD technology were used for 1.5 min/bed in PET; CT of spiral scan was performed under 120 kV using automatic exposure control technology (30-210 mA, noise index 25). Model and patients whole body CT images were reconstructed with conventional and 40% ASiR methods respectively, and the CT attenuation value and noise index were measured. Results: Research of model and clinical showed that standard deviation of ASiR method in model CT was 33.0% lower than the conventional CT reconstruction method (t =27.76, P<0.01), standard deviation of CT in normal tissues (brain, lung, mediastinum, liver and vertebral body) and lesions (brain, lung, mediastinum, liver and vertebral body) reduced by 21.08% (t =23.35, P<0.01) and 24.43% (t =16.15, P<0.01) respectively, especially for normal liver tissue and liver lesions, standard deviations of CT were reduced by 51.33% (t=34.21, P<0.0) and 49.54% (t=15.21, P<0.01) respectively. Conclusion: ASiR reconstruction method was significantly reduced the noise of low dose CT image and improved the quality of CT image in whole body PET/CT, which seems more suitable for quantitative analysis and clinical applications. (authors)

  17. Clinical and survival impact of FDG PET in patients with suspicion of recurrent cervical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pallardy, Amandine; Testard, Aude; Resche, Isabelle; Bridji, Boumediene; Bodet-Milin, Caroline; Oudoux, Aurore; Ansquer, Catherine; Campion, Loic; Bourbouloux, Emmanuelle; Sagan, Christine; Kraeber-Bodere, Francoise; Rousseau, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the contribution of 18 F-FDG PET to the clinical management and survival outcome of patients suspected of recurrent cervical carcinoma and in line with the hypothesis that early diagnosis of recurrent cervical cancer may improve overall survival. A total of 40 patients underwent conventional imaging (CI) and FDG PET/CT for suspected cervical cancer. Clinical management decisions were recorded with CI and additional PET/CT. Discordances and concordances between CI and PET/CT results were compared to the final diagnosis as based on histopathology analysis or follow-up considered as the gold standard. The final diagnosis was established pathologically (n=25) or by median clinical follow-up for 48 months after the PET (n=15). The PET/CT was positive in 76% (20/26) of patients compared to 19% (6/26) with CI. Globally PET/CT modified the treatment plan in 55% (22/40) of patients and in 75% (18/24) when the CI was negative prior to PET/CT. These changes led to the use of previously unplanned therapeutic procedures in 37.5% (15/40). When FDG PET was positive for recurrence (>3 foci), the median overall survival was 12 months (2-70) compared to patients with PET findings with ≤1 focus for which the median survival was not attained (p=0.007). A multivariate analysis of prognostic factors demonstrated that abnormal FDG uptake (>3 foci) was the most significant factor (p<0.03) for death from cervical cancer. FDG PET is a valuable tool in the case of suspected recurrence of cervical cancer on account of its impact on treatment planning and especially in predicting patient outcome. (orig.)

  18. Performance of FDG PET/CT in the clinical management of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groheux, David; Espié, Marc; Giacchetti, Sylvie; Hindié, Elif

    2013-02-01

    In this analysis, the role of metabolic imaging with fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in breast cancer is reviewed. The analysis was limited to recent works by using state-of-the-art positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) technology. The strengths and limitations of FDG PET/CT are examined in various clinical settings, and the following questions are answered: Is FDG PET/CT useful to differentiate malignant from benign breast lesions? Can FDG PET/CT replace sentinel node biopsy for axillary staging? What is the role of FDG PET/CT in initial staging of inflammatory or locally advanced breast cancer? What is the role of FDG PET/CT in initial staging of clinical stage IIA and IIB and primary operable stage IIIA breast cancer? How does FDG PET/CT compare with conventional techniques in the restaging of cancer in patients who are suspected of having disease recurrence? What is the role of FDG PET/CT in the assessment of early response to neoadjuvant therapy and of response to therapy for metastatic disease? Some recommendations for clinical practice are given.

  19. The clinical impact of [18F]-FDG Pet during the opening year of a Pet centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talbot Jean-Noël

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We have evaluated the clinical impact of FDG-PET on patient staging and management during the opening year of our PET centre in France. A questionnaire, translation in French of the questionnaire used recently in California, was sent to the referring physician of each of the 476 patients who had at least one routine FDG-PET examination during the year 2000. Of 348 responses (response rate = 73%, the disease was upstaged in 26% of the cases and downstaged in 9%. Inter-modality management changes (change from a scheduled therapeutic modality for a different one were reported in 37% of the cases and intra-modality changes in 9%. Those modification rates were respectively 38% and 7% in recurrence of colorectal cancer (153 patients, 47% and 7% in lung cancer (118 patients, 16% and 23% in lymphoma (43 patients, 25% and 6% in the staging of head and neck cancers (32 patients.When comparing with the similar studies performed in California, there were no significant differences between the rates of inter-modality management changes. In contrast, intra-modality management changes were less frequent in our survey, except for lymphoma. Globally, the clinical impact of FDG PET was similar, with a higher response rate to our survey (73% versus 35%; it was above the mean 31% rate of therapeutic modification derived from a recent tabulated summary in over 3400 patients.

  20. DosedPet application for Nuclear Medicine: Calculation of the volume of medication needed for PET/CT patient; Aplicativo DosedPet para uso em Medicina Nuclear: calculo do volume de medicamento necessario para paciente de PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Pedro Augusto do; Rodrigues, Araken dos S. Werneck, E-mail: pedroan88@gmail.com [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil). Programa de Pos Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnologias em Saude

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the application (APP) DosePet that calculates the amount of medicament for PET / CT in patients according to the predetermined radiation dose. The software has been designed using the web MIT App Inventor2 tool for Android platform. The application allows the workers to simulate the amount of radiation still existing in the facilities after the applications, increasing security and reducing exposures, and enable greater efficiency in the use of the radiopharmaceutical. (author)

  1. The application of 18F-FDG PET/CT for exploring the metastatic carcinoma of spleen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Dangfan; Guan Yihui; Zhao Jun; Zuo Chuantao; Lin Xiangtong; Dai Jiazhong

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT for diagnosing the metastatic carcinoma of spleen. Methods: Retrospectively reviewed all the 8 cases with splenic metastases diagnosed by PET/CT, and compared the diagnostic result of PET/CT with that of CT alone, that of PET alone, that of B-ultrasonic scan and that of clinical information, all the diagnoses were refered to the confirmation by the clinical findings during follow-up. Results: All the 8 cases of splenic metastases diagnosed by PET/CT were proved by follow-up. PET revealed 6, CT revealed 4 and B-ultrasonic scan only 1. PET/CT did not miss either of the 2 splenic metastases had been diagnosed before PET/CT. Conclusions: PET/CT determined the location of the splenic metastases better than CT alone or PET alone did. PET/CT could increase the detection rate of splenic metastases. (authors)

  2. A prospective study of the clinical impact of PET scanning in lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, R.J.; Kalff, V.; Binns, D.S.; McManus, M.; Millward, M.; Ball, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: PET scanning using F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), has been shown to very accurately stage patients with non-small cell lung cancer. At this Institute these patients are only sent for PET imaging where there remains any significant doubt as to their clinical staging or management after the completion of conventional screening test including CT scanning. This study examines how PET scan findings influenced the clinical management decisions in 45 consecutive patients (26 males, mean age 69±9 yrs: range 36-78 yrs). Referring doctors were asked to indicate reason for the PET scan, stage their patients on the basis of aU their current investigations, including CT scans, and to indicate their management plans prior to PET scanning. Follow-up of subsequent patient management at 2-4 weeks post PET scan was then obtained and compared to pre scan plans. Results:, PET was used to stage 27 patients, restage 8, plan radiotherapy in 4, post treatment follow-up in 3, assess solitary nodules in 2, and as a baseline for experimental therapy in 1. To date follow-up has shown that in 14 (31%) patients PET scanning found new distant abnormalities which caused planned radical surgery or radiotherapy to be changed to palliative treatment only. Following PET findings, which clarified equivocal findings on other imaging modalities 9 patients underwent curative lung surgery. This found localised disease only in the 5 who have had surgery to this time. Similarly 7 patients continued on to have radical radiotherapy. In 3 patients, original treatment protocols changed (smaller radiation portal, surgery after good response to radiotherapy, planned chemotherapy ceased). In 8(18%) patients PET scans did not alter planned therapy. 1 patient awaits follow-up. Conclusions: In carefully selected patients with lung cancer, PET scanning significantly affected management decisions in 82%. It was used not only to spare unnecessary treatment, but also to target treatment appropriate to

  3. Dual-gated cardiac PET-clinical feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teraes, Mika; Kokki, Tommi; Noponen, Tommi; Hoppela, Erika; Sipilae, Hannu T.; Knuuti, Juhani [Turku PET Centre, PO BOX 52, Turku (Finland); Durand-Schaefer, Nicolas [General Electric Medical Systems, Buc (France); Pietilae, Mikko [Turku University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Turku (Finland); Kiss, Jan [Turku University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Turku (Finland)

    2010-03-15

    Both respiratory and cardiac motions reduce image quality in myocardial imaging. For accurate imaging of small structures such as vulnerable coronary plaques, simultaneous cardiac and respiratory gating is warranted. This study tests the feasibility of a recently developed robust method for cardiac-respiratory gating. List-mode data with triggers from respiratory and cardiac cycles are rearranged into dual-gated segments and reconstructed with standard algorithms of a commercial PET/CT scanner. Cardiac gates were defined as three fixed phases and one variable diastolic phase. Chest motion was measured with a respiratory gating device and post-processed to determine gates. Preservation of quantification in dual-gated images was tested with an IEC whole-body phantom. Minipig and human studies were performed to evaluate the feasibility of the method. In minipig studies, a coronary catheter with radioactive tip was guided in coronary artery for in vivo and ex vivo acquisitions. Dual gating in humans with suspected cardiac disorders was performed using 18-F-FDG as a tracer. The method was found feasible for in vivo imaging and the radioactive catheter tip was better resolved in gated images. In human studies, the dual gating was found feasible and easy for clinical routine. Maximal movement of myocardial surface in cranio-caudal direction was over 20 mm. The shape of myocardium was clearly different between the gates and papillary muscles become more visible in diastolic images. The first clinical experiences using robust cardiac-respiratory dual gating are encouraging. Further testing in larger clinical populations using tracers designed especially for plaque imaging is warranted. (orig.)

  4. Dual-gated cardiac PET-clinical feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teraes, Mika; Kokki, Tommi; Noponen, Tommi; Hoppela, Erika; Sipilae, Hannu T.; Knuuti, Juhani; Durand-Schaefer, Nicolas; Pietilae, Mikko; Kiss, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Both respiratory and cardiac motions reduce image quality in myocardial imaging. For accurate imaging of small structures such as vulnerable coronary plaques, simultaneous cardiac and respiratory gating is warranted. This study tests the feasibility of a recently developed robust method for cardiac-respiratory gating. List-mode data with triggers from respiratory and cardiac cycles are rearranged into dual-gated segments and reconstructed with standard algorithms of a commercial PET/CT scanner. Cardiac gates were defined as three fixed phases and one variable diastolic phase. Chest motion was measured with a respiratory gating device and post-processed to determine gates. Preservation of quantification in dual-gated images was tested with an IEC whole-body phantom. Minipig and human studies were performed to evaluate the feasibility of the method. In minipig studies, a coronary catheter with radioactive tip was guided in coronary artery for in vivo and ex vivo acquisitions. Dual gating in humans with suspected cardiac disorders was performed using 18-F-FDG as a tracer. The method was found feasible for in vivo imaging and the radioactive catheter tip was better resolved in gated images. In human studies, the dual gating was found feasible and easy for clinical routine. Maximal movement of myocardial surface in cranio-caudal direction was over 20 mm. The shape of myocardium was clearly different between the gates and papillary muscles become more visible in diastolic images. The first clinical experiences using robust cardiac-respiratory dual gating are encouraging. Further testing in larger clinical populations using tracers designed especially for plaque imaging is warranted. (orig.)

  5. FDG-PET in the clinical management of Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchings, Martin; Eigtved, Annika I; Specht, Lena

    2004-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a molecular functional imaging technique that provides qualitative and quantitative information about the localization and activity of pathophysiological processes. The most commonly used tracer for oncological purposes is 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG......). FDG-PET has within recent years become the most important nuclear medicine imaging modality in the management of lymphoma. This review summarizes the data published so far concerning the value of FDG-PET in staging, treatment monitoring, therapy planning, and follow-up of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). FDG...

  6. Initial clinical evaluation of PET-based ion beam therapy monitoring under consideration of organ motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Christopher; Bauer, Julia; Unholtz, Daniel; Richter, Daniel; Herfarth, Klaus; Debus, Jürgen; Parodi, Katia

    2016-02-01

    Intrafractional organ motion imposes considerable challenges to scanned ion beam therapy and demands for a thorough verification of the applied treatment. At the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), the scanned ion beam delivery is verified by means of postirradiation positron-emission-tomography (PET) imaging. This work presents a first clinical evaluation of PET-based treatment monitoring in ion beam therapy under consideration of target motion. Three patients with mobile liver lesions underwent scanned carbon ion irradiation at HIT and postirradiation PET/CT (x-ray-computed-tomography) imaging with a commercial scanner. Respiratory motion was recorded during irradiation and subsequent image acquisition. This enabled a time-resolved (4D) calculation of the expected irradiation-induced activity pattern and, for one patient where an additional 4D CT was acquired at the PET/CT scanner after treatment, a motion-compensated PET image reconstruction. For the other patients, PET data were reconstructed statically. To verify the treatment, calculated prediction and reconstructed measurement were compared with a focus on the ion beam range. Results in the current three patients suggest that for motion amplitudes in the order of 2 mm there is no benefit from incorporating respiratory motion information into PET-based treatment monitoring. For a target motion in the order of 10 mm, motion-related effects become more severe and a time-resolved modeling of the expected activity distribution can lead to an improved data interpretation if a sufficient number of true coincidences is detected. Benefits from motion-compensated PET image reconstruction could not be shown conclusively at the current stage. The feasibility of clinical PET-based treatment verification under consideration of organ motion has been shown for the first time. Improvements in noise-robust 4D PET image reconstruction are deemed necessary to enhance the clinical potential.

  7. Initial clinical evaluation of PET-based ion beam therapy monitoring under consideration of organ motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurz, Christopher; Bauer, Julia; Unholtz, Daniel; Herfarth, Klaus; Debus, Jürgen; Richter, Daniel; Parodi, Katia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Intrafractional organ motion imposes considerable challenges to scanned ion beam therapy and demands for a thorough verification of the applied treatment. At the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT), the scanned ion beam delivery is verified by means of postirradiation positron-emission-tomography (PET) imaging. This work presents a first clinical evaluation of PET-based treatment monitoring in ion beam therapy under consideration of target motion. Methods: Three patients with mobile liver lesions underwent scanned carbon ion irradiation at HIT and postirradiation PET/CT (x-ray-computed-tomography) imaging with a commercial scanner. Respiratory motion was recorded during irradiation and subsequent image acquisition. This enabled a time-resolved (4D) calculation of the expected irradiation-induced activity pattern and, for one patient where an additional 4D CT was acquired at the PET/CT scanner after treatment, a motion-compensated PET image reconstruction. For the other patients, PET data were reconstructed statically. To verify the treatment, calculated prediction and reconstructed measurement were compared with a focus on the ion beam range. Results: Results in the current three patients suggest that for motion amplitudes in the order of 2 mm there is no benefit from incorporating respiratory motion information into PET-based treatment monitoring. For a target motion in the order of 10 mm, motion-related effects become more severe and a time-resolved modeling of the expected activity distribution can lead to an improved data interpretation if a sufficient number of true coincidences is detected. Benefits from motion-compensated PET image reconstruction could not be shown conclusively at the current stage. Conclusions: The feasibility of clinical PET-based treatment verification under consideration of organ motion has been shown for the first time. Improvements in noise-robust 4D PET image reconstruction are deemed necessary to enhance the

  8. Clinical feasibility of {sup 90}Y digital PET/CT for imaging microsphere biodistribution following radioembolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Chadwick L.; Binzel, Katherine; Zhang, Jun; Knopp, Michael V. [The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Wright Center of Innovation in Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Columbus, OH (United States); Wuthrick, Evan J. [The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2017-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical feasibility of next generation solid-state digital photon counting PET/CT (dPET/CT) technology and imaging findings in patients following {sup 90}Y microsphere radioembolization in comparison with standard of care (SOC) bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT (bSPECT/CT). Five patients underwent SOC {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung imaging immediately following routine radioembolization with 3.5 ± 1.7 GBq of {sup 90}Y-labeled glass microspheres. All patients also underwent dPET/CT imaging at 29 ± 11 h following radioembolization. Matched pairs comparison was used to compare image quality, image contrast and {sup 90}Y biodistribution between dPET/CT and bSPECT/CT images. Volumetric assessments of {sup 90}Y activity using different isocontour thresholds on dPET/CT and bSPECT/CT images were also compared. Digital PET/CT consistently provided better visual image quality and {sup 90}Y-to-background image contrast while depicting {sup 90}Y biodistribution than bSPECT/CT. Isocontour volumetric assessment using a 1% threshold precisely outlined {sup 90}Y activity and the treatment volume on dPET/CT images, whereas a more restrictive 20% threshold on bSPECT/CT images was needed to obtain comparable treatment volumes. The use of a less restrictive 10% threshold isocontour on bSPECT/CT images grossly overestimated the treatment volume when compared with the 1% threshold on dPET/CT images. Digital PET/CT is clinically feasible for the assessment of {sup 90}Y microsphere biodistribution following radioembolization, and provides better visual image quality and image contrast than routine bSPECT/CT with comparable acquisition times. With further optimization and clinical validation, dPET technology may allow faster and more accurate imaging-based assessment of {sup 90}Y microsphere biodistribution. (orig.)

  9. Clinical studies on the use of PET in radiotherapy planning in Germany. An update; Klinische Studien zum Einsatz der PET in der Bestrahlungsplanung in Deutschland. Ein Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nestle, U.; Mix, M.; Weber, W.; Grosu, A.L. [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg (Germany). Kliniken fuer Strahlenheilkunde und Nuklearmedizin

    2011-07-15

    In recent years, PET and PET/CT have well been established for staging and restaging of various malignancies. Increasingly, the modality is also used for radiotherapy treatment planning. However, clinical studies investigating the patients benefit by the inclusion of those modalities into RT treatment planning are mandatory, simultaneously defining standards for future care. Chances and problems of such studies are discussed using the examples of the PET-Plan and GLIAA trials. (orig.)

  10. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in the oncologic clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serna M, J.A.; Luviano, C.; Martinez V, D.; Maldonado S, A.

    2005-01-01

    We intended to determine the frequency with that the computer axial tomography (TAC), it was able to visualize the lesions extra neoplasia detected by the PET tomography in patients with fully identified primary malignant neoplasia. (Author)

  11. Detection of antibiotic resistance in clinical bacterial strains from pets

    OpenAIRE

    Poeta, P.; Rodrigues, J.

    2008-01-01

    The identification of different bacterial strains and the occurrence of antibiotic resistance were investigated in several infection processes of pets as skin abscess with purulent discharge, bronco alveolar fluid, earwax, urine, mammary, and eye fluid. Streptococcus spp. and Staphylococcus spp. were the most detected in the different samples. A high frequency of antimicrobial resistance has been observed and this could reflect the wide use of antimicrobials in pets, making the effectiveness ...

  12. fMRI. Basics and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulmer, Stephan; Jansen, Olav (eds.) [University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Inst. of Neuroradiology, Neurocenter

    2010-07-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) and the basic method of BOLD imaging were introduced in 1993 by Seiji Ogawa. From very basic experiments, fMRI has evolved into a clinical application for daily routine brain imaging. There have been various improvements in both the imaging technique as such as well as in the statistical analysis. In this volume, experts in the field share their knowledge and point out possible technical barriers and problems explaining how to solve them. Starting from the very basics on the origin of the BOLD signal, the book covers technical issues, anatomical landmarks, presurgical applications, and special issues in various clinical fields. Other modalities for brain mapping such as PET, TMS, and MEG are also compared with fMRI. This book is intended to give a state-of-the-art overview and to serve as a reference and guide for clinical applications of fMRI. (orig.)

  13. PET with coincidence gamma cameras - clinical benefit from the radiooncologists' point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, E.; Feyerabend, T.; Stallmann, C.; Lauer, I.; Baehre, M.

    2001-01-01

    Positron emission tomography with FDG (FDG-PET) is a new technique, which displays the cellular metabolic activity. Since tumors exhibit an increased metabolic activity when compared to normal tissue, this imaging modality has a particularly high importance. FDG-PET is not only useful for localizing and staging of malignant tumors, but also to evaluate therapy response. In this context, PET is superior to morphologically orientated modalities, because therapeutically induced changes in glucose metabolism precede morphologic alterations. Numerous studies indicate, that PET will play an important role in radiooncology concerning therapy planning and monitoring the effects of therapy during and after treatment. Further clinical studies are necessary to evaluate the information provided by FDG-PET more precisely. Coincidence gamma cameras with adequate imaging characteristics will gain enhanced importance to meet these increasing demands. (orig.) [de

  14. The Strategies to Homogenize PET/CT Metrics: The Case of Onco-Haematological Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane Chauvie

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET has been a widely used tool in oncology for staging lymphomas for a long time. Recently, several large clinical trials demonstrated its utility in therapy management during treatment, paving the way to personalized medicine. In doing so, the traditional way of reporting PET based on the extent of disease has been complemented by a discrete scale that takes in account tumour metabolism. However, due to several technical, physical and biological limitations in the use of PET uptake as a biomarker, stringent rules have been used in clinical trials to reduce the errors in its evaluation. Within this manuscript we will describe shortly the evolution in PET reporting, examine the main errors in uptake measurement, and analyse which strategy the clinical trials applied to reduce them.

  15. Simultaneous PET/MR head–neck cancer imaging: Preliminary clinical experience and multiparametric evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Covello, M.; Cavaliere, C.; Aiello, M.; Cianelli, M.S.; Mesolella, M.; Iorio, B.; Rossi, A.; Nicolai, E.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Simultaneous PET/MRI is a suitable tool for head/neck T-staging. • No significant differences have been found for PET measures get by both PET/CT and PET/MRI. • SUV 2D and 3D measures in HN lesion offer comparable estimations. • Multiparametric evaluation allows a complete characterization of HN lesions. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the role of simultaneous hybrid PET/MR imaging and to correlate metabolic PET data with morpho-functional parameters derived by MRI in patients with head–neck cancer. Methods: Forty-four patients, with histologically confirmed head and neck malignancy (22 primary tumors and 22 follow-up) were studied. Patients initially received a clinical exam and endoscopy with direct biopsy. Next patients underwent whole body PET/CT followed by PET/MR of the head/neck region. PET and MRI studies were separately evaluated by two blinded groups (both included one radiologist and one nuclear physician) in order to define the presence or absence of lesions/recurrences. Regions of interest (ROIs) analysis was conducted on the primary lesion at the level of maximum size on metabolic (SUV and MTV), diffusion (ADC) and perfusion (K trans , V e , k ep and iAUC) parameters. Results: PET/MR examinations were successfully performed on all 44 patients. Agreement between the two blinded groups was found in anatomic allocation of lesions by PET/MR (Primary tumors: Cohen's kappa 0.93; Follow-up: Cohen's kappa 0.89). There was a significant correlation between CT-SUV measures and MR (e.g., CT-SUV VOI vs. MR-SUV VOI: ρ = 0.97, p < 0.001 for the entire sample). There was also significant positive correlations between the ROI area, SUV measures, and the metabolic parameters (SUV and MTV) obtained during both PET/CT and PET/MR. A significant negative correlation was observed between ADC and K trans values in the primary tumors. In addition, a significant negative correlation existed between MR SUV and ADC in recurrent tumors

  16. Investigations with FDG-PET Scanning in Prostate Cancer Show Limited Value for Clinical Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salminen, Eeva [Univ. of Turku (Finland). Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy; Hogg, Annette; Binns, David; Hicks, Rodney [The Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, East Melbourne, Vic (Australia). Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging; Frydenberg, Mark [Monash Medical Centre, Clayton, Vic (Australia)

    2002-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate FDG-PET (fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography) imaging in the management of prostate cancer. Twenty-two patients were studied during different disease phases of prostate cancer, for staging or restaging to clarify specific clinical questions. FDG-PET was performed encompassing the thorax, abdomen and pelvis using the Penn PET 300H scanner. Scanning was begun 60 min after {sup 18}F fluorodeoxyglucose marker. Patients were catheterized and administered diuretics to minimize urinary activity. Information obtained with FDG-PET was concordant with findings from other investigations in 7/22 (32%) patients, discordant in 15/22 (68%) patients and equivalent in one patient (4%). PET indicated progressive disease in five patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) <4 ng/L. The impact on management of the patients was high in 46% of cases, low in 41% and for 14% there was no impact on management. The accuracy of FDG-PET was 72% (95% CI 50-89) as confirmed by invasive diagnostics/follow-up. FDG-PET can provide useful information and improve the clinician's decision on further management procedures in selected patients with low PSA and bone or lymph node changes. A negative PET scan in prostate cancer should be interpreted with caution.

  17. Positron emission tomography clinical practice

    CERN Document Server

    Valk, Peter E; Bailey, Dale L; Townsend, David W; Maisey, Michael N

    2006-01-01

    This book provides a contemporary reference to the science, technology and clinical applications of PET and PET/CT. The opening chapters summarize the scientific aspects of PET and PET/CT including physics, instrumentation, radiation dosimetry and radiation protection. A chapter on normal variants in FDG PET imaging serves as an introduction to the clinical chapters, which cover oncology applications and have been updated to include the impact of FDG PET/CT imaging in oncology. The book concludes with chapters on the use of PET and PET/CT in cardiology and neurology and PET imaging of infectio

  18. Clinical utility of flumazenil-PET versus [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose-PET and MRI in refractory partial epilepsy. A prospective study in 100 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryvlin, P; Bouvard, S; Le Bars, D; De Lamérie, G; Grégoire, M C; Kahane, P; Froment, J C; Mauguière, F

    1998-11-01

    We assessed the clinical utility of [11C]flumazenil-PET (FMZ-PET) prospectively in 100 epileptic patients undergoing a pre-surgical evaluation, and defined the specific contribution of this neuro-imaging technique with respect to those of MRI and [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose-PET (FDG-PET). All patients benefited from a long term video-EEG monitoring, whereas an intracranial EEG investigation was performed in 40 cases. Most of our patients (73%) demonstrated a FMZ-PET abnormality; this hit rate was significantly higher in temporal lobe epilepsy (94%) than in other types of epilepsy (50%) (P lobe epilepsy associated with MRI signs of hippocampal sclerosis, FMZ-PET abnormalities delineated the site of seizure onset precisely, whenever they were coextensive with FDG-PET abnormalities; (ii) in bi-temporal epilepsy, FMZ-PET helped to confirm the bilateral origin of seizures by showing a specific pattern of decreased FMZ binding in both temporal lobes in 33% of cases; (iii) in patients with a unilateral cryptogenic frontal lobe epilepsy, FMZ-PET provided further evidence of the side and site of seizure onset in 55% of cases. Thus, FMZ-PET deserves to be included in the pre-surgical evaluation of these specific categories of epileptic patients, representing approximately half of the population considered for epilepsy surgery.

  19. PET in tumor imaging: research only or a cost effective clinical tool?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    PET imaging has for many years been a versatile tool for non-invasive imaging of neuro-physiology and, indeed, whole body physiology. Quantitative PET imaging of trace amounts of radioactivity is scientifically elegant and can be very complex. This lecture focuses on whether and where this test is clinically useful. Because of the research tradition, PET imaging has been perceived as an 'expensive' test, as it costs more per scan than CT and MRI scans at most institutions. Such a superficial analysis is incorrect, however, as it is increasingly recognized that imaging costs, which in some circumstances will be increased by the use of PET, are only a relatively small component of patient care costs. Thus, PET may raise imaging costs and the number of imaging procedures in some settings, though PET may reduce imaging test numbers in other settings. However, the analysis must focus on the total costs of patient management. Analyses focused on total patient care costs, including cost of hospitalization and cost surgery as well as imaging costs, have shown that PET can substantially reduce total patient care costs in several settings. This is achieved by providing a more accurate diagnosis, and thus having fewer instances of an incorrect diagnosis resulting in subsequent inappropriate surgery or investigations. Several institutions have shown scenarios in which PET for tumor imaging is cost effective. While the specific results of the analyses vary based on disease prevalence and cost input values for each procedure, as well as the projected performance of PET, the similar results showing total care cost savings in the management of several common cancers, strongly supports the rational for the use of PET in cancer management. In addition, promising clinical results are forthcoming in several other illnesses, suggesting PET will have broader utility than these uses, alone. Thus, while PET is an 'expensive' imaging procedure and has considerable utility as a research

  20. 'Serial review on clinical PET tracers'. Manufacturing and quality control of positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals produced by in-house cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saji, Hideo

    2009-01-01

    In order to establish PET diagnosis as a routine clinical tool, manufacture's compliance with regulations under the Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) principle for PET radiopharmaceuticals is necessary. For this purpose, the Sub-committee on Medical Application of Positron Emitting Radionuclides, Medical Science and Pharmaceutical Committee of Japan Radioisotopes Association has proposed 'Standards for Compounds Labeled with Emitting Radionuclides Approved as Established Techniques for Medical Use'. This guideline includes the general notices, general rules for preparations, general tests for the quality control, quality of each PET agents, guideline for manufacturing environment and manufacturing process at manufacturing facilities of PET agents. Each facility should have a committee and establish an internal system to account for manufacturing compounds labeled with positron emitting radionuclides produced in the facility, and compile standards by referring to the 'Established Standard Techniques of Labeling Compounds with Emitting Radionuclides for use as Radiopharmaceuticals: approved by the Subcommittee on Medical Application of Cyclotron-Produced Radionuclides (revised in 2009)', in order to maintain the quality of radiopharmaceuticals. (author)

  1. Clinical utility of FDG PET in Parkinson's disease and atypical parkinsonism associated with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Zuzana; Gandolfo, Federica; Orini, Stefania; Garibotto, Valentina; Agosta, Federica; Arbizu, Javier; Bouwman, Femke; Drzezga, Alexander; Nestor, Peter; Boccardi, Marina; Altomare, Daniele; Festari, Cristina; Nobili, Flavio

    2018-05-19

    There are no comprehensive guidelines for the use of FDG PET in the following three clinical scenarios: (1) diagnostic work-up of patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) at risk of future cognitive decline, (2) discriminating idiopathic PD from progressive supranuclear palsy, and (3) identifying the underlying neuropathology in corticobasal syndrome. We therefore performed three literature searches and evaluated the selected studies for quality of design, risk of bias, inconsistency, imprecision, indirectness and effect size. Critical outcomes were the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive/negative predictive value, area under the receiving operating characteristic curve, and positive/negative likelihood ratio of FDG PET in detecting the target condition. Using the Delphi method, a panel of seven experts voted for or against the use of FDG PET based on published evidence and expert opinion. Of 91 studies selected from the three literature searches, only four included an adequate quantitative assessment of the performance of FDG PET. The majority of studies lacked robust methodology due to lack of critical outcomes, inadequate gold standard and no head-to-head comparison with an appropriate reference standard. The panel recommended the use of FDG PET for all three clinical scenarios based on nonquantitative evidence of clinical utility. Despite widespread use of FDG PET in clinical practice and extensive research, there is still very limited good quality evidence for the use of FDG PET. However, in the opinion of the majority of the panellists, FDG PET is a clinically useful imaging biomarker for idiopathic PD and atypical parkinsonism associated with dementia.

  2. Clinical utility of FDG PET/CT in acute complicated pyelonephritis - results from an observational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Chih-Hsing [Mackay Memorial Hospital at Taipei, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taipei (China); Tseng, Jing-Ren; Yen, Tzu-Chen [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Center for Advanced Molecular Imaging and Translation, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, College of Medicine, Taoyuan (China); Lee, Ming-Hsun [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Taoyuan (China); Yang, Lan-Yan [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Biostatistics Unit, Clinical Trial Center, Taoyuan (China)

    2018-03-15

    Acute complicated pyelonephritis (ACP) is an upper urinary tract infection associated with coexisting urinary tract abnormalities or medical conditions that could predispose to serious outcomes or treatment failures. Although CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are frequently used in patients with ACP, the clinical value of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) has not been systematically investigated. This single-center retrospective study was designed to evaluate the potential usefulness of FDG PET/CT in patients with ACP. Thirty-one adult patients with ACP who underwent FDG PET/CT were examined. FDG PET/CT imaging characteristics, including tracer uptake patterns, kidney volumes, and extrarenal imaging findings, were reviewed in combination with clinical data and conventional imaging results. Of the 31 patients, 19 (61%) showed focal FDG uptake. The remaining 12 study participants showed a diffuse FDG uptake pattern. After volumetric approximation, the affected kidneys were found to be significantly enlarged. Patients who showed a focal uptake pattern had a higher frequency of abscess formation requiring drainage. ACP patients showing diffuse tracer uptake patterns had a more benign clinical course. Seven patients had suspected extrarenal coinfections, and FDG PET/CT successfully confirmed the clinical suspicion in five cases. FDG PET/CT was as sensitive as CT in identifying the six patients (19%) who developed abscesses. Notably, FDG PET/CT findings caused a modification to the initial antibiotic regimen in nine patients (29%). FDG PET/CT may be clinically useful in the assessment of patients with ACP who have a progressive disease course. (orig.)

  3. The preparation and application of carbon-11 nuclide and its PET imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mingfang

    2002-01-01

    Carbon-11 is a valuable positron nuclide, for it can be used to replace carbon atom at specific position inside the organic molecules and not change the molecular biochemistry character. Carbon-11 has wide application in the labeling of amino acids, fatty acids, receptor-ligand and neurotransmitter molecular etc, which are used for detecting the blood flow, metabolism, the synthesis of protein and the neurotransmitter function in brain by PET imaging. It is very important in basic science and clinical research to understand and master the preparation of carbon-11 and its labeled compounds

  4. Clinical use of digital retrospective image fusion of CT, MRI, FDG-PET and SPECT - fields of indications and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemke, A.J.; Niehues, S.M.; Amthauer, H.; Felix, R.; Rohlfing, T.; Hosten, N.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and the clinical benefits of retrospective digital image fusion (PET, SPECT, CT and MRI). Materials and methods: In a prospective study, a total of 273 image fusions were performed and evaluated. The underlying image acquisitions (CT, MRI, SPECT and PET) were performed in a way appropriate for the respective clinical question and anatomical region. Image fusion was executed with a software program developed during this study. The results of the image fusion procedure were evaluated in terms of technical feasibility, clinical objective, and therapeutic impact. Results: The most frequent combinations of modalities were CT/PET (n = 156) and MRI/PET (n = 59), followed by MRI/SPECT (n = 28), CT/SPECT (n = 22) and CT/MRI (n = 8). The clinical questions included following regions (more than one region per case possible): neurocranium (n = 42), neck (n = 13), lung and mediastinum (n = 24), abdomen (n = 181), and pelvis (n = 65). In 92.6% of all cases (n = 253), image fusion was technically successful. Image fusion was able to improve sensitivity and specificity of the single modality, or to add important diagnostic information. Image fusion was problematic in cases of different body positions between the two imaging modalities or different positions of mobile organs. In 37.9% of the cases, image fusion added clinically relevant information compared to the single modality. Conclusion: For clinical questions concerning liver, pancreas, rectum, neck, or neurocranium, image fusion is a reliable method suitable for routine clinical application. Organ motion still limits its feasibility and routine use in other areas (e.g., thorax). (orig.)

  5. Imaging performance of LabPET APD-based digital PET scanners for pre-clinical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergeron, Mélanie; Cadorette, Jules; Beaudoin, Jean-François; Lecomte, Roger; Tétrault, Marc-André; Leroux, Jean-Daniel; Fontaine, Réjean

    2014-01-01

    17% for an energy threshold of 250 keV and 10% for an energy threshold of 350 keV. The results obtained with two energy window settings confirm the relevance of high-efficiency and high-resolution operating modes to take full advantage of the imaging capabilities of the LabPET scanners for molecular imaging applications. (paper)

  6. PET/MR in oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balyasnikova, Svetlana; Löfgren, Johan; de Nijs, Robin

    2012-01-01

    of the challenges inherent in this new technology, but focus on potential applications for simultaneous PET/MR in the field of oncology. Methods and tracers for use with the PET technology will be familiar to most readers of this journal; thus this paper aims to provide a short and basic introduction to a number...... be applied together with PET increasing the amount of information about the tissues of interest. The potential clinical benefit of applying PET/MR in staging, radiotherapy planning and treatment evaluation in oncology, as well as the research perspectives for the use of PET/MR in the development of new...

  7. Visualisation of bladder cancer using 11C-choline PET: first clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jong, Igle J.; Pruim, Jan; Elsinga, Philip H.; Jongen, Maud M.G.J.; Vaalburg, Willem; Mensink, Han J.A.

    2002-01-01

    bowel, rectum and prostate gland. CHOL uptake in bladder cancer was avid, visualising the tumour in the virtual absence of urinary radioactivity. No uptake of CHOL was seen in pre-malignant lesions or in small non-invasive tumours. Our results warrant further research into the value of CHOL PET in the clinical management of patients with bladder cancer. (orig.)

  8. Study on the application of PET-CT in gynecology tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Lilian

    2012-01-01

    Gynecology tumors seriously threatened the health of female. With the development of imageology, PET, a functionality examination method, has been widely used in the early diagnosis and monitoring of curative effect in gynecology tumors. PET-CT has the good future in its development because it combined with the advantage of functional and structural imaging. The characters and application of PET-CT in gynecology tumors were reviewed in this paper. (author)

  9. Clinical applications of iterative reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberl, S.

    1998-01-01

    Expectation maximisation (EM) reconstruction largely eliminates the hot and cold streaking artifacts characteristic of filtered-back projection (FBP) reconstruction around localised hot areas, such as the bladder. It also substantially reduces the problem of decreased inferior wall counts in MIBI myocardial perfusion studies due to ''streaking'' from high liver uptake. Non-uniform attenuation and scatter correction, resolution recovery, anatomical information, e.g. from MRI or CT tracer kinetic modelling, can all be built into the EM reconstruction imaging model. The properties of ordered subset EM (OSEM) have also been used to correct for known patient motion as part of the reconstruction process. These uses of EM are elaborated more fully in some of the other abstracts of this meeting. Currently we use OSEM routinely for: (i) studies where streaking is a problem, including all MIBI myocardial perfusion studies, to avoid hot liver inferior wall artifact, (ii) all whole body FDG PET, all lung V/Q SPECT (which have a short acquisition time) and all gated 201 TI myocardial perfusion studies due to improved noise characteristics of OSEM in these studies; (iii) studies with measured, non-uniform attenuation correction. With the accelerated OSEM algorithm, iterative reconstruction is practical for routine clinical applications and we have found OSEM to provide clearly superior reconstructions for the areas listed above and are investigating its application to other studies. In clinical use, we have not found OSEM to introduce artifacts which would not also occur with FBP, e.g. uncorrected patient motion will cause artifacts with both OSEM and FBP

  10. Simulation and image reconstruction of clinical TOF-PET scanners

    OpenAIRE

    Abushab, Khaled M. A

    2013-01-01

    En esta tesis se ha mostrado que el código de simulación Monte Carlo PeneloPET, desarrollado en el Grupo de Física Nuclear de la Universidad Complutense de Madrid, es lo suficientemente flexible como para incorporar las principales características de distintos escáneres PET, incluyendo escáneres clínicos, logrando reproducir las medidas experimentales obtenidas con estas máquinas. Una de los principales problemas de simular escáneres comerciales consiste en el hecho de que generalmente ...

  11. Assessing FDG-PET diagnostic accuracy studies to develop recommendations for clinical use in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccardi, Marina; Festari, Cristina; Altomare, Daniele; Gandolfo, Federica; Orini, Stefania; Nobili, Flavio; Frisoni, Giovanni B

    2018-04-30

    FDG-PET is frequently used as a marker of synaptic damage to diagnose dementing neurodegenerative disorders. We aimed to adapt the items of evidence quality to FDG-PET diagnostic studies, and assess the evidence available in current literature to assist Delphi decisions for European recommendations for clinical use. Based on acknowledged methodological guidance, we defined the domains, specific to FDG-PET, required to assess the quality of evidence in 21 literature searches addressing as many Population Intervention Comparison Outcome (PICO) questions. We ranked findings for each PICO and fed experts making Delphi decisions for recommending clinical use. Among the 1435 retrieved studies, most lacked validated measures of test performance, an adequate gold standard, and head-to-head comparison of FDG-PET and clinical diagnosis, and only 58 entered detailed assessment. Only two studies assessed the accuracy of the comparator (clinical diagnosis) versus any kind of gold-/reference-standard. As to the index-test (FDG-PET-based diagnosis), an independent gold-standard was available in 24% of the examined papers; 38% used an acceptable reference-standard (clinical follow-up); and 38% compared FDG-PET-based diagnosis only to baseline clinical diagnosis. These methodological limitations did not allow for deriving recommendations from evidence. An incremental diagnostic value of FDG-PET versus clinical diagnosis or lack thereof cannot be derived from the current literature. Many of the observed limitations may easily be overcome, and we outlined them as research priorities to improve the quality of current evidence. Such improvement is necessary to outline evidence-based guidelines. The available data were anyway provided to expert clinicians who defined interim recommendations.

  12. Generating Evidence for Clinical Benefit of PET/CT in Diagnosing Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vach, Werner; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Gerke, Oke

    2011-01-01

    For diagnostic methods such as PET/CT, not only diagnostic accuracy but also clinical benefit must be demonstrated. However, there is a lack of consensus about how to approach this task. Here we consider 6 clinical scenarios to review some basic approaches to demonstrating the clinical benefit...... of PET/CT in cancer patients: replacement of an invasive procedure, improved accuracy of initial diagnosis, improved accuracy of staging for curative versus palliative treatment, improved accuracy of staging for radiation versus chemotherapy, response evaluation, and acceleration of clinical decisions....... We also develop some guidelines for the evaluation of clinical benefit. First, it should be clarified whether there is a direct benefit of the use of PET/CT or an indirect benefit because of improved diagnostic accuracy. If there is an indirect benefit, then decision modeling should be used initially...

  13. Evaluation of New Inorganic Scintillators for Application in a Prototype Small Animal PET Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Kuntner, C

    2003-01-01

    In the study of new pharmaceuticals as well as brain and genetic research, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a useful method. It has also recently entered the clinical domain in cardiology and particularly in oncology. Small animals such as mice, are often used to validate sophisticated models of human disease. High spatial resolution PET instrumentation is therefore necessary due to the reduced dimensions of the organs. Inorganic scintillators are employed in most of the diagnostic imaging devices. The ultimate performance of the PET scanner is tightly bound to the scintillation properties of the crystals. In the last years there has been an effort to develop new scintillating materials characterized by high light output, high detection efficiency and fast decay time. The most studied systems are mainly Ce3+-doped crystals such as LSO:Ce, YAP:Ce, LuAP:Ce, and recently also mixed Lux(RE3+)1-xAlO3:Ce crystals. These crystals are very attractive for medical application because of their high density (with th...

  14. Clinical utility of FDG-PET in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Federica; Altomare, Daniele; Festari, Cristina; Orini, Stefania; Gandolfo, Federica; Boccardi, Marina; Arbizu, Javier; Bouwman, Femke; Drzezga, Alexander; Nestor, Peter; Nobili, Flavio; Walker, Zuzana; Pagani, Marco

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the incremental value of FDG-PET over clinical tests in: (i) diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); (ii) picking early signs of neurodegeneration in patients with a genetic risk of Huntington's disease (HD); and detecting metabolic changes related to cognitive impairment in (iii) ALS and (iv) HD patients. Four comprehensive literature searches were conducted using the PICO model to extract evidence from relevant studies. An expert panel then voted using the Delphi method on these four diagnostic scenarios. The availability of evidence was good for FDG-PET utility to support the diagnosis of ALS, poor for identifying presymptomatic subjects carrying HD mutation who will convert to HD, and lacking for identifying cognitive-related metabolic changes in both ALS and HD. After the Delphi consensual procedure, the panel did not support the clinical use of FDG-PET for any of the four scenarios. Relative to other neurodegenerative diseases, the clinical use of FDG-PET in ALS and HD is still in its infancy. Once validated by disease-control studies, FDG-PET might represent a potentially useful biomarker for ALS diagnosis. FDG-PET is presently not justified as a routine investigation to predict conversion to HD, nor to detect evidence of brain dysfunction justifying cognitive decline in ALS and HD.

  15. An update on technical and methodological aspects for cardiac PET applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PRESOTTO, Luca; BUSNARDO, Elena; GIANOLLI, Luigi; BETTINARDI, Valentino

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is indicated for a large number of cardiac diseases: perfusion and viability studies are commonly used to evaluate coronary artery disease; PET can also be used to assess sarcoidosis and endocarditis, as well as to investigate amyloidosis. Furthermore, a hot topic for research is plaque characterization. Most of these studies are technically very challenging. High count rates and short acquisition times characterize perfusion scans while very small targets have to be imaged in inflammation/infection and plaques examinations. Furthermore, cardiac PET suffers from respiratory and cardiac motion blur. Each type of studies has specific requirements from the technical and methodological point of view, thus PET systems with overall high performances are required. Furthermore, in the era of hybrid PET/computed tomography (CT) and PET/Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) systems, the combination of complementary functional and anatomical information can be used to improve diagnosis and prognosis. Moreover, PET images can be qualitatively and quantitatively improved exploiting information from the other modality, using advanced algorithms. In this review we will report the latest technological and methodological innovations for PET cardiac applications, with particular reference to the state of the art of the hybrid PET/CT and PET/MRI. We will also report the most recent advancements in software, from reconstruction algorithms to image processing and analysis programs.

  16. Clinical applications of SPECT/CT: advantages and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigo, P.

    2006-01-01

    The application of hybrid SPECT cameras in Nuclear Medicine follows the revolutionary introduction of PET/CT. This review focuses on the advantages and limitations of SPECT/CT in its various clinical indications. It appears that SPECT/CT will be a clear factor of progress for Nuclear Medicine. (author)

  17. PET, Positron emission tomography: Presentation of a clinical case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sierralta C, Paulina; Jofre M, M. Josefina; Gonzalez E, Patricio; Massardo V, Teresa; Humeres A, Pamela; Canessa G, Jose

    2003-01-01

    A patient with a solitary pulmonary nodule is presented. She was studied with PET using F-18 FDG. The metabolic images demonstrated increased uptake in the nodule and 2 additional areas suggestive of extension, not seen in anatomic diagnostic procedures. These findings were compatible with a malignant tumour with metastasis (au)

  18. Recurrent bladder carcinoma: clinical and prognostic role of 18 F-FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alongi, Pierpaolo [San Raffaele G. Giglio Institute, Department of Radiological Sciences, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Cefalu (Italy); Caobelli, Federico [Basel University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Gentile, Roberta; Baldari, Sergio [University of Messina, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Department of Biomedical Sciences and Morphological and Functional Images, Messina (Italy); Stefano, Alessandro; Russo, Giorgio; Gilardi, Maria Carla [IBFM-CNR, Cefalu (Italy); Albano, Domenico [Universita degli Studi di Palermo, DIBIMEF - Sezione di Scienze Radiologiche, Palermo (Italy); Midiri, Massimo [San Raffaele G. Giglio Institute, Department of Radiological Sciences, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Cefalu (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Palermo, DIBIMEF - Sezione di Scienze Radiologiche, Palermo (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    A small number of studies evaluated the detection rate of lesions from bladder carcinoma (BC) of 18 F-FDG PET/CT in the restaging process. However, the prognostic role of FDG PET/CT still remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the accuracy, the effect upon treatment decision, and the prognostic value of FDG PET/CT in patients with suspected recurrent BC. Forty-one patients affected by BC underwent FDG PET/CT for restaging purpose. The diagnostic accuracy of visually interpreted FDG PET/CT was assessed compared to histology (n = 8), other diagnostic imaging modalities (contrast-enhanced CT in 38/41 patients and MRI in 15/41) and clinical follow-up (n = 41). Semiquantitative PET values (SUVmax, SUVmean, SUL, MTV, TLG) were calculated using a graph-based method. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were assessed by using Kaplan-Meier curves. The risk of progression (hazard ratio, HR) was computed by Cox regression analysis by considering all the available variables. PET was considered positive in 21 of 41 patients. Of these, recurrent BC was confirmed in 20 (95 %). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of FDG PET/CT were 87 %, 94 %, 95 %, 85 %, 90 %. AUC was 0.9 (95 %IC 0.8-1). Bayesian positive and negative likelihood ratios were 14.5 and 0.13, respectively. FDG PET/CT findings modified the therapeutic approach in 16 patients (modified therapy in 10 PET-positive patients, watch-and-wait in six PET-negative patients). PFS was significantly longer in patients with negative scan vs. those with pathological findings (85 % vs. 24 %, p < 0.05; HR = 12.4; p = 0.001). Moreover, an unremarkable study was associated with a longer OS (88 % vs. 47 % after 2 years and 87 % vs. 25 % after 3 years, respectively, p < 0.05). Standardized uptake value (SUV)max > 6 and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) > 8.5 were recognized as the most accurate thresholds to predict PFS (2-year PFS 62 % for

  19. Basic principles and applications of {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT in oral and maxillofacial imaging: A pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omami, Galal [Dept. of Oral Diagnosis and Polyclinics, Faculty of Dentistry, The Hong Kong University, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Tamimi, Dania [BeamReaders Inc., Orlando (United States); Branstette, Barton F. [Dept. of Otolaryngology and Radiology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh (United States)

    2014-12-15

    A combination of positron emission tomography (PET) with 18F-labeled fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) and computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT) has increasingly become a widely used imaging modality for the diagnosis and management of head and neck cancer. On the basis of both recent literature and our professional experience, we present a set of principles with pictorial illustrations and clinical applications of FDG-PET/CT in the evaluation and management planning of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx. We feel that this paper will be of interest and will aid the learning of oral and maxillofacial radiology trainees and practitioners.

  20. Clinical evaluation of 2D versus 3D whole-body PET image quality using a dedicated BGO PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visvikis, D.; Griffiths, D.; Costa, D.C.; Bomanji, J.; Ell, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    Three-dimensional positron emission tomography (3D PET) results in higher system sensitivity, with an associated increase in the detection of scatter and random coincidences. The objective of this work was to compare, from a clinical perspective, 3D and two-dimensional (2D) acquisitions in terms of whole-body (WB) PET image quality with a dedicated BGO PET system. 2D and 3D WB emission acquisitions were carried out in 70 patients. Variable acquisition parameters in terms of time of emission acquisition per axial field of view (aFOV) and slice overlap between sequential aFOVs were used during the 3D acquisitions. 3D and 2D images were reconstructed using FORE+WLS and OSEM respectively. Scatter correction was performed by convolution subtraction and a model-based scatter correction in 2D and 3D respectively. All WB images were attenuation corrected using segmented transmission scans. Images were blindly assessed by three observers for the presence of artefacts, confidence in lesion detection and overall image quality using a scoring system. Statistically significant differences between 2D and 3D image quality were only obtained for 3D emission acquisitions of 3 min. No statistically significant differences were observed for image artefacts or lesion detectability scores. Image quality correlated significantly with patient weight for both modes of operation. Finally, no differences were seen in image artefact scores for the different axial slice overlaps considered, suggesting the use of five slice overlaps in 3D WB acquisitions. 3D WB imaging using a dedicated BGO-based PET scanner offers similar image quality to that obtained in 2D considering similar overall times of acquisitions. (orig.)

  1. Clinical efficacy of FDG-PET scan in the patients with primary or recurrent gynecologic malignancies: clinical experiences with FDG-PET scan in cervical carcinoma of uterus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Hoon

    1998-12-01

    This study was done to evaluate the clinical feasibility of FDG-PET scan in patients with cervical carcinoma. PET-scans were performed in 74 patients with cervical carcinoma from March, 1998 to September, 1998. Fourteen cases were done at pretreatment period and sixty cases were done at post-treatment follow up period. In this study, the scans were obtained after bladder emptying by foley catheter insertion and diuretics to reduce the tracer activity in the bladder and improve the images of central lesions. We could find some incidental recurrent or metastatic lesions by FDG-PET scan (at pretreatment; 5 cases, at post-treatment; clinically no evidence of disease; 8 cases). FDG-PET scan had high sensitivity (100%) for central lesions and metastatic lymph nodes of cervical cancer but could not precisely define the anatomic location of the cancer and the sensitivity was not superior than MRI. Earlier detection of metastatic lymph nodes was superior than CT/MRI (sensitivity; 100 %) for metastatic lymph nodes. Also we found 3 double primary cancers incidentally (2 lung cancers and 1 thyroid cancer). In conclusion, FDG-FET scan might be useful for the earlier of hidden lesions that cannot be detected by routine conventional methods and differential diagnosis with radiation fibrosis and benign lymph adenophy.

  2. International conference on clinical PET and molecular nuclear medicine (IPET 2007). Book of abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency is organizing its first international conference on 'Clinical PET and Molecular Nuclear Medicine'. Medical imaging technologies have undergone explosive growth over the past two decades. Today, imaging is at a crossroad, with molecular targeted imaging agents expected to broadly expand the capabilities of conventional anatomical imaging methods. Observing molecular interactions in the living body by the radiotracer technique has become known as 'molecular nuclear medicine'. Molecular nuclear medicine techniques analyze cellular biochemistry and its relationship to disease processes expressed in tissue and organ dysfunction, for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. People can often have similar manifestations of disease, but no two patients will be the same. Functional radionuclide imaging and positron emission tomography (PET) provide excellent opportunities to follow the pathology in individual patients and therefore provide a means for tailored clinical management. These also provide the means to assess the response to treatment in a safe and non-invasive manner. Changes at molecular and cellular levels provide vital clues for evaluating the effectiveness of chosen clinical treatment plans. This information is expected to have a major impact on understanding disease, disease detection, individualised treatment, and drug development. Recently, considerable attention has been drawn to nuclear medicine with the visualization of biochemical processes in vivo such as PET studies with 18F-FDG in many different organs and in cancerous tissues. With the arrival of PET/CT systems there is a new era of accurate mapping of disease processes. Today, 18F-FDG is the most useful PET tracer for the detection, staging, treatment planning and management of cancer. There is mounting evidence for its competitive advantage over conventional techniques in major medical areas including oncology, cardiology, and neurology. Nuclear medicine is

  3. International conference on clinical PET and molecular nuclear medicine (IPET 2007). Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency is organizing its first international conference on 'Clinical PET and Molecular Nuclear Medicine'. Medical imaging technologies have undergone explosive growth over the past two decades. Today, imaging is at a crossroad, with molecular targeted imaging agents expected to broadly expand the capabilities of conventional anatomical imaging methods. Observing molecular interactions in the living body by the radiotracer technique has become known as 'molecular nuclear medicine'. Molecular nuclear medicine techniques analyze cellular biochemistry and its relationship to disease processes expressed in tissue and organ dysfunction, for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. People can often have similar manifestations of disease, but no two patients will be the same. Functional radionuclide imaging and positron emission tomography (PET) provide excellent opportunities to follow the pathology in individual patients and therefore provide a means for tailored clinical management. These also provide the means to assess the response to treatment in a safe and non-invasive manner. Changes at molecular and cellular levels provide vital clues for evaluating the effectiveness of chosen clinical treatment plans. This information is expected to have a major impact on understanding disease, disease detection, individualised treatment, and drug development. Recently, considerable attention has been drawn to nuclear medicine with the visualization of biochemical processes in vivo such as PET studies with 18F-FDG in many different organs and in cancerous tissues. With the arrival of PET/CT systems there is a new era of accurate mapping of disease processes. Today, 18F-FDG is the most useful PET tracer for the detection, staging, treatment planning and management of cancer. There is mounting evidence for its competitive advantage over conventional techniques in major medical areas including oncology, cardiology, and neurology. Nuclear medicine is

  4. Initial clinical results for breath-hold CT-based processing of respiratory-gated PET acquisitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fin, Loic; Daouk, Joel; Morvan, Julie; Esper, Isabelle El; Saidi, Lazhar; Meyer, Marc-Etienne; Bailly, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    Respiratory motion causes uptake in positron emission tomography (PET) images of chest structures to spread out and misregister with the CT images. This misregistration can alter the attenuation correction and thus the quantisation of PET images. In this paper, we present the first clinical results for a respiratory-gated PET (RG-PET) processing method based on a single breath-hold CT (BH-CT) acquisition, which seeks to improve diagnostic accuracy via better PET-to-CT co-registration. We refer to this method as ''CT-based'' RG-PET processing. Thirteen lesions were studied. Patients underwent a standard clinical PET protocol and then the CT-based protocol, which consists of a 10-min List Mode RG-PET acquisition, followed by a shallow end-expiration BH-CT. The respective performances of the CT-based and clinical PET methods were evaluated by comparing the distances between the lesions' centroids on PET and CT images. SUV MAX and volume variations were also investigated. The CT-based method showed significantly lower (p=0.027) centroid distances (mean change relative to the clinical method =-49%; range =-100% to 0%). This led to higher SUV MAX (mean change =+33%; range =-4% to 69%). Lesion volumes were significantly lower (p=0.022) in CT-based PET volumes (mean change =-39%: range =-74% to -1%) compared with clinical ones. A CT-based RG-PET processing method can be implemented in clinical practice with a small increase in radiation exposure. It improves PET-CT co-registration of lung lesions and should lead to more accurate attenuation correction and thus SUV measurement. (orig.)

  5. PET based nanocomposite films for microwave packaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galdi, M. R.; Olivieri, R.; Liguori, L.; Albanese, D.; Di Matteo, M.; Di Maio, L.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, changes in life standards have promoted the diffusion of Ready to Cook (RTC) and Ready to Eat (RTE) products for microwave ovens. However, the main limits in microwave (MW) ovens usage are often related to the proper choice of packaging materials suitable for such technology. In fact, packages for microwaveable RTC and RTE foods should ensure adequate preservation of the product before cooking/heating such as high barriers to gases and aromas and adequate control of water vapor transmission. In addition, microwaveable packaging material must be transparent to MW, thermally stable and resistant to the mechanical stress induced by the accumulation in the head space of volatile substances produced during the cooking. Polymeric materials are good candidates for microwaveable packaging thanks to their transparency to MW. In the last years a great interest is devoted to developing innovative solution based on the use of additives or systems that act as susceptors or heating enhancers for improving the characteristics of polymers in cooking/heating in MW ovens. The present work was focused on the production and characterization of nanocomposite copolyester based films suitable for microwaveable food packaging applications. The matrices selected consist in two PET copolymers modified with carbon black (ULTRA STD) and with titanium oxide (ULTRA NA). Nanocomposite co-extruded multilayer films were produced using different percentages (0%, 2% and 4%wt/wt) of Cloisite 20A (C20A). Films were analyzed for evaluating the effect of nanofiller on the morphology and barrier properties. Moreover, to verify the effectiveness of the designed systems in reducing the cooking times of meat products, MW heating tests were carried out on pork meat hamburgers in MW oven at varying supplied powers. The cooking tests have pointed out that the selected matrices are efficient in reducing cooking times and that even low concentration of C20A acts as heating enhancers of PET

  6. PET based nanocomposite films for microwave packaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galdi, M. R., E-mail: mrgaldi@unisa.it; Olivieri, R.; Liguori, L.; Albanese, D., E-mail: dalbanese@unisa.it; Di Matteo, M.; Di Maio, L., E-mail: ldimaio@unisa.it [Industrial Engineering Department, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II 132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    In recent years, changes in life standards have promoted the diffusion of Ready to Cook (RTC) and Ready to Eat (RTE) products for microwave ovens. However, the main limits in microwave (MW) ovens usage are often related to the proper choice of packaging materials suitable for such technology. In fact, packages for microwaveable RTC and RTE foods should ensure adequate preservation of the product before cooking/heating such as high barriers to gases and aromas and adequate control of water vapor transmission. In addition, microwaveable packaging material must be transparent to MW, thermally stable and resistant to the mechanical stress induced by the accumulation in the head space of volatile substances produced during the cooking. Polymeric materials are good candidates for microwaveable packaging thanks to their transparency to MW. In the last years a great interest is devoted to developing innovative solution based on the use of additives or systems that act as susceptors or heating enhancers for improving the characteristics of polymers in cooking/heating in MW ovens. The present work was focused on the production and characterization of nanocomposite copolyester based films suitable for microwaveable food packaging applications. The matrices selected consist in two PET copolymers modified with carbon black (ULTRA STD) and with titanium oxide (ULTRA NA). Nanocomposite co-extruded multilayer films were produced using different percentages (0%, 2% and 4%wt/wt) of Cloisite 20A (C20A). Films were analyzed for evaluating the effect of nanofiller on the morphology and barrier properties. Moreover, to verify the effectiveness of the designed systems in reducing the cooking times of meat products, MW heating tests were carried out on pork meat hamburgers in MW oven at varying supplied powers. The cooking tests have pointed out that the selected matrices are efficient in reducing cooking times and that even low concentration of C20A acts as heating enhancers of PET.

  7. PET based nanocomposite films for microwave packaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdi, M. R.; Olivieri, R.; Liguori, L.; Albanese, D.; Di Matteo, M.; Di Maio, L.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, changes in life standards have promoted the diffusion of Ready to Cook (RTC) and Ready to Eat (RTE) products for microwave ovens. However, the main limits in microwave (MW) ovens usage are often related to the proper choice of packaging materials suitable for such technology. In fact, packages for microwaveable RTC and RTE foods should ensure adequate preservation of the product before cooking/heating such as high barriers to gases and aromas and adequate control of water vapor transmission. In addition, microwaveable packaging material must be transparent to MW, thermally stable and resistant to the mechanical stress induced by the accumulation in the head space of volatile substances produced during the cooking. Polymeric materials are good candidates for microwaveable packaging thanks to their transparency to MW. In the last years a great interest is devoted to developing innovative solution based on the use of additives or systems that act as susceptors or heating enhancers for improving the characteristics of polymers in cooking/heating in MW ovens. The present work was focused on the production and characterization of nanocomposite copolyester based films suitable for microwaveable food packaging applications. The matrices selected consist in two PET copolymers modified with carbon black (ULTRA STD) and with titanium oxide (ULTRA NA). Nanocomposite co-extruded multilayer films were produced using different percentages (0%, 2% and 4%wt/wt) of Cloisite 20A (C20A). Films were analyzed for evaluating the effect of nanofiller on the morphology and barrier properties. Moreover, to verify the effectiveness of the designed systems in reducing the cooking times of meat products, MW heating tests were carried out on pork meat hamburgers in MW oven at varying supplied powers. The cooking tests have pointed out that the selected matrices are efficient in reducing cooking times and that even low concentration of C20A acts as heating enhancers of PET.

  8. Clinical significance of pretreatment FDG PET/CT IN MOBG-avid pediatric neuroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Seo Young; Kim, Yong Il; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kang, Keon Wook; Chung, June Key; Lee, Dong Soo; Kang, Hyoung Jin; Shin, Hee Young [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, E. Edmund [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Rahim, Muhammad Kashif [Nishtar Medical College and Hospital, Multan (Pakistan)

    2017-06-15

    {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging is well known to have clinical significance in the initial staging and response evaluation of the many kinds of neoplasms. However, its role in the pediatric neuroblastoma is not clearly defined. In the present study, the clinical significance of FDG-PET/computed tomography (CT) in 123I- or 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG)-avid pediatric neuroblastoma was investigated. Twenty patients with neuroblastoma who undertook pretreatment FDG PET/CT at our institute between 2008 and 2015 and showed MIBG avidity were retrospectively enrolled in the present study. Clinical information—including histopathology, and serum markers—and several PET parameters—including SUVmax of the primary lesion (Psuv), target-to-background ratio (TBR), metabolic tumor volume (MTV), and coefficient of variation (CV)—were analyzed. The prognostic effect of PET parameters was evaluated in terms of progression-free survival (PFS). Total 20 patients (4.5 ± 3.5 years) were divided as two groups by disease progression. Six patients (30.0 %) experienced disease progression and one patient (5.0 %) died during follow-up period. There were not statistically significant in age, stage, MYCN status, primary tumor size, serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), neuron-specific enolase (NSE), and ferritin level between two groups with progression or no progression. However, Psuv (p = 0.017), TBR (p = 0.09), MTV (p = 0.02), and CV (p = 0.036) showed significant differences between two groups. In univariate analysis, PFS was significantly associated with Psuv (p = 0.021) and TBR (p = 0.023). FDG-PET parameters were significantly related with progression of neuroblastoma. FDG-PET/CT may have the potential as a valuable modality for evaluating prognosis in the patients with MIBG-avid pediatric neuroblastoma.

  9. Clinical application of ghrelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Ghrelin as a human natural hormone is involved in fundamental regulatory processes of eating and energy balance. Ghrelin signals the nutrient availability from the gastrointestinal tract to the central nervous system, up-regulates food intake and lowers energy expenditure mainly through hypothalamic mediators acting both centrally and peripherally including the gastrointestinal tract (motility, epithelium), promotes both neuro-endocrine and inflammatory signals to increase skeletal muscle growth and decrease protein breakdown, and increases lipolysis while body fat utilization is reduced. Ghrelin does more to exert its probably sentinel role around "human energy": it influences through mainly extra-hypothalamic actions the hedonic and incentive value of food, mood and anxiety, sleep-wake regulation, learning and memory, and neurogenesis. Recently numerous ghrelin gene-derived peptides were discovered, demonstrating the complexity within the ghrelin/ghrelin receptor axis. For clinical applications, not only the natural ghrelin and its slice variants, but also several modified or artificial molecules acting at ghrelin-associated receptors were and are developed. Current clinical applications are limited to clinical studies, focusing mainly on cachexia in chronic heart failure, COPD, cancer, endstage- renal-disease or cystic fibrosis, but also on frailty in elderly, gastrointestinal motility (e.g., gastroparesis, functional dyspepsia, postoperative ileus), after curative gastrectomy, anorexia nervosa, growth hormone deficient patients, alcohol craving, sleep-wake regulation (e.g. major depression), or sympathetic nervous activity in obesity. The results of completed, preliminary studies support the clinical potential of ghrelin, ghrelin gene-derived peptides, and artificial analogues, suggesting that larger clinical trials are demanded to move ghrelin towards an available and reimbursed pharmaceutical intervention.

  10. Initial validation of 4D-model for a clinical PET scanner using the Monte Carlo code gate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Igor F.; Lima, Fernando R.A.; Gomes, Marcelo S.; Vieira, Jose W.; Pacheco, Ludimila M.; Chaves, Rosa M.

    2011-01-01

    Building exposure computational models (ECM) of emission tomography (PET and SPECT) currently has several dedicated computing tools based on Monte Carlo techniques (SimSET, SORTEO, SIMIND, GATE). This paper is divided into two steps: (1) using the dedicated code GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission) to build a 4D model (where the fourth dimension is the time) of a clinical PET scanner from General Electric, GE ADVANCE, simulating the geometric and electronic structures suitable for this scanner, as well as some phenomena 4D, for example, rotating gantry; (2) the next step is to evaluate the performance of the model built here in the reproduction of test noise equivalent count rate (NEC) based on the NEMA Standards Publication NU protocols 2-2007 for this tomography. The results for steps (1) and (2) will be compared with experimental and theoretical values of the literature showing actual state of art of validation. (author)

  11. Initial validation of 4D-model for a clinical PET scanner using the Monte Carlo code gate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Igor F.; Lima, Fernando R.A.; Gomes, Marcelo S., E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, Jose W.; Pacheco, Ludimila M. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Chaves, Rosa M. [Instituto de Radium e Supervoltagem Ivo Roesler, Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Building exposure computational models (ECM) of emission tomography (PET and SPECT) currently has several dedicated computing tools based on Monte Carlo techniques (SimSET, SORTEO, SIMIND, GATE). This paper is divided into two steps: (1) using the dedicated code GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission) to build a 4D model (where the fourth dimension is the time) of a clinical PET scanner from General Electric, GE ADVANCE, simulating the geometric and electronic structures suitable for this scanner, as well as some phenomena 4D, for example, rotating gantry; (2) the next step is to evaluate the performance of the model built here in the reproduction of test noise equivalent count rate (NEC) based on the NEMA Standards Publication NU protocols 2-2007 for this tomography. The results for steps (1) and (2) will be compared with experimental and theoretical values of the literature showing actual state of art of validation. (author)

  12. Clinical evaluation of PET image reconstruction using a spatial resolution model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Flemming Littrup; Klausen, Thomas Levin; Loft, Annika

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: PET image resolution is variable across the measured field-of-view and described by the point spread function (PSF). When accounting for the PSF during PET image reconstruction image resolution is improved and partial volume effects are reduced. Here, we evaluate the effect of PSF......-based reconstruction on lesion quantification in routine clinical whole-body (WB) PET/CT imaging. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 41 oncology patients were referred for a WB-PET/CT examination (Biograph 40 TruePoint). Emission data were acquired at 2.5min/bed at 1hpi of 400 MBq [18F]-FDG. Attenuation-corrected PET images were...... reconstructed on 336×336-matrices using: (R1) standard AW-OSEM (4 iter, 8 subsets, 4mm Gaussian) and (R2) AW-OSEM with PSF (3 iter, 21 subsets, 2mm). Blinded and randomised reading of R1- and R2-PET images was performed. Individual lesions were located and counted independently on both sets of images...

  13. Clinical utility of F-18 FDG PET-CT in the initial evaluation of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Poul Henning; Holdgaard, Paw Christian; Christensen, Janne Buck; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2016-10-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) is a resource-demanding imaging modality with increasing popularity in the workup of patients with suspected or proven lung cancer. To review the clinical usefulness of this imaging modality in the diagnosis, staging, and pre-operative evaluation, we conducted a systematic literature search, review, and quality assessment using the rapid evidence assessment toolkit and the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine methodology. The literature search resulted in 4,208 records including 918 reviews, of which 139 met the predefined criteria and were read in full to identify relevant original articles on F-18 FDG PET-CT (1) in the evaluation of solitary pulmonary nodules (n = 14), (2) in curative-intent treatment trials (n = 9), and (3) in planning of invasive procedures (n = 18). We found the following important results from the literature review: 1) PET-CT can rule out malignancy in most solitary pulmonary nodules due to high sensitivity (recommendation level A). 2) PET-CT reduces the number of futile treatment trials (recommendation level A). 3) The sensitivity of PET-CT in general is insufficient to rule out mediastinal lymph node metastasis (recommendation level A). ᅟ 1) With few exceptions, solitary pulmonary nodules can safely be considered benign if the PET-CT scan is negative. Exceptions consist of small (PET-CT scan has excluded occult distant metastases. 3) In general, lymph node metastasis in the mediastinum cannot be ruled out on the basis of a negative PET-CT, and confirmative invasive staging should be performed in most patients before mediastinal metastasis is confirmed or ruled out.

  14. Clinical utility of F-18 FDG PET-CT in the initial evaluation of lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, Poul Henning [Vejle Hospital, Department of Medicine, Division of Respiratory Medicine, Vejle (Denmark); Holdgaard, Paw Christian [Vejle Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vejle (Denmark); Christensen, Janne Buck [Odense University Hospital/University of Southern Denmark, Department of Quality and Research/HTA, Odense University Hospital and Medical Research Library, Odense (Denmark); Hoeilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming [Odense University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense (Denmark)

    2016-10-15

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) is a resource-demanding imaging modality with increasing popularity in the workup of patients with suspected or proven lung cancer. To review the clinical usefulness of this imaging modality in the diagnosis, staging, and pre-operative evaluation, we conducted a systematic literature search, review, and quality assessment using the rapid evidence assessment toolkit and the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine methodology. The literature search resulted in 4,208 records including 918 reviews, of which 139 met the predefined criteria and were read in full to identify relevant original articles on F-18 FDG PET-CT (1) in the evaluation of solitary pulmonary nodules (n = 14), (2) in curative-intent treatment trials (n = 9), and (3) in planning of invasive procedures (n = 18). We found the following important results from the literature review: (1) PET-CT can rule out malignancy in most solitary pulmonary nodules due to high sensitivity (recommendation level A). (2) PET-CT reduces the number of futile treatment trials (recommendation level A). (3) The sensitivity of PET-CT in general is insufficient to rule out mediastinal lymph node metastasis (recommendation level A). (1) With few exceptions, solitary pulmonary nodules can safely be considered benign if the PET-CT scan is negative. Exceptions consist of small (<1 cm) and non-solid, solitary pulmonary nodules. These abnormalities should be followed up by CT in a structured programme. (2) No curative-intent treatment should be commenced until a PET-CT scan has excluded occult distant metastases. (3) In general, lymph node metastasis in the mediastinum cannot be ruled out on the basis of a negative PET-CT, and confirmative invasive staging should be performed in most patients before mediastinal metastasis is confirmed or ruled out. (orig.)

  15. Clinical utility of F-18 FDG PET-CT in the initial evaluation of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, Poul Henning; Holdgaard, Paw Christian; Christensen, Janne Buck; Hoeilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) is a resource-demanding imaging modality with increasing popularity in the workup of patients with suspected or proven lung cancer. To review the clinical usefulness of this imaging modality in the diagnosis, staging, and pre-operative evaluation, we conducted a systematic literature search, review, and quality assessment using the rapid evidence assessment toolkit and the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine methodology. The literature search resulted in 4,208 records including 918 reviews, of which 139 met the predefined criteria and were read in full to identify relevant original articles on F-18 FDG PET-CT (1) in the evaluation of solitary pulmonary nodules (n = 14), (2) in curative-intent treatment trials (n = 9), and (3) in planning of invasive procedures (n = 18). We found the following important results from the literature review: (1) PET-CT can rule out malignancy in most solitary pulmonary nodules due to high sensitivity (recommendation level A). (2) PET-CT reduces the number of futile treatment trials (recommendation level A). (3) The sensitivity of PET-CT in general is insufficient to rule out mediastinal lymph node metastasis (recommendation level A). (1) With few exceptions, solitary pulmonary nodules can safely be considered benign if the PET-CT scan is negative. Exceptions consist of small (<1 cm) and non-solid, solitary pulmonary nodules. These abnormalities should be followed up by CT in a structured programme. (2) No curative-intent treatment should be commenced until a PET-CT scan has excluded occult distant metastases. (3) In general, lymph node metastasis in the mediastinum cannot be ruled out on the basis of a negative PET-CT, and confirmative invasive staging should be performed in most patients before mediastinal metastasis is confirmed or ruled out. (orig.)

  16. Recurrent renal cell carcinoma: clinical and prognostic value of FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alongi, Pierpaolo; Picchio, Maria; Gianolli, Luigi; Zattoni, Fabio; Spallino, Marianna; Saladini, Giorgio; Evangelista, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our study was 1) to evaluate the diagnostic performance of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT), 2) to assess the impact of FDG PET/CT on treatment decision-making, and 3) to estimate the prognostic value of FDG PET/CT in the restaging process among patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). From the FDG PET/CT databases of San Raffaele Hospital in Milan, Italy, and the Veneto Institute of Oncology in Padua, Italy, we selected 104 patients with a certain diagnosis of RCC after surgery, and for whom at least 24 months of post-surgical FDG PET/CT, clinical, and instrumental follow-up data was available. The sensitivity and specificity of FDG PET/CT were assessed by histology and/or other imaging as standard of reference. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were computed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify predictors of outcome. FDG PET/CT resulted in a positive diagnosis in 58 patients and a negative diagnosis in 46 patients. Sensitivity and specificity were 74 % and 80 %, respectively. FDG PET/CT findings influenced therapeutic management in 45/104 cases (43 %). After a median follow-up period of 37 months (± standard deviation 12.9), 51 (49 %) patients had recurrence of disease, and 26 (25 %) had died. In analysis of OS, positive versus negative FDG PET/CT was associated with worse cumulative survival rates over a 5-year period (19 % vs. 69 %, respectively; p <0.05). Similarly, a positive FDG PET/CT correlated with a lower 3-year PFS rate. In addition, univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that a positive scan, alone or in combination with disease stage III-IV or nuclear grading 3-4, was associated with high risk of progression (multivariate analysis = hazard ratios [HRs] of 4.01, 3.7, and 2.8, respectively; all p < 0.05). FDG PET/CT is a valuable tool both in treatment decision-making and for

  17. Recurrent renal cell carcinoma: clinical and prognostic value of FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alongi, Pierpaolo; Picchio, Maria; Gianolli, Luigi [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Nuclear Medicine Department, Milan (Italy); Zattoni, Fabio [University of Padua, Department of Oncological and Surgical Sciences, Urology Clinic, Padua (Italy); Spallino, Marianna [University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Saladini, Giorgio; Evangelista, Laura [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV - IRCCS, Padua, Italy, Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine Unit, Padua (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    The purpose of our study was 1) to evaluate the diagnostic performance of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT), 2) to assess the impact of FDG PET/CT on treatment decision-making, and 3) to estimate the prognostic value of FDG PET/CT in the restaging process among patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). From the FDG PET/CT databases of San Raffaele Hospital in Milan, Italy, and the Veneto Institute of Oncology in Padua, Italy, we selected 104 patients with a certain diagnosis of RCC after surgery, and for whom at least 24 months of post-surgical FDG PET/CT, clinical, and instrumental follow-up data was available. The sensitivity and specificity of FDG PET/CT were assessed by histology and/or other imaging as standard of reference. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were computed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify predictors of outcome. FDG PET/CT resulted in a positive diagnosis in 58 patients and a negative diagnosis in 46 patients. Sensitivity and specificity were 74 % and 80 %, respectively. FDG PET/CT findings influenced therapeutic management in 45/104 cases (43 %). After a median follow-up period of 37 months (± standard deviation 12.9), 51 (49 %) patients had recurrence of disease, and 26 (25 %) had died. In analysis of OS, positive versus negative FDG PET/CT was associated with worse cumulative survival rates over a 5-year period (19 % vs. 69 %, respectively; p <0.05). Similarly, a positive FDG PET/CT correlated with a lower 3-year PFS rate. In addition, univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that a positive scan, alone or in combination with disease stage III-IV or nuclear grading 3-4, was associated with high risk of progression (multivariate analysis = hazard ratios [HRs] of 4.01, 3.7, and 2.8, respectively; all p < 0.05). FDG PET/CT is a valuable tool both in treatment decision-making and for

  18. Clinical value of FDG-PET in cutaneous malignant melanoma: First experience in Estonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarenko, S.; Niin, M.; Paats, A.; Tonnov, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: In November 2002 first 18F-FDG-PET was performed in Estonia using a mobile truck-mounted scanning technology (Accel, Siemens) provided by the International Healthcare Group (IHG, Amersfoort, Netherlands). The FDG was provided by MAP Medical Technologies, Schering, (Helsinki, Finland). In 2003 this scheme was repeated for further scanning sessions. Evaluation of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) using nuclear technique is of particular interest in Estonia as its incidence is on the rise. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in CMM has a well-documented high diagnostic accuracy, especially in staging of the disease. The aim of the current study was to assess the impact of 18F-FDG-PET on detailed staging and clinical management in CMM. 30 patients of CMM, 16 males and 14 females, all non-diabetic, in the age range of 26 to 69 years were studied. Of these 30 patients, 12 were of high risk primary CMM, 7 had regional lymph node metastases and 11 had distant metastases. Patients were asked to consume a low-carbohydrate diet 3 days prior to the FDG-PET scan. 194 to 410 MBq (average 335 MBq) 18F-FDG was administered to the patients who were asked to come fasting for a minimum of 6 hours. Whole body scan was performed 40 to 65 minutes after the administration of FDG on the mobile PET. In 13 of the 30 patients (43%) 18F-FDG-PET changed the staging. In remaining 17 patients (57%) 18F-FDG-PET increased confidence level for the chosen treatment. Lymphadenectomy was planned in 2 patients showing lymph node involvement on FDG-PET. In other 2 patients, one with small pulmonary and other with a liver lesions found on PET but negative on radiological examination 'wait-and-watch' strategy was chosen. An unexpected hypermetabolic lesion seen in 1 case turned out to be a benign focus of connective tissue. One patient shown to have multiple distant metastases was started on chemotherapy. Finally in 8 of the 30 (27%) patients an immediate positive

  19. PET and diagnostic technology evaluation in a global clinical process. DGN's point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotzerke, J.; Dietlein, M.; Gruenwald, F.; Bockisch, A.

    2010-01-01

    malignancies will be improved continuously. It is the claim of the health insurances to implement innovative therapeutic approaches in controlled clinical trials with tools of quality control. The monitoring committee is responsible for the safety of the patients. PET is part of the health care. Internationally accepted rules for clinical trials stipulate that any interim analyses of those trials are confidential as long as recruitment is active. The delay until evidence is documented by the published final analysis is methodologically accepted and not a characteristic of PET. (7) Procedures in nuclear medicine without the use of PET-tracers with short half-life will increase the radiation exposure of the patients; the use of non-PET-tracers with longer half-life is in contravention of the German regulation of radiation protection. (orig.)

  20. PET with coincidence gamma cameras - clinical benefit from the radiooncologists' point of view; PET mit Koinzidenz-Gammakameras - klinischer Nutzen aus der Sicht des Radioonkologen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, E; Feyerabend, T; Stallmann, C; Lauer, I; Baehre, M [Universitaetsklinikum Luebeck (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Nuklearmedizin

    2001-11-01

    Positron emission tomography with FDG (FDG-PET) is a new technique, which displays the cellular metabolic activity. Since tumors exhibit an increased metabolic activity when compared to normal tissue, this imaging modality has a particularly high importance. FDG-PET is not only useful for localizing and staging of malignant tumors, but also to evaluate therapy response. In this context, PET is superior to morphologically orientated modalities, because therapeutically induced changes in glucose metabolism precede morphologic alterations. Numerous studies indicate, that PET will play an important role in radiooncology concerning therapy planning and monitoring the effects of therapy during and after treatment. Further clinical studies are necessary to evaluate the information provided by FDG-PET more precisely. Coincidence gamma cameras with adequate imaging characteristics will gain enhanced importance to meet these increasing demands. (orig.) [German] Die Positronenemissionstomographie mit FDG (FDG-PET) ist ein neues Verfahren, das die Stoffwechselaktivitaet von Zellen bildlich wiedergibt. Da Tumorgewebe im Vergleich zu normalem Gewebe einen erhoehten Stoffwechsel aufweist, hat dieses Untersuchungsverfahren in der Onkologie einen besonders hohen Stellenwert. Neben der Lokalisations- und Ausbreitungsdiagnostik eignet sich die FDG-PET zur Erfolgsbeurteilung. Die PET ist hierin den anderen morphologischen Verfahren ueberlegen, da die Veraenderungen des Glukosemetabolismus durch therapeutische Massnahmen morphologischen Veraenderungen vorausgehen. Zahlreiche Untersuchungen lassen erkennen, dass die PET fuer die Radioonkologie einen wichtigen Stellenwert einnehmen wird. Dies betrifft die Bestrahlungsplanung und das Therapiemonitoring waehrend und nach einer Behandlung. Weitere klinische Studien sind notwendig, um die Aussagekraft der FDG-PET besser zu evaluieren. Den Koinzidenz-Gammakameras mit adaequaten Bildgebungseigenschaften kommt eine zunehmende Bedeutung zu, um

  1. Clinical signs, therapy and zoonotic risk of pet guinea pigs with dermatophytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, A; Hein, J; Heusinger, A; Mueller, R S

    2013-03-01

    Systematic studies about pet guinea pigs with dermatophytosis are rare. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical signs, therapy and zoonotic risk of pet guinea pigs with dermatophytosis. Questionnaires from both owners (n = 74) of pet guinea pigs with dermatophytosis and their veterinarians (n = 101) were analysed regarding clinical signs, therapy and data pertinent to zoonotic potential. Trichophyton (T.) mentagrophytes was found in 97% of cases. In the weeks preceding the onset of the clinical signs, a new guinea pig joined the household in 43% of cases. One third of the affected guinea pigs had lived in the household for less than 3 months. Predominant clinical signs were alopecia (83%), scaling (73%) and crusting (70%). The most commonly affected body site was the head (75%). In approximately one quarter of the cases humans showed clinical signs of dermatophytosis, in half the households, only children were affected. Skin lesions were seen most often on the face, the neck and the arms. Pet guinea pigs carrying dermatophytes must be considered a serious zoonotic risk for their owners, especially for children. A major risk factor for dermatophytosis seems to be a recent acquisition of a new guinea pig. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Clinical value of positron emission tomography (PET) in oncology: Results of an interdisciplinary consensus conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reske, S.N.; Bares, R.; Buell, U.; Guhlmann, A.; Moser, E.; Wannenmacher, M.F.

    1996-01-01

    Clinical value of PET in oncology was evaluated by a panel of recognized experts in the framework of an interdisciplinary consensus conference. On the basis of PET studies, well documented in the international literature, the value of PET for solving clinical questions was classified according to the following categories 'appropriate' (1a), 'mostly acceptable' (1b), 'helpful' (2a), 'value as yet unknown' (2b), 'useless' (3). 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) acts as the radiopharmaceutical of choice for PET in clinical oncology. PET is indicated (1a) for diagnosing relapse in high grade glioma (FDG) or low grade glioma (C-11 methionine or F-18 fluorotyrosine), differential diagnosis of solitary peripheral pulponary nodules in high risk patients and for diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma. PET may be clinically used (1b): In 'low-grade' glioma, search for unknown primary in head and neck tumors, suspicion of relapse in nonsmall cell bronchial carcinoma (NSCBC) and colorectal carcinoma, lymphnode staging in NSCBC, pancreatic carcinoma, muscle invasive bladder carcinoma and testicular cancer. Staging of Hodgkin's disease (HD, stage I/II vs III), early therapy control in patients with a residual mass or suspicion of relapse in HD and in high grade NHL, lymph node staging and search for distant metastases in malignant melanoma (Breslow>1,5 mm), search for lymph node or distant metastases in differentiated thyroid cancer with elevated hTG and a negative radioiodide whole body scan. Many further indications are emerging, but are not yet sufficiently well documented in the literature. For most indications beside scientific studies, an individual cost benefit utility evaluation by the responsible physician is recommended. (orig./MG) [de

  3. Feasibility of simultaneous PET/MR of the carotid artery: first clinical experience and comparison to PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Knudsen, Andreas; Hag, Anne Mette Fisker

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed at comparing PET/MR to PET/CT for imaging the carotid arteries in patients with known increased risk of atherosclerosis. Six HIV-positive men underwent sequential PET/MR and PET/CT of the carotid arteries after injection of 400 MBq of 18F-FDG. PET/MR was performed a median of 131......) indicating that the luminal 18F-FDG content had minimal influence on the values. The study shows for the first time that simultaneous PET/MR of the carotid arteries is feasible in patients with increased risk of atherosclerosis. Quantification of 18F-FDG uptake correlated well between PET/MR and PET...

  4. {sup 18}F-FDG PET of the hands with a dedicated high-resolution PEM system (arthro-PET): correlation with PET/CT, radiography and clinical parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mhlanga, Joyce C.; Lodge, Martin [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States); Carrino, John A. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Musculoskeletal Radiology, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wang, Hao [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Oncology Biostatistics Division, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wahl, Richard L. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States); Johns Hopkins University Hospitals, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this study was to prospectively determine the feasibility and compare the novel use of a positron emission mammography (PEM) scanner with standard PET/CT for evaluating hand osteoarthritis (OA) with {sup 18}F-FDG. Institutional review board approval and written informed consent were obtained for this HIPAA-compliant prospective study in which 14 adults referred for oncological {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT underwent dedicated hand PET/CT followed by arthro-PET using the PEM device. Hand radiographs were obtained and scored for the presence and severity of OA. Summed qualitative and quantitative joint glycolytic scores for each modality were compared with the findings on plain radiography and clinical features. Eight patients with clinical and/or radiographic evidence of OA comprised the OA group (mean age 73 ± 7.7 years). Six patients served as the control group (53.7 ± 9.3 years). Arthro-PET quantitative and qualitative joint glycolytic scores were highly correlated with PET/CT findings in the OA patients (r = 0.86. p = 0.007; r = 0.94, p = 0.001). Qualitative arthro-PET and PET/CT joint scores were significantly higher in the OA patients than in controls (38.7 ± 6.6 vs. 32.2 ± 0.4, p = 0.02; 37.5 ± 5.4 vs. 32.2 ± 0.4, p = 0.03, respectively). Quantitative arthro-PET and PET/CT maximum SUV-lean joint scores were higher in the OA patients, although they did not reach statistical significance (20.8 ± 4.2 vs. 18 ± 1.8, p = 0.13; 22.8 ± 5.38 vs. 20.1 ± 1.54, p= 0.21). By definition, OA patients had higher radiographic joint scores than controls (30.9 ± 31.3 vs. 0, p = 0.03). Hand imaging using a small field of view PEM system (arthro-PET) with FDG is feasible, performing comparably to PET/CT in assessing metabolic joint activity. Arthro-PET and PET/CT showed higher joint FDG uptake in OA. Further exploration of arthro-PET in arthritis management is warranted. (orig.)

  5. Progress in the application of a combination microdialysis and PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Jinping; Zhou Xue; Zhu Lin

    2010-01-01

    PET is an advanced imaging technology to obtain biological, physiological or pharmacological function. The PET signal comprises the sum of a radio-probe and its radioactive metabolites from intracellular, extracellular and intravascular compartments of a given tissue, it cannot provide the chemical composition of the radioactivity or compartments of radio-labeled substances present. On the other hand, in vivo microdialysis is a powerful sampling technique wherein regional chemical information is obtained by implanting a probe into the extracellular fluid of interest tissue. Combined PET and microdialysis may potentially play an important role inn pathophysiology, pharmacology, pharmacokinetics and drug metabolism. (authors)

  6. Blind source separation analysis of PET dynamic data: a simple method with exciting MR-PET applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oros-Peusquens, Ana-Maria; Silva, Nuno da [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Weiss, Carolin [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Cologne, 50924 Cologne (Germany); Stoffels, Gabrielle; Herzog, Hans; Langen, Karl J [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Shah, N Jon [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Jülich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) - Section JARA-Brain RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2014-07-29

    Denoising of dynamic PET data improves parameter imaging by PET and is gaining momentum. This contribution describes an analysis of dynamic PET data by blind source separation methods and comparison of the results with MR-based brain properties.

  7. Cerebral activation studies by PET and fMRT, clinical relevance?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, T.

    1997-01-01

    Cerebral activation studies by PET and fMRT will gain increasing clinical relevance for functional neuroanatomy (reading, speaking), localisation of largely unknown cortical functions (vestibular cortex), imaging of subjective complaints of functional impairments (pain, smell, memory), and documentation of neurological rehabilitation at neuronal level (regeneration, compensation, substitution, learning). (orig.) [de

  8. Presentation of the DosePet application (APP) for use in Nuclear Medicine: calculation of the amount of medicament for PET / CT patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Pedro Augusto do; Rodrigues, Araken dos S. Werneck

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the application (APP) DosePet that calculates the amount of medicament for PET / CT in patients according to the predetermined radiation dose. The software has been designed using the web MIT App Inventor2 tool for Android platform. The application allows the workers to simulate the amount of radiation still existing in the premises after the applications, increasing security and reducing exposures, and enable greater efficiency in the use of the radiopharmaceutical. (author)

  9. Clinical correlates of decreased anteroposterior metabolic gradients in positron emission tomography (PET) of schizophrenic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLisi, L.E.; Buchsbaum, M.S.; Holcomb, H.H.

    1985-01-01

    The finding in schizophrenic patients of a reversal of the normal frontal to posterior pattern of brain metabolic activity with positron emission tomography (PET) is of interest, but its relevance to psychopathology is unknown. Using PET, the authors studied 21 patients with chronic schizophrenia and 21 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Although eight of the 21 patients and only one of the control subjects showed a relatively lower anteroposterior metabolic gradient, no clinical correlates of this finding were noted. In addition, cerebral atrophy, as determined by CAT scan, was not associated with this aberrant metabolic pattern

  10. Clinical value of FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of suspected recurrent ovarian cancer: is there an impact of FDG PET/CT on patient management?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilici, Ahmet; Ustaalioglu, Bala Basak Oven; Seker, Mesut; Salepci, Taflan; Gumus, Mahmut; Canpolat, Nesrin; Tekinsoy, Bulent

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical value of FDG PET/CT in patients with suspected ovarian cancer recurrence as compared with diagnostic CT, and to assess the impact of the results of FDG PET/CT on treatment planning. Included in this retrospective study were 60 patients with suspected recurrent ovarian cancer who had previously undergone primary debulking surgery and had been treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. Diagnostic CT and FDG PET/CT imaging were performed for all patients as clinically indicated. The changes in the clinical management of patients according to the results of FDG PET/CT were also analysed. FDG PET/CT was performed in 21 patients with a previously negative or indeterminate diagnostic CT scan, but an elevated CA-125 level, and provided a sensitivity of 95% in the detection of recurrent disease. FDG PET/CT revealed recurrent disease in 19 patients. In 17 of 60 patients, the indication for FDG PET/CT was an elevated CA-125 level and an abnormal diagnostic CT scan to localize accurately the extent of disease. FDG PET/CT scans correctly identified recurrent disease in 16 of the 17 patients, a sensitivity of 94.1%. Moreover, FDG PET/CT was performed in 18 patients with clinical symptoms of ovarian cancer recurrence, an abnormal diagnostic CT scan, but a normal CA-125 level. In this setting, FDG PET/CT correctly confirmed recurrent disease in seven patients providing a sensitivity of 100% in determining recurrence. In four patients, FDG PET/CT was carried out for the assessment of treatment response. Three of four scans were classified as true-negative indicating a complete response. In the other patient, FDG PET/CT identified progression of disease. In total, 45 (75%) of the 60 patients had recurrent disease, in 14 (31.1%) documented by histopathology and in 31 (68.9%) on clinical follow-up, while 15 (25%) had no evidence of recurrent disease. The overall sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and positive and negative predictive value

  11. Spectral Analysis of Dynamic PET Studies: A Review of 20 Years of Method Developments and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronese, Mattia; Rizzo, Gaia; Bertoldo, Alessandra; Turkheimer, Federico E

    2016-01-01

    In Positron Emission Tomography (PET), spectral analysis (SA) allows the quantification of dynamic data by relating the radioactivity measured by the scanner in time to the underlying physiological processes of the system under investigation. Among the different approaches for the quantification of PET data, SA is based on the linear solution of the Laplace transform inversion whereas the measured arterial and tissue time-activity curves of a radiotracer are used to calculate the input response function of the tissue. In the recent years SA has been used with a large number of PET tracers in brain and nonbrain applications, demonstrating that it is a very flexible and robust method for PET data analysis. Differently from the most common PET quantification approaches that adopt standard nonlinear estimation of compartmental models or some linear simplifications, SA can be applied without defining any specific model configuration and has demonstrated very good sensitivity to the underlying kinetics. This characteristic makes it useful as an investigative tool especially for the analysis of novel PET tracers. The purpose of this work is to offer an overview of SA, to discuss advantages and limitations of the methodology, and to inform about its applications in the PET field.

  12. Application of 18F-FDG PET for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klisarova, A.; Bochev, P.; Deleva, N.; Dimitrov, I.; Ivanov, B.

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body dementia are the two most frequent disorders among degenerative dementias. Their clinical identification and differential diagnosis are often difficult in the early stages when, on the other hand treatment is most effective. FDG-PET assessment of region brain metabolism is a proven method and its application demented patients ensures a higher diagnostic accuracy even at the preclinical stage. It helps resolving cases with difficult differential diagnosis as well. In this paper we discuss the application of the method in Alzheimer's disease and Lev body dementia; we present typical cases of both disorder which were assessed by FDG-PET for the first time in Bulgaria highlighting the methodology and the characteristic imaging findings

  13. Clinical utility of FDG-PET for the differential diagnosis among the main forms of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestor, Peter J; Altomare, Daniele; Festari, Cristina; Drzezga, Alexander; Rivolta, Jasmine; Walker, Zuzana; Bouwman, Femke; Orini, Stefania; Law, Ian; Agosta, Federica; Arbizu, Javier; Boccardi, Marina; Nobili, Flavio; Frisoni, Giovanni Battista

    2018-05-07

    To assess the clinical utility of FDG-PET as a diagnostic aid for differentiating Alzheimer's disease (AD; both typical and atypical forms), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), vascular dementia (VaD) and non-degenerative pseudodementia. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using the PICO model to extract evidence from relevant studies. An expert panel then voted on six different diagnostic scenarios using the Delphi method. The level of empirical study evidence for the use of FDG-PET was considered good for the discrimination of DLB and AD; fair for discriminating FTLD from AD; poor for atypical AD; and lacking for discriminating DLB from FTLD, AD from VaD, and for pseudodementia. Delphi voting led to consensus in all scenarios within two iterations. Panellists supported the use of FDG-PET for all PICOs-including those where study evidence was poor or lacking-based on its negative predictive value and on the assistance it provides when typical patterns of hypometabolism for a given diagnosis are observed. Although there is an overall lack of evidence on which to base strong recommendations, it was generally concluded that FDG-PET has a diagnostic role in all scenarios. Prospective studies targeting diagnostically uncertain patients for assessing the added value of FDG-PET would be highly desirable.

  14. Clinical Investigation of the Dopaminergic System with PET and FLUORINE-18-FLUORO-L-DOPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, Terrence Rayford

    1995-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a tool that provides quantitative physiological information. It is valuable both in a clinical environment, where information is sought for an individual, and in a research environment, to answer more fundamental questions about physiology and disease states. PET is particularly attractive compared to other nuclear medicine imaging techniques in cases where the anatomical regions of interest are small or when true metabolic rate constants are required. One example with both of these requirements is the investigation of Parkinson's Disease, which is characterized as a presynaptic motor function deficit affecting the striatum. As dopaminergic neurons die, the ability of the striatum to affect motor function decreases. The extent of functional neuronal damage in the small sub-structures may be ascertained by measuring the ability of the caudate and putamen to trap and store dopamine, a neurotransmitter. PET is able to utilize a tracer of dopamine activity, ^ {18}F- scL-DOPA, to quantitate the viability of the striatum. This thesis work deals with implementing and optimizing the many different elements that compose a PET study of the dopaminergic system, including: radioisotope production; conversion of aqueous ^{18}F ^-into [^ {18}F]-F2; synthesis of ^{18}F- scL -DOPA; details of the PET scan itself; measurements to estimate the radiation dosimetry; accurate measurement of a plasma input function; and the quantitation of dopaminergic activity in normal human subjects as well as in Parkinson's Disease patients.

  15. Potential medical applications of the plasma focus in the radioisotope production for PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roshan, M.V.; Razaghi, S.; Asghari, F.; Rawat, R.S.; Springham, S.V.; Lee, P.; Lee, S.; Tan, T.L.

    2014-01-01

    Devices other than the accelerators are desired to be investigated for generating high energy particles to induce nuclear reaction and positron emission tomography (PET) producing radioisotopes. The experimental data of plasma focus devices (PF) are studied and the activity scaling law for External Solid Target (EST) activation is established. Based on the scaling law and the techniques to enhance the radioisotopes production, the feasibility of generating the required activity for PET imaging is studied. - Highlights: • Short lived radioisotopes for PET imaging are produced in plasma focus device. • The scaling law of the activity induced with plasma focus energy is established. • The potential medical applications of plasma focus are studied

  16. Evaluation of the performance of the YAP-(S)PET scanner and its application in neuroscience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belcari, Nicola; Guerra, Alberto Del; Bartoli, Antonietta; Bianchi, Daniele; Lazzarotti, Marco; Sensi, Luca; Menichetti, Luca; Lecchi, Michela; Erba, Paola A.; Mariani, Giuliano; Corsini, Giovanni U.; Sgado, Paola

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the performance evaluation of the small animal scanner YAP-(S)PET, both in PET and SPECT modalities following preliminary NEMA standards for small animal PET. Data are taken with a new version of the scanner that is installed at the IFC-CNR in Pisa (Italy) within the framework of the Center of Excellence AmbiSEN of the University of Pisa. This paper also reports some preliminary SPECT applications in neuroscience using 123 I-FP-CIT (DaTSCAN)

  17. The need for clinical quantification of combined PET/MRI data in pediatric epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muzik, Otto; Pai, Darshan; Juhasz, Csaba; Hua, Jing

    2013-01-01

    In the past, multimodality integrative analysis of image data has been used to obtain a better understanding of underlying mechanisms of seizure generation and propagation in children with extratemporal lobe epilepsy. However, despite important advances in the combined analysis of PET, MRI, DTI and EEG data, successful surgical outcome is only achieved in about 2/3 of patients undergoing resective surgery. The advent of simultaneous PET/MR data acquisition promises an important advance in neuroimaging through clinical quantification, which will finally translate the strength of PET (which is the ability to absolutely quantify physiological parameters such as metabolic rates and receptor densities) into clinical work. Taking advantage of recently developed integrated PET/MR devices, absolute physiological values will be available in clinical routine, replacing currently used visual assessment of relative tissue tracer uptake. This will allow assessment of global increases/decreases of brain function during critical phases of development and is likely to have a significant impact on patient management in pediatric epilepsy

  18. The need for clinical quantification of combined PET/MRI data in pediatric epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzik, Otto, E-mail: otto@pet.wayne.edu [Department of Pediatrics, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States); Department of Radiology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States); Pai, Darshan [Department of Computer Science, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States); Juhasz, Csaba [Department of Pediatrics, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States); Hua, Jing [Department of Computer Science, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2013-02-21

    In the past, multimodality integrative analysis of image data has been used to obtain a better understanding of underlying mechanisms of seizure generation and propagation in children with extratemporal lobe epilepsy. However, despite important advances in the combined analysis of PET, MRI, DTI and EEG data, successful surgical outcome is only achieved in about 2/3 of patients undergoing resective surgery. The advent of simultaneous PET/MR data acquisition promises an important advance in neuroimaging through clinical quantification, which will finally translate the strength of PET (which is the ability to absolutely quantify physiological parameters such as metabolic rates and receptor densities) into clinical work. Taking advantage of recently developed integrated PET/MR devices, absolute physiological values will be available in clinical routine, replacing currently used visual assessment of relative tissue tracer uptake. This will allow assessment of global increases/decreases of brain function during critical phases of development and is likely to have a significant impact on patient management in pediatric epilepsy.

  19. Clinical Outcomes of Patients Receiving Integrated PET/CT-Guided Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernon, Matthew R.; Maheshwari, Mohit; Schultz, Christopher J.; Michel, Michelle A.; Wong, Stuart J.; Campbell, Bruce H.; Massey, Becky L.; Wilson, J. Frank; Wang Dian

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We previously reported the advantages of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET) fused with CT for radiotherapy planning over CT alone in head and neck carcinoma (HNC). The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes and the predictive value of PET for patients receiving PET/CT-guided definitive radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: From December 2002 to August 2006, 42 patients received PET/CT imaging as part of staging and radiotherapy planning. Clinical outcomes including locoregional recurrence, distant metastasis, death, and treatment-related toxicities were collected retrospectively and analyzed for disease-free and overall survival and cumulative incidence of recurrence. Results: Median follow-up from initiation of treatment was 32 months. Overall survival and disease-free survival were 82.8% and 71.0%, respectively, at 2 years, and 74.1% and 66.9% at 3 years. Of the 42 patients, seven recurrences were identified (three LR, one DM, three both LR and DM). Mean time to recurrence was 9.4 months. Cumulative risk of recurrence was 18.7%. The maximum standard uptake volume (SUV) of primary tumor, adenopathy, or both on PET did not correlate with recurrence, with mean values of 12.0 for treatment failures vs. 11.7 for all patients. Toxicities identified in those patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy were also evaluated. Conclusions: A high level of disease control combined with favorable toxicity profiles was achieved in a cohort of HNC patients receiving PET/CT fusion guided radiotherapy plus/minus chemotherapy. Maximum SUV of primary tumor and/or adenopathy was not predictive of risk of disease recurrence

  20. Administered activities of 18F-FDG PET clinics in pediatrics patients in Brazil- preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Cassio Miri; Sa, Lidia V. de

    2013-01-01

    A survey was conducted among the Brazilian clinical PET, with the purpose of investigating the activities administered to pediatric oncology patients and assess whether significant differences between the protocols adopted. In addition, this survey can cooperate to the suggestion diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in nuclear medicine. Although the methodology for delivering doses by most clinics be based on patient's weight, the results showed variations of up to 191, 6% between the activities administered in clinics, even for similar devices. The average value of the distribution of activities reported was 4.46 ± 1,6 MBq /kg. These data demonstrate the need for harmonization and optimization of 18 F-FDG/PET procedures, as well as training for professionals involved in the clinical routine

  1. Clinical value of FDG-PET in the follow up of post-operative patients with endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saga, Tsuneo; Higashi, Tatsuya; Ishimori, Takayoshi

    2003-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of FDG-PET in the follow up of post-operative patients with endometrial cancer was retrospectively evaluated. Twenty-one post-operative patients with endometrial cancer received 30 FDG-PET examinations to evaluate recurrence or response to treatment. The findings of FDG-PET were compared with their serum levels of tumor markers, CT and/or MRI findings, and the final outcome. Results of FDG-PET were also correlated with the clinical course of each patient. In detecting recurrent lesions and evaluating treatment responses, FDG-PET, with the help in anatomic information by CT/MRI, showed better diagnostic ability (sensitivity 100.0%, specificity 88.2%, accuracy 93.3%) compared with combined conventional imaging (sensitivity 84.6%, specificity 85.7%, accuracy 85.0%) and tumor markers (sensitivity 100.0%, specificity 70.6%, accuracy 83.3%). FDG-PET had no false-negative results, suggesting the possibility of its use as the first-line examination in a patient's follow-up. FDG-PET could detect unknown lesions in 4 cases, and, as reported for other malignancies, FDG-PET affected the patient management in one-third of the cases. Furthermore, the results of FDG-PET correlated well with the clinical outcome of the patients, with patients with negative PET results tending to show disease-free courses. These results suggest that, despite the limited number of patients studied, FDG-PET was accurate in detecting recurrence and evaluating therapeutic response, and could afford important information in the management of post-operative patients with endometrial cancer. FDG-PET also appeared to have a possibility to predict the outcome of each patient. (author)

  2. Current applications of PET imaging of sex hormone receptors with a fluorinated analogue of estradiol or of testosterone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbot, J-N.; Montravers, F.; Huchet, V.; Michaud, L.; Ohnona, J.; Balogova, S.; Kerrou, K.; Gligorov, V.; Lotz, P.; Nataf, V.; Cussenot, O.; Darai, E.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the most frequent approach in the oncologic applications of positron emission tomography (PET) is detecting the hypermetabolic activity of the cancer tissue. A more specific approach, which may be complementary, is detecting the overexpression of receptors. In this review article, we aim to evaluate the results that are currently available for PET imaging of the sex hormone receptors in clinical oncology. The indication of PET and now PET/CT has been more disputed in breast carcinoma than in many other primary cancers (e.g., lung, head and neck, colorectal, lymphoma). 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), the glucose analogue for PET imaging, has a limited sensitivity to detect the primary breast tumors in case of lobular or in situ forms or small sized tumors localised on systematic mammography, and to identify minimal node invasion in the axilla. Using 16α-( 18 F]fluoro-17β-estradiol (FES), a fluorinated estradiol analogue, PET is able to detect the over-expression of the oestrogen receptor (ER) in lesions, at a whole-body level. FES and FDG appear complementary for a better diagnostic performance in staging locally advanced breast cancer or restaging recurrent or metastatic breast cancer. Another potential indication is predicting the response to starting or resuming hormone therapy in patients with metastatic breast cancer, in relation with the ER status of all lesions revealed by FES PET. In two retrospective studies, FDG PET was also able to predict the response to hormone therapy, on basis of a metabolic flare, observed either after 7-10 days of treatment or during an estradiol challenge. A prospective comparison of those approaches is warranted. One study reported predicting response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy thanks to a low value of FES SUV m ax or FES/FDG SUV max ratio. The presence of ER in uterine tumors, including the benign ones, in ovarian cancers or even in meningiomas, may have therapeutic consequences and FES PET could have a clinical

  3. Value of 18F-FDG PET in Clinical Staging of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suwen Liu; Jinming Yu; Ligang Xing

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the feasibility of 18F-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) in the staging of non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC).METHODS 105 patients with NSCLC had been examined by 18F-FDG PET before radiotherapy. The results of the 18F-FDG PET examination were compared with those of CT:RESULTS The staging was changed in 38 patients because of 18F-FDG PET findings, with PET resulting in upstaging in 31 patients and downstaging in seven patients. Because of distant metastasis detected by PET, 21 patients received palliative treatment. Six of the seven downstaged patients underwent radical surgery, among which the PET findings were concordant with the pathological findings in five patients. Distant metastasis detected by PET elevated the pre-PET stage: at stage 110.0% (2/20), stage Ⅱ 14.3% (3/21 ) and stage Ⅲ 25.0% (16/64), respectively.CONCLUSION 18F-FDG PET, by changing clinical staging in 36.2% (38/105)of NSCLC patients, has an impact on treatment strategy in NSCLC patients.

  4. Clinical evaluation of respiration-induced attenuation uncertainties in pulmonary 3D PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruis, Matthijs F; van de Kamer, Jeroen B; Vogel, Wouter V; Belderbos, José Sa; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; van Herk, Marcel

    2015-12-01

    In contemporary positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scanners, PET attenuation correction is performed by means of a CT-based attenuation map. Respiratory motion can however induce offsets between the PET and CT data. Studies have demonstrated that these offsets can cause errors in quantitative PET measures. The purpose of this study is to quantify the effects of respiration-induced CT differences on the attenuation correction of pulmonary 18-fluordeoxyglucose (FDG) 3D PET/CT in a patient population and to investigate contributing factors. For 32 lung cancer patients, 3D-CT, 4D-PET and 4D-CT data were acquired. The 4D FDG PET data were attenuation corrected (AC) using a free-breathing 3D-CT (3D-AC), the end-inspiration CT (EI-AC), the end-expiration CT (EE-AC) or phase-by-phase (P-AC). After reconstruction and AC, the 4D-PET data were averaged. In the 4Davg data, we measured maximum tumour standardised uptake value (SUV)max in the tumour, SUVmean in a lung volume of interest (VOI) and average SUV (SUVmean) in a muscle VOI. On the 4D-CT, we measured the lung volume differences and CT number changes between inhale and exhale in the lung VOI. Compared to P-AC, we found -2.3% (range -9.7% to 1.2%) lower tumour SUVmax in EI-AC and 2.0% (range -0.9% to 9.5%) higher SUVmax in EE-AC. No differences in the muscle SUV were found. The use of 3D-AC led to respiration-induced SUVmax differences up to 20% compared to the use of P-AC. SUVmean differences in the lung VOI between EI-AC and EE-AC correlated to average CT differences in this region (ρ = 0.83). SUVmax differences in the tumour correlated to the volume changes of the lungs (ρ = -0.55) and the motion amplitude of the tumour (ρ = 0.53), both as measured on the 4D-CT. Respiration-induced CT variations in clinical data can in extreme cases lead to SUV effects larger than 10% on PET attenuation correction. These differences were case specific and correlated to differences in CT number

  5. Local respiratory motion correction for PET/CT imaging: Application to lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamare, F., E-mail: frederic.lamare@chu-bordeaux.fr; Fernandez, P. [INCIA, UMR 5287, University of Bordeaux, Talence F-33400, France and Nuclear Medicine Department, University Hospital, Bordeaux 33000 (France); Fayad, H.; Visvikis, D. [INSERM, UMR1101, LaTIM, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest 29609 (France)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Despite multiple methodologies already proposed to correct respiratory motion in the whole PET imaging field of view (FOV), such approaches have not found wide acceptance in clinical routine. An alternative can be the local respiratory motion correction (LRMC) of data corresponding to a given volume of interest (VOI: organ or tumor). Advantages of LRMC include the use of a simple motion model, faster execution times, and organ specific motion correction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of LMRC using various motion models for oncology (lung lesion) applications. Methods: Both simulated (NURBS based 4D cardiac-torso phantom) and clinical studies (six patients) were used in the evaluation of the proposed LRMC approach. PET data were acquired in list-mode and synchronized with respiration. The implemented approach consists first in defining a VOI on the reconstructed motion average image. Gated PET images of the VOI are subsequently reconstructed using only lines of response passing through the selected VOI and are used in combination with a center of gravity or an affine/elastic registration algorithm to derive the transformation maps corresponding to the respiration effects. Those are finally integrated in the reconstruction process to produce a motion free image over the lesion regions. Results: Although the center of gravity or affine algorithm achieved similar performance for individual lesion motion correction, the elastic model, applied either locally or to the whole FOV, led to an overall superior performance. The spatial tumor location was altered by 89% and 81% for the elastic model applied locally or to the whole FOV, respectively (compared to 44% and 39% for the center of gravity and affine models, respectively). This resulted in similar associated overall tumor volume changes of 84% and 80%, respectively (compared to 75% and 71% for the center of gravity and affine models, respectively). The application of the nonrigid

  6. Triroc: A Multi-Channel SiPM Read-Out ASIC for PET/PET-ToF Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Salleh; Fleury, Julien; de la Taille, Christophe; Seguin-Moreau, Nathalie; Dulucq, Frederic; Martin-Chassard, Gisele; Callier, Stephane; Thienpont, Damien; Raux, Ludovic

    2015-06-01

    Triroc is the latest addition to SiPM readout ASICs family developed at Weeroc, a start-up company from the Omega microelectronics group of IN2P3/CNRS. This chip is developed under the framework TRIMAGE European project which is aimed for building a cost effective tri-modal PET/MR/EEG brain scan. To ensure the flexibility and compatibility with any SiPM in the market, the ASIC is designed to be capable of accepting negative and positive polarity input signals. This 64-channel ASIC, is suitable for SiPM readout which requires high accuracy timing and charge measurements. Targeted applications would be PET prototyping with time-of-flight capability. Main features of Triroc includes high dynamic range ADC up to 2500 photoelectrons and TDC fine time binning of 40 ps. Triroc requires very minimal external components which means it is a good contender for compact multichannel PET prototyping. Triroc is designed by using AMS 0.35 μm SiGe technology and it was submitted in March 2014. The detail design of this chip will be presented.

  7. Potential clinical applications of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose position emission tomography/magnetic resonance mammography in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Ihn Ho; Kong, Eun Jung [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Yeugnam University Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    The whole-body positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance (MR) scan is a cutting edge technology providing comprehensive structural information from MR imaging and functional features from PET in a single session. Recent research findings and clinical experience have shown that 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) whole-body PET/MR imaging has a diagnostic performance comparable with or superior to that of PET/CT in the field of oncology, including for breast cancer. In particular, FDG PET/MR mammography in the prone position with the breast hanging in a pendant manner can provide more comprehensive information about the metabolism, anatomy, and functional features of a breast lesion than a whole-body PET/MR scan. This article reports on current state-of-the-art PET/MR mammography in patients with breast cancer and the prospects for potential application in the future.

  8. Utility of Amyloid and FDG-PET in Clinical Practice: Differences Between Secondary and Tertiary Care Memory Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lage, Carmen; Suarez, Andrea Gonzalez; Pozueta, Ana; Riancho, Javier; Kazimierczak, Martha; Bravo, Maria; Jimenez Bonilla, Julio; de Arcocha Torres, Marıa; Quirce, Remedios; Banzo, Ignacio; Vazquez-Higuera, Jose Luis; Rabinovici, Gil D; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Eloy; Sánchez-Juan, Pascual

    2018-04-27

    The clinical utility of amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) has not been fully established. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of amyloid imaging on clinical decision making in a secondary care unit and compare our results with a previous study in a tertiary center following the same methods. We reviewed retrospectively 151 cognitively impaired patients who underwent amyloid (Pittsburgh compound B [PiB]) PET and were evaluated clinically before and after the scan in a secondary care unit. One hundred and fifty concurrently underwent fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET. We assessed changes between the pre- and post-PET clinical diagnosis and Alzheimer's disease treatment plan. The association between PiB/FDG results and changes in management was evaluated using χ2 and multivariate logistic regression. Concordance between classification based on scan readings and baseline diagnosis was 66% for PiB and 47% for FDG. The primary diagnosis changed after PET in 17.2% of cases. When examined independently, discordant PiB and discordant FDG were both associated with diagnostic change (p PET due to a higher likelihood of diagnostic change. We found that changes in diagnosis after PET in our secondary center almost doubled those of our previous analysis of a tertiary unit (9% versus 17.2%). Our results offer some clues about the rational use of amyloid PET in a secondary care memory unit stressing its utility in mild cognitive impairment patients.

  9. Clinical role of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET-CT in the management of head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yu'na; Zhao Jinhua

    2007-01-01

    The combined PET and CT scan provides more accurate detection of tumors by providing the functional and anatomic information simultaneously, 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET-CT has clinical value in localizing primary tumor, staging before treatment, monitoring the residual and recurrent diseases after radiotherapy and providing biological target volume to radiation treatment planning. (authors)

  10. Clinical study of the image fusion between CT and FDG-PET in the head and neck region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shozushima, Masanori; Moriguchi, Hitoshi; Shoji, Satoru; Sakamaki, Kimio; Ishikawa, Yoshihito; Kudo, Keigo; Satoh, Masanobu

    1999-01-01

    Image fusion using PET and CT from the head and neck region was performed with the use of external markers on 7 patients with squamous cell carcinoma. The purpose of this study was to examine a resultant error and the clinical usefulness of image fusion. Patients had primary lesions of the tongue, the maxillary gingiva or the maxillary sinus. All patients underwent PET with FDG and CT to detect tumor sites. Of these 7 patients, diagnostic images and the clinical observation found 6 cases of regional lymph node metastasis of the neck. To ensure the anatomical detail of the PET images, small radioactive markers were placed on the philtrum and below both earlobes. The PET image and CT image were then overlapped on a computer. The image fusion of PET and CT was successfully performed on all patients. The superposition error of this method was examined between the PET and CT images. The accuracy of fit measured as the mean distance between the PET and CT image was in the range of 2-5 mm. PET-CT superimposed images produced an increase in the localization of tumor FDG uptake and localized FDG uptake on the palatine tonsils. The marker system described here for the alignment of PET and CT images can be used on a routine basis without the invasive fixation of external markers, and also improve the management and follow up on patients with head and neck carcinoma. (author)

  11. Generation of structural MR images from amyloid PET: Application to MR-less quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hongyoon; Lee, Dong Soo

    2017-12-07

    Structural magnetic resonance (MR) images concomitantly acquired with PET images can provide crucial anatomical information for precise quantitative analysis. However, in the clinical setting, not all the subjects have corresponding MR. Here, we developed a model to generate structural MR images from amyloid PET using deep generative networks. We applied our model to quantification of cortical amyloid load without structural MR. Methods: We used florbetapir PET and structural MR data of Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database. The generative network was trained to generate realistic structural MR images from florbetapir PET images. After the training, the model was applied to the quantification of cortical amyloid load. PET images were spatially normalized to the template space using the generated MR and then standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR) of the target regions was measured by predefined regions-of-interests. A real MR-based quantification was used as the gold standard to measure the accuracy of our approach. Other MR-less methods, a normal PET template-based, multi-atlas PET template-based and PET segmentation-based normalization/quantification methods, were also tested. We compared performance of quantification methods using generated MR with that of MR-based and MR-less quantification methods. Results: Generated MR images from florbetapir PET showed visually similar signal patterns to the real MR. The structural similarity index between real and generated MR was 0.91 ± 0.04. Mean absolute error of SUVR of cortical composite regions estimated by the generated MR-based method was 0.04±0.03, which was significantly smaller than other MR-less methods (0.29±0.12 for the normal PET-template, 0.12±0.07 for multiatlas PET-template and 0.08±0.06 for PET segmentation-based methods). Bland-Altman plots revealed that the generated MR-based SUVR quantification was the closest to the SUVR values estimated by the real MR-based method. Conclusion

  12. Application of cross-species PET imaging to assess neurotransmitter release in brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnema, Sjoerd J; Scheinin, Mika; Shahid, Mohammed; Lehto, Jussi; Borroni, Edilio; Bang-Andersen, Benny; Sallinen, Jukka; Wong, Erik; Farde, Lars; Halldin, Christer; Grimwood, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    This review attempts to summarize the current status in relation to the use of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in the assessment of synaptic concentrations of endogenous mediators in the living brain. Although PET radioligands are now available for more than 40 CNS targets, at the initiation of the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI) "Novel Methods leading to New Medications in Depression and Schizophrenia" (NEWMEDS) in 2009, PET radioligands sensitive to an endogenous neurotransmitter were only validated for dopamine. NEWMEDS work-package 5, "Cross-species and neurochemical imaging (PET) methods for drug discovery", commenced with a focus on developing methods enabling assessment of changes in extracellular concentrations of serotonin and noradrenaline in the brain. Sharing the workload across institutions, we utilized in vitro techniques with cells and tissues, in vivo receptor binding and microdialysis techniques in rodents, and in vivo PET imaging in non-human primates and humans. Here, we discuss these efforts and review other recently published reports on the use of radioligands to assess changes in endogenous levels of dopamine, serotonin, noradrenaline, γ-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, acetylcholine, and opioid peptides. The emphasis is on assessment of the availability of appropriate translational tools (PET radioligands, pharmacological challenge agents) and on studies in non-human primates and human subjects, as well as current challenges and future directions. PET imaging directed at investigating changes in endogenous neurochemicals, including the work done in NEWMEDS, have highlighted an opportunity to further extend the capability and application of this technology in drug development.

  13. Clinical use of digital retrospective image fusion of CT, MRI, FDG-PET and SPECT - fields of indications and results; Klinischer Einsatz der digitalen retrospektiven Bildfusion von CT, MRT, FDG-PET und SPECT - Anwendungsgebiete und Ergebnisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemke, A.J.; Niehues, S.M.; Amthauer, H.; Felix, R. [Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite, Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Rohlfing, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Stanford Univ. (United States); Hosten, N. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Univ. Greifswald (Germany)

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and the clinical benefits of retrospective digital image fusion (PET, SPECT, CT and MRI). Materials and methods: In a prospective study, a total of 273 image fusions were performed and evaluated. The underlying image acquisitions (CT, MRI, SPECT and PET) were performed in a way appropriate for the respective clinical question and anatomical region. Image fusion was executed with a software program developed during this study. The results of the image fusion procedure were evaluated in terms of technical feasibility, clinical objective, and therapeutic impact. Results: The most frequent combinations of modalities were CT/PET (n = 156) and MRI/PET (n = 59), followed by MRI/SPECT (n = 28), CT/SPECT (n = 22) and CT/MRI (n = 8). The clinical questions included following regions (more than one region per case possible): neurocranium (n = 42), neck (n = 13), lung and mediastinum (n = 24), abdomen (n = 181), and pelvis (n = 65). In 92.6% of all cases (n = 253), image fusion was technically successful. Image fusion was able to improve sensitivity and specificity of the single modality, or to add important diagnostic information. Image fusion was problematic in cases of different body positions between the two imaging modalities or different positions of mobile organs. In 37.9% of the cases, image fusion added clinically relevant information compared to the single modality. Conclusion: For clinical questions concerning liver, pancreas, rectum, neck, or neurocranium, image fusion is a reliable method suitable for routine clinical application. Organ motion still limits its feasibility and routine use in other areas (e.g., thorax). (orig.)

  14. Laboratory and cyclotron requirements for PET research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlyer, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    The requirements for carrying out PET research can vary widely depending on the type of basic research being carried out and the extent of a clinical program at a particular center. The type of accelerator and laboratory facilities will, of course, depend on the exact mix. These centers have been divided into four categories. 1. Clinical PET with no radionuclide production facilities, 2. clinical PET with some radionuclide production facilities, 3. clinical PET with research support, and 4. a PET research facility developing new tracers and exploring clinical applications. Guidelines for the choice of an accelerator based on these categories and the practical yields of the common nuclear reactions for production of PET isotopes have been developed and are detailed. Guidelines as to the size and physical layout of the laboratory space necessary for the synthesis of various radiopharmaceuticals have also been developed and are presented. Important utility and air flow considerations are explored

  15. The application of PET, SPECT and MRS in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Aisheng; Tian Jianming

    2005-01-01

    PET and SPECT provide the means to studying in vivo the neurochemical, hemodynamic or metabolic consequences of the degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamineric system in Parkinson's disease (PD). Activation studies using cerebral blood flow and metabolism measurements during a motor task reveal an impaired ability to activate the supplementary motor area and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in PD. The extent of striatal dopaminergic denervation can be quantified with PET and SPECT. Striatal uptake of 18 F-dopa is markedly decreased in PD, more in the putamen than in the caudate nucleus, and inversely correlates with the severity of motor signs and with duration of disease. PET and SPECT make possible the assessment by noninvasive means of the changes in dopamine receptor density. Meanwhile, MRS can reveal changes in concentration of several hydrogenate and phosphoric compounds in the brain. The functional information of brain in PD can be obtained with these complementary techniques. (authors)

  16. Amyloid PET in European and North American cohorts; and exploring age as a limit to clinical use of amyloid imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiotis, Konstantinos [Karolinska Institutet, Department of NVS, Center for Alzheimer Research, Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Carter, Stephen F. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of NVS, Center for Alzheimer Research, Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); University of Manchester, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, Institute of Brain, Behaviour and Mental Health, Manchester (United Kingdom); Farid, Karim [Karolinska Institutet, Department of NVS, Center for Alzheimer Research, Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); APHP, Hotel-Dieu Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Savitcheva, Irina [Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Nordberg, Agneta [Karolinska Institutet, Department of NVS, Center for Alzheimer Research, Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Collaboration: for the Diagnostic Molecular Imaging (DiMI) network and the Alzheimer' s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    2015-09-15

    Several radiotracers that bind to fibrillar amyloid-beta in the brain have been developed and used in various patient cohorts. This study aimed to investigate the comparability of two amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) tracers as well as examine how age affects the discriminative properties of amyloid PET imaging. Fifty-one healthy controls (HCs), 72 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 90 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) from a European cohort were scanned with [11C]Pittsburgh compound-B (PIB) and compared with an age-, sex- and disease severity-matched population of 51 HC, 72 MCI and 84 AD patients from a North American cohort who were scanned with [18F]Florbetapir. An additional North American population of 246 HC, 342 MCI and 138 AD patients with a Florbetapir scan was split by age (55-75 vs 76-93 y) into groups matched for gender and disease severity. PET template-based analyses were used to quantify regional tracer uptake. The mean regional uptake patterns were similar and strong correlations were found between the two tracers across the regions of interest in HC (ρ = 0.671, p = 0.02), amyloid-positive MCI (ρ = 0.902, p < 0.001) and AD patients (ρ = 0.853, p < 0.001). The application of the Florbetapir cut-off point resulted in a higher proportion of amyloid-positive HC and a lower proportion of amyloid-positive AD patients in the older group (28 and 30 %, respectively) than in the younger group (19 and 20 %, respectively). These results illustrate the comparability of Florbetapir and PIB in unrelated but matched patient populations. The role of amyloid PET imaging becomes increasingly important with increasing age in the diagnostic assessment of clinically impaired patients. (orig.)

  17. Amyloid PET in European and North American cohorts; and exploring age as a limit to clinical use of amyloid imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiotis, Konstantinos; Carter, Stephen F.; Farid, Karim; Savitcheva, Irina; Nordberg, Agneta

    2015-01-01

    Several radiotracers that bind to fibrillar amyloid-beta in the brain have been developed and used in various patient cohorts. This study aimed to investigate the comparability of two amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) tracers as well as examine how age affects the discriminative properties of amyloid PET imaging. Fifty-one healthy controls (HCs), 72 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 90 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) from a European cohort were scanned with [11C]Pittsburgh compound-B (PIB) and compared with an age-, sex- and disease severity-matched population of 51 HC, 72 MCI and 84 AD patients from a North American cohort who were scanned with [18F]Florbetapir. An additional North American population of 246 HC, 342 MCI and 138 AD patients with a Florbetapir scan was split by age (55-75 vs 76-93 y) into groups matched for gender and disease severity. PET template-based analyses were used to quantify regional tracer uptake. The mean regional uptake patterns were similar and strong correlations were found between the two tracers across the regions of interest in HC (ρ = 0.671, p = 0.02), amyloid-positive MCI (ρ = 0.902, p < 0.001) and AD patients (ρ = 0.853, p < 0.001). The application of the Florbetapir cut-off point resulted in a higher proportion of amyloid-positive HC and a lower proportion of amyloid-positive AD patients in the older group (28 and 30 %, respectively) than in the younger group (19 and 20 %, respectively). These results illustrate the comparability of Florbetapir and PIB in unrelated but matched patient populations. The role of amyloid PET imaging becomes increasingly important with increasing age in the diagnostic assessment of clinically impaired patients. (orig.)

  18. MO-FG-207-00: Technological Advances in PET/MR Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The use of integrated PET/MRI systems in clinical applications can best benefit from understanding their technological advances and limitations. The currently available clinical PET/MRI systems have their own characteristics. Thorough analyses of existing technical data and evaluation of necessary performance metrics for quality assurances could be conducted to optimize application-specific PET/MRI protocols. This Symposium will focus on technical advances and limitations of clinical PET/MRI systems, and how this exciting imaging modality can be utilized in applications that can benefit from both PET and MRI. Learning Objectives: To understand the technological advances of clinical PET/MRI systems To correctly identify clinical applications that can benefit from PET/MRI To understand ongoing work to further improve the current PET/MRI technology Floris Jansen is a GE Healthcare employee

  19. MO-FG-207-00: Technological Advances in PET/MR Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    The use of integrated PET/MRI systems in clinical applications can best benefit from understanding their technological advances and limitations. The currently available clinical PET/MRI systems have their own characteristics. Thorough analyses of existing technical data and evaluation of necessary performance metrics for quality assurances could be conducted to optimize application-specific PET/MRI protocols. This Symposium will focus on technical advances and limitations of clinical PET/MRI systems, and how this exciting imaging modality can be utilized in applications that can benefit from both PET and MRI. Learning Objectives: To understand the technological advances of clinical PET/MRI systems To correctly identify clinical applications that can benefit from PET/MRI To understand ongoing work to further improve the current PET/MRI technology Floris Jansen is a GE Healthcare employee.

  20. Application of 18F-FDG PET/CT for the diagnosis of cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Wenlan; Wu Hubing; Wang Quanshi; Ye Xianghua

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical value of 18 F-fluorode-oxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT for staging and re-staging cervical cancer cases. Methods: This retrospective study included 88 patients. Of the 88 patients, 19 were primary cervical cancer, 11 were benign cervical tumor and 58 were cervical cancer patients with post-treatment surveillance. All had either whole body or abdominal-pelvic FDG PET/CT imaging. The diagnosis was established according to the pathologic results of surgery or biopsy, and(or) multi-modality imaging and clinical follow-up for at least six months. Results: For initial diagnosis of cervical cancer, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of FDG PET/CT were 17/19 (89.5%), 10/11 (90.9%) and 27/30(90.0%) respectively. For re-staging cervical cancer, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of FDG PET/CT were 10/11 (90. 9%), 47/47 (100. 0%) and 57/58 (98.3%) respectively. In all, 41 had metastases. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of FDG PET/ CT detecting metastases were 92.7%, 88.9% and 90.9% respectively. Of the metastatic sites, 66.3% were abdominal-pelvic lymph nodes, 26.8% of the metastatic lymph nodes were detected with diameters less than 1.0 cm. Twenty-two of twenty seven (28.6%) patients were identified to have extra-pelvic lesions after PET/CT and were then changed their treatment plans. Conclusions: 18 F-FDG PET/CT is useful in staging and re-staging cervical cancer patients. PET/CT is of great value in identifying small lesions and also in detecting extra-pelvic lesions. (authors)

  1. Added Diagnostic Value of 11C-PiB-PET in Memory Clinic Patients with Uncertain Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.S. Frederiksen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The added diagnostic value of 11C-PiB-PET for the assessment of the accumulation of cortical beta-amyloid in memory clinic patients with uncertain diagnosis remains undetermined. Methods: All patients who underwent PiB-PET at the Copenhagen Memory Clinic between March 2008 and November 2011 were included in this uncontrolled, retrospective study. The standard diagnostic evaluation program included physical and neurological examination, cognitive and functional assessment, a cranial CT or MRI, functional imaging and cerebrospinal fluid sampling. Based on anonymized case reports, three experienced clinicians reached a consensus diagnosis and rated their confidence in the diagnosis before and after disclosure of PiB-PET ratings. PiB-PET scans were rated as either positive or negative. Results: A total of 57 patients (17 females, 30 males; age 65.7 years, range 44.2–82.6 were included in the study. Twenty-seven had a positive PiB-PET scan. At the first diagnostic evaluation, 16 patients were given a clinical Alheimer’s disease diagnosis (14 PiB positive. Of the 57 patients, 13 (23% were diagnostically reclassified after PiB-PET ratings were disclosed. The clinicians’ overall confidence in their diagnosis increased in 28 (49% patients. Conclusion: PiB-PET adds to the specialist clinical evaluation and other supplemental diagnostic investigations in the diagnostic classification of patients with uncertain diagnosis in a specialized memory clinic.

  2. Recent application of PET in the pathological mechanisms of PD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Jiyu

    2003-01-01

    PET is the best method in the investigation of molecular pathology at present. In this review, the value of positron emission computed tomography for providing insight into the role of pathology mechanism, early diagnosis, differential diagnosis, mechanisms of motor fluctuations in Parkinson disease is reviewed. Especially it can be used for the early diagnosis of PD, thus being beneficial to the therapy of it

  3. 18F-FDG PET/CT in the clinical management of patients with lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, P; Martín, A; Díaz, L; Cabrero, M; García, R; García-Talavera, P; Caballero, D

    The aim of this work was to review the current recommendations for staging and response assessment of patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in routine clinical practice after chemotherapy and/or stem cell transplantation. A five-point scale (5-PS) from the First International Workshop on PET in Lymphoma in Deauville, France, in 2009, was recommended as the standard tool to score imaging to assess treatment response in patients with lymphoma using 18 F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT. Following the recommendations of the 11th and 12th International Conferences on Malignant Lymphoma held in Lugano (Switzerland), in 2011 and 2013, respectively, a consensus (the so-called Lugano Classification) was reached regarding the use of PET/CT for staging and response assessment in FDG-avid lymphomas. As a result, 18 F-FDG PET/CT was formally incorporated into standard staging for FDG-avid lymphomas. A bone marrow biopsy is no longer indicated for the routine staging of HL and most diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. PET/CT will be used to assess response in FDG-avid histologies using the 5-point scale. The recent introduction of biological agents with immune mechanisms requires flexibility in interpretations of the Lugano criteria due to tumour flare or a pseudo-progression effect produced by these agents. Provisional criteria have been proposed (Lymphoma Response to Immunomodulatory Therapy Criteria) with the introduction of the term 'Indeterminate Response' in order to identify this phenomenon until confirmed as flare/pseudoprogression or true progression. All these recommendations will improve evaluations of patients with lymphoma, and allow comparison of results from clinical practice and trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  4. Cyclotrons for clinical and biomedical research with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this commentary is to present some background material on cyclotrons and other particle accelerators particularly with a view toward the considerations behind acquiring and installing such a machine for purely clinical and/or biomedical research use

  5. Clinical blood flow measurements with O-15 water and Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hichwa, R.D.; Watkins, G.L.; Boles Ponto, L.L.

    1993-01-01

    Traditionally PET chemists have been primarily involved in development and synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals for imaging. If greater clinical utility and research productivity are to be achieved in the PET field, then this role must be expanded to include not just the synthesis of the end product, but also the efficient and timely delivery of the radiopharmaceutical. Hence, the chemist must also consider (1) more automation of synthesis and QC procedures, (2) reduced radiopharmaceutical preparation time with emphasis towards on-line syntheses whenever feasible, (3) integrated cyclotron/chemistry operations, (4) dose delivery schemes to minimize staff exposure while maintaining purity, sterility and apyrogenicity, and (5) technologist/technician operability of all procedures. At the University of Iowa, techniques have been employed to stream-line the production synthesis, delivery, and imaging of O-15 labelled water for determination of tissue blood flow. Automated cyclotron and PET tomograph operation, as well as steady-state production of O-15 water permit a single PET technologist to conduct qualitative blood flow studies on demand for routine or emergency procedures

  6. FDG PET/CT in clinical oncology. Case based approach with teaching points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihailovic, Jasna [Novi Sad Univ. (Serbia). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Goldsmith, Stanley J. [Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States). Div. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imging; Killeen, Ronan P. [St. Vincents Univ. Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)

    2012-07-01

    Organized according to the role of FDG PET/CT in the evaluation and management of oncology patients. 100 informative cases reflecting the issues that clinicians address in their daily practice. Ideal for all newcomers to the field, whether medical students, radiology, nuclear medicine, or oncology fellows, or practicing physicians. FDG PET/CT has rapidly emerged as an invaluable combined imaging modality that can identify tumors on the basis of not only anatomical alterations but also metabolic activity, thus allowing the detection of lesions that would otherwise be too small to distinguish. This book, comprising a collection of images from oncology cases, is organized according to the role of FDG PET/CT in the evaluation and management of oncology patients, and only secondarily by organ or tumor entity. In this way, it reflects the issues that clinicians actually address in their daily practice, namely: identification of an unknown or unsuspected primary; determination of the extent of disease; evaluation of response to therapy; and surveillance after response, i.e., detection of recurrent disease. In total, 100 cases involving different primary tumors are presented to illustrate findings in these different circumstances. FDG PET/CT in Clinical Oncology will be of great value to all newcomers to this field, whether medical students, radiology, nuclear medicine, or oncology fellows, or practicing physicians.

  7. In-beam PET at clinical proton beams with pile-up rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmbrecht, Stephan; Fiedler, Fine; Iltzsche, Marc [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Radiation Physics; Enghardt, Wolfgang [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Radiation Physics; OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Radiooncology; German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Dresden (Germany); Pausch, Guntram [OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Tintori, Carlo [CAEN S.p.A., Viareggio (Italy); Kormoll, Thomas [OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). AG Radiation Physics

    2017-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a means of imaging the β{sup +}-activity produced by the radiation field in ion beam therapy and therefore for treatment verification. Prompt γ-rays that are emitted during beam application challenge the detectors and electronics of PET systems, since those are designed for low and medium count rates. Typical PET detectors operated according to a modified Anger principle suffer from multiple events at high rates. Therefore, in-beam PET systems using such detectors rely on a synchronization of beam status and measurement to reject deteriorated data. In this work, a method for pile-up rejection is applied to conventional Anger logic block detectors. It allows for an in-beam data acquisition without further synchronization. Though cyclotrons produce a continuous wave beam, the radiation field shaping technique introduces breaks in the application. Time regimes mimicking synchrotrons as well as cyclotron based ones using double-scattering or pencil beam scanning field shaping at dose rates of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 Gy/min were investigated. Two types of inhomogeneous phantoms were imaged. The first one simulates cavity structures, the other one mimics a static lung irradiation. It could be shown that, depending on the dose rate and the beam time structure, in-beam measurement including a few seconds decay time only, yield images which revealed all inhomogeneities in the phantoms. This technique can be the basis for the development of an in-beam PET system with traditional detectors and off-the-shelf electronics.

  8. The clinical role of "1"8F-FDG PET/CT in diagnosis of the peritoneal carcinomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoyan; Zhang Xiangsong; Chen Zhifeng; Li Ziping; Li Fang; Rao Guohui; Shi Xinchong; Hu Ping

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical role of "1"8F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT in diagnosis of the peritoneal carcinomatosis. Methods: The "1"8F-FDG PET/CT scan was performed in 22 patients. All had documented malignancy and had ascites. Histopathology. or clinical follow-up was 'gold standard' for diagnostic accuracy in PET/CT scan. Results: Of these 22 patients, 18 had positive "1"8F- FDG PET/CT findings. Sixteen were peritoneal carcinomatosis and 2 were peritoneal tuberculosis. Four patients had negative "1"8F-FDG PET/CT findings. Three were peritonitis and 1 was peritoneal carcinomatosis. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of "1"8F-FDG PET/CT in diagnosing peritoneal carcinomatosis were 94.1% (16/17), 3/5, 88.9% (16/18), 3/4, and 86.4% (19/22). Conclusions: "1"8F-FDG PET/CT had high sensitivity in detecting peritoneal carcinomatosis. The most common false positive for "1"8F-FDG PET/CT in ascites was peritoneal tuberculosis. (authors)

  9. Thyroid Incidentalomas on 18F-FDG PET/CT: Clinical Significance and Controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Makis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the current study is to examine the incidence and clinical significance of unexpected focal uptake of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG on positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT in the thyroid gland of oncology patients, the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax of benign and malignant thyroid incidentalomas in these patients, and review the literature. Methods: Seven thousand two hundred fifty-two 18F-FDG PET/CT studies performed over four years, were retrospectively reviewed. Studies with incidental focal 18F-FDG uptake in the thyroid gland were further analyzed. Results: Incidental focal thyroid 18F-FDG uptake was identified in 157 of 7252 patients (2.2%. Sufficient follow-up data (≥12 months were available in 128 patients, of whom 57 (45% had a biopsy performed and 71 had clinical follow-up. Malignancy was diagnosed in 14 of 128 patients (10.9%. There was a statistically significant difference between the median SUVmax of benign thyroid incidentalomas (SUVmax 4.8 vs malignant (SUVmax 6.3, but the wide range of overlap between the two groups yielded no clinically useful SUVmax threshold value to determine malignancy. Conclusion: 18F-FDG positive focal thyroid incidentalomas occurred in 2.2% of oncologic PET/CT scans, and were malignant in 10.9% of 128 patients. This is the lowest reported malignancy rate in a North American study to date, and significantly lower than the average malignancy rate (35% reported in the literature. Invasive biopsy of all 18F-FDG positive thyroid incidentalomas, as recommended by some studies, is unwarranted and further research to determine optimal management is needed. There was no clinically useful SUVmax cut-off value to determine malignancy and PET/CT may not be a useful imaging modality to follow these patients conservatively.

  10. Extended suicide with a pet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Brian K

    2013-01-01

    The combination of the killing of a pet and a suicide is a perplexing scenario that is largely unexplored in the literature. Many forensic psychiatrists and psychologists may be unaccustomed to considering the significance of the killing of a pet. The subject is important, however, because many people regard their pets as members of their family. A case is presented of a woman who killed her pet dog and herself by carbon monoxide poisoning. The purpose of this article is to provide an initial exploration of the topic of extended suicide with a pet. Forensic mental health evaluations may have a role in understanding the etiology of this event and in opining as to the culpability of individuals who attempt to or successfully kill a pet and then commit suicide. Because the scientific literature is lacking, there is a need to understand this act from a variety of perspectives. First, a social and anthropological perspective will be presented that summarizes the history of the practice of killing of one's pet, with a focus on the ancient Egyptians. A clinical context will examine what relationship animals have to mental illness. A vast body of existing scientific data showing the relevance of human attachment to pets suggests that conclusions from the phenomena of homicide-suicide and filicide-suicide are applicable to extended suicide with a pet. Finally, recommendations will be proposed for both clinical and forensic psychiatrists faced with similar cases.

  11. The clinical utility of FDG PET/CT among solid organ transplant recipients suspected of malignancy or infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wareham, Neval E.; Lundgren, J.D. [Rigshospitalet, Centre for Health and Infectious Disease Research (CHIP), Department of Infectious Diseases, Copenhagen (Denmark); Cunha-Bang, C. da; Sengeloev, H. [Rigshospitalet, Department of Haematology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Gustafsson, F.; Iversen, M. [Rigshospitalet, Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Johannesen, H.H.; Kjaer, A.; Fischer, B.M. [Rigshospitalet, Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Copenhagen (Denmark); Rasmussen, A. [Rigshospitalet, Department of Surgical Gastroenterology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Soerensen, S.S. [Rigshospitalet, Department of Nephrology, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2017-03-15

    Solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients are at high risk of developing infections and malignancies. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT may enable timely detection of these diseases and help to ensure early intervention. We aimed to describe the clinical utility of FDG PET/CT in consecutive, diagnostic unresolved SOT recipients transplanted from January 2004 to May 2015. Recipients with a post-transplant FDG PET/CT performed as part of diagnostic work-up were included. Detailed chart reviews were done to extract relevant clinical information and determine the final diagnosis related to the FDG PET/CT. Based on a priori defined criteria and the final diagnosis, results from each scan were classified as true or false, and diagnostic values determined. Among the 1,814 recipients in the cohort, 145 had an FDG PET/CT performed; 122 under the indication of diagnostically unresolved symptoms with a suspicion of malignancy or infection. The remaining (N = 23) had an FDG PET/CT to follow-up on a known disease or to stage a known malignancy. The 122 recipients underwent a total of 133 FDG PET/CT scans performed for a suspected malignancy (66 %) or an infection (34 %). Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the FDG PET/CT in diagnosing these conditions were 97, 84, 87, and 96 %, respectively. FDG PET/CT is an accurate diagnostic tool for the work-up of diagnostic unresolved SOT recipients suspected of malignancy or infection. The high sensitivity and NPV underlines the potential usefulness of PET/CT for excluding malignancy or focal infections in this often complex clinical situation. (orig.)

  12. The clinical utility of FDG PET/CT among solid organ transplant recipients suspected of malignancy or infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wareham, Neval E.; Lundgren, J.D.; Cunha-Bang, C. da; Sengeloev, H.; Gustafsson, F.; Iversen, M.; Johannesen, H.H.; Kjaer, A.; Fischer, B.M.; Rasmussen, A.; Soerensen, S.S.

    2017-01-01

    Solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients are at high risk of developing infections and malignancies. 18 F-FDG PET/CT may enable timely detection of these diseases and help to ensure early intervention. We aimed to describe the clinical utility of FDG PET/CT in consecutive, diagnostic unresolved SOT recipients transplanted from January 2004 to May 2015. Recipients with a post-transplant FDG PET/CT performed as part of diagnostic work-up were included. Detailed chart reviews were done to extract relevant clinical information and determine the final diagnosis related to the FDG PET/CT. Based on a priori defined criteria and the final diagnosis, results from each scan were classified as true or false, and diagnostic values determined. Among the 1,814 recipients in the cohort, 145 had an FDG PET/CT performed; 122 under the indication of diagnostically unresolved symptoms with a suspicion of malignancy or infection. The remaining (N = 23) had an FDG PET/CT to follow-up on a known disease or to stage a known malignancy. The 122 recipients underwent a total of 133 FDG PET/CT scans performed for a suspected malignancy (66 %) or an infection (34 %). Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the FDG PET/CT in diagnosing these conditions were 97, 84, 87, and 96 %, respectively. FDG PET/CT is an accurate diagnostic tool for the work-up of diagnostic unresolved SOT recipients suspected of malignancy or infection. The high sensitivity and NPV underlines the potential usefulness of PET/CT for excluding malignancy or focal infections in this often complex clinical situation. (orig.)

  13. Absolute number of new lesions on 18F-FDG PET/CT is more predictive of clinical response than SUV changes in metastatic melanoma patients receiving ipilimumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Hoda; Sachpekidis, Christos; Winkler, Julia; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Haberkorn, Uwe; Hassel, Jessica C; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2018-03-01

    Evaluation of response to immunotherapy is a matter of debate. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the response of metastatic melanoma to treatment with ipilimumab by means of 18 F-FDG PET/CT, using the patients' clinical response as reference. The final cohort included in the analyses consisted of 41 patients with metastatic melanoma who underwent 18 F-FDG PET/CT before and after administration of ipilimumab. After determination of the best clinical response, the PET/CT scans were reviewed and a separate independent analysis was performed, based on the number and functional size of newly emerged 18 F-FDG-avid lesions, as well as on the SUV changes after therapy. The median observation time of the patients after therapy was 21.4 months (range 6.3-41.9 months). Based on their clinical response, patients were dichotomized into those with clinical benefit (CB) and those without CB (No-CB). The CB group (31 patients) included those with stable disease, partial remission and complete remission, and the No-CB group (10 patients) included those with progressive disease. The application of a threshold of four newly emerged 18 F-FDG-avid lesions on the posttherapy PET/CT scan led to a sensitivity (correctly predicting CB) of 84% and a specificity (correctly predicting No-CB) of 100%. This cut-off was lower for lesions with larger functional diameters (three new lesions larger than 1.0 cm and two new lesions larger than 1.5 cm). SUV changes after therapy did not correlate with clinical response. Based on these findings, we developed criteria for predicting clinical response to immunotherapy by means of 18 F-FDG PET/CT (PET Response Evaluation Criteria for Immunotherapy, PERCIMT). Our results show that a cut-off of four newly emerged 18 F-FDG-avid lesions on posttherapy PET/CT gives a reliable indication of treatment failure in patients under ipilimumab treatment. Moreover, the functional size of the new lesions plays an important role in predicting the clinical

  14. Calibration of F-18 activity for PET applications in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    León, Yecenia Moreno; Verdecia, Pilar Oropesa; Rodríguez, Lourdes García; Águila, Rolando A. Serra; Magaña, Yoel Jénez; Hechavarría, Ailec Bell; Pérez, Nayla; Cacero, Maray Dubalón; Ruiz, Javier Mas

    2016-01-01

    In the paper we present the results of the calibration of the concentration of F-18 dissolution activity in Cuba. Methods of measurement in a calibrated well ionization chamber, traceable to the UK national standard and gamma spectrometry yielded equivalent results within the limit of the associated uncertainties, respectively. The measurement uncertainties of the F-18 activity of the secondary standard activity activator, CAPINTEC CRCTM 15R, obtained from calibration of the instrument with the calibrated solutions of radionuclide, are also shown for the measurement of samples in the geometries of interest in Nuclear Medicine: glass jars and plastic syringes. The results presented in this paper constitute the necessary metrological support for the use of F-18 radiopharmaceuticals and the new PET and PET / CT technologies in medical practice in Cuba.

  15. Research progress in radiolabeling imaging mechanism and clinical applications of "1"8F-FDG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai Shizhen; Yang Zhi; Du Jin

    2011-01-01

    PET/CT is one of the most advanced technologies contemporarily, achieving the combination of anatomical imaging and functional imaging. "1"8F-FDG is the most important positron radiopharmaceutical, which was used over 95% in total PET/CT imaging. FDG- PET has been extensively used in diagnosis of several kinds of diseases such as tumor, cardiac disease and epilepsy. The present review provides the history, the quality control, the imaging mechanisms as well as the research progress of the clinical applications of "1"8F-FDG. (authors)

  16. Cerebral activation studies by PET and fMRT, clinical relevance?; Zerebrale Aktivierungsstudien mit PET und fMRT, klinische Relevanz?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, T. [Neurologische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum Grosshadern, Muenchen Univ. (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    Cerebral activation studies by PET and fMRT will gain increasing clinical relevance for functional neuroanatomy (reading, speaking), localisation of largely unknown cortical functions (vestibular cortex), imaging of subjective complaints of functional impairments (pain, smell, memory), and documentation of neurological rehabilitation at neuronal level (regeneration, compensation, substitution, learning). (orig.) [Deutsch] Zerebrale Aktivierungsstudien mit PET und fMRT erlangen zunehmend klinische Bedeutung fuer die funktionelle Neuroanatomie einzelner und komplexer Hirnleistungen (Lesen, Sprechen), die Lokalisation bislang unzureichend erforschter Hirnfunktionen (vestibulaerer Kortex), die Objektivierung subjektiver Beschwerden und Funktionsausfaelle (Schmerz, Riechen, Gedaechtnis) und die Dokumentation neurologischer Rehabilitation auf neuronaler Ebene (Regeneration, Kompensation, Substitution, Lernen). (orig.)

  17. Clinical characteristics of elastofibroma dorsi incidentally detected on FDG-PET/CT for a thoracic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Hidenori; Higa, Noboru; Yohena, Tomofumi

    2011-01-01

    When elastofibroma dorsi with FDG accumulation is found by 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in patients with a malignant tumor, its differentiation from a metastasis seems to be a difficult and critical problem. As there are few reports on FDG-PET for elastofibroma dorsi, we reviewed those cases of elastofibroma dorsi which were incidentally discovered on FDG-PET/CT. We retrospectively reviewed 306 patients who underwent FDG-PET/CT for the evaluation of a lung or mediastinal tumor, and in whom elastofibroma dorsi was detected, and analyzed their clinical characteristics. Elastofibroma dorsi was detected in 16 of the 306 cases (5.2%); 10 of whom were women and 6 were men. Age ranged from 55 to 82 years, with an average of 71.6 years. Woman were predominant among the patients with elastofibroma dorsi, compared with patients without a tumor (p=0.0177). Elderly patients were also predominant among the patients with elastofibroma dorsi, compared with patients without a tumor, but the difference was not significant (p=0.0587). The accumulation of FDG was observed in 8 of the 16 cases (15 of 31 tumors). The maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) ranged from 2.0 to 2.9, with an average of 2.3, among those cases in which the SUVmax was evaluated. Although elastofibroma is rare, it is important for physicians to know that some elastofibromas exhibit FDG accumulation on PET. This knowledge may help to prevent unnecessary biopsies or surgical interventions, and also prevent excessive anxiety in patients with elastofibroma dorsi. (author)

  18. Clinical Significance of 18F-FDG-PET in Invasive Lobular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Takaaki; Yajima, Reina; Kurozumi, Sasagu; Higuchi, Toru; Obayashi, Sayaka; Tokiniwa, Hideaki; Nagaoka, Rin; Takata, Daisuke; Horiguchi, Jun; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    The diagnostic utility of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) for breast cancer is controversial. The histological type or tumor size of breast cancer has been reported to be associated with a greater likelihood of positive FDG uptake. Compared to invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs), invasive lobular carcinomas (ILCs) have a lower level of FDG uptake and are detected at a significantly lower sensitivity. The role of preoperative FDG-PET for ILCs may, thus, be limited. Few data evaluating the significance of FDG-PET in ILCs are available. Here, we evaluated the clinical significance of FDG-PET for ILC patients. We retrospectively investigated the cases of 196 consecutive patients with primary breast cancer who were diagnosed as having ILC (n=15) or IDC (n=181) and underwent FDG-PET preoperatively. Fifteen (7.7%) of patients were histopathologically diagnosed as ILC. A univariate analysis revealed that tumor size, extent of tumor, estrogen receptor (ER) expression and progesterone receptor (PgR) expression were significantly different between the ILC and IDC groups. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) values of the primary tumors were not significantly different between the two groups but, regardless of the larger size of tumor or ductal spread, the SUV max was relatively lower in the ILC group compared to the IDC group. The tumors in two ILC cases showed no FDG uptake. Among the ILC cases, there were linear associations between SUV max and tumor size and between SUV max and the nuclear grade by Pearson correlation (r=0.447, p=0.048 and r=0.519, p=0.024, respectively). Our findings imply that the preoperative FDG uptake in ILC may be reflective of the tumor size and the nuclear grade of the tumor. FDG uptake may be useful and predictive of aggressive features or prognosis in ILC patients. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison SPECT-CT with PET-CT in several applications of small-animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Yifan; Song Shaoli; Huang Gang

    2009-01-01

    With the development of medical science, monitoring dynamic biologic processes in small-animal models of diseases has become one of the most important approaches in medical studies. Important physiologic parameters that traditionally have been characterized by nuclear medicine imaging include blood flow, biochemical metabolism, and cellular receptors. Recently, nuclear medicine has been greatly facilitated by the newer development of dual-modality integrated imaging systems (SPECT-CT and PET-CT), which provide functional and anatomical images in the same scanning session, with the acquired images co-registered by means of the hardware. The purpose of this review is to compare SPECT-CT with PET-CT in several applications of small-animal models. Conclusicn: PET-CT for small animal modes in nledical research in the applications has great advantages, but SPECT-CT is still a very important role, and research low cost. (authors)

  20. Use of a clinical PET/MR scanner for preclinical research with first results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chary, Karthik; Teuho, Jarmo; Virta, Jenni; Sipilä, Hannu; Saunavaara, Virva; Roivainen, Anne; Teräs, Mika [Turku PET Centre, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland)

    2014-07-29

    This study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of preclinical imaging in a clinical PET/MR system. Preliminary sequences were evaluated for establishing preclinical protocols for rat brain and rabbit knee. Rats were placed in a stereotactic holder, allowing a 30 minute scan time before re-administration of anesthesia. In-house developed warm-water heating system was used to maintain the body temperature at 37.5°C, monitored using an MR-compatible rectal probe. Brain imaging was performed with a dedicated 4 channel phased array receive coil (RAPID Biomedical GmbH, Germany). High resolution coronal images were acquired using conventional T1-SE (0.30x0.30x1.2mm) and T2-TSE (0.23x0.23x0.7mm) with a total scan time of 30 min. PET/MR imaging was performed on two white rabbits. The rabbits were imaged in a custom wooden holder. PET/MR protocol had a total duration of 45 minutes. No external heating was used. MR protocol consisted of anatomical T1, T2 and PDW of the knees, using a SENSE Flex-S coil. MR attenuation correction (MRAC) was acquired with 3D T1-FFE using three-class segmentation. A dynamic 30 minute PET acquisition was started on injection of 33.8MBq of Ga-68. Animal coils enabled high resolution images to be acquired in reasonable acquisition time with regards to animal handling and anesthesia. T1 and T2 images provided good differentiation of anatomy in the rat brain with high contrast. T1, T2 and PDW images of the rabbit knee had high resolution and differentiation of anatomical structures. MRAC was able to distinguish the knees and the body contour. Image fusion of PET and MR was able to localize the infection, which was confirmed by a physician. Pre-clinical imaging with the Ingenuity TF was deemed feasible, although PET imaging is limited by the resolution of the scanner. The preliminary sequences were successfully implemented for future studies on the Ingenuity TF.

  1. Use of a clinical PET/MR scanner for preclinical research with first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chary, Karthik; Teuho, Jarmo; Virta, Jenni; Sipilä, Hannu; Saunavaara, Virva; Roivainen, Anne; Teräs, Mika

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of preclinical imaging in a clinical PET/MR system. Preliminary sequences were evaluated for establishing preclinical protocols for rat brain and rabbit knee. Rats were placed in a stereotactic holder, allowing a 30 minute scan time before re-administration of anesthesia. In-house developed warm-water heating system was used to maintain the body temperature at 37.5°C, monitored using an MR-compatible rectal probe. Brain imaging was performed with a dedicated 4 channel phased array receive coil (RAPID Biomedical GmbH, Germany). High resolution coronal images were acquired using conventional T1-SE (0.30x0.30x1.2mm) and T2-TSE (0.23x0.23x0.7mm) with a total scan time of 30 min. PET/MR imaging was performed on two white rabbits. The rabbits were imaged in a custom wooden holder. PET/MR protocol had a total duration of 45 minutes. No external heating was used. MR protocol consisted of anatomical T1, T2 and PDW of the knees, using a SENSE Flex-S coil. MR attenuation correction (MRAC) was acquired with 3D T1-FFE using three-class segmentation. A dynamic 30 minute PET acquisition was started on injection of 33.8MBq of Ga-68. Animal coils enabled high resolution images to be acquired in reasonable acquisition time with regards to animal handling and anesthesia. T1 and T2 images provided good differentiation of anatomy in the rat brain with high contrast. T1, T2 and PDW images of the rabbit knee had high resolution and differentiation of anatomical structures. MRAC was able to distinguish the knees and the body contour. Image fusion of PET and MR was able to localize the infection, which was confirmed by a physician. Pre-clinical imaging with the Ingenuity TF was deemed feasible, although PET imaging is limited by the resolution of the scanner. The preliminary sequences were successfully implemented for future studies on the Ingenuity TF.

  2. Clinical applications of Gallium-68

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Sangeeta Ray; Pomper, Martin G.

    2013-01-01

    Gallium-68 is a positron-emitting radioisotope that is produced from a 68 Ge/ 68 Ga generator. As such it is conveniently used, decoupling radiopharmacies from the need for a cyclotron on site. Gallium-68-labeled peptides have been recognized as a new class of radiopharmaceuticals showing fast target localization and blood clearance. 68 Ga-DOTATOC, 8 Ga-DOTATATE, 68 Ga-DOTANOC, are the most prominent radiopharmaceuticals currently in use for imaging and differentiating lesions of various somatostatin receptor subtypes, overexpressed in many neuroendocrine tumors. There has been a tremendous increase in the number of clinical studies with 68 Ga over the past few years around the world, including within the United States. An estimated ∼10,000 scans are being performed yearly in Europe at about 100 centers utilizing 68 Ga-labeled somatostatin analogs within clinical trials. Two academic sites within the US have also begun to undertake human studies. This review will focus on the clinical experience of selected, well-established and recently applied 68 Ga-labeled imaging agents used in nuclear medicine. - Highlights: ► A summary of the emerging clinical uses of 68 Ga-based radiopharmaceuticals is provided. ► 68 Ga-PET may prove as or more clinically robust than the corresponding 18 F-labeled agents. ► 68 Ga-radiopeptides were studied for targeting of somatostatin receptors subtypes. ► 68 Ga-DOTATOC, 68 Ga-DOTATATE, 68 Ga-DOTANOC, are currently in clinical trials

  3. An experimental phantom study of the effect of gadolinium-based MR contrast agents on PET attenuation coefficients and PET quantification in PET-MR imaging: application to cardiac studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O' Doherty, Jim; Schleyer, Paul

    2017-12-01

    Simultaneous cardiac perfusion studies are an increasing trend in PET-MR imaging. During dynamic PET imaging, the introduction of gadolinium-based MR contrast agents (GBCA) at high concentrations during a dual injection of GBCA and PET radiotracer may cause increased attenuation effects of the PET signal, and thus errors in quantification of PET images. We thus aimed to calculate the change in linear attenuation coefficient (LAC) of a mixture of PET radiotracer and increasing concentrations of GBCA in solution and furthermore, to investigate if this change in LAC produced a measurable effect on the image-based PET activity concentration when attenuation corrected by three different AC strategies. We performed simultaneous PET-MR imaging of a phantom in a static scenario using a fixed activity of 40 MBq [18 F]-NaF, water, and an increasing GBCA concentration from 0 to 66 mM (based on an assumed maximum possible concentration of GBCA in the left ventricle in a clinical study). This simulated a range of clinical concentrations of GBCA. We investigated two methods to calculate the LAC of the solution mixture at 511 keV: (1) a mathematical mixture rule and (2) CT imaging of each concentration step and subsequent conversion to LAC at 511 keV. This comparison showed that the ranges of LAC produced by both methods are equivalent with an increase in LAC of the mixed solution of approximately 2% over the range of 0-66 mM. We then employed three different attenuation correction methods to the PET data: (1) each PET scan at a specific millimolar concentration of GBCA corrected by its corresponding CT scan, (2) each PET scan corrected by a CT scan with no GBCA present (i.e., at 0 mM GBCA), and (3) a manually generated attenuation map, whereby all CT voxels in the phantom at 0 mM were replaced by LAC = 0.1 cm -1 . All attenuation correction methods (1-3) were accurate to the true measured activity concentration within 5%, and there were no trends in image

  4. Utility of PET in gynecological cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Chang Woon

    2002-01-01

    Clinical application of positron emission tomography (PET) is rapidly increasing for the detection and staging of cancer at whole-body studies performed with 2-[fluorine-18] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG). Although many cancers can be detected by FDG-PET, there has been limited clinical experience with FDG-PET for the detection of gynecological cancers including malignancies in uterus and ovary. FDG-PET can show foci of metastatic disease that may not be apparent at conventional anatomic imaging and can aid in the characterization of indeterminate soft-tissue masses. Most gynecological cancers need to surgical management. FDG-PET can improve the selection of patients for surgical treatment and thereby reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with inappropriate surgery. FDG-PET is also useful for the early detection of recurrence and the monitoring of therapeutic effect. In this review, I discuss the clinical feasibility and imitations of this imaging modality in patients with gynecological cancers

  5. Quantitative comparison of OSEM and penalized likelihood image reconstruction using relative difference penalties for clinical PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sangtae; Asma, Evren; Cheng, Lishui; Manjeshwar, Ravindra M; Ross, Steven G; Miao, Jun; Jin, Xiao; Wollenweber, Scott D

    2015-01-01

    Ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) is the most widely used algorithm for clinical PET image reconstruction. OSEM is usually stopped early and post-filtered to control image noise and does not necessarily achieve optimal quantitation accuracy. As an alternative to OSEM, we have recently implemented a penalized likelihood (PL) image reconstruction algorithm for clinical PET using the relative difference penalty with the aim of improving quantitation accuracy without compromising visual image quality. Preliminary clinical studies have demonstrated visual image quality including lesion conspicuity in images reconstructed by the PL algorithm is better than or at least as good as that in OSEM images. In this paper we evaluate lesion quantitation accuracy of the PL algorithm with the relative difference penalty compared to OSEM by using various data sets including phantom data acquired with an anthropomorphic torso phantom, an extended oval phantom and the NEMA image quality phantom; clinical data; and hybrid clinical data generated by adding simulated lesion data to clinical data. We focus on mean standardized uptake values and compare them for PL and OSEM using both time-of-flight (TOF) and non-TOF data. The results demonstrate improvements of PL in lesion quantitation accuracy compared to OSEM with a particular improvement in cold background regions such as lungs. (paper)

  6. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in the oncologic clinical practice; Tomografia por Emision de Positrones (PET) en la practica clinica oncologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serna M, J A; Luviano, C; Martinez V, D [Hospital Angeles del Pedregal Mexico DF (Mexico); Maldonado S, A [Centro PET Complutense, Madrid (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    We intended to determine the frequency with that the computer axial tomography (TAC), it was able to visualize the lesions extra neoplasia detected by the PET tomography in patients with fully identified primary malignant neoplasia. (Author)

  7. Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology working group and European Association for Neuro-Oncology recommendations for the clinical use of PET imaging in gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Nathalie L.; Weller, Michael; Suchorska, Bogdana

    2016-01-01

    This guideline provides recommendations for the use of PET imaging in gliomas. The review examines established clinical benefit in glioma patients of PET using glucose (18F-FDG) and amino acid tracers (11C-MET, 18F-FET, and 18F-FDOPA). An increasing number of studies have been published on PET im...

  8. The clinical impact of [18F]FDG PET/CT for the management of recurrent endometrial cancer: correlation with clinical and histological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hyun Hoon; Kim, Jae Weon; Park, Noh-Hyun; Song, Yong-Sang; Kang, Soon-Beom; Kang, Won Jun; Chung, June-Key

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of integrated positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) for the identification of suspected recurrent endometrial cancer after treatment. Thirty-one women (median age, 53 years) with endometrial cancer treated by primary staging laparotomy who had [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT performed for suspected recurrence were retrospectively reviewed. The findings of the PET/CT scans were compared, with the histological examination after a surgical biopsy in 20 cases and with clinical follow-up in 11 cases to determine the diagnostic accuracy of PET/CT. Twelve (38.7%) of the 31 patients had a documented recurrence by surgical biopsy or clinical follow-up, and 19 (61.3%) had no evidence of recurrence. Of the 12 patients with recurrent disease, nine (75.0%) women were confirmed to have a recurrence by surgical biopsy. A close correlation was found between the PET/CT and histological or clinical analyses (κ = 0.933, p < 0.001). The overall sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of PET/CT were 100, 94.7, 92.3, 100, and 96.8%, respectively. The PET/CT results modified the diagnostic or treatment plan in seven (22.6%) patients, resulting in five (16.1%) patients undergoing previously unplanned therapeutic procedures and eliminating previously planned diagnostic procedures in two (6.5%) patients. Patients with negative PET/CT scans showed significantly better progression-free survival than those with positive scans (p = 0.015). Integrated PET/CT appears to be highly sensitive, specific, and accurate as a post-therapy surveillance modality for endometrial cancer in well-selected patients. The PET/CT might be used to improve patient surveillance and prognosis. (orig.)

  9. Do TSH, FT3, and FT4 Impact BAT Visualization of Clinical FDG-PET/CT Images?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuichi Nishii

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We retrospectively analyzed activated BAT visualization on FDG-PET/CT in patients with various conditions and TH levels to clarify the relationships between visualization of BAT on FDG-PET/CT and the effect of TH. Methods. Patients who underwent clinical FDG-PET/CT were reviewed and we categorized patients into 5 groups: (i thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW group; (ii recombinant human thyrotropin (rhTSH group; (iii hypothyroidism group; (iv hyperthyroidism group; and (v BAT group. A total of sixty-two FDG-PET/CT imaging studies in fifty-nine patients were performed. To compare each group, gender; age; body weight; serum TSH, FT3, and FT4 levels; and outside temperature were evaluated. Results. No significant visualization of BAT was noted in any of the images in the THW, rhTSH, hypothyroidism, and hyperthyroidism groups. All patients in the BAT group were in a euthyroid state. When the BAT-negative and BAT-positive patient groups were compared, it was noted that the minimum and maximum temperature on the day of the PET study and maximum temperature of the one day before the PET study were significantly lower in BAT-positive group than in all those of other groups. Conclusions. Elevated TSH condition before RIT, hyperthyroidism, or hypothyroidism did not significantly impact BAT visualization of clinical FDG-PET/CT images.

  10. Do TSH, FT3, and FT4 Impact BAT Visualization of Clinical FDG-PET/CT Images?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishii, Ryuichi; Nagamachi, Shigeki; Mizutani, Youichi; Terada, Tamasa; Kiyohara, Syogo; Wakamatsu, Hideyuki; Fujita, Seigo; Higashi, Tatsuya; Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Saga, Tsuneo; Hirai, Toshinori

    2018-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed activated BAT visualization on FDG-PET/CT in patients with various conditions and TH levels to clarify the relationships between visualization of BAT on FDG-PET/CT and the effect of TH. Patients who underwent clinical FDG-PET/CT were reviewed and we categorized patients into 5 groups: (i) thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW) group; (ii) recombinant human thyrotropin (rhTSH) group; (iii) hypothyroidism group; (iv) hyperthyroidism group; and (v) BAT group. A total of sixty-two FDG-PET/CT imaging studies in fifty-nine patients were performed. To compare each group, gender; age; body weight; serum TSH, FT3, and FT4 levels; and outside temperature were evaluated. No significant visualization of BAT was noted in any of the images in the THW, rhTSH, hypothyroidism, and hyperthyroidism groups. All patients in the BAT group were in a euthyroid state. When the BAT-negative and BAT-positive patient groups were compared, it was noted that the minimum and maximum temperature on the day of the PET study and maximum temperature of the one day before the PET study were significantly lower in BAT-positive group than in all those of other groups. Elevated TSH condition before RIT, hyperthyroidism, or hypothyroidism did not significantly impact BAT visualization of clinical FDG-PET/CT images.

  11. NIRS report of investigations for the development of the next generation PET apparatus. FY 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    The present status of studies conducted by representative technology fields for the development of the next generation PET apparatus, and the summary of opinions given by investigators of nuclear medicine are reported. The former involves chapters of: Summary of representative technologies for the development of the next generation PET apparatus; Count rate analysis of PET apparatuses for the whole body and small animals by PET simulator; Scintillator; DOI (depth of interaction) detector-evaluation of the detector with 256-ch fluorescence polarization-photomultiplier tubes (FP-PMT) trial apparatus etc; Examination of multi-slice DOI-MR compatible detector for PET; Development of application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for processing the front-end signals; Detector simulation; Circuit for processing PET detector signals; Signal processing-coincidence circuit; Data collection system; Signal processing technology for the next generation PET; Reconstruction of statistical PET image using DOI signals; Monte Carlo simulation and Unique directions-PET for infants and for the whole body autonomic nervous systems and mental activity; and Actual design and evaluation of image reconstruction by statistical means. Opinions are: Progress of clinical PET apparatus; Desirable PET drugs and apparatuses; From clinical practice for the development of the next generation PET apparatus; From clinical psychiatric studies for the development; From application of drug development and basic researches; From brain PET practice; From clinical PET practice; and The role of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in PET development. Also involved is the publication list. (N.I.)

  12. Combined PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D. L.; Pichler, B. J.; Gückel, B.

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarises key themes and discussions from the 4th international workshop dedicated to the advancement of the technical, scientific and clinical applications of combined positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems that was held in Tübingen, Germany, from...

  13. [18F]CFA as a clinically translatable probe for PET imaging of deoxycytidine kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woosuk; Le, Thuc M; Wei, Liu; Poddar, Soumya; Bazzy, Jimmy; Wang, Xuemeng; Uong, Nhu T; Abt, Evan R; Capri, Joseph R; Austin, Wayne R; Van Valkenburgh, Juno S; Steele, Dalton; Gipson, Raymond M; Slavik, Roger; Cabebe, Anthony E; Taechariyakul, Thotsophon; Yaghoubi, Shahriar S; Lee, Jason T; Sadeghi, Saman; Lavie, Arnon; Faull, Kym F; Witte, Owen N; Donahue, Timothy R; Phelps, Michael E; Herschman, Harvey R; Herrmann, Ken; Czernin, Johannes; Radu, Caius G

    2016-04-12

    Deoxycytidine kinase (dCK), a rate-limiting enzyme in the cytosolic deoxyribonucleoside (dN) salvage pathway, is an important therapeutic and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging target in cancer. PET probes for dCK have been developed and are effective in mice but have suboptimal specificity and sensitivity in humans. To identify a more suitable probe for clinical dCK PET imaging, we compared the selectivity of two candidate compounds-[(18)F]Clofarabine; 2-chloro-2'-deoxy-2'-[(18)F]fluoro-9-β-d-arabinofuranosyl-adenine ([(18)F]CFA) and 2'-deoxy-2'-[(18)F]fluoro-9-β-d-arabinofuranosyl-guanine ([(18)F]F-AraG)-for dCK and deoxyguanosine kinase (dGK), a dCK-related mitochondrial enzyme. We demonstrate that, in the tracer concentration range used for PET imaging, [(18)F]CFA is primarily a substrate for dCK, with minimal cross-reactivity. In contrast, [(18)F]F-AraG is a better substrate for dGK than for dCK. [(18)F]CFA accumulation in leukemia cells correlated with dCK expression and was abrogated by treatment with a dCK inhibitor. Although [(18)F]CFA uptake was reduced by deoxycytidine (dC) competition, this inhibition required high dC concentrations present in murine, but not human, plasma. Expression of cytidine deaminase, a dC-catabolizing enzyme, in leukemia cells both in cell culture and in mice reduced the competition between dC and [(18)F]CFA, leading to increased dCK-dependent probe accumulation. First-in-human, to our knowledge, [(18)F]CFA PET/CT studies showed probe accumulation in tissues with high dCK expression: e.g., hematopoietic bone marrow and secondary lymphoid organs. The selectivity of [(18)F]CFA for dCK and its favorable biodistribution in humans justify further studies to validate [(18)F]CFA PET as a new cancer biomarker for treatment stratification and monitoring.

  14. Diagnosis of pancreatic cancer using fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET). Usefulness and limitations in clinical reality''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashi, Tatsuya; Saga, Tsuneo; Ishimori, Takayoshi; Fujimoto, Koji; Doi, Ryuichiro; Imamura, Masayuki; Konishi, Junji

    2003-01-01

    The present review will provide an overview of the literature concerning the FDG PET diagnosis of pancreatic cancer and a summary from our experience of 231 cases of pancreatic lesions. FDG PET can effectively differentiate pancreatic cancer from benign lesion with high accuracy. Newly-developed PET scanners can detect small pancreatic cancers, up to 7 mm in diameter, by their high resolution, which could make a great contribution to the early detection of resectable and potentially curable pancreatic cancers. FDG PET is useful and cost-beneficial in the pre-operative staging of pancreatic cancer because an unexpected distant metastasis can be detected by whole-body PET in about 40% of the cases, which results in avoidance of unnecessary surgical procedures. FDG PET is also useful in evaluation of the treatment effect, monitoring after the operation and detection of recurrent pancreatic cancers. However, there are some drawbacks in PET diagnosis. A relatively wide overlap has been reported between semiquantitative uptake values obtained in cancers and those in inflammatory lesions. As for false-positive cases, active and chronic pancreatitis and autoimmune pancreatitis sometimes show high FDG accumulation and mimic pancreatic cancer with a shape of focal uptake. There were 8 false negative cases in the detection of pancreatic cancer by FDG PET, up to 33 mm in diameter, mainly because of their poor cellularity in cancer tissues. In addition, there are 19% of cancer cases with a decline in FDG uptake from 1 hr to 2 hr scan. FDG PET was recently applied to and was shown to be feasible in the differential diagnosis of cystic pancreatic lesions, such as intraductal papillary mucinous tumor of the pancreas. Further investigations are required to clarify the clinical value of FDG PET in predicting prognosis of the pancreatic patients. (author) 124 refs

  15. Clinical evaluation of whole-body oncologic PET with time-of-flight and point-spread function for the hybrid PET/MR system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Kun; Cui, Bixiao; Ma, Jie; Shuai, Dongmei; Liang, Zhigang; Jansen, Floris; Zhou, Yun; Lu, Jie; Zhao, Guoguang

    2017-08-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) imaging is a new multimodality imaging technology that can provide structural and functional information simultaneously. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the time-of-flight (TOF) and point-spread function (PSF) on small lesions observed in PET/MR images from clinical patient image sets. This study evaluated 54 small lesions in 14 patients who had undergone 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/MR. Lesions up to 30mm in diameter were included. The PET data were reconstructed with a baseline ordered-subsets expectation-maximization (OSEM) algorithm, OSEM+PSF, OSEM+TOF and OSEM+TOF+PSF. PET image quality and small lesions were visually evaluated and scored by a 3-point scale. A quantitative analysis was then performed using the mean and maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) of the small lesions (SUV mean and SUV max ). The lesions were divided into two groups according to the long-axis diameter and the location respectively and evaluated with each reconstruction algorithm. We also evaluated the background signal by analyzing the SUV liver . OSEM+TOF+PSF provided the highest value and OSEM+TOF or PSF showed a higher value than OSEM for the visual assessment and quantitative analysis. The combination of TOF and PSF increased the SUV mean by 26.6% and the SUV max by 30.0%. The SUV liver was not influenced by PSF or TOF. For the OSEM+TOF+PSF model, the change in SUV mean and SUV max for lesions PET/MR images, potentially improving small lesion detectability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. PET-CT: current applications and new developments in the thorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erasmus, Jeremy J; Mawlawi, Osama; Howard, Brandon; Patz, Edward F

    2014-02-01

    Positron emission tomography computed tomography(PET-CT) imaging has emerged as an essential clinical diagnostic tool in the evaluation of thoracic abnormalities. Currently, its primary role is for tumor imaging; it helps to differentiate benign from malignant nodules, stage tumors, determine response, and follow patients after therapy is complete. It has also been used for nononcologic diseases, but the indications are less well defined. PET is a fundamental component of the molecular imaging initiative, and as new more specific imaging probes and better instrumentation are developed, PET-CT is certain to improve diagnostic accuracy and become even more integrated into the imaging armamentarium. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. Evolution of PET and SPECT tracers from cyclotrons: production and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoecklin, G.

    1992-01-01

    Small cyclotrons play an increasing role in the production of medically useful isotopes. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) are major tools in modern nuclear medicine for monitoring regional physiological and pharmacological functions at a molecular level. This requires physiological substrates or drugs labeled with suitable positron emitters or single photon emitters. Short-lived neutron deficient radioisotopes of high specific activity and high radionuclidic purity are needed. Some examples of radionuclide production, the development of radiopharmaceuticals for PET and SPECT, and their applications is presented with special emphasis on fluorine-18 and iodine-123. (author)

  18. Clinical application of positron emission tomography for diagnosis of dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, Kazunari [Hyogo Brain and Heart Center, Himeji (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    Clinical applications of PET studies for dementia are reviewed in this paper. At the mild and moderate stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD), glucose metabolism is reduced not only in the parietotemporal region but also in the posterior cingulate and precuneus. At the advanced stage of AD, there is also a metabolic reduction in the frontal region. In AD patients, glucose metabolism is relatively preserved in the pons, sensorimotor cortices, primary visual cortices, basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum. In patients with dementia with Lewy bodies, glucose metabolism in the primary visual cortices is reduced, and this reduction appears to be associated with the reduction pattern in AD patients. In patients with frontotemporal dementia, reduced metabolism in the frontotemporal region is the main feature of this disease, but reduced metabolism in the basal ganglia, and/or parietal metabolic reduction can be associated with the frontotemporal reduction. When corticobasal degeneration is associated with dementia, the reduction pattern of dementia is similar to the reduction pattern in AD and the hallmarks of diagnosing corticobasal degeneration associated with dementia are a reduced metabolism in the primary sensorimotor region and/or basal ganglia and an asymmetric reduction in the two hemispheres. FDG-PET is a very useful tool for the diagnosis of early AD and for the differential diagnosis of dementia. I also describe clinical applications of PET for the diagnosis of dementia in Japan. (author)

  19. Clinical application of positron emission tomography for diagnosis of dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Kazunari

    2002-01-01

    Clinical applications of PET studies for dementia are reviewed in this paper. At the mild and moderate stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD), glucose metabolism is reduced not only in the parietotemporal region but also in the posterior cingulate and precuneus. At the advanced stage of AD, there is also a metabolic reduction in the frontal region. In AD patients, glucose metabolism is relatively preserved in the pons, sensorimotor cortices, primary visual cortices, basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum. In patients with dementia with Lewy bodies, glucose metabolism in the primary visual cortices is reduced, and this reduction appears to be associated with the reduction pattern in AD patients. In patients with frontotemporal dementia, reduced metabolism in the frontotemporal region is the main feature of this disease, but reduced metabolism in the basal ganglia, and/or parietal metabolic reduction can be associated with the frontotemporal reduction. When corticobasal degeneration is associated with dementia, the reduction pattern of dementia is similar to the reduction pattern in AD and the hallmarks of diagnosing corticobasal degeneration associated with dementia are a reduced metabolism in the primary sensorimotor region and/or basal ganglia and an asymmetric reduction in the two hemispheres. FDG-PET is a very useful tool for the diagnosis of early AD and for the differential diagnosis of dementia. I also describe clinical applications of PET for the diagnosis of dementia in Japan. (author)

  20. Accuracy of Dose Calibrators for 68Ga PET Imaging: Unexpected Findings in a Multicenter Clinical Pretrial Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Dale L; Hofman, Michael S; Forwood, Nicholas J; O'Keefe, Graeme J; Scott, Andrew M; van Wyngaardt, Winifred M; Howe, Bonnie; Kovacev, Olga; Francis, Roslyn J

    2018-04-01

    We report the discovery of a systematic miscalibration during the work-up process for site validation of a multicenter clinical PET imaging trial using 68 Ga, which manifested as a consistent and reproducible underestimation in the quantitative accuracy (assessed by SUV) of a range of PET systems from different manufacturers at several different facilities around Australia. Methods: Sites were asked to follow a strict preparation protocol to create a radioactive phantom with 68 Ga to be imaged using a standard clinical protocol before commencing imaging in the trial. All sites had routinely used 68 Ga for clinical PET imaging for many years. The reconstructed image data were transferred to an imaging core laboratory for analysis, along with information about ancillary equipment such as the radionuclide dose calibrator. Fourteen PET systems were assessed from 10 nuclear medicine facilities in Australia, with the aim for each PET system being to produce images within 5% of the true SUV. Results: At initial testing, 10 of the 14 PET systems underestimated the SUV by 15% on average (range, 13%-23%). Multiple PET systems at one site, from two different manufacturers, were all similarly affected, suggesting a common cause. We eventually identified an incorrect factory-shipped dose calibrator setting from a single manufacturer as being the cause. The calibrator setting for 68 Ga was subsequently adjusted by the users so that the reconstructed images produced accurate values. Conclusion: PET imaging involves a chain of measurements and calibrations to produce accurate quantitative performance. Testing of the entire chain is simple, however, and should form part of any quality assurance program or prequalifying site assessment before commencing a quantitative imaging trial or clinical imaging. © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  1. The clinical impact of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in extracranial pediatric germ cell tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Adam; Vali, Reza; Marie, Eman; Shammas, Amer [The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Nuclear Medicine, Toronto, ON (Canada); Shaikh, Furqan [The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Division of Haematology and oncology, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2017-10-15

    Extracranial germ cell tumors are an uncommon pediatric malignancy with limited information on the clinical impact of {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in the literature. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the clinical impact on management of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT with diagnostic computed tomography (CT) in pediatric extracranial germ cell tumor. The list of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT performed for extracranial germ cell tumor between May 2007 and November 2015 was obtained from the nuclear medicine database. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and concurrent diagnostic CT were obtained and independently reviewed. Additionally, the patients' charts were reviewed for duration of follow-up and biopsy when available. The impact of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT compared with diagnostic CT on staging and patient management was demonstrated by chart review, imaging findings and follow-up studies. During the study period, 9 children (5 males and 4 females; age range: 1.6-17 years, mode age: 14 years) had 11 {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT studies for the evaluation of germ cell tumor. Diagnostic CTs were available for comparison in 8 patients (10 {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT studies). The average interval between diagnostic CT and PET/CT was 7.2 days (range: 0-37 days). In total, five lesions concerning for active malignancy were identified on diagnostic CT while seven were identified on PET/CT. Overall, {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT resulted in a change in management in 3 of the 9 patients (33%). {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT had a significant impact on the management of pediatric germ cell tumors in this retrospective study. Continued multicenter studies are required secondary to the rarity of this tumor to demonstrate the benefit of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in particular clinical scenarios. (orig.)

  2. Interpretation and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, C.B.

    1987-01-01

    This chapter discusses the factors to be kept in mind during routine interpretation of MR images. This includes the factors that determine contrast on standard spin-echo images and some distinguishing features between true lesions and artifactually simulated lesions. This chapter also indicates the standard protocols for MRI of various portions of the body. Finally, the current indications for MRI of various portions of the body are suggested; however, it is recognized that the indications for MRI are rapidly increasing and consequently, at the time of publication of this chapter, it is likely that many more applications will have become evident. Interpretation of magnetic resonance (MR) images requires consideration of anatomy and tissue characteristics and extraction of artifacts resulting from motion and other factors

  3. Clinical significance of reduced cerebral metabolism in multiple sclerosis. A combined PET and MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Xiayan; Tanaka, Makoto; Kondo, Susumu; Okamoto, Koichi; Hirai, Shunsaku

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) has provided major insights into the disease's natural history, and many studies have focussed on possible correlations between MRI findings and the clinical manifestations of MS. In contrast, there are few reports on possible relationships between functional imaging data and cognitive function. The present study assessed the relationship between clinical presentation and combined anatomical and functional imaging data in MS. Twenty patients with definite MS underwent MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) to evaluate cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and oxygen metabolism (rCMRO 2 ). The relationships between these neuroimaging findings and clinical data, including the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), Mini-mental status scale, Hasegawa Dementia Scale and relapse time, were evaluated with Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. A general reduction in rCBF and rCMRO 2 in the gray and white matter were found in the MS patients. EDSS was correlated with the number and size of the lesions on MRI and was negatively correlated with rCMRO 2 . A correlation between the decrease in rCMRO 2 and the level of cognitive impairment was also found. The severity of cerebral hypometabolism was also related to the number of relapses. Morphological and functional findings obtained by MRI and PET are closely related to the clinical status in MS. Our results suggest that measurement of cerebral metabolism in MS has the potential to be an objective marker for monitoring disease activity and to provide prognostic information. (author)

  4. Virtual colonoscopy: clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laghi, A.

    2005-01-01

    Virtual colonoscopy (VC), also known as computed tomography Colonography (CTC), is a non-invasive test for the examination of the colon based on volumetric, thin-collimation CT acquisition of a cleansed and air-distended colon. The technique is easy, less labour-intensive than barium enema and conventional colonoscopy, and is inherently safer. Several studies demonstrate the ability of VC in the detection of colonic neoplastic lesions, not only large carcinomas, but also polyps. Currently, the most widely accepted clinical indication is incomplete or unsuccessful colonoscopy, which may be the result of redundant colon, patient intolerance to the procedure, spasm not resolving even with the use of spasmolytics, obstructing colo-rectal cancer. VC is also used to detect cancer in frail and immobile patients to avoid sedation during colonoscopy or the turning required during barium enema. The use of VC in patients under surveillance following colo-rectal cancer surgery is under investigation. Further studies are necessary in order to assess the cost-effectiveness of this approach. For colo-rectal cancer screening, a practical approach is to consider VC as a currently credible alternative screening method and as a reasonable alternative to the other colo-rectal cancer screening tests when a patient is unable or unwilling to undergo conventional colonoscopy. (orig.)

  5. Virtual colonoscopy: clinical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laghi, A. [Univ. of Rome La Sapienza, Polo Didattico Pontino, Latina (Italy)

    2005-11-15

    Virtual colonoscopy (VC), also known as computed tomography Colonography (CTC), is a non-invasive test for the examination of the colon based on volumetric, thin-collimation CT acquisition of a cleansed and air-distended colon. The technique is easy, less labour-intensive than barium enema and conventional colonoscopy, and is inherently safer. Several studies demonstrate the ability of VC in the detection of colonic neoplastic lesions, not only large carcinomas, but also polyps. Currently, the most widely accepted clinical indication is incomplete or unsuccessful colonoscopy, which may be the result of redundant colon, patient intolerance to the procedure, spasm not resolving even with the use of spasmolytics, obstructing colo-rectal cancer. VC is also used to detect cancer in frail and immobile patients to avoid sedation during colonoscopy or the turning required during barium enema. The use of VC in patients under surveillance following colo-rectal cancer surgery is under investigation. Further studies are necessary in order to assess the cost-effectiveness of this approach. For colo-rectal cancer screening, a practical approach is to consider VC as a currently credible alternative screening method and as a reasonable alternative to the other colo-rectal cancer screening tests when a patient is unable or unwilling to undergo conventional colonoscopy. (orig.)

  6. Pediatric DXA: clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binkovitz, Larry A.; Sparke, Paul; Henwood, Maria J.

    2007-01-01

    Normal bone mineral accrual requires adequate dietary intake of calcium, vitamin D and other nutrients; hepatic and renal activation of vitamin D; normal hormone levels (thyroid, parathyroid, reproductive and growth hormones); and neuromuscular functioning with sufficient stress upon the skeleton to induce bone deposition. The presence of genetic or acquired diseases and the therapies that are used to treat them can also impact bone health. Since the introduction of clinical DXA in pediatrics in the early 1990s, there has been considerable investigation into the causes of low bone mineral density (BMD) in children. Pediatricians have also become aware of the role adequate bone mass accrual in childhood has in preventing osteoporotic fractures in late adulthood. Additionally, the availability of medications to improve BMD has increased with the development of bisphosphonates. These factors have led to the increased utilization of DXA in pediatrics. This review summarizes much of the previous research regarding BMD in children and is meant to assist radiologists and clinicians with DXA utilization and interpretation. (orig.)

  7. Combined positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for clinical oncology: technical aspects and acquisition protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, T.

    2004-01-01

    Combined PET/CT imaging is a non-invasive means of reviewing both, the anatomy and the molecular pathways of a patient during a quasi-simultaneous examination. Since the introduction of the prototype PET/CT in 1998 a rapid development of this imaging technology is being witnessed. The incorporation of fast PET detector technology into PET/CT designs and the routine use of the CT transmission images for attenuation correction of the PET allow for anato-metabolic whole-body examinations to be completed in less than 30 min. Thus, PET/CT imaging offers a logistical advantage to both, the patient and the clinicians since the two complementary exams - whenever clinically indicated - can be performed almost at the same time and a single integrated report can be created. Nevertheless, a number of pit-falls, primarily from the use of CT-based attenuation correction, have been identified and are being addressed through optimized acquisition protocols. It is fair to say, that PET/CT has been integrated in the diagnostic imaging arena, and in many cases has led to a close collaboration between different, yet complementary diagnostic and therapeutic medical disciplines. (orig.)

  8. Calibration of Ga-68 activity for PET applications in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García Rodríguez, Lourdes; Oropesa Verdecia, Pilar; Serra Águila, Rolando A.; Moreno León, Yecenia; Jénez Magaña, Yoel; Pérez LoretdeMola, Nayla; Bell Hechavarría, Ailec; Mas Ruiz, Javier; Cassette, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    A Ga-68 solution was used to calibrate the activity concentration using the double-triple coincidence ratio (TDCR) method of liquid scintillation for the first time in the country. The expanded uncertainty (k = 2) of the concentration of Ga-68 activity in the calibrated solution was equal to 2%. For measurements, the commercial liquid scintillation counter HIDEXTM was used. Samples were prepared by adding between 40 and 50 mg of the radioactive solution to 15 mL of ULTIMAGOLD ™ scintillating cocktail. For the estimation of Ga-68 counting efficiencies in the samples used for the calibration, a FORTRAN program developed by the National Institute of Metrology of France for the magnitudes of ionizing radiation, LNHB, was used. The validation of the method was carried out by the calibration of a standard solution of Na-22, also positronic emitter with similar disintegration scheme to Ga-68. The difference between the concentration of Na-22 activity measured using the TDCR method and the certified reference value traceable to the National Institute of Metrology of the United States (NIST) was 0.15%. With the solution of Ga-68 standardized by the TDCR method the calibration of the secondary standard activity meter, model CAPINTEC CRCTM 15R, was carried out for a geometry of 2R flask with 1mL of radioactive solution. Afterwards, this standard activity meter was calibrated for the measurement of Ga-68 in the geometries of interest in nuclear medicine: Flask 15R with 6 mL of radioactive solution, 2.5 mL syringe with 2 mL of radioactive solution and 5 mL syringe with 2 mL of radioactive solution. The results presented in this paper constitute the necessary metrological support for the introduction of new PET and PET / CT technologies into medical practice in Cuba.

  9. Clinical Utility of Amyloid PET Imaging in the Differential Diagnosis of Atypical Dementias and Its Impact on Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensaïdane, Mohamed Reda; Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu; Poulin, Stéphane; Buteau, François-Alexandre; Guimond, Jean; Bergeron, David; Verret, Louis; Fortin, Marie-Pierre; Houde, Michèle; Bouchard, Rémi W; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Laforce, Robert

    2016-04-18

    Recent studies have supported a role for amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in distinguishing Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology from other pathological protein accumulations leading to dementia. We investigated the clinical utility of amyloid PET in the differential diagnosis of atypical dementia cases and its impact on caregivers. Using the amyloid tracer 18F-NAV4694, we prospectively scanned 28 patients (mean age 59.3 y, s.d. 5.8; mean MMSE 21.4, s.d. 6.0) with an atypical dementia syndrome. Following a comprehensive diagnostic workup (i.e., history taking, neurological examination, blood tests, neuropsychological evaluation, MRI, and FDG-PET), no certain diagnosis could be arrived at. Amyloid PET was then conducted and classified as positive or negative. Attending physicians were asked to evaluate whether this result led to a change in diagnosis or altered management. They also reported their degree of confidence in the diagnosis. Caregivers were met after disclosure of amyloid PET results and completed a questionnaire/interview to assess the impact of the scan. Our cohort was evenly divided between positive (14/28) and negative (14/28) 18F-NAV4694 cases. Amyloid PET resulted in a diagnostic change in 9/28 cases (32.1%: 17.8% changed from AD to non-AD, 14.3% from non-AD to AD). There was a 44% increase in diagnostic confidence. Altered management occurred in 71.4% (20/28) of cases. Knowledge of amyloid status improved caregivers' outcomes in all domains (anxiety, depression, disease perception, future anticipation, and quality of life). This study suggests a useful additive role for amyloid PET in atypical cases with an unclear diagnosis beyond the extensive workup of a tertiary memory clinic. Amyloid PET increased diagnostic confidence and led to clinically significant alterations in management. The information gained from that test was well received by caregivers and encouraged spending quality time with their loved ones.

  10. Recent advances in iterative reconstruction for clinical SPECT/PET and CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Brian F

    2011-08-01

    Statistical iterative reconstruction is now widely used in clinical practice and has contributed to significant improvement in image quality in recent years. Although primarily used for reconstruction in emission tomography (both single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET)) there is increasing interest in also applying similar algorithms to x-ray computed tomography (CT). There is increasing complexity in the factors that are included in the reconstruction, a demonstration of the versatility of the approach. Research continues with exploration of methods for further improving reconstruction quality with effective correction for various sources of artefact.

  11. PET performance and MRI compatibility evaluation of a digital, ToF-capable PET/MRI insert equipped with clinical scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schug, David; Wehner, Jakob; Dueppenbecker, Peter Michael; Weissler, Bjoern; Goldschmidt, Benjamin; Schulz, Volkmar; Gebhardt, Pierre; Salomon, Andre; Kiessling, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    We evaluate the MR compatibility of the Hyperion-II D positron emission tomography (PET) insert, which allows simultaneous operation in a clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. In contrast to previous investigations, this work aims at the evaluation of a clinical crystal configuration. An imaging-capable demonstrator with an axial field-of-view of 32 mm and a crystal-to-crystal spacing of 217.6 mm was equipped with LYSO scintillators with a pitch of 4 mm which were read out in a one-to-one coupling scheme by sensor tiles composed of digital silicon photomultipliers from Philips Digital Photon Counting (DPC 3200-22). The PET performance degradation (energy resolution and coincidence resolution time (CRT)) was evaluated during simultaneous operation of the MRI scanner. We used clinically motivated imaging sequences as well as synthetic gradient stress test sequences. Without activity of the MRI scanner, we measured for trigger scheme 1 (first photon trigger) an energy resolution of 11.4% and a CRT of 213 ps for a narrow energy (NE) window using five 22 Na point-like sources. When applying the synthetic gradient sequences, we found worst-case relative degradations of the energy resolution by 5.1% and of the CRT by 33.9%. After identifying the origin of the degradations and implementing a fix to the read-out hardware, the same evaluation revealed no degradation of the PET performance anymore even when the most demanding gradient stress tests were applied. The PET performance of the insert was initially evaluated using the point sources, a high-activity phantom and hot-rod phantoms in order to assess the spatial resolution. Trigger schemes 2–4 delivered an energy resolution of 11.4% as well and CRTs of 279 ps, 333 ps and 557 ps for the NE window, respectively. An isocenter sensitivity of 0.41% using the NE window and 0.71% with a wide energy window was measured. Using a hot-rod phantom, a spatial resolution in the order of 2 mm was demonstrated and

  12. PET performance and MRI compatibility evaluation of a digital, ToF-capable PET/MRI insert equipped with clinical scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schug, David; Wehner, Jakob; Dueppenbecker, Peter Michael; Weissler, Bjoern; Gebhardt, Pierre; Goldschmidt, Benjamin; Salomon, Andre; Kiessling, Fabian; Schulz, Volkmar

    2015-09-01

    We evaluate the MR compatibility of the Hyperion-IID positron emission tomography (PET) insert, which allows simultaneous operation in a clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. In contrast to previous investigations, this work aims at the evaluation of a clinical crystal configuration. An imaging-capable demonstrator with an axial field-of-view of 32 mm and a crystal-to-crystal spacing of 217.6 mm was equipped with LYSO scintillators with a pitch of 4 mm which were read out in a one-to-one coupling scheme by sensor tiles composed of digital silicon photomultipliers from Philips Digital Photon Counting (DPC 3200-22). The PET performance degradation (energy resolution and coincidence resolution time (CRT)) was evaluated during simultaneous operation of the MRI scanner. We used clinically motivated imaging sequences as well as synthetic gradient stress test sequences. Without activity of the MRI scanner, we measured for trigger scheme 1 (first photon trigger) an energy resolution of 11.4% and a CRT of 213 ps for a narrow energy (NE) window using five 22Na point-like sources. When applying the synthetic gradient sequences, we found worst-case relative degradations of the energy resolution by 5.1% and of the CRT by 33.9%. After identifying the origin of the degradations and implementing a fix to the read-out hardware, the same evaluation revealed no degradation of the PET performance anymore even when the most demanding gradient stress tests were applied. The PET performance of the insert was initially evaluated using the point sources, a high-activity phantom and hot-rod phantoms in order to assess the spatial resolution. Trigger schemes 2-4 delivered an energy resolution of 11.4% as well and CRTs of 279 ps, 333 ps and 557 ps for the NE window, respectively. An isocenter sensitivity of 0.41% using the NE window and 0.71% with a wide energy window was measured. Using a hot-rod phantom, a spatial resolution in the order of 2 mm was demonstrated and the

  13. Comparison of clinical and physics scoring of PET images when image reconstruction parameters are varied

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, C.; Johnston, C.; Sheehy, N.; Reilly, G. O.

    2013-01-01

    In this study the quantitative and qualitative image quality (IQ) measurements with clinical judgement of IQ in positron emission tomography (PET) were compared. The limitations of IQ metrics and the proposed criteria of acceptability for PET scanners are discussed. Phantom and patient images were reconstructed using seven different iterative reconstruction protocols. For each reconstructed set of images, IQ was scored based both on the visual analysis and on the quantitative metrics. The quantitative physics metrics did not rank the reconstruction protocols in the same order as the clinicians' scoring of perceived IQ (R s = -0.54). Better agreement was achieved when comparing the clinical perception of IQ to the physicist's visual assessment of IQ in the phantom images (R s = +0.59). The closest agreement was seen between the quantitative physics metrics and the measurement of the standard uptake values (SUVs) in small tumours (R s = +0.92). Given the disparity between the clinical perception of IQ and the physics metrics a cautious approach to use of IQ measurements for determining suspension levels is warranted. (authors)

  14. ECAT ART - a continuously rotating PET camera: performance characteristics, initial clinical studies, and installation considerations in a nuclear medicine department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, D.L.; Young, H.; Bloomfield, P.M.; Meikle, S.R.; Glass, D.; Myers, M.J.; Spinks, T.J.; Watson, C.C.; Luk, P.; Peters, A.M.; Jones, T.

    1997-01-01

    Advances in image reconstruction techniques have permitted the development of a commercial, rotating, partial ring, fully 3D scanner, the ECAT ART. The system has less than one-half the number of bismuth germanate detectors compared with a full ring scanner with the equivalent field of view, resulting in reduced capital cost. The performance characteristics, implications for installation in a nuclear medicine department, and clinical utility of the scanner are presented in this report. The sensitivity (20 cm diameter x 20 cm long cylindrical phantom, no scatter correction) is 11400 cps.kBq -1 .ml -1 . This compares with 5800 and 40500 cps.kBq -1 .ml -1 in 2D and 3D respectively for the equivalent full ring scanner (ECAT EXACT). With an energy window of 350-650 keV the maximum noise equivalent count (NEC) rate was 27 kcps at a radioactivity concentration of ∝15 kBq .ml -1 in the cylinder. Spatial resolution is ∝6 mm full width at half maximum on axis degrading to just under 8 mm at a distance of 20 cm off axis. Installation and use within the nuclear medicine department does not appreciably increase background levels of radiation on gamma cameras in adjacent rooms and the dose rate to an operator in the same room is 2 μSv .h -1 for a typical fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) study with an initial injected activity of 370 MBq. The scanner has been used for clinical imaging with 18 F-FDG for neurological and oncological applications. Its novel use for imaging iron-52 transferrin for localising erythropoietic activity demonstrates its sensitivity and resolution advantages over a conventional dual-headed gamma camera. The ECAT ART provides a viable alternative to conventional full ring PET scanners without compromising the performance required for clinical PET imaging. (orig.). With 9 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Significant clinical impact and prognostic stratification provided by FDG-PET in the staging of oesophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duong, Cuong P.; Demitriou, Helen; Thompson, Anne; Williams, David; Thomas, Robert J.S.; Weih, LeAnn; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical impact of FDG-PET in staging oesophageal cancer and whether this information improves prognostic stratification. Impact was based on comparison of a prospectively recorded pre-PET plan with post-PET treatment in 68 consecutive patients undergoing primary staging. Survival was analysed using the Kaplan-Meier product limit method and the Cox proportional hazards regression model. FDG-PET findings impacted on the management of 27/68 patients (40%): in 12 therapy was changed from curative to palliative and in three from palliative to curative, while in 12 other patients there was a change in the treatment modality or delivery but not in the treatment intent. The median survival was 21 months, with post-PET stage and treatment intent both strongly associated with survival (p<0.001). Conventional stage was not able to clearly stratify this population. The use of FDG-PET for primary staging of oesophageal cancer changed the clinical management of more than one-third of patients and provided superior prognostic stratification compared with conventional investigations. (orig.)

  16. Clinical value of FDG hybrid-PET in staging and restaging of malignant lymphoma. Compared with conventional diagnostic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichler, R.; Maschek, W.; Hatzl-Griesenhofer, M.; Huber, H.; Wimmer, G.; Wahl, G.; Fridrik, M.

    2000-01-01

    Aim of the present retrospective study was to validate the clinical value of F-18-FDG PET imaging in lymphoma patients with a dual head camera modified for coincidence detection. Staging before and after oncological treatment was compared with a conservative diagnostic approach. Methods: 48 patients (28 non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 20 Hodgkin's disease) received FDG-Hybrid-PET scans. Pretherapeutic staging was realized in 28 patients, 9 of them had control studies after they had completed therapy. Totally 29 persons were examined for posttherapeutic restaging. Computed tomography imaging and lymph node sonography was performed in all cases. Results were validated by clinical follow-up, in three cases a recidive was proven by biopsy. Results: CT and ultrasound detected 77 lesions in 28 patients compared with 100 visualized by PET, but this difference in pretherapeutic staging did not reach significance at p>0.05 by Fisher's t-test. Hybrid-PET obtained a sensitivity of 93%, a specifity of 79%, a positive of 82% and a negative predictive value of 92% for detection of residual disease. The values for CT+US were 87%, 64%, 72% and 88% respectively. Conclusion: FDG Hybrid-PET is as or even more accurate than standard morphologic diagnostic methods for prestaging in malignant lymphoma. Additionally, there is a substancial benefit for therapy monitoring of residual disease using coincidence detection PET with a 3/4-inch crystal gamma camera. (orig.) [de

  17. Metabolic imaging using PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    There is growing evidence that myocardial metabolism plays a key role not only in ischaemic heart disease but also in a variety of diseases which involve myocardium globally, such as heart failure and diabetes mellitus. Understanding myocardial metabolism in such diseases helps to elucidate the pathophysiology and assists in making therapeutic decisions. As well as providing information on regional changes, PET can deliver quantitative information about both regional and global changes in metabolism. This capability of quantitative measurement is one of the major advantages of PET along with physiological positron tracers, especially relevant in evaluating diseases which involve the whole myocardium. This review discusses major PET tracers for metabolic imaging and their clinical applications and contributions to research regarding ischaemic heart disease and other diseases such as heart failure and diabetic heart disease. Future applications of positron metabolic tracers for the detection of vulnerable plaque are also highlighted briefly. (orig.)

  18. PET, Positron emission tomography: Presentation of a clinical case; PET, Tomografia por emision de positrones: Presentacion de un caso clinico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierralta C, Paulina; Jofre M, M Josefina; Gonzalez E, Patricio; Massardo V, Teresa; Humeres A, Pamela; Canessa G, Jose [Hospital Militar de Santiago, Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Centro PET de Imagenes Moleculares, Santiago (Chile)

    2003-07-01

    A patient with a solitary pulmonary nodule is presented. She was studied with PET using F-18 FDG. The metabolic images demonstrated increased uptake in the nodule and 2 additional areas suggestive of extension, not seen in anatomic diagnostic procedures. These findings were compatible with a malignant tumour with metastasis (au)

  19. FDG-PET/CT in oncology. German guideline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, B.J.; Beyer, T.; Bockisch, A.; Delbeke, D.; Kotzerke, J.; Minkov, V.; Reiser, M.; Willich, N.

    2007-01-01

    FDG-PET/CT examinations combine metabolic and morphologic imaging within an integrated procedure. Over the past decade PET/CT imaging has gained wide clinical acceptance in the field of oncology. This FDG-PET/CT guideline focuses on indications, data acquisition and processing as well as documentation of FDG-PET/CT examinations in oncologic patients within a clinical and social context specific to Germany. Background information and definitions are followed by examples of clinical and research applications of FDG-PET/CT. Furthermore, protocols for CT scanning (low dose and contrast-enhanced CT) and PET emission imaging are discussed. Documentation and reporting of examinations are specified. Image interpretation criteria and sources of errors are discussed. Quality control for FDG and PET/CT-systems, qualification requirements of personnel as well as legal aspects are presented. (orig.)

  20. The detection rates and tumor clinical/pathological stages of whole-body FDG-PET cancer screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Ken; Omagari, Junichi; Ochiai, Reiji; Yoshida, Tsuyoshi; Kitagawa, Mami; Kobayashi, Hisashi; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2007-01-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) has been used for cancer screening, mainly in East-Asia, and cancers are found not infrequently. However, their stages have not been clarified. We examined the detection rates of various cancers using whole-body PET for the screening of cancers in asymptomatic individuals, focusing on their clinical and pathological stages. Whole-body PET was obtained as a part of our cancer screening program among 3,426 healthy subjects. All subjects participated in a course of PET examination in conjunction with conventional examinations including a medical questionnaire, tumor markers, immunological fecal occult blood test, neck and abdominal ultrasonography and whole body computed tomography. A diagnosis and staging was obtained by an analysis of the pathological findings or by an analysis of the clinical follow-up data. Malignant tumors were discovered in 65 lesions found in 3,426 participants (1.90%). The PET findings were true-positive in 46 of the 65 cancer cases. The cancers were found in the following organs: the colon 14; thyroid gland 10; stomach 7; lung 5; liver 3; breast 2; and one each in the kidney, gallbladder, esophagus, pancreas and retroperitoneum. The stages were as follows: stage 0 5, stage I 17, stage II 10, stage III 7, and stage IV 6. One was an unknown primary. There were 19 false-negative findings (0.6%) on PET. Six cancers (0.18%) were missed in our screening program. PET imaging has the potential to detect a wide variety of cancers at potentially curative stages. Most PET-negative cancers are early stage cancers, and thus can be detected using other conventional examinations such as endoscopy. (author)

  1. Clinical Application of Nape Acupuncture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUA Xiao-yin; CUI Yi-jun

    2003-01-01

    @@ Nape Acupuncture refers to an acupuncture method at nuchal region. It was initiated and applied in clinic by Dr. HUA Yan-ling from Shanghai Research Institute of Acupuncture and Meridian and it can be used for treating diseases of nervous, circulatory and motor systems. Especially, it is more effective for brain-origin diseases. The author ever studied this acupuncture method from Dr. Hua and found it was effective according to clinical application. Now several typical cases are reported as follows.

  2. Current status and future perspective of PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myung Chul

    2002-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a nuclear medicine imaging modality that consists of systemic administration to a subject of a radiopharmaceutical labeled with a positron-emitting radionuclide. Following administration, its distribution in the organ or structure under study can be assessed as a function of time and space by (1) detecting the annihilation radiation resulting from the interaction of the positrons with matter, and (2) reconstructing the distribution of the radioactivity from a series of that used in computed tomography (CT). The nuclides most generally exhibit chemical properties that render them particularly desirable in physiological studies. The radionuclides most widely used in PET are F-18, C-11, O-15 and N-13. Regarding to the number of the current PET Centers worldwide (based on ICP data), more than 300 PET Centers were in operation in 2000. The use of PET technology grew rapidly compared to that in 1992 and 1996, particularly in the USA, which demonstrates a three-fold rise in PET installations. In 2001, 194 PET Centers were operating in the USA. In 1994, two clinical and research-oriented PET Centers at Seoul National University Hospital and Samsung Medical Center, was established as the first dedicated PET and Cyclotron machines in Korea, followed by two more PET facilities at the Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Ajou Medical Center, Yonsei University Medical Center, National Cancer Center and established their PET Center. Catholic Medical School and Pusan National University Hospital have finalized a plan to install PET machine in 2002, which results in total of nine PET Centers in Korea. Considering annual trends of PET application in four major PET centers in Korea in Asan Medical Center recent six years (from 1995 to 2000), a total of 11,564 patients have been studied every year and the number of PET studies has shown steep growth year upon year. We had, 1,020 PET patients in 1995. This number increased to 1,196, 1,756, 2,379, 3

  3. Clinical impact of PET/CT imaging after adjuvant therapy in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Huan-Chun [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Taoyuan (China); Kang, Chung-Jan; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Liao, Chun-Ta [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Taoyuan (China); Wang, Hung-Ming [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Medical Oncology, Taoyuan (China); Lin, Chien-Yu [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Taoyuan (China); Lee, Li-Yu [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Pathology, Taoyuan (China); Yen, Tzu-Chen [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Taoyuan (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Linkou, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taoyuan (China)

    2017-09-15

    This single-center retrospective study of prospectively collected data was aimed at comparing the clinical outcomes of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) with symptomatic recurrences identified by PET/CT imaging following adjuvant therapy (Group A) versus those of cases with asymptomatic recurrences diagnosed through periodic post-adjuvant therapy PET/CT surveillance (Group B). We also sought to establish the priority of salvage therapy in the two study groups. We identified 111 patients with advanced resected OSCC who developed recurrences following adjuvant therapy (51 in Group A and 60 in Group B). Histopathology served as the gold standard for recurrent lesions. The impact of post-adjuvant therapy PET/CT surveillance was examined with Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazards regression models. The 2-year DSS and OS rates were marginally or significantly higher in Group B than in Group A (P = 0.073 and P = 0.025, respectively). Time-dependent ROC curve analysis demonstrated that the optimal cutoff values for time to positive PET/CT findings in relation to OS were 12 months for Group A and 9 months for Group B, respectively. Independent risk factors identified in multivariate analyses were used to devise two prognostic scoring systems for 2-year DSS and OS in each study group (all P < 0.001). Scheduled periodic PET/CT surveillance is a valuable tool for early detection of recurrent lesion(s) in asymptomatic OSCC patients who bear risk factors for disease recurrence. The presence of clinical symptoms and a short time to positive PET/CT findings were adverse prognostic factors for clinical outcome in patients with advanced OSCC. The priority of salvage therapy is discussed in each patient subgroup according to the devised prognostic scoring systems. (orig.)

  4. Development of a nomogram combining clinical staging with 18F-FDG PET/CT image features in non-small-cell lung cancer stage I-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desseroit, Marie-Charlotte; Visvikis, Dimitris; Majdoub, Mohamed; Hatt, Mathieu; Tixier, Florent; Perdrisot, Remy; Cheze Le Rest, Catherine; Guillevin, Remy

    2016-01-01

    Our goal was to develop a nomogram by exploiting intratumour heterogeneity on CT and PET images from routine 18 F-FDG PET/CT acquisitions to identify patients with the poorest prognosis. This retrospective study included 116 patients with NSCLC stage I, II or III and with staging 18 F-FDG PET/CT imaging. Primary tumour volumes were delineated using the FLAB algorithm and 3D Slicer trademark on PET and CT images, respectively. PET and CT heterogeneities were quantified using texture analysis. The reproducibility of the CT features was assessed on a separate test-retest dataset. The stratification power of the PET/CT features was evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test. The best standard metric (functional volume) was combined with the least redundant and most prognostic PET/CT heterogeneity features to build the nomogram. PET entropy and CT zone percentage had the highest complementary values with clinical stage and functional volume. The nomogram improved stratification amongst patients with stage II and III disease, allowing identification of patients with the poorest prognosis (clinical stage III, large tumour volume, high PET heterogeneity and low CT heterogeneity). Intratumour heterogeneity quantified using textural features on both CT and PET images from routine staging 18 F-FDG PET/CT acquisitions can be used to create a nomogram with higher stratification power than staging alone. (orig.)

  5. Methodological studies into the applicability of positron emission tomography (PET) in light-ion beam tumor therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawelke, J.

    1995-06-01

    For reconstruction of measured activity distributions, a multiplicative iteration scheme was used which, however, does not fulfill the clinical requirement of availability of reconstructed activity distributions within a few minutes after measuring. This disadvantage was set off by the development of an empirical algorithm for determination of the 3D-distribution of the intersection points of all possible coincidence line pairs. This algorithm was then applied for the reconstruction of the positron emitter distributions measured during range measurement of light ions. For the simple, compact source distributions and small number of measured coincidences in this case, the method of intersecting point computation is better than the iterative method in that it is significantly faster and yields images of comparable quality. On the basis of these results, a PET system was set up for clinical applications at the irradiation system for experimental light-ion beam therapy at GSI Darmstadt. (orig./DG) [de

  6. Translocator Protein-18 kDa (TSPO Positron Emission Tomography (PET Imaging and Its Clinical Impact in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Claire Dupont

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In vivo exploration of activated microglia in neurodegenerative diseases is achievable by Positron Emission Tomography (PET imaging, using dedicated radiopharmaceuticals targeting the translocator protein-18 kDa (TSPO. In this review, we emphasized the major advances made over the last 20 years, thanks to TSPO PET imaging, to define the pathophysiological implication of microglia activation and neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, and also in psychiatric disorders. The extent and upregulation of TSPO as a molecular biomarker of activated microglia in the human brain is now widely documented in these pathologies, but its significance, and especially its protective or deleterious action regarding the disease’s stage, remains under debate. Thus, we exposed new and plausible suggestions to enhance the contribution of TSPO PET imaging for biomedical research by exploring microglia’s role and interactions with other cells in brain parenchyma. Multiplex approaches, associating TSPO PET radiopharmaceuticals with other biomarkers (PET imaging of cellular metabolism, neurotransmission or abnormal protein aggregates, but also other imaging modalities, and peripheral cytokine levels measurement and/or metabolomics analysis was considered. Finally, the actual clinical impact of TSPO PET imaging as a routine biomarker of neuroinflammation was put into perspective regarding the current development of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of 201thallium-SPECT and 18F-FDG-PET in the clinical assessment of glioma recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Rio, Manuel; Rodriguez-Fernandez, Antonio; Ramos-Font, Carlos; Lopez-Ramirez, Escarlata; Llamas-Elvira, Jose M.

    2008-01-01

    Reliable differential diagnosis between tumour recurrence and treatment-induced lesions is required to take advantage of new therapeutic approaches to recurrent gliomas. Structural imaging methods offer a high sensitivity but a low specificity, which might be improved by neurofunctional imaging. This study aimed to test the hypothesis that incorporation of 18-fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) increases the accuracy of this differential diagnosis obtained with 201 Tl chloride-single-photon emission computed tomography ( 201 Tl-SPECT). Seventy-six patients (mean age 47.72 ± 16.19 years) under suspicion of glioma recurrence, 42% with low-grade and 58% with high-grade lesions, were studied by 201 Tl-SPECT and FDG-PET, reporting results under blinded conditions using visual analysis. Tumour was confirmed by histological confirmation (23 patients) or clinical and structural neuroimaging follow-up (mean of 2.6 years). This population had a high disease prevalence (72%). Globally, highest sensitivity was obtained using 201 Tl-SPECT assessed with MRI (96%) and highest specificity using FDG-PET + MRI (95%). FDG-PET appeared slightly better for confirming tumour recurrence, whereas 201 Tl-SPECT was superior for ruling out possible recurrence (disease present in 38% of FDG-PET negative explorations). In the high-grade subgroup, there were no false-positive examinations (specificity: 100%), but sensitivity differed among techniques ( 201 Tl-SPECT: 94%; 201 Tl-SPECT + MRI: 97%; FDG-PET + MRI: 83%). In the low-grade subgroup, 201 Tl-SPECT+ MRI showed highest sensitivity (95%) and lowest posttest negative probability (9%); FDG-PET + MRI offered highest specificity (92%) with a posttest negative probability of 35%. FDG-PET does not clearly improve the diagnostic accuracy of 201 Tl-SPECT, which appears to be a more appropriate examination for the diagnosis of possible brain tumour recurrence, especially for ruling it out. (orig.)

  8. Application of a semi-automatic ROI setting system for brain PET images to animal PET studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuge, Yuji; Akai, Nobuo; Tamura, Koji

    1998-01-01

    ProASSIST, a semi-automatic ROI (region of interest) setting system for human brain PET images, has been modified for use with the canine brain, and the performance of the obtained system was evaluated by comparing the operational simplicity for ROI setting and the consistency of ROI values obtained with those by a conventional manual procedure. Namely, we created segment maps for the canine brain by making reference to the coronal section atlas of the canine brain by Lim et al., and incorporated them into the ProASSIST system. For the performance test, CBF (cerebral blood flow) and CMRglc (cerebral metabolic rate in glucose) images in dogs with or without focal cerebral ischemia were used. In ProASSIST, brain contours were defined semiautomatically. In the ROI analysis of the test image, manual modification of the contour was necessary in half cases examined (8/16). However, the operation was rather simple so that the operation time per one brain section was significantly shorter than that in the manual operation. The ROI values determined by the system were comparable with those by the manual procedure, confirming the applicability of the system to these animal studies. The use of the system like the present one would also merit the more objective data acquisition for the quantitative ROI analysis, because no manual procedure except for some specifications of the anatomical features is required for ROI setting. (author)

  9. MO-FG-207-02: Technological Advances and Challenges: Experience with Time-Of-Flight PET Combined with 3-Tesla MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, F.

    2015-01-01

    The use of integrated PET/MRI systems in clinical applications can best benefit from understanding their technological advances and limitations. The currently available clinical PET/MRI systems have their own characteristics. Thorough analyses of existing technical data and evaluation of necessary performance metrics for quality assurances could be conducted to optimize application-specific PET/MRI protocols. This Symposium will focus on technical advances and limitations of clinical PET/MRI systems, and how this exciting imaging modality can be utilized in applications that can benefit from both PET and MRI. Learning Objectives: To understand the technological advances of clinical PET/MRI systems To correctly identify clinical applications that can benefit from PET/MRI To understand ongoing work to further improve the current PET/MRI technology Floris Jansen is a GE Healthcare employee

  10. MO-FG-207-02: Technological Advances and Challenges: Experience with Time-Of-Flight PET Combined with 3-Tesla MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, F. [GE Healthcare (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    The use of integrated PET/MRI systems in clinical applications can best benefit from understanding their technological advances and limitations. The currently available clinical PET/MRI systems have their own characteristics. Thorough analyses of existing technical data and evaluation of necessary performance metrics for quality assurances could be conducted to optimize application-specific PET/MRI protocols. This Symposium will focus on technical advances and limitations of clinical PET/MRI systems, and how this exciting imaging modality can be utilized in applications that can benefit from both PET and MRI. Learning Objectives: To understand the technological advances of clinical PET/MRI systems To correctly identify clinical applications that can benefit from PET/MRI To understand ongoing work to further improve the current PET/MRI technology Floris Jansen is a GE Healthcare employee.

  11. MO-FG-207-01: Technological Advances and Challenges: Experience with the First Integrated Whole-Body PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laforest, R. [Washington University School of Medicine (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The use of integrated PET/MRI systems in clinical applications can best benefit from understanding their technological advances and limitations. The currently available clinical PET/MRI systems have their own characteristics. Thorough analyses of existing technical data and evaluation of necessary performance metrics for quality assurances could be conducted to optimize application-specific PET/MRI protocols. This Symposium will focus on technical advances and limitations of clinical PET/MRI systems, and how this exciting imaging modality can be utilized in applications that can benefit from both PET and MRI. Learning Objectives: To understand the technological advances of clinical PET/MRI systems To correctly identify clinical applications that can benefit from PET/MRI To understand ongoing work to further improve the current PET/MRI technology Floris Jansen is a GE Healthcare employee.

  12. MO-FG-207-01: Technological Advances and Challenges: Experience with the First Integrated Whole-Body PET/MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laforest, R.

    2015-01-01

    The use of integrated PET/MRI systems in clinical applications can best benefit from understanding their technological advances and limitations. The currently available clinical PET/MRI systems have their own characteristics. Thorough analyses of existing technical data and evaluation of necessary performance metrics for quality assurances could be conducted to optimize application-specific PET/MRI protocols. This Symposium will focus on technical advances and limitations of clinical PET/MRI systems, and how this exciting imaging modality can be utilized in applications that can benefit from both PET and MRI. Learning Objectives: To understand the technological advances of clinical PET/MRI systems To correctly identify clinical applications that can benefit from PET/MRI To understand ongoing work to further improve the current PET/MRI technology Floris Jansen is a GE Healthcare employee

  13. submitter Clinical evaluation of the radiolanthanide terbium-152: first-in-human PET/CT with $^152$Tb-DOTATOC

    CERN Document Server

    Baum, Richard P; Benešová, Martina; Vermeulen, Christiaan; Gnesin, Silvano; Köster, Ulli; Johnston, Karl; Müller, Dirk; Senftleben, Stefan; Kulkarni, Harshad R; Türler, Andreas; Schibli, Roger; Prior, John O; van der Meulen, Nicholas P; Müller, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    The existence of theragnostic pairs of radionuclides allows the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Radiolanthanides, such as $^{177}$Lu, are successfully used for therapeutic purposes; however, a perfect diagnostic match is currently not available for clinical use. A unique, multi-disciplinary study was performed using $^{152}$Tb ($T_{1/2}$ = 17.5 h, E$\\beta ^+_{average}$ = 1140 keV, I$β^+$ = 20.3%), which resulted in the first-in-human PET/CT images with this promising radionuclide. For this purpose, $^{152}$Tb was produced via a spallation process followed by mass separation at ISOLDE, CERN. The chemical separation and quality control, performed at PSI, resulted in a pure product in sufficient yields. Clinical PET phantom studies revealed an increased image noise level, because of the smaller $\\beta^+$ branching ratio of $^{152}$Tb as compared to standard PET nuclides at matched activity concentrations; however, the expected recovery would be comparable at matched ...

  14. PET and diagnostic technology evaluation in a global clinical process. DGN's point of view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotzerke, J. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Dresden (Germany); Dietlein, M. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Koeln (Germany); Gruenwald, F. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Bockisch, A. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Essen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    therapy of malignancies will be improved continuously. It is the claim of the health insurances to implement innovative therapeutic approaches in controlled clinical trials with tools of quality control. The monitoring committee is responsible for the safety of the patients. PET is part of the health care. Internationally accepted rules for clinical trials stipulate that any interim analyses of those trials are confidential as long as recruitment is active. The delay until evidence is documented by the published final analysis is methodologically accepted and not a characteristic of PET. (7) Procedures in nuclear medicine without the use of PET-tracers with short half-life will increase the radiation exposure of the patients; the use of non-PET-tracers with longer half-life is in contravention of the German regulation of radiation protection. (orig.)

  15. Clinical impact of {sup 11}C-methionine PET on expected management of patients with brain neoplasm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamane, Tomohiko; Senda, Michio [Institution of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Division of Molecular imaging, Kobe (Japan); Sakamoto, Setsu [Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kobe (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    We retrospectively examined the clinical efficacy of {sup 11}C-methionine positron emission tomography ({sup 11}C-MET PET) in patients with brain neoplasm, especially whether the {sup 11}C-MET PET changed the clinical management and whether the change was beneficial or detrimental. This study reviewed 89 {sup 11}C-MET PET scans for 80 patients (20 scans for initial diagnosis of brain tumor and 69 scans for differentiating tumor recurrence from radiation necrosis). Final diagnosis and the effect on the intended management were obtained from the questionnaire to the referring physicians or directly from the medical records. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for the {sup 11}C-MET PET were evaluated. Regarding the management impact, the rate of scans that caused changes in intended management was also evaluated. Moreover, the occurrence of scans having detrimental diagnostic impact (DDI) and beneficial diagnostic impact (BDI) were evaluated. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of {sup 11}C-MET PET was 87.8, 80.0, and 85.9%. The intended management was changed in 50.0% of the scans. DDI and BDI were observed in 4.3 and 36.2% of the total relevant scans, respectively. {sup 11}C-MET PET can provide useful information in initial diagnosis and differentiating tumor recurrence from radiation necrosis. The intended management was changed in half of the scans. Since a few cases did not receive the requisite treatment due to false-negative results of {sup 11}C-MET PET, management decision should be made carefully, especially in the case of a negative scan. (orig.)

  16. Green synthesis of chromium-based metal-organic framework (Cr-MOF) from waste polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles for hydrogen storage applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ren, Jianwei

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available It is of great economic value to produce high-value PET-based MOF materials by the veritable elimination of waste PET, and provide sufficient MOF materials for hydrogen storage applications. Consequently, this work demonstrates the use of waste PET...

  17. Colorectal cancer staging: comparison of whole-body PET/CT and PET/MR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Onofrio A; Coutinho, Artur M; Sahani, Dushyant V; Vangel, Mark G; Gee, Michael S; Hahn, Peter F; Witzel, Thomas; Soricelli, Andrea; Salvatore, Marco; Catana, Ciprian; Mahmood, Umar; Rosen, Bruce R; Gervais, Debra

    2017-04-01

    Correct staging is imperative for colorectal cancer (CRC) since it influences both prognosis and management. Several imaging methods are used for this purpose, with variable performance. Positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance (PET/MR) is an innovative imaging technique recently employed for clinical application. The present study was undertaken to compare the staging accuracy of whole-body positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) with whole-body PET/MR in patients with both newly diagnosed and treated colorectal cancer. Twenty-six patients, who underwent same day whole-body (WB) PET/CT and WB-PET/MR, were evaluated. PET/CT and PET/MR studies were interpreted by consensus by a radiologist and a nuclear medicine physician. Correlations with prior imaging and follow-up studies were used as the reference standard. Correct staging was compared between methods using McNemar's Chi square test. The two methods were in agreement and correct for 18/26 (69%) patients, and in agreement and incorrect for one patient (3.8%). PET/MR and PET/CT stages for the remaining 7/26 patients (27%) were discordant, with PET/MR staging being correct in all seven cases. PET/MR significantly outperformed PET/CT overall for accurate staging (P = 0.02). PET/MR outperformed PET/CT in CRC staging. PET/MR might allow accurate local and distant staging of CRC patients during both at the time of diagnosis and during follow-up.

  18. Clinical applications of cells labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, B.M.

    1994-01-01

    Blood cells labelled with radionuclides are reviewed and main applications are described. Red blood cell labelling by both random and specific principle. A table with most important clinical uses, 99mTc labelling of RBC are described pre tinning and in vivo reduction of Tc, in vitro labelling and administration of labelled RBC and in vivo modified technique. Labelled leucocytes with several 99mTc-complex radiopharmaceuticals by in vitro technique and specific monoclonal s for white cells(neutrofiles). Labelled platelets for clinical use and research by in vitro technique and in vivo labelling

  19. fMRI. Basics and clinical applications. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulmer, Stephan [Medizinisch Radiologisces Institut (MRI), Zuerich (Switzerland); Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie; Jansen, Olav (eds.) [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie

    2013-11-01

    State of the art overview of fMRI. Covers technical issues, methods of statistical analysis, and the full range of clinical applications. Revised and expanded edition including discussion of novel aspects of analysis and further important applications. Includes comparisons with other brain mapping techniques and discussion of potential combined uses. Since functional MRI (fMRI) and the basic method of BOLD imaging were introduced in 1993 by Seiji Ogawa, fMRI has evolved into an invaluable clinical tool for routine brain imaging, and there have been substantial improvements in both the imaging technique itself and the associated statistical analysis. This book provides a state of the art overview of fMRI and its use in clinical practice. Experts in the field share their knowledge and explain how to overcome diverse potential technical barriers and problems. Starting from the very basics on the origin of the BOLD signal, the book covers technical issues, anatomical landmarks, the full range of clinical applications, methods of statistical analysis, and special issues in various clinical fields. Comparisons are made with other brain mapping techniques, such as DTI, PET, TMS, EEG, and MEG, and their combined use with fMRI is also discussed. Since the first edition, original chapters have been updated and new chapters added, covering both novel aspects of analysis and further important clinical applications.

  20. A compact high resolution flat panel PET detector based on the new 4-side buttable MPPC for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Wen, Jie; Ravindranath, Bosky; O'Sullivan, Andrew W; Catherall, David; Li, Ke; Wei, Shouyi; Komarov, Sergey; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2015-09-11

    Compact high-resolution panel detectors using virtual pinhole (VP) PET geometry can be inserted into existing clinical or pre-clinical PET systems to improve regional spatial resolution and sensitivity. Here we describe a compact panel PET detector built using the new Though Silicon Via (TSV) multi-pixel photon counters (MPPC) detector. This insert provides high spatial resolution and good timing performance for multiple bio-medical applications. Because the TSV MPPC design eliminates wire bonding and has a package dimension which is very close to the MPPC's active area, it is 4-side buttable. The custom designed MPPC array (based on Hamamatsu S12641-PA-50(x)) used in the prototype is composed of 4 × 4 TSV-MPPC cells with a 4.46 mm pitch in both directions. The detector module has 16 × 16 lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystal array, with each crystal measuring 0.92 × 0.92 × 3 mm 3 with 1.0 mm pitch. The outer diameter of the detector block is 16.8 × 16.8 mm 2 . Thirty-two such blocks will be arranged in a 4 × 8 array with 1 mm gaps to form a panel detector with detection area around 7 cm × 14 cm in the full-size detector. The flood histogram acquired with Ge-68 source showed excellent crystal separation capability with all 256 crystals clearly resolved. The detector module's mean, standard deviation, minimum (best) and maximum (worst) energy resolution were 10.19%, +/-0.68%, 8.36% and 13.45% FWHM, respectively. The measured coincidence time resolution between the block detector and a fast reference detector (around 200 ps single photon timing resolution) was 0.95 ns. When tested with Siemens Cardinal electronics the performance of the detector blocks remain consistent. These results demonstrate that the TSV-MPPC is a promising photon sensor for use in a flat panel PET insert composed of many high resolution compact detector modules.

  1. Clinical utility of simultaneous whole-body 18F-FDG PET/MRI as a single-step imaging modality in the staging of primary nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Yeh, Chih-Hua; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Ng, Shu-Hang; Chang, Joseph Tung-Chieh; Lin, Chien-Yu; Yen-Ming, Tsang; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Huang, Bing-Shen; Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Chang, Kai-Ping; Wang, Hung-Ming; Liao, Chun-Ta

    2018-03-03

    Both head and neck magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) play a crucial role in the staging of primary nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In this study, we sought to prospectively investigate the clinical utility of simultaneous whole-body 18F-FDG PET/MRI for primary staging of NPC patients. We examined 113 patients with histologically confirmed NPC who underwent pretreatment, simultaneous whole-body PET/MRI and PET/CT for primary tumor staging. The images obtained with the different imaging modalities were interpreted independently and compared with each other. PET/MRI increased the accuracy of head and neck MRI for assessment of primary tumor extent in four patients via addition of FDG uptake information to increase the conspicuity of morphologically subtle lesions. PET/MR images were more discernible than PET/CT images for mapping tumor extension, especially intracranial invasion. Regarding the N staging assessment, the sensitivity of PET/MRI (99.5%) was higher than that of head and neck MRI (94.2%) and PET/CT (90.9%). PET/MRI was particularly useful for distinguishing retropharyngeal nodal metastasis from adjacent nasopharyngeal tumors. For distant metastasis evaluation, PET/MRI exhibited a similar sensitivity (90% vs. 86.7% vs. 83.3%), but higher positive predictive value (93.1% vs. 78.8% vs. 83.3%) than whole-body MRI and PET/CT, respectively. For tumor staging of NPC, simultaneous whole-body PET/MRI was more accurate than head and neck MRI and PET/CT, and may serve as a single-step staging modality.

  2. Comparison of clinical efficacy of second look operation and FDG-PET scan in patients with ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Sang Young

    1999-12-01

    This study is to investigate whether FDG-PET scan can substitute for second look operation in patients with ovarian cancer showing complete response with chemotherapy. From Jan. 1999 to Oct. 1999, 10 patients with advanced ovarian cancer who showed clinical complete response with 6 cycles of combination chemotherapy were registered in KCCH. These patients showed no residual tumors in conventional radiologic imaging studies (CT or MRI), normal tumor marker, no evidence of disease by physical examination. PET scans and second look operation were performed in 10 patients with advanced ovarian cancer (3 patients with stage IIc, 2 patients with stage IIIb, 5 patients with IIIc), who showed complete response with cytoreductive surgery and 6 cycles of post-operative adjuvant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy. Median age of patients was 45 years, and serous cystadenocarcinoma was most common histologic type. None showed active lesion in pelvis and abdomen with FDG-PET scan (SUV; > 3.5 kg/ml), and I patient showed active lesion in lung field. On second look operations, 5 patients (50%) showed positive result on multiple blind biopsy. The patient with active lesion on FDG-PET scan in lung field confirmed to have metastatic lesions by chest CT scan. In conclusion, FDG-PET scan is not useful for detection of small ovarian cancer lesions in pelvis and abdomen, and cannot substitute for second look operation to determine pathologic complete response

  3. Comparison of clinical efficacy of second look operation and FDG-PET scan in patients with ovarian cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Sang Young

    1999-12-01

    This study is to investigate whether FDG-PET scan can substitute for second look operation in patients with ovarian cancer showing complete response with chemotherapy. From Jan. 1999 to Oct. 1999, 10 patients with advanced ovarian cancer who showed clinical complete response with 6 cycles of combination chemotherapy were registered in KCCH. These patients showed no residual tumors in conventional radiologic imaging studies (CT or MRI), normal tumor marker, no evidence of disease by physical examination. PET scans and second look operation were performed in 10 patients with advanced ovarian cancer (3 patients with stage IIc, 2 patients with stage IIIb, 5 patients with IIIc), who showed complete response with cytoreductive surgery and 6 cycles of post-operative adjuvant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy. Median age of patients was 45 years, and serous cystadenocarcinoma was most common histologic type. None showed active lesion in pelvis and abdomen with FDG-PET scan (SUV; > 3.5 kg/ml), and I patient showed active lesion in lung field. On second look operations, 5 patients (50%) showed positive result on multiple blind biopsy. The patient with active lesion on FDG-PET scan in lung field confirmed to have metastatic lesions by chest CT scan. In conclusion, FDG-PET scan is not useful for detection of small ovarian cancer lesions in pelvis and abdomen, and cannot substitute for second look operation to determine pathologic complete response.

  4. Dynamic PET image reconstruction integrating temporal regularization associated with respiratory motion correction for applications in oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlin, Thibaut; Visvikis, Dimitris; Fernandez, Philippe; Lamare, Frédéric

    2018-02-01

    Respiratory motion reduces both the qualitative and quantitative accuracy of PET images in oncology. This impact is more significant for quantitative applications based on kinetic modeling, where dynamic acquisitions are associated with limited statistics due to the necessity of enhanced temporal resolution. The aim of this study is to address these drawbacks, by combining a respiratory motion correction approach with temporal regularization in a unique reconstruction algorithm for dynamic PET imaging. Elastic transformation parameters for the motion correction are estimated from the non-attenuation-corrected PET images. The derived displacement matrices are subsequently used in a list-mode based OSEM reconstruction algorithm integrating a temporal regularization between the 3D dynamic PET frames, based on temporal basis functions. These functions are simultaneously estimated at each iteration, along with their relative coefficients for each image voxel. Quantitative evaluation has been performed using dynamic FDG PET/CT acquisitions of lung cancer patients acquired on a GE DRX system. The performance of the proposed method is compared with that of a standard multi-frame OSEM reconstruction algorithm. The proposed method achieved substantial improvements in terms of noise reduction while accounting for loss of contrast due to respiratory motion. Results on simulated data showed that the proposed 4D algorithms led to bias reduction values up to 40% in both tumor and blood regions for similar standard deviation levels, in comparison with a standard 3D reconstruction. Patlak parameter estimations on reconstructed images with the proposed reconstruction methods resulted in 30% and 40% bias reduction in the tumor and lung region respectively for the Patlak slope, and a 30% bias reduction for the intercept in the tumor region (a similar Patlak intercept was achieved in the lung area). Incorporation of the respiratory motion correction using an elastic model along with a

  5. Development of scintillation materials for PET scanners

    CERN Document Server

    Korzhik, Mikhail; Annenkov, Alexander N; Borissevitch, Andrei; Dossovitski, Alexei; Missevitch, Oleg; Lecoq, Paul

    2007-01-01

    The growing demand on PET methodology for a variety of applications ranging from clinical use to fundamental studies triggers research and development of PET scanners providing better spatial resolution and sensitivity. These efforts are primarily focused on the development of advanced PET detector solutions and on the developments of new scintillation materials as well. However Lu containing scintillation materials introduced in the last century such as LSO, LYSO, LuAP, LuYAP crystals still remain the best PET species in spite of the recent developments of bright, fast but relatively low density lanthanum bromide scintillators. At the same time Lu based materials have several drawbacks which are high temperature of crystallization and relatively high cost compared to alkali-halide scintillation materials. Here we describe recent results in the development of new scintillation materials for PET application.

  6. Clinical applications of immunoglobulin: update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Cristina Zago Novaretti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Human immunoglobulin is the most used blood product in the clinical practice. Immunoglobulin applications have increased quickly since the elucidation of its immunomodulatory and antiinflammatory properties which turned this blood product into a precious tool in the treatment of numerous diseases that present with humoral immune deficiency or that cause immune system dysfunction. Currently, the approved indications for Ig are: primary immunodeficiencies, secondary immunodeficiencies (multiple myeloma or chronic lymphoid leukemia, Kawasaki syndrome, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, Guillain Barré syndrome, graft-versus-host disease following bone marrow transplantation and repeat infections in HIV children. On the other hand, there are numerous "off-label" indications of immunoglobulin, which represent 20-60% of all clinical applications of this drug. It is important to study all these indications and, above all, the scientific evidence for its use, in order to provide patients with a new therapeutic option without burdening the health system. This review results from a wide selection of papers identified in the Pubmed and Lilacs scientific electronic databases. A group of descriptors were used from human immunoglobulin to the names of each disease that immunoglobulin is clinically applied. Our main objective is to list the numerous indications of immunoglobulin, both authorized and "off-label" and to analyze these indications in the light of the most recent scientific evidence.

  7. A study on development of fast silicon photomultipliers for TOF-PET Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chae Hun

    2011-02-01

    micro-pixels with 66 % fill factor. At this condition, the dynamic range was appropriate for measurement of 511 keV gamma photons with LYSO coupling. Additionally integrated quenching capacitors were fabricated with the Metal-Insulator-Metal (MIM) structure which is commonly used in standard CMOS processes. Quenching capacitor C q with 30 fF successfully modified the single photon pulse shape of SiPM. The initial current in the single photon pulse shape was increased, so, the pulse shape became shaper than conventional SiPMs. This sharper pulse shape shortens the rise time of PET detectors coupled to LYSO. 10 to 90 % rise time of the PET detector based on C q integrated SiPM was 22.5 ns while the normal SiPM has 34.3 ns. The performance of fabricated SiPM was experimentally evaluated with parameters such as reverse bias characteristics, single photoelectron spectrum, gain, dark count rate, energy resolution, and Photon Detection efficiency (PDE). The breakdown voltage was around 16.5 V, so the operating voltage was 17 V to 18V. The gain was obtained with the mean spacing method from single photoelectron spectra, and high gain about 2x10 6 was measured. In Na-22 spectrum measurements, the energy resolution was better than 15 % FWHM at 511 keV which is good enough to use in PET. The experimental results show its feasibility to use in TOF-PET application. The fabricated SiPM has better performances than commercial SiPMs except for dark count rates. Due to N+ formation by the direct arsenic implantation, dark count rate was higher than commercials. As a future work, the SiPM fabrication process scheme is needed to study in order to reduce the dark count rate

  8. Joint reconstruction via coupled Bregman iterations with applications to PET-MR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasch, Julian; Brinkmann, Eva-Maria; Burger, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Joint reconstruction has recently attracted a lot of attention, especially in the field of medical multi-modality imaging such as PET-MRI. Most of the developed methods rely on the comparison of image gradients, or more precisely their location, direction and magnitude, to make use of structural similarities between the images. A challenge and still an open issue for most of the methods is to handle images in entirely different scales, i.e. different magnitudes of gradients that cannot be dealt with by a global scaling of the data. We propose the use of generalized Bregman distances and infimal convolutions thereof with regard to the well-known total variation functional. The use of a total variation subgradient respectively the involved vector field rather than an image gradient naturally excludes the magnitudes of gradients, which in particular solves the scaling behavior. Additionally, the presented method features a weighting that allows to control the amount of interaction between channels. We give insights into the general behavior of the method, before we further tailor it to a particular application, namely PET-MRI joint reconstruction. To do so, we compute joint reconstruction results from blurry Poisson data for PET and undersampled Fourier data from MRI and show that we can gain a mutual benefit for both modalities. In particular, the results are superior to the respective separate reconstructions and other joint reconstruction methods.

  9. Application of machine learning methodology for pet-based definition of lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerhet, A.; Small, C.; Quon, H.; Riauka, T.; Schrader, L.; Greiner, R.; Yee, D.; McEwan, A.; Roa, W.

    2010-01-01

    We applied a learning methodology framework to assist in the threshold-based segmentation of non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc) tumours in positron-emission tomography–computed tomography (pet–ct) imaging for use in radiotherapy planning. Gated and standard free-breathing studies of two patients were independently analysed (four studies in total). Each study had a pet–ct and a treatment-planning ct image. The reference gross tumour volume (gtv) was identified by two experienced radiation oncologists who also determined reference standardized uptake value (suv) thresholds that most closely approximated the gtv contour on each slice. A set of uptake distribution-related attributes was calculated for each pet slice. A machine learning algorithm was trained on a subset of the pet slices to cope with slice-to-slice variation in the optimal suv threshold: that is, to predict the most appropriate suv threshold from the calculated attributes for each slice. The algorithm’s performance was evaluated using the remainder of the pet slices. A high degree of geometric similarity was achieved between the areas outlined by the predicted and the reference suv thresholds (Jaccard index exceeding 0.82). No significant difference was found between the gated and the free-breathing results in the same patient. In this preliminary work, we demonstrated the potential applicability of a machine learning methodology as an auxiliary tool for radiation treatment planning in nsclc. PMID:20179802

  10. Application of the in-beam PET therapy monitoring on precision irradiations with helium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedler, F.

    2008-01-01

    The main goal of the present dissertation was to extend the in-beam PET method to new ion types. It was shown that the in-beam PET method can also be applied for 3 He irradiations. For this experiments on a 3 He beam were performed. The activity yield is at equal applied dose about three times larger than at 12 C irradiations. The reachable range resolution is smaller than 1 mm. At the irradiation of an inhomogeneous phantom it was shown that a contrast between different materials is resolvable. From the experimentally determined reaction rates cross sections for the reactions leading to positron emitters were performed. The data taken in the 3 He experiments were compared those obtained in carbon-ion experiments as well as literature data for proton irradiations. A comparison with the calculations of the simulation program SHIELD-HIT was performed. A collection of cross-section models and the established requirements for a simulation program applicable for in-beam PET are preparing for further work

  11. Monte Carlo modeling of a clinical PET scanner by using the GATE dedicated computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Igor Fagner; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade

    2011-01-01

    This paper demonstrates more possible detailed the GATE simulated architecture involved in the 4D modeling of a General Electric PET scanner, the Advance. So, it were used data present in the literature on the configuration of GE modelled PET. The obtained results which were the 3D components of PET creation, and the simulation of 4D phenomena as the source decay and the gantry whirl, exhibit the potential of tool in emission tomograph modelling

  12. Significance of chronic marked hyperglycemia on FDG-PET. Is it really problematic for clinical oncologic imaging?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Tadashi; Higashi, Tatsuya; Nakamoto, Yuji

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the adverse effects of chronic marked hyperglycemia on clinical diagnostic performance of positron emission tomography (PET) using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Fifty-seven scans of 54 patients, who received FDG-PET for the diagnosis of various cancer(s), and who showed high plasma glucose level of more than 200 mg/dl at the time of administration of FDG in spite of at least 4-h fasting, were retrospectively analyzed. In the clinical follow-up, this high plasma glucose was confirmed as chronic hyperglycemia derived from uncontrolled diabetes (n=32) and untreated diabetes (n=25). Based on the final diagnosis of malignancy obtained by histopathology or clinical follow-up for at least 6 months, the diagnostic performance of visual PET analysis was evaluated. Excluding nine scans of nine patients without sufficient follow-up, final diagnosis was obtained in 48 scans of 45 patients. In 36 scans of 36 patients, at least one malignant lesion was finally confirmed, and true-positive and false-negative results were obtained in 30 and six cases, respectively. Six cases showed false-negative results due to low FDG-avid pathological characteristics (hepatocellular carcinoma, etc.), chemotherapeutic effect or small tumor size. Overall, the patient-based sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and diagnostic accuracy were 83, 83, 94, 63 and 83%, respectively. In lesion-based diagnosis, 56 of 75 lesions (74%) were depicted by PET, while 19 lesions were negative on PET, also due to low FDG-avid characteristics or small size (less than 15 mm). At the time of chronic hyperglycemia (not acute hyperglycemia), the adverse effect caused by high plasma glucose level was minimum. The FDG uptake of the tumor maintained a sufficiently high level for visual clinical diagnosis in most cases, except in the cases of low FDG-avid tumors or small lesions (15 mm in size). (author)

  13. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anu, Sharma, E-mail: issaranu@gmail.com; Gayatri, Sharma, E-mail: sharmagayatri@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Govt. College of Engineering & Technology, Bikaner, Rajasthan (India)

    2016-05-06

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  14. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anu, Sharma; Gayatri, Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  15. Integrated PET/CT in non-small cell lung cancer staging—Clinical and pathological agreement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P. Vaz

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Integrated PET/CT has become a fundamental tool in the preoperative assessment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC providing useful anatomical and metabolic information to characterize tumoral lesions and to detect unsuspected metastatic disease. Aim: To compare the agreement between clinical and pathological staging before and after the use of PET/CT. Material and methods: Retrospective study of patients with NSCLC who underwent potentially curative surgery throughout 10.5 years. Cohen's kappa coefficient was used to evaluate staging agreement. Results: One hundred and fifty patients were evaluated, 78% males, with a mean age of 65 (±9.6 years. Thirteen percent were submitted to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. PET/CT was performed in 41%. Global agreement between clinical and pathological staging was 51% (kappa = 0.3639. There was a statistically significant difference between the staging results in patients who underwent PET/CT, when compared to the subgroup who did not (p = 0.003. For those with PET/CT false negatives occurred in less 39%, false positives in more 12% and clinical and pathological staging coincided in more 27%. The overall results reflected an improvement in the agreement between clinical and pathological staging in the PET/CT subgroup (67%, kappa = 0.5737 vs 40%, kappa = 0.2292. PET/CT accuracy was enhanced when patients re-staged after neoadjuvant therapy were excluded and a substantial staging agreement was obtained for those who had the exam only for staging purposes (73%, kappa = 0.6323. Conclusion: Inclusion of PET/CT in NSCLC preoperative assessment improved the accuracy of the clinical staging, with a good level of agreement with pathological staging. Resumo: Introdução: A PET/TC integrada tornou-se num instrumento fundamental na avaliação pré-operatória do cancro do pulmão de não pequenas células (CPNPC, fornecendo informação anatómica e

  16. Correction for Partial Volume Effect Is a Must, Not a Luxury, to Fully Exploit the Potential of Quantitative PET Imaging in Clinical Oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alavi, Abass; Werner, Thomas J; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2018-01-01

    The partial volume effect (PVE) is considered as one of the major degrading factors impacting image quality and hampering the accuracy of quantitative PET imaging in clinical oncology. This effect is the consequence of the limited spatial resolution of whole-body PET scanners, which results in bl...

  17. TH-E-202-00: PET for Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    PET/CT is a very important imaging tool in the management of oncology patients. PET/CT has been applied for treatment planning and response evaluation in radiation therapy. This educational session will discuss: Pitfalls and remedies in PET/CT imaging for RT planning The use of hypoxia PET imaging for radiotherapy PET for tumor response evaluation The first presentation will address the issue of mis-registration between the CT and PET images in the thorax and the abdomen. We will discuss the challenges of respiratory gating and introduce an average CT technique to improve the registration for dose calculation and image-guidance in radiation therapy. The second presentation will discuss the use of hypoxia PET Imaging for radiation therapy. We will discuss various hypoxia radiotracers, the choice of clinical acquisition protocol (in particular a single late static acquisition versus a dynamic acquisition), and the compartmental modeling with different transfer rate constants explained. We will demonstrate applications of hypoxia imaging for dose escalation/de-escalation in clinical trials. The last presentation will discuss the use of PET/CT for tumor response evaluation. We will discuss anatomic response assessment vs. metabolic response assessment, visual evaluation and semi-quantitative evaluation, and limitations of current PET/CT assessment. We will summarize clinical trials using PET response in guiding adaptive radiotherapy. Finally, we will summarize recent advancements in PET/CT radiomics and non-FDG PET tracers for response assessment. Learning Objectives: Identify the causes of mis-registration of CT and PET images in PET/CT, and review the strategies to remedy the issue. Understand the basics of PET imaging of tumor hypoxia (radiotracers, how PET measures the hypoxia selective uptake, imaging protocols, applications in chemo-radiation therapy). Understand the basics of dynamic PET imaging, compartmental modeling and parametric images. Understand the

  18. TH-E-202-00: PET for Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    PET/CT is a very important imaging tool in the management of oncology patients. PET/CT has been applied for treatment planning and response evaluation in radiation therapy. This educational session will discuss: Pitfalls and remedies in PET/CT imaging for RT planning The use of hypoxia PET imaging for radiotherapy PET for tumor response evaluation The first presentation will address the issue of mis-registration between the CT and PET images in the thorax and the abdomen. We will discuss the challenges of respiratory gating and introduce an average CT technique to improve the registration for dose calculation and image-guidance in radiation therapy. The second presentation will discuss the use of hypoxia PET Imaging for radiation therapy. We will discuss various hypoxia radiotracers, the choice of clinical acquisition protocol (in particular a single late static acquisition versus a dynamic acquisition), and the compartmental modeling with different transfer rate constants explained. We will demonstrate applications of hypoxia imaging for dose escalation/de-escalation in clinical trials. The last presentation will discuss the use of PET/CT for tumor response evaluation. We will discuss anatomic response assessment vs. metabolic response assessment, visual evaluation and semi-quantitative evaluation, and limitations of current PET/CT assessment. We will summarize clinical trials using PET response in guiding adaptive radiotherapy. Finally, we will summarize recent advancements in PET/CT radiomics and non-FDG PET tracers for response assessment. Learning Objectives: Identify the causes of mis-registration of CT and PET images in PET/CT, and review the strategies to remedy the issue. Understand the basics of PET imaging of tumor hypoxia (radiotracers, how PET measures the hypoxia selective uptake, imaging protocols, applications in chemo-radiation therapy). Understand the basics of dynamic PET imaging, compartmental modeling and parametric images. Understand the

  19. PET/MRI: Technical challenges and recent advances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Jin Ho; Choi, Yong; Im, Ki Chun

    2016-01-01

    Integrated positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which can provide complementary functional and anatomical information about a specific organ or body system at the molecular level, has become a powerful imaging modality to understand the molecular biology details, disease mechanisms, and pharmacokinetics in animals and humans. Although the first experiment on the PET/MRI was performed in the early 1990s, its clinical application was accomplished in recent years because there were various technical challenges in integrating PET and MRI in a single system with minimum mutual interference between PET and MRI. This paper presents the technical challenges and recent advances in combining PET and MRI along with several approaches for improving PET image quality of the PET/MRI hybrid imaging system

  20. Using PET with {sup 18}F-AV-45 (florbetapir) to quantify brain amyloid load in a clinical environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camus, V.; Tauber, C.; Hommet, C.; Mondon, K.; Cottier, J.P.; Beaufils, E.; Ribeiro, M.J.; Vercouillie, J. [UMR INSERM U930-CNRS ERL 3106, Tours (France); Universite Francois Rabelais de Tours, Tours (France); CHRU de Tours, Tours (France); Payoux, P.; Tafani, M. [INSERM U825, Toulouse (France); Universite Paul Sabatier de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); CHRU de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Barre, L. [Groupe de Developpements Methodologiques en Tomographie par Emission de Positons, CEA/DSV/I2BM/CI-NAPS UMR6232, Caen (France); Universite de Caen Basse Normandie, Caen (France); Desgranges, B.; La Joie, R.; Chetelat, G.; La Sayette, V. de; Eustache, F. [INSERM U1077, Caen (France); Universite de Caen Basse Normandie - UMR-S1077, Caen (France); Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, UMR-S1077, Caen (France); Voisin, T.; Vellas, B. [Universite Paul Sabatier de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); INSERM U1027, Toulouse (France); CHRU de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Gissot, V. [CIC-IT /CIC INSERM 202, Tours (France); CHRU de Tours, Tours (France); Vierron, E. [UMR INSERM U930-CNRS ERL 3106, Tours (France); Universite Francois Rabelais de Tours, Tours (France); Guilloteau, D. [UMR INSERM U930-CNRS ERL 3106, Tours (France); Universite Francois Rabelais de Tours, Tours (France); CIC-IT /CIC INSERM 202, Tours (France); CHRU de Tours, Tours (France)

    2012-04-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of brain amyloid load has been suggested as a core biomarker for Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aim of this study was to test the feasibility of using PET imaging with {sup 18}F-AV-45 (florbetapir) in a routine clinical environment to differentiate between patients with mild to moderate AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) from normal healthy controls (HC). In this study, 46 subjects (20 men and 26 women, mean age of 69.0 {+-} 7.6 years), including 13 with AD, 12 with MCI and 21 HC subjects, were enrolled from three academic memory clinics. PET images were acquired over a 10-min period 50 min after injection of florbetapir (mean {+-} SD of radioactivity injected, 259 {+-} 57 MBq). PET images were assessed visually by two individuals blinded to any clinical information and quantitatively via the standard uptake value ratio (SUVr) in the specific regions of interest, which were defined in relation to the cerebellum as the reference region. The mean values of SUVr were higher in AD patients (median 1.20, Q1-Q3 1.16-1.30) than in HC subjects (median 1.05, Q1-Q3 1.04-1.08; p = 0.0001) in the overall cortex and all cortical regions (precuneus, anterior and posterior cingulate, and frontal median, temporal, parietal and occipital cortex). The MCI subjects also showed a higher uptake of florbetapir in the posterior cingulate cortex (median 1.06, Q1-Q3 0.97-1.28) compared with HC subjects (median 0.95, Q1-Q3 0.82-1.02; p = 0.03). Qualitative visual assessment of the PET scans showed a sensitivity of 84.6% (95% CI 0.55-0.98) and a specificity of 38.1% (95% CI 0.18-0.62) for discriminating AD patients from HC subjects; however, the quantitative assessment of the global cortex SUVr showed a sensitivity of 92.3% and specificity of 90.5% with a cut-off value of 1.122 (area under the curve 0.894). These preliminary results suggest that PET with florbetapir is a safe and suitable biomarker for AD that can be used routinely in a

  1. Using PET with 18F-AV-45 (florbetapir) to quantify brain amyloid load in a clinical environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camus, V.; Tauber, C.; Hommet, C.; Mondon, K.; Cottier, J.P.; Beaufils, E.; Ribeiro, M.J.; Vercouillie, J.; Payoux, P.; Tafani, M.; Barre, L.; Desgranges, B.; La Joie, R.; Chetelat, G.; La Sayette, V. de; Eustache, F.; Voisin, T.; Vellas, B.; Gissot, V.; Vierron, E.; Guilloteau, D.

    2012-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of brain amyloid load has been suggested as a core biomarker for Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aim of this study was to test the feasibility of using PET imaging with 18 F-AV-45 (florbetapir) in a routine clinical environment to differentiate between patients with mild to moderate AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) from normal healthy controls (HC). In this study, 46 subjects (20 men and 26 women, mean age of 69.0 ± 7.6 years), including 13 with AD, 12 with MCI and 21 HC subjects, were enrolled from three academic memory clinics. PET images were acquired over a 10-min period 50 min after injection of florbetapir (mean ± SD of radioactivity injected, 259 ± 57 MBq). PET images were assessed visually by two individuals blinded to any clinical information and quantitatively via the standard uptake value ratio (SUVr) in the specific regions of interest, which were defined in relation to the cerebellum as the reference region. The mean values of SUVr were higher in AD patients (median 1.20, Q1-Q3 1.16-1.30) than in HC subjects (median 1.05, Q1-Q3 1.04-1.08; p = 0.0001) in the overall cortex and all cortical regions (precuneus, anterior and posterior cingulate, and frontal median, temporal, parietal and occipital cortex). The MCI subjects also showed a higher uptake of florbetapir in the posterior cingulate cortex (median 1.06, Q1-Q3 0.97-1.28) compared with HC subjects (median 0.95, Q1-Q3 0.82-1.02; p = 0.03). Qualitative visual assessment of the PET scans showed a sensitivity of 84.6% (95% CI 0.55-0.98) and a specificity of 38.1% (95% CI 0.18-0.62) for discriminating AD patients from HC subjects; however, the quantitative assessment of the global cortex SUVr showed a sensitivity of 92.3% and specificity of 90.5% with a cut-off value of 1.122 (area under the curve 0.894). These preliminary results suggest that PET with florbetapir is a safe and suitable biomarker for AD that can be used routinely in a clinical environment

  2. Clinical efficacy of FDG-PET scan as preoperative diagnostic tool in cervical cancer stage Ib and IIa: comparison between the results of FDG-PET scan and operative findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Hoon

    1999-12-01

    This study was done to evaluate the clinical feasibility of FDG-PET scan for routine preoperative diagnostic methods in cervical carcinoma. PET-scans were performed from March, 1999 to November, 1999. There were 6 stage Ib and 7 IIa patients and all patients were performed radical hysterectomy and bilateral pelvic lymph node dissections and were evaluated by FDG-PET scan before operation. The mean age of the patients were 50.3 years old. Six cases had lymph node metastases by pelvis MRI, and three cases by FDG-PET scan. We could not find any lymph node metastases at surgery in 3 patients (50.0%) among 6 patients who were diagnosed by nodal metastases by pelvis MRI. And we found 1 patients with nodal metastases who had negative findings by pelvis MRI. By FDG-PET scan, we could find metastases in all positive patients. But we also found 2 additional metastatic cases in the patients with negative findings. In this study, the comparison was very difficult due to the individual differences in the comparison would be made by site-specific not person. The sensitivity of MRI and FDG-PET scan were 50.0% and 30.0%. The specificity were 94.1 % and 95.6%. The positive predictive value were 55.6 % and 50.0 %. In conclusion, we could find any superiority of FDG-PET scan in the diagnosis of lymph node metastases the pelvis MRI. So there are limitations to use the FDG-PET scan in the routine preoperative diagnostic tools in cervical cancer. But if we have more experiences to use the FDG-PET scan such as precise cut-off value of SUV and combination of other imaging technique, the FDG-PET scan are still promising diagnostic tools in cervical cancer.

  3. FDG PET in non-pharmacological therapy in Alzheimer's disease; cerebral metabolic increase correlates with clinical improvement after cognitive therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Hae Ri; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Park, Seong Min; Lee, Seung Hyun; Park, Eun Kyung; Lee, Jung Seok; Kim, Sang Yun; Kim, Sang Eun

    2007-01-01

    In management of AD, pharmacological treatment alone using acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChEI) is general consensus, and provides beneficial effect to prolong their progression. Combined non-pharmacological therapy, especially cognitive therapy is recently having attention with expectation of improvement in cognitive ability. This study examined the effect of combined cognitive therapy in AD patients who were maintaining AChEI using FDG PET. Four patients (689 yrs) who diagnosed as probable Alzheimer's disease based on the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria participated in this study. 12-week cognitive therapy comprised seven fields to enhance orientation, memory, recall, visuo-motor organization, categorization and behavior modification/sequencing. They received 45-minute sessions twice per week with maintaining their previous medication. Clinical improvement was assessed by comprehensive neuropsychological tests. Two FDG PET studies were performed before cognitive therapy and in the middle of the therapy, and compared to evaluate the effect of cognitive therapy to cerebral metabolism. Two of 4 patients whose initial cognitive impairment was milder had clinical improvement after 12 weeks, the rest who were more severely impaired failed to have clinical improvement. Regional cerebral hypometabolism on initial PET was correlated with their functional status. Follow up PET of two responders demonstrated the increases in regional metabolism in the temporal and/or frontal cortex, which was associated their functional improvement. Cerebral metabolism in poor responders were minimally increased or no changed. This preliminary data suggests that cognitive therapy is potentially useful to stabilize or improve cognitive and functional performance in AD patients with relatively mild cognitive dysfunction. And FDG PET could demonstrate possible candidates for cognitive therapy and the effect of the therapy

  4. The role of hybrid SPECT-CT in oncology: current and emerging clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, F.U.; Scarsbrook, A.F.

    2008-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography - computed tomography (SPECT-CT) is an emerging dual-modality imaging technique with many established and potential clinical applications in the field of oncology. To date, there has been a considerable emphasis on the benefits of integrated positron emission tomography - computed tomography (PET-CT) in oncology, but relatively little focus on the clinical utility of SPECT-CT. As with PET-CT, accurate co-registration of anatomical and functional data from a combined SPECT-CT camera often provides complementary diagnostic information. Both sensitivity (superior disease localization) and specificity (exclusion of false-positives due to physiological tracer uptake) are improved, and the functional significance of indeterminate lesions detected on cross-sectional imaging can be defined. This article will review the scope of hybrid SPECT-CT in oncology and illustrate both current and emerging clinical applications

  5. 18F-FDG PET-CT respiratory gating in characterization of pulmonary lesions. Approximation towards clinical indications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Vicente, A.M.; Soriano Castrejon, A.M.; Talavera Rubio, M.P.; Leon Martin, A.A.; Palomar Munoz, A.M.; Pilkington Woll, J.P.; Poblete Garcia, V.M.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)-CT respiratory gating (4D) study in the correct documentation of pulmonary lesions with faint uptake in standard PET-CT. Forty-two pulmonary lesions with a low or no detectable uptake of FDG (standardized uptake value (SUV) max max was determined for each lesion in both studies. For the 4D studies, we selected the SUV max in respiratory period with the highest uptake ('best bin'). We calculated the SUV max percentage difference between 3D and 4D PET-CT (% difference=SUV max 4D-SUV max 3D/SUV max 3D x 100) and the relation of this value with the size and locations of the lesions. In 4D study, any lesion with SUV max ≥2.5 was classified as malignant. We assessed the changes of lesion classification (from benign to malignant) applying the 4D technique. The final diagnosis was obtained by histological assessment or clinical and radiological follow-up longer than 12 months. Forty out of 42 lesions showed an increase of SUV max in the 4D study with respect to 3D. The mean SUV max in the 3D and 4D PET-CT studies were 1.33 (±0.59) and 2.26 (±0.87), respectively. The SUV max percentage difference mean between both techniques was 83.3% (±80.81). The smaller the lesion the greater was the SUV max percentage difference (P<0.05). No differences were observed depending on the location of the lesion. In 40% of cases, there was a change in the final classification of lesions from benign to malignant. In the final diagnosis, 24 lesions were malignant. 4D PET-CT diagnosed correctly the 52% of them. The 4D PET-CT study permitted a better characterization of malignant lung lesions compared with the standard PET-CT, because of its higher sensitivity. 4D PET-CT is a recommendable technique in the early diagnosis of malignant lesions. (author)

  6. DICOM for quantitative imaging biomarker development: a standards based approach to sharing clinical data and structured PET/CT analysis results in head and neck cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Andriy; Clunie, David; Ulrich, Ethan; Bauer, Christian; Wahle, Andreas; Brown, Bartley; Onken, Michael; Riesmeier, Jörg; Pieper, Steve; Kikinis, Ron; Buatti, John; Beichel, Reinhard R

    2016-01-01

    Background. Imaging biomarkers hold tremendous promise for precision medicine clinical applications. Development of such biomarkers relies heavily on image post-processing tools for automated image quantitation. Their deployment in the context of clinical research necessitates interoperability with the clinical systems. Comparison with the established outcomes and evaluation tasks motivate integration of the clinical and imaging data, and the use of standardized approaches to support annotation and sharing of the analysis results and semantics. We developed the methodology and tools to support these tasks in Positron Emission Tomography and Computed Tomography (PET/CT) quantitative imaging (QI) biomarker development applied to head and neck cancer (HNC) treatment response assessment, using the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM(®)) international standard and free open-source software. Methods. Quantitative analysis of PET/CT imaging data collected on patients undergoing treatment for HNC was conducted. Processing steps included Standardized Uptake Value (SUV) normalization of the images, segmentation of the tumor using manual and semi-automatic approaches, automatic segmentation of the reference regions, and extraction of the volumetric segmentation-based measurements. Suitable components of the DICOM standard were identified to model the various types of data produced by the analysis. A developer toolkit of conversion routines and an Application Programming Interface (API) were contributed and applied to create a standards-based representation of the data. Results. DICOM Real World Value Mapping, Segmentation and Structured Reporting objects were utilized for standards-compliant representation of the PET/CT QI analysis results and relevant clinical data. A number of correction proposals to the standard were developed. The open-source DICOM toolkit (DCMTK) was improved to simplify the task of DICOM encoding by introducing new API abstractions

  7. Application of PET/CT in treatment response evaluation and recurrence prediction in patients with newly-diagnosed multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Liu, Junru; Huang, Beihui; Chen, Meilan; Diao, Xiangwen; Li, Juan

    2017-04-11

    Multiple myeloma (MM) causes osteolytic lesions which can be detected by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/Computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT). We prospectively involve 96 Newly diagnosed MM to take PET/CT scan at scheduled treatment time (figure 1), and 18F-FDG uptake of lesion was measured by SUVmax and T/Mmax. All MM patients took bortezomib based chemotherapy as induction and received ASCT and maintenance. All clinical features were analyzed with the PET/CT image changes, and some relationships between treatment response and FDG uptakes changes were found: Osteolytic lesions of MM uptakes higher FDG than healthy volunteers, and this trend is more obvious in extramedullary lesions. Compared to X-ray, PET/CT was more sensitive both in discoering bone as well as extramedullary lesions. In newly diagnosed MM, several adverse clinical factors were related to high FDG uptakes of bone lesions. Bone lesion FDG uptakes of MM with P53 mutation or with hypodiploidy and complex karyotype were also higher than those without such changes. In treatment response, PET/CT showed higher sensitivity in detecting tumor residual disease than immunofixation electrophoresis. But in relapse prediction, it might show false positive disease recurrences and the imaging changes might be influenced by infections and hemoglobulin levels. PET/CT is sensitive in discovering meduallary and extrameduallary lesions of MM, and the 18F-FDG uptake of lesions are related with clinical indictors and biological features of plasma cells. In evaluating treatment response and survival, PET/CT showed its superiority. But in predicting relapse or refractory, it may show false positive results.

  8. Associations between [18F]AV1451 tau PET and CSF measures of tau pathology in a clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Joie, Renaud; Bejanin, Alexandre; Fagan, Anne M; Ayakta, Nagehan; Baker, Suzanne L; Bourakova, Viktoriya; Boxer, Adam L; Cha, Jungho; Karydas, Anna; Jerome, Gina; Maass, Anne; Mensing, Ashley; Miller, Zachary A; O'Neil, James P; Pham, Julie; Rosen, Howard J; Tsai, Richard; Visani, Adrienne V; Miller, Bruce L; Jagust, William J; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2018-01-23

    To assess the relationships between fluid and imaging biomarkers of tau pathology and compare their diagnostic utility in a clinically heterogeneous sample. Fifty-three patients (28 with clinical Alzheimer disease [AD] and 25 with non-AD clinical neurodegenerative diagnoses) underwent β-amyloid (Aβ) and tau ([ 18 F]AV1451) PET and lumbar puncture. CSF biomarkers (Aβ 42 , total tau [t-tau], and phosphorylated tau [p-tau]) were measured by multianalyte immunoassay (AlzBio3). Receiver operator characteristic analyses were performed to compare discrimination of Aβ-positive AD from non-AD conditions across biomarkers. Correlations between CSF biomarkers and PET standardized uptake value ratios (SUVR) were assessed using skipped Pearson correlation coefficients. Voxelwise analyses were run to assess regional CSF-PET associations. [ 18 F]AV1451-PET cortical SUVR and p-tau showed excellent discrimination between Aβ-positive AD and non-AD conditions (area under the curve 0.92-0.94; ≤0.83 for other CSF measures), and reached 83% classification agreement. In the full sample, cortical [ 18 F]AV1451 was associated with all CSF biomarkers, most strongly with p-tau ( r = 0.75 vs 0.57 for t-tau and -0.49 for Aβ 42 ). When restricted to Aβ-positive patients with AD, [ 18 F]AV1451 SUVR correlated modestly with p-tau and t-tau (both r = 0.46) but not Aβ 42 ( r = 0.02). On voxelwise analysis, [ 18 F]AV1451 correlated with CSF p-tau in temporoparietal cortices and with t-tau in medial prefrontal regions. Within AD, Mini-Mental State Examination scores were associated with [ 18 F]AV1451-PET, but not CSF biomarkers. [ 18 F]AV1451-PET and CSF p-tau had comparable value for differential diagnosis. Correlations were robust in a heterogeneous clinical group but attenuated (although significant) in AD, suggesting that fluid and imaging biomarkers capture different aspects of tau pathology. This study provides Class III evidence that, in a clinical sample of patients with a variety

  9. Clinical applications of contrast echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorge, Leon Galindo

    2005-01-01

    The echocardiography is the technique more used for the diagnosis and pursuit of the cardiovascular illnesses; therefore, their diagnostic precision has acquired a vital importance in the handling of the patients with cardiovascular pathologies. However, with relative frequency, the diagnostic capacity of the echocardiography exam is diminished by limitations of the acoustic window, mainly in-patient with obesity, lung illnesses and alterations of the thoracic wall. This can be obviated with the use of the intra-esophagus echocardiography, although this it is a procedure semi-invasive and not very practical of carrying out in all the patients with problems of acoustic window. In this article the clinical applications are revised more common of the contrast echocardiography

  10. Pearls and pitfalls in clinical interpretation of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeted PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Solnes, Lilja B.; Javadi, Mehrbod S.; Pomper, Martin G.; Rowe, Steven P. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Haberkorn, Uwe [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Eiber, Matthias [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Technical University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Ross, Ashley E.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Allaf, Mohamad E.; Gorin, Michael A. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, The James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute and Department of Urology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2017-11-15

    The rapidly expanding clinical adaptation of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeted PET imaging in the evaluation of patients with prostate cancer has placed an increasing onus on understanding both the potential pearls of interpretation as well as limitations of this new technique. As with any new molecular imaging modality, accurate characterization of abnormalities on PSMA-targeted PET imaging can be accomplished only if one is aware of the normal distribution pattern, physiological variants of radiotracer uptake, and potential sources of false-positive and false-negative imaging findings. In recent years, a growing number of reports have come to light describing incidental non-prostatic benign or malignant pathologies with high uptake on PSMA-targeted PET imaging. In this review, we have summarized the published literature regarding the potential pearls and technical and interpretive pitfalls of this imaging modality. Knowledge of these limitations can increase the confidence of interpreting physicians and thus improve patient care. As PSMA-targeted PET is expected to be evaluated in larger prospective trials, the dissemination of potential diagnostic pitfalls and the biologic underpinning of those findings will be of increased importance. (orig.)

  11. Pearls and pitfalls in clinical interpretation of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeted PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Solnes, Lilja B.; Javadi, Mehrbod S.; Pomper, Martin G.; Rowe, Steven P.; Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Haberkorn, Uwe; Eiber, Matthias; Ross, Ashley E.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Allaf, Mohamad E.; Gorin, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    The rapidly expanding clinical adaptation of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeted PET imaging in the evaluation of patients with prostate cancer has placed an increasing onus on understanding both the potential pearls of interpretation as well as limitations of this new technique. As with any new molecular imaging modality, accurate characterization of abnormalities on PSMA-targeted PET imaging can be accomplished only if one is aware of the normal distribution pattern, physiological variants of radiotracer uptake, and potential sources of false-positive and false-negative imaging findings. In recent years, a growing number of reports have come to light describing incidental non-prostatic benign or malignant pathologies with high uptake on PSMA-targeted PET imaging. In this review, we have summarized the published literature regarding the potential pearls and technical and interpretive pitfalls of this imaging modality. Knowledge of these limitations can increase the confidence of interpreting physicians and thus improve patient care. As PSMA-targeted PET is expected to be evaluated in larger prospective trials, the dissemination of potential diagnostic pitfalls and the biologic underpinning of those findings will be of increased importance. (orig.)

  12. 90Nb: potential radionuclide for application in immuno-PET. Development of appropriate production strategy and first in vivo evaluation of 90Nb-labeled monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radchenko, Valery

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is a modern and highly effective tool for the detection and treatment of oncological disease. Molecular imaging based on radiotracers includes single photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET), which provide non-invasive tumor visualization on nano- and picomolar level, respectively. Currently, many novel tracers for more precise discovery of small tumors and metastases have been introduced and are under investigation. Many of them are protein-based biomolecules which nature herself produces as antigens for the eradication of tumor cells. Antibodies and antibody fragments play an important role in tumor diagnostics and treatment. PET imaging with antibodies and antibody fragments is called immuno-PET. The main issue that needs to be addressed is that appropriate radiotracers with half-lives related to the half-lives of biomolecules are needed. The development of novel radiotracers is a multistep, complicated task. This task includes the evaluation of production, separation and labeling strategy for chosen radionuclide. Finally, the biomolecule-radionuclide complex should be stable in time. An equally important factor is the economic suitability of the production strategy, which will lead to a key decision for future application of the developed radionuclide. In recent work, 90 Nb has been proposed as a potential candidate for application in immuno-PET. Its half-life of 14.6 hours is suitable for application with antibody fragments and some intact antibodies. 90 Nb has a relatively high positron branching of 53% and an optimal energy of β + emission of 0.35 MeV that can provide high quality of imaging with low dose of used radionuclide. First proof-of-principle studies have shown that 90 Nb: (i) can be produced in sufficient amount and purity by proton bombardment of natural zirconium target (ii) can be isolated from target material with appropriate radiochemical purity (iii) may be used for labeling of monoclonal

  13. Clinical value of PET/CT in evaluation of curative effects on malignant lymphoma and diagnosis of recurrence%PET/CT在恶性淋巴瘤疗效评估及复发诊断中的临床价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周克; 王旭春

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨PET/CT用于恶性淋巴瘤的疗效预测、评估及复发诊断的临床应用价值.方法 选择经病理证实的78例恶性淋巴瘤患者,男性51例,女性27例,年龄17~74岁,均行4~6疗程化疗或化疗加局部放疗.均分别分别在治疗前、治疗中及治疗后行18F - FDG全身PET/CT扫描检查2~6次,对PET、CT及PET/CT图像进行综合分析.结果本组78例中,16例治疗过程中用18F-FDG PET/CT监测发现疗效不佳,更换了治疗方案.PET/CT图像标准化摄取值(SUV值)呈阳性的43例中,39例为肿瘤残存或复发,4例为炎症;SUV值呈阴性的35例中,3例复发.本组疗效:完全缓解(CR)36例;部分缓解(PR)21例;稳定(SD)8例:进展(PD)13例.结论 18F-FDG PET/CT在性淋巴瘤早期疗效预测、疗效评估及残留肿块的性质鉴别、预后及生存率评估等方面,均有很高的临床应用价值.%Objective To discuss the clinical application value of PET/CT in the prediction and evaluation of curative effects on malignant lymphoma and in the diagnosis of recurrence. Methods Seventy eight patients, who were pathologically diagnosed as malignant lymphoma( 51 male and 27 female ones aged from 17 to 74 years old ),were selected and received the chemotherapy or chemotherapy plus local radiotherapy for 4 to 6 course of treatment. They received the examination by whole - body 18 F - FDG PET/CT scanning two to six times before, during, and after the treatment. A comprehensive analysis was made in their PET, CT, and PET/CT images. Results Among the 78 cases,the curative effects in 16 ones were identified poor by the 18F - FDG PET/CT monitoring during the treatment,and then their therapeutic schedule was changed. In 43 cases,the standard uptake values( SUV )of the PET/CT images were positive; in 39 ones, there were residual tumor or recurrence; there were 4 cases of inflammation; in 35 ones, the SUVs were negative , and there were 3 cases of recurrence. The results showed complete relieK CR )in

  14. Clinical Significance of Focal Breast Lesions Incidentally Identified by 18F-FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Young Seok; Choi, Joon Young; Lee, Su Jin; Hyun, Seung Hyup; Lee, Ji Young; Choi, Yong; Choe, Yearn Seong; Lee, Kyung Han; Kim, Byung Tae

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the incidence and malignant risk of focal breast lesions incidentally detected by 18 F-FDG PET/CT. Various PET/CT findings of the breast lesions were also analyzed to improve the differentiation between benign from malignant focal breast lesions. The subjects were 3,768 consecutive 18 F-FDG PET/CT exams performed in adult females without a history of breast cancer. A focal breast lesion was defined as a focal 18 F-FDG uptake or a focal nodular lesion on CT image irrespective of 18 F-FDG uptake in the breasts. The maximum SUV and CT pattern of focal breast lesions were evaluated, and were compared with final diagnosis. The incidence of focal breast lesions on PET/CT in adult female subjects was 1.4% (58 lesions in 53 subjects). In finally confirmed 53 lesions of 48 subjects, 11 lesions of 8 subjects (20.8%) were proven to be malignant. When the PET/CT patterns suggesting benignancy (maximum attenuation value > 75 HU or 20) were added as diagnostic criteria of PET/CT to differentiate benign from malignant breast lesions along with maximum SUV, the area under ROC curve of PET/CT was significantly increased compared with maximum SUV alone (0.680±0.093 vs. 0.786±0.076, p 18 F-FDG PET/CT is not low, deserving further diagnostic confirmation. Image interpretation considering both 18 F-FDG uptake and PET/CT pattern may be helpful to improve the differentiation from malignant and benign focal breast lesion

  15. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the early prediction of pathological response in aggressive subtypes of breast cancer: review of the literature and recommendations for use in clinical trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groheux, David [Saint-Louis Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris Cedex 10 (France); INSERM/CNRS UMR944/7212, University Paris-Diderot, PRES Paris Cite, Paris (France); Mankoff, David [University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia (United States); Espie, Marc [INSERM/CNRS UMR944/7212, University Paris-Diderot, PRES Paris Cite, Paris (France); Saint-Louis Hospital, Department of Medical Oncology, Breast Diseases Centre, Paris (France); Hindie, Elif [University of Bordeaux, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Haut-Leveque Hospital, Bordeaux (France)

    2016-05-15

    Early assessment of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) might be helpful in avoiding the toxicity of ineffective chemotherapy and allowing refinement of treatment. We conducted a review of the literature regarding the applicability of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT to the prediction of an early pathological response in different subgroups of breast cancer. Clinical research in this field has intensified in the last few years. Early studies by various groups have shown the potential of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the early assessment of response to NAC. However, interim PET/CT in breast cancer has not yet gained wide acceptance compared to its use in other settings such as lymphomas. This is in part due to a lack of consensus that early evaluation of response can be used to direct change in therapy in the neoadjuvant breast cancer setting, and only limited data showing that response-adaptive therapy leads to improved outcomes. However, one major element that has hampered the use of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in directing neoadjuvant therapy is its evaluation in populations with mixed subtypes of breast cancer. However, major improvements have occurred in recent years. Pilot studies have highlighted the need for considering breast cancer subtype and the type of treatment, and have offered criteria for the use of PET/CT for the early prediction of response in specific settings. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT has considerable potential for the early prediction of pathological complete response to NAC in aggressive subtypes such as triple-negative or HER2-positive breast cancers. The results of a multicentre trial that used early metabolic response on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT as a means to select poor responders to adapt neoadjuvant treatment have recently been published. Other trials are ongoing or being planned. (orig.)

  16. Clinical impact of FDG-PET/CT on colorectal cancer staging and treatment strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus K; Hess, Søren; Alavi, Abass

    2014-01-01

    and patients divided as follows: (A) Patients with a change in therapy following FDG-PET/CT and (B) Patients without a change following FDG-PET/CT. Sixty-two patients had colon and five had rectal cancer. Of these, 20 (30%; CI 20.2-41.7) belonged to group A, whereas 47 (70%; CI 58.3-79.8) fell in group B......FDG-PET/CT is rarely used for initial staging of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Surgical resection of primary tumor and isolated metastases may result in long-term survival or presumed cure, whereas disseminated disease contraindicates operation. We analyzed a retrospective material...

  17. A Virtual Clinical Trial of FDG-PET Imaging of Breast Cancer: Effect of Variability on Response Assessment1

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Robert L; Elston, Brian F; Doot, Robert K; Lewellen, Thomas K; Mankoff, David A; Kinahan, Paul E

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is growing interest in using positron emission tomography (PET) standardized uptake values (SUVs) to assess tumor response to therapy. However, many error sources compromise the ability to detect SUV changes. We explore relationships between these errors and overall SUV variability. METHODS: We used simulations in a virtual clinical trial framework to study impacts of error sources from scanning and analysis effects on assessment of SUV changes. We varied tumor diameter, s...

  18. Slowly progressive fluent aphasia; Clinical features and an imaging study including MRI, SPECT and PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, Yasuhisa; Momose, Toshimitsu; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Ishikawa, Takashi; Iwata, Makoto (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Bando, Mitsuaki

    1991-05-01

    Three patients with slowly progressive fluent aphasia are reported. One of the patients presented with memory disturbance. They were characterized clinically by having selective deficits in vocabulary, which resulted in impairment of confrontation naming, and auditory comprehension. MRI showed an atrophy not only in the left temporal lobe (including the superior, middle and inferior temporal gyri), hippocampus, parahippocampual gyrus, and fusiform gyrus, but also in the left parietal lobe. I-123 IMP SPECT and F-18 FDG PET were used to determine regional cerebral blood flow and regional cerebral metabolic rate, respectively. In addition to the decreased tracer uptake in the left temporal and/or parietal lobe, a decreased uptake was seen in the bilateral basal ganglia, the inner side of the temporal lobe (including the bilateral hippocampus), the right anterior temporal lobe, and the left thalamus. These findings may deny the previous thought that lesions are localized in slowly progressive fluent aphasia. Furthermore, noticeable difficulty in naming, i.e., patients unable to recognize the right answer, are considered attributable to widespread lesions from the whole left temporal lobe, including the hippocampus, to the right temporal lobe. (N.K.).

  19. Multi-technique hybrid imaging in PET/CT and PET/MR: what does the future hold?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galiza Barbosa, F. de; Delso, G.; Voert, E.E.G.W. ter; Huellner, M.W.; Herrmann, K.; Veit-Haibach, P.

    2016-01-01

    Integrated positron-emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) is one of the most important imaging techniques to have emerged in oncological practice in the last decade. Hybrid imaging, in general, remains a rapidly growing field, not only in developing countries, but also in western industrialised healthcare systems. A great deal of technological development and research is focused on improving hybrid imaging technology further and introducing new techniques, e.g., integrated PET and magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI). Additionally, there are several new PET tracers on the horizon, which have the potential to broaden clinical applications in hybrid imaging for diagnosis as well as therapy. This article aims to highlight some of the major technical and clinical advances that are currently taking place in PET/CT and PET/MRI that will potentially maintain the position of hybrid techniques at the forefront of medical imaging technologies.

  20. Application of the in-beam PET therapy monitoring on precision irradiations with helium ions; Anwendung des in-beam PET Therapiemonitorings auf Praezisionsbestrahlungen mit Helium-Ionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, F.

    2008-02-19

    The main goal of the present dissertation was to extend the in-beam PET method to new ion types. It was shown that the in-beam PET method can also be applied for {sup 3}He irradiations. For this experiments on a {sup 3}He beam were performed. The activity yield is at equal applied dose about three times larger than at {sup 12}C irradiations. The reachable range resolution is smaller than 1 mm. At the irradiation of an inhomogeneous phantom it was shown that a contrast between different materials is resolvable. From the experimentally determined reaction rates cross sections for the reactions leading to positron emitters were performed. The data taken in the {sup 3}He experiments were compared those obtained in carbon-ion experiments as well as literature data for proton irradiations. A comparison with the calculations of the simulation program SHIELD-HIT was performed. A collection of cross-section models and the established requirements for a simulation program applicable for in-beam PET are preparing for further work.

  1. Absolute number of new lesions on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT is more predictive of clinical response than SUV changes in metastatic melanoma patients receiving ipilimumab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anwar, Hoda; Sachpekidis, Christos; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia [German Cancer Research Center, Medical PET Group-Biological Imaging, Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Winkler, Julia; Hassel, Jessica C. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Dermatology and National Center for Tumor Diseases, Heidelberg (Germany); Kopp-Schneider, Annette [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Biostatistics, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberkorn, Uwe [German Cancer Research Center, Medical PET Group-Biological Imaging, Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); University of Heidelberg, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2018-03-15

    Evaluation of response to immunotherapy is a matter of debate. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the response of metastatic melanoma to treatment with ipilimumab by means of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT, using the patients' clinical response as reference. The final cohort included in the analyses consisted of 41 patients with metastatic melanoma who underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT before and after administration of ipilimumab. After determination of the best clinical response, the PET/CT scans were reviewed and a separate independent analysis was performed, based on the number and functional size of newly emerged {sup 18}F-FDG-avid lesions, as well as on the SUV changes after therapy. The median observation time of the patients after therapy was 21.4 months (range 6.3-41.9 months). Based on their clinical response, patients were dichotomized into those with clinical benefit (CB) and those without CB (No-CB). The CB group (31 patients) included those with stable disease, partial remission and complete remission, and the No-CB group (10 patients) included those with progressive disease. The application of a threshold of four newly emerged {sup 18}F-FDG-avid lesions on the posttherapy PET/CT scan led to a sensitivity (correctly predicting CB) of 84% and a specificity (correctly predicting No-CB) of 100%. This cut-off was lower for lesions with larger functional diameters (three new lesions larger than 1.0 cm and two new lesions larger than 1.5 cm). SUV changes after therapy did not correlate with clinical response. Based on these findings, we developed criteria for predicting clinical response to immunotherapy by means of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT (PET Response Evaluation Criteria for Immunotherapy, PERCIMT). Our results show that a cut-off of four newly emerged {sup 18}F-FDG-avid lesions on posttherapy PET/CT gives a reliable indication of treatment failure in patients under ipilimumab treatment. Moreover, the functional size of the new lesions plays an important

  2. Early clinical experience and impact of 18F-FDG PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutte, Henrik; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjaer, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the influence and impact of [F]- fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) in Denmark. METHODS: A standardized questionnaire was sent to the referring physicians of 743 consecutive cases between January 2000 and December 2001. The questionnaire was designed...... to determine whether and how the results of the FDG PET imaging changed patient management. RESULTS: The response rate was 71% (524 responded). The distribution of all responding physicians included 26 different specialities. The majority were from haematology (23%), oncology (20%), plastic surgery (17...... confirmed the diagnosis, helped staging, changed treatment plan or confirmed treatment of choice. Physicians indicated a general satisfaction with FDG PET imaging in 86% of the cases. CONCLUSION: This survey-based study indicates that FDG PET imaging has a major impact on patient management, contributing...

  3. Current status and future role of brain PET/MRI in clinical and research settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, P.; Barthel, H.; Sabri, O. [University Hospital Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Drzezga, A. [University Hospital Cologne, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Koeln (Germany)

    2015-01-09

    Hybrid PET/MRI systematically offers a complementary combination of two modalities that has often proven itself superior to the single modality approach in the diagnostic work-up of many neurological and psychiatric diseases. Emerging PET tracers, technical advances in multiparametric MRI and obvious workflow advantages may lead to a significant improvement in the diagnosis of dementia disorders, neurooncological diseases, epilepsy and neurovascular diseases using PET/MRI. Moreover, simultaneous PET/MRI is well suited to complex studies of brain function in which fast fluctuations of brain signals (e.g. related to task processing or in response to pharmacological interventions) need to be monitored on multiple levels. Initial simultaneous studies have already demonstrated that these complementary measures of brain function can provide new insights into the functional and structural organization of the brain. (orig.)

  4. Current status and future role of brain PET/MRI in clinical and research settings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, P.; Barthel, H.; Sabri, O.; Drzezga, A.

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid PET/MRI systematically offers a complementary combination of two modalities that has often proven itself superior to the single modality approach in the diagnostic work-up of many neurological and psychiatric diseases. Emerging PET tracers, technical advances in multiparametric MRI and obvious workflow advantages may lead to a significant improvement in the diagnosis of dementia disorders, neurooncological diseases, epilepsy and neurovascular diseases using PET/MRI. Moreover, simultaneous PET/MRI is well suited to complex studies of brain function in which fast fluctuations of brain signals (e.g. related to task processing or in response to pharmacological interventions) need to be monitored on multiple levels. Initial simultaneous studies have already demonstrated that these complementary measures of brain function can provide new insights into the functional and structural organization of the brain. (orig.)

  5. Clinical application of cardiac SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Shigeyuki

    1999-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has replaced planar imaging techniques for myocardial scintigraphy. Thallium-201 was the dominant agent employed for myocardial perfusion imaging. Today new technetium-99m labelled radionuclides have been used as excellent alternatives to 201 Tl for detection of coronary artery disease, prognostification, and even assessment of myocardial viability. Pharmacologic stress imaging using either dipyridamole, adenosine or dobutamine is a substitute for exercise stress. Accurate determination of myocardial viability is vitally important for clinical decision making for patients with LV dysfunction who will most benefit from revascularization. Stunned and hibernated myocardium may result in profound regional LTV dysfunction in absence of necrosis. The various approach such as stress-redistribution-reinjection imaging, rest-redistribution imaging and stress-redistribution-24 hours delayed imaging has been utilized to assess myocardial viability with 201 Tl. Quantitative assessment of 99m Tc MIBI uptake reflect the degree of viability. 123 I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), an analog of norepinephrine, has been used for scintigraphic assessment of regional cardiac adrenergic innervation. Cardiac sympathetic denervation, assessed by 123 I-MIBG, due to ischemia in non-Q myocardial infarction and unstable angina has been shown. Quantitative cardiac MIBG scintigram was shown to have prognostic value in patients with severe congestive heart failure. 23 I-BMIPP (ρ-methyl-iodophenyl pentadecanoic acid) has been used to assess myocardial fatty acid utilization. BMIPP has the memory function of ischemia in unstable angina, since decreased BMIPP uptake persists several days after ischemic episode. Nuclear cardiology in Japan has experienced an expansion in the techniques including use of new radionuclides, 99m Tc perfusion agents, 123 I-MIBG and 23 I-BMIPP and in associated clinical application to the various cardiac diseases

  6. Clinical value of FDG-PET/CT in suspected paraneoplastic syndromes: a retrospective analysis of 137 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoern Kristensen, Stine; Hess, Soeren; Petersen, Henrik; Hoeilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming [Odense University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense (Denmark)

    2015-12-15

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) are relatively infrequent manifestations appearing before or after a cancer declares itself. Autoimmune mechanisms may be involved, but their cause and pathogenesis are often unknown. Due to disparity of symptoms, PNS remain a major diagnostic challenge. We examined the value of FDG-PET/CT for ruling in or out malignancy in a heterogeneous group of patients with suspected PNS. We retrospectively extracted data from all patients referred 2009-2013 with suspected PNS. Data included age, sex, follow-up period, scan report, further diagnostic procedures, and final clinical diagnosis. Conclusions of the scan reports were compared to the final follow-up outcome as determined during an average follow-up of 31 months (range 6-51.5) in patients who were not diagnosed with cancer in immediate continuation of a positive PET/CT scan. A total of 137 patients were included. Main causes for referral were neurological (n = 67), rheumatological (n = 25), dermatological (n = 18), nephrological (n = 6), haematological (n = 2), abnormal biochemistry (n = 11), and others (n = 8). The cancer prevalence was 8.8 %. The FDG-PET/CT results were as follows: nine true positives, 22 false positives, 103 true negatives, and three false negatives. Corresponding diagnostic values were: sensitivity 75 %, specificity 82 %, accuracy 82 %, and positive and negative predictive values of 29 % and 97 %, respectively. FDG-PET/CT has in patients with suspected PNS an impressively high negative predictive value and may be of value in ruling out PNS, the more so, the more the number of false positives can be minimized or used in differential diagnosis. We believe that FDG-PET/CT may become an important adjunct to the work-up and triage of patients with suspected PNS. (orig.)

  7. Evaluation of early-phase [18F]-florbetaben PET acquisition in clinical routine cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Daerr

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Early-phase FBB acquisitions correlate on a relative quantitative and visual level with FDG PET scans, irrespective of the amyloid plaque density assessed in late FBB imaging. Thus, early-phase FBB uptake depicts a metabolism-like image, suggesting it as a valid surrogate marker for synaptic dysfunction, which could ultimately circumvent the need for additional FDG PET investigation in diagnosis of dementia.

  8. Incremental clinical value of a dedicated RT planning FDG PET-CT over staging PET-CT in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, P.; Som, S.; Vinod, S.; Lin, M.; Shon, I. H.

    2009-01-01

    Full text:Objectives: To evaluate whether FDG-PET performed for radiotherapy planning can detect disease progression, compared with staging PET. Methods: Thirteen patients underwent a planning PET-CT for curative RT ( R T-PET ) within eight weeks of a staging PET-CT for newly diagnosed NSCLC between 10/2007 and 1/2009. All studies were acquired on a Philips GXL PET-CT using the same protocols, except RT-PET is acquired on a RT flat bed. The images were interpreted by consensus readings of two physicians: location/number, visual grading (0-4:3> liver, 4>brain), max transverse diameter ( M ax D ) (tumour margin is delineated by a SUV threshold of 2.5) and max SUV of each lesion. Progressive disease (PD) is defined as >10% increase in max D. Results: RT-PET detected PD (primary or nodal) or new metastases in 8 pts (61%) (mean interval:30.2±14 days, range:7-54 days). For primary tumour, RT-PET detected PD in 5 pts (range: 12-32% increase in max D and 12-39% increase in SUV) and RT-CT detected PD in 3 pts (11-21% increase in max D, paired t test: p = 0.19). Stage-PET detected 28 mediastinal/hilar nodal sites. RT-PET detected PD in 11 of these lesions in 4 pts (31%) and CT detected similar progression in 8 lesions in 2 pts. RT-PET detected 10 new lesions in 3 pts (23%) resulting in upstaging to N3 in 2 pts (supraclavicular and hilar nodes) and M1 in 1 pt (bone). Conclusion: A dedicated RT PET-CT has the potential to detect disease progression and impact on RT planning in a large number of patients.

  9. Clinical utility of F-18 FDG PET-CT in the initial evaluation of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Poul Henning; Holdgaard, Paw Christian; Buck Christensen, Janne

    2016-01-01

    the predefined criteria and were read in full to identify relevant original articles on F-18 FDG PET-CT (1) in the evaluation of solitary pulmonary nodules (n = 14), (2) in curative-intent treatment trials (n = 9), and (3) in planning of invasive procedures (n = 18). RESULTS: We found the following important...... results from the literature review: 1) PET-CT can rule out malignancy in most solitary pulmonary nodules due to high sensitivity (recommendation level A). 2) PET-CT reduces the number of futile treatment trials (recommendation level A). 3) The sensitivity of PET-CT in general is insufficient to rule out...... by CT in a structured programme. 2) No curative-intent treatment should be commenced until a PET-CT scan has excluded occult distant metastases. 3) In general, lymph node metastasis in the mediastinum cannot be ruled out on the basis of a negative PET-CT, and confirmative invasive staging should...

  10. Clinical role of early dynamic FDG-PET/CT for the evaluation of renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Reiko; Abe, Koichiro; Kondo, Tsunenori; Tanabe, Kazunari; Sakai, Shuji

    2016-06-01

    We studied the usefulness of early dynamic (ED) and whole-body (WB) FDG-PET/CT for the evaluation of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). One hundred patients with 107 tumours underwent kidney ED and WB FDG-PET/CT. We visually and semiquantitatively evaluated the FDG accumulation in RCCs in the ED and WB phases, and compared the accumulation values with regard to histological type (clear cell carcinoma [CCC] vs. non-clear cell carcinoma [N-CCC]), the TNM stage (high stage [3-4] vs. low stage [1-2]), the Fuhrman grade (high grade [3-4] vs. low grade [1-2]) and presence versus absence of venous (V) and lymphatic (Ly) invasion. In the ED phase, visual evaluation revealed no significant differences in FDG accumulation in terms of each item. However, the maximum standardized uptake value and tumour-to-normal tissue ratios were significantly higher in the CCCs compared to the N-CCCs (p PET/CT is a useful tool for the evaluation of RCCs. • ED and WB FDG-PET/ CT helps to assess patients with RCC • ED FDG-PET/CT enabled differentiation between CCC and N-CCC • FDG accumulation in the WB phase reflects tumour aggressiveness • Management of RCC is improved by ED and WB FDG-PET/CT.

  11. Clinical and diagnostic value of preoperative MR mammography and FDG-PET in suspicious breast lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, C.; Scheidhauer, K.; Theissen, P.; Scharl, A.; Goering, U.J.; Kugel, H.; Krahe, T.; Pietrzyk, U.

    2003-01-01

    Dynamic enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) mammography and fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) of the breast were directly compared preoperatively in suspicious breast lesions. Forty-two breast lesions in 40 patients were examined with a three-dimensional dynamic MR imaging series and FDG-PET. The MR and PET examinations were evaluated separately and the results were compared with the histological findings. The sensitivity and specificity of each method were calculated. The diagnostic value of both modalities as single diagnostic tool and in combination was investigated. Nineteen malignant and 23 benign breast lesions were proven histologically. Magnetic resonance mammography and FDG-PET showed a sensitivity of 89 and 63%, respectively. The specificity was 74 and 91%, respectively. The combination of both imaging methods decreased the not-required biopsies from 55 to 17%. Only one false-negative finding - a patient pre-treated with chemotherapy - was observed in both methods. The combination of MR mammography and FDG-PET can help to decrease biopsies of benign breast lesions. Because of their high cost, these modalities should only be used in problematic cases to either rule out or to demonstrate malignancy. The best diagnostic strategy is achieved using MR mammography first. If the diagnosis is still questionable, FDG-PET can be performed. (orig.)

  12. Clinical value of {sup 18}F-fluorodihydroxyphenylalanine positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-DOPA PET/CT) for detecting pheochromocytoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luster, Markus; Zeich, Katrin; Glatting, Gerhard; Buck, Andreas K.; Solbach, Christoph; Reske, Sven N. [University of Ulm, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ulm (Germany); Karges, Wolfram [RWTH Aachen, Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Aachen (Germany); Pauls, Sandra [University of Ulm, Department of Radiology, Ulm (Germany); Verburg, Frederik A. [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Dralle, Henning [University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of General, Visceral and Vascular Surgery, Halle (Germany); Neumaier, Bernd [University of Ulm, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ulm (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Neurologische Forschung, Section for Radiochemistry, Cologne (Germany); Mottaghy, Felix M. [University of Ulm, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ulm (Germany); RWTH Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    In detecting pheochromocytoma (PHEO), positron emission tomography (PET) with the radiolabelled amine precursor {sup 18}F-fluorodihydroxyphenylalanine ({sup 18}F-DOPA) offers excellent specificity, while computed tomography (CT) provides high sensitivity and ability to localize lesions; therefore, the combination of these modalities could be advantageous in this setting. The aim of this study was to investigate whether combined {sup 18}F-DOPA PET/CT more accurately detects and localizes PHEO lesions than does each modality alone. {sup 18}F-DOPA PET, CT and {sup 18}F-DOPA PET/CT images of 25 consecutive patients undergoing diagnostic scanning of suspected sporadic or multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 syndrome-associated PHEO were reviewed retrospectively in randomized sequence. Two blinded observers scored the images regarding the likelihood of PHEO being present and localizable. Results were correlated with subsequent clinical history and, when available, histology. Of the 19 lesions detected by all three modalities, PET identified each as positive for PHEO, but was unable to definitively localize 15 of 19 (79%). CT could definitively localize all 19 lesions, but could not definitively diagnose or exclude PHEO in 18 of 19 (95%) lesions. Furthermore, CT falsely identified as negative for PHEO one lesion which was judged to be positive for this tumor by both PET and PET/CT. Only in PET/CT scans were all 19 lesions accurately characterized and localized. On a per-patient basis, the sensitivity of {sup 18}F-DOPA PET/CT for PHEO was 100% and the specificity 88%, with a 100% positive predictive value and an 88% negative predictive value. {sup 18}F-DOPA PET/CT more accurately diagnoses and localizes adrenal and extra-adrenal masses suspicious for PHEO than do {sup 18}F-DOPA PET or CT alone. (orig.)

  13. Clinical value of 18F-fluorodihydroxyphenylalanine positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-DOPA PET/CT) for detecting pheochromocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luster, Markus; Zeich, Katrin; Glatting, Gerhard; Buck, Andreas K.; Solbach, Christoph; Reske, Sven N.; Karges, Wolfram; Pauls, Sandra; Verburg, Frederik A.; Dralle, Henning; Neumaier, Bernd; Mottaghy, Felix M.

    2010-01-01

    In detecting pheochromocytoma (PHEO), positron emission tomography (PET) with the radiolabelled amine precursor 18 F-fluorodihydroxyphenylalanine ( 18 F-DOPA) offers excellent specificity, while computed tomography (CT) provides high sensitivity and ability to localize lesions; therefore, the combination of these modalities could be advantageous in this setting. The aim of this study was to investigate whether combined 18 F-DOPA PET/CT more accurately detects and localizes PHEO lesions than does each modality alone. 18 F-DOPA PET, CT and 18 F-DOPA PET/CT images of 25 consecutive patients undergoing diagnostic scanning of suspected sporadic or multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 syndrome-associated PHEO were reviewed retrospectively in randomized sequence. Two blinded observers scored the images regarding the likelihood of PHEO being present and localizable. Results were correlated with subsequent clinical history and, when available, histology. Of the 19 lesions detected by all three modalities, PET identified each as positive for PHEO, but was unable to definitively localize 15 of 19 (79%). CT could definitively localize all 19 lesions, but could not definitively diagnose or exclude PHEO in 18 of 19 (95%) lesions. Furthermore, CT falsely identified as negative for PHEO one lesion which was judged to be positive for this tumor by both PET and PET/CT. Only in PET/CT scans were all 19 lesions accurately characterized and localized. On a per-patient basis, the sensitivity of 18 F-DOPA PET/CT for PHEO was 100% and the specificity 88%, with a 100% positive predictive value and an 88% negative predictive value. 18 F-DOPA PET/CT more accurately diagnoses and localizes adrenal and extra-adrenal masses suspicious for PHEO than do 18 F-DOPA PET or CT alone. (orig.)

  14. CSF biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease concord with amyloid-β PET and predict clinical progression: A study of fully automated immunoassays in BioFINDER and ADNI cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Oskar; Seibyl, John; Stomrud, Erik; Zetterberg, Henrik; Trojanowski, John Q; Bittner, Tobias; Lifke, Valeria; Corradini, Veronika; Eichenlaub, Udo; Batrla, Richard; Buck, Katharina; Zink, Katharina; Rabe, Christina; Blennow, Kaj; Shaw, Leslie M

    2018-03-01

    We studied whether fully automated Elecsys cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) immunoassay results were concordant with positron emission tomography (PET) and predicted clinical progression, even with cutoffs established in an independent cohort. Cutoffs for Elecsys amyloid-β 1-42 (Aβ), total tau/Aβ(1-42), and phosphorylated tau/Aβ(1-42) were defined against [ 18 F]flutemetamol PET in Swedish BioFINDER (n = 277) and validated against [ 18 F]florbetapir PET in Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (n = 646). Clinical progression in patients with mild cognitive impairment (n = 619) was studied. CSF total tau/Aβ(1-42) and phosphorylated tau/Aβ(1-42) ratios were highly concordant with PET classification in BioFINDER (overall percent agreement: 90%; area under the curve: 94%). The CSF biomarker statuses established by predefined cutoffs were highly concordant with PET classification in Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (overall percent agreement: 89%-90%; area under the curves: 96%) and predicted greater 2-year clinical decline in patients with mild cognitive impairment. Strikingly, tau/Aβ ratios were as accurate as semiquantitative PET image assessment in predicting visual read-based outcomes. Elecsys CSF biomarker assays may provide reliable alternatives to PET in Alzheimer's disease diagnosis. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Application of separable parameter space techniques to multi-tracer PET compartment modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jeff L; Michael Morey, A; Kadrmas, Dan J

    2016-01-01

    Multi-tracer positron emission tomography (PET) can image two or more tracers in a single scan, characterizing multiple aspects of biological functions to provide new insights into many diseases. The technique uses dynamic imaging, resulting in time-activity curves that contain contributions from each tracer present. The process of separating and recovering separate images and/or imaging measures for each tracer requires the application of kinetic constraints, which are most commonly applied by fitting parallel compartment models for all tracers. Such multi-tracer compartment modeling presents challenging nonlinear fits in multiple dimensions. This work extends separable parameter space kinetic modeling techniques, previously developed for fitting single-tracer compartment models, to fitting multi-tracer compartment models. The multi-tracer compartment model solution equations were reformulated to maximally separate the linear and nonlinear aspects of the fitting problem, and separable least-squares techniques were applied to effectively reduce the dimensionality of the nonlinear fit. The benefits of the approach are then explored through a number of illustrative examples, including characterization of separable parameter space multi-tracer objective functions and demonstration of exhaustive search fits which guarantee the true global minimum to within arbitrary search precision. Iterative gradient-descent algorithms using Levenberg–Marquardt were also tested, demonstrating improved fitting speed and robustness as compared to corresponding fits using conventional model formulations. The proposed technique overcomes many of the challenges in fitting simultaneous multi-tracer PET compartment models. (paper)

  16. Respiratory motion correction for PET oncology applications using affine transformation of list mode data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamare, F; Cresson, T; Savean, J; Rest, C Cheze Le; Reader, A J; Visvikis, D

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory motion is a source of artefacts and reduced image quality in PET. Proposed methodology for correction of respiratory effects involves the use of gated frames, which are however of low signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore a method accounting for respiratory motion effects without affecting the statistical quality of the reconstructed images is necessary. We have implemented an affine transformation of list mode data for the correction of respiratory motion over the thorax. The study was performed using datasets of the NCAT phantom at different points throughout the respiratory cycle. List mode data based PET simulated frames were produced by combining the NCAT datasets with a Monte Carlo simulation. Transformation parameters accounting for respiratory motion were estimated according to an affine registration and were subsequently applied on the original list mode data. The corrected and uncorrected list mode datasets were subsequently reconstructed using the one-pass list mode EM (OPL-EM) algorithm. Comparison of corrected and uncorrected respiratory motion average frames suggests that an affine transformation in the list mode data prior to reconstruction can produce significant improvements in accounting for respiratory motion artefacts in the lungs and heart. However, the application of a common set of transformation parameters across the imaging field of view does not significantly correct the respiratory effects on organs such as the stomach, liver or spleen

  17. Present and future of clinical cardiovascular PET imaging in Europe - a position statement by the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology (ECNC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guludec, D.; Lautamaeki, R.; Bengel, F.M.; Knuuti, J.; Bax, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    This position statement was prepared by the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology and summarises the current and future potential of PET as a clinical cardiovascular diagnostic imaging tool. The first section describes how methodological developments have positively influenced the transition of PET from a research tool towards a clinical diagnostic test. In the second section, evidence in support of its superior diagnostic accuracy, its value to guide decision making and to predict outcome and its cost effectiveness is summarised. The third section finally outlines new PET-based approaches and concepts, which will likely influence clinical cardiovascular medicine in the future. The notion that integration of cardiac PET into healthcare systems and disease management algorithms will advance quality of care is increasingly supported by the literature highlighted in this statement. (orig.)

  18. Feasibility of [18F]FDG-PET and coregistered CT on clinical target volume definition of advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messa, C.; IBFM-CNR, Milan; Scientific Institute H.S. Raffaele, Milan; Ceresoli, G.L.; Gregorc, V.; Rizzo, G.; Scientific Institute H.S. Raffaele, Milan; Artioli, D.; Cattaneo, M.; Castellone, P.; Picchio, M.; Landoni, C.; Scientific Institute H.S. Raffaele, Milan; Fazio, F.; IBFM-CNR, Milan; Scientific Institute H.S. Raffaele, Milan; Scientific Institute H.S. Raffaele, Milan

    2005-01-01

    Aim. To prospectively evaluate the impact of co registered positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) in 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) planning in patients with non-small lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods. Twenty-one patients (median age: 57 years; range: 42-80 years) referred to 3D-CRT for NSCLC were recruited. Positron emission tomography with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ([ 18 F]FDG-PET) and conventional CT images were coregistered (PET/CT images) using a commerciaI software package based on surface matching technique. Neoplastic areas were contoured on [ 18 F]FDGPET images with the aid of the correspondent CT image by a nuclear medicine physician. CT images and their relative PET contours were then transferred to treatment planning system. A radiation oncologist firstly contoured clinical target volumes (CTV) on CT scan alone (CTV-CT), and then on co registered PET/CT images (CTV-PET/CT). CTV-CT and CTV-PET/CT were compared for each patient; a difference higher than 25% was considered of clinical relevance. Results. Three patients were shifted to palliative radiotherapy for metastatic disease or very large tumor size, showed by [ 18 F]FDG-PET. Of the remaining 18 patients a CTV change, after inclusion of PET/CT data, was observed in 10/18 cases (55%): larger in 7/18 (range 33-279%) and smaller in 3/18 patients (range 26-34%), mainly due to inclusion or exclusion of Iymph-nodal disease and to better definition of tumor extent. CTV changes smaller than 25% occurred in the remaining 8/18 patients. Conclusion. [ 18 F]FDG-PET and CT images co-registration in radiotherapy treatment planning Ied to a change in CTV definition in the majority of our patients, which may signillcantly modify management and radiation treatment modality in these patients

  19. Comparison of 18F-FDG PET/CT and PET/MRI in patients with multiple myeloma

    OpenAIRE

    Sachpekidis, Christos; Hillengass, Jens; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Mosebach, Jennifer; Pan, Leyun; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    PET/MRI represents a promising hybrid imaging modality with several potential clinical applications. Although PET/MRI seems highly attractive in the diagnostic approach of multiple myeloma (MM), its role has not yet been evaluated. The aims of this prospective study are to evaluate the feasibility of 18F-FDG PET/MRI in detection of MM lesions, and to investigate the reproducibility of bone marrow lesions detection and quantitative data of 18F-FDG uptake between the functional (PET) component ...

  20. Preoperative imaging of charcot neuroarthropathy. Does the additional application of 18F-FDG-PET make sense?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoepfner, S.; Krolak, C.; Kessler, S.; Tiling, R.

    2006-01-01

    With about 4 million diabetics in Germany and presumed inclination over the following years the treatment of diabetic complications like diabetic foot will become an even more important point. The management of Charcot's foot has undergone fundamental change in the last few years. Formerly, treatment was almost exclusively limited to non surgical measures; since the late 1990's, however, current practice has shifted to early, stage-appropriate surgical therapy. The aim of the present prospective study was to investigate the value of positron emission tomography (PET) in the pre-operative work-up of Charcot's foot. PET were compared to magnetic resonance tomography (MRI). Patients, methods: MRI and PET imaging were used as part of the preoperative work-up in 18 patients with Type II diabetes mellitus. The diagnosis of Charcot's foot requiring surgical treatment were made on the basis of clinical and radiologic criteria. Results: of 46 Charcot's lesions confirmed at surgery, 44 and 35 were detected by means of PET and MRI, respectively. PET can be used in the work-up of patients with metal implants where the MRI does not show adequate findings. PET shows the areas of detritus formation exhibit only moderately increased glucose metabolism and at visual interpretation do not usually impress as typical for acute osteomyelitis. Average SUV values stood at 1.2 (range: 0.5-2.9). Conclusions: the differentiation between Charcot's lesions and floride osteomyelitis provides the surgeon with important additional information, which is often unavailable from MRI. Because of this important additional data, PET could be considered preferable to morphologic imaging (CT, projection radiography) in the preoperative work-up of Charcot's foot. (orig.)

  1. Preoperative imaging of charcot neuroarthropathy. Does the additional application of {sup 18}F-FDG-PET make sense?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoepfner, S. [Abt. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Giessen und Marburg, Standort Giessen (Germany); Krolak, C. [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie, Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Kessler, S. [Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Tiling, R. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    With about 4 million diabetics in Germany and presumed inclination over the following years the treatment of diabetic complications like diabetic foot will become an even more important point. The management of Charcot's foot has undergone fundamental change in the last few years. Formerly, treatment was almost exclusively limited to non surgical measures; since the late 1990's, however, current practice has shifted to early, stage-appropriate surgical therapy. The aim of the present prospective study was to investigate the value of positron emission tomography (PET) in the pre-operative work-up of Charcot's foot. PET were compared to magnetic resonance tomography (MRI). Patients, methods: MRI and PET imaging were used as part of the preoperative work-up in 18 patients with Type II diabetes mellitus. The diagnosis of Charcot's foot requiring surgical treatment were made on the basis of clinical and radiologic criteria. Results: of 46 Charcot's lesions confirmed at surgery, 44 and 35 were detected by means of PET and MRI, respectively. PET can be used in the work-up of patients with metal implants where the MRI does not show adequate findings. PET shows the areas of detritus formation exhibit only moderately increased glucose metabolism and at visual interpretation do not usually impress as typical for acute osteomyelitis. Average SUV values stood at 1.2 (range: 0.5-2.9). Conclusions: the differentiation between Charcot's lesions and floride osteomyelitis provides the surgeon with important additional information, which is often unavailable from MRI. Because of this important additional data, PET could be considered preferable to morphologic imaging (CT, projection radiography) in the preoperative work-up of Charcot's foot. (orig.)

  2. Clinical use of quantitative cardiac perfusion PET: rationale, modalities and possible indications. Position paper of the Cardiovascular Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciagra, Roberto; Passeri, Alessandro; Bucerius, Jan; Verberne, Hein J.; Slart, Riemer H.J.A.; Lindner, Oliver; Gimelli, Alessia; Hyafil, Fabien; Agostini, Denis; Uebleis, Christopher; Hacker, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, PET was regarded as a luxurious way of performing myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, with excellent image quality and diagnostic capabilities that hardly justified the additional cost and procedural effort. Quantitative perfusion PET was considered a major improvement over standard qualitative imaging, because it allows the measurement of parameters not otherwise available, but for many years its use was confined to academic and research settings. In recent years, however, several factors have contributed to the renewal of interest in quantitative perfusion PET, which has become a much more readily accessible technique due to progress in hardware and the availability of dedicated and user-friendly platforms and programs. In spite of this evolution and of the growing evidence that quantitative perfusion PET can play a role in the clinical setting, there are not yet clear indications for its clinical use. Therefore, the Cardiovascular Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, starting from the experience of its members, decided to examine the current literature on quantitative perfusion PET to (1) evaluate the rationale for its clinical use, (2) identify the main methodological requirements, (3) identify the remaining technical difficulties, (4) define the most reliable interpretation criteria, and finally (5) tentatively delineate currently acceptable and possibly appropriate clinical indications. The present position paper must be considered as a starting point aiming to promote a wider use of quantitative perfusion PET and to encourage the conception and execution of the studies needed to definitely establish its role in clinical practice. (orig.)

  3. Monte Carlo modeling of a clinical PET scanner by using the GATE dedicated computer code; Modelagem Monte Carlo de um PET Scanner clinico utilizando o codigo dedicado GATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Igor Fagner; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Universidade de Pernambuco (UPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Escola Politecnica; Vieira, Jose Wilson [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    This paper demonstrates more possible detailed the GATE simulated architecture involved in the 4D modeling of a General Electric PET scanner, the Advance. So, it were used data present in the literature on the configuration of GE modelled PET. The obtained results which were the 3D components of PET creation, and the simulation of 4D phenomena as the source decay and the gantry whirl, exhibit the potential of tool in emission tomograph modelling

  4. Application of single- and dual-energy CT brain tissue segmentation to PET monitoring of proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Bianca; Landry, Guillaume; Schwarz, Florian; Tessonnier, Thomas; Kamp, Florian; Dedes, George; Thieke, Christian; Würl, Matthias; Kurz, Christopher; Ganswindt, Ute; Verhaegen, Frank; Debus, Jürgen; Belka, Claus; Sommer, Wieland; Reiser, Maximilian; Bauer, Julia; Parodi, Katia

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the ability of single and dual energy computed tomography (SECT, DECT) to estimate tissue composition and density for usage in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of irradiation induced β + activity distributions. This was done to assess the impact on positron emission tomography (PET) range verification in proton therapy. A DECT-based brain tissue segmentation method was developed for white matter (WM), grey matter (GM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The elemental composition of reference tissues was assigned to closest CT numbers in DECT space (DECTdist). The method was also applied to SECT data (SECTdist). In a validation experiment, the proton irradiation induced PET activity of three brain equivalent solutions (BES) was compared to simulations based on different tissue segmentations. Five patients scanned with a dual source DECT scanner were analyzed to compare the different segmentation methods. A single magnetic resonance (MR) scan was used for comparison with an established segmentation toolkit. Additionally, one patient with SECT and post-treatment PET scans was investigated. For BES, DECTdist and SECTdist reduced differences to the reference simulation by up to 62% when compared to the conventional stoichiometric segmentation (SECTSchneider). In comparison to MR brain segmentation, Dice similarity coefficients for WM, GM and CSF were 0.61, 0.67 and 0.66 for DECTdist and 0.54, 0.41 and 0.66 for SECTdist. MC simulations of PET treatment verification in patients showed important differences between DECTdist/SECTdist and SECTSchneider for patients with large CSF areas within the treatment field but not in WM and GM. Differences could be misinterpreted as PET derived range shifts of up to 4 mm. DECTdist and SECTdist yielded comparable activity distributions, and comparison of SECTdist to a measured patient PET scan showed improved agreement when compared to SECTSchneider. The agreement between predicted and measured PET

  5. Incremental clinical value of a dedicated RT planning FDG PET-CT over staging PET-CT in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, P.; Som, S.; Vinod, S.; Lin, M.; Shon, I. H.

    2009-01-01

    Full text:Objectives: To evaluate whether FDG-PET performed for radiotherapy planning can detect disease progression, compared with staging PET. Methods: Thirteen patients underwent a planning PET-CT for curative RT ( R T-PET ) within eight weeks of a staging PET-CT for newly diagnosed NSCLC between 10/2007 and 1/2009. All studies were acquired on a Philips GXL PET-CT using the same protocols, except RT-PET is acquired on a RT flat bed. The images were interpreted by consensus readings of two physicians: location/number, visual grading (0-4:3> liver, 4>brain), max transverse diameter ( M ax D ) (tumour margin is delineated by a SUV threshold of 2.5) and max SUV of each lesion. Progressive disease (PD) is defined as >10% increase in max D. Results: RT-PET detected PD (primary or nodal) or new metastases in 8 pts (61%) (mean interval:30.2±14 days, range:7-54 days). For primary tumour, RT-PET detected PD in 5

  6. Clinical application of functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniwaki, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    Described is the present state of clinical application of fMRI in the preoperative assessment of brain tumors, and plasticity in and pathophysiology of central diseases. For the tumor resection, fMRI is useful for risk assessment of postoperative nerve dysfunction, for selection of the patient rather suitable for brain mapping at the invasive surgery than at the pre-operation and for guidance of the operation itself. Preoperative fMRI alone can neither distinguish the regions of the primary and secondary functions nor exhibit the relation between the tumor and white matter fibers but there are compensatory means for these drawbacks. Benefit of preoperative fMRI has not yet been based on the evidence on double blind trials. Combination of fMRI imaging and electroencephalography (EEG) finding has shown that, in generalized epilepsy, extensive and stimulated activation occurs in both frontal/occipital regions and in thalamus area, respectively, and that the concomitant lowered activities are conceivably the reflection of burst discharge in normal brain functions. Plasticity in the human brain has been demonstrated by fMRI in cerebral vascular diseases, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Pathogenesis of Parkinson disease and depression has been better understood by fMRI investigations revealing regions with elevated and reduced activities. Studies of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder have shown similar change of activities with functional reductions of the right dorsolateral frontal anterior area and of dorsal frontal cingulate gyrus, together with stimulated wider regions to given tasks. As above, fMRI has greatly contributed to our understanding of diseases of central nervous system and is to be expected to expand wider in this field. (T.T.)

  7. Relevance of positron emission tomography (PET) in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, W.A.; Avril, N.; Schwaiger, M.

    1999-01-01

    Background: The clinical use of positron emission tomography (PET) for detection and staging of malignant tumors is rapidly increasing. Furthermore, encouraging results for monitoring the effects of radio- and chemotherapy have been reported. Methods: This review describes the technical principles of PET and the biological characteristics of tracers used in oncological research and patient studies. The results of clinical studies published in peer reviewed journals during the last 5 years are summarized and clinical indications for PET scans in various tumor types are discussed. Results and Conclusions: Numerous studies have documented the high diagnostic accuracy of PET studies using the glucose analogue F-18-fluordeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) for detection and staging of malignant tumors. In this field, FDG-PET has been particularly successful in lung cancer, colorectal cancer, malignant lymphoma and melanoma. Furthermore, FDG-PET has often proven to be superior to morphological imaging techniques for differentation of tumor recurrence from scar tissue. Due to the high glucose utilization of normal gray matter radiolabeled amino-acids like C-11-methionine are superior to FDG for detection and delineation of brain tumors by PET. In the future, more specific markers of tumor cell proliferation and gene expression may allow the application of PET not only for dianostic imaging also but for non-invasive biological characterization of malignant tumors and early monitoring of therapeutic interventions. (orig.) [de

  8. Performance evaluation of a compact PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system for small animal imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Qingyang; Wang, Shi; Ma, Tianyu; Wu, Jing; Liu, Hui; Xu, Tianpeng; Xia, Yan; Fan, Peng; Lyu, Zhenlei; Liu, Yaqiang

    2015-01-01

    PET, SPECT and CT imaging techniques are widely used in preclinical small animal imaging applications. In this paper, we present a compact small animal PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system. A dual-functional, shared detector design is implemented which enables PET and SPECT imaging with a same LYSO ring detector. A multi-pinhole collimator is mounted on the system and inserted into the detector ring in SPECT imaging mode. A cone-beam CT consisting of a micro focus X-ray tube and a CMOS detector is implemented. The detailed design and the performance evaluations are reported in this paper. In PET imaging mode, the measured NEMA based spatial resolution is 2.12 mm (FWHM), and the sensitivity at the central field of view (CFOV) is 3.2%. The FOV size is 50 mm (∅)×100 mm (L). The SPECT has a spatial resolution of 1.32 mm (FWHM) and an average sensitivity of 0.031% at the center axial, and a 30 mm (∅)×90 mm (L) FOV. The CT spatial resolution is 8.32 lp/mm @10%MTF, and the contrast discrimination function value is 2.06% with 1.5 mm size cubic box object. In conclusion, a compact, tri-modality PET/SPECT/CT system was successfully built with low cost and high performance

  9. Study on mechanical and physical properties of composite materials with recycled PET as fillers for paving block application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicaksono, Sigit Tri; Ardhyananta, Hosta; Rasyida, Amaliya

    2018-04-01

    Base on Sidoarjo's goverment data, there was more than 4000 metric ton perday of waste that has been accumulated during 2016. More than 10 percent from overall waste is plastics. In accordance with the Indonesia government regulation, "Indonesia clean from waste" by 2020 through 3R (Reduce, Reuse and Recycle) program, we have been focusing research on how to reduce the accumulation of the plastics waste in Sidoarjo by processing it become a new product. In this research, we have made the plastic waste of PET bottle as additional fillers or agregates of composite material for construction application as a paving block. The composition of PET plastic used as fillers is vary from 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50% from total volume of agregates. The ratio of cement binder to sands agregate is 1:3. The specimens were characterized its mechanical and physical properties by using flexural testing, compressive testing, density and water absorbance measurement. The results show that the mechanical (flexural and compressive) properties of composite materials is increased significantly by increasing PET fillers up to 20%, however it was decreased when PET content more than 20%. But, both the density and water absobance of specimens are decreased by increasing of PET fillers.

  10. PET / MRI vs. PET / CT. Indications Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva González, Juan P.

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid techniques in Nuclear Medicine is currently a field in full development for diagnosis and treatment of various medical conditions. With the recent advent of PET / MRI much it speculated about whether or not it is superior to PET / CT especially in oncology. The Conference seeks to clarify this situation by dealing issues such as: State of the art technology PET / MRI; Indications Oncology; Some clinical cases. It concludes by explaining the oncological indications of both the real and current situation of the PET / MRI. (author)

  11. Application of Molecular Tools for Gut Health of Pet Animals: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipismita Samal

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Gut health is an important facet of well being of pet animals; it is in this context, various nutritional and biotechnological approaches have been proposed to manipulate the gut health by specifically targeting the colonic microbiota. Nutritional approaches include supplementation of antioxidants and phytochemicals like flavonoids, isoflavonoids and carotenoids. Biotechnological approaches include supplementation of probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics in the diet and potential application of molecular tools like fluorescent in situ hybridization, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, quantitative dot blot hybridization, and restriction fragment length polymorphism etc. in studying the fecal microbiota composition. Post-genomic and related technologies, i.e. genomics, nutrigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and epigenomics in the study of gastrointestinal tract also put forward challenges for nutritionists and microbiologists to elucidate the complex interactions between gut microbiota and host.

  12. First results in the application of silicon photomultiplier matrices to small animal PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llosa, G. [University of Pisa, Department of Physics, Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: gabriela.llosa@pi.infn.it; Belcari, N.; Bisogni, M.G. [University of Pisa, Department of Physics, Pisa (Italy); INFN Pisa (Italy); Collazuol, G. [University of Pisa, Department of Physics, Pisa (Italy); Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy); Marcatili, S. [University of Pisa, Department of Physics, Pisa (Italy); INFN Pisa (Italy); Boscardin, M.; Melchiorri, M.; Tarolli, A.; Piemonte, C.; Zorzi, N. [FBK irst, Trento (Italy); Barrillon, P.; Bondil-Blin, S.; Chaumat, V.; La Taille, C. de; Dinu, N.; Puill, V.; Vagnucci, J-F. [Laboratoire de l' Accelerateur Lineaire, IN2P3-CNRS, Orsay (France); Del Guerra, A. [University of Pisa, Department of Physics, Pisa (Italy); INFN Pisa (Italy)

    2009-10-21

    A very high resolution small animal PET scanner that employs matrices of silicon photomultipliers as photodetectors is under development at the University of Pisa and INFN Pisa. The first SiPM matrices composed of 16 (4x4)1mmx1mm pixel elements on a common substrate have been produced at FBK-irst, and are being evaluated for this application. The MAROC2 ASIC developed at LAL-Orsay has been employed for the readout of the SiPM matrices. The devices have been tested with pixelated and continuous LYSO crystals. The results show the good performance of the matrices and lead to the fabrication of matrices with 64 SiPM elements.

  13. First results in the application of silicon photomultiplier matrices to small animal PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llosa, G.; Belcari, N.; Bisogni, M.G.; Collazuol, G.; Marcatili, S.; Boscardin, M.; Melchiorri, M.; Tarolli, A.; Piemonte, C.; Zorzi, N.; Barrillon, P.; Bondil-Blin, S.; Chaumat, V.; La Taille, C. de; Dinu, N.; Puill, V.; Vagnucci, J-F.; Del Guerra, A.

    2009-01-01

    A very high resolution small animal PET scanner that employs matrices of silicon photomultipliers as photodetectors is under development at the University of Pisa and INFN Pisa. The first SiPM matrices composed of 16 (4x4)1mmx1mm pixel elements on a common substrate have been produced at FBK-irst, and are being evaluated for this application. The MAROC2 ASIC developed at LAL-Orsay has been employed for the readout of the SiPM matrices. The devices have been tested with pixelated and continuous LYSO crystals. The results show the good performance of the matrices and lead to the fabrication of matrices with 64 SiPM elements.

  14. Differential regional cerebral glucose metabolism in clinical syndromes of frontotemporal lobar degeneration: a study with FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. M.; Cho, S. S.; Na, D. L.; Lee, K. H.; Choi, Y.; Choe, Y. S.; Kim, B. T.; Kim, S. E.

    2001-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration( FTLD) is the third most common dementia, following Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body disease. Four prototypic neurobehavioral syndromes can be produced by FTLD: frontotemporal dementia (FTD), frontotemporal dementia with motor neuron disease (MND), semantic dementia (SD), and progressive aphasia (PA). We investigated patterns of metabolic impairment in patient with FTLD presented with four different clinical syndromes. We analysed glucose metabolic patterns on FDG PET images obtained from 34 patients with a clinical diagnosis of FTLD (19 FTD, 6 MND, 6 SD, and 3 PA, according to a consensus criteria for clinical syndromes associated with FTLD) and 7 age-matched healthy controls using SPM99. Patients with FTD had metabolic deficit in the left frontal cortex and bilateral anterior temporal cortex. Hypometabolism in the bilateral premotor are was shown in patients with MND. Patients with SD had metabolic deficit in the left posterior temporal cortex including Wernicke's area, while hypometabolism in the bilateral inferior frontal gyrus including Broca's area and left angular gyrus was seen in patients with PA. These metabolic patterns were well correlated with clinical features of FTLD syndromes. These data provide a biochemical basis of clinical classification of FTLD. FDG PET may help evaluate and classify patients with FTLD

  15. Differential regional cerebral glucose metabolism in clinical syndromes of frontotemporal lobar degeneration: a study with FDG PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. M.; Cho, S. S.; Na, D. L.; Lee, K. H.; Choi, Y.; Choe, Y. S.; Kim, B. T.; Kim, S. E. [College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration( FTLD) is the third most common dementia, following Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body disease. Four prototypic neurobehavioral syndromes can be produced by FTLD: frontotemporal dementia (FTD), frontotemporal dementia with motor neuron disease (MND), semantic dementia (SD), and progressive aphasia (PA). We investigated patterns of metabolic impairment in patient with FTLD presented with four different clinical syndromes. We analysed glucose metabolic patterns on FDG PET images obtained from 34 patients with a clinical diagnosis of FTLD (19 FTD, 6 MND, 6 SD, and 3 PA, according to a consensus criteria for clinical syndromes associated with FTLD) and 7 age-matched healthy controls using SPM99. Patients with FTD had metabolic deficit in the left frontal cortex and bilateral anterior temporal cortex. Hypometabolism in the bilateral premotor are was shown in patients with MND. Patients with SD had metabolic deficit in the left posterior temporal cortex including Wernicke's area, while hypometabolism in the bilateral inferior frontal gyrus including Broca's area and left angular gyrus was seen in patients with PA. These metabolic patterns were well correlated with clinical features of FTLD syndromes. These data provide a biochemical basis of clinical classification of FTLD. FDG PET may help evaluate and classify patients with FTLD.

  16. Imaging and PET - PET/CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Schulthess, G.K.; Hany, Th.F.

    2008-01-01

    PET/CT has grown because the lack of anatomic landmarks in PET makes 'hardware-fusion' to anatomic cross-sectional data extremely useful. Addition of CT to PET improves specificity, but also sensitivity, and adding PET to CT adds sensitivity and specificity in tumor imaging. The synergistic advantage of adding CT is that the attenuation correction needed for PET data can also be derived from the CT data. This makes PET-CT 25-30% faster than PET alone, leading to higher patient throughput and a more comfortable examination for patients typically lasting 20 minutes or less. FDG-PET-CT appears to provide relevant information in the staging and therapy monitoring of many tumors, such as lung carcinoma, colorectal cancer, lymphoma, gynaecological cancers, melanoma and many others, with the notable exception of prostatic cancer. for this cancer, choline derivatives may possibly become useful radiopharmaceuticals. The published literature on the applications of FDG-PET-CT in oncology is still limited but several designed studies have demonstrated the benefits of PET-CT. (authors)

  17. Clinical Evaluation of Zero-Echo-Time Attenuation Correction for Brain 18F-FDG PET/MRI: Comparison with Atlas Attenuation Correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Tetsuro; Ter Voert, Edwin E G W; Warnock, Geoffrey; Buck, Alfred; Huellner, Martin; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Delso, Gaspar

    2016-12-01

    Accurate attenuation correction (AC) on PET/MR is still challenging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical feasibility of AC based on fast zero-echo-time (ZTE) MRI by comparing it with the default atlas-based AC on a clinical PET/MR scanner. We recruited 10 patients with malignant diseases not located on the brain. In all patients, a clinically indicated whole-body 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan was acquired. In addition, a head PET/MR scan was obtained voluntarily. For each patient, 2 AC maps were generated from the MR images. One was atlas-AC, derived from T1-weighted liver acquisition with volume acceleration flex images (clinical standard). The other was ZTE-AC, derived from proton-density-weighted ZTE images by applying tissue segmentation and assigning continuous attenuation values to the bone. The AC map generated by PET/CT was used as a silver standard. On the basis of each AC map, PET images were reconstructed from identical raw data on the PET/MR scanner. All PET images were normalized to the SPM5 PET template. After that, these images were qualified visually and quantified in 67 volumes of interest (VOIs; automated anatomic labeling, atlas). Relative differences and absolute relative differences between PET images based on each AC were calculated. 18 F-FDG uptake in all 670 VOIs and generalized merged VOIs were compared using a paired t test. Qualitative analysis shows that ZTE-AC was robust to patient variability. Nevertheless, misclassification of air and bone in mastoid and nasal areas led to the overestimation of PET in the temporal lobe and cerebellum (%diff of ZTE-AC, 2.46% ± 1.19% and 3.31% ± 1.70%, respectively). The |%diff| of all 670 VOIs on ZTE was improved by approximately 25% compared with atlas-AC (ZTE-AC vs. atlas-AC, 1.77% ± 1.41% vs. 2.44% ± 1.63%, P PET in regions near the skull base. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  18. Cyclotron/PET project in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engler, H.

    2006-01-01

    The Positron Computed Tomography (PET) is a tri dimensional image technique which shows biochemical information. PET is used in neurology and cardiology diseases. The National Center Cyclotron PET has been found to research, development and health science applications.

  19. Assessment of clinical utility of 18F-FDG PET in patients with head and neck cancer: a probability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goerres, Gerhard W.; Mosna-Firlejczyk, Katarzyna; Schulthess, Gustav K. von; Steurer, Johann; Bachmann, Lucas M.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to calculate disease probabilities based on data of patients with head and neck cancer in the register of our institution and to perform a systematic review of the available data on the accuracy of PET in the primary assessment and follow-up of patients with head and neck cancer. The pre-test probability of head and neck cancer among patients in our institutional data registry was assessed. Then the published literature was selected and appraised according to a standard protocol of systematic reviews. Two reviewers independently selected and extracted data on study characteristics, quality and accuracy. Accuracy data were used to form 2 x 2 contingency tables and were pooled to produce summary receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and summary likelihood ratios for positive and negative testing. Finally post-test probabilities were calculated on the basis of the pre-test probabilities of this patient group. All patients had cytologically or histologically proven cancer. The prevalence of additional lymph node metastases on PET in staging examinations was 19.6% (11/56), and that of locoregional recurrence on restaging PET was 28.6% (12/42). In the primary assessment of patients, PET had positive and negative likelihood ratios of 3.9 (2.56-5.93) and 0.24 (0.14-0.41), respectively. Disease probabilities were therefore 49.4% for a positive test result and 5.7% for a negative test result. In the assessment of recurrence these values were 3.96 (2.8-5.6) and 0.16 (0.1-0.25), resulting in probabilities of 49.7% and 3.8%. PET evaluation for involvement of lymph nodes had positive and negative likelihood ratios of 17.26 (10.9-27.3) and 0.19 (0.13-0.27) for primary assessment and 11.0 (2.93-41.24) and 0.14 (0.01-1.88) for detection of recurrence. The probabilities were 81.2% and 4.5% for primary assessment and 73.3% and 3.4% for assessment of recurrence. It is concluded that in this clinical setting the main advantage of PET is the

  20. 13N-ammonia myocardial perfusion imaging with a PET/CT scanner: impact on clinical decision making and cost-effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegrist, Patrick T.; Husmann, Lars; Knabenhans, Martina; Gaemperli, Oliver; Valenta, Ines; Hoefflinghaus, Tobias; Scheffel, Hans; Stolzmann, Paul; Alkadhi, Hatem; Kaufmann, Philipp A.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine the impact of 13 N-ammonia positron emission tomography (PET) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) on clinical decision making and its cost-effectiveness. One hundred consecutive patients (28 women, 72 men; mean age 60.9 ± 12.0 years; range 24-85 years) underwent 13 N-ammonia PET scanning (and computed tomography, used only for attenuation correction) to assess myocardial perfusion in patients with known (n = 79) or suspected (n = 8) coronary artery disease (CAD), or for suspected small-vessel disease (SVD; n = 13). Before PET, the referring physician was asked to determine patient treatment if PET would not be available. Four weeks later, PET patient management was reassessed for each patient individually. Before PET management strategies would have been: diagnostic angiography (62 of 100 patients), diagnostic angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI; 6 of 100), coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG; 3 of 100), transplantation (1 of 100), or conservative medical treatment (28 of 100). After PET scanning, treatment strategies were altered in 78 patients leading to: diagnostic angiography (0 of 100), PCI (20 of 100), CABG (3 of 100), transplantation (1 of 100), or conservative medical treatment (76 of 100). Patient management followed the recommendations of PET findings in 97% of the cases. Cost-effectiveness analysis revealed lower costs of EUR206/patient as a result of PET scanning. In a population with a high prevalence of known CAD, PET is cost-effective and has an important impact on patient management. (orig.)

  1. The clinical usefulness of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) in follow-up of curatively resected pancreatic cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Woohyun; Jang, Jin-Young; Kang, Mee Joo; Chang, Ye Rim; Shin, Yong Chan; Chang, Jihoon; Kim, Sun-Whe

    2016-01-01

    Computed tomography and serum tumor markers have limited value in detecting recurrence after curative surgery of pancreatic cancer. This study evaluated the clinical utility of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) in diagnosing recurrence. One hundred ten patients underwent curative resection of pancreatic cancer were enrolled. The diagnostic value of abdominal computed tomography (CT), PET-CT and serum carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 concentration were compared. The prognostic value of SUVmax on PET-CT was evaluated. PET-CT showed relatively higher sensitivity (84.5% vs. 75.0%) and accuracy (84.5% vs. 74.5%) than CT, whereas PET-CT plus CT showed greater sensitivity (97.6%) and accuracy (90.0%) than either alone. In detecting distant recurrences, PET-CT showed higher sensitivity (83.1% vs. 67.7%) than CT. Nineteen patients showed recurrences only on PET-CT, with eleven having invisible or suspected benign lesions on CT, and eight had recurrences in areas not covered by CT. SUVmax over 3.3 was predictive of poor survival after recurrence. PET-CT in combination with CT improves the detection of recurrence. PET-CT was especially advantageous in detecting recurrences in areas not covered by CT. If active post-operative surveillance after curative resection of pancreatic cancer is deemed beneficial, then it should include PET-CT combined with CT. Copyright © 2015 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical experience with a commercially available negative oral contrast medium in PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausegger, K.; Reinprecht, P. [Roentgendiagnostisches Zentralinstitut, LKH Klagenfurt (Austria); Kau, T. [Roentgendiagnostisches Zentral Inst., Klagenfurt (Austria); Igerc, I.; Lind, P. [Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin und Spezielle Endokrinologie, LKH Klagenfurt (Austria)

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: to evaluate a commercially available negative oral contrast material for PET/CT. Material and methods: in a prospective series of 49 patients, Mukofalk {sup registered}, which is a vegetarian-based substance, was used as a negative oral contrast medium in whole body PET/CT studies. Mukofalk was administered during a time period of 1.5 hours before the examination. Quality of small bowl distension and eventual pathological tracer uptake in the intestine were evaluated. Results: distension of the small bowel was excellent or good in 41 (85%) and poor in 8 (15%) patients. Mild tracer uptake in the small bowel was observed in 5 patients (10.2%) and moderate uptake in another 2 patients (4%). In none of these patients did the F-18 FDG uptake interfere with image interpretation. Conclusion: Mukofalk {sup registered} can be used as a negative oral contrast medium in PET/CT studies. (orig.)

  3. Clinical experience with a commercially available negative oral contrast medium in PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausegger, K.; Reinprecht, P.; Kau, T.; Igerc, I.; Lind, P.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: to evaluate a commercially available negative oral contrast material for PET/CT. Material and methods: in a prospective series of 49 patients, Mukofalk registered , which is a vegetarian-based substance, was used as a negative oral contrast medium in whole body PET/CT studies. Mukofalk was administered during a time period of 1.5 hours before the examination. Quality of small bowl distension and eventual pathological tracer uptake in the intestine were evaluated. Results: distension of the small bowel was excellent or good in 41 (85%) and poor in 8 (15%) patients. Mild tracer uptake in the small bowel was observed in 5 patients (10.2%) and moderate uptake in another 2 patients (4%). In none of these patients did the F-18 FDG uptake interfere with image interpretation. Conclusion: Mukofalk registered can be used as a negative oral contrast medium in PET/CT studies. (orig.)

  4. Perfusion imaging using rubidium-82 ((82)Rb) PET in rats with myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Andreas Ettrup; Ghotbi, Adam Ali; Bodholdt, Rasmus Poul

    2017-01-01

    Assessing myocardial perfusion using 82Rb-PET is emerging as a valuable clinical tool.1,2 The rapid decay (T½ = 76 s) allows for absolute quantification of both rest and stress perfusion within 30 minutes. In addition to evaluation of epicardial disease with perfusion defects, also evaluation...... of balanced coronary and small vessel disease is possible. For further evaluation of how 82Rb-PET can be used clinically, pre-clinical application of the method would be valuable. However, so far no data on the use of 82Rb-PET in small animals have been published nor has the use of 82Rb-PET, to the best...

  5. PET/MR brain imaging: evaluation of clinical UTE-based attenuation correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aasheim, Lars Birger; Karlberg, Anna; Goa, Paal Erik; Haaberg, Asta; Soerhaug, Sveinung; Fagerli, Unn-Merete; Eikenes, Live

    2015-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in PET/MR imaging is that of accurate MR-based attenuation correction (AC) of the acquired PET data, which must be solved if the PET/MR modality is to reach its full potential. The aim of this study was to investigate the performance of Siemens' most recent version (VB20P) of MR-based AC of head PET data, by comparing it to CT-based AC. Methods: 18 F-FDG PET data from seven lymphoma and twelve lung cancer patients examined with a Biograph mMR PET/MR system were reconstructed with both CT-based and MR-based AC, avoiding sources of error arising when comparing PET data from different systems. The resulting images were compared quantitatively by measuring changes in mean SUV in ten different brain regions in both hemispheres, as well as the brainstem. In addition, the attenuation maps (μ maps) were compared regarding volume and localization of cranial bone. The UTE μ maps clearly overestimate the amount of bone in the neck, while slightly underestimating the amount of bone in the cranium, and the localization of bone in the cranial region also differ from the CT μ maps. In air/tissue interfaces in the sinuses and ears, the MRAC method struggles to correctly classify the different tissues. The misclassification of tissue is most likely caused by a combination of artefacts and the insufficiency of the UTE method to accurately separate bone. Quantitatively, this results in a combination of overestimation (0.5-3.6 %) and underestimation (2.7-5.2 %) of PET activity throughout the brain, depending on the proximity to the inaccurate regions. Our results indicate that the performance of the UTE method as implemented in VB20P is close to the theoretical maximum of such an MRAC method in the brain, while it does not perform satisfactorily in the neck or face/nasal area. Further improvement of the UTE MRAC or other available methods for more accurate segmentation of bone should be incorporated. (orig.)

  6. A modular data acquisition system for high resolution clinical PET scanners

    OpenAIRE

    Sportelli, Giancarlo

    2011-01-01

    En las últimas dos décadas, la Tomografía por Emisión de Positrones (PET) ha demostrado ser una modalidad clave para el estudio de la biología del cúncer y trastornos cardíacos, y para la realizaciún imágenes moleculares, una tecnica que permite la terapia individualizada de la enfermedad [Weissleder01]. La mejor característica de la PET es su sensibilidad: es la tecnica que proporciona imúagenes moleculares con la mayor sensibilidad, y las imúagenes de cuerpo entero que produce no pueden ser...

  7. Clinical PET/MR Imaging in Dementia and Neuro-Oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Otto M.; Marner, Lisbeth; Law, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of hybrid PET/MRI systems allows simultaneous multimodality image acquisition of high technical quality. This technique is well suited for the brain, and particularly in dementia and neuro-oncology. In routine use combinations of well-established MRI sequences and PET tracers....../MRI using [18F]-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine (FET) also abide to the expectations of the adaptive and versatile diagnostic tool necessary in neuro-oncology covering both simple 20 min protocols for routine treatment surveillance and complicated 90 min brain and spinal cord protocols in pediatric neuro...

  8. Clinical study of 18F-FDG PET/CT whole-body imaging in disseminated carcinoma of unknown primary site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guohui; Liang Peiyan; Cai Yanjun; Zhang Weiguang; Xie Chuanmiao; Wu Peihong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP) is not uncommon in usual clinical settings. They are, by definition, those cases with clinically suspected primary malignancy but not revealed by conventional investigation. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of whole-body 18 F-fluoro- deoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT in detecting a primary neoplasm for these patients. Methods: A totle of 150 patients with retrievable records from 169 CUP patients were selected within a group of consecutive 2589 patients from Jan. 2006 to Jun. 2007. All cases underwent whole-body FDG PET/CT scan. The final diagnoses were confirmed by pathologic results, other imaging modalities or clinical follow-up. Results: Among 150 patients, primary tumor sites were successfully detected by whole-body 18 F-FDG PET/CT scan in 70 cases (46.7%), of which 52 were pathologically confirmed and 18 by clinical follow-up. And 38 cases (54.3%) were lung cancer, 8 (11.4%) were nasopharyngeal carcinoma, 13 (18.6%) in digestive sys- tem, and 11 (15.7%) in other systems. Three clinically suspected CUP cases with negative 18 F-FDG PET/ CT were subsequently confirmed of benign processes by clinical follow-up. Six patients were wrongly diagnosed by 18 F-FDG PET/CT, and 15 patients did not have a confirmed diagnosis by the end of research. The primary cause of malignancy after 18 F-FDG PET/CT remained obscure in 56 patients, only 3 of whom be- came known during the course of clinical follow-up (nasopharyngeal bladder and esophageal carcinoma). Conclusion: 18 F-FDG PET/CT whole-body imaging plays an important role in patients with metastatic CUP. (authors)

  9. Presentation of the DosePet application (APP) for use in Nuclear Medicine: calculation of the amount of medicament for PET / CT patients; Apresentacao do aplicativo DosedPet para uso em Medicina Nuclear: calculo do volume de medicamento necessario para paciente de PETCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Pedro Augusto do; Rodrigues, Araken dos S. Werneck, E-mail: pedroan88@gmail.com [Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), Brasilia, DF (Brazil). Faculdade Ceilandia. Programa de Pos Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnologias em Saude

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the application (APP) DosePet that calculates the amount of medicament for PET / CT in patients according to the predetermined radiation dose. The software has been designed using the web MIT App Inventor2 tool for Android platform. The application allows the workers to simulate the amount of radiation still existing in the premises after the applications, increasing security and reducing exposures, and enable greater efficiency in the use of the radiopharmaceutical. (author)

  10. Clinical usefulness of 18F–FDG PET/CT for initial staging and assessment of treatment efficacy in patients with lymph node tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefebvre, Nicolas; Argemi, Xavier; Meyer, Nicolas; Mootien, Joy; Douiri, Nawal; Sferrazza-Mandala, Stefania; Schramm, Frédéric; Weingertner, Noëlle; Christmann, Daniel; Hansmann, Yves; Imperiale, Alessio

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Few studies have evaluated the promising role of 18 F–fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/computed tomography FDG PET/CT in evaluating and monitoring treatment response in patients with lymph node tuberculosis (LNTB). The aim of this clinical investigation was to assess the clinical usefulness of FDG PET/CT for initial tuberculosis staging and to determine the prognostic value of the decrease of 18 F–FDG uptake during antibiotic treatment in LNTB patients. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 18 cases of LNTB admitted at a single center from 2004 to 2014. Medical records of patients who underwent two FDG PET/CT (>6 months interval), at initial staging and at the end of therapy were reviewed to determine the impact of FDG PET/CT on initial management of LNTB and response to therapy. Statistical analysis was performed using linear mixed-effects model. Results: Thirteen cases of disseminated LNTB and five cases of localized LNTB were included in the study. Initial FDG PET/CT allowed guided biopsy for initial diagnosis in 5 patients and identified unknown extra-LN TB sites in 9 patients. Visual analysis follow-up of FDG PET/CT showed a complete metabolic response in 9/18 patients (all of whom were cured), a partial response in 7/18 (5 of whom were cured) and no response in 2/18 (all of whom were not cured). The semi-quantitative evaluation of 18F–FDG intensity decrease based on the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), compared to targeted estimated decrease allowed to predict correctly a complete response to treatment in 14/18 cases. Conclusion: FDG PET/CT allows an accurate pre-therapeutic mapping of LNTB and helps for early TB confirmation. The SUVmax follow up is a potential tool for monitoring the treatment response.

  11. Implementation and application of simulation platform of PET based on GATE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Bin; Zhao Shujun; Zhang Shixun; Liu Haojia

    2010-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a tool for obtaining functional image in vivo and GATE is a dedicated software for PET/SPECT simulation based on Mentor Carlo Method. It encapsulates the Geant4 libraries to achieve a modular and provides a number of new characteristics. In practice, a simulation platform of PET has been builded employing GATE based on Ubuntu operating system, including many keys and skills in the process. We have exploited benchmark PET, a testing example in GATE, and implemented PET scanner simulation in the end. Through analyzing the simulation data, the result demonstrate that predictive goal has been reached. The work provides the foundation for investigating PET scanner and optimizing the algorithm of tomograph image reconstruction. (authors)

  12. PET and MR imaging: the odd couple or a match made in heaven?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Ciprian; Guimaraes, Alexander R; Rosen, Bruce R

    2013-05-01

    PET and MR imaging are modalities routinely used for clinical and research applications. Integrated scanners capable of acquiring PET and MR imaging data in the same session, sequentially or simultaneously, have recently become available for human use. In this article, we describe some of the technical advances that allowed the development of human PET/MR scanners; briefly discuss methodologic challenges and opportunities provided by this novel technology; and present potential oncologic, cardiac, and neuropsychiatric applications. These examples range from studies that might immediately benefit from PET/MR to more advanced applications on which future development might have an even broader impact.

  13. PET and MRI: The Odd Couple or a Match Made in Heaven?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Ciprian; Guimaraes, Alexander R.; Rosen, Bruce R.

    2013-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are imaging modalities routinely used for clinical and research applications. Integrated scanners capable of acquiring PET and MRI data in the same imaging session, sequentially or simultaneously, have recently become available for human use. In this manuscript, we describe some of the technical advances that allowed the development of human PET/MR scanners, briefly discuss methodological challenges and opportunities provided by this novel technology and present potential oncologic, cardiac, and neuro-psychiatric applications. These examples range from studies that might immediately benefit from PET/MR to more advanced applications where future development might have an even broader impact. PMID:23492887

  14. Application of PET-CT for radiotherapy of the patient with carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia; Luo Quanyong; Yuan Zhibin

    2006-01-01

    PET-CT is an advanced imaging instrument combing anatomical and metabolic information into one. Combined with the radiation planning system, PET-CT is playing an increasingly important tool in the diagnosis and staging of malignant disease image-guided therapy planning, and treatment monitoring. Especially, PET-CT has a significant role in the delineation of tumor target volume, optimization of radiation planning. (authors)

  15. Clinical application of digital radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Nagasaka, Hideo; Himi, Kazuhisa [Nihon Univ., Tokyo. School of Medicine

    1983-04-01

    Utility of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) by fluorography was advocated with demonstrable clinical cases. DSA is drawing attention for use at the outpatient clinic because it is relatively noninvasive, involves less risk than that by catheterization, and can be performed by intravenous injection. It also has a number of advantages such as instantaneous imaging and possible imaging of multiple sites by the same procedure. It still be extensively used in clinical practice not only as a screening method, but also as a functional imaging one.

  16. Enhanced Application of 18F-FDG PET/CT in Bladder Cancer by Adding Early Dynamic Acquisition to a Standard Delayed PET Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hai-Jeon; Yoo, Jang; Kim, Yemi; Lee, Dong Hyeon; Kim, Bom Sahn

    2017-10-01

    We investigated the value of early dynamic (ED) PET for the detection and characterization of bladder cancer. Fifty-two bladder cancer patients were prospectively enrolled. The study protocol was composed of ED, whole-body (WB, 60 minutes after injection), and additional delayed (AD, 120 minutes after injection) PET acquisition. Early dynamic PET was acquired for 10 minutes and reconstructed as 5 frames at 2-minute intervals. A focal radiotracer accumulation confined to the bladder wall was considered as PET positive and referred for further quantitative measurement. SUVmax on ED (SUVmax, SUVmax, SUVmax, SUVmax, and SUVmax for 5 frames), WB (SUVmax), and AD PET (SUVmax) were measured. PET results were correlated with bladder cancer pathology variables. The sensitivities of ED, WB, and AD PET for bladder cancer were 84.6%, 57.7%, and 61.2%, respectively. The sensitivity of ED PET was significantly higher than that of WB (P = 0.002) and AD PET (P = 0.008). On ED PET, SUVmax was significantly correlated with muscle invasiveness, histological grade, and pathological tumor size (P = 0.018, P = 0.030, and P = 0.030). On WB and AD PET, only pathological tumor size showed significant positive correlation with SUVmax and SUVmax (P = 0.043 and P = 0.007). Early dynamic PET can help to detect and characterize bladder cancer.

  17. Clinical value of PET/CT applied in diagnosis and treatment of malignant lymphoma%PET/CT应用于恶性淋巴瘤诊治中的临床价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘艳; 沈丽达; 杨小芸; 李蓉; 张晓芸

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical value of PET/CT in the diagnosis,clinical value,curative effect evalua-tion and residual lesion diagnosis of malignant lymphoma(ML). Methods Ono hundred and fifty-three cases of ML considered by PET/CT examination in the Yunnan Provincial Tumor Hospital from January 2008 to December 2013 were collected ,screened according to different research purposes ,grouped and statistically analyzed. Results The diagnosis positive rate of PET/CT was 96.08%(147/153). The maximal PET/CT standard uptake value (SUVmax) for diagnosing ML was 9.26-10.94,the mean SUV (ΔSUV) was 7.54-8.95.ΔSUV in the non-Hopdgkin lympghoma(NHL) group was higher than that in the Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) group,but the difference was not statistically significant(P<0.05);in 52 cases of preoperative PET/CT and CT combined with ultrasound examination,the clinical stage by CT combined with ultrasound examination in 16 cases were adjusted after PET/CT examination;ΔSUV had statistical difference between before and after treatment (P<0.05);in 34 cases of preoperative and post-operative PET/CT examination for evaluating the curative effects ,their curative effect judgments were consistent in 21 cases and inconsistent in 13 cases. Conclusion The PET/CT examination has high positive rate for diagnosing ML and may serve as a reli-able imagiological basis for clinically diagnosing lymphoma;the SUV value is an important indicator in the PET/CT examination;the