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Sample records for clinical pet application

  1. Clinical PET application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang-Moo; Hong, S. W.; Choi, C. W.; Yang, S. D.; Choi, J. S.; Kweon, O. J. et al. [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-12-01

    PET gives various metabolic images, and is very important, new diagnostic modality in clinical oncology. In Korea Cancer Center Hospital, PET is installed as a research tool of long-mid-term atomic research project. For the efficient use of PET for clinical and research projects, income from the patients should be managed to get the raw material, equipment, manpower, and also for the clinical PET research. 1. Support the clinical application of PET in oncology. 2. Budgetary management of income, costs for raw material, equipment, manpower, and the clinical PET research project. In this year, 1,327 cases of PET images were obtained, which resulted total income of 829,770,000won. Increased demand for {sup 18}FDG in and outside KCCH need more than 2 times production of {sup 18} in a day. Manpower should be added for the second PET operation and RI production. 10 figs., 4 tabs. (Author)

  2. Clinical PET application

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    Lim, Sang Moo; Hong, Song W.; Choi, Chang W.; Yang, Seong Dae [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea)

    1997-12-01

    PET gives various methabolic images, and is very important, new diagnostic modality in clinical oncology. In Korea Cancer Center Hospital, PET is installed as a research tool of long-mid-term atomic research project. For the efficient use of PET for clinical and research projects, income from the patients should be managed to get the raw material, equipment, manpower, and also for the clinical PET research. 1. Support the clinical application of PET in oncology. 2. Budgetary management of income, costs for raw material, equipment, manpower, and the clinical PET research project. In this year, 250 cases of PET images were obtained, which resulted total income of 180,000,000 won. 50,000,000 won was deposited for the 1998 PET clinical research. Second year PET clinical research should be managed under unified project. Increased demand for {sup 18}FDG in and outside KCCH need more than 2 times production of {sup 18}FDG in a day purchase of HPLC pump and {sup 68}Ga pin source which was delayed due to economic crisis, should be done early in 1998. (author). 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Clinical application of PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomena, Francisco [Hospital Clinico Villarroel, Barcelona (Spain). Nuclear Medicine]. E-mail: flomena@clinic.ub.es; Soler, Marina [CETIR Grup Medic. Esplkugues de Llobregat, Barcelona (Spain). PET Unit

    2005-10-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an imaging modality that gives information on tissue metabolism and functionalism, different from other imaging techniques like computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which provide anatomical or structural information. PET has reached its development in biomedical research because of its capacity to use analogous compounds of many endogenous substance as tracers, and to measure, in vivo and in a non-invasive way, their consumption by the different organs and tissues of the mammalian body. Fluorodeoxyglucose-F 18 (FDG) PET has been proven to be a tracer adequate for clinical use in oncology and in many neurological diseases, with an excellent cost-efficiency ratio. The current PET-CT scanners can come to be the best tools for exploring patients who suffer from cancer.(author)

  4. Clinical application of pet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Lomeña

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET is an imaging modality that gives information on tissue metabolism and functionalism, different from other imaging techniques like computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, which provide anatomical or structural information. PET has reached its development in biomedical research because of its capacity to use analogous compounds of many endogenous substance as tracers, and to measure, in vivo and in a non-invasive way, their consumption by the different organs and tissues of the mammalian body. Fluordeoxyglucose-F18 (FDG PET has been proven to be a tracer adequate for clinical use in oncology and in many neurological diseases, with an excellent cost-efficiency ratio. The current PET-CT scanners can come to be the best tools for exploring patients who suffer from cancer.A tomografia por emissão de pósitrons (PET é uma técnica de diagnóstico por imagem que fornece informação sobre o metabolismo e funcionamento dos tecidos, diferente de outras técnicas de imagens como tomografia computadorizada (TC e ressonância magnética (RM, as quais fornecem informações estruturais ou anatômicas. O PET alcançou seu desenvolvimento em investigação biomédica devido à sua capacidade de usar traçadores análogos a muitas substâncias endógenas e de medir in vivo e de forma não invasiva seu consumo em diferentes órgãos e tecidos dos mamíferos 18Fluordesoxiglicose (FDG PET tem provado ser uma exploração de uso clínico com excelente relação custo benefício em oncologia e em muitas doenças neurológicas. Os atuais tomógrafos por PET-CT podem chegar a ser a melhor ferramenta de diagnóstico nos pacientes que sofrem de câncer.

  5. Clinical application of pet

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Lomeña; Marina Soler

    2005-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is an imaging modality that gives information on tissue metabolism and functionalism, different from other imaging techniques like computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which provide anatomical or structural information. PET has reached its development in biomedical research because of its capacity to use analogous compounds of many endogenous substance as tracers, and to measure, in vivo and in a non-invasive way, their consumption ...

  6. Clinical applications of PET in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohren, Eric M; Turkington, Timothy G; Coleman, R Edward

    2004-05-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) provides metabolic information that has been documented to be useful in patient care. The properties of positron decay permit accurate imaging of the distribution of positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. The wide array of positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals has been used to characterize multiple physiologic and pathologic states. PET is used for characterizing brain disorders such as Alzheimer disease and epilepsy and cardiac disorders such as coronary artery disease and myocardial viability. The neurologic and cardiac applications of PET are not covered in this review. The major utilization of PET clinically is in oncology and consists of imaging the distribution of fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). FDG, an analogue of glucose, accumulates in most tumors in a greater amount than it does in normal tissue. FDG PET is being used in diagnosis and follow-up of several malignancies, and the list of articles supporting its use continues to grow. In this review, the physics and instrumentation aspects of PET are described. Many of the clinical applications in oncology are mature and readily covered by third-party payers. Other applications are being used clinically but have not been as carefully evaluated in the literature, and these applications may not be covered by third-party payers. The developing applications of PET are included in this review. PMID:15044750

  7. PET/MRI. Methodology and clinical applications

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    Carrio, Ignasi [Autonomous Univ. of Barcelona, Hospital Sant Pau (Spain). Dept. Medicina Nuclear; Ros, Pablo (ed.) [Univ. Hospitals Case, Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-04-01

    Provides detailed information on the methodology and equipment of MRI-PET. Covers a wide range of clinical applications in oncology, cardiology, and neurology. Written by an international group of experts in MRI and PET. PET/MRI is an exciting novel diagnostic imaging modality that combines the precise anatomic and physiologic information provided by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with the molecular data obtained with positron emission tomography (PET). PET/MRI offers the promise of a simplified work flow, reduced radiation, whole-body imaging with superior soft tissue contrast, and time of flight physiologic information. It has been described as the pathway to molecular imaging in medicine. In compiling this textbook, the editors have brought together a truly international group of experts in MRI and PET. The book is divided into two parts. The first part covers methodology and equipment and comprises chapters on basic molecular medicine, development of specific contrast agents, MR attenuation and validation, quantitative MRI and PET motion correction, and technical implications for both MRI and PET. The second part of the book focuses on clinical applications in oncology, cardiology, and neurology. Imaging of major neoplasms, including lymphomas and tumors of the breast, prostate, and head and neck, is covered in individual chapters. Further chapters address functional and metabolic cardiovascular examinations and major central nervous system applications such as brain tumors and dementias. Risks, safety aspects, and healthcare costs and impacts are also discussed. This book will be of interest to all radiologists and nuclear medicine physicians who wish to learn more about the latest developments in this important emerging imaging modality and its applications.

  8. Clinical application of PET/MRI in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotoudeh, Houman; Sharma, Akash; Fowler, Kathryn J; McConathy, Jonathan; Dehdashti, Farrokh

    2016-08-01

    Hybrid imaging with integrated positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combines the advantages of the high-resolution anatomic data from MRI and functional imaging data from PET, and has the potential to improve the diagnostic evaluation of various types of cancers. The clinical oncologic applications of this newest hybrid imaging technology are evolving and substantial efforts are underway to define the role of PET/MRI in routine clinical use. The current published literature suggests that PET/MRI may play an important role in the evaluation of patients with certain types of malignancies, involving anatomic locations such as the pelvis and the liver. The purpose of this article is to review the current published PET/MRI literature in specific body oncologic applications. In addition, PET/MRI protocols and some of the technical issues of this hybrid imaging will be briefly discussed. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:265-276. PMID:27007987

  9. Clinical application with a hybrid PET/MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composite image diagnosis using a hybrid PET/MRI system is beneficial comparing to individual diagnosis of PET functional images and MRI anatomical images in standalone systems. Because the hybrid PET/MRI system makes it possible to detect disease more accurately and quickly. Moreover, it improves staging evaluation, therapy monitoring and follow-up observation. The stand-alone PET and MRI systems have already been established as useful clinical methods and provides complementary information for each other. With the hybrid PET/MRI system, it is expected to cover a wider range of clinical application. In addition, the hybrid system enables us to get highly precise registration information and more accurate fusion images. (author)

  10. Clinical application of FDG-PET for cancer diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography using 18F-FDG is accepted in clinical medicine as an imaging tool for the diagnosis and assessment of a large variety of cancers. Medicare reimbursement for these studies has been accepted in Japan since 2002. The number of requests for FDG-PET examinations has been increasing in institutions where a PET device is installed. PET is considered to be especially effective in re-staging and detecting recurrence of disease. In order to evaluate PET images properly, it is important to be familiar with the various physiological uptake patterns of FDG, and also to be alert to the possibility of false-positive and false-negative findings. Quantitative values obtained in PET images are widely used for the differentiation of benign and malignant tumors and for monitoring treatment; however, it should be kept in mind that these values may be influenced by many factors. To complement the poorer spatial resolution of PET, a combined PET/CT scanner has been created and its clinical application has begun. It is expected that this imaging tool will be useful and have a great effect on patient management. (author)

  11. Clinical application and future direction in PET technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation describes that F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is crucial to play the major roles in patients with carcinoma in our institute. Positron emission tomography (PET) center consists of one cyclotron (18/9 Cyclone IBA) and PET scanner (Phillips) associated with GSO crystal. FDG-PET is employed to study approximately 3000 patients with carcinoma. We believe that our institute as cancer center in Fukuoka prefecture acts to give the more information prior to therapeutic management of patients in a clinical setting. First, the presentation describes the incidental finding before therapy, staging before surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, the therapeutic effect, the elevation of tumor marker, and the clinical application of FDG-PET in the novel therapy. As noted above, the presentation demonstrates, showing the clinical FDG-PET imaging, how to contribute to patients management. Second, the new PET technology has played for rapid advance in molecular imaging. The advantage of new technique in molecular biology and their integration into nuclear medicine provide a critical opportunity to improve the quality of diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. The presentation briefly addresses the history of molecular imaging and the role as monitoring gene therapy with reporter gene. (author)

  12. Applications of PET CT in clinical practice: Present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Durval Campos

    2007-02-01

    Radionuclide imaging and specially positron emission tomography (PET) has already demonstrated its benefits in three major medical subjects, i.e. neurology, cardiology and particularly clinical oncology. More recently the combination of PET and X-ray computed tomography (CT) as PET-CT led to a significant increment of the already large number of clinical applications of this imaging modality. This "anatomy-metabolic fusion" also known as Metabolic Imaging has its future assured if we can: (1) improve resolution reducing partial volume effect, (2) achieve very fast whole body imaging, (3) obtain accurate quantification of specific functions with higher contrast resolution and, if possible, (4) reduce exposure rates due to the unavoidable use of ionizing radiation.

  13. Necessity and clinical application of diagnostic CT in PET-CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET scanning has a definite clinical impact on diagnosis, initial staging, restaging, monitoring therapeutic effects of malignancies, and on assessment of myocardial viability. Whereas, PET scans has false positive diagnosis and false negative diagnosis of malignant lesions. It leads to reduce specifity in PET imaging. application of diagnostic CT, especially applying contrast enhanced CT scans, three dimensional technique, CTA(CT angiography), CT perfusion and CT virtual endoscopy can realize dominance complementation with PET and CT, PET-CT imaging diagnosis combines with PET and CT diagnostic technique, it improves sensitivity, specifity, and accuracy in clinical application of PET-CT scanner. (authors)

  14. Clinical oncologic applications of PET/MRI: a new horizon

    OpenAIRE

    Partovi, Sasan; Kohan, Andres; Rubbert, Christian; Vercher-Conejero, Jose Luis; Gaeta, Chiara; Yuh, Roger; Zipp, Lisa; Herrmann, Karin A.; Robbin, Mark R.; Lee, Zhenghong; Muzic, Raymond F.; Faulhaber, Peter; Ros, Pablo R

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) leverages the high soft-tissue contrast and the functional sequences of MR with the molecular information of PET in one single, hybrid imaging technology. This technology, which was recently introduced into the clinical arena in a few medical centers worldwide, provides information about tumor biology and microenvironment. Studies on indirect PET/MRI (use of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) images softw...

  15. Clinical Application of 18F-FDG PET in Epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FDG PET has been used as a diagnostic tool for localization of seizure focus for last 2-3 decades. In this article, the clinical usefulness of FDG PET in the management of patients with epilepsy has been reviewed, which provided the evidences to justify the medicare reimbursement for FDG PET in management of patients with epilepsy. Literature review demonstrated that FDG PET provides an important information in localization of seizure focus and determination whether a patients is a surgical candidate or not. FDG PET has been reported to have high diagnostic performance in localization of seizure focus in neocortical epilepsy as well as temporal lobe epilepsy regardless of the presence of structural lesion on MRI. Particularly, FDG PET can provide the additional information when the results from standard diagnositic modality such as interictal or video-monitored EEG, and MRI are inconclusive or discordant, and make to avoid invasive study. Furthermore, the presence of hypometabolism and extent of metabolic extent has been reported as an important predictor for seizure free outcome. However, studies suggested that more accurate localization and better surgical outcome could be expected with multimodal approach by combination of EEG, MRI, and functional studies using FDG PET or perfusion SPECT rather than using a single diagnostic modality in management of patients with epilepsy. Complementary use of FDG PET in management of epilepsy is worth for good surgical outcome in epilepsy patients

  16. Clinical Application of 18F-FDG PET in Urothelial Carcinoma, Vulva and Vaginal Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical experience on FDG PET in urothelial tumors, vulva and vaginal carcinoma is still limited. The main interest of this review is to study a bibliographic review and applications of PET for urothelial tumors, vulva and vaginal carcinoma. The role of positron emission tomography (PET) is still evolving but is likely to be most important in determining early spread of disease in patients with aggressive tumors and for monitoring response to therapy. More extensive clinical investigations are necessary to support this indications

  17. Clinical Application of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in Urothelial Carcinoma, Vulva and Vaginal Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai, Moon Sun [Kwandong University College of Medicine, Koyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Clinical experience on FDG PET in urothelial tumors, vulva and vaginal carcinoma is still limited. The main interest of this review is to study a bibliographic review and applications of PET for urothelial tumors, vulva and vaginal carcinoma. The role of positron emission tomography (PET) is still evolving but is likely to be most important in determining early spread of disease in patients with aggressive tumors and for monitoring response to therapy. More extensive clinical investigations are necessary to support this indications.

  18. Imaging with non-FDG PET tracers: outlook for current clinical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Lopci, Egesta; Nanni, Cristina; Castellucci, Paolo; Montini, Gian Carlo; Allegri, Vincenzo; Rubello, Domenico; Chierichetti, Franca; Ambrosini, Valentina; Fanti, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Apart from the historical and clinical relevance of positron emission tomography (PET) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG), various other new tracers are gaining a remarkable place in functional imaging. Their contribution to clinical decision-making is irreplaceable in several disciplines. In this brief review we aimed to describe the main non-FDG PET tracers based on their clinical relevance and application for patient care.

  19. 'Serial review on clinical PET tracers'. Application of health insurance of [15O]oxygen PET and [18F]FDG-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As regards the application required for health insurance of PET, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare indicates the following procedures: first, request a permission to the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare for the clinical use of the automatic synthetic instrument for PET drug, approved according to the Pharmaceutical Affairs Law. Second, put into practice the use of PET test, under the highly advanced medicine premises. Then, in case of gathered positive results, the health insurance is approved for this PET test. Thus, following the above mentioned procedures, first, the use of [15O] oxygen PET was approved in April 1996. Second, the use of [18F]FDG-PET was approved in 12 different diseases: epilepsy, ischemic heart disease and 10 different types of cancer, in April 2002. Third, in April 2006, a additional 3 types of cancer were approved. Now, we are in the process to get the health insurance of all kinds of malignant tumors (cancer and sarcoma) except for the early gastric cancer. (author)

  20. Clinical Application of {sup 18}F-FDG PET and PET-CT in Adrenal Tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Kyung Hoon; Choi, Duck Joo; Lee, Min Kyung; Choe, Won Sick [Gachon University Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Adrenal tumors are increasingly detected by widespread use of anatomical imaging such as CT, MRI, etc. For these adrenal tumors, differentiation between malignancy and benignancy is very important. In diagnostic assessment of adrenal tumor, {sup 18}F-FDG PET and PET-CT have been reported to have high diagnostic performance, especially, very excellent performance in evaluation of adrenal metastasis in the oncologic patient. In cases of adrenal incidentalomas, {sup 18}F-FDG PET or PET-CT is helpful if CT or chemical-shift MRI is inconclusive. {sup 18}F-FDG PET and PET-CT may be applied to the patients with MIBG-negative pheochromocytomas. In summary, {sup 18}F-FDG PET and PET-CT are expected to be effective diagnostic tools in the management of adrenal tumor.

  1. Clinical applications of PET-CT in nuclear medicine to medical specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This regional training course about Clinical Applications of PET-Tc in nuclear medicine include: imaging, pathology, scintigraphy, computed tomography, radiology, endoscopy, magnetic resonance, biopsy, and histology. It also describes pathologies and diseases of organs and bone structures such as: musculoskeletal and osseous damage, tumors, fibroids, metastasize, neoplasm, adenopathies and cancer of liver, brain, glands, kidney, neck, thorax, lungs, uterus, ovaries, craniums, hypophysis etc

  2. Applications of PET-CT in clinical practice: Present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclide imaging and specially positron emission tomography (PET) has already demonstrated its benefits in three major medical subjects, i.e. neurology, cardiology and particularly clinical oncology. More recently the combination of PET and X-ray computed tomography (CT) as PET-CT led to a significant increment of the already large number of clinical applications of this imaging modality. This 'anatomy-metabolic fusion' also known as Metabolic Imaging has its future assured if we can: (1) improve resolution reducing partial volume effect, (2) achieve very fast whole body imaging (3) obtain accurate quantification of specific functions with higher contrast resolution and, if possible, (4) reduce exposure rates due to the unavoidable use of ionizing radiation

  3. Current preclinical and clinical applications of hypoxia PET imaging using 2-nitroimidazoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypoxia is a common characteristic of solid tumors and is associated with poor prognosis. Positron emission tomography (PET) can visualize tumor hypoxia in a non.invasive 3-dimensional manner and can be used to acquire information longitudinally. Multiple 2-nitroimidazole based PET traces are developed, validated and quantified in the search for the ideal hypoxia tracer and several tracers have shown to reliably represent tumor hypoxia. Furthermore, multiple studies describe the prognostic value of hypoxia PET imaging and ability to monitor hypoxia during treatment. These applications can be of great potential and their role in treatment planning and modification needs to be further assessed with respect to personalized chemo radiation therapy. In this review we focus on the tracers that were positively validated in preclinical and clinical studies and report accurate quantification and visualization of hypoxia. The characteristics of these tracers are summarized for both preclinical and clinical studies. Furthermore the clinical applications of hypoxia PET imaging are addressed with a focus on treatment and the prognostic potential. Also the feasibility studies for hypoxia guided intensity modulated radiation therapy and the patient stratification for hypoxia targeted drugs are assessed.

  4. Failure mode, effects and criticality analysis research on human factors in clinical PET application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To identify the steps with potentially higher risk through the analysis of human factors in clinical PET application so as to provide the efficient measures to reduce the risk of potential exposures. Methods: The basic data were obtained through field investigation, questionnaire,failure mode, risk identification, FMECA and expert's evaluation, with statistical analysis made. Comparison was made of the relative risk values of automatic encapsulation equipment and manual encapsulation ones. Results: The 10 steps with potentially higher risks were identified through analyzing human factors of clinical PET application, of which 8 occurred in the phase of chemical synthesis.The measures to control risk were addressed for the steps with higher risk. The results show that the relative risk value of the clinical process with automatic encapsulation equipment was 2.28 ± 0.99 and the one with manual encapsulation equipment was 3.20 ± 2.01 (t=2.56, P<0.05), with the latter being 76% of the former. Conclusions: Failure mode and FMECA are effective in risk evaluation of clinical PET application, which can provide important basis for risk control. (authors)

  5. The preliminary clinical application of PET/CT on the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of PET/CT on the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. Methods: 46 lung cancer patients including 35 pre-treatment and 11 post-treatment cases. PET/CT fusion images, PET images and CT images of the same patient were analyzed frame by frame. Results: 1) The sensitivity of PET/CT in 35 pre-treated cases reached 100%. Except one case of alveolar carcinoma showed a diffuse uptake in both lungs, the other patients displayed as hypermetabolic nodular or mass lesions with the size around 0.8-9.4 cm and the standardized uptake value (SUV) 4.6 ± 1.94. The position of hypermetabolic lesion of PET finding were all concordant to CT. PET/CT was superior to PET and CT in final diagnosis, delineating the border, detecting tumor invasion and in differentiating lung cancer from atelectasis, obstructive pneumonitis and pleural effusion. Among 11 post-treated cases, no malignancy was seen in 9 cases and in two cases with metastases in both lungs, the lesions were detected definitely by PET/CT. 2)For the staging, PET/CT was also superior to PET and CT alone with the sensitivity of 95.2%(PET/CT), 90.4%(PET), 73.8%(CT) respectively. PET and CT were complemental each other in the detection of the lesions. Obviously, PET was superior to CT in detection of small lymph node metastases, pleura, bone and adrenal metastases. CT was better than PET in detection of small lung metastases. Conclusions: PET/CT is superior to PET and CT alone in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. PET and CT can complement each other. (authors)

  6. Clinical Application of 18F-FDG PET in Alzheimer's Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET of the cerebral metabolic rate of glucose is increasingly used to support the clinical diagnosis in the examination of patients with suspected major neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease. 18F-FDG PET has been reported to have high diagnostic performance, especially, very high sensitivity in the diagnosis and clinical assessment of therapeutic efficacy. According to clinical research data hitherto, 18F-FDG PET is expected to be an effective diagnostic tool in early and differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Since 2004, Medicare covers 18F-FDG PET scans for the differential diagnosis of fronto-temporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) under specific requirements; or, its use in a CMS approved practical clinical trial focused on the utility of 18F-FDG PET in the diagnosis or treatment of dementing neurodegenerative diseases

  7. Clinical Application of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in Alzheimer's Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Young Hoon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    PET of the cerebral metabolic rate of glucose is increasingly used to support the clinical diagnosis in the examination of patients with suspected major neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease. {sup 18}F-FDG PET has been reported to have high diagnostic performance, especially, very high sensitivity in the diagnosis and clinical assessment of therapeutic efficacy. According to clinical research data hitherto, {sup 18}F-FDG PET is expected to be an effective diagnostic tool in early and differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Since 2004, Medicare covers {sup 18}F-FDG PET scans for the differential diagnosis of fronto-temporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) under specific requirements; or, its use in a CMS approved practical clinical trial focused on the utility of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in the diagnosis or treatment of dementing neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Clinical Application of 18F-FDG PET in Multiple Myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review focuses on the clinical use of 18F-FDG PET to evaluate multiple myeloma. 18F-FDG PET is useful for diagnosis, staging of multiple myeloma and differential diagnosis of myeloma related disease such as monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance or plasmacytoma. For therapy response, 18F-FDG PET may be effective after chemotherapy for multiple myeloma and radiotherapy for plasmacytoma

  9. Clinical Application of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in Testicular Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Joon Kee [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    {sup 18}F-FDG PET has a higher diagnostic accuracy than CT in initial staging of testicular cancer. In seminoma, it can discriminate residual tumor from necrosis/fibrosis or mature teratoma. {sup 18}F-FDG PET is also useful for the response evaluation of chemotherapy. However, there's no clinical evidence for the use of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of testicular cancer.

  10. PET/CT-guided biopsies of metabolically active bone lesions: applications and clinical impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klaeser, Bernd; Wartenberg, Jan; Weitzel, Thilo; Krause, Thomas [Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Wiskirchen, Jakub [Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); University Hospital Tuebingen, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, and Nuclear Medicine, Tuebingen (Germany); Schmid, Ralph A. [Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Mueller, Michel D. [Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland)

    2010-11-15

    In a minority of cases a definite diagnosis and stage grouping in cancer patients is not possible based on the imaging information of PET/CT. We report our experience with percutaneous PET/CT-guided bone biopsies to histologically verify the aetiology of hypermetabolic bone lesions. We retrospectively reviewed the data of 20 consecutive patients who underwent multimodal image-guided bone biopsies using a dedicated PET/CT system in a step-by-step technique. Technical and clinical success rates of PET/CT-guided biopsies were evaluated. Questionnaires were sent to the referring physicians to assess the impact of biopsies on patient management and to check the clinical need for PET/CT-guided biopsies. Clinical indications for biopsy were to histologically verify the aetiology of metabolically active bone lesions without a morphological correlate confirming the suspicion of metastases in 15 patients, to determine the origin of suspected metastases in 3 patients and to evaluate the appropriateness of targeted therapy options in 2 patients. Biopsies were technically successful in all patients. In 19 of 20 patients a definite histological diagnosis was possible. No complications or adverse effects occurred. The result of PET/CT-guided bone biopsies determined a change of the planned treatment in overall 56% of patients, with intramodality changes, e.g. chemotherapy with palliative instead of curative intent, and intermodality changes, e.g. systemic therapy instead of surgery, in 22 and 50%, respectively. PET/CT-guided bone biopsies are a promising alternative to conventional techniques to make metabolically active bone lesions - especially without a distinctive morphological correlate - accessible for histological verification. PET/CT-guided biopsies had a major clinical impact in patients who otherwise cannot be reliably stage grouped at the time of treatment decisions. (orig.)

  11. Clinical application of FDG PET for pathological response of breast cancer after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical usefulness of FDG PET in predicting the pathological response in breast cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. 33 patients with newly diagnosed, locally advanced breast cancer had PET scans before and after chemotherapy to assess tumor response, and then pathology was confirmed after surgery. FDG PET for assessing tumor response was done by measuring peak SUV (pSUV) and then calculating reduction rate (RR). RR was stratified into RR complete response (rrCR) at >88% reduction, RR partial response (rrPR) at RR between 56∼87%, and no response (rrNR) in reductions <55%. Clinical assessment was done with physical exams, U/S, and CT. Histopathological response were classified into pathological no response(pNR), pathological partial response (pPR) and pathological complete response (pCR). 15% (5 of 33) patients had pCR, 85% (28 of 33) had pPR. Using a 88% reduction in SUV as a threshold value for differentiation between pCR from pPR, PET scans correctly differentiated pCR in 3 patients out of 5. When using a cut off value of 55% reduction rate, PET scans correctly differentiated pPR in 19 patients out of 21, and for pNR, the PET scans correctly differentiated only 2 patients out of 7. Diagnostic accuracy of PET for pathologic response was 25 out of 33 cases (75.8%). The diagnostic accuracy of clinical assessment was 25 of 33 cases (72.7%). This study suggests that pSUV reduction rate can be a useful tool when predicting the pathological response of primary breast cancers after neo-adjuvant chemotherapy

  12. Integrated 18FDG PET/CT: Utility and Applications in Clinical Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieves Gómez-León

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate diagnosis and staging are essential for an optimal management of cancer patients. Positron emision tomography with 2-deoxy-2-fluorine-18-fluoro-D-glucose (18FDG-PET and, more recently, 18FDG-PET/computed tomography (18FDG-PET/CT have emerged as powerful imaging tools in oncology, because of the valuable functional information they provide. The combined acquisition of PET and CT has synergistic advantages over its isolated constituents and minimizes their limitations. It decreases examination times by 25%–40%, leads to a higher patient throughput and unificates two imaging procedures in a single session. There is evidence that 18FDG-PET/CT is a more accurate test than either of its components for the evaluation of various tumors. It is a particularly valuable tool for detection of recurrence, especially in asymptomatic patients with rising tumor markers and those with negative or equivocal findings on conventional imaging tests. Yet, there are some limitations and areas of uncertainty, mainly regarding the lack of specificity of the 18FDG uptake and the variable 18FDG avidity of some cancers. This article reviews the advantages, limitations and main applications of 18FDG-PET/CT in oncology, with especial emphasis on lung cancer, colorectal cancer, lymphomas, melanoma and head and neck cancers.

  13. 基于文献计量法的我国PET-CT临床应用现状研究%A study on clinical application of PET-CT in China batted on biblioMetrics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟开; 马云川; 陈东红; 熊杰明; 莫陶欣; 王秋樵; 李佳根

    2013-01-01

    Objective:The aim of this study was to promote the clinical application of PET-CT and scientific research,and to realize the clinical application of PET-CT in China.Methods:By using the method of bibliometric,2 528 articles were retrieved by the key words of "PET-CT" or the title of "PET-CT" in CNKI since CNKI was built to February 2013.We carried out statistical analysis based on literature database.Results:The numbers of PET-CT clinical application article and scientific research were increasing year by year,the number of articles in PET-CT of tumor was the largest(1 651 articles,65.4%),the number of articles in PET-CT of lung cancer and gynecological tumor,head and neck neoplasms was the top three.Conclusions:The increase of the number of PET-CT articles is connected with the increase of the number of medical equipment and the regional distribution,PET-CT in clinical application and research in our country presents imbalance,we suggest that PET-CT in clinical application should be developed.%目的:掌握我国PET-CT临床应用现状,为促进PET-CT的临床应用和科学研究提供建议和参考.方法:本研究运用文献计量法,以“PET-CT”为关键词或以“PET-CT"为篇名,在CNKI中国知网上检索出建库以来至2013年2月20日的文献2 528篇,在形成文献数据库的基础上进行计量统计分析.结果:PET-CT临床应用的文章数量和资助课题数量逐年增加,应用于肿瘤领域的文章数量最多(1651篇,占65.4%),其中肺部肿瘤、妇科肿瘤和头颈部肿瘤的文章数量居前3位.结论:PET-CT文章数量的增加与该医疗设备数量的增加及地域分布有关,PET-CT在我国的临床应用及研究呈现出不均衡状态,建议开拓更广泛的PET-CT应用领域.

  14. The clinical application of 18F-FDG PET/CT scan in the thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of thyroid cancer is the top ranking among endocrine carcinoma worldwide. Many imaging modalities have been applied in diagnosing, characterization of the biological behaviors and predicting the outcomes of various thyroid carcinoma. Over the years, 18F-FDG PET/CT has been largely used to identify undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma cells in thyroid carcinoma patients with or without 131I avid lesion. The purpose of this mini-review was to update the clinical role and positive impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT in various thyroid carcinoma patients. (authors)

  15. Clinical impact of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) on oncological patients and their potentially application context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    (PET) Positron Emission Tomography is a technique of nuclear medicine that has ability of detecting cancer through mechanisms based on molecular alterations of neoplastic processes. This review describes the PET Oncology applications and discusses the potential application of this technology in the sanitary and national academic framework . The most widely used in Oncology plotter is an analogue of laglucosa labelled with fluo: 18F-2-fluoro-2-Deoxy-D-glucose (FDG). In this way, the PET detects tumour retention of FDG, due to the highest glycolytic of cancer cells. In addition, the PET allow the study of the entire body at the same exploratory and some teams are coupled to systems of axial tomography (PET-CT). By ET-FDG, it is possible to diagnose, staging and restaged the majority of cancers, with diagnostic accuracy close to 90 per cent higher than the values provided by the conventional imaging techniques such. It is also possible to know early response to cancer treatments and obtain relevant medical prognosis information. (author)

  16. Clinical Application of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in Cervix Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, So Won [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seok Ki [Research Institute and Hospital National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Cervix cancer is one of common gynecological cancers in the world, and staged with FIGO or TNM system. However, these clinical staging systems lack information about lymph node or distant metastases, thus imaging modalities are considered to make an appropriate therapeutic plan and enhance overall survival rate. In this context, FDG PET is recommended to pre-treatment stating and prognosis prediction, for it could noninvasively evaluate the status of lymph nodes, especially abdominal paraaortic nodes which are closely related with prognosis. Moreover, the degree of FDG uptake is correlated with prognosis. Although there is no consistent method for surveillance of cervix cancer, FDG PET seems a very important tool in detecting tumor recurrence because it is much more advantageous than conventional imaging modalities such as MRI for discerning recurrent tumor from fibrosis caused by radiation or surgery. Furthermore, FDG PET could be used to evaluate treatment response. On the other hand, recently introduced PET/CT is expected to play an ancillary role to FIGO staging by adding anatomical information, and enhance diagnostic performance of PET by decreasing false positive findings.

  17. 6-L-(18)F-fluorodihydroxyphenylalanine PET in neuroendocrine tumors : Basic aspects and emerging clinical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, Pieter L.; Chirakal, Raman; Marriott, Christopher J.; Brouwers, Adrienne H.; Koopmans, Klaas Pieter; Gulenchyn, Karen Y.

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, 6-L-(18)F-fluorodihydroxyphenylalanine ((18)F-DOPA) PET has emerged as a new diagnostic tool for the imaging of neuroendocrine tumors. This application is based on the unique property of neuroendocrine tumors to produce and secrete various substances, a process that requires the upt

  18. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Static whole-body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single-bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ∼15–20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole-body PET acquisition protocol of ∼45 min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6 min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (six passes × seven bed positions, each scanned for 45 s). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of ten different clinically

  19. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Lodge, Martin A.; Tahari, Abdel K.; Zhou, Y.; Wahl, Richard L.; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-10-01

    Static whole-body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single-bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ˜15-20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole-body PET acquisition protocol of ˜45 min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6 min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (six passes × seven bed positions, each scanned for 45 s). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of ten different clinically

  20. Clinical application and progress of PET and PET-CT for differential diagnosis of the benign or malignant pulmonary nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To differential diagnosis the benign or malignant of pulmonary nodules is a medical difficult problem. As the development of medical imaging equipment and technology, PET-CT can identified benign or malignant lesions of pulmonary nodules though changes of metabolism. Researches about PET-CT for differential diagnosis pulmonary nodules benign or malignant are reviewed. (authors)

  1. High throughput static and dynamic small animal imaging using clinical PET/CT: potential preclinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aide, Nicolas [Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre and Caen University, Bioticla Team, EA1792, IFR 146 ICORE, GRECAN, Caen (France); Caen University Hospital and Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, PET Unit, Caen (France); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, East Melbourne (Australia); Centre Francois Baclesse, Nuclear Medicine Department, Caen cedex 5 (France); Desmonts, Cedric; Agostini, Denis; Bardet, Stephane; Bouvard, Gerard [Caen University Hospital and Francois Baclesse Cancer Centre, PET Unit, Caen (France); Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu; Roselt, Peter; Neels, Oliver [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, East Melbourne (Australia); Beyer, Thomas [cmi-experts GmbH, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); University Hospital Bern, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Bern (Switzerland); Kinross, Kathryn [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, East Melbourne (Australia); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Sir Donald and Lady Trescowthick Laboratories, East Melbourne (Australia); Hicks, Rodney J. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Molecular Imaging, East Melbourne (Australia); University of Melbourne, The Department of Medicine, Parkville (Australia)

    2010-05-15

    The objective of the study was to evaluate state-of-the-art clinical PET/CT technology in performing static and dynamic imaging of several mice simultaneously. A mouse-sized phantom was imaged mimicking simultaneous imaging of three mice with computation of recovery coefficients (RCs) and spillover ratios (SORs). Fifteen mice harbouring abdominal or subcutaneous tumours were imaged on clinical PET/CT with point spread function (PSF) reconstruction after injection of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose or [18F]fluorothymidine. Three of these mice were imaged alone and simultaneously at radial positions -5, 0 and 5 cm. The remaining 12 tumour-bearing mice were imaged in groups of 3 to establish the quantitative accuracy of PET data using ex vivo gamma counting as the reference. Finally, a dynamic scan was performed in three mice simultaneously after the injection of {sup 68}Ga-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). For typical lesion sizes of 7-8 mm phantom experiments indicated RCs of 0.42 and 0.76 for ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) and PSF reconstruction, respectively. For PSF reconstruction, SOR{sub air} and SOR{sub water} were 5.3 and 7.5%, respectively. A strong correlation (r {sup 2} = 0.97, p < 0.0001) between quantitative data obtained in mice imaged alone and simultaneously in a group of three was found following PSF reconstruction. The correlation between ex vivo counting and PET/CT data was better with PSF reconstruction (r {sup 2} = 0.98; slope = 0.89, p < 0.0001) than without (r {sup 2} = 0.96; slope = 0.62, p < 0.001). Valid time-activity curves of the blood pool, kidneys and bladder could be derived from {sup 68}Ga-EDTA dynamic acquisition. New generation clinical PET/CT can be used for simultaneous imaging of multiple small animals in experiments requiring high throughput and where a dedicated small animal PET system is not available. (orig.)

  2. Clinical application of PET/CT in diagnosis and staging of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer: comparison with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical value of integrated positron-emission tomography and computed tomography(PET/CT) in diagnosis and Staging of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and to compare the diagnostic and Staging accuracy with PET alone. Methods: PET/CT was performed in 42 patients (6 women, 36 men; mean age ±SD, 57.9 ±12.7 y) with proven or suspected non-small-cell lung cancer. All studies were retrospectively reviewed by two moderately experienced physicians unaware of the clinical information. PET/CT and PET images were evaluated independently and separately. Focal fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake on attenuation-corrected PET images was scored on a 5-point scale (0 = definitely benign, 1 = probably benign, 2 = equivocal, 3 = probably malignant, 4 = definitely malignant). PET/CT images were then reviewed. Comparison was performed on a lesion-by-lesion basis. Accuracy was evaluated on the basis of follow-up, histopathologic findings or at least one other imaging method. Tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage was assigned on the basis of image analysis. Results: A total of 201 foci with abnormal FDG uptake were noted, two of which were seen only on PET/CT images. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detection of primary cancer were 94, 100, and 95% with PET/CT. PET/CT provided additional information over the separate interpretation of PET and CT in 24 patients (57%) with 57 sites (28%). In comparison with PET, the frequency of equivocal and probable lesion characterization was reduced by 57% (63 to 27) with PET/CT The frequency of definite lesion characterization was increased by 23% (141 to 174) with PET/CT Overall correct staging increased from 81% to 89% with PET/CT on a patient-by-patient analysis. Conclusions: Compare to PET alone, PET/CT improves the accuracy in the diagnosis and staging of non-small-cell lung cancer. More definitely normal and definitely abnormal lesions were identified with PET/CT than with PET alone. (authors)

  3. FDG PET/CT in infection and inflammation—current and emerging clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integrated positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with the glucose analogue, 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG), is an evolving hybrid imaging technique in the evaluation of an important and diverse group of pathological conditions, which are characterised by infection and aseptic inflammation. With a rapidly expanding body of evidence, it is being increasingly recognised that, in addition to its established role in oncological imaging, FDG PET/CT also has clinical utility in suspected infection and inflammation. The technique can identify the source of infection or inflammation in a timely fashion ahead of morphological changes on conventional anatomical imaging techniques, such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), map the extent and severity of disease, identify sites for tissue sampling, and assess therapy response. FDG PET/CT exhibits distinct advantages over traditional radionuclide imaging techniques in terms of shorter duration of examination, higher spatial resolution, non-invasive nature of acquisition, ability to perform quantitative analyses, and the provision of a synergistic combination of functional and anatomical imaging. With the use of illustrative clinico-radiological cases, this article discusses the current and emerging evidence for the use of FDG PET/CT in a broad spectrum of disorders, such as fever of unknown origin, sarcoidosis, large vessel vasculitis, musculoskeletal infections, joint prosthesis or implant-related complications, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related infections, and miscellaneous indications, such as IgG4-related systemic disease. It will also briefly summarise the role of more novel tracers such as FDG-labelled leukocytes and gallium-68 PET tracers in this arena

  4. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and its application in clinical diagnosis and functional brain organization studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in positron emission tomography (PET) and other brain-imaging techniques have made it possible to visualize the working brain while the human subject is thinking, speaking or planning an action. PET provides researches with an opportunity to infer the neuroanatomy of a given function. Subjects either inhale or are injected with a radioactive material that binds to a physiologically active compound in the body. This serves as a tracer of blood flow and metabolic processes that reflect the activation of a given structure by emitting gamma rays which may be detected through a tomograph. PET research has produced findings that extend our knowledge on several important issues such as cerebral representation of language, perception, attention or memory. It has also proven to be an important source of information for clinical diagnosis of various neurological and psychiatric diseases. The present article provides a short review of main achievements in those fields. However, functional brain imaging is not exempt from methodological and theoretical difficulties. The main limitations of the method have been outlined. (author)

  5. The clinical application value of PET/CT in adenocarcinoma with bronchioloalveolar carcinoma features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of our study was to demonstrate the clinical usefulness of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for adenocarcinoma with bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) features, through evaluating the relationship between the intrathoracic lymph node metastases and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), tumor size of the primary tumor and the ratio of BAC component and analysing the correlation of SUVmax, tumor size and the ratio of BAC component. This was a retrospective study. Forty-five patients with focal peripheral lung adenocarcinoma with BAC features were included in this study and underwent the PET/CT scan. Twenty-one patients were women and 24 were men. None of the patients had insulin-dependent diabetes and the serum glucose levels in all patients just before 18F-FDG was injected were less than 120 mg/dl. The diagnosis of the lesion was made by surgical histopathology. All patients underwent successful surgery, and pathologic examination confirmed that 34 of 118 excised nodal groups in 18 patients were proved to be positive for malignancy. Univariate analysis revealed 3 potential factors related to intrathoracic lymph node metastases: SUVmax (P=0.002); the ratio of BAC component (P=0.002); maximum dimension of a tumor on mediastinal window setting images (mDmax, P=0.025). The maximum dimension of a tumor on pulmonary window setting images (pDmax, P=0.373) had no significance. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve based on SUVmax, mDmax and the ratio of BAC component was constructed, the area under curve (AUC) was 85.2, 70.3 and 81.5% separately. There was no statistical significance between AUC of SUVmax and AUC of the ratio of BAC component (Z=0.901, P=0.368). The AUC of SUVmax and AUC of the ratio of BAC component were significantly higher than AUC of mDmax (Z=2.112, P=0.035; Z=2.016, P=0.042). The SUVmax and the ratio of BAC component had significant inverse correlation (r=-0.85, P<0.01). The mDmax and the ratio of BAC

  6. Medical application of PET technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, C. W.; An, S. H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Yang, S. D.; Jun, G. S. and others

    1999-04-01

    We performed following studies using PET technology: 1. Clinical usefulness of [{sup 18}F]FDG whole body PET in malignant disease 2. Clinical usefulness of quantitative evaluation of F-18-FDG 3. Pilot study of C-11 methionine PET in brain tumor 4. PET study in patients with Parkinson's disease 5. A study on the clinical myocardial PET image. PET gives various metabolic information for the living human body, and is very important, new diagnostic modality. The PET study will give us the information of cancer patients such as early detection of cancer, staging, recurrence detection and characterization of cancer. The quantitative analysis using PET could be applied to evaluate the pathophysiology of various diseases and develop new drugs and develop new radiopharmaceuticals.

  7. Medical application of PET technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We performed following studies using PET technology: 1. Clinical usefulness of [18F]FDG whole body PET in malignant disease 2. Clinical usefulness of quantitative evaluation of F-18-FDG 3. Pilot study of C-11 methionine PET in brain tumor 4. PET study in patients with Parkinson's disease 5. A study on the clinical myocardial PET image. PET gives various metabolic information for the living human body, and is very important, new diagnostic modality. The PET study will give us the information of cancer patients such as early detection of cancer, staging, recurrence detection and characterization of cancer. The quantitative analysis using PET could be applied to evaluate the pathophysiology of various diseases and develop new drugs and develop new radiopharmaceuticals

  8. Clinical Application of 18F-FDG PET in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common primary tumor in the liver. FDG PET has been applied for staging and treatment planning of hepatocellular carcinoma. It could reflect tumor prognosis because glucose metabolism assessed by FDG PET is known to have correlations with the differentiation and aggressiveness of the tumor. Although the ability of FDG PET to detect well-differentiated or low grade tumors and intra-hepatic lesions is not good, it is expected to play a major role in pre-surgical assessments for liver transplantation because it is useful in detecting extra-hepatic lesions and unexpected distant metastases with a better diagnostic performance than other conventional imaging modalities. Additionally, FDG PET has an advantage to screen other cancers through whole body scanning. As a new tracer for PET, Acetate demonstrates higher sensitivity and specificity to FDG in evaluating hepatocellular carcinoma. It thus seems that simultaneous use of Acetate PET with FDG PET could be helpful in diagnosis, especially detecting extra-hepatic metastases

  9. Clinical application of FDG-PET/CT for occult primary cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to assess the role of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in the identification of occult primary cancers. The study population consisted of 39 consecutive patients with histologically proven metastatic disease or diagnosed by conventional procedures (CT or MRI). PET/CT imaging was performed in all patients 1 hour after administration of 3.75 MBq/kg of fluorodeoxyglucose with a whole-body field of view. PET/CT detected the occult primary cancer in 31 cases (79.4%), showing higher sensitivity than other reports. PET/CT was able to depict more primary tumors, though not significantly, than either of the other imaging modalities. (author)

  10. Clinical Application of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in Nonmelanomatous Skin Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Joon Kee [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Nonmelanomatous skin cancer includes basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, merkel cell carcinoma and dermatofibrosarcoma protuberance. So far, there have been a few reports that {sup 18}F-FDG PET was useful in the evaluation of metastasis and therapeutic response in nonmelanomatous skin cancer, however, those are very weak evidences. Therefore, further studies on the usefulness of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in nonmelanomatous skin cancer are required.

  11. Clinical Application of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in Malignant Mesothelioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Jeong [Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) has a poor prognosis and a strong association with exposure to asbestos. Although there are not generally accepted guidelines for treatment of MPM, recent reports suggest that multimodality therapy combining chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery can improve the survival of patients with MPM. Therefore exact staging is required to decide the best treatment option. However, it is well known that there are many difficulties in determining precise preoperative stage, predicting prognosis, and monitoring response to therapy with conventional imaging modalities such as CT and MRI in MPM. Recently PET with {sup 18}F-FDG comes into the spotlight as an important staging method. There is increasing evidence that PET is superior to other conventional imaging modalities in diagnosis and staging of MPM. Particularly PET/CT improves the diagnostic and staging accuracy over PET or CT alone in MPM because it provides anatomic imaging data as well as functional information. PET and PET/CT are also useful for monitoring response to therapy and SUV is reported as a prognostic factor in MPM.

  12. (18)F-FDG PET/CT quantification in head and neck squamous cell cancer: principles, technical issues and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manca, Gianpiero; Vanzi, Eleonora; Rubello, Domenico; Giammarile, Francesco; Grassetto, Gaia; Wong, Ka Kit; Perkins, Alan C; Colletti, Patrick M; Volterrani, Duccio

    2016-07-01

    (18)F-FDG PET/CT plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC). The major clinical applications of this method include diagnosing an unknown primary tumour, identifying regional lymph node involvement and distant metastases, and providing prognostic information. (18)F-FDG PET/CT is also used for precise delineation of the tumour volume for radiation therapy planning and dose painting, and for treatment response monitoring, by detecting residual or recurrent disease. Most of these applications would benefit from a quantitative approach to the disease, but the quantitative capability of (18)F-FDG PET/CT is still underused in HNSCC. Innovations in PET/CT technology promise to overcome the issues that until now have hindered the employment of dynamic procedures in clinical practice and have limited "quantification" to the evaluation of standardized uptake values (SUV), de facto a semiquantitative parameter, the limits of which are well known to the nuclear medicine community. In this paper the principles of quantitative imaging and the related technical issues are reviewed so that professionals involved in HNSCC management can reflect on the advantages of "true" quantification. A discussion is then presented on how semiquantitative information is currently used in clinical (18)F-FDG PET/CT applications in HNSCC, by discussing the improvements that could be obtained with more advanced and "personalized" quantification techniques. PMID:26780912

  13. 18F-FDG PET/CT quantification in head and neck squamous cell cancer: principles, technical issues and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    18F-FDG PET/CT plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC). The major clinical applications of this method include diagnosing an unknown primary tumour, identifying regional lymph node involvement and distant metastases, and providing prognostic information. 18F-FDG PET/CT is also used for precise delineation of the tumour volume for radiation therapy planning and dose painting, and for treatment response monitoring, by detecting residual or recurrent disease. Most of these applications would benefit from a quantitative approach to the disease, but the quantitative capability of 18F-FDG PET/CT is still underused in HNSCC. Innovations in PET/CT technology promise to overcome the issues that until now have hindered the employment of dynamic procedures in clinical practice and have limited ''quantification'' to the evaluation of standardized uptake values (SUV), de facto a semiquantitative parameter, the limits of which are well known to the nuclear medicine community. In this paper the principles of quantitative imaging and the related technical issues are reviewed so that professionals involved in HNSCC management can reflect on the advantages of ''true'' quantification. A discussion is then presented on how semiquantitative information is currently used in clinical 18F-FDG PET/CT applications in HNSCC, by discussing the improvements that could be obtained with more advanced and ''personalized'' quantification techniques. (orig.)

  14. PET/CT and PET - application in pediatric oncology; PET/CT und PET - Einsatz in der paediatrischen Onkologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzius, C.; Lang, K.; Schober, O. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Univ. Muenster (Germany); Wormanns, D. [Inst. fuer klinische Radiologie, Univ. Muenster (Germany); Vormoor, J. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Kinder- und Jugendmedizin - Paediatrische Haematologie und Onkologie, Univ. Muenster (Germany)

    2004-12-01

    PET-CT is a new imaging technology with a high capability to improve oncologic imaging. Introduction into clinical practise started approximately 3 years ago. Consequently, the available literature data are preliminary. There are no studies concerning PET-CT in pediatric patients. Nevertheless, it can already be supposed that the synthesis of structural and metabolic information improves the accuracy of staging and has the realistic potential to change patient management in a relevant percentage rate in pediatric patients. In this article, the advantages and special features of the application of PET-CT in young oncologic patients are pointed out. Potential clinical applications of PET-CT in this patient group include Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas, Ewing tumors, osteosarcomas, rhabdomyosarcomas and neuroblastomas. (orig.)

  15. Clinical Application of 18F-FDG PET in Parkinson's Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. It is slowly progressive disease that affects a small area of cells in the mid brain known as the substantia nigra. Gradual degeneration of these cells causes a reduction in a vital chemical known as dopamine. In the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, it has difficulty in biopsy and limits in radiologic modalities. 18F-FDG PET shows various findings from normal to diffuse decrement of FDG uptake. 18F-FDG PET is expected to be a evaluation tool in the treatment of Parkinson's disease

  16. PET imaging in pediatric neuroradiology: current and future applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sunhee [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Salamon, Noriko [UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Radiology, Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Jackson, Hollie A.; Blueml, Stefan [Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Radiology, Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Panigrahy, Ashok [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Keck School of Medicine of USC, Department of Radiology, Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Molecular imaging with positron emitting tomography (PET) is widely accepted as an essential part of the diagnosis and evaluation of neoplastic and non-neoplastic disease processes. PET has expanded its role from the research domain into clinical application for oncology, cardiology and neuropsychiatry. More recently, PET is being used as a clinical molecular imaging tool in pediatric neuroimaging. PET is considered an accurate and noninvasive method to study brain activity and to understand pediatric neurological disease processes. In this review, specific examples of the clinical use of PET are given with respect to pediatric neuroimaging. The current use of co-registration of PET with MR imaging is exemplified in regard to pediatric epilepsy. The current use of PET/CT in the evaluation of head and neck lymphoma and pediatric brain tumors is also reviewed. Emerging technologies including PET/MRI and neuroreceptor imaging are discussed. (orig.)

  17. PET/CT image registration: Preliminary tests for its application to clinical dosimetry in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quality of dosimetry in radiotherapy treatment requires the accurate delimitation of the gross tumor volume. This can be achieved by complementing the anatomical detail provided by CT images through fusion with other imaging modalities that provide additional metabolic and physiological information. Therefore, use of multiple imaging modalities for radiotherapy treatment planning requires an accurate image registration method. This work describes tests carried out on a Discovery LS positron emission/computed tomography (PET/CT) system by General Electric Medical Systems (GEMS), for its later use to obtain images to delimit the target in radiotherapy treatment. Several phantoms have been used to verify image correlation, in combination with fiducial markers, which were used as a system of external landmarks. We analyzed the geometrical accuracy of two different fusion methods with the images obtained with these phantoms. We first studied the fusion method used by the PET/CT system by GEMS (hardware fusion) on the basis that there is satisfactory coincidence between the reconstruction centers in CT and PET systems; and secondly the fiducial fusion, a registration method, by means of least-squares fitting algorithm of a landmark points system. The study concluded with the verification of the centroid position of some phantom components in both imaging modalities. Centroids were estimated through a calculation similar to center-of-mass, weighted by the value of the CT number and the uptake intensity in PET. The mean deviations found for the hardware fusion method were: vertical bar Δx vertical bar ±σ=3.3 mm±1.0 mm and vertical bar Δy vertical bar ±σ=3.6 mm±1.0 mm. These values were substantially improved upon applying fiducial fusion based on external landmark points: vertical bar Δx vertical bar ±σ=0.7 mm±0.8 mm and vertical bar Δy vertical bar ±σ=0.3 mm±1.7 mm. We also noted that differences found for each of the fusion methods were similar for

  18. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT quantification in head and neck squamous cell cancer: principles, technical issues and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manca, Gianpiero; Volterrani, Duccio [University Hospital of Pisa, Regional Center of Nuclear Medicine, Pisa (Italy); Vanzi, Eleonora [University Hospital of Siena, Service of Medical Physics, Siena (Italy); Rubello, Domenico; Grassetto, Gaia [Santa Maria della Misericordia Rovigo Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rovigo (Italy); Giammarile, Francesco [Faculte Charles Merieux, Medecine Nucleaire, Centre Hospitalier and Biophysique, Lyon (France); Wong, Ka Kit [University of Michigan Hospital, Nuclear Medicine/Radiology Department, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Nuclear Medicine Service, Department of Veterans Affairs Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Perkins, Alan C. [University of Nottingham, Department of Radiological Sciences, School of Medicine, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Colletti, Patrick M. [Southern University of California, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-07-15

    {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC). The major clinical applications of this method include diagnosing an unknown primary tumour, identifying regional lymph node involvement and distant metastases, and providing prognostic information. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT is also used for precise delineation of the tumour volume for radiation therapy planning and dose painting, and for treatment response monitoring, by detecting residual or recurrent disease. Most of these applications would benefit from a quantitative approach to the disease, but the quantitative capability of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT is still underused in HNSCC. Innovations in PET/CT technology promise to overcome the issues that until now have hindered the employment of dynamic procedures in clinical practice and have limited ''quantification'' to the evaluation of standardized uptake values (SUV), de facto a semiquantitative parameter, the limits of which are well known to the nuclear medicine community. In this paper the principles of quantitative imaging and the related technical issues are reviewed so that professionals involved in HNSCC management can reflect on the advantages of ''true'' quantification. A discussion is then presented on how semiquantitative information is currently used in clinical {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT applications in HNSCC, by discussing the improvements that could be obtained with more advanced and ''personalized'' quantification techniques. (orig.)

  19. Cost-effective analysis of PET application in NSCLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of PET and CT application for diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in China. Methods: Using decision analysis method the diagnostic efficiency of PET and CT for diagnosis of NSCLC in china was analysed. And also the value of cost for accurate diagnosis (CAD), cost for accurate staging (CAS) and cost for effective therapy (CAT) was calculated. Results: (1) For the accurate diagnosis, CT was much more cost-effective than PET. (2) For the accurate staging, CT was still more cost-effective than PET. (3) For the all over diagnostic and therapeutic cost, PET was more cost-effective than CT. (4) The priority of PET to CT was for the diagnosis of stage I NSCLC. Conclusion: For the management of NSCLC patient in China, CT is more cost-effective for screening, whereas PET for clinical staging and monitoring therapeutic effect. (authors)

  20. Workshop on the production, application and clinical translation of “non-standard” PET nuclides: a meeting report

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, J. S.; Welch, M J; Tang, L.

    2007-01-01

    A one-day satellite workshop was organized to coincide with the 17th International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Sciences held in Aachen, Germany, April 30-May 4, 2007. The workshop, “Production and application of ‘non-standard’ PET nuclides”, was held on Sunday April 29, 2007 at the Eurogress Aachen and was organized by J. Lewis, PhD, L. Tang, and M. Welch, PhD. The workshop was designed for the radiopharmaceutical community discussing the production, use and dissemination of the “non-sta...

  1. Clinical application of FDG PET to lung and esophageal cancer. The use of FDG PET for nodal staging of non-small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, Hee Jong

    1998-12-01

    Positron tomography (PET) using fluorine-18 deoxyglucose (FDG), showing increased FDG uptake and retention in malignancy cells, has been proven useful to differentiate malignant from benign tissue. We undertook the prospective study to compare the accuracy of whole-bocy FDG PET with that of conventional chest computed tomography (CT) for the nodal staging of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). FDG PET and contrast enhanced CT were performed in 36 patients with potentially resectable NSCLC. Each imaging study was evaluated independently, and nodal stations were localized according to American Thoracic Society mapping system. Extensive lymph node dissection (1101 nodes) of ipsi- and contralateral mediastinal nodal stations was performed at thoracotomy and /or mediastinoscopy. Imaging findings were correlated with histopathologic staging results and analyzed with McNema test (p) and Kappa value(k). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of CT for ipsilatreal mediastinal nodal staging were 38 % , 68 % , 25%, 79%, 61% and those of PET were 88%, 71%, 47%, 95%, 75% (p>0.05, K=0.29). When analyzed by individual nodal group (superior, aortopulmonary window, and inferior), the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of CT were 27%, 82%, 22%, 85%, 73% and those of PET were 60%, 87%, 92%, 82% (p<0.05, k=0.27). FDG PET in addition to CT appears to be superior to CT alone for mediastinal staging of non-small cell lung cancer.

  2. Automated radiochemical processing for clinical PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Siemens RDS 112, an automated radiochemical production and delivery system designed to support a clinical PET program, consists of an 11 MeV, proton only, negative ion cyclotron, a shield, a computer, and targetry and chemical processing modules to produce radiochemicals used in PET imaging. The principal clinical PET tracers are [18F]FDG, [13N]ammonia and [15O]water. Automated synthesis of [18F]FDG is achieved using the Chemistry Process Control Unit (CPCU), a general purpose valve-and-tubing device that emulates manual processes while allowing for competent operator intervention. Using function-based command file software, this pressure-driven synthesis system carries out chemical processing procedures by timing only, without process-based feedback. To date, nine CPCUs have installed at seven institutions resulting in 1,200+ syntheses of [18F]FDG, with an average yield of 55% (EOB)

  3. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and breast cancer in clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavayssiere, Robert [Centre d' Imagerie Paris-Nord, 1, avenue Charles Peguy, 95200 Sarcelles (France); Institut du Sein Henri Hartmann (ISHH), 1, rue des Dames Augustines, 92200 Neuilly sur Seine (France)], E-mail: cab.lav@wanadoo.fr; Cabee, Anne-Elizabeth [Centre d' Imagerie Paris-Nord, 1, avenue Charles Peguy, 95200 Sarcelles (France); Institut du Sein Henri Hartmann (ISHH), 1, rue des Dames Augustines, 92200 Neuilly sur Seine (France); Centre RMX, 80, avenue Felix Faure, 75105 Paris (France); Filmont, Jean-Emmanuel [Institut du Sein Henri Hartmann (ISHH), 1, rue des Dames Augustines, 92200 Neuilly sur Seine (France); American Hospital of Paris, Nuclear Medicine, 63, boulevard Victor Hugo - BP 109, 92202 Neuilly sur Seine Cedex (France)

    2009-01-15

    The landscape of oncologic practice has changed deeply during the past few years and there is now a need, through a multidisciplinary approach, for imaging to provide accurate evaluation of morphology and function and to guide treatment (Image Guided Therapy). Increasing emphasis has been put on Position Emission Tomography (PET) role in various cancers among clinicians and patients despite a general context of healthcare expenditure limitation. Positron Emission Tomography has currently a limited role in breast cancer, but also general radiologists and specialists should be aware of these indications, especially when staging aggressive cancers and looking for recurrence. Currently, the hybrid systems associating PET and Computed Tomography (CT) and in the same device [Rohren EM, Turkington TG, Coleman RE. Clinical applications of PET in oncology. Radiology 2004;231:305-32; Blodgett TM, Meltzer CM, Townsend DW. PET/CT: form and function. Radiology 2007;242:360-85; von Schulthess GK, Steinert HC, Hany TF. Integrated PET/CT: current applications and futures directions. Radiology 2006;238(2):405-22], or PET-CT, are more commonly used and the two techniques are adding their potentialities. Other techniques, MRI in particular, may also compete with PET in some instance and as far as ionizing radiations dose limitation is considered, some breast cancers becoming some form of a chronic disease. Breast cancer is a very complex, non-uniform, disease and molecular imaging at large may contribute to a better knowledge and to new drugs development. Ongoing research, Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and new tracers, are likely to bring improvements in patient care [Kelloff GJ, Hoffman JM, Johnson B, et al. Progress and promise of FDG-PET Imaging for cancer patient management and oncologic drug development. Clin Cancer Res 2005;1(April (8)): 2005].

  4. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and breast cancer in clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The landscape of oncologic practice has changed deeply during the past few years and there is now a need, through a multidisciplinary approach, for imaging to provide accurate evaluation of morphology and function and to guide treatment (Image Guided Therapy). Increasing emphasis has been put on Position Emission Tomography (PET) role in various cancers among clinicians and patients despite a general context of healthcare expenditure limitation. Positron Emission Tomography has currently a limited role in breast cancer, but also general radiologists and specialists should be aware of these indications, especially when staging aggressive cancers and looking for recurrence. Currently, the hybrid systems associating PET and Computed Tomography (CT) and in the same device [Rohren EM, Turkington TG, Coleman RE. Clinical applications of PET in oncology. Radiology 2004;231:305-32; Blodgett TM, Meltzer CM, Townsend DW. PET/CT: form and function. Radiology 2007;242:360-85; von Schulthess GK, Steinert HC, Hany TF. Integrated PET/CT: current applications and futures directions. Radiology 2006;238(2):405-22], or PET-CT, are more commonly used and the two techniques are adding their potentialities. Other techniques, MRI in particular, may also compete with PET in some instance and as far as ionizing radiations dose limitation is considered, some breast cancers becoming some form of a chronic disease. Breast cancer is a very complex, non-uniform, disease and molecular imaging at large may contribute to a better knowledge and to new drugs development. Ongoing research, Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and new tracers, are likely to bring improvements in patient care [Kelloff GJ, Hoffman JM, Johnson B, et al. Progress and promise of FDG-PET Imaging for cancer patient management and oncologic drug development. Clin Cancer Res 2005;1(April (8)): 2005

  5. PET imaging clinical trials: standards for good image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Imaging holds a promising place in the drug development process and clinical trials. In recent times, scientists and researchers have realized that imaging enables them to look for new surrogate endpoints and accelerate the process of drug development. As the number of such trials is increasing every year, there is a growing awareness for the need of quality in imaging trials, so as to avoid imaging issues, reduce losses due to non-evaluable imaging and improve subject safety. This paper is an attempt to address the need of standards for good quality image in clinical trials which use imaging. The main focus of the paper is to describe the various acquisition options in PET-CT available for medical imaging, their applicability in drug development process and clinical trials, emphasize the need to identify possible sources that could possibly impact the quality of images, ways of standardizing the equipments and minimizing the variability of different scanners. Additionally this paper will look into the importance of an expert medical imaging group, imaging protocols, quality assurance programs, and image assessment post acquisition for technical compliance and image quality. A reference of standards as prescribed by various scientific bodies and organizations will also be reviewed. In this paper the focus will be mainly to discuss aspects of PET-CT imaging in clinical trials. PET-CT has the potential to be best for response monitoring to therapy and early detection of disease compared to all other imaging modalities such as CT, MRI, gamma camera, SPECT, ultrasonography etc. In research, PET imaging can help in understanding the pharmacokinetics of a molecule, i.e. kinetic modeling and provides various imaging options, qualitative and quantitative. PET-CT provides anatomical as well as functional information and has the potential to be highly reproducible. The paper emphasizes good imaging practices and its relevance, especially when we are not just

  6. Clinical PET activities in European and Asia-Oceanian Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical diagnosis using positron emission tomography (PET) requires high costs. Therefore, sociomedical evaluation is very important for spread of clinical PET. In this report, sociomedical situation in European and Asia-Oceanian countries, especially concerning transportation of 18F-FDG and reimbursement of medical costs for clinical PET indications, is reported. It seems that UK, Germany and Belgium are the most advanced in clinical PET in Europe. In these countries, many PET investigations are reimbursed though systems are different among the countries. In UK, both public and private insurance gives authorization for clinical PET to some extent. In Germany, private health insurance companies give authorization but public insurance has not. In Belgium, private health insurance does not exist and public insurance gives authorization for clinical PET. Other European countries seem to be in transitional stages. Transportation of 18F-FDG has been already started in almost every country in Europe and Asia-Oceania. In Japan, neither transportation of FDG nor full reimbursement of clinical PET has not started yet and this situation seems to be exceptional. To promote clinical PET in Japan, there is the need of at least establishing a list of clinical indications for PET investigations and establishing commercial-based 18F-FDG supplying system. They could be regarded as a kind of infrastructure for spread of clinical PET. (author)

  7. Clinical PET: changing the practice of oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until recently positron emission tomography (PET) has been largely confined to academic institutions with the capital and human resources to support this technologically advanced modality. More recently its utility in oncology has fuelled the wider dissemination of this modality into routine clinical practice. Small animal PET scanners allow tracers to be validated prior to use in human subjects. The Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute clinical PET program began operation in 1996 and since that time has grown to be the first Australian centre with 2 PET scanners, including the first combined PET/CT. Although the majority of the almost 10,000 studies performed in our facility have utilised FDG, new tracers are increasingly being used in clinical trials, particularly for therapeutic monitoring of novel chemotherapeutic agents. In establishing our facility we have sought to influence referral patterns to those situations where epidemiological and case control data suggest that conventional diagnostic algorithms currently fail us. This is particularly the case in situation where recognition of this failure leads to routine use of either a morbid procedure or treatment in an entire population of patients, even in the absence of abnormality after conventional staging. For example, CT scanning is recognised to have insufficient accuracy for staging the status of mediastinal lymph node spread of non-small cell lung cancer to determine operability. Accordingly, a large number of patients undergo mediastinoscopy and pathological sampling of lymph nodes. Other patients are subjected to futile open and close thoracotomies due to incorrect staging. FDG PET has convincingly been shown to be more accurate than CT for staging the mediastinum and in a recent randomised control trial was shown to significantly reduce unnecessary thoractomies. By trying to limit the use of PET to situations where a range of different management options are available depending on the true extent of

  8. PET: functional imaging applications in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis, staging and management of tumors. At present, its principal application is in lung cancer, but interest in other applications is growing rapidly. (orig.)

  9. Joint PET-MR respiratory motion models for clinical PET motion correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manber, Richard; Thielemans, Kris; Hutton, Brian F; Wan, Simon; McClelland, Jamie; Barnes, Anna; Arridge, Simon; Ourselin, Sébastien; Atkinson, David

    2016-09-01

    Patient motion due to respiration can lead to artefacts and blurring in positron emission tomography (PET) images, in addition to quantification errors. The integration of PET with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in PET-MR scanners provides complementary clinical information, and allows the use of high spatial resolution and high contrast MR images to monitor and correct motion-corrupted PET data. In this paper we build on previous work to form a methodology for respiratory motion correction of PET data, and show it can improve PET image quality whilst having minimal impact on clinical PET-MR protocols. We introduce a joint PET-MR motion model, using only 1 min per PET bed position of simultaneously acquired PET and MR data to provide a respiratory motion correspondence model that captures inter-cycle and intra-cycle breathing variations. In the model setup, 2D multi-slice MR provides the dynamic imaging component, and PET data, via low spatial resolution framing and principal component analysis, provides the model surrogate. We evaluate different motion models (1D and 2D linear, and 1D and 2D polynomial) by computing model-fit and model-prediction errors on dynamic MR images on a data set of 45 patients. Finally we apply the motion model methodology to 5 clinical PET-MR oncology patient datasets. Qualitative PET reconstruction improvements and artefact reduction are assessed with visual analysis, and quantitative improvements are calculated using standardised uptake value (SUV(peak) and SUV(max)) changes in avid lesions. We demonstrate the capability of a joint PET-MR motion model to predict respiratory motion by showing significantly improved image quality of PET data acquired before the motion model data. The method can be used to incorporate motion into the reconstruction of any length of PET acquisition, with only 1 min of extra scan time, and with no external hardware required. PMID:27524409

  10. TH-A-17A-01: Innovation in PET Instrumentation and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innovation in PET instrumentation has led to the new millennium revolutionary imaging applications for diagnosis, therapeutic guidance, and development of new molecular imaging probes, etc. However, after several decades innovations, will the advances of PET technology and applications continue with the same trend and pace? What will be the next big thing beyond the PET/CT, PET/MRI, and Time-of-flight PET? How will the PET instrumentation and imaging performance be further improved by novel detector research and advanced imaging system development? Or will the development of new algorithms and methodologies extend the limit of current instrumentation and leapfrog the imaging quality and quantification for practical applications? The objective of this session is to present an overview of current status and advances in the PET instrumentation and applications with speakers from leading academic institutes and a major medical imaging company. Presenting with both academic research projects and commercial technology developments, this session will provide a glimpse of some latest advances and challenges in the field, such as using semiconductor photon-sensor based PET detectors to improve performance and enable new applications, as well as the technology trend that may lead to the next breakthrough in PET imaging for clinical and preclinical applications. Both imaging and image-guided therapy subjects will be discussed. Learning Objectives: Describe the latest innovations in PET instrumentation and applications Understand the driven force behind the PET instrumentation innovation and development Learn the trend of PET technology development for applications

  11. TH-A-17A-01: Innovation in PET Instrumentation and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, M [Siemens Healthcare, Knoxville, Tennessee (United States); Miyaoka, R [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Shao, Y [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Innovation in PET instrumentation has led to the new millennium revolutionary imaging applications for diagnosis, therapeutic guidance, and development of new molecular imaging probes, etc. However, after several decades innovations, will the advances of PET technology and applications continue with the same trend and pace? What will be the next big thing beyond the PET/CT, PET/MRI, and Time-of-flight PET? How will the PET instrumentation and imaging performance be further improved by novel detector research and advanced imaging system development? Or will the development of new algorithms and methodologies extend the limit of current instrumentation and leapfrog the imaging quality and quantification for practical applications? The objective of this session is to present an overview of current status and advances in the PET instrumentation and applications with speakers from leading academic institutes and a major medical imaging company. Presenting with both academic research projects and commercial technology developments, this session will provide a glimpse of some latest advances and challenges in the field, such as using semiconductor photon-sensor based PET detectors to improve performance and enable new applications, as well as the technology trend that may lead to the next breakthrough in PET imaging for clinical and preclinical applications. Both imaging and image-guided therapy subjects will be discussed. Learning Objectives: Describe the latest innovations in PET instrumentation and applications Understand the driven force behind the PET instrumentation innovation and development Learn the trend of PET technology development for applications.

  12. Positron Emission Tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) assesses biochemical processes in the living subject, producing images of function rather than form. Using PET, physicians are able to obtain not the anatomical information provided by other medical imaging techniques, but pictures of physiological activity. In metaphoric terms, traditional imaging methods supply a map of the body's roadways, its, anatomy; PET shows the traffic along those paths, its biochemistry. This document discusses the principles of PET, the radiopharmaceuticals in PET, PET research, clinical applications of PET, the cost of PET, training of individuals for PET, the role of the United States Department of Energy in PET, and the futures of PET. 22 figs

  13. Clinical PET/CT Atlas: A Casebook of Imaging in Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integrated positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has evolved since its introduction into the commercial market more than a decade ago. It is now a key procedure, particularly in oncological imaging. Over the last years in routine clinical service, PET/CT has had a significant impact on diagnosis, treatment planning, staging, therapy, and monitoring of treatment response and has therefore played an important role in the care of cancer patients. The high sensitivity from the PET component and the specificity of the CT component give this hybrid imaging modality the unique characteristics that make PET/CT, even after over 10 years of clinical use, one of the fastest growing imaging modalities worldwide. This publication combines over 90 comprehensive cases covering all major indications of fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG)-PET/CT as well as some cases of clinically relevant special tracers. The cases provide an overview of what the specific disease can look like in PET/CT, the typical pattern of the disease’s spread as well as likely pitfalls and teaching points. This PET/CT Atlas will allow professionals interested in PET/CT imaging to embrace the variety of oncological imaging by providing clinically relevant teaching files on the effectiveness and diagnostic quality of FDG-PET/CT imaging in routine applications

  14. Quantification of 18F-FDG PET images using probabilistic brain atlas: clinical application in temporal lobe epilepsy patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A probabilistic atlas of the human brain (Statistical Probability Anatomical Maps: SPAM) was developed by the international consortium for brain mapping (ICBM). After calculating the counts in volume of interest (VOI) using the product of probability of SPAM images and counts in FDG images, asymmetric indexes(AI) were calculated and used for finding epileptogenic zones in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). FDG PET images from 28 surgically confirmed TLE patients and 12 age-matched controls were spatially normalized to the averaged brain MRI atlas of ICBM. The counts from normalized PET images were multiplied with the probability of 12 VOIs (superior temporal gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus, hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, and amygdala in each hemisphere) of SPAM images of Montreal Neurological Institute. Finally AI was calculated on each pair of VOI, and compared with visual assessment. If AI was deviated more than 2 standard deviation of normal controls, we considered epileptogenic zones were found successfully. The counts of VOIs in normal controls were symmetric (AI 0.05) except those of inferior temporal gyrus (p<0.01). AIs in 5 pairs of VOI excluding inferior temporal gyrus were deviated to one side in TLE (p<0.05). Lateralization was correct in 23/28 of patients by AI, but all of 28 were consistent with visual inspection. In 3 patients with normal AI was symmetric on visual inspection. In 2 patients falsely lateralized using AI, metabolism was also decreased visually on contra-lateral side. Asymmetric index obtained by the product of statistical probability anatomical map and FDG PET correlated well with visual assessment in TLE patients. SPAM is useful for quantification of VOIs in functional images

  15. Advantage of PET/CT in clinical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent introduction of combined PET/CET scanners paves the way for for real multimodality imaging in clinical routine diagnostics. In this overview we present our first experiences with this new imagining modality. In addition the diagnostic goals of combined PET/CT imaging, strategies for image acquisition and radiation exposure as well as usefulness of PET/CT in different clinical indications are discussed. Finally, from our point of view advantages as well as limitations of hybrid PET/CT scanners are resumed. (author)

  16. Polypyrrole Coated PET Fabrics for Thermal Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2010-01-01

    Polypyrrole can be chemically synthesized on PET fabrics, giving rise to textiles with high electric conductivity. These textiles are suitable for several applications from antistatic films to electromagnetic interference shielding devices. Here we discuss the thermal-electric performance and the heat generation of polypyrrole coated PET fabric samples, previously studied because of their electric conductivity and electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness. The measured Seebeck effe...

  17. Cyclotron-produced radioisotopes and their clinical use at the Austin PET Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tochon-Danguy, H.J. [Centre for PET, Melbourne, VIC (Australia). Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre

    1997-12-31

    A Centre for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has been established within the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre in Melbourne. PET is a non-invasive technique based on the use of biologically relevant compounds labelled with short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides such as carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18. The basic equipment consists of a medical cyclotron (10 MeV proton and 5 MeV deuteron), six lead-shielded hot cells with associated radiochemistry facilities and a whole body PET scanner. During its first five years of operation, the Melbourne PET Centre, has pursued a strong radiolabelling development program, leading to an ambitious clinical program in neurology, oncology and cardiology. This presentation will describe the basic principles of the PET technique and review the cyclotron-produced radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals. Radiolabelling development programs and clinical applications are also addressed. 30 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig.

  18. Cyclotron-produced radioisotopes and their clinical use at the Austin PET Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Centre for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has been established within the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre in Melbourne. PET is a non-invasive technique based on the use of biologically relevant compounds labelled with short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides such as carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18. The basic equipment consists of a medical cyclotron (10 MeV proton and 5 MeV deuteron), six lead-shielded hot cells with associated radiochemistry facilities and a whole body PET scanner. During its first five years of operation, the Melbourne PET Centre, has pursued a strong radiolabelling development program, leading to an ambitious clinical program in neurology, oncology and cardiology. This presentation will describe the basic principles of the PET technique and review the cyclotron-produced radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals. Radiolabelling development programs and clinical applications are also addressed

  19. Pediatric oncologic imaging. A key application of combined PET/MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatidis, Sergios; La Fougere, C.; Schaefer, J.F. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2016-04-15

    Pediatric imaging has been identified as a key application of combined whole-body PET/MRI. First studies have revealed the clinical feasibility and possible advantages of PET/MRI over PET/CT and MRI. Besides a significant reduction in radiation exposure of about 50 - 75 %, combined whole-body PET/MRI offers the diagnostic advantage of the multiparametric characterization of pathophysiologic processes and helps reduce the number of necessary imaging studies. However, very few studies focusing on pediatric PET/MRI have been published to date. Additional studies are necessary in order to fully appreciate the clinical impact of this novel method. This review article shall summarize the existing literature concerning pediatric PET/MRI and give insight into the practical experience derived from over 160 pediatric PET/MRI examinations that were performed in Tuebingen.

  20. Initial clinical test of a breast-PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this initial clinical study was to test a new positron emission/tomography imager and biopsy system (PEM/PET) in a small group of selected subjects to assess its clinical imaging capabilities. Specifically, the main task of this study is to determine whether the new system can successfully be used to produce images of known breast cancer and compare them to those acquired by standard techniques. The PEM/PET system consists of two pairs of rotating radiation detectors located beneath a patient table. The scanner has a spatial resolution of ∼2 mm in all three dimensions. The subjects consisted of five patients diagnosed with locally advanced breast cancer ranging in age from 40 to 55 years old scheduled for pre-treatment, conventional whole body PET imaging with F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). The primary lesions were at least 2 cm in diameter. The images from the PEM/PET system demonstrated that this system is capable of identifying some lesions not visible in standard mammograms. Furthermore, while the relatively large lesions imaged in this study where all visualised by a standard whole body PET/CT scanner, some of the morphology of the tumours (ductal infiltration, for example) was better defined with the PEM/PET system. Significantly, these images were obtained immediately following a standard whole body PET scan. The initial testing of the new PEM/PET system demonstrated that the new system is capable of producing good quality breast-PET images compared standard methods.

  1. Quantification Methods for Clinical Studies in Nuclear Medicine - Applications in AMS, PET/CT and SPECT/CT

    OpenAIRE

    Sydoff, Marie

    2013-01-01

    An essential part of the development of new radiopharmaceuticals for use in diagnostic nuclear medicine is the determination of its biokinetic properties. The uptake and turn-over of the radiopharmaceutical in the source organs is of great interest since this could determine whether the radiopharmaceutical would be suitable for clinical use or not. It is also important that the biokinetics and dosimetry of the radiopharmaceuticals is thoroughly investigated in order to determine the radiation...

  2. Impact of F-18 FDG-PET for the Clinical Multidisciplinary Evaluation of Dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prakash, Vineet; Vestergård, Karsten; Frost, Majbritt; Iyer, Victor Vishwanath; Steffensen, Elena; Larsson, Elna Boel-Marie

    PURPOSE            Dementia is a challenging clinical diagnosis. Compared with conventional clinical evaluations, F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET has been reported to improve not only the diagnostic accuracy of dementia but also help better define the underlying  type. This is because FDG PET d...... or Frontotemporal dementia.                       CLINICAL RELEVANCE/APPLICATION            F18-FDG Brain PET with visual and automated analyses can be valuable  in a diagnostic algorithim for the work up of dementia when the cause is uncertain.......PURPOSE            Dementia is a challenging clinical diagnosis. Compared with conventional clinical evaluations, F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET has been reported to improve not only the diagnostic accuracy of dementia but also help better define the underlying  type. This is because FDG PET...... demonstrates metabolic patterns reflecting neuronal function specific to different dementias.To assess the impact of PET on a multidisciplinary  dementia clinic for patients with suspected dementia by comparing it with the initial clinical evaluation and paraclinical tests.                       METHOD AND...

  3. Developing Methods for Quantitative PET: Application to Multimodal Human and Rat Brain Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Hu

    2014-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a functional medical imaging tool that enables the visualization of radio-labeled biologically active molecules (tracer) distributed inside a living body. PET is also combined with other modalities such as CT and MRI with either software or hardware methods to gain synergy. However numerous technical and biological issues remain to be addressed to improve the utility of PET in multimodal imaging for both clinical and preclinical applications. Patient move...

  4. Guide to clinical PET in oncology: Improving clinical management of cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has an approximately 50 year-history. It was developed as a tool of medical science to quantitatively measure metabolic rates of bio-substances in vivo and in particular the number of receptors in neuroscience. Until the late 1990s PET was, in most cases, research oriented activity. In 2001, positron emission tomography/X ray computed tomography (PET/CT) hybrid imaging system became commercially available. An era of clinical PET then emerged, in which PET images were utilized for clinical practice in the treatment and diagnosis of cancer patients. PET imaging could recognize areas of abnormal metabolic behaviour of cancers in vivo, and the addition of CT imaging underlines the site of malignancy. More accurate and precise interpretation of cancer lesions can therefore be performed by PET/CT imaging than PET or CT imaging alone. Clinical PET, in particular with fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG), has already proven itself to have considerable value in oncology. The indications include malignant lymphoma and melanoma, head and neck cancers, oesophageal cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer and colorectal cancer, and it is still being expanded. The roles of clinical PET could be for 1) preoperative staging of cancers, 2) differentiation between residual tumour and scarring, 3) demonstration of suspected recurrences, 4) monitoring response to therapy, 5) prognosis and 6) radiotherapy treatment planning. Clinical PET can be used to illustrate exactly which treatment should be applied for a cancer patient as well as where surgeons should operate and where radiation oncologists should target radiation therapy. An almost exponential rise in the introduction of clinical PET, as well as the installation of PET/CT has been seen throughout the world. Clinical PET is currently viewed as the most powerful diagnostic tool in its field. This IAEA-TECDOC presents an overview of clinical PET for cancer patients and a relevant source of

  5. PET-Based Personalized Management in Clinical Oncology: An Unavoidable Path for the Foreseeable Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sandip; Alavi, Abass

    2016-07-01

    It is imperative that the thrust of clinical practice in the ensuing years would be to develop personalized management model for various disorders. PET-computed tomography (PET-CT) based molecular functional imaging has been increasingly utilized for assessment of tumor and other nonmalignant disorders and has the ability to explore disease phenotype on an individual basis and address critical clinical decision making questions related to practice of personalized medicine. Hence, it is essential to make a concerted systematic effort to explore and define the appropriate place of PET-CT in personalized clinical practice in each of malignancies, which would strengthen the concept further. The potential advantages of PET based disease management can be classified into broad categories: (1) Traditional: which includes assessment of disease extent such as initial disease staging and restaging, treatment response evaluation particularly early in the course and thus PET-CT response adaptive decision for continuing the same regimen or switching to salvage schedules; there has been continuous addition of newer application of PET based disease restaging in oncological parlance (eg, Richter transformation); (2) Recent and emerging developments: this includes exploring tumor biology with FDG and non-FDG PET tracers. The potential of multitracer PET imaging (particularly new and novel tracers, eg, 68Ga-DOTA-TOC/NOC/TATE in NET, 68Ga-PSMA and 18F-fluorocholine in prostate carcinoma, 18F-fluoroestradiol in breast carcinoma) has provided a scientific basis to stratify and select appropriate targeted therapies (both radionuclide and nonradionuclide treatment), a major boost for individualized disease management in clinical oncology. Integrating the molecular level information obtained from PET with structural imaging further individualizing treatment plan in radiation oncology, precision of interventions and biopsies of a particular lesion and forecasting disease prognosis. PMID

  6. High time-resolution photodetectors for PET applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronzhin, Anatoly [Fermilab

    2015-11-27

    This paper describes recent developments aiming at the improvement of the time resolution of photodetectors used in positron emission tomography (PET). Promising photodetector candidates for future PET-time-of-flight (TOF) applications are also discussed.

  7. Clinic-like animal model for causal-pathogenetical investigations of hypoxic-ischemic brain injuries (Combined application of radioactively labelled microspheres and PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complex nature of the pathogenesis in hypoxic-ischemic brain injuries, requires the combined determination of the dynamics of main factors in these disturbing processes. The application of suitable methods for registration of such pathogenetic processes is shown in an adequate animal model for simulating the early hypoxic-ischemic brain injuries. That the radioactive labelled microsphere technique is suitable to comprehend quantitatively the dynamics of the intracerebral redistribution of the circulating blood due to hypoxia/hyercapnia by simultaneous-multiple measuring of the regional cerebral blood flow. Therefore, at the first time an inadequate hypoxia-induced blood flow increase was shown in large parts of the forebrain in intrauterine growth retarded newborn piglets. For estimation of the regional cerebral glucose utilization in newborn piglets, the 18F-FDG PET is introduced. The measurements were carried out on a stationary high-density avalanche chamber (HIDAC) camera and yielded the fundamental application of this camera model for PET investigations also in the newborn brain due to the very good spatial resolution. (author)

  8. Strategies for clinical implementation and quality management of PET tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) methodologies, which visualize in vivo biochemical, physiological and pharmacological processes, together with the availability of hybrid imaging modalities (PET with computer tomography (PET/CT) imaging), have revolutionized patient diagnosis, disease staging, disease management and therapy follow-up. These technologies have opened up fascinating possibilities for new non-invasive medical care and individualized patient management unlike those seen before in a clinical setting. There is immense global interest in PET, with accelerated investment in the clinical setting. The radiotracers used for PET are very different from conventional nuclear medicine radiopharmaceuticals. They have extremely short half-lives, which means that they have to be produced close to the clinical user. The time available for the labelling of PET molecules (including purification and quality control) is very limited, which presents new challenges and a need for more proficient systems to be established before clinical use. The busy and demanding nature of clinical settings adds to the complexities and creates a need for more robust quality management programmes. This publication focuses on clinical settings and was compiled following several IAEA Consultants Meetings and with the benefit of the contributions of individual experts. It aims to raise awareness of the issues involved and suggests ways of reducing risk. The purpose of these guidelines is to encourage a proactive approach to each aspect of parametric release and to propose practical test methods for each criterion for parametric acceptance, thereby helping end users to ensure the quality of PET products. It is hoped that these criteria will stimulate further cooperation among various countries worldwide in the development of a set of harmonized acceptance test criteria for PET systems and sensible quality assurance (QA) standards for all PET tracers. Many countries and IAEA Member States are

  9. PET imaging with 89Zr: From radiochemistry to the clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advent of antibody-based cancer therapeutics has led to the concomitant rise in the development of companion diagnostics for these therapies, particularly nuclear imaging agents. A number of radioisotopes have been employed for antibody-based PET and SPECT imaging, notably 64Cu, 124I, 111In, and 99mTc; in recent years, however, the field has increasingly focused on 89Zr, a radiometal with near ideal physical and chemical properties for immunoPET imaging. In the review at hand, we seek to provide a comprehensive portrait of the current state of 89Zr radiochemical and imaging research, including work into the production and purification of the isotope, the synthesis of new chelators, the development of new bioconjugation strategies, the creation of novel 89Zr-based agents for preclinical imaging studies, and the translation of 89Zr-labeled radiopharmaceuticals to the clinic. Particular attention will also be dedicated to emerging trends in the field, 89Zr-based imaging applications using vectors other than antibodies, the comparative advantages and limitations of 89Zr-based imaging compared to that with other isotopes, and areas that would benefit from more extensive investigation. At bottom, it is hoped that this review will provide both the experienced investigator and new scientist with a full and critical overview of this exciting and fast-developing field.

  10. Application of PET and PET/CT imaging for cancer screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential application of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and PET/CT for cancer screening in asymptomatic individuals. Methods: The subjects consisted of 3631 physical check up examinees (1947 men, 1684 women; mean age ±SD, 52.1±8.2 y) with non-specific medical histories. Whole-body FDG PET (or PET/CT), ultrasound and tumor markers were performed on all patients. Focal hypermetabolic areas with intensities equal to or exceeding the level of FDG uptake in the brain and bladder were considered abnormal and interpreted as neoplasia. Follow-up periods were longer than one year. Results: Among the 3631 FDG PET (including 1687 PET/CT), ultrasound and tumor markers examinations, malignant tumors were discovered in 47 examinees (1.29%). PET findings were true-positive in 38 of the 47 cancers (80.9%). In addition, 32 of the 47 cancers were performed with the PET-CT scan. PET detected cancer lesions in 28 of the 32 examinees. However, the CT detected cancer lesions in only 15 of 32 examinees. Conclusion: The sensitivity of FDG PET in the detection of a wide variety of cancers is high. Most cancer can be detected with FDG PET in a resectable stage. CT of the PET/CT for localization and characteristics of the lesion shows an increased specificity of the PET scan. Using ultrasound and tumor markers may complement the PET scan in cancer screening for hepatic and urologic neoplasms. (authors)

  11. SPECT-PET in Epilepsy and Clinical Approach in Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergün, Eser Lay; Saygi, Serap; Yalnizoglu, Dilek; Oguz, Kader Karli; Erbas, Belkis

    2016-07-01

    In epilepsy, a detailed history, blood chemistry, routine electroencephalography, and brain MRI are important for the diagnosis of seizure type or epilepsy syndrome for the decision of appropriate drug treatment. Although antiepileptic drugs are mostly successful for controlling epileptic seizures, 20%-30% patients are resistant to medical treatment and continue to have seizures. In this intractable patient group, surgical resection is the primarily preferred treatment option. This particular group of patients should be referred to the epilepsy center for detailed investigation and further treatment. When the results of electroencephalography, MRI, and clinical status are discordant or there is no structural lesion on MRI, ictal-periictal SPECT, and interictal PET play key roles for lateralization or localization of epileptic region and guidance for the subsequent subdural electrode placement in intractable epilepsy. SPECT and PET show the functional status of the brain. SPECT and PET play important roles in the evaluation of epilepsy sydromes in childhood by showing abnormal brain regions. Most of the experience has been gained with (18)FDG-PET, in this respect. (11)C-flumazenil-PET usually deliniates the seizure focus more smaller than (18)FDG-PET and is sensitive in identifying medial temporal sclerosis. (11)C-alpha-methyl-l-tryptophan is helpful in the differentiation of epileptogenic and nonepileptogenic regions in children especially in tuberous sclerosis and multifocal cortical dysplasia for the evaluation of surgery. Finally, when there is concordance among these detailed investigations, resective surgery or palliative procedures can be discussed individually. PMID:27237440

  12. The clinical application of 4D 18F-FDG PET/CT on gross tumor volume delineation for radiotherapy planning in esophageal squamous cell cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yao-Ching; Hsieh, Te-Chun; Yu, Chun-Yen; Yen, Kuo-Yang; Chen, Shang-Wen; Yang, Shih-Neng; Chien, Chun-Ru; Hsu, Shih-Ming; Pan, Tinsu; Kao, Chia-Hung; Liang, Ji-An

    2012-01-01

    A combination of four-dimensional computed tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (4D CT-FDG PET) was used to delineate gross tumor volume (GTV) in esophageal cancer (EC). Eighteen patients with EC were prospectively enrolled. Using 4D images taken during the respiratory cycle, the average CT image phase was fused with the average FDG PET phase in order to analyze the optimal standardized uptake values (SUV) or threshold. PET-based GTV (GTVPET) was determined with...

  13. PET Imaging - from Physics to Clinical Molecular Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stan

    2008-03-01

    From the beginnings many years ago in a few physics laboratories and first applications as a research brain function imager, PET became lately a leading molecular imaging modality used in diagnosis, staging and therapy monitoring of cancer, as well as has increased use in assessment of brain function (early diagnosis of Alzheimer's, etc) and in cardiac function. To assist with anatomic structure map and with absorption correction CT is often used with PET in a duo system. Growing interest in the last 5-10 years in dedicated organ specific PET imagers (breast, prostate, brain, etc) presents again an opportunity to the particle physics instrumentation community to contribute to the important field of medical imaging. In addition to the bulky standard ring structures, compact, economical and high performance mobile imagers are being proposed and build. The latest development in standard PET imaging is introduction of the well known TOF concept enabling clearer tomographic pictures of the patient organs. Development and availability of novel photodetectors such as Silicon PMT immune to magnetic fields offers an exciting opportunity to use PET in conjunction with MRI and fMRI. As before with avalanche photodiodes, particle physics community plays a leading role in developing these devices. The presentation will mostly focus on present and future opportunities for better PET designs based on new technologies and methods: new scintillators, photodetectors, readout, software.

  14. Clinical FDG PET CT in the Investigation of Suspected Inflammatory and Infective Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, Eleanor; Wig, Surabhi; Prakash, Vineet

    PURPOSE          F18 FDG PET CT is an established molecular imaging technique most commonly used in the diagnosis and staging of oncological conditions. A rapidly growing clinical application of PET CT is in the investigation of inflammatory and infectious diseases. A review of PET CT scans...... scanning after multiple diagnostic investigations failed to determine a diagnosis.                   RESULTS          PET CT was useful in all 59 cases; revealing malignancy in 11 (2 of whom had associated myositis), systemic vasculitis in 9, inflammatory arthropathy in 5, infectious/other inflammatory...... performed in a tertiary referal centre is presented illustrating its applications and clinical value in the evaluation of suspected or known inflammatory conditions.                   METHOD AND MATERIALS          a retrospective case review of 59 patients was carried out. all patients underwent PET CT...

  15. PET: the importance of physicists for the clinical arena

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    David Townsend giving a seminar at CERN on 9 February. The past few years have seen significant advances in the development of instrumentation for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The recent appearance of combined PET and Computed Tomography (CT) scanners that can simultaneously image both anatomy and function is of particular importance. This was the main subject of "Advances in PET imaging: from physics to physician", a seminar presented at CERN by David Townsend on Wednesday 9 February  and organized by the TT and PH groups. David Townsend, who started his career at CERN in the 1970s, is now Professor at the Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Medical Center (Knoxville, TN). Recipient of the 2004 Clinical Scientist of the Year Award, he is an internationally renowned researcher and PET physicist, with over 25 years of experience in the field. His 1999 image of the year, an award from the Society of Nuclear Medicine in the US, was produced using a combined state-of-the art PET and a true d...

  16. Clinical relevance of molecular diagnosis in pet allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uriarte, S A; Sastre, J

    2016-07-01

    We describe the pattern of sensitisation to pet IgE components and its association with clinical symptoms. Hundred and fifty nine consecutive patients with rhinitis/asthma sensitised to dog, cat, and horse were recruited. Specific IgE to whole extracts and to pet recombinant allergens were performed. Only 5% of patients were monosensitised to animal allergens. Specific IgE to Can f 1 was significantly associated with persistent rhinitis, Can f 2 with asthma diagnosis, Can f 3 with moderate/severe rhinitis (M/S-R) and asthma diagnosis (AD), and Can f 5 with persistent and M/S-R. Positive IgE to Fel d 2 was significantly associated with M/S-R and AD, Equ c 1 with M/S-R and Equ c 3 with persistent rhinitis, AD and severe asthma. Sensitisation to ≥2 molecules or to pet albumins was associated with more severe respiratory symptoms. Molecular diagnosis in patients with pet allergy may also help clinicians to predict clinical symptoms and their severity. PMID:27108666

  17. Clinical application of 18F-FDG PET/CT in diagnosis of multiple myeloma%18F-FDG PET/CT在诊断多发性骨髓瘤中的临床应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭烽; 赵文锐; 川玲; 梁英魁; 王升; 雷霄

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the features of 18F-FDG PET/CT for multiple myeloma (MM) and to explore the value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of MM. Methods 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging findings were retrospectively analyzed in 19 patients with MM proved by bone marrow aspiration biopsy. SUVmeam of those lesions were measured. Results All patients suffered from multiple lesions in bone. A total of 221 lesions(about 85.3% of all lesions) were found by CT, which showed as punched out or bubbly lytic destructions of bone. All lesions were mostly found in none marrow of axial skeleton, and rarely formed soft tissue masses and extr-amedullary organ involvement. A total of 198 lesions(about 76.4% ) in bone got focal 1SF-FDG uptake increasing in PET and SUVmeam was 3.1 ±1.4(1.3 -7.4). PET of the lesions with hvpermetabolism were generally matched with CT results, but not matched completely in some lesions. Characteristics of PET/CT images were categorized into three types: ①Multiple bone destructions were shown by CT in partial patients, which mismatched with the hvpermetabolism lesions by PET. ②Some lesions were found with hyperme-tabolism by PET, but no bone destructions in CT. ③The bone destructions combined with soft tissue mass with hypermetabolism in PET were similar to CT results. Two patients with negative results by routine bone marrow aspiration were proved as MM by bone marrow biopsy guided by PET/CT. Conclusion. 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging has an important value in diagnosing MM. Bone marrow aspiration biopsy guided by "F-FDG PET/CT can improve the diagnostic sensitivity, especially in those false-negative patients.%目的 分析多发性骨髓瘤的PET/CT表现,探讨其在诊断多发性骨髓瘤中的作用. 方法 19例经骨髓穿刺活检证实为多发性骨髓瘤患者,均行全身PET/CT检查,分析影像形态、功能代谢的特点,并测量平均标准摄取值(SUVmean). 结果 19例患者均表现为全身多发骨病变.CT共检出病灶221

  18. Clinical utility of a combined PET/CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2001, after several years of development work, the first integral device combining positron emission tomography with computer tomography (PET/CT) was introduced to clinical practice on a wider scale. In principle, the device represents a combination of the hardware of two diagnostic instruments, its primary purpose being to provide an accurate superposition of the tomographies supplied by each. The present paper discusses this technology from a medical viewpoint, especially as regards oncology, giving due consideration to technical aspects wherever necessary

  19. Introducing Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in Clinical Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Janevik-Ivanovska, Emilija; Avmedovski, Fatmir; Yamamoto, Mayumi; Bhonsle, Uday

    2009-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a major diagnostic imaging technique predominantly used in determining the presence and severity of cancers, neurological conditions, and cardiovascular diseases. It is currently the most effective way to check for cancer recurrences and it offers significant advantages over other forms of imaging such as computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans in detecting disease in many patients. In the USA, an estimated 1 129 900 clinical PE...

  20. Clinical usefulness of FDG-PET for biliary cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forty-one patients with biliary cancer (22 extrahepatic bile duct cancer, 11 gall bladder cancer, 8 ampullary cancer) who underwent 18F-fluorodeoxy-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) before treatment were enrolled in the present study. We investigated the clinical significance of PET for primary tumor, metastases and the other cancers. We also analyzed the relationship between the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and clinicopathologic factors. The accumulation of FDG to primary tumor was observed in 28 of 41 patients (68.3%). The sensitivity of FDG-PET was 100% for gallbladder cancer, 87.5% for ampullary cancer, and 45.4% for bile duct cancer, respectively. The SUVmax levels in primary tumor were significantly correlated with M-category in tumor, nodes and metastasis (TNM) classification (p=0.033). Meanwhile, 21 patients (51%) showed the FDG accumulation except for the primary tumor. The sensitivity for lymph node metastasis, liver metastasis, and peritoneal dissemination was 89%, 75%, and 100%, respectively. In the abnormal accumulations of the other regions in 8 patients, colon cancer was newly found in 3 patients. FDG-PET has a low sensitivity for detecting the primary tumor in biliary cancer, but it is useful for detection of distant metastasis and occult malignant disease. (author)

  1. Ga-68-DOTATOC: Feasibility of high throughput screening by small animal PET using a clinical high-resolution PET/CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As radio peptide tracers have been developed in recent years for the high sensitive detection of neuroendocrine tumors, still the broad application of other peptides to breast and prostate cancer is missing. A rapid screening of new peptides can, in theory, be based on in vivo screening in animals by PET/CT. To test this hypothesis and to asses the minimum screening time needed per animal, we used the application of Ga-68-DOTATOC PET/CT in rats as test system. The Ga-68-DOTATOC yields in a hot spot imaging with minimal background. To delineate liver and spleen, we performed PET/CT of 10 animals on a SIEMENS Biograph 16 LSO HIGHREZ after intravenous injection of 1.5 MBq Ga-68-DOTATOC per animal. Animals were mounted in an '18 slot' holding device and scanned for a single-bed position. The emission times for the PET scan was varied from 1 to 20 min. The images were assessed first for 'PET only' and afterwards in PET/CT fusion mode. The detection of the two organs was good at emission times down to 1 min in PET/CT fusion mode. In the 'PET only' scans, the liver was clearly to be identified down to 1 min emission in all animals. But the spleen could only be delineated only by 1 min of emission in the PET/CT-fusion mode. In conclusion the screening of 'hot spot' enriching peptides is feasible. 'PET only' is in terms of delineation of small organs by far inferior to PET/CT fusion. If animal tumors are above a diameter of 10 mm small, animal PET/CT using clinical high resolution scanners will enable rapid screening. Even the determination of bio-distributions becomes feasible by using list mode tools. The time for the whole survey of 18 animals including anesthesia, preparation and mounting was approximately 20 min. By use of several holding devices mounted simultaneously, a survey time of less than 1 h for 180 animals can be expected

  2. Image artifacts from MR-based attenuation correction in clinical, whole-body PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Sune H; Holm, Søren; Hansen, Adam E;

    2013-01-01

    Integrated whole-body PET/MRI tomographs have become available. PET/MR imaging has the potential to supplement, or even replace combined PET/CT imaging in selected clinical indications. However, this is true only if methodological pitfalls and image artifacts arising from novel MR-based attenuation...

  3. The clinical contribution of FDG-PET in the peritoneal metastasis from colorectal or ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical contribution of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for detecting peritoneal metastasis and therapeutic decision in patients with colorectal or ovarian cancer. Twenty patients with abnormal FDG uptake in the peritoneum were enrolled in this study. We could distinct the peritoneum from the enteric loop by PET/CT. Clinical management was altered by FDG-PET in 11 patients that were performed operation or chemotherapy. FDG-PET/CT has a clinical contribution in the peritoneal metastasis from colorectal or ovarian cancer. (author)

  4. Combined PET - CT and PET - MRI imaging from non hybrid cameras: Protocol approaches and clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this presentation, we describe our experience with different approaches on PET-CT and PET-MRI alignment and display, analysing the performance of all the registration tools available at the Nuclear Medicine School Foundation, the impact of those tools and the necessary troubleshooting during implementation. Those tools include the development of our own software for automatic registration with different algorithms, and the use of available commercial ones front several branches. We found registration using fiducial or anatomical landmarks are unacceptable for clinical practice. Manual registration is feasible, though is time consuming, and needs to be performed by trained staff, preferably checked or performed by the reader at the reading room. Automatic Registration has today more acceptance. The method of choice in mutual information, described elsewhere. It needs little training for software manipulation and no anatomical familiarity from the operator. Currently, the author's preference is to run a mutual information registration, and personally check and correct manually minor inter modality discrepancies while reading each study

  5. PET application in psychiatry and psychopharmacology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suhara, Tetsuya [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    In the last few decades diagnostic and research tools in the medical field have made great advances, yet psychiatry has lacked sufficiently sensitive tools to measure the aberration of brain functions. Recently however, the development of Positron emission tomography (PET) techniques has made it possible to measure changes in neurochemical components in mental disorders and the effect of psychoactive drugs in living human brain. Most of the advancement in the psychiatric field has came from the development psychoactive drugs. Brain research involving identification of neurotransmission is largely based on compounds developed in psychopharmacology. Some of these compounds have been radiolabelled and used as radioligands for quantitative examination of neuroreceptors and other aspects of neurotransmission. Using PET, radioligand binding can now be examined in the human brain in vivo. PET techniques also allow examination of an unlabelled drug by examination of its interaction with a radioligand. So one potential of PET in psychiatry is to investigate the mechanism of psychoactive drugs. Antidepressants modulate serotonin transmission by inhibiting serotonin reuptake from the synaptic cleft. High affinity [{sup 3}H]imipramine binding sites in mammalian brain have been labelled to investigate serotonin transporters in living human brain by PET. Cyanoimipramine which is described as a potent serotonin reuptake inhibitor, was labelled with {sup 11}C. In a PET experiment with 6 healthy human subjects, a high accumulation of [{sup 11}C]cyanoimipramine was found in the thalamus and striatum and lowest accumulation was observed in the cerebellum, a region relatively void of serotonin transporters. The thalamus to cerebellum ratio was about 2 at 90 min after the injection of the tracer. Recently, [{sup 11}C]McN5652-X has been introduced as a better tracer for serotonin transporter imaging. Employing [{sup 11}C]McN5652-X in a PET study of 7 healthy human subjects, a high

  6. PET ANIMALS (CATS AND DOGS) OWNERS PROSPECTS FOR THE VETERINARY CLINICS

    OpenAIRE

    DEMİR, Pınar; UĞURLU KOÇ, Aysun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the views and expectations of pet animal owners were determined for their veterinary clinic. The material of this study was obtained from a survey conducted with the owners of 102 pet animals in Ankara Altinpark. 55.9% of the pet owners, who surveyed, were  female and the average age of pet owners were 34.9±1.28 and having pet animals average 8.2±0.79 years. The study also determined that almost 55% of animal breeders who surveyed feed the cat. The average monthly income of the...

  7. Clinical impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT on suspected cervical cancer recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT on patients with suspected cervical cancer recurrence. Methods: Fifty-one cervical cancer patients, clinically suspected to have tumor recurrence during follow-up, underwent 18F-FDG PET/CT examination. 18F-FDG PET/CT results were compared with those of conventional images, as referred to histopathology or clinical follow-up. Impacts of 18F-FDG PET/CT were evaluated based on documented changes of clinical management. Results: In total, 43 patients were found to have positive lesions by 18F-FDG PET/CT, in which 40 were true recurrence,but 2 were pelvic abscess and 1 was radiation enterocolitis. Other 8 patients were found negative by 18F-FDG PET/CT and confirmed by pathology or follow-up. In patient-based analyses, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT for the detection of tumor recurrence were 100% (40/40), 72.73% (8/11), and 94.12% (48/51) respectively. In 7 patients, the clinical management was changed due to 18F-FDG PET/CT findings. Conclusion: 18F-FDG PET/CT is an efficient tool for determining the recurrence of cervical cancer and instructing the clinical management. (authors)

  8. The clinical impact of PET scanning in patients with melanoma: A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Small series have shown that PET scanning using F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), can quite accurately stage patients melanoma. At this Institute these patients are only sent for PET imaging if they have high risk melanomas ( >3 Clarke's grade primaries) or there remains any significant doubt as to their clinical staging or management after the completion of conventional screening. This prospective study examines how PET scan findings influenced the clinical management decisions in 53 patients (29 males, mean age 54±13 yrs: range 31-81 yrs) Referring doctors were asked to indicate reason for the PET scan, stage their patients on the basis of all their current investigations, and to indicate their management plans prior to PET scanning. Follow-up of subsequent patient management at 2-4 weeks post PET scan was then obtained and compared to pre PET plans. PET was used to stage 26 patients, restage 17, follow-up 5, assess recurrence in 3, and other in 2 patients. To date follow-up has shown that in 32/49 (65%) patients PET was used to triage patients to locoregional surgery (10 patients), radical radiotherapy (5 patients), or to continuing follow-up only (17 patients). Three further high risk patients with negative PET scans had sentinel mode biopsy. In only 13 patients was management already determined, with planned treatment being changed in 6. Four patients have not had their post PET scan review yet. To date proven false negative PET scans have occurred in 3 cases, 2 sentinel node biopsies showed microscopic disease, and one scan incorrectly labelled gall-bladder melanoma as hydro-nephrotic kidney. Interestingly in 3 cases, PET discovered other unsuspected tumours (rectum x 2, plasmacytoma). PET scanning has been incorporated into routine management to triage most high risk patients, but it still alters interventions in half of those patients where management has already been planned. PET clearly misses small volume disease, the importance of which is

  9. PET imaging for addiction medicine: From neural mechanisms to clinical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiers, Corinde E; Cabrera, Elizabeth; Skarda, Emily; Volkow, Nora D; Wang, Gene-Jack

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has been shown to be an effective imaging technique to study neurometabolic and neurochemical processes involved in addiction. That is, PET has been used to research neurobiological differences in substance abusers versus healthy controls and the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of abused drugs. Over the past years, the research scope has shifted to investigating neurobiological effects of abstinence and treatment, and their predictive power for relapse and other clinical outcomes. This chapter provides an overview of PET methodology, recent human PET studies on drug addiction and their implications for clinical treatment. PMID:26822359

  10. The application of PET/CT in immunoglobulin G4-related disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4)-related disease is a kind of new systemic entity characterized by mass-forming lesions in various organs that consist of lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates and fibrosclerosis with numerous IgG4-positive plasma cells. PET/CT has been widely used in clinical as a whole body examination that earned plenty of successful experience, especially in multiple locations and organs cancer such as lymphoma. PET/CT also has a potential application in IgG4-related diseases as its feature of systemic. (authors)

  11. Clinical studies on the use of PET in radiotherapy planning in Germany. An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, PET and PET/CT have well been established for staging and restaging of various malignancies. Increasingly, the modality is also used for radiotherapy treatment planning. However, clinical studies investigating the patients benefit by the inclusion of those modalities into RT treatment planning are mandatory, simultaneously defining standards for future care. Chances and problems of such studies are discussed using the examples of the PET-Plan and GLIAA trials. (orig.)

  12. 4D offline PET-based treatment verification in ion beam therapy. Experimental and clinical evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the accessible sharp dose gradients, external beam radiotherapy with protons and heavier ions enables a highly conformal adaptation of the delivered dose to arbitrarily shaped tumour volumes. However, this high conformity is accompanied by an increased sensitivity to potential uncertainties, e.g., due to changes in the patient anatomy. Additional challenges are imposed by respiratory motion which does not only lead to rapid changes of the patient anatomy, but, in the cased of actively scanned ions beams, also to the formation of dose inhomogeneities. Therefore, it is highly desirable to verify the actual application of the treatment and to detect possible deviations with respect to the planned irradiation. At present, the only clinically implemented approach for a close-in-time verification of single treatment fractions is based on detecting the distribution of β+-emitter formed in nuclear fragmentation reactions during the irradiation by means of positron emission tomography (PET). For this purpose, a commercial PET/CT (computed tomography) scanner has been installed directly next to the treatment rooms at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT). Up to present, the application of this treatment verification technique is, however, still limited to static target volumes. This thesis aimed at investigating the feasibility and performance of PET-based treatment verification under consideration of organ motion. In experimental irradiation studies with moving phantoms, not only the practicability of PET-based treatment monitoring for moving targets, using a commercial PET/CT device, could be shown for the first time, but also the potential of this technique to detect motion-related deviations from the planned treatment with sub-millimetre accuracy. The first application to four exemplary hepato-cellular carcinoma patient cases under substantially more challenging clinical conditions indicated potential for improvement by taking organ motion into

  13. 4D offline PET-based treatment verification in ion beam therapy. Experimental and clinical evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurz, Christopher

    2014-06-12

    Due to the accessible sharp dose gradients, external beam radiotherapy with protons and heavier ions enables a highly conformal adaptation of the delivered dose to arbitrarily shaped tumour volumes. However, this high conformity is accompanied by an increased sensitivity to potential uncertainties, e.g., due to changes in the patient anatomy. Additional challenges are imposed by respiratory motion which does not only lead to rapid changes of the patient anatomy, but, in the cased of actively scanned ions beams, also to the formation of dose inhomogeneities. Therefore, it is highly desirable to verify the actual application of the treatment and to detect possible deviations with respect to the planned irradiation. At present, the only clinically implemented approach for a close-in-time verification of single treatment fractions is based on detecting the distribution of β{sup +}-emitter formed in nuclear fragmentation reactions during the irradiation by means of positron emission tomography (PET). For this purpose, a commercial PET/CT (computed tomography) scanner has been installed directly next to the treatment rooms at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT). Up to present, the application of this treatment verification technique is, however, still limited to static target volumes. This thesis aimed at investigating the feasibility and performance of PET-based treatment verification under consideration of organ motion. In experimental irradiation studies with moving phantoms, not only the practicability of PET-based treatment monitoring for moving targets, using a commercial PET/CT device, could be shown for the first time, but also the potential of this technique to detect motion-related deviations from the planned treatment with sub-millimetre accuracy. The first application to four exemplary hepato-cellular carcinoma patient cases under substantially more challenging clinical conditions indicated potential for improvement by taking organ motion into

  14. Application of PET-CT imaging in pediatric oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pediatric oncology is one of the important cause of children death. PET-CT, which can provide functional and anatomical images in the same scanning session, has a high sensitivity and specialty in the diagnosis of tumors. During the examination of children, careful preparation and individualized dosage are the keys to make it. PET-CT has a great value in making the personal therapy strategy during the clinical activity, including staging, grading, evaluation of therapy, and the items of prognosis and follow-up. (authors)

  15. Basic principles and applications of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in oral and maxillofacial imaging: A pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combination of positron emission tomography (PET) with 18F-labeled fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG) and computed tomography (18F-FDG-PET/CT) has increasingly become a widely used imaging modality for the diagnosis and management of head and neck cancer. On the basis of both recent literature and our professional experience, we present a set of principles with pictorial illustrations and clinical applications of FDG-PET/CT in the evaluation and management planning of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx. We feel that this paper will be of interest and will aid the learning of oral and maxillofacial radiology trainees and practitioners.

  16. Generalized whole-body Patlak parametric imaging for enhanced quantification in clinical PET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Zhou, Yun; Lodge, Martin A.; Casey, Michael E.; Wahl, Richard L.; Zaidi, Habib; Rahmim, Arman

    2015-01-01

    We recently developed a dynamic multi-bed PET data acquisition framework to translate the quantitative benefits of Patlak voxel-wise analysis to the domain of routine clinical whole-body (WB) imaging. The standard Patlak (sPatlak) linear graphical analysis assumes irreversible PET tracer uptake, ign

  17. Bringing New PET Drugs to Clinical Practice - A Regulatory Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Hung, Joseph C.

    2013-01-01

    The regulatory framework for radioactive drugs, in particular those used in positron emission tomography (PET) scans, has been gradually established since the release of the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act in 1997. Various guidances specially tailored to accommodate special properties of PET drugs have been issued by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in order to ensure this valuable technology (i.e., PET molecular imaging) will continue to be available to patients and yet ...

  18. Accuracy of a clinical PET/CT vs. a preclinical μPET system for monitoring treatment effects in tumour xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Small animal imaging is of growing importance for preclinical research and drug development. Tumour xenografts implanted in mice can be visualized with a clinical PET/CT (cPET); however, it is unclear whether early treatment effects can be monitored. Thus, we investigated the accuracy of a cPET versus a preclinical μPET using 18F-FDG for assessing early treatment effects. Materials and methods: The spatial resolution and the quantitative accuracy of a clinical and preclinical PET were evaluated in phantom experiments. To investigate the sensitivity for assessing treatment response, A431 tumour xenografts were implanted in nude mice. Glucose metabolism was measured in untreated controls and in two therapy groups (either one or four days of antiangiogenic treatment). Data was validated by γ-counting of explanted tissues. Results: In phantom experiments, cPET enabled reliable separation of boreholes ≥ 5 mm whereas μPET visualized boreholes ≥ 2 mm. In animal studies, μPET provided significantly higher tumour-to-muscle ratios for untreated control tumours than cPET (3.41 ± 0.87 vs. 1.60 ± .0.28, respectively; p < 0.01). During treatment, cPET detected significant therapy effects at day 4 (p < 0.05) whereas μPET revealed highly significant therapy effects even at day one (p < 0.01). Correspondingly, γ-counting of explanted tumours indicated significant therapy effects at day one and highly significant treatment response at day 4. Correlation with γ-counting was good for cPET (r = 0.74; p < 0.01) and excellent for μPET (r = 0.85; p < 0.01). Conclusion: Clinical PET is suited to investigate tumour xenografts ≥ 5 mm at an advanced time-point of treatment. For imaging smaller tumours or for the sensitive assessment of very early therapy effects, μPET should be preferred

  19. Accuracy of a clinical PET/CT vs. a preclinical μPET system for monitoring treatment effects in tumour xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmowski, Karin [Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Department of Pneumology and Critical Care Medicine, Thoraxklinik Heidelberg, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Winz, Oliver [Department of Nuclear Medicine, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Rix, Anne; Bzyl, Jessica [Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Behrendt, Florian F.; Verburg, Frederic A.; Mottaghy, Felix M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Palmowski, Moritz, E-mail: mpalmowski@ukaachen.de [Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Department of Nuclear Medicine, RWTH-Aachen University, Aachen (Germany); Academic Radiology Baden Baden, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Small animal imaging is of growing importance for preclinical research and drug development. Tumour xenografts implanted in mice can be visualized with a clinical PET/CT (cPET); however, it is unclear whether early treatment effects can be monitored. Thus, we investigated the accuracy of a cPET versus a preclinical μPET using {sup 18}F-FDG for assessing early treatment effects. Materials and methods: The spatial resolution and the quantitative accuracy of a clinical and preclinical PET were evaluated in phantom experiments. To investigate the sensitivity for assessing treatment response, A431 tumour xenografts were implanted in nude mice. Glucose metabolism was measured in untreated controls and in two therapy groups (either one or four days of antiangiogenic treatment). Data was validated by γ-counting of explanted tissues. Results: In phantom experiments, cPET enabled reliable separation of boreholes ≥ 5 mm whereas μPET visualized boreholes ≥ 2 mm. In animal studies, μPET provided significantly higher tumour-to-muscle ratios for untreated control tumours than cPET (3.41 ± 0.87 vs. 1.60 ± .0.28, respectively; p < 0.01). During treatment, cPET detected significant therapy effects at day 4 (p < 0.05) whereas μPET revealed highly significant therapy effects even at day one (p < 0.01). Correspondingly, γ-counting of explanted tumours indicated significant therapy effects at day one and highly significant treatment response at day 4. Correlation with γ-counting was good for cPET (r = 0.74; p < 0.01) and excellent for μPET (r = 0.85; p < 0.01). Conclusion: Clinical PET is suited to investigate tumour xenografts ≥ 5 mm at an advanced time-point of treatment. For imaging smaller tumours or for the sensitive assessment of very early therapy effects, μPET should be preferred.

  20. PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariager, Rasmus Mølgaard; Schmidt, Regin; Heiberg, Morten Rievers

    PET handler om den hemmelige tjenestes arbejde under den kolde krig 1945-1989. Her fortæller Regin Schmidt, Rasmus Mariager og Morten Heiberg om de mest dramatiske og interessante sager fra PET's arkiv. PET er på flere måder en udemokratisk institution, der er sat til at vogte over demokratiet....... Dens virksomhed er skjult for offentligheden, den overvåger borgernes aktiviteter, og den registrerer følsomme personoplysninger. Historien om PET rejser spørgsmålet om, hvad man skal gøre, når befolkningen i et demokrati er kritisk indstillet over for overvågningen af lovlige politiske aktiviteter......, mens myndighederne mener, at det er nødvendigt for at beskytte demokratiet. PET er på en gang en fortælling om konkrete aktioner og begivenheder i PET's arbejde og et stykke Danmarkshistorie. Det handler om overvågning, spioner, politisk ekstremisme og international terrorisme.  ...

  1. Application of raclopride PET in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a kind of degenerative disease afflicting middle-aged and older people, accompanied by abnormal D2 receptor function resulted from dopamine deficiency. Raclopride is an ideal tracer because of its high selectivity and affinity to D2 receptor. 11C-raclopride PET can directly show the distribution and density of D2 receptor on molecular level that it's of great importance in the analysis of the illness state and dopamine mechanism of sequential movement, movement-fluctuation complication, medicine and surgical therapy. (authors)

  2. Recent Advances in the Development and Application of Radiolabeled Kinase Inhibitors for PET Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim Bernard-Gauthier

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 20 years, intensive investigation and multiple clinical successes targeting protein kinases, mostly for cancer treatment, have identified small molecule kinase inhibitors as a prominent therapeutic class. In the course of those investigations, radiolabeled kinase inhibitors for positron emission tomography (PET imaging have been synthesized and evaluated as diagnostic imaging probes for cancer characterization. Given that inhibitor coverage of the kinome is continuously expanding, in vivo PET imaging will likely find increasing applications for therapy monitoring and receptor density studies both in- and outside of oncological conditions. Early investigated radiolabeled inhibitors, which are mostly based on clinically approved tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI isotopologues, have now entered clinical trials. Novel radioligands for cancer and PET neuroimaging originating from novel but relevant target kinases are currently being explored in preclinical studies. This article reviews the literature involving radiotracer design, radiochemistry approaches, biological tracer evaluation and nuclear imaging results of radiolabeled kinase inhibitors for PET reported between 2010 and mid-2015. Aspects regarding the usefulness of pursuing selective vs. promiscuous inhibitor scaffolds and the inherent challenges associated with intracellular enzyme imaging will be discussed.

  3. PET/CT in nononcological lung diseases: current applications and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitanio, Selene; Nordin, Abdul Jalil; Noraini, Abdul Rahim; Rossetti, Claudio

    2016-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) combined with computed tomography (CT) is an established diagnostic modality that has become an essential imaging tool in oncological practice. However, thanks to its noninvasive nature and its capability to provide physiological information, the main applications of this technique have significantly expanded.(18)F-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is the most commonly used radiopharmaceutical for PET scanning and demonstrates metabolic activity in various tissues. Since activated inflammatory cells, like malignant cells, predominantly metabolise glucose as a source of energy and increase expression of glucose transporters when activated, FDG-PET/CT can be successfully used to detect and monitor a variety of lung diseases, such as infections and several inflammatory conditions.The added value of FDG-PET/CT as a molecular imaging technique relies on its capability to identify disease in very early stages, long before the appearance of structural changes detectable by conventional imaging. Furthermore, by detecting the active phase of infectious or inflammatory processes, disease progression and treatment efficacy can be monitored.This review will focus on the clinical use of FDG-PET/CT in nonmalignant pulmonary diseases. PMID:27581824

  4. Clinical impact of whole body FDG-PET for recurrent biliary cancer. A multicenter study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of positron emission tomography (PET) using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in patients with follow-up or suspected recurrent biliary cancer in a multicenter study. We performed a retrospective review of 50 patients who underwent FDG-PET (either integrated PET/CT or manual fusion of dedicated PET and CT) scans for post-treatment surveillance of biliary cancer. Recurrence was suspected in 40 of these patients on the basis of tumor marker levels, and/or findings of conventional imaging (group A). Clinical findings in the remaining 10 patients showed them to be disease-free (group B). The diagnostic performance and clinical impact of PET were analyzed. Recurrence was confirmed in 28 out of the 40 patients in group A, and 1 of the 10 patients in group B. Patient-based analysis showed that the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of PET for detecting recurrence were 86% (25/29), 91% (19/21), and 88% (44/50), respectively. The one patient with recurrence in group B was correctly interpreted by PET. Positive test likelihood ratio and negative test likelihood ratio were increased from 1.69 to 9.05, and 0.08 to 0.32, respectively, after PET study. The findings of PET resulted in a change of management for 10 out of the 50 patients (20%) by initiating an unplanned treatment strategy (n=7), by obviating the need for planned diagnostic procedures (n=2), or by changing the treatment plan (n=1). FDG-PET/CT or PET with CT yielded helpful information in patients with suspected recurrent biliary cancer. (author)

  5. Clinical and survival impact of FDG PET in patients with suspicion of recurrent cervical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the contribution of 18F-FDG PET to the clinical management and survival outcome of patients suspected of recurrent cervical carcinoma and in line with the hypothesis that early diagnosis of recurrent cervical cancer may improve overall survival. A total of 40 patients underwent conventional imaging (CI) and FDG PET/CT for suspected cervical cancer. Clinical management decisions were recorded with CI and additional PET/CT. Discordances and concordances between CI and PET/CT results were compared to the final diagnosis as based on histopathology analysis or follow-up considered as the gold standard. The final diagnosis was established pathologically (n=25) or by median clinical follow-up for 48 months after the PET (n=15). The PET/CT was positive in 76% (20/26) of patients compared to 19% (6/26) with CI. Globally PET/CT modified the treatment plan in 55% (22/40) of patients and in 75% (18/24) when the CI was negative prior to PET/CT. These changes led to the use of previously unplanned therapeutic procedures in 37.5% (15/40). When FDG PET was positive for recurrence (>3 foci), the median overall survival was 12 months (2-70) compared to patients with PET findings with ≤1 focus for which the median survival was not attained (p=0.007). A multivariate analysis of prognostic factors demonstrated that abnormal FDG uptake (>3 foci) was the most significant factor (p<0.03) for death from cervical cancer. FDG PET is a valuable tool in the case of suspected recurrence of cervical cancer on account of its impact on treatment planning and especially in predicting patient outcome. (orig.)

  6. The clinical impact of [18F]-FDG Pet during the opening year of a Pet centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talbot Jean-Noël

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We have evaluated the clinical impact of FDG-PET on patient staging and management during the opening year of our PET centre in France. A questionnaire, translation in French of the questionnaire used recently in California, was sent to the referring physician of each of the 476 patients who had at least one routine FDG-PET examination during the year 2000. Of 348 responses (response rate = 73%, the disease was upstaged in 26% of the cases and downstaged in 9%. Inter-modality management changes (change from a scheduled therapeutic modality for a different one were reported in 37% of the cases and intra-modality changes in 9%. Those modification rates were respectively 38% and 7% in recurrence of colorectal cancer (153 patients, 47% and 7% in lung cancer (118 patients, 16% and 23% in lymphoma (43 patients, 25% and 6% in the staging of head and neck cancers (32 patients.When comparing with the similar studies performed in California, there were no significant differences between the rates of inter-modality management changes. In contrast, intra-modality management changes were less frequent in our survey, except for lymphoma. Globally, the clinical impact of FDG PET was similar, with a higher response rate to our survey (73% versus 35%; it was above the mean 31% rate of therapeutic modification derived from a recent tabulated summary in over 3400 patients.

  7. Feasibility study of small animal imaging using clinical PET/CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wen-Lin; Chen, Chia-Lin; Wang, Ze-Jing; Wu, Tung-Hsin; Liu, Dai-Wei; Lee, Jason J. S.

    2007-02-01

    The feasibility of small animal imaging using a clinical positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanner with [F-18]-fluoro-2-deoxy- D-glucose (FDG) was evaluated. Two protocols in PET/CT system, single-mouse high-resolution mode (SHR) and multi-mouse high throughput mode (MHT) protocol were employed to investigate the ability of the scanner and also explored the performance differences between microPET and clinical PET/CT. In this study, we have found that even the clinical PET/CT scanner could not compete with the microPET scanner, especially in spatial resolution; the high-resolution CT image could advance the anatomical information to sub-millimeter level. Besides, CT-based attenuation correction can improve the image uniformity characteristics and quantification accuracy, and the large bore of a human whole-body scanner broadens the possibility of high throughput studies. Considering all the benefits, clinical PET/CT imaging might be a potential alternative for small animal study.

  8. Comparison of meta-analyses among elastosonography (ES) and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging techniques in the application of prostate cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Qiaohong; Duan, Zhongxiang; Lei, Jixiao; Jiao, Guangli

    2016-03-01

    early diagnosis of PCa than any other studied imaging techniques. However, the diagnostic ranking of the six imaging techniques might not be applicable to the clinical phase due to the shortage of stratified analysis. PMID:26415734

  9. A review of clinical conditions of pet rabbits associated with their teeth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pet rabbits are frequently treated by veterinary surgeons but most of the literature is based on diseases encountered in laboratory or commercial rabbits. Many pet rabbits suffer from dental abnormalities and 40 clinical cases of diseases associated with teeth problems are reviewed. The clinical and radiological examination of the oral cavity of conscious and anaesthetized rabbits is described and the treatment of dental disorders is discussed

  10. Clinical impact of FDG PET scanning in colon cancer patients: a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: PET scanning using FDG accurately stages patients (pts) with complications arising some time after initial treatment of colorectal cancer. This prospective study assessed how the FDG PET scan results affected management in 42 such pts (33 males, mean age 64 ± 12, range 32-88 years), where clinical doubt remained about their stage after routine assessment, including conventional imaging (CI). Prior to PET scanning, referring doctors were asked why it was needed, to stage their pts according to available data and indicate probable management plans. Follow-up of subsequent management which occurred post-PET was obtained and compared to pre-scan plans. After PET scanning, 14 pts (33%) were converted from aggressive treatment of suspected locoregional disease to palliative therapy after discovery of distant undetected but subsequently confirmed metastases. A further 8 pts (19%) had treatment changed (2 pts: surgery to follow-up; 2 pts: radiotherapy field changed; 4 pts: surgery to medical therapy). Nine patients were cleared for surgery but 2/6 were found to be inoperable due to small metastases ( < 1 cm) not detected on PET or Cl. In 11 pts, continued clinical observation followed negative PET. PET found occult tumour in 2/4 pts with rising CEA but negative CI. Of 17 pts deemed operable on CI, only 6 were considered surgical candidates following PET. In summary, in carefully selected patients with previously treated colorectal cancer, PET scanning significantly altered management in 21/41 (52%.). The significant reduction in surgery provided a significant cost saving in this population. A clear PET scan in patients with otherwise operative disease does not always exclude small volume metastases

  11. A prospective study of the clinical impact of PET scanning in lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: PET scanning using F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), has been shown to very accurately stage patients with non-small cell lung cancer. At this Institute these patients are only sent for PET imaging where there remains any significant doubt as to their clinical staging or management after the completion of conventional screening test including CT scanning. This study examines how PET scan findings influenced the clinical management decisions in 45 consecutive patients (26 males, mean age 69±9 yrs: range 36-78 yrs). Referring doctors were asked to indicate reason for the PET scan, stage their patients on the basis of aU their current investigations, including CT scans, and to indicate their management plans prior to PET scanning. Follow-up of subsequent patient management at 2-4 weeks post PET scan was then obtained and compared to pre scan plans. Results:, PET was used to stage 27 patients, restage 8, plan radiotherapy in 4, post treatment follow-up in 3, assess solitary nodules in 2, and as a baseline for experimental therapy in 1. To date follow-up has shown that in 14 (31%) patients PET scanning found new distant abnormalities which caused planned radical surgery or radiotherapy to be changed to palliative treatment only. Following PET findings, which clarified equivocal findings on other imaging modalities 9 patients underwent curative lung surgery. This found localised disease only in the 5 who have had surgery to this time. Similarly 7 patients continued on to have radical radiotherapy. In 3 patients, original treatment protocols changed (smaller radiation portal, surgery after good response to radiotherapy, planned chemotherapy ceased). In 8(18%) patients PET scans did not alter planned therapy. 1 patient awaits follow-up. Conclusions: In carefully selected patients with lung cancer, PET scanning significantly affected management decisions in 82%. It was used not only to spare unnecessary treatment, but also to target treatment appropriate to

  12. Focuss algorithm application in kinetic compartment modeling for PET tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular imaging is in the process of becoming. Its application mostly depends on the molecular discovery process of imaging probes and drugs, from the mouse to the patient, from research to clinical practice. Positron emission tomography (PET) can non-invasively monitor . pharmacokinetic and functional processes of drugs in intact organisms at tracer concentrations by kinetic modeling. It has been known that for all biological systems, linear or nonlinear, if the system is injected by a tracer in a steady state, the distribution of the tracer follows the kinetics of a linear compartmental system, which has sums of exponential solutions. Based on the general compartmental description of the tracer's fate in vivo, we presented a novel kinetic modeling approach for the quantification of in vivo tracer studies with dynamic positron emission tomography (PET), which can determine a parsimonious model consisting with the measured data. This kinetic modeling technique allows for estimation of parametric images from a voxel based analysis and requires no a priori decision about the tracer's fate in vivo, instead determining the most appropriate model from the information contained within the kinetic data. Choosing a set of exponential functions, convolved with the plasma input function, as basis functions, the time activity curve of a region or a pixel can be written as a linear combination of the basis functions with corresponding coefficients. The number of non-zero coefficients returned corresponds to the model order which is related to the number of tissue compartments. The system macro parameters are simply determined using the focal underdetermined system solver (FOCUSS) algorithm. The FOCUSS algorithm is a nonparametric algorithm for finding localized energy solutions from limited data and is a recursive linear estimation procedure. FOCUSS algorithm usually converges very fast, so demands a few iterations. The effectiveness is verified by simulation and clinical

  13. The potential clinical value of FDG-PET for recurrent renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The clinical value of positron emission tomography (PET) using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) for follow-up or suspected recurrence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has not been fully evaluated. The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of FDG-PET for postoperative assessment in patients with RCC. Methods: We reviewed 28 scans in 23 patients who had undergone FDG-PET scans after surgery for RCC. Diagnostic accuracy of visually interpreted PET was evaluated based on final diagnoses obtained histologically or by clinical follow-up at least 6 months. Also, additional information over CT, influence on treatment decisions, and the accuracy of FDG uptake as a predictor of survival were assessed. Results: Recurrence of renal carcinoma was histologically (n = 15) or clinically (n = 6) confirmed in 21 of 28 cases. Overall, the sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy using FDG-PET were 81%, 71%, and 79%, respectively. In papillary RCC, the sensitivity was 100%; however, that was 75% in clear cell RCC in patient-basis. PET correctly detected local recurrence and metastases in all cases in the peritoneum, bone, muscle and adrenal gland. Additional information was obtained from scans in 6 cases (21%), which influenced therapeutic management in 3 cases (11%). Cumulative survival rates over 5 years in the PET-positive vs. the PET-negative group were 46% vs. 83%, respectively (p = 0.17). Conclusions: FDG-PET would be useful for postoperative surveillance in patients with RCC, although its impact on treatment decisions may be limited. Further investigations are necessary to conclude whether PET has a prognostic value.

  14. The potential clinical value of FDG-PET for recurrent renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakatani, Koya, E-mail: koyakn@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-kawahara-cho, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto 606-8507 Japan (Japan); Nakamoto, Yuji, E-mail: 9709.ynakamo1@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-kawahara-cho, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto 606-8507 Japan (Japan); Saga, Tsuneo, E-mail: saga@nirs.go.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-Ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Higashi, Tatsuya, E-mail: higashi@shigamed.jp [Research Institute, Shiga Medical Center for Adults, 5-4-30 Moriyama, Moriyama City, Shiga 524-8524 Japan (Japan); Togashi, Kaori, E-mail: ktogashi@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin-kawahara-cho, Sakyo-Ku, Kyoto 606-8507 Japan (Japan)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: The clinical value of positron emission tomography (PET) using {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) for follow-up or suspected recurrence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has not been fully evaluated. The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic performance of FDG-PET for postoperative assessment in patients with RCC. Methods: We reviewed 28 scans in 23 patients who had undergone FDG-PET scans after surgery for RCC. Diagnostic accuracy of visually interpreted PET was evaluated based on final diagnoses obtained histologically or by clinical follow-up at least 6 months. Also, additional information over CT, influence on treatment decisions, and the accuracy of FDG uptake as a predictor of survival were assessed. Results: Recurrence of renal carcinoma was histologically (n = 15) or clinically (n = 6) confirmed in 21 of 28 cases. Overall, the sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy using FDG-PET were 81%, 71%, and 79%, respectively. In papillary RCC, the sensitivity was 100%; however, that was 75% in clear cell RCC in patient-basis. PET correctly detected local recurrence and metastases in all cases in the peritoneum, bone, muscle and adrenal gland. Additional information was obtained from scans in 6 cases (21%), which influenced therapeutic management in 3 cases (11%). Cumulative survival rates over 5 years in the PET-positive vs. the PET-negative group were 46% vs. 83%, respectively (p = 0.17). Conclusions: FDG-PET would be useful for postoperative surveillance in patients with RCC, although its impact on treatment decisions may be limited. Further investigations are necessary to conclude whether PET has a prognostic value.

  15. Factors influencing the establishment and maintenance of a clinical PET imaging service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Interest in PET (Positron Emission Tomography) Imaging has increased and many Imaging Units will be confronted by the prospect of introducing a PET service. Using our experience of setting up and maintaining a Clinical PET imaging service, we will demonstrate the issues to be considered in establishing a safe and effective service Areas to be covered include: instrumentation and Quality Control for imaging and accessory equipment radiopharmaceutical availability; utilisation of time and space for planning and scheduling, radiation safety for staff, patients and visitors, adequate staffing levels to maintain service and low doses, training for clinical and technical staff, and the costs associated with the running of a unit. We hope to show some of the various aspects to consider when providing a Clinical PET Imaging service and how we have tackled it without compromising quality or safety. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  16. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in the oncologic clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We intended to determine the frequency with that the computer axial tomography (TAC), it was able to visualize the lesions extra neoplasia detected by the PET tomography in patients with fully identified primary malignant neoplasia. (Author)

  17. Clinical studies on the use of PET in radiotherapy planning in Germany. An update; Klinische Studien zum Einsatz der PET in der Bestrahlungsplanung in Deutschland. Ein Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nestle, U.; Mix, M.; Weber, W.; Grosu, A.L. [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg (Germany). Kliniken fuer Strahlenheilkunde und Nuklearmedizin

    2011-07-15

    In recent years, PET and PET/CT have well been established for staging and restaging of various malignancies. Increasingly, the modality is also used for radiotherapy treatment planning. However, clinical studies investigating the patients benefit by the inclusion of those modalities into RT treatment planning are mandatory, simultaneously defining standards for future care. Chances and problems of such studies are discussed using the examples of the PET-Plan and GLIAA trials. (orig.)

  18. Positron emission tomography clinical practice

    CERN Document Server

    Valk, Peter E; Bailey, Dale L; Townsend, David W; Maisey, Michael N

    2006-01-01

    This book provides a contemporary reference to the science, technology and clinical applications of PET and PET/CT. The opening chapters summarize the scientific aspects of PET and PET/CT including physics, instrumentation, radiation dosimetry and radiation protection. A chapter on normal variants in FDG PET imaging serves as an introduction to the clinical chapters, which cover oncology applications and have been updated to include the impact of FDG PET/CT imaging in oncology. The book concludes with chapters on the use of PET and PET/CT in cardiology and neurology and PET imaging of infectio

  19. Clinical application study on malignant metastatic diseases between DWIBS and PET/CT%背景抑制扩散加权成像与PET/CT在恶性肿瘤转移性病变中的临床应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈茜刚; 周良平; 彭卫军; 毛健; 张灵; 顾雅佳; 姚之丰; 程竞仪

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: Diffusion-weighted whole-body imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) can be used for magnetic resonance imaging systemic examination, especially in examing the metastatic lesions, lymph node and bone diseases, and the imaging result is similar with PET. This study aimed to evaluate the application value of magnetic resonance DWIBS and positron emission tomography with computed tomography (PET/CT) on malignant metastatic diseases. Methods: Thirty-six patients confirmed with malignant tumors accompanying metastasis by the pathology of operation or biopsy underwent both DWIBS imaging and PET/CT, chi-square test and Kappa test were used for comparing the detection results of metastasis by these 2 imaging methods. Results:Among the 36 malignant tumor patients with 238 metastatic lesions, 218 (91.6%, 218/238) lesions in DWIBS and 209 (87.8%, 209/238) lesions in PET/CT were detected, with 200 lesions detected by the two methods simultaneously, and the concordance rate was 88.7%(211/238);but there was no statistical signiifcance between this two methods (χ2=1.843, P=0.157). Kappa test showed a fair concordance rate between DWIBS and PET/CT (P=0.000).There were different significance between DWIBS and PET/CT in detecting metastatic lesions of brain and bone (P=0.005 and 0.031);But there was no signiifcant differences (P=0.309 and 1.000) in detecting metastatic lesions of lymph nodes and liver. Conclusion:DWIBS could detect metastatic lesions effectively, and there is ifne consistency with PET/CT. DWIBS is more sensitive than PET/CT in detecting metastatic lesions of brain and bone, so DWIBS could be chosed for screening metastatic lesions according to the characteristics of different primary tumors.%背景与目的:抑制扩散加权成像(diffusion-weighted whole-body imaging with background body signal suppression,DWIBS),是一种可用于全身检查的核磁共振成像技术,尤其可以较好的显示转移病灶、

  20. Pre-clinical PET/MR: technological advances and new perspectives in biomedical research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehrl, Hans F.; Judenhofer, Martin S.; Wiehr, Stefan; Pichler, Bernd J. [University of Tuebingen, Department of Radiology, Laboratory for Preclinical Imaging and Imaging Technology of the Werner Siemens-Foundation, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    Combined PET/MRI allows for multi-parametric imaging and reveals one or more functional processes simultaneously along with high-resolution morphology. Especially in small-animal research, where high soft tissue contrast is required, and the scan time as well as radiation dose are critical factors, the combination of PET and MRI would be beneficial compared with PET/CT. In the mid-1990's, several research groups used different approaches to integrate PET detectors into high-field MRI. First, systems were based on optical fibres guiding the scintillation light to the PMT's, which reside outside the fringe magnetic field. Recent advances in gamma ray detector technology, which were initiated mainly by the advent of avalanche photodiodes (APD's) as well as the routine availability of fast scintillation materials like lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO), paved the way towards the development of fully magnetic-field-insensitive high-performance PET detectors. Current animal PET/MR technologies are reviewed and pitfalls when engineering a full integration of a PET and a high-field MRI are discussed. Compact PET detectors can be integrated in small-bore, high-field MRI tomographs. Detailed performance evaluations have shown that the mutual interference between the two imaging systems could be minimized. The performance of all major MR applications, ranging from T1- or T2-weighted imaging up to echo-planar imaging (EPI) for functional MRI (fMRI) or magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), could be maintained, even when the PET insert was built into the MRI and acquiring PET data simultaneously. Similarly, the PET system performance was not influenced by the static magnetic field or applied MRI sequences. Initial biomedical research applications range from the combination of functional information from PET with the anatomical information from the MRI to multi-functional imaging combining metabolic PET and MRI data. Compared to other multi-modality approaches PET

  1. Clinical use of digital retrospective image fusion of CT, MRI, FDG-PET and SPECT - fields of indications and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and the clinical benefits of retrospective digital image fusion (PET, SPECT, CT and MRI). Materials and methods: In a prospective study, a total of 273 image fusions were performed and evaluated. The underlying image acquisitions (CT, MRI, SPECT and PET) were performed in a way appropriate for the respective clinical question and anatomical region. Image fusion was executed with a software program developed during this study. The results of the image fusion procedure were evaluated in terms of technical feasibility, clinical objective, and therapeutic impact. Results: The most frequent combinations of modalities were CT/PET (n = 156) and MRI/PET (n = 59), followed by MRI/SPECT (n = 28), CT/SPECT (n = 22) and CT/MRI (n = 8). The clinical questions included following regions (more than one region per case possible): neurocranium (n = 42), neck (n = 13), lung and mediastinum (n = 24), abdomen (n = 181), and pelvis (n = 65). In 92.6% of all cases (n = 253), image fusion was technically successful. Image fusion was able to improve sensitivity and specificity of the single modality, or to add important diagnostic information. Image fusion was problematic in cases of different body positions between the two imaging modalities or different positions of mobile organs. In 37.9% of the cases, image fusion added clinically relevant information compared to the single modality. Conclusion: For clinical questions concerning liver, pancreas, rectum, neck, or neurocranium, image fusion is a reliable method suitable for routine clinical application. Organ motion still limits its feasibility and routine use in other areas (e.g., thorax). (orig.)

  2. PET-based dose delivery verification in proton therapy: a GATE based simulation study of five PET system designs in clinical conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET is a promising technique for in vivo treatment verification in hadrontherapy. Three main PET geometries dedicated to in-beam treatment monitoring have been proposed in the literature: the dual-head PET geometry, the OpenPET geometry and the slanted-closed ring geometry. The aim of this work is to characterize the performance of two of these dedicated PET detectors in realistic clinical conditions. Several configurations of the dual-head PET and OpenPET systems were simulated using GATE v6.2. For the dual-head configuration, two aperture angles (15° and 45°) were studied. For the OpenPET system, two gaps between rings were investigated (110 and 160 mm). A full-ring PET system was also simulated as a reference. After preliminary evaluation of the sensitivity and spatial resolution using a Derenzo phantom, a real small-field head and neck treatment plan was simulated, with and without introducing patient displacements. No wash-out was taken into account. 3D maps of the annihilation photon locations were deduced from the PET data acquired right after the treatment session (5 min acquisition) using a dedicated OS-EM reconstruction algorithm. Detection sensitivity at the center of the field-of-view (FOV) varied from 5.2% (45° dual-head system) to 7.0% (full-ring PET). The dual-head systems had a more uniform efficiency within the FOV than the OpenPET systems. The spatial resolution strongly depended on the location within the FOV for the ϕ = 45° dual-head system and for the two OpenPET systems. All investigated architectures identified the magnitude of mispositioning introduced in the simulations within a 1.5 mm accuracy. The variability on the estimated mispositionings was less than 2 mm for all PET systems. (paper)

  3. Simultaneous PET/MR head–neck cancer imaging: Preliminary clinical experience and multiparametric evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covello, M., E-mail: echoplanare@gmail.com [IRCCS SDN, Via E. Gianturco, 111-113 – 80143, Naples (Italy); Cavaliere, C.; Aiello, M.; Cianelli, M.S. [IRCCS SDN, Via E. Gianturco, 111-113 – 80143, Naples (Italy); Mesolella, M.; Iorio, B. [Department of Otorhinolaryngoiatry, Federico II University, Naples (Italy); Rossi, A.; Nicolai, E. [IRCCS SDN, Via E. Gianturco, 111-113 – 80143, Naples (Italy)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Simultaneous PET/MRI is a suitable tool for head/neck T-staging. • No significant differences have been found for PET measures get by both PET/CT and PET/MRI. • SUV 2D and 3D measures in HN lesion offer comparable estimations. • Multiparametric evaluation allows a complete characterization of HN lesions. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the role of simultaneous hybrid PET/MR imaging and to correlate metabolic PET data with morpho-functional parameters derived by MRI in patients with head–neck cancer. Methods: Forty-four patients, with histologically confirmed head and neck malignancy (22 primary tumors and 22 follow-up) were studied. Patients initially received a clinical exam and endoscopy with direct biopsy. Next patients underwent whole body PET/CT followed by PET/MR of the head/neck region. PET and MRI studies were separately evaluated by two blinded groups (both included one radiologist and one nuclear physician) in order to define the presence or absence of lesions/recurrences. Regions of interest (ROIs) analysis was conducted on the primary lesion at the level of maximum size on metabolic (SUV and MTV), diffusion (ADC) and perfusion (K{sup trans}, V{sub e}, k{sub ep} and iAUC) parameters. Results: PET/MR examinations were successfully performed on all 44 patients. Agreement between the two blinded groups was found in anatomic allocation of lesions by PET/MR (Primary tumors: Cohen's kappa 0.93; Follow-up: Cohen's kappa 0.89). There was a significant correlation between CT-SUV measures and MR (e.g., CT-SUV VOI vs. MR-SUV VOI: ρ = 0.97, p < 0.001 for the entire sample). There was also significant positive correlations between the ROI area, SUV measures, and the metabolic parameters (SUV and MTV) obtained during both PET/CT and PET/MR. A significant negative correlation was observed between ADC and K{sup trans} values in the primary tumors. In addition, a significant negative correlation existed between MR SUV and ADC in

  4. Simultaneous PET/MR head–neck cancer imaging: Preliminary clinical experience and multiparametric evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Simultaneous PET/MRI is a suitable tool for head/neck T-staging. • No significant differences have been found for PET measures get by both PET/CT and PET/MRI. • SUV 2D and 3D measures in HN lesion offer comparable estimations. • Multiparametric evaluation allows a complete characterization of HN lesions. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the role of simultaneous hybrid PET/MR imaging and to correlate metabolic PET data with morpho-functional parameters derived by MRI in patients with head–neck cancer. Methods: Forty-four patients, with histologically confirmed head and neck malignancy (22 primary tumors and 22 follow-up) were studied. Patients initially received a clinical exam and endoscopy with direct biopsy. Next patients underwent whole body PET/CT followed by PET/MR of the head/neck region. PET and MRI studies were separately evaluated by two blinded groups (both included one radiologist and one nuclear physician) in order to define the presence or absence of lesions/recurrences. Regions of interest (ROIs) analysis was conducted on the primary lesion at the level of maximum size on metabolic (SUV and MTV), diffusion (ADC) and perfusion (Ktrans, Ve, kep and iAUC) parameters. Results: PET/MR examinations were successfully performed on all 44 patients. Agreement between the two blinded groups was found in anatomic allocation of lesions by PET/MR (Primary tumors: Cohen's kappa 0.93; Follow-up: Cohen's kappa 0.89). There was a significant correlation between CT-SUV measures and MR (e.g., CT-SUV VOI vs. MR-SUV VOI: ρ = 0.97, p < 0.001 for the entire sample). There was also significant positive correlations between the ROI area, SUV measures, and the metabolic parameters (SUV and MTV) obtained during both PET/CT and PET/MR. A significant negative correlation was observed between ADC and Ktrans values in the primary tumors. In addition, a significant negative correlation existed between MR SUV and ADC in recurrent tumors. Conclusion

  5. PET in tumor imaging: research only or a cost effective clinical tool?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET imaging has for many years been a versatile tool for non-invasive imaging of neuro-physiology and, indeed, whole body physiology. Quantitative PET imaging of trace amounts of radioactivity is scientifically elegant and can be very complex. This lecture focuses on whether and where this test is clinically useful. Because of the research tradition, PET imaging has been perceived as an 'expensive' test, as it costs more per scan than CT and MRI scans at most institutions. Such a superficial analysis is incorrect, however, as it is increasingly recognized that imaging costs, which in some circumstances will be increased by the use of PET, are only a relatively small component of patient care costs. Thus, PET may raise imaging costs and the number of imaging procedures in some settings, though PET may reduce imaging test numbers in other settings. However, the analysis must focus on the total costs of patient management. Analyses focused on total patient care costs, including cost of hospitalization and cost surgery as well as imaging costs, have shown that PET can substantially reduce total patient care costs in several settings. This is achieved by providing a more accurate diagnosis, and thus having fewer instances of an incorrect diagnosis resulting in subsequent inappropriate surgery or investigations. Several institutions have shown scenarios in which PET for tumor imaging is cost effective. While the specific results of the analyses vary based on disease prevalence and cost input values for each procedure, as well as the projected performance of PET, the similar results showing total care cost savings in the management of several common cancers, strongly supports the rational for the use of PET in cancer management. In addition, promising clinical results are forthcoming in several other illnesses, suggesting PET will have broader utility than these uses, alone. Thus, while PET is an 'expensive' imaging procedure and has considerable utility as a research

  6. 18F-FDG PET/CT impact on testicular tumours clinical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testicular tumour is the most common malignancy in young men. The diagnostic work-up is mainly based on morphological imaging. The aim of our study was to evaluate the clinical impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT in patients with testicular tumour. We retrospectively evaluated all patients studied by 18F-FDG PET/CT at our centre. Inclusion criteria were: pathological confirmation of testicular tumour, contrast-enhanced CT scan performed within a month of the PET/CT scan, and clinical/imaging follow-up performed at the Oncology Unit of our hospital. Overall, 56 patients were enrolled and 121 PET/CT scans were evaluated. 18F-FDG PET/CT was performed following standard procedures and the results were compared with clinical, imaging and follow-up data. Clinicians were contacted to enquire whether the PET/CT scan influenced the patient's management. Answers were scored as follows: start/continue chemotherapy or radiotherapy, indication for surgery of secondary lesions, and clinical surveillance. On a scan basis, 51 seminoma and 70 nonseminoma (NS) cases were reviewed. Of the 121 cases. 32 were found to be true-positive, 74 true-negative, 8 false-positive and 6 false-negative by PET/CT. PET/CT showed good sensitivity and specificity for seminoma lesion detection (92 % and 84 %, respectively), but its sensitivity was lower for NS forms (sensitivity and specificity 77 % and 95 %, respectively). The PET/CT scan influenced the clinical management of 47 of 51 seminomas (in 6 chemotherapy was started/continued, in 3 radiotherapy was started/continued, in 2 surgery of secondary lesions was performed, and in 36 clinical surveillance was considered appropriate), and 59 of 70 NS (in 18 therapy/surgery was started/continued, and in 41 clinical surveillance was considered appropriate). Our preliminary data demonstrate the potential usefulness of PET/CT for the assessment of patients with testicular tumour. It provides valuable information for the clinical management, particularly for clinical

  7. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT impact on testicular tumours clinical management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosini, Valentina; Nicolini, Silvia; Nanni, Cristina; Allegri, Vincenzo; Fanti, Stefano [S.Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Zucchini, Giorgia; Berselli, Annalisa; Martoni, Andrea; Cricca, Antonia [S.Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Oncology, Bologna (Italy); Domenico, Rubello [S.Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Rovigo (Italy)

    2014-04-15

    Testicular tumour is the most common malignancy in young men. The diagnostic work-up is mainly based on morphological imaging. The aim of our study was to evaluate the clinical impact of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in patients with testicular tumour. We retrospectively evaluated all patients studied by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT at our centre. Inclusion criteria were: pathological confirmation of testicular tumour, contrast-enhanced CT scan performed within a month of the PET/CT scan, and clinical/imaging follow-up performed at the Oncology Unit of our hospital. Overall, 56 patients were enrolled and 121 PET/CT scans were evaluated. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was performed following standard procedures and the results were compared with clinical, imaging and follow-up data. Clinicians were contacted to enquire whether the PET/CT scan influenced the patient's management. Answers were scored as follows: start/continue chemotherapy or radiotherapy, indication for surgery of secondary lesions, and clinical surveillance. On a scan basis, 51 seminoma and 70 nonseminoma (NS) cases were reviewed. Of the 121 cases. 32 were found to be true-positive, 74 true-negative, 8 false-positive and 6 false-negative by PET/CT. PET/CT showed good sensitivity and specificity for seminoma lesion detection (92 % and 84 %, respectively), but its sensitivity was lower for NS forms (sensitivity and specificity 77 % and 95 %, respectively). The PET/CT scan influenced the clinical management of 47 of 51 seminomas (in 6 chemotherapy was started/continued, in 3 radiotherapy was started/continued, in 2 surgery of secondary lesions was performed, and in 36 clinical surveillance was considered appropriate), and 59 of 70 NS (in 18 therapy/surgery was started/continued, and in 41 clinical surveillance was considered appropriate). Our preliminary data demonstrate the potential usefulness of PET/CT for the assessment of patients with testicular tumour. It provides valuable information for the clinical management

  8. Clinical value of PET/CT for the management of malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of PET/CT for the management of malignant tumors. Methods: 96 patients (68 male, 28 female, mean age 61.7, ranged 26-89 years old). All are confirmed by pathology or clinic ally except brain tumor and all were not treated. PET/CT imaging was performed using GE Discovery LS PET/CT. Radiotherapy target definition: gross target volume (GTV) was defined using PET/CT fusion imaging. All data were analyzed with SPSS 10.0. Results: 1) Of 96 patients, PET/CT detection sensitivity was 97.92%. The overall tumor staging was changed in 44(45.83%) patients and the rates of metastasis to the lymph nodes and other organs were increased 37.50% and 23.96%, respectively. 2) The therapy regimen was changed in 35(36.46%) patients after PET/CT imaging. 3) The size, boundary and surrounding tissue of the tumor were clearly delineated in the fusion image. Hence it was possible for localization of biological target volume in radiotherapy and also for assessment of the resected extent for surgery. Conclusion: PET/CT plays an important role in early diagnosis, accurate staging and management of tumor patients, especially as a guide to localization of the target volume in radiotherapy and assessment of the resected tumor extent during operation. (authors)

  9. Clinical utility of 18 Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/CT scans in patients with suspect ocular tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Salil Mehta

    2013-01-01

    Systemic imaging of patients with suspect ocular tuberculosis include chest X-rays and computed tomography (CT) scans. Reports have suggested a role for 18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/CT (FDG-PET/CT) scans. We report on the clinical utility of 18 FDG PET/CT in two patients. Case 1: A 38-year-old female patient presented with recurrent anterior uveitis. A 18 FDG-PET scan revealed metabolically active supraclavicular and chest lymph nodes. An aspiration cytology of the cervi...

  10. Clinical PET-MR Imaging in Breast Cancer and Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Samuel L; Friedman, Kent P

    2016-10-01

    Hybrid imaging systems have dramatically improved thoracic oncology patient care over the past 2 decades. PET-MR imaging systems have the potential to further improve imaging of thoracic neoplasms, resulting in diagnostic and therapeutic advantages compared with current MR imaging and PET-computed tomography systems. Increasing soft tissue contrast and lesion sensitivity, improved image registration, reduced radiation exposure, and improved patient convenience are immediate clinical advantages. Multiparametric quantitative imaging capabilities of PET-MR imaging have the potential to improve understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cancer and treatment effects, potentially guiding improvements in diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27593245

  11. Clinical evaluation of a breathing protocol for PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juan, Ramon de [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Zurich, 8091, Zurich (Switzerland); Department of Nuclear Medicine, San Carlos University Hospital, Madrid (Spain); Seifert, Burkhardt [Department of Biostatistics, University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Berthold, Thomas; Schulthess, Gustav K. von; Goerres, Gerhard W. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Zurich, 8091, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the frequency and severity of respiration-induced curvilinear respiration artifacts (RICA) on co-registered positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) images acquired on a combined PET/CT scanner before and after modifying the respiration protocol for CT scanning, with retrospective analysis of two groups of 100 patients each, before and after implementing a respiration protocol with breath-hold (BH) in the normal expiration position for the acquisition of the CT images. The CT data were used as attenuation map and for image co-registration. A ranking of co-registered PET/CT and PET images (including maximum intensity projection) was done by two observers in consensus using a scale from 0 to 3. Zero indicated that no RICA was visible and 1, 2, and 3 described artifact with increasing severity. A significant difference in RICA occurrence was found between the two groups (p<0.0001). There was a 45% decrease of artifact frequency when using the normal expiration protocol and a 68% decrease of grade-2 and grade-3 artifacts (p=0.004). The results of this study suggest that BH during the normal expiration position for CT scanning can be recommended to reduce the occurrence and the severity of RICA on PET/CT. (orig.)

  12. Clinical evaluation of a breathing protocol for PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to assess the frequency and severity of respiration-induced curvilinear respiration artifacts (RICA) on co-registered positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) images acquired on a combined PET/CT scanner before and after modifying the respiration protocol for CT scanning, with retrospective analysis of two groups of 100 patients each, before and after implementing a respiration protocol with breath-hold (BH) in the normal expiration position for the acquisition of the CT images. The CT data were used as attenuation map and for image co-registration. A ranking of co-registered PET/CT and PET images (including maximum intensity projection) was done by two observers in consensus using a scale from 0 to 3. Zero indicated that no RICA was visible and 1, 2, and 3 described artifact with increasing severity. A significant difference in RICA occurrence was found between the two groups (p<0.0001). There was a 45% decrease of artifact frequency when using the normal expiration protocol and a 68% decrease of grade-2 and grade-3 artifacts (p=0.004). The results of this study suggest that BH during the normal expiration position for CT scanning can be recommended to reduce the occurrence and the severity of RICA on PET/CT. (orig.)

  13. Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technology in the application of PET/CT whole body scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To improve image quality of low dose CT in whole body PET/CT using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) technology. Methods: Twice CT scans were performed with GE water model,scan parameters were: 120 kV, 120 and 300 mA respectively. In addition, 30 subjects treated with PET/CT were selected randomly, whole body PET/CT were performed after 18F-FDG injection of 3.70 MBq/kg, Sharp IR+time of flight + VUE Point HD technology were used for 1.5 min/bed in PET; CT of spiral scan was performed under 120 kV using automatic exposure control technology (30-210 mA, noise index 25). Model and patients whole body CT images were reconstructed with conventional and 40% ASiR methods respectively, and the CT attenuation value and noise index were measured. Results: Research of model and clinical showed that standard deviation of ASiR method in model CT was 33.0% lower than the conventional CT reconstruction method (t =27.76, P<0.01), standard deviation of CT in normal tissues (brain, lung, mediastinum, liver and vertebral body) and lesions (brain, lung, mediastinum, liver and vertebral body) reduced by 21.08% (t =23.35, P<0.01) and 24.43% (t =16.15, P<0.01) respectively, especially for normal liver tissue and liver lesions, standard deviations of CT were reduced by 51.33% (t=34.21, P<0.0) and 49.54% (t=15.21, P<0.01) respectively. Conclusion: ASiR reconstruction method was significantly reduced the noise of low dose CT image and improved the quality of CT image in whole body PET/CT, which seems more suitable for quantitative analysis and clinical applications. (authors)

  14. AUTOMATION FOR THE SYNTHESIS AND APPLICATION OF PET RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of automated systems supporting the production and application of PET radiopharmaceuticals has been an important focus of researchers since the first successes of using carbon-11 (Comar et al., 1979) and fluorine-18 (Reivich et al., 1979) labeled compounds to visualize functional activity of the human brain. These initial successes of imaging the human brain soon led to applications in the human heart (Schelbert et al., 1980), and quickly radiochemists began to see the importance of automation to support PET studies in humans (Lambrecht, 1982; Langstrom et al., 1983). Driven by the necessity of controlling processes emanating high fluxes of 511 KeV photons, and by the tedium of repetitive syntheses for carrying out these human PET investigations, academic and government scientists have designed, developed and tested many useful and novel automated systems in the past twenty years. These systems, originally designed primarily by radiochemists, not only carry out effectively the tasks they were designed for, but also demonstrate significant engineering innovation in the field of laboratory automation

  15. AUTOMATION FOR THE SYNTHESIS AND APPLICATION OF PET RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexoff, D.L.

    2001-09-21

    The development of automated systems supporting the production and application of PET radiopharmaceuticals has been an important focus of researchers since the first successes of using carbon-11 (Comar et al., 1979) and fluorine-18 (Reivich et al., 1979) labeled compounds to visualize functional activity of the human brain. These initial successes of imaging the human brain soon led to applications in the human heart (Schelbert et al., 1980), and quickly radiochemists began to see the importance of automation to support PET studies in humans (Lambrecht, 1982; Langstrom et al., 1983). Driven by the necessity of controlling processes emanating high fluxes of 511 KeV photons, and by the tedium of repetitive syntheses for carrying out these human PET investigations, academic and government scientists have designed, developed and tested many useful and novel automated systems in the past twenty years. These systems, originally designed primarily by radiochemists, not only carry out effectively the tasks they were designed for, but also demonstrate significant engineering innovation in the field of laboratory automation.

  16. PET Imaging with 89Zr: From Radiochemistry to the Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Deri, Melissa A.; Zeglis, Brian M; Francesconi, Lynn C.; Lewis, Jason S.

    2012-01-01

    The advent of antibody-based cancer therapeutics has led to the concomitant rise in the development of companion diagnostics for these therapies, particularly nuclear imaging agents. A number of radioisotopes have been employed for antibody-based PET and SPECT imaging, notably 64Cu, 124I, 111In, and 99mTc; in recent years, however, the field has increasingly focused on 89Zr, a radiometal with near ideal physical and chemical properties for immunoPET imaging. In the review at hand, we seek to ...

  17. Generating Evidence for Clinical Benefit of PET/CT in Diagnosing Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vach, Werner; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Gerke, Oke;

    2011-01-01

    For diagnostic methods such as PET/CT, not only diagnostic accuracy but also clinical benefit must be demonstrated. However, there is a lack of consensus about how to approach this task. Here we consider 6 clinical scenarios to review some basic approaches to demonstrating the clinical benefit of....... We also develop some guidelines for the evaluation of clinical benefit. First, it should be clarified whether there is a direct benefit of the use of PET/CT or an indirect benefit because of improved diagnostic accuracy. If there is an indirect benefit, then decision modeling should be used initially...... to assess the benefit expected from the use of PET/CT. Only if decision modeling does not allow definitive conclusions should randomized controlled trials be planned....

  18. Clinical Applications of Capnography

    OpenAIRE

    NIKOLOVA-TODOROVA, ZORICA

    2008-01-01

    This article gives a short review of the basic definitions of capnography and its use. The introduction gives an overview of the historical development of this procedure. Technical features of the method are presented, followed by several definitions for understanding the basic terms needed to realize the applications of capnography. The last section is a descriptive part that explains the most important clinical applications of capnography, the strengths and limitations of this method. This ...

  19. PET radiopharmaceuticals for neuroreceptor imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Routine clinical PET radiopharmaceuticals for the noninvasive imaging of brain receptors, transporters,and enzymes are commonly labeled with positron emitting nuclides such as carbon-11 or fluorine-18. Certain minimal conditions need to be fulfilled for these PET ligands to be used as imaging agents in vivo. Some of these prerequisites are discussed and examples of the most useful clinical PET radiopharmaceuticals that have found application in the central nervous system are reviewed.

  20. Imaging performance of LabPET APD-based digital PET scanners for pre-clinical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    % for an energy threshold of 250 keV and 10% for an energy threshold of 350 keV. The results obtained with two energy window settings confirm the relevance of high-efficiency and high-resolution operating modes to take full advantage of the imaging capabilities of the LabPET scanners for molecular imaging applications. (paper)

  1. Automatic registration of PET and CT studies for clinical use in thoracic and abdominal conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim. Implementation and validation of an automatic registration method based on mutual information (MI) for the integration of thoracic and abdominal positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) studies, with the purpose to facilitate in a clinical context the inclusion of PET metabolic information in conformal radiotherapy (RT). Methods. Registration was obtained by modeling a rigid spatial transformation between CT and PET transmission studies. The registration method was based on Normalized Mutual Information (NMI), by iteratively transforming the PET volume, until its optimal alignment to the CT study is achieved, in correspondence of the maximum of NMI. To avoid entrapment in Iocal maxima and to improve convergence speed we introduced a multi resolution scheme. Accuracy of the proposed approach was investigated in experimental data, relative to phantom and patient studies, acquired in conditions similar to clinical situations. Results. In phantom studies the mean error in the 3D space is 3.6 mm (range 3-4 mm) in thoracic region and 3.2 mm (range 2.9-3.7 mm) in abdominal region, considerably Iess than PET spatial resolution. In patient studies the spatial mean error increases with respect to phantom studies (5.4 mm and 5.2 mm for thorax and abdomen, respectively) but remains comparable to the PET spatial resolution. The accuracy of spatial realignment was thus found adequate for the registration of PET/CT registration, if good patient repositioning was adopted. Conclusion. The proposed registration method, based on MI, was validated for the integration of PET/CT studies of patients candidate for thoracic and abdominal conformaI RT. The method is automatic and provided with a user interface, thus suitable for clinical use

  2. Brain dopamine receptors in relation to clinical PET-studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of published PET Models are discussed with regard to their structure and some of the underlying assumptions. Results of experiments with spiperone and N-methylspiperone in the rat and human brain, which challenge some of these assumptions, are summarized. (author). 37 refs.; 6 figs.; 1 tab

  3. PET, Positron emission tomography: Presentation of a clinical case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A patient with a solitary pulmonary nodule is presented. She was studied with PET using F-18 FDG. The metabolic images demonstrated increased uptake in the nodule and 2 additional areas suggestive of extension, not seen in anatomic diagnostic procedures. These findings were compatible with a malignant tumour with metastasis (au)

  4. The clinical usefulness of F-18-FDG CoDe PET in lung cancer staging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was undertaken to assess clinical usefulness of D-18-FDG CoDe PET in nodal staging of lung cancer by comparing with computed tomography (CT) and surgical findings. We performed prospective study comparing CoDe PET and CT of thorax in the presurgical assessment of mediastinum in 24 patients with NSCLC and 1 patient with bronchoaveolar cell ca (BAC). CoDe PET was performed using a dual-head gamma camera (Varicam, Elscint) equipped with 5/8 inch thick NaI(Tl) crystals. Data was acquired at about 1 hour after IV injection of 111-370 MBq of F-18-FDG. An areal scan of the thorax was performed using a slip ring gantry for 30 min. After rebinning, routine tomographic slices were reconstructed without attenuation correction. The images were analyzed visually and compared with CT and pathologic results. CoDe PET detected all surgically proven malignant lesions (12 adenocarcinoma, 11 squamous cell ca of, 1 adenosquamous cell ca, 1 BAC). Hilar and mediastinal lymph node involvement was present in 20%. In nodal staging, 19 CoDe PET studies agreed with pathologic findings, whereas 14 of 25 patients CT agreed with pathologic results. The accuracy of CoDe PET in nodal staging was better than that of CT in a limited number of patients studied thus far. FDG CoDe PET appears to be a supplementary modality in prompt diagnosis, staging and successful management of lung cancer

  5. Gamma camera based FDG PET in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron Emission Tomography(PET) was introduced as a research tool in the 1970s and it took about 20 years before PET became an useful clinical imaging modality. In the USA, insurance coverage for PET procedures in the 1990s was the turning point, I believe, for this progress. Initially PET was used in neurology but recently more than 80% of PET procedures are in oncological applications. I firmly believe, in the 21st century, one can not manage cancer patients properly without PET and PET is very important medical imaging modality in basic and clinical sciences. PET is grouped into 2 categories; conventional (c) and gamma camera based (CB) PET. CBPET is more readily available utilizing dual-head gamma cameras and commercially available FDG to many medical centers at low cost to patients. In fact there are more CBPET in operation than cPET in the USA. CBPET is inferior to cPET in its performance but clinical studies in oncology is feasible without expensive infrastructures such as staffing, rooms and equipments. At Ajou university Hospital, CBPET was installed in late 1997 for the first time in Korea as well as in Asia and the system has been used successfully and effectively in oncological applications. Our was the fourth PET operation in Korea and I believe this may have been instrumental for other institutions got interested in clinical PET. The following is a brief description of our clinical experience of FDG CBPET in oncology

  6. Clinical efficacy of FDG-PET scan in the patients with primary or recurrent gynecologic malignancies: clinical experiences with FDG-PET scan in cervical carcinoma of uterus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was done to evaluate the clinical feasibility of FDG-PET scan in patients with cervical carcinoma. PET-scans were performed in 74 patients with cervical carcinoma from March, 1998 to September, 1998. Fourteen cases were done at pretreatment period and sixty cases were done at post-treatment follow up period. In this study, the scans were obtained after bladder emptying by foley catheter insertion and diuretics to reduce the tracer activity in the bladder and improve the images of central lesions. We could find some incidental recurrent or metastatic lesions by FDG-PET scan (at pretreatment; 5 cases, at post-treatment; clinically no evidence of disease; 8 cases). FDG-PET scan had high sensitivity (100%) for central lesions and metastatic lymph nodes of cervical cancer but could not precisely define the anatomic location of the cancer and the sensitivity was not superior than MRI. Earlier detection of metastatic lymph nodes was superior than CT/MRI (sensitivity; 100 %) for metastatic lymph nodes. Also we found 3 double primary cancers incidentally (2 lung cancers and 1 thyroid cancer). In conclusion, FDG-FET scan might be useful for the earlier of hidden lesions that cannot be detected by routine conventional methods and differential diagnosis with radiation fibrosis and benign lymph adenophy

  7. Clinical efficacy of FDG-PET scan in the patients with primary or recurrent gynecologic malignancies: clinical experiences with FDG-PET scan in cervical carcinoma of uterus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Hoon

    1998-12-01

    This study was done to evaluate the clinical feasibility of FDG-PET scan in patients with cervical carcinoma. PET-scans were performed in 74 patients with cervical carcinoma from March, 1998 to September, 1998. Fourteen cases were done at pretreatment period and sixty cases were done at post-treatment follow up period. In this study, the scans were obtained after bladder emptying by foley catheter insertion and diuretics to reduce the tracer activity in the bladder and improve the images of central lesions. We could find some incidental recurrent or metastatic lesions by FDG-PET scan (at pretreatment; 5 cases, at post-treatment; clinically no evidence of disease; 8 cases). FDG-PET scan had high sensitivity (100%) for central lesions and metastatic lymph nodes of cervical cancer but could not precisely define the anatomic location of the cancer and the sensitivity was not superior than MRI. Earlier detection of metastatic lymph nodes was superior than CT/MRI (sensitivity; 100 %) for metastatic lymph nodes. Also we found 3 double primary cancers incidentally (2 lung cancers and 1 thyroid cancer). In conclusion, FDG-FET scan might be useful for the earlier of hidden lesions that cannot be detected by routine conventional methods and differential diagnosis with radiation fibrosis and benign lymph adenophy.

  8. PET/MRI in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Andreas; Loft, Annika; Law, Ian;

    2013-01-01

    described include brain tumors, pediatric oncology as well as lung, abdominal and pelvic cancer. In general the cases show that PET/MRI performs well in all these types of cancer when compared to PET/CT. However, future large-scale clinical studies are needed to establish when to use PET/MRI. We envision......Combined PET/MRI systems are now commercially available and are expected to change the medical imaging field by providing combined anato-metabolic image information. We believe this will be of particular relevance in imaging of cancer patients. At the Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear...... Medicine & PET at Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen we installed an integrated PET/MRI in December 2011. Here, we describe our first clinical PET/MR cases and discuss some of the areas within oncology where we envision promising future application of integrated PET/MR imaging in clinical routine. Cases...

  9. International conference on clinical PET and molecular nuclear medicine (IPET 2007). Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency is organizing its first international conference on 'Clinical PET and Molecular Nuclear Medicine'. Medical imaging technologies have undergone explosive growth over the past two decades. Today, imaging is at a crossroad, with molecular targeted imaging agents expected to broadly expand the capabilities of conventional anatomical imaging methods. Observing molecular interactions in the living body by the radiotracer technique has become known as 'molecular nuclear medicine'. Molecular nuclear medicine techniques analyze cellular biochemistry and its relationship to disease processes expressed in tissue and organ dysfunction, for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. People can often have similar manifestations of disease, but no two patients will be the same. Functional radionuclide imaging and positron emission tomography (PET) provide excellent opportunities to follow the pathology in individual patients and therefore provide a means for tailored clinical management. These also provide the means to assess the response to treatment in a safe and non-invasive manner. Changes at molecular and cellular levels provide vital clues for evaluating the effectiveness of chosen clinical treatment plans. This information is expected to have a major impact on understanding disease, disease detection, individualised treatment, and drug development. Recently, considerable attention has been drawn to nuclear medicine with the visualization of biochemical processes in vivo such as PET studies with 18F-FDG in many different organs and in cancerous tissues. With the arrival of PET/CT systems there is a new era of accurate mapping of disease processes. Today, 18F-FDG is the most useful PET tracer for the detection, staging, treatment planning and management of cancer. There is mounting evidence for its competitive advantage over conventional techniques in major medical areas including oncology, cardiology, and neurology. Nuclear medicine is

  10. Initial clinical results for breath-hold CT-based processing of respiratory-gated PET acquisitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fin, Loic; Daouk, Joel; Morvan, Julie; Esper, Isabelle El; Saidi, Lazhar; Meyer, Marc-Etienne [Amiens University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Amiens (France); Bailly, Pascal [Amiens University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Amiens (France); CHU d' Amiens, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, unite TEP, Hopital Sud, Amiens cedex (France)

    2008-11-15

    Respiratory motion causes uptake in positron emission tomography (PET) images of chest structures to spread out and misregister with the CT images. This misregistration can alter the attenuation correction and thus the quantisation of PET images. In this paper, we present the first clinical results for a respiratory-gated PET (RG-PET) processing method based on a single breath-hold CT (BH-CT) acquisition, which seeks to improve diagnostic accuracy via better PET-to-CT co-registration. We refer to this method as ''CT-based'' RG-PET processing. Thirteen lesions were studied. Patients underwent a standard clinical PET protocol and then the CT-based protocol, which consists of a 10-min List Mode RG-PET acquisition, followed by a shallow end-expiration BH-CT. The respective performances of the CT-based and clinical PET methods were evaluated by comparing the distances between the lesions' centroids on PET and CT images. SUV{sub MAX} and volume variations were also investigated. The CT-based method showed significantly lower (p=0.027) centroid distances (mean change relative to the clinical method =-49%; range =-100% to 0%). This led to higher SUV{sub MAX} (mean change =+33%; range =-4% to 69%). Lesion volumes were significantly lower (p=0.022) in CT-based PET volumes (mean change =-39%: range =-74% to -1%) compared with clinical ones. A CT-based RG-PET processing method can be implemented in clinical practice with a small increase in radiation exposure. It improves PET-CT co-registration of lung lesions and should lead to more accurate attenuation correction and thus SUV measurement. (orig.)

  11. Initial clinical results for breath-hold CT-based processing of respiratory-gated PET acquisitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Respiratory motion causes uptake in positron emission tomography (PET) images of chest structures to spread out and misregister with the CT images. This misregistration can alter the attenuation correction and thus the quantisation of PET images. In this paper, we present the first clinical results for a respiratory-gated PET (RG-PET) processing method based on a single breath-hold CT (BH-CT) acquisition, which seeks to improve diagnostic accuracy via better PET-to-CT co-registration. We refer to this method as ''CT-based'' RG-PET processing. Thirteen lesions were studied. Patients underwent a standard clinical PET protocol and then the CT-based protocol, which consists of a 10-min List Mode RG-PET acquisition, followed by a shallow end-expiration BH-CT. The respective performances of the CT-based and clinical PET methods were evaluated by comparing the distances between the lesions' centroids on PET and CT images. SUVMAX and volume variations were also investigated. The CT-based method showed significantly lower (p=0.027) centroid distances (mean change relative to the clinical method =-49%; range =-100% to 0%). This led to higher SUVMAX (mean change =+33%; range =-4% to 69%). Lesion volumes were significantly lower (p=0.022) in CT-based PET volumes (mean change =-39%: range =-74% to -1%) compared with clinical ones. A CT-based RG-PET processing method can be implemented in clinical practice with a small increase in radiation exposure. It improves PET-CT co-registration of lung lesions and should lead to more accurate attenuation correction and thus SUV measurement. (orig.)

  12. The clinical value of PET/CT in therapeutic management of the malignant tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of hybrid PET/CT in therapeutic management of the malignant tumor. Methods: 69 patients with malignant tumor without accepting any treatment, who were diagnosed by either pathology (24 patients) or clinical data (45 patients), were analyzed in this study. The age of the 20 females and 49 males ranged between 26 and 99 years (mean 63 years). PET/CT scans were performed using Discovery LS-PET/CT system (GE Discovery LS, CT attenuation correction, OSEM reconstruction), after injection of 5.55 MBq/kg FDG 40 minutes. Results: l. PET/CT showed 18 patients with single lesion and 51 patients with multiple lesions. while in CT imaging showed 47 patients with single lesion before PET/CT scanning. 29 (61.7%) patients were changed the clinical stage and therapeutic scheme after PET/CT performing. 2. Offered biological target orientation to radiotherapy or operation extension to surgery: radiotherapy doctors used PET/CT fusion imaging to direct radiotherapy orientation to 29 patients who were fit for radiotherapy. Five of them, who had treated by MM50 for one period of treatment, reexamined PET/CT after one month later, the former tumor was disappeared or shirked and the metabolism of glucose returned to normal. 10 patients were operated after the doctor confirmed the operation extension and operation path according to the PET/CT fusion images. The pathological results showed no carcinoma cell implicated or soakage in surgery cutting margins. The metastasis lymph nodes were completely removed. One patient, her operation was failed, was diagnosed primary lung cancer with hilus and lymph nodes metastases by PET/CT which indicated that the operation was not suitable for this patient. Conclusion: Hybrid PFT/CT imaging may offer an important tool in therapeutic management of the malignant tumor. One, it can provide more accurate diagnosis for clinical stage of the malignant tumor and assistant doctor's to draw the therapeutic scheme. Two, it

  13. Melanin Targeted Pre-clinical PET Imaging of Melanoma Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Gang; Miao, Zheng; Liu, Hongguang; Jiang, Lei; Limpa-Amara, Naengnoi; Mahmood, Ashfaq; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Cheng, Zhen

    2009-01-01

    Dialkylamino-alkyl-benzamide possess affinities for melanin, suggesting that such 18F-labeled benzamides could potentially be used as melanin targeted positron emission tomography (PET) probes to identify melanotic melanoma metastases in vivo with high sensitivity and specificity. In this report, we describe the synthesis, in vitro and in vivo evaluation of 18F-N-[2-(diethylamino)ethyl]-4-fluoro-Benzamide (18F-FBZA) in mouse tumor models.

  14. Clinical Applications for Estetrol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visser M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the potential clinical applications for the human fetal estrogen estetrol (E4 are presented based on recently obtained data in preclinical and clinical studies. In the past E4 has been classified as a weak estrogen due to its rather low estrogen receptor affinity. However, recent research has demonstrated that due to its favorable pharmacokinetic properties, especially the slow elimination and long half-life, E4 is an effective orally bioavailable estrogen agonist with estrogen antagonistic effects on the breast in the presence of estradiol. Based on the pharmacokinetic properties, the pharmacological profile and the safety and efficacy results in human studies, E4 seems potentially suitable as a drug for human use in applications such as hormone replacement therapy (vaginal atrophy and vasomotor symptoms, contraception, osteoporosis and breast cancer.

  15. Clinical evaluation of PET image reconstruction using a spatial resolution model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: PET image resolution is variable across the measured field-of-view and described by the point spread function (PSF). When accounting for the PSF during PET image reconstruction image resolution is improved and partial volume effects are reduced. Here, we evaluate the effect of PSF-based reconstruction on lesion quantification in routine clinical whole-body (WB) PET/CT imaging. Materials and methods: 41 oncology patients were referred for a WB-PET/CT examination (Biograph 40 TruePoint). Emission data were acquired at 2.5 min/bed at 1 h pi of 400 MBq [18F]-FDG. Attenuation-corrected PET images were reconstructed on 336 × 336-matrices using: (R1) standard AW-OSEM (4 iter, 8 subsets, 4 mm Gaussian) and (R2) AW-OSEM with PSF (3 iter, 21 subsets, 2 mm). Blinded and randomised reading of R1- and R2-PET images was performed. Individual lesions were located and counted independently on both sets of images. The relative change in PET quantification (SUVmax, SUVmean, volume) of lesions seen on R1 and R2 is reported as (R2 − R1)/R1. Furthermore, SUVmax and SUVmean was measured for a 3 cm spherical norm region in the right lobe of the healthy liver for R1 and R2. Results: Clinical reading revealed 91 and 103 positive lesions for R1 and R2, respectively. For all lesions SUVmax (R2) was higher than SUVmax (R1). Regression analysis indicated that the relative increase in SUVmax (and SUVmean) decreased with lesion size, whilst it increased with increasing radial distance from the centre of the field of view (FOV). There was no significant difference in SUVmean in homogenous liver tissue between R1 and R2. Conclusion: In whole-body FDG-PET/CT using routine clinical protocols, PSF-based PET reconstruction increases lesion detection and affects SUVmax measurements compared to standard AW-OSEM PET reconstruction

  16. Initial validation of 4D-model for a clinical PET scanner using the Monte Carlo code gate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Building exposure computational models (ECM) of emission tomography (PET and SPECT) currently has several dedicated computing tools based on Monte Carlo techniques (SimSET, SORTEO, SIMIND, GATE). This paper is divided into two steps: (1) using the dedicated code GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission) to build a 4D model (where the fourth dimension is the time) of a clinical PET scanner from General Electric, GE ADVANCE, simulating the geometric and electronic structures suitable for this scanner, as well as some phenomena 4D, for example, rotating gantry; (2) the next step is to evaluate the performance of the model built here in the reproduction of test noise equivalent count rate (NEC) based on the NEMA Standards Publication NU protocols 2-2007 for this tomography. The results for steps (1) and (2) will be compared with experimental and theoretical values of the literature showing actual state of art of validation. (author)

  17. Initial validation of 4D-model for a clinical PET scanner using the Monte Carlo code gate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Igor F.; Lima, Fernando R.A.; Gomes, Marcelo S., E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, Jose W.; Pacheco, Ludimila M. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Chaves, Rosa M. [Instituto de Radium e Supervoltagem Ivo Roesler, Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Building exposure computational models (ECM) of emission tomography (PET and SPECT) currently has several dedicated computing tools based on Monte Carlo techniques (SimSET, SORTEO, SIMIND, GATE). This paper is divided into two steps: (1) using the dedicated code GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission) to build a 4D model (where the fourth dimension is the time) of a clinical PET scanner from General Electric, GE ADVANCE, simulating the geometric and electronic structures suitable for this scanner, as well as some phenomena 4D, for example, rotating gantry; (2) the next step is to evaluate the performance of the model built here in the reproduction of test noise equivalent count rate (NEC) based on the NEMA Standards Publication NU protocols 2-2007 for this tomography. The results for steps (1) and (2) will be compared with experimental and theoretical values of the literature showing actual state of art of validation. (author)

  18. Recurrent renal cell carcinoma: clinical and prognostic value of FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of our study was 1) to evaluate the diagnostic performance of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT), 2) to assess the impact of FDG PET/CT on treatment decision-making, and 3) to estimate the prognostic value of FDG PET/CT in the restaging process among patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). From the FDG PET/CT databases of San Raffaele Hospital in Milan, Italy, and the Veneto Institute of Oncology in Padua, Italy, we selected 104 patients with a certain diagnosis of RCC after surgery, and for whom at least 24 months of post-surgical FDG PET/CT, clinical, and instrumental follow-up data was available. The sensitivity and specificity of FDG PET/CT were assessed by histology and/or other imaging as standard of reference. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were computed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify predictors of outcome. FDG PET/CT resulted in a positive diagnosis in 58 patients and a negative diagnosis in 46 patients. Sensitivity and specificity were 74 % and 80 %, respectively. FDG PET/CT findings influenced therapeutic management in 45/104 cases (43 %). After a median follow-up period of 37 months (± standard deviation 12.9), 51 (49 %) patients had recurrence of disease, and 26 (25 %) had died. In analysis of OS, positive versus negative FDG PET/CT was associated with worse cumulative survival rates over a 5-year period (19 % vs. 69 %, respectively; p <0.05). Similarly, a positive FDG PET/CT correlated with a lower 3-year PFS rate. In addition, univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that a positive scan, alone or in combination with disease stage III-IV or nuclear grading 3-4, was associated with high risk of progression (multivariate analysis = hazard ratios [HRs] of 4.01, 3.7, and 2.8, respectively; all p < 0.05). FDG PET/CT is a valuable tool both in treatment decision-making and for

  19. Recurrent renal cell carcinoma: clinical and prognostic value of FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alongi, Pierpaolo; Picchio, Maria; Gianolli, Luigi [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Nuclear Medicine Department, Milan (Italy); Zattoni, Fabio [University of Padua, Department of Oncological and Surgical Sciences, Urology Clinic, Padua (Italy); Spallino, Marianna [University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Saladini, Giorgio; Evangelista, Laura [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV - IRCCS, Padua, Italy, Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine Unit, Padua (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    The purpose of our study was 1) to evaluate the diagnostic performance of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT), 2) to assess the impact of FDG PET/CT on treatment decision-making, and 3) to estimate the prognostic value of FDG PET/CT in the restaging process among patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). From the FDG PET/CT databases of San Raffaele Hospital in Milan, Italy, and the Veneto Institute of Oncology in Padua, Italy, we selected 104 patients with a certain diagnosis of RCC after surgery, and for whom at least 24 months of post-surgical FDG PET/CT, clinical, and instrumental follow-up data was available. The sensitivity and specificity of FDG PET/CT were assessed by histology and/or other imaging as standard of reference. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were computed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify predictors of outcome. FDG PET/CT resulted in a positive diagnosis in 58 patients and a negative diagnosis in 46 patients. Sensitivity and specificity were 74 % and 80 %, respectively. FDG PET/CT findings influenced therapeutic management in 45/104 cases (43 %). After a median follow-up period of 37 months (± standard deviation 12.9), 51 (49 %) patients had recurrence of disease, and 26 (25 %) had died. In analysis of OS, positive versus negative FDG PET/CT was associated with worse cumulative survival rates over a 5-year period (19 % vs. 69 %, respectively; p <0.05). Similarly, a positive FDG PET/CT correlated with a lower 3-year PFS rate. In addition, univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that a positive scan, alone or in combination with disease stage III-IV or nuclear grading 3-4, was associated with high risk of progression (multivariate analysis = hazard ratios [HRs] of 4.01, 3.7, and 2.8, respectively; all p < 0.05). FDG PET/CT is a valuable tool both in treatment decision-making and for

  20. Clinical impact of 11C-methionine PET on expected management of patients with brain neoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We retrospectively examined the clinical efficacy of 11C-methionine positron emission tomography (11C-MET PET) in patients with brain neoplasm, especially whether the 11C-MET PET changed the clinical management and whether the change was beneficial or detrimental. This study reviewed 89 11C-MET PET scans for 80 patients (20 scans for initial diagnosis of brain tumor and 69 scans for differentiating tumor recurrence from radiation necrosis). Final diagnosis and the effect on the intended management were obtained from the questionnaire to the referring physicians or directly from the medical records. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for the 11C-MET PET were evaluated. Regarding the management impact, the rate of scans that caused changes in intended management was also evaluated. Moreover, the occurrence of scans having detrimental diagnostic impact (DDI) and beneficial diagnostic impact (BDI) were evaluated. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 11C-MET PET was 87.8, 80.0, and 85.9%. The intended management was changed in 50.0% of the scans. DDI and BDI were observed in 4.3 and 36.2% of the total relevant scans, respectively. 11C-MET PET can provide useful information in initial diagnosis and differentiating tumor recurrence from radiation necrosis. The intended management was changed in half of the scans. Since a few cases did not receive the requisite treatment due to false-negative results of 11C-MET PET, management decision should be made carefully, especially in the case of a negative scan. (orig.)

  1. Clinical value of FDG-PET in cutaneous malignant melanoma: First experience in Estonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In November 2002 first 18F-FDG-PET was performed in Estonia using a mobile truck-mounted scanning technology (Accel, Siemens) provided by the International Healthcare Group (IHG, Amersfoort, Netherlands). The FDG was provided by MAP Medical Technologies, Schering, (Helsinki, Finland). In 2003 this scheme was repeated for further scanning sessions. Evaluation of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) using nuclear technique is of particular interest in Estonia as its incidence is on the rise. F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in CMM has a well-documented high diagnostic accuracy, especially in staging of the disease. The aim of the current study was to assess the impact of 18F-FDG-PET on detailed staging and clinical management in CMM. 30 patients of CMM, 16 males and 14 females, all non-diabetic, in the age range of 26 to 69 years were studied. Of these 30 patients, 12 were of high risk primary CMM, 7 had regional lymph node metastases and 11 had distant metastases. Patients were asked to consume a low-carbohydrate diet 3 days prior to the FDG-PET scan. 194 to 410 MBq (average 335 MBq) 18F-FDG was administered to the patients who were asked to come fasting for a minimum of 6 hours. Whole body scan was performed 40 to 65 minutes after the administration of FDG on the mobile PET. In 13 of the 30 patients (43%) 18F-FDG-PET changed the staging. In remaining 17 patients (57%) 18F-FDG-PET increased confidence level for the chosen treatment. Lymphadenectomy was planned in 2 patients showing lymph node involvement on FDG-PET. In other 2 patients, one with small pulmonary and other with a liver lesions found on PET but negative on radiological examination 'wait-and-watch' strategy was chosen. An unexpected hypermetabolic lesion seen in 1 case turned out to be a benign focus of connective tissue. One patient shown to have multiple distant metastases was started on chemotherapy. Finally in 8 of the 30 (27%) patients an immediate positive

  2. PET and diagnostic technology evaluation in a global clinical process. DGN's point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    malignancies will be improved continuously. It is the claim of the health insurances to implement innovative therapeutic approaches in controlled clinical trials with tools of quality control. The monitoring committee is responsible for the safety of the patients. PET is part of the health care. Internationally accepted rules for clinical trials stipulate that any interim analyses of those trials are confidential as long as recruitment is active. The delay until evidence is documented by the published final analysis is methodologically accepted and not a characteristic of PET. (7) Procedures in nuclear medicine without the use of PET-tracers with short half-life will increase the radiation exposure of the patients; the use of non-PET-tracers with longer half-life is in contravention of the German regulation of radiation protection. (orig.)

  3. Application of fluorine-18 in the syntheses of PET Radiotracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Full text:' Positron emission tomography (PET) is a nuclear medicine imaging technique that uses physiologically active compounds labelled with positron-emitting radionuclides to image and measure the function of in vivo biological processes with minimal disturbance. Fluorine-18 (18F; 97%β+, Emax = 0.635 MeV, t1/2 = 109.7 min) is the most commonly used radionuclide in PET. At McMaster University, 18F has been produced by the use of a reactor (6Li(n,α)3H;16O(t,n)18F)), a tandem Van de Graaf accelerator (20Ne(d,α)18F) and a negative ion proton cyclotron. Neither the reactor nor the accelerator is suitable for the production of 18F for clinical use because of the co-production of tritium (reactor) and low 18F yield (accelerator). Presently, a Siemens RDS 112 proton cyclotron operating at 11 MeV is used for the routine production of 18F by the nuclear reaction, 18O(p,n)18F. The present study focuses on the radiofluorination of the carbon-carbon double bond in 3,4,6-tri-O-acetyl-D-glucal (TAG) by 18F labelled F2 ([18F]F2) to produce 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-FDG) and 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-β-D-allose (2-FDβA). 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose has proven to be an invaluable probe for the study of local glucose metabolism in humans when used in conjunction with PET and has become the standard PET imaging agent against which other imaging agents for tumor detection are compared. 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-β-D-allose is an analogue of the rare sugar, D-allose. It has been suggested that D-allose may be useful for the treatment of ischemia/reperfusion injury and leukemia. (author)

  4. PET/MR in children. Initial clinical experience in paediatric oncology using an integrated PET/MR scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Hirsch, Franz Wolfgang; Sattler, Bernhard; Sorge, Ina; Kurch, Lars; Viehweger, Adrian; Ritter, Lutz; Werner, Peter; Jochimsen, Thies; Barthel, Henryk; Bierbach, Uta; Till, Holger; Sabri, Osama; Kluge, Regine

    2013-01-01

    Use of PET/MR in children has not previously been reported, to the best of our knowledge. Children with systemic malignancies may benefit from the reduced radiation exposure offered by PET/MR. We report our initial experience with PET/MR hybrid imaging and our current established sequence protocol after 21 PET/MR studies in 15 children with multifocal malignant diseases. The effective dose of a PET/MR scan was only about 20% that of the equivalent PET/CT examination. Simultaneous acquisition ...

  5. Cerebral activation studies by PET and fMRT, clinical relevance?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral activation studies by PET and fMRT will gain increasing clinical relevance for functional neuroanatomy (reading, speaking), localisation of largely unknown cortical functions (vestibular cortex), imaging of subjective complaints of functional impairments (pain, smell, memory), and documentation of neurological rehabilitation at neuronal level (regeneration, compensation, substitution, learning). (orig.)

  6. Evaluation of New Inorganic Scintillators for Application in a Prototype Small Animal PET Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Kuntner, C

    2003-01-01

    In the study of new pharmaceuticals as well as brain and genetic research, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a useful method. It has also recently entered the clinical domain in cardiology and particularly in oncology. Small animals such as mice, are often used to validate sophisticated models of human disease. High spatial resolution PET instrumentation is therefore necessary due to the reduced dimensions of the organs. Inorganic scintillators are employed in most of the diagnostic imaging devices. The ultimate performance of the PET scanner is tightly bound to the scintillation properties of the crystals. In the last years there has been an effort to develop new scintillating materials characterized by high light output, high detection efficiency and fast decay time. The most studied systems are mainly Ce3+-doped crystals such as LSO:Ce, YAP:Ce, LuAP:Ce, and recently also mixed Lux(RE3+)1-xAlO3:Ce crystals. These crystals are very attractive for medical application because of their high density (with th...

  7. Basic principles and applications of {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT in oral and maxillofacial imaging: A pictorial essay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omami, Galal [Dept. of Oral Diagnosis and Polyclinics, Faculty of Dentistry, The Hong Kong University, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Tamimi, Dania [BeamReaders Inc., Orlando (United States); Branstette, Barton F. [Dept. of Otolaryngology and Radiology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh (United States)

    2014-12-15

    A combination of positron emission tomography (PET) with 18F-labeled fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) and computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT) has increasingly become a widely used imaging modality for the diagnosis and management of head and neck cancer. On the basis of both recent literature and our professional experience, we present a set of principles with pictorial illustrations and clinical applications of FDG-PET/CT in the evaluation and management planning of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and oropharynx. We feel that this paper will be of interest and will aid the learning of oral and maxillofacial radiology trainees and practitioners.

  8. Genotypic characterisation and cluster analysis of Campylobacter jejuni isolates from domestic pets, human clinical cases and retail food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acke Els

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The genetic similarity of Campylobacter jejuni isolates from pets, compared to human clinical cases and retail food isolates collected in Ireland over 2001-2006 was investigated by cluster analysis of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE fingerprinting profiles. Comparison of the PFGE profiles of 60 pet isolates and 109 human isolates revealed that seven (4.1% profiles were grouped in clusters including at least one human and one pet C. jejuni isolate. In total six (1.6% of 60 pet and 310 food profiles were in clusters with at least one food and one pet C. jejuni isolate. The detection of only a small number of genetically indistinguishable isolates by PFGE profile cluster analysis from pets and from humans with enteritis in this study suggests that pets are unlikely to be an important reservoir for human campylobacteriosis in Ireland. However, genetically indistinguishable isolates were detected and C. jejuni from pets may circulate and may contribute to clinical infections in humans. In addition, contaminated food fed to pets may be a potential source of Campylobacter infection in pets, which may subsequently pose a risk to humans.

  9. Potential Clinical Value of Multiparametric PET in the Prediction of Alzheimer’s Disease Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueqi; Zhou, Yun; Wang, Rongfu; Cao, Haoyin; Reid, Savina; Gao, Rui; Han, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the potential clinical value of quantitative functional FDG PET and pathological amyloid-β PET with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers and clinical assessments in the prediction of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) progression. Methods We studied 82 subjects for up to 96 months (median = 84 months) in a longitudinal Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) project. All preprocessed PET images were spatially normalized to standard Montreal Neurologic Institute space. Regions of interest (ROI) were defined on MRI template, and standard uptake values ratios (SUVRs) to the cerebellum for FDG and amyloid-β PET were calculated. Predictive values of single and multiparametric PET biomarkers with and without clinical assessments and CSF biomarkers for AD progression were evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and logistic regression model. Results The posterior precuneus and cingulate SUVRs were identified for both FDG and amyloid-β PET in predicating progression in normal controls (NCs) and subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). FDG parietal and lateral temporal SUVRs were suggested for monitoring NCs and MCI group progression, respectively. 18F-AV45 global cortex attained (78.6%, 74.5%, 75.4%) (sensitivity, specificity, accuracy) in predicting NC progression, which is comparable to the 11C-PiB global cortex SUVR’s in predicting MCI to AD. A logistic regression model to combine FDG parietal and posterior precuneus SUVR and Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive (ADAS-Cog) Total Mod was identified in predicating NC progression with (80.0%, 94.9%, 93.9%) (sensitivity, specificity, accuracy). The selected model including FDG posterior cingulate SUVR, ADAS-Cog Total Mod, and Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) scores for predicating MCI to AD attained (96.4%, 81.2%, 83.6%) (sensitivity, specificity, accuracy). 11C-PiB medial temporal SUVR with MMSE significantly increased 11C-PiB PET AUC to 0.915 (p<0

  10. Clinical correlates of decreased anteroposterior metabolic gradients in positron emission tomography (PET) of schizophrenic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The finding in schizophrenic patients of a reversal of the normal frontal to posterior pattern of brain metabolic activity with positron emission tomography (PET) is of interest, but its relevance to psychopathology is unknown. Using PET, the authors studied 21 patients with chronic schizophrenia and 21 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Although eight of the 21 patients and only one of the control subjects showed a relatively lower anteroposterior metabolic gradient, no clinical correlates of this finding were noted. In addition, cerebral atrophy, as determined by CAT scan, was not associated with this aberrant metabolic pattern

  11. Clinical correlates of decreased anteroposterior metabolic gradients in positron emission tomography (PET) of schizophrenic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLisi, L.E.; Buchsbaum, M.S.; Holcomb, H.H.; Dowling-Zimmerman, S.; Pickar, D.; Boronow, J.; Morihisa, J.M.; van Kammen, D.P.; Carpenter, W.; Kessler, R.

    1985-01-01

    The finding in schizophrenic patients of a reversal of the normal frontal to posterior pattern of brain metabolic activity with positron emission tomography (PET) is of interest, but its relevance to psychopathology is unknown. Using PET, the authors studied 21 patients with chronic schizophrenia and 21 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Although eight of the 21 patients and only one of the control subjects showed a relatively lower anteroposterior metabolic gradient, no clinical correlates of this finding were noted. In addition, cerebral atrophy, as determined by CAT scan, was not associated with this aberrant metabolic pattern.

  12. Administered activities of 18F-FDG PET clinics in pediatrics patients in Brazil- preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey was conducted among the Brazilian clinical PET, with the purpose of investigating the activities administered to pediatric oncology patients and assess whether significant differences between the protocols adopted. In addition, this survey can cooperate to the suggestion diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in nuclear medicine. Although the methodology for delivering doses by most clinics be based on patient's weight, the results showed variations of up to 191, 6% between the activities administered in clinics, even for similar devices. The average value of the distribution of activities reported was 4.46 ± 1,6 MBq /kg. These data demonstrate the need for harmonization and optimization of 18F-FDG/PET procedures, as well as training for professionals involved in the clinical routine

  13. {sup 18}F-FDG PET of the hands with a dedicated high-resolution PEM system (arthro-PET): correlation with PET/CT, radiography and clinical parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mhlanga, Joyce C.; Lodge, Martin [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States); Carrino, John A. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Musculoskeletal Radiology, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wang, Hao [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Oncology Biostatistics Division, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wahl, Richard L. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Baltimore, MD (United States); Johns Hopkins University Hospitals, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this study was to prospectively determine the feasibility and compare the novel use of a positron emission mammography (PEM) scanner with standard PET/CT for evaluating hand osteoarthritis (OA) with {sup 18}F-FDG. Institutional review board approval and written informed consent were obtained for this HIPAA-compliant prospective study in which 14 adults referred for oncological {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT underwent dedicated hand PET/CT followed by arthro-PET using the PEM device. Hand radiographs were obtained and scored for the presence and severity of OA. Summed qualitative and quantitative joint glycolytic scores for each modality were compared with the findings on plain radiography and clinical features. Eight patients with clinical and/or radiographic evidence of OA comprised the OA group (mean age 73 ± 7.7 years). Six patients served as the control group (53.7 ± 9.3 years). Arthro-PET quantitative and qualitative joint glycolytic scores were highly correlated with PET/CT findings in the OA patients (r = 0.86. p = 0.007; r = 0.94, p = 0.001). Qualitative arthro-PET and PET/CT joint scores were significantly higher in the OA patients than in controls (38.7 ± 6.6 vs. 32.2 ± 0.4, p = 0.02; 37.5 ± 5.4 vs. 32.2 ± 0.4, p = 0.03, respectively). Quantitative arthro-PET and PET/CT maximum SUV-lean joint scores were higher in the OA patients, although they did not reach statistical significance (20.8 ± 4.2 vs. 18 ± 1.8, p = 0.13; 22.8 ± 5.38 vs. 20.1 ± 1.54, p= 0.21). By definition, OA patients had higher radiographic joint scores than controls (30.9 ± 31.3 vs. 0, p = 0.03). Hand imaging using a small field of view PEM system (arthro-PET) with FDG is feasible, performing comparably to PET/CT in assessing metabolic joint activity. Arthro-PET and PET/CT showed higher joint FDG uptake in OA. Further exploration of arthro-PET in arthritis management is warranted. (orig.)

  14. Clinical impact of FDG PET-CT in patients with potentially operable metastatic colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To assess the clinical impact of 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron-emission tomography–computed tomography (PET-CT) in patients with potentially resectable metastatic colorectal cancer. Materials and methods: One hundred and two patients with potentially resectable metastatic colorectal cancer underwent FDG PET-CT in addition to conventional imaging over an 18-month period. The findings were compared to conventional imaging, with histological or clinico-radiological validation. The impact on subsequent management was evaluated using information from clinico-radiological databases. Results: Of 102 patients (mean age 67 years, range 27–85 years), 94 had liver, five had isolated lung, and three had limited peritoneal metastases. In 31 patients (30%) PET-CT had a major impact on subsequent management, by correctly clarifying indeterminate lesions on conventional imaging as inoperable metastatic disease in 16 patients, detecting previously unsuspected metastatic disease in nine patients, identifying occult second primary tumours in three patients, and correctly down-staging three patients. PET-CT had a minor impact in 12 patients (12%), no impact in 49 cases (48%), and a potentially negative impact in 10 cases (10%). Following PET-CT, 36 (35%) patients were no longer considered for surgery. Of those remaining operative 45 of 66 (68%) underwent potentially curative metastatic surgery. In this cohort PET-CT saved 16 futile laparotomies. Conclusion: FDG PET-CT has a valuable role in selected patients with metastatic colorectal cancer by improving staging accuracy and characterizing indeterminate lesions and helps triage patients to the appropriate treatment.

  15. Clinical impact of FDG PET-CT in patients with potentially operable metastatic colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, R.H. [Department of Radiology, Calderdale and Huddersfield NHS Foundation Trust, Huddersfield (United Kingdom); Chowdhury, F.U. [Departments of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, St James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); Lodge, J.P.A. [HPB and Transplant Unit, St James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom); Scarsbrook, A.F., E-mail: andrew.scarsbrook@leedsth.nhs.uk [Departments of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, St James' s University Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-15

    Aim: To assess the clinical impact of 2-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron-emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) in patients with potentially resectable metastatic colorectal cancer. Materials and methods: One hundred and two patients with potentially resectable metastatic colorectal cancer underwent FDG PET-CT in addition to conventional imaging over an 18-month period. The findings were compared to conventional imaging, with histological or clinico-radiological validation. The impact on subsequent management was evaluated using information from clinico-radiological databases. Results: Of 102 patients (mean age 67 years, range 27-85 years), 94 had liver, five had isolated lung, and three had limited peritoneal metastases. In 31 patients (30%) PET-CT had a major impact on subsequent management, by correctly clarifying indeterminate lesions on conventional imaging as inoperable metastatic disease in 16 patients, detecting previously unsuspected metastatic disease in nine patients, identifying occult second primary tumours in three patients, and correctly down-staging three patients. PET-CT had a minor impact in 12 patients (12%), no impact in 49 cases (48%), and a potentially negative impact in 10 cases (10%). Following PET-CT, 36 (35%) patients were no longer considered for surgery. Of those remaining operative 45 of 66 (68%) underwent potentially curative metastatic surgery. In this cohort PET-CT saved 16 futile laparotomies. Conclusion: FDG PET-CT has a valuable role in selected patients with metastatic colorectal cancer by improving staging accuracy and characterizing indeterminate lesions and helps triage patients to the appropriate treatment.

  16. The need for clinical quantification of combined PET/MRI data in pediatric epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzik, Otto, E-mail: otto@pet.wayne.edu [Department of Pediatrics, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States); Department of Radiology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States); Pai, Darshan [Department of Computer Science, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States); Juhasz, Csaba [Department of Pediatrics, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States); Hua, Jing [Department of Computer Science, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2013-02-21

    In the past, multimodality integrative analysis of image data has been used to obtain a better understanding of underlying mechanisms of seizure generation and propagation in children with extratemporal lobe epilepsy. However, despite important advances in the combined analysis of PET, MRI, DTI and EEG data, successful surgical outcome is only achieved in about 2/3 of patients undergoing resective surgery. The advent of simultaneous PET/MR data acquisition promises an important advance in neuroimaging through clinical quantification, which will finally translate the strength of PET (which is the ability to absolutely quantify physiological parameters such as metabolic rates and receptor densities) into clinical work. Taking advantage of recently developed integrated PET/MR devices, absolute physiological values will be available in clinical routine, replacing currently used visual assessment of relative tissue tracer uptake. This will allow assessment of global increases/decreases of brain function during critical phases of development and is likely to have a significant impact on patient management in pediatric epilepsy.

  17. The need for clinical quantification of combined PET/MRI data in pediatric epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past, multimodality integrative analysis of image data has been used to obtain a better understanding of underlying mechanisms of seizure generation and propagation in children with extratemporal lobe epilepsy. However, despite important advances in the combined analysis of PET, MRI, DTI and EEG data, successful surgical outcome is only achieved in about 2/3 of patients undergoing resective surgery. The advent of simultaneous PET/MR data acquisition promises an important advance in neuroimaging through clinical quantification, which will finally translate the strength of PET (which is the ability to absolutely quantify physiological parameters such as metabolic rates and receptor densities) into clinical work. Taking advantage of recently developed integrated PET/MR devices, absolute physiological values will be available in clinical routine, replacing currently used visual assessment of relative tissue tracer uptake. This will allow assessment of global increases/decreases of brain function during critical phases of development and is likely to have a significant impact on patient management in pediatric epilepsy

  18. The need for clinical quantification of combined PET/MRI data in pediatric epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzik, Otto; Pai, Darshan; Juhasz, Csaba; Hua, Jing

    2013-02-01

    In the past, multimodality integrative analysis of image data has been used to obtain a better understanding of underlying mechanisms of seizure generation and propagation in children with extratemporal lobe epilepsy. However, despite important advances in the combined analysis of PET, MRI, DTI and EEG data, successful surgical outcome is only achieved in about 2/3 of patients undergoing resective surgery. The advent of simultaneous PET/MR data acquisition promises an important advance in neuroimaging through clinical quantification, which will finally translate the strength of PET (which is the ability to absolutely quantify physiological parameters such as metabolic rates and receptor densities) into clinical work. Taking advantage of recently developed integrated PET/MR devices, absolute physiological values will be available in clinical routine, replacing currently used visual assessment of relative tissue tracer uptake. This will allow assessment of global increases/decreases of brain function during critical phases of development and is likely to have a significant impact on patient management in pediatric epilepsy.

  19. Clinical utility of 18 Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET/CT scans in patients with suspect ocular tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salil Mehta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic imaging of patients with suspect ocular tuberculosis include chest X-rays and computed tomography (CT scans. Reports have suggested a role for 18 fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/CT (FDG-PET/CT scans. We report on the clinical utility of 18 FDG PET/CT in two patients. Case 1: A 38-year-old female patient presented with recurrent anterior uveitis. A 18 FDG-PET scan revealed metabolically active supraclavicular and chest lymph nodes. An aspiration cytology of the cervical lymph node revealed caseating granulomas suggestive of tuberculosis. Case 2: A 58-year-old female patient presented with recurrent anterior uveitis. A 18 FDG-PET scan revealed metabolically active lymph nodes in the neck. A biopsy of the cervical lymph node revealed epithelioid granulomas suggestive of tuberculosis. Both patients were started on standard antitubercular therapy with a subsequent marked reduction of activity. PET/CT scans may suggest the sites of safe high-yield biopsies.

  20. Clinical Utility of Positron Emission Tomography Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET-MRI) in Gastrointestinal Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Robert; Choi, Minsig

    2016-01-01

    Anatomic imaging utilizing both CT (computed tomography) and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) limits the assessment of cancer metastases in lymph nodes and distant organs while functional imaging like PET (positron emission tomography) scan has its limitation in spatial resolution capacity. Hybrid imaging utilizing PET-CT and PET-MRI are novel imaging modalities that are changing the current landscape in cancer diagnosis, staging, and treatment response. MRI has shown to have higher sensitivity in soft tissue, head and neck pathology, and pelvic disease, as well as, detecting small metastases in the liver and bone compared to CT. Combining MRI with PET allows for detection of metastases that may have been missed with current imaging modalities. In this review, we will examine the clinical utility of FDG PET-MRI in the diagnosis and staging of gastrointestinal cancers with focus on esophageal, stomach, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers. We will also explore its role in treatment response and future directions associated with it. PMID:27618106

  1. Applications of PET imaging of neurological tumors with radiolabeled amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Routine diagnostics and treatment monitoring of brain tumors is usually based on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, the capacity of structural MRI to differentiate neoplastic tissue from non-specific treatment changes may be limited especially after therapeutic interventions such as neurosurgical resection, radio- and chemotherapy. Metabolic imaging using PET may provide relevant additional information on tumor metabolism, which allows for more accurate diagnostics especially in clinically equivocal situations. In contrast to the widely used 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose, which exhibits a poor tumor-to-background contrast within the brain, amino acid tracers provide high sensitivity to detect primary tumors, recurrent or residual gliomas, including most low-grade gliomas. The method improves targeting of biopsy and provides additional information of tumor extent, which is helpful for planning neurosurgery and radiotherapy. In the further course of the disease, amino acid positron-emission tomography (PET) allows a sensitive monitoring of treatment response, the early detection of tumor recurrence, and an improved differentiation of tumor recurrence from treatment-related changes. In the past, the method had only limited availability due to the use of radiopharmaceuticals with a short half-life. In recent years, however, novel amino acid tracers labeled with positron emitters with a longer half-life have been developed and clinically validated which allow a more efficient and cost-effective application. These developments and the well-documented diagnostic performance of PET using radiolabeled amino acids suggest that its application continues to spread and that the method may be available as a routine diagnostic technique for certain indications in the near future.

  2. Clinical Outcomes of Patients Receiving Integrated PET/CT-Guided Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We previously reported the advantages of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (PET) fused with CT for radiotherapy planning over CT alone in head and neck carcinoma (HNC). The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes and the predictive value of PET for patients receiving PET/CT-guided definitive radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: From December 2002 to August 2006, 42 patients received PET/CT imaging as part of staging and radiotherapy planning. Clinical outcomes including locoregional recurrence, distant metastasis, death, and treatment-related toxicities were collected retrospectively and analyzed for disease-free and overall survival and cumulative incidence of recurrence. Results: Median follow-up from initiation of treatment was 32 months. Overall survival and disease-free survival were 82.8% and 71.0%, respectively, at 2 years, and 74.1% and 66.9% at 3 years. Of the 42 patients, seven recurrences were identified (three LR, one DM, three both LR and DM). Mean time to recurrence was 9.4 months. Cumulative risk of recurrence was 18.7%. The maximum standard uptake volume (SUV) of primary tumor, adenopathy, or both on PET did not correlate with recurrence, with mean values of 12.0 for treatment failures vs. 11.7 for all patients. Toxicities identified in those patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy were also evaluated. Conclusions: A high level of disease control combined with favorable toxicity profiles was achieved in a cohort of HNC patients receiving PET/CT fusion guided radiotherapy plus/minus chemotherapy. Maximum SUV of primary tumor and/or adenopathy was not predictive of risk of disease recurrence

  3. Multifaceted utility of PET-CT in infectious and inflammatory disorders: making the case from day to day clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FDG PET/CT has evolved as a promising diagnostic modality for assessing various inflammatory and infectious diseases. This has direct and important relevance to the day to day clinical practice in developing countries including Indian scenario. Recent studies have shown that FDG PET has a high diagnostic accuracy in detecting active inflammation and has been employed in the infectious disorders

  4. PET/MR in children. Initial clinical experience in paediatric oncology using an integrated PET/MR scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Use of PET/MR in children has not previously been reported, to the best of our knowledge. Children with systemic malignancies may benefit from the reduced radiation exposure offered by PET/MR. We report our initial experience with PET/MR hybrid imaging and our current established sequence protocol after 21 PET/MR studies in 15 children with multifocal malignant diseases. The effective dose of a PET/MR scan was only about 20% that of the equivalent PET/CT examination. Simultaneous acquisition of PET and MR data combines the advantages of the two previously separate modalities. Furthermore, the technique also enables whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and statements to be made about the biological cellularity and nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio of tumours. Combined PET/MR saves time and resources. One disadvantage of PET/MR is that in order to have an effect, a significantly longer examination time is needed than with PET/CT. In our initial experience, PET/MR has turned out to be an unexpectedly stable and reliable hybrid imaging modality, which generates a complementary diagnostic study of great additional value. (orig.)

  5. PET/MR in children. Initial clinical experience in paediatric oncology using an integrated PET/MR scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, Franz Wolfgang; Sorge, Ina; Viehweger, Adrian; Ritter, Lutz [University of Leipzig, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Leipzig (Germany); Sattler, Bernhard; Kurch, Lars; Werner, Peter; Jochimsen, Thies; Barthel, Henryk; Sabri, Osama; Kluge, Regine [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Bierbach, Uta [University of Leipzig, Department of Paediatric Oncology, Leipzig (Germany); Till, Holger [University of Leipzig, Department of Paediatric Surgery, Leipzig (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Use of PET/MR in children has not previously been reported, to the best of our knowledge. Children with systemic malignancies may benefit from the reduced radiation exposure offered by PET/MR. We report our initial experience with PET/MR hybrid imaging and our current established sequence protocol after 21 PET/MR studies in 15 children with multifocal malignant diseases. The effective dose of a PET/MR scan was only about 20% that of the equivalent PET/CT examination. Simultaneous acquisition of PET and MR data combines the advantages of the two previously separate modalities. Furthermore, the technique also enables whole-body diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and statements to be made about the biological cellularity and nuclear/cytoplasmic ratio of tumours. Combined PET/MR saves time and resources. One disadvantage of PET/MR is that in order to have an effect, a significantly longer examination time is needed than with PET/CT. In our initial experience, PET/MR has turned out to be an unexpectedly stable and reliable hybrid imaging modality, which generates a complementary diagnostic study of great additional value. (orig.)

  6. Clinical evaluation of PET image reconstruction using a spatial resolution model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Flemming Littrup; Klausen, Thomas Levin; Loft, Annika;

    2013-01-01

    relative change in PET quantification (SUV(max), SUV(mean), volume) of lesions seen on R1 and R2 is reported as (R2-R1)/R1. Furthermore, SUV(max) and SUV(mean) was measured for a 3cm spherical norm region in the right lobe of the healthy liver for R1 and R2. RESULTS: Clinical reading revealed 91 and 103...... positive lesions for R1 and R2, respectively. For all lesions SUV(max) (R2) was higher than SUV(max) (R1). Regression analysis indicated that the relative increase in SUV(max) (and SUV(mean)) decreased with lesion size, whilst it increased with increasing radial distance from the centre of the field of...... view (FOV). There was no significant difference in SUV(mean) in homogenous liver tissue between R1 and R2. CONCLUSION: In whole-body FDG-PET/CT using routine clinical protocols, PSF-based PET reconstruction increases lesion detection and affects SUV(max) measurements compared to standard AW-OSEM PET...

  7. Clinical validation of FDG-PET/CT in the radiation treatment planning for patients with oesophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The aim of this prospective study was to determine the proportion of locoregional recurrences (LRRs) that could have been prevented if radiotherapy treatment planning for oesophageal cancer was based on PET/CT instead of CT. Materials and methods: Ninety oesophageal cancer patients, eligible for high dose (neo-adjuvant) (chemo)radiotherapy, were included. All patients underwent a planning FDG-PET/CT-scan. Radiotherapy target volumes (TVs) were delineated on CT and patients were treated according to the CT-based treatment plans. The PET images remained blinded. After treatment, TVs were adjusted based on PET/CT, when appropriate. Follow up included CT-thorax/abdomen every 6 months. If LRR was suspected, a PET/CT was conducted and the site of recurrence was compared to the original TVs. If the LRR was located outside the CT-based clinical TV (CTV) and inside the PET/CT-based CTV, we considered this LRR possibly preventable. Results: Based on PET/CT, the gross tumour volume (GTV) was larger in 23% and smaller in 27% of the cases. In 32 patients (36%), >5% of the PET/CT-based GTV would be missed if the treatment planning was based on CT. The median follow up was 29 months. LRRs were seen in 10 patients (11%). There were 3 in-field recurrences, 4 regional recurrences outside both CT-based and PET/CT-based CTV and 3 recurrences at the anastomosis without changes in TV by PET/CT; none of these recurrences were considered preventable by PET/CT. Conclusion: No LRR was found after CT-based radiotherapy that could have been prevented by PET/CT. The value of PET/CT for radiotherapy seems limited

  8. The Clinical Usefulness of 18F FDG PET/CT in Patients with Systemic Autoimmune Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Individuals with systemic autoimmune disease have an increased susceptibility to both inflammation and malignancy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of 18F FDG PET/CT in patients with systemic autoimmune disease. Forty patients diagnosed with systemic autoimmune disease were enrolled. Diagnostic accuracy of FDG PET/CT for detecting malignancy was assessed. FDG PET/CT findings, including maximum standardized uptake (SUVmax) of lymphadenopathy (LAP), liver, bone marrow, spleen, joint and muscles, were considered for the characterization of LAPs. FDG PET/CT could detect metabolically activated lesions in 36 out of 40 patients (90%) including inflammatory lesions in 28 out of 32 patients (88%). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of FDG PET/CT for the detection of malignancy were 100, 67, 70, 25, and 100%, respectively. Multiple LAPs were found in 25 of 40 patients (63%), and comprised three malignancies, four cases of tuberculosis, and 18 reactive changes. A SUVmax ratio of bone marrow to liver below 0.78 could distinguish malignancy from tuberculosis + reactive change (AUC=1.000, sensitivity: 100%, specificity: 100%). The SUVmax ratio of spleen to liver in the reactive group was also significantly higher than that in the malignancy group (P=0.014). SUVmax of LAP in the TB group was significantly higher than that in the reactive group (P=0.040). PET/CT is useful in detecting and differentiating inflammation and malignancy in patients with systemic autoimmune disease. Frequent false positive interpretations can be minimized by consideration of FDG uptake in bone marrow and spleen.

  9. Reduced FDG-PET brain metabolism and executive function predict clinical progression in elderly healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ewers

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain changes reminiscent of Alzheimer disease (AD have been previously reported in a substantial portion of elderly cognitive healthy (HC subjects. The major aim was to evaluate the accuracy of MRI assessed regional gray matter (GM volume, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET, and neuropsychological test scores to identify those HC subjects who subsequently convert to mild cognitive impairment (MCI or AD dementia. We obtained in 54 healthy control (HC subjects a priori defined region of interest (ROI values of medial temporal and parietal FDG-PET and medial temporal GM volume. In logistic regression analyses, these ROI values were tested together with neuropsychological test scores (free recall, trail making test B (TMT-B as predictors of HC conversion during a clinical follow-up between 3 and 4 years. In voxel-based analyses, FDG-PET and MRI GM maps were compared between HC converters and HC non-converters. Out of the 54 HC subjects, 11 subjects converted to MCI or AD dementia. Lower FDG-PET ROI values were associated with higher likelihood of conversion (p = 0.004, with the area under the curve (AUC yielding 82.0% (95% CI = (95.5%, 68.5%. The GM volume ROI was not a significant predictor (p = 0.07. TMT-B but not the free recall tests were a significant predictor (AUC = 71% (95% CI = 50.4%, 91.7%. For the combination of FDG-PET and TMT-B, the AUC was 93.4% (sensitivity = 82%, specificity = 93%. Voxel-based group comparison showed reduced FDG-PET metabolism within the temporo-parietal and prefrontal cortex in HC converters. In conclusion, medial temporal and-parietal FDG-PET and executive function show a clinically acceptable accuracy for predicting clinical progression in elderly HC subjects.

  10. PET based nanocomposite films for microwave packaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, changes in life standards have promoted the diffusion of Ready to Cook (RTC) and Ready to Eat (RTE) products for microwave ovens. However, the main limits in microwave (MW) ovens usage are often related to the proper choice of packaging materials suitable for such technology. In fact, packages for microwaveable RTC and RTE foods should ensure adequate preservation of the product before cooking/heating such as high barriers to gases and aromas and adequate control of water vapor transmission. In addition, microwaveable packaging material must be transparent to MW, thermally stable and resistant to the mechanical stress induced by the accumulation in the head space of volatile substances produced during the cooking. Polymeric materials are good candidates for microwaveable packaging thanks to their transparency to MW. In the last years a great interest is devoted to developing innovative solution based on the use of additives or systems that act as susceptors or heating enhancers for improving the characteristics of polymers in cooking/heating in MW ovens. The present work was focused on the production and characterization of nanocomposite copolyester based films suitable for microwaveable food packaging applications. The matrices selected consist in two PET copolymers modified with carbon black (ULTRA STD) and with titanium oxide (ULTRA NA). Nanocomposite co-extruded multilayer films were produced using different percentages (0%, 2% and 4%wt/wt) of Cloisite 20A (C20A). Films were analyzed for evaluating the effect of nanofiller on the morphology and barrier properties. Moreover, to verify the effectiveness of the designed systems in reducing the cooking times of meat products, MW heating tests were carried out on pork meat hamburgers in MW oven at varying supplied powers. The cooking tests have pointed out that the selected matrices are efficient in reducing cooking times and that even low concentration of C20A acts as heating enhancers of PET

  11. PET based nanocomposite films for microwave packaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdi, M. R.; Olivieri, R.; Liguori, L.; Albanese, D.; Di Matteo, M.; Di Maio, L.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, changes in life standards have promoted the diffusion of Ready to Cook (RTC) and Ready to Eat (RTE) products for microwave ovens. However, the main limits in microwave (MW) ovens usage are often related to the proper choice of packaging materials suitable for such technology. In fact, packages for microwaveable RTC and RTE foods should ensure adequate preservation of the product before cooking/heating such as high barriers to gases and aromas and adequate control of water vapor transmission. In addition, microwaveable packaging material must be transparent to MW, thermally stable and resistant to the mechanical stress induced by the accumulation in the head space of volatile substances produced during the cooking. Polymeric materials are good candidates for microwaveable packaging thanks to their transparency to MW. In the last years a great interest is devoted to developing innovative solution based on the use of additives or systems that act as susceptors or heating enhancers for improving the characteristics of polymers in cooking/heating in MW ovens. The present work was focused on the production and characterization of nanocomposite copolyester based films suitable for microwaveable food packaging applications. The matrices selected consist in two PET copolymers modified with carbon black (ULTRA STD) and with titanium oxide (ULTRA NA). Nanocomposite co-extruded multilayer films were produced using different percentages (0%, 2% and 4%wt/wt) of Cloisite 20A (C20A). Films were analyzed for evaluating the effect of nanofiller on the morphology and barrier properties. Moreover, to verify the effectiveness of the designed systems in reducing the cooking times of meat products, MW heating tests were carried out on pork meat hamburgers in MW oven at varying supplied powers. The cooking tests have pointed out that the selected matrices are efficient in reducing cooking times and that even low concentration of C20A acts as heating enhancers of PET.

  12. PET based nanocomposite films for microwave packaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galdi, M. R., E-mail: mrgaldi@unisa.it; Olivieri, R.; Liguori, L.; Albanese, D., E-mail: dalbanese@unisa.it; Di Matteo, M.; Di Maio, L., E-mail: ldimaio@unisa.it [Industrial Engineering Department, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II 132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    In recent years, changes in life standards have promoted the diffusion of Ready to Cook (RTC) and Ready to Eat (RTE) products for microwave ovens. However, the main limits in microwave (MW) ovens usage are often related to the proper choice of packaging materials suitable for such technology. In fact, packages for microwaveable RTC and RTE foods should ensure adequate preservation of the product before cooking/heating such as high barriers to gases and aromas and adequate control of water vapor transmission. In addition, microwaveable packaging material must be transparent to MW, thermally stable and resistant to the mechanical stress induced by the accumulation in the head space of volatile substances produced during the cooking. Polymeric materials are good candidates for microwaveable packaging thanks to their transparency to MW. In the last years a great interest is devoted to developing innovative solution based on the use of additives or systems that act as susceptors or heating enhancers for improving the characteristics of polymers in cooking/heating in MW ovens. The present work was focused on the production and characterization of nanocomposite copolyester based films suitable for microwaveable food packaging applications. The matrices selected consist in two PET copolymers modified with carbon black (ULTRA STD) and with titanium oxide (ULTRA NA). Nanocomposite co-extruded multilayer films were produced using different percentages (0%, 2% and 4%wt/wt) of Cloisite 20A (C20A). Films were analyzed for evaluating the effect of nanofiller on the morphology and barrier properties. Moreover, to verify the effectiveness of the designed systems in reducing the cooking times of meat products, MW heating tests were carried out on pork meat hamburgers in MW oven at varying supplied powers. The cooking tests have pointed out that the selected matrices are efficient in reducing cooking times and that even low concentration of C20A acts as heating enhancers of PET.

  13. Amyloid PET in European and North American cohorts; and exploring age as a limit to clinical use of amyloid imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiotis, Konstantinos [Karolinska Institutet, Department of NVS, Center for Alzheimer Research, Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Carter, Stephen F. [Karolinska Institutet, Department of NVS, Center for Alzheimer Research, Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); University of Manchester, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, Institute of Brain, Behaviour and Mental Health, Manchester (United Kingdom); Farid, Karim [Karolinska Institutet, Department of NVS, Center for Alzheimer Research, Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); APHP, Hotel-Dieu Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Savitcheva, Irina [Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Nordberg, Agneta [Karolinska Institutet, Department of NVS, Center for Alzheimer Research, Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden); Collaboration: for the Diagnostic Molecular Imaging (DiMI) network and the Alzheimer' s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    2015-09-15

    Several radiotracers that bind to fibrillar amyloid-beta in the brain have been developed and used in various patient cohorts. This study aimed to investigate the comparability of two amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) tracers as well as examine how age affects the discriminative properties of amyloid PET imaging. Fifty-one healthy controls (HCs), 72 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 90 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) from a European cohort were scanned with [11C]Pittsburgh compound-B (PIB) and compared with an age-, sex- and disease severity-matched population of 51 HC, 72 MCI and 84 AD patients from a North American cohort who were scanned with [18F]Florbetapir. An additional North American population of 246 HC, 342 MCI and 138 AD patients with a Florbetapir scan was split by age (55-75 vs 76-93 y) into groups matched for gender and disease severity. PET template-based analyses were used to quantify regional tracer uptake. The mean regional uptake patterns were similar and strong correlations were found between the two tracers across the regions of interest in HC (ρ = 0.671, p = 0.02), amyloid-positive MCI (ρ = 0.902, p < 0.001) and AD patients (ρ = 0.853, p < 0.001). The application of the Florbetapir cut-off point resulted in a higher proportion of amyloid-positive HC and a lower proportion of amyloid-positive AD patients in the older group (28 and 30 %, respectively) than in the younger group (19 and 20 %, respectively). These results illustrate the comparability of Florbetapir and PIB in unrelated but matched patient populations. The role of amyloid PET imaging becomes increasingly important with increasing age in the diagnostic assessment of clinically impaired patients. (orig.)

  14. Amyloid PET in European and North American cohorts; and exploring age as a limit to clinical use of amyloid imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several radiotracers that bind to fibrillar amyloid-beta in the brain have been developed and used in various patient cohorts. This study aimed to investigate the comparability of two amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) tracers as well as examine how age affects the discriminative properties of amyloid PET imaging. Fifty-one healthy controls (HCs), 72 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 90 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) from a European cohort were scanned with [11C]Pittsburgh compound-B (PIB) and compared with an age-, sex- and disease severity-matched population of 51 HC, 72 MCI and 84 AD patients from a North American cohort who were scanned with [18F]Florbetapir. An additional North American population of 246 HC, 342 MCI and 138 AD patients with a Florbetapir scan was split by age (55-75 vs 76-93 y) into groups matched for gender and disease severity. PET template-based analyses were used to quantify regional tracer uptake. The mean regional uptake patterns were similar and strong correlations were found between the two tracers across the regions of interest in HC (ρ = 0.671, p = 0.02), amyloid-positive MCI (ρ = 0.902, p < 0.001) and AD patients (ρ = 0.853, p < 0.001). The application of the Florbetapir cut-off point resulted in a higher proportion of amyloid-positive HC and a lower proportion of amyloid-positive AD patients in the older group (28 and 30 %, respectively) than in the younger group (19 and 20 %, respectively). These results illustrate the comparability of Florbetapir and PIB in unrelated but matched patient populations. The role of amyloid PET imaging becomes increasingly important with increasing age in the diagnostic assessment of clinically impaired patients. (orig.)

  15. Clinical applications of radioimmunolocalisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Localization of tumours by external scintigraphy after intravenous administration of radiolabeled antibody directed against a tumour-associated antigen [radioimmunolocalisation (RIL)] might be expected to solve many of the problems of conventional tumour imaging. Although no truly specific tumour antigen is known, there are many tumour-associated antigens which are present in much higher concentrations in certain tumours than in tissues which are normal or affected by other diseases. This feature has the potential to endow RIL with a degree of specificity not exhibited by imaging methods such as computerised tomography (CT), ultrasound (US) or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) which reflect the physical characteristics of tissues. The clinical application of new imaging methods depends partly on their comparative performance in terms of sensitivity and specificity and also on ways in which the unique features of each can be exploited to optimize the management of individual patients. There are significant deficiencies with all the existing imaging methods; this chapter discusses the extent to which RIL may fill some of the gaps. Particular attention will be paid to situations where the result has consequences for patient management. Much of the work cited was carried out in experimental systems and on more than 300 patients at Charing Cross Hospital between 1979 and 1984

  16. FDG PET/CT in clinical oncology. Case based approach with teaching points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organized according to the role of FDG PET/CT in the evaluation and management of oncology patients. 100 informative cases reflecting the issues that clinicians address in their daily practice. Ideal for all newcomers to the field, whether medical students, radiology, nuclear medicine, or oncology fellows, or practicing physicians. FDG PET/CT has rapidly emerged as an invaluable combined imaging modality that can identify tumors on the basis of not only anatomical alterations but also metabolic activity, thus allowing the detection of lesions that would otherwise be too small to distinguish. This book, comprising a collection of images from oncology cases, is organized according to the role of FDG PET/CT in the evaluation and management of oncology patients, and only secondarily by organ or tumor entity. In this way, it reflects the issues that clinicians actually address in their daily practice, namely: identification of an unknown or unsuspected primary; determination of the extent of disease; evaluation of response to therapy; and surveillance after response, i.e., detection of recurrent disease. In total, 100 cases involving different primary tumors are presented to illustrate findings in these different circumstances. FDG PET/CT in Clinical Oncology will be of great value to all newcomers to this field, whether medical students, radiology, nuclear medicine, or oncology fellows, or practicing physicians.

  17. The Clinical Utility of Rectal Gas Distension F-18 FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Suk; Lim, Seok Tae; Jeong, Young Jin; Kim, Dong Wook; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Sohn, Myung Hee [Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical value of rectal gas distension F-18 FDG PET/CT imaging for the differentiation of the rectal focal uptake lesions. Twenty four patients (M:F=11:13, Age 62.8{+-}12.4 years) underwent rectal gas distension F-18 FDG PET/CT, prospectively: initial image at 50-60 min after the intravenous injection of F-18 FDG and rectal distension image after the infusion of air through the anus. Focally increased uptake lesions on initial images but disappeared on rectal distension images defined a physiological uptake. For the differential evaluation of persistent focal uptake lesions on rectal distension images, colonoscopy and histopathologic examination were performed. Among the 24 patients, 27 lesions of focal rectal uptake were detected on initial images of F-18 FDG PET/CT. Of these, 7 lesions were able to judge with physiological uptake because the focal increased uptake disappeared from rectal distension image. Remaining 3 lesions were non-rectal lesions (2 lesions: rectovesical space, 1 lesion: uterine myoma). Among 17 lesions which was showed persistent increased uptake in rectal distension image, 15 lesions were confirmed as the malignant tumor (SUVmax=15.9{+-}6.8) and 2 lesions were confirmed as the benign lesions including adenoma and inflammatory disease. The rectal distension F-18 FDG PET/CT imaging could be an important noninvasive method for the differentiation of malignant and benign focal rectal uptake lesions including physiologic uptake.

  18. FDG PET/CT in clinical oncology. Case based approach with teaching points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihailovic, Jasna [Novi Sad Univ. (Serbia). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Goldsmith, Stanley J. [Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States). Div. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imging; Killeen, Ronan P. [St. Vincents Univ. Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)

    2012-07-01

    Organized according to the role of FDG PET/CT in the evaluation and management of oncology patients. 100 informative cases reflecting the issues that clinicians address in their daily practice. Ideal for all newcomers to the field, whether medical students, radiology, nuclear medicine, or oncology fellows, or practicing physicians. FDG PET/CT has rapidly emerged as an invaluable combined imaging modality that can identify tumors on the basis of not only anatomical alterations but also metabolic activity, thus allowing the detection of lesions that would otherwise be too small to distinguish. This book, comprising a collection of images from oncology cases, is organized according to the role of FDG PET/CT in the evaluation and management of oncology patients, and only secondarily by organ or tumor entity. In this way, it reflects the issues that clinicians actually address in their daily practice, namely: identification of an unknown or unsuspected primary; determination of the extent of disease; evaluation of response to therapy; and surveillance after response, i.e., detection of recurrent disease. In total, 100 cases involving different primary tumors are presented to illustrate findings in these different circumstances. FDG PET/CT in Clinical Oncology will be of great value to all newcomers to this field, whether medical students, radiology, nuclear medicine, or oncology fellows, or practicing physicians.

  19. Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (FDG-PET) and PET/Computed Tomography Imaging Characteristics of Thyroid Lymphoma and Their Potential Clinical Utility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, S.; Li, G.; Bural, G.; Alavi, A. (Div. of Nuclear Medicine, Hospital of Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States))

    2009-02-15

    Background: A relative paucity of data exists in the literature with regard to the utility of fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging in the clinical management of patients with primary lymphoma of the thyroid gland (PTL). Purpose: To explore the FDG-PET imaging characteristics and their potential role in PTL, and to compare the results with anatomical imaging modalities. Material and Methods: Patients with thyroid lymphoma who had undergone whole-body FDG-PET or PET/computed tomography (CT) during their course of the disease were identified by examination of case records. PET scans were reevaluated, and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was calculated and used as the semiquantitative measure of FDG uptake for this analysis. CT and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies carried out within 1 week of FDG-PET scan and without any therapeutic intervention between the two studies were considered for the purpose of comparison. A total of six patients with 20 studies (14 FDG-PET and six PET/CT examinations) were identified following the criteria. All patients were female (age 16-83 years). Among these, five were proven to have PTL. Two patients had localized PTL (stage IE), two patients had associated regional nodal involvement (IIE), and one patient had associated nodal involvement on both sides of the diaphragm (IIIE) at presentation. Except for one patient with follicular B-cell lymphoma, all others were diffuse large-B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) subtype. Results: Avid FDG uptake was observed in both cases of untreated PTL, with SUVmax of 23 and 7.6, respectively. One patient showed focal FDG uptake (SUVmax 6.7) in the thyroid in the setting of a responding abdominal non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and was subsequently proven as adenomatous nodule with Hurthle cell changes. Following successful therapy, SUVmax declined consistently with improvement in disease status. In one patient, complete response was noted earlier by FDG-PET compared

  20. Report of research and development of next generation PET equipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a report of the meeting concerning the next generation PET, held January 26, 2004, National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Chiba (NIRS), and contains the list of investigators, the first part of current status of investigations on the research and development of the PET equipments in NIRS and co-working facilities, the second part of comments of investigators of nuclear medicine, and list of published works. The first part describes the summarized current state of the works, examinations of correction of sensitivity with application of PET simulator, scintillator for PET, development of depth of interaction (DOI) detector for jPET-D4, 4-layer DOI detector for PET of small animals, evaluation of 256 channel-flat pane (FP)-position sensitive photomultiplier tube (PMT), detector simulation, correction of detector elements, development of coincidence imaging detector during surgery, circuit for processing the detector signals, development of front-end encoder ASIC, coincidence circuit, evaluation of jPET-D4 images, statistical reconstruction of DOI-PET images, Monte Carlo simulation technology, measurement and correction of body movement, and pioneer/original works. The second part; trend of clinical PET, development of in vivo radiopharmaceuticals and PET, trend of new PET equipments, demands for the new PET equipment from clinical neurology, investigations of human brain functions by PET, PET and tumors, evaluation of PET equipment NEMA NU2-2001, and PET and MRI. (N.I.)

  1. Evaluation of the Metabolic Response to Cyclopamine Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer Xenografts Using a Clinical PET-CT System1

    OpenAIRE

    Kayed, Hany; MEYER, Patrick; He, Yong; Kraenzlin, Bettina; Fink, Christian; Gretz, Norbert; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Sadick, Maliha

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We analyzed the effects of anti-hedgehog signaling on the 18F-FDG uptake of pancreatic cancer xenografts (PCXs) using a clinically implemented positron emission tomography (PET)-computer tomography (CT) scanner with high-resolution reconstruction. METHODS: PCXs from two pancreatic cancer cell lines were developed subcutaneously in nude mice and injected intraperitoneally with a low dose of cyclopamine for 1 week. 18F-FDG PET-CT was performed using a new-generation clinical PET-CT ...

  2. Visualisation of metastatic oesophageal and gastric cancer and prediction of clinical response to palliative chemotherapy using {sup 18}FDG PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzen, S.; Peschel, C.; Lordick, F. [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Haematology/Medical Oncology, Technical Univ. Munich (Germany); Herrmann, K.; Wieder, H.; Schwaiger, M. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Technical Univ. Munich (Germany); Weber, W.A.; Hennig, M. [Inst. for Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Technical Univ. Munich (Germany); Ott, K. [Dept. of Surgery, Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany); Bredenkamp, R. [Munich Centre for Clinical Studies, Munich (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Aim: This study assessed the value of {sup 18}F-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for visualisation and early metabolic response assessment in metastatic gastro-oesophageal cancer. Patients, methods: Twenty-six patients who were treated for metastatic disease (20 adenocarcinomas, 6 squamous cell cancers) underwent FDG-PET before and two weeks after the onset of palliative chemotherapy with either oxaliplatin + 5-FU/LV or with docetaxel + capecitabine. PET results were validated according to clinical response based on RECIST criteria. Results: Twenty-four tumours (92%) could be visualised by FDG-PET and were also assessable by a second PET scan at 2 weeks. The 2 tumours that were not detectable by PET were both gastric cancers belonging to the non-intestinal subtype according to Lauren. Median time to progression and overall survival were not significantly different for metabolic responders and non-responders (6.3 vs 5.3 months and 14.1 vs 12.5 months, respectively). Conclusion: In this heterogeneous study population, FDG-PET had a limited accuracy in predicting clinical response. However, the metabolic response prediction was particularly good in the subgroup of patients with oesophageal squamous cell cancer. Therefore, FDG-PET and assessment of cancer therapy clearly merits further investigation in circumscribed patient populations with metastatic disease. (orig.)

  3. Liver angioscintigraphy: clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoteanu, Mircea; Cotul, Sabin O; Pîgleşan, Cecilia; Tamaş, Stefan

    2004-03-01

    Liver angioscintigraphy (LAS) is a radio-isotope method for the investigation of liver perfusion and its alteration in various hepatic diseases. It measures the arterial and portal venous fractions of total liver blood flow. The percentage of liver blood flow supplied by hepatic artery is estimated mathematically by the hepatic perfusion index (HPI), normally between 25 % and 40 %. The decrease of portal blood flow in liver cirrhosis is compensated ("buffer" mechanisms) by increased arterial supply, with higher HPI value. For a patient with chronic liver disease, HPI over 50% suggests arterialization of hepatic perfusion, guiding the diagnose to liver cirrhosis. Splenic curve is completing the diagnostic information of the hepatic curve. Corroborated with per rectal scintigraphy and liver SPECT, LAS offers a good hemodynamic staging of chronic inflammatory liver diseases. Malignant tumors (primitive or metastases) increase the arterial supply of the liver and decrease the portal flow, HPI being over 50% (currently 65 % - 90 %). Benign tumors do not change portal/arterial liver blood flow ratio. SPECT or non-scintigraphic morphological investigations increase the diagnostic value of LAS for primitive liver tumors. Liver cancer occurring on cirrhosis is a limitative factor for LAS. Hepatic metastases increase the arterial perfusion (and HPI value) very quickly, before their size allows morphologic imaging diagnosis. LAS is therefore an early method to diagnose liver metastases being especially used in colorectal cancer. Other clinical applications of LAS are: follow up of liver toxicity of drugs, evaluation of portal vein permeability, post surgery follow up of the liver tumor patients. PMID:15054528

  4. Application of 18F-FDG PET for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body dementia are the two most frequent disorders among degenerative dementias. Their clinical identification and differential diagnosis are often difficult in the early stages when, on the other hand treatment is most effective. FDG-PET assessment of region brain metabolism is a proven method and its application demented patients ensures a higher diagnostic accuracy even at the preclinical stage. It helps resolving cases with difficult differential diagnosis as well. In this paper we discuss the application of the method in Alzheimer's disease and Lev body dementia; we present typical cases of both disorder which were assessed by FDG-PET for the first time in Bulgaria highlighting the methodology and the characteristic imaging findings

  5. Quantitative comparison of OSEM and penalized likelihood image reconstruction using relative difference penalties for clinical PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sangtae; Ross, Steven G.; Asma, Evren; Miao, Jun; Jin, Xiao; Cheng, Lishui; Wollenweber, Scott D.; Manjeshwar, Ravindra M.

    2015-08-01

    Ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) is the most widely used algorithm for clinical PET image reconstruction. OSEM is usually stopped early and post-filtered to control image noise and does not necessarily achieve optimal quantitation accuracy. As an alternative to OSEM, we have recently implemented a penalized likelihood (PL) image reconstruction algorithm for clinical PET using the relative difference penalty with the aim of improving quantitation accuracy without compromising visual image quality. Preliminary clinical studies have demonstrated visual image quality including lesion conspicuity in images reconstructed by the PL algorithm is better than or at least as good as that in OSEM images. In this paper we evaluate lesion quantitation accuracy of the PL algorithm with the relative difference penalty compared to OSEM by using various data sets including phantom data acquired with an anthropomorphic torso phantom, an extended oval phantom and the NEMA image quality phantom; clinical data; and hybrid clinical data generated by adding simulated lesion data to clinical data. We focus on mean standardized uptake values and compare them for PL and OSEM using both time-of-flight (TOF) and non-TOF data. The results demonstrate improvements of PL in lesion quantitation accuracy compared to OSEM with a particular improvement in cold background regions such as lungs.

  6. Quantitative comparison of OSEM and penalized likelihood image reconstruction using relative difference penalties for clinical PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sangtae; Ross, Steven G; Asma, Evren; Miao, Jun; Jin, Xiao; Cheng, Lishui; Wollenweber, Scott D; Manjeshwar, Ravindra M

    2015-08-01

    Ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) is the most widely used algorithm for clinical PET image reconstruction. OSEM is usually stopped early and post-filtered to control image noise and does not necessarily achieve optimal quantitation accuracy. As an alternative to OSEM, we have recently implemented a penalized likelihood (PL) image reconstruction algorithm for clinical PET using the relative difference penalty with the aim of improving quantitation accuracy without compromising visual image quality. Preliminary clinical studies have demonstrated visual image quality including lesion conspicuity in images reconstructed by the PL algorithm is better than or at least as good as that in OSEM images. In this paper we evaluate lesion quantitation accuracy of the PL algorithm with the relative difference penalty compared to OSEM by using various data sets including phantom data acquired with an anthropomorphic torso phantom, an extended oval phantom and the NEMA image quality phantom; clinical data; and hybrid clinical data generated by adding simulated lesion data to clinical data. We focus on mean standardized uptake values and compare them for PL and OSEM using both time-of-flight (TOF) and non-TOF data. The results demonstrate improvements of PL in lesion quantitation accuracy compared to OSEM with a particular improvement in cold background regions such as lungs. PMID:26158503

  7. Quantitative comparison of OSEM and penalized likelihood image reconstruction using relative difference penalties for clinical PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) is the most widely used algorithm for clinical PET image reconstruction. OSEM is usually stopped early and post-filtered to control image noise and does not necessarily achieve optimal quantitation accuracy. As an alternative to OSEM, we have recently implemented a penalized likelihood (PL) image reconstruction algorithm for clinical PET using the relative difference penalty with the aim of improving quantitation accuracy without compromising visual image quality. Preliminary clinical studies have demonstrated visual image quality including lesion conspicuity in images reconstructed by the PL algorithm is better than or at least as good as that in OSEM images. In this paper we evaluate lesion quantitation accuracy of the PL algorithm with the relative difference penalty compared to OSEM by using various data sets including phantom data acquired with an anthropomorphic torso phantom, an extended oval phantom and the NEMA image quality phantom; clinical data; and hybrid clinical data generated by adding simulated lesion data to clinical data. We focus on mean standardized uptake values and compare them for PL and OSEM using both time-of-flight (TOF) and non-TOF data. The results demonstrate improvements of PL in lesion quantitation accuracy compared to OSEM with a particular improvement in cold background regions such as lungs. (paper)

  8. Emerging clinical applications of computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liguori C

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Carlo Liguori,1 Giulia Frauenfelder,2 Carlo Massaroni,3 Paola Saccomandi,3 Francesco Giurazza,4 Francesca Pitocco,4 Riccardo Marano,5 Emiliano Schena,3 1Radiology Unit, AORN A Cardarelli, 2Radiology Unit, AOU Federico II, Naples, 3Measurement and Biomedical Instrumentation Unit, 4Radiology Unit, Università Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, 5Department of Radiological Sciences, Institute of Radiology, Catholic University of Rome, A Gemelli University Hospital, Rome, Italy Abstract: X-ray computed tomography (CT has recently been experiencing remarkable growth as a result of technological advances and new clinical applications. This paper reviews the essential physics of X-ray CT and its major components. Also reviewed are recent promising applications of CT, ie, CT-guided procedures, CT-based thermometry, photon-counting technology, hybrid PET-CT, use of ultrafast-high pitch scanners, and potential use of dual-energy CT for material differentiations. These promising solutions and a better knowledge of their potentialities should allow CT to be used in a safe and effective manner in several clinical applications. Keywords: computed tomography, X-ray, thermometry, dual-energy, ultrafast scanner, guidance, photon-counting technology

  9. Prevalence of Clinically Significant Extraosseous Findings on Unenhanced CT Portions of 18F-Fluoride PET/CT Bone Scans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Jung Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Due to the frequently interrupted supply of 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate, the use of 18F-fluoride positron emission tomography (PET/computed tomography (CT has become more popular. The study aims to determine the percentage of extraosseous findings from the unenhanced CT portion of 18F-fluoride PET/CT scans. Materials and Methods. We retrospectively collected 18F-fluoride PET/CT studies between March 2010 and February 2011. The unenhanced CT portions of 18F-fluoride PET/CT were reviewed for each patient. Significant extraosseous findings related to malignancy from the unenhanced CT were recorded. Results. A total of 158 patients (110 females, 48 males were included in the study. Clinically significant extraosseous findings from the unenhanced CT were found in 43 patients (27.2%. Previously unknown extraosseous findings were identified in 17 patients (10.8% after a review of the 18F-fluoride PET/CT scan results. Most of the extraosseous findings were small pulmonary metastases or enlarged metastatic lymph nodes. Conclusion. It is not rare to identify new clinically significant extraosseous findings from the unenhanced CT of 18F-fluoride PET/CT studies. Therefore the clinical management of patients may be altered by the results, and a careful review of the unenhanced CT portion of 18F-fluoride PET/CT is mandatory.

  10. PET in lung cancer staging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary clinical application of FDG-PET is in the evaluation of patients with lung cancer and includes diagnosis, staging and restaging of non-small cell lung cancer. PET has a very high accuracy (sensitivity=97%, specificity=78%) for characterizing nodules that are indeterminate by chest radiograph and computed tomography. The major utility of PET in the evaluation of patients with lung cancer is the staging of the entire body. PET is more accurate than the conventional imaging modalities of CT and bone scans in the detection of metastatic disease. PET is accurate in the staging of the mediastinum, adrenal glands, and the skeletal system. PET is not as accurate in the detection of brain metastases because of their small size and the normal cortical accumulation

  11. PET/MR in oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balyasnikova, Svetlana; Löfgren, Johan; de Nijs, Robin;

    2012-01-01

    a number of different MRI techniques, such as DWI-MR (diffusion weighted imaging MR), DCE-MR (dynamic contrast enhanced MR), MRS (MR spectroscopy) and MR for attenuation correction of PET. All MR techniques presented in this paper have shown promising results in the treatment of patients with solid......After more than 20 years of research, a fully integrated PET/MR scanner was launched in 2010 enabling simultaneous acquisition of PET and MR imaging. Currently, no clinical indication for combined PET/MR has been established, however the expectations are high. In this paper we will discuss some of...... the challenges inherent in this new technology, but focus on potential applications for simultaneous PET/MR in the field of oncology. Methods and tracers for use with the PET technology will be familiar to most readers of this journal; thus this paper aims to provide a short and basic introduction to...

  12. Development and Test of a High Performance Multi Channel Readout System on a Chip with Application in PET/MR

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The availability of new, compact, magnetic field tolerant sensors suitable for PET has opened the opportunity to build highly integrated PET scanners that can be included in commercial MR scanners. This combination has long been expected to have big advantages over existing systems combining PET and CT. This thesis describes my work towards building a highly integrated readout ASIC for application in PET/MR within the framework of the HYPERImage and SUBLIMA projects. It also gives a brief ...

  13. Current applications of PET imaging of sex hormone receptors with a fluorinated analogue of estradiol or of testosterone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, the most frequent approach in the oncologic applications of positron emission tomography (PET) is detecting the hypermetabolic activity of the cancer tissue. A more specific approach, which may be complementary, is detecting the overexpression of receptors. In this review article, we aim to evaluate the results that are currently available for PET imaging of the sex hormone receptors in clinical oncology. The indication of PET and now PET/CT has been more disputed in breast carcinoma than in many other primary cancers (e.g., lung, head and neck, colorectal, lymphoma). 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), the glucose analogue for PET imaging, has a limited sensitivity to detect the primary breast tumors in case of lobular or in situ forms or small sized tumors localised on systematic mammography, and to identify minimal node invasion in the axilla. Using 16α-(18F]fluoro-17β-estradiol (FES), a fluorinated estradiol analogue, PET is able to detect the over-expression of the oestrogen receptor (ER) in lesions, at a whole-body level. FES and FDG appear complementary for a better diagnostic performance in staging locally advanced breast cancer or restaging recurrent or metastatic breast cancer. Another potential indication is predicting the response to starting or resuming hormone therapy in patients with metastatic breast cancer, in relation with the ER status of all lesions revealed by FES PET. In two retrospective studies, FDG PET was also able to predict the response to hormone therapy, on basis of a metabolic flare, observed either after 7-10 days of treatment or during an estradiol challenge. A prospective comparison of those approaches is warranted. One study reported predicting response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy thanks to a low value of FES SUVmax or FES/FDG SUV max ratio. The presence of ER in uterine tumors, including the benign ones, in ovarian cancers or even in meningiomas, may have therapeutic consequences and FES PET could have a clinical utility

  14. Metformin and cancer: Technical and clinical implications for FDG-PET imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Selene; Capitanio; Cecilia; Marini; Gianmario; Sambuceti; Silvia; Morbelli

    2015-01-01

    Metformin is the most widely used hypoglycemic agent. Besides its conventional indications, increasing evidence demonstrate a potential efficacy of this biguanide as an anticancer drug. Possible mechanisms of actions seem to be independent from its hypoglycemic effect and seemto involve the interference with key pathways in cellular proliferation and glycolysis. To date, many clinical trials implying the use of metformin in cancer treatment are on-going. The increasing use of 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxyd-glucose positron emission tomography(FDG-PET) in cancer evaluation raises a number of questions about the possible interference of the biguanide on FDG distribution. In particular, the interferences exerted by metformin on AMP-activated protein kinase pathway(the cellular energy sensor), on insulin levels and on Hexokinase could potentially have repercussion on glucose handling and thus on FDG distribution. A better comprehension of the impact of metformin on FDG uptake is needed in order to optimize the use of PET in this setting. This evaluation would be useful to ameliorate scans interpretation in diabetic patients under chronic metformin treatment and to critically interpret images in the context of clinical trials. Furthermore, collecting prospective data in this setting would help to verify whether FDG-PET could be a valid tool to appreciate the anticancer effect of this new therapeutic approach.

  15. Clinical value of FDG-PET/CT in suspected paraneoplastic syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Stine Bjørn; Hess, Søren; Petersen, Henrik; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) are relatively infrequent manifestations appearing before or after a cancer declares itself. Autoimmune mechanisms may be involved, but their cause and pathogenesis are often unknown. Due to disparity of symptoms, PNS remain a major diagnostic challenge. We......, and final clinical diagnosis. Conclusions of the scan reports were compared to the final follow-up outcome as determined during an average follow-up of 31 months (range 6-51.5) in patients who were not diagnosed with cancer in immediate continuation of a positive PET/CT scan. RESULTS: A total of 137...... patients were included. Main causes for referral were neurological (n = 67), rheumatological (n = 25), dermatological (n = 18), nephrological (n = 6), haematological (n = 2), abnormal biochemistry (n = 11), and others (n = 8). The cancer prevalence was 8.8 %. The FDG-PET/CT results were as follows: nine...

  16. Local respiratory motion correction for PET/CT imaging: Application to lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamare, F., E-mail: frederic.lamare@chu-bordeaux.fr; Fernandez, P. [INCIA, UMR 5287, University of Bordeaux, Talence F-33400, France and Nuclear Medicine Department, University Hospital, Bordeaux 33000 (France); Fayad, H.; Visvikis, D. [INSERM, UMR1101, LaTIM, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest 29609 (France)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Despite multiple methodologies already proposed to correct respiratory motion in the whole PET imaging field of view (FOV), such approaches have not found wide acceptance in clinical routine. An alternative can be the local respiratory motion correction (LRMC) of data corresponding to a given volume of interest (VOI: organ or tumor). Advantages of LRMC include the use of a simple motion model, faster execution times, and organ specific motion correction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of LMRC using various motion models for oncology (lung lesion) applications. Methods: Both simulated (NURBS based 4D cardiac-torso phantom) and clinical studies (six patients) were used in the evaluation of the proposed LRMC approach. PET data were acquired in list-mode and synchronized with respiration. The implemented approach consists first in defining a VOI on the reconstructed motion average image. Gated PET images of the VOI are subsequently reconstructed using only lines of response passing through the selected VOI and are used in combination with a center of gravity or an affine/elastic registration algorithm to derive the transformation maps corresponding to the respiration effects. Those are finally integrated in the reconstruction process to produce a motion free image over the lesion regions. Results: Although the center of gravity or affine algorithm achieved similar performance for individual lesion motion correction, the elastic model, applied either locally or to the whole FOV, led to an overall superior performance. The spatial tumor location was altered by 89% and 81% for the elastic model applied locally or to the whole FOV, respectively (compared to 44% and 39% for the center of gravity and affine models, respectively). This resulted in similar associated overall tumor volume changes of 84% and 80%, respectively (compared to 75% and 71% for the center of gravity and affine models, respectively). The application of the nonrigid

  17. Local respiratory motion correction for PET/CT imaging: Application to lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Despite multiple methodologies already proposed to correct respiratory motion in the whole PET imaging field of view (FOV), such approaches have not found wide acceptance in clinical routine. An alternative can be the local respiratory motion correction (LRMC) of data corresponding to a given volume of interest (VOI: organ or tumor). Advantages of LRMC include the use of a simple motion model, faster execution times, and organ specific motion correction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of LMRC using various motion models for oncology (lung lesion) applications. Methods: Both simulated (NURBS based 4D cardiac-torso phantom) and clinical studies (six patients) were used in the evaluation of the proposed LRMC approach. PET data were acquired in list-mode and synchronized with respiration. The implemented approach consists first in defining a VOI on the reconstructed motion average image. Gated PET images of the VOI are subsequently reconstructed using only lines of response passing through the selected VOI and are used in combination with a center of gravity or an affine/elastic registration algorithm to derive the transformation maps corresponding to the respiration effects. Those are finally integrated in the reconstruction process to produce a motion free image over the lesion regions. Results: Although the center of gravity or affine algorithm achieved similar performance for individual lesion motion correction, the elastic model, applied either locally or to the whole FOV, led to an overall superior performance. The spatial tumor location was altered by 89% and 81% for the elastic model applied locally or to the whole FOV, respectively (compared to 44% and 39% for the center of gravity and affine models, respectively). This resulted in similar associated overall tumor volume changes of 84% and 80%, respectively (compared to 75% and 71% for the center of gravity and affine models, respectively). The application of the nonrigid

  18. Clinical applications of Gallium-68

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallium-68 is a positron-emitting radioisotope that is produced from a 68Ge/68Ga generator. As such it is conveniently used, decoupling radiopharmacies from the need for a cyclotron on site. Gallium-68-labeled peptides have been recognized as a new class of radiopharmaceuticals showing fast target localization and blood clearance. 68Ga-DOTATOC, 8Ga-DOTATATE, 68Ga-DOTANOC, are the most prominent radiopharmaceuticals currently in use for imaging and differentiating lesions of various somatostatin receptor subtypes, overexpressed in many neuroendocrine tumors. There has been a tremendous increase in the number of clinical studies with 68Ga over the past few years around the world, including within the United States. An estimated ∼10,000 scans are being performed yearly in Europe at about 100 centers utilizing 68Ga-labeled somatostatin analogs within clinical trials. Two academic sites within the US have also begun to undertake human studies. This review will focus on the clinical experience of selected, well-established and recently applied 68Ga-labeled imaging agents used in nuclear medicine. - Highlights: ► A summary of the emerging clinical uses of 68Ga-based radiopharmaceuticals is provided. ► 68Ga-PET may prove as or more clinically robust than the corresponding 18F-labeled agents. ► 68Ga-radiopeptides were studied for targeting of somatostatin receptors subtypes. ► 68Ga-DOTATOC, 68Ga-DOTATATE, 68Ga-DOTANOC, are currently in clinical trials

  19. Evaluation of the performance of the YAP-(S)PET scanner and its application in neuroscience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belcari, Nicola [Department of Physics ' E. Fermi' and Center of Excellence ' AmbiSEN' , University of Pisa, and INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Pisa I-56127 (Italy)]. E-mail: belcari@df.unipi.it; Guerra, Alberto Del [Department of Physics ' E. Fermi' and Center of Excellence ' AmbiSEN' , University of Pisa, and INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Pisa I-56127 (Italy); Bartoli, Antonietta [Department of Physics ' E. Fermi' and Center of Excellence ' AmbiSEN' , University of Pisa, and INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Pisa I-56127 (Italy); Bianchi, Daniele [I.S.E. s.r.l. Vecchiano, Pisa (Italy); Lazzarotti, Marco [I.S.E. s.r.l. Vecchiano, Pisa (Italy); Sensi, Luca [I.S.E. s.r.l. Vecchiano, Pisa (Italy); Menichetti, Luca [IFC-CNR, Pisa (Italy); Lecchi, Michela [University of Milan, Milan (Italy); Erba, Paola A. [Nuclear Medicine Section, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Mariani, Giuliano [Nuclear Medicine Section, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Corsini, Giovanni U. [Department of Neuroscience, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Sgado, Paola [Department of Neuroscience, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2007-02-01

    This paper presents the performance evaluation of the small animal scanner YAP-(S)PET, both in PET and SPECT modalities following preliminary NEMA standards for small animal PET. Data are taken with a new version of the scanner that is installed at the IFC-CNR in Pisa (Italy) within the framework of the Center of Excellence AmbiSEN of the University of Pisa. This paper also reports some preliminary SPECT applications in neuroscience using {sup 123}I-FP-CIT (DaTSCAN)

  20. Evaluation of the performance of the YAP-(S)PET scanner and its application in neuroscience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the performance evaluation of the small animal scanner YAP-(S)PET, both in PET and SPECT modalities following preliminary NEMA standards for small animal PET. Data are taken with a new version of the scanner that is installed at the IFC-CNR in Pisa (Italy) within the framework of the Center of Excellence AmbiSEN of the University of Pisa. This paper also reports some preliminary SPECT applications in neuroscience using 123I-FP-CIT (DaTSCAN)

  1. Potential medical applications of the plasma focus in the radioisotope production for PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devices other than the accelerators are desired to be investigated for generating high energy particles to induce nuclear reaction and positron emission tomography (PET) producing radioisotopes. The experimental data of plasma focus devices (PF) are studied and the activity scaling law for External Solid Target (EST) activation is established. Based on the scaling law and the techniques to enhance the radioisotopes production, the feasibility of generating the required activity for PET imaging is studied. - Highlights: • Short lived radioisotopes for PET imaging are produced in plasma focus device. • The scaling law of the activity induced with plasma focus energy is established. • The potential medical applications of plasma focus are studied

  2. FDG PET/CT in Crohn's disease: correlation of quantitative FDG PET/CT parameters with clinical and endoscopic surrogate markers of disease activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility and potential clinical utility of assessment of Crohn's disease (CD) activity by 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT employing a new quantitative approach. A total of 22 subjects (mean age 37) with CD who had undergone FDG PET/CT followed by ileocolonoscopy within 1 week were included in this analysis. The CD endoscopy index of severity (CDEIS) for various bowel segments was calculated. The CD activity index (CDAI) was evaluated, and fecal calprotectin was measured. On PET, regions with increased FDG uptake in large bowel were segmented with an adaptive contrast-oriented thresholding algorithm, and metabolically active volume (MAV), uncorrected mean standardized uptake value (SUVmean), partial volume-corrected SUVmean (PVC-SUVmean), SUVmax, uncorrected total lesion glycolysis (TLG = MAV x SUVmean), and PVC total lesion glycolysis (PVC-TLG = MAV x PVC-SUVmean) were measured. Global CD activity score (GCDAS) was calculated as the sum of PVC-TLG over all clinically significant FDG-avid regions in each subject. Correlations between regional PET quantification measures (SUVs, TLGs) and CDEIS were calculated. Correlations between the global PET quantification measure (GCDAS, global SUVs) with CDAI, fecal calprotectin, CDEIS, and CRP level were also calculated. SUVmax, PVC-SUVmean, and PVC-TLG significantly correlated with segment CDEIS subscores (r = 0.50, r = 0.69, and r = 0.31, respectively; p < 0.05). GCDAS significantly correlated with CDAI and fecal calprotectin (r = 0.64 and r = 0.51, respectively; p < 0.05). By employing this new quantitative approach, we were able to calculate indices of regional and global CD activity, which correlated well with both clinical and pathological disease activity surrogate markers. This approach may be of clinical importance in measuring both global disease activity and treatment response in patients with CD. (orig.)

  3. Extended suicide with a pet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Brian K

    2013-01-01

    The combination of the killing of a pet and a suicide is a perplexing scenario that is largely unexplored in the literature. Many forensic psychiatrists and psychologists may be unaccustomed to considering the significance of the killing of a pet. The subject is important, however, because many people regard their pets as members of their family. A case is presented of a woman who killed her pet dog and herself by carbon monoxide poisoning. The purpose of this article is to provide an initial exploration of the topic of extended suicide with a pet. Forensic mental health evaluations may have a role in understanding the etiology of this event and in opining as to the culpability of individuals who attempt to or successfully kill a pet and then commit suicide. Because the scientific literature is lacking, there is a need to understand this act from a variety of perspectives. First, a social and anthropological perspective will be presented that summarizes the history of the practice of killing of one's pet, with a focus on the ancient Egyptians. A clinical context will examine what relationship animals have to mental illness. A vast body of existing scientific data showing the relevance of human attachment to pets suggests that conclusions from the phenomena of homicide-suicide and filicide-suicide are applicable to extended suicide with a pet. Finally, recommendations will be proposed for both clinical and forensic psychiatrists faced with similar cases. PMID:24051598

  4. Generalized whole-body Patlak parametric imaging for enhanced quantification in clinical PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Zhou, Yun; Lodge, Martin A.; Casey, Michael E.; Wahl, Richard L.; Zaidi, Habib; Rahmim, Arman

    2015-11-01

    We recently developed a dynamic multi-bed PET data acquisition framework to translate the quantitative benefits of Patlak voxel-wise analysis to the domain of routine clinical whole-body (WB) imaging. The standard Patlak (sPatlak) linear graphical analysis assumes irreversible PET tracer uptake, ignoring the effect of FDG dephosphorylation, which has been suggested by a number of PET studies. In this work: (i) a non-linear generalized Patlak (gPatlak) model is utilized, including a net efflux rate constant kloss, and (ii) a hybrid (s/g)Patlak (hPatlak) imaging technique is introduced to enhance contrast to noise ratios (CNRs) of uptake rate Ki images. Representative set of kinetic parameter values and the XCAT phantom were employed to generate realistic 4D simulation PET data, and the proposed methods were additionally evaluated on 11 WB dynamic PET patient studies. Quantitative analysis on the simulated Ki images over 2 groups of regions-of-interest (ROIs), with low (ROI A) or high (ROI B) true kloss relative to Ki, suggested superior accuracy for gPatlak. Bias of sPatlak was found to be 16-18% and 20-40% poorer than gPatlak for ROIs A and B, respectively. By contrast, gPatlak exhibited, on average, 10% higher noise than sPatlak. Meanwhile, the bias and noise levels for hPatlak always ranged between the other two methods. In general, hPatlak was seen to outperform all methods in terms of target-to-background ratio (TBR) and CNR for all ROIs. Validation on patient datasets demonstrated clinical feasibility for all Patlak methods, while TBR and CNR evaluations confirmed our simulation findings, and suggested presence of non-negligible kloss reversibility in clinical data. As such, we recommend gPatlak for highly quantitative imaging tasks, while, for tasks emphasizing lesion detectability (e.g. TBR, CNR) over quantification, or for high levels of noise, hPatlak is instead preferred. Finally, gPatlak and hPatlak CNR was systematically higher compared to routine SUV

  5. Generalized whole-body Patlak parametric imaging for enhanced quantification in clinical PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We recently developed a dynamic multi-bed PET data acquisition framework to translate the quantitative benefits of Patlak voxel-wise analysis to the domain of routine clinical whole-body (WB) imaging. The standard Patlak (sPatlak) linear graphical analysis assumes irreversible PET tracer uptake, ignoring the effect of FDG dephosphorylation, which has been suggested by a number of PET studies. In this work: (i) a non-linear generalized Patlak (gPatlak) model is utilized, including a net efflux rate constant kloss, and (ii) a hybrid (s/g)Patlak (hPatlak) imaging technique is introduced to enhance contrast to noise ratios (CNRs) of uptake rate Ki images. Representative set of kinetic parameter values and the XCAT phantom were employed to generate realistic 4D simulation PET data, and the proposed methods were additionally evaluated on 11 WB dynamic PET patient studies. Quantitative analysis on the simulated Ki images over 2 groups of regions-of-interest (ROIs), with low (ROI A) or high (ROI B) true kloss relative to Ki, suggested superior accuracy for gPatlak. Bias of sPatlak was found to be 16–18% and 20–40% poorer than gPatlak for ROIs A and B, respectively. By contrast, gPatlak exhibited, on average, 10% higher noise than sPatlak. Meanwhile, the bias and noise levels for hPatlak always ranged between the other two methods. In general, hPatlak was seen to outperform all methods in terms of target-to-background ratio (TBR) and CNR for all ROIs. Validation on patient datasets demonstrated clinical feasibility for all Patlak methods, while TBR and CNR evaluations confirmed our simulation findings, and suggested presence of non-negligible kloss reversibility in clinical data. As such, we recommend gPatlak for highly quantitative imaging tasks, while, for tasks emphasizing lesion detectability (e.g. TBR, CNR) over quantification, or for high levels of noise, hPatlak is instead preferred. Finally, gPatlak and hPatlak CNR was systematically higher compared to routine

  6. Genotypic characterisation and cluster analysis of Campylobacter jejuni isolates from domestic pets, human clinical cases and retail food

    OpenAIRE

    Acke Els; Carroll Cyril; O'Leary Aoife; McGill Kevina; Kelly Lorraine; Lawlor Amanda; Madden Robert H; Moran Lynn; Scates Pam; McNamara Eleanor; Moore John E; Jones Boyd R; Fanning Seamus; Whyte Paul

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The genetic similarity of Campylobacter jejuni isolates from pets, compared to human clinical cases and retail food isolates collected in Ireland over 2001-2006 was investigated by cluster analysis of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) fingerprinting profiles. Comparison of the PFGE profiles of 60 pet isolates and 109 human isolates revealed that seven (4.1%) profiles were grouped in clusters including at least one human and one pet C. jejuni isolate. In total six (1.6%) of 60 p...

  7. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in the oncologic clinical practice; Tomografia por Emision de Positrones (PET) en la practica clinica oncologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serna M, J.A.; Luviano, C.; Martinez V, D. [Hospital Angeles del Pedregal Mexico DF (Mexico); Maldonado S, A. [Centro PET Complutense, Madrid (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    We intended to determine the frequency with that the computer axial tomography (TAC), it was able to visualize the lesions extra neoplasia detected by the PET tomography in patients with fully identified primary malignant neoplasia. (Author)

  8. Clinical significance of reduced cerebral metabolism in multiple sclerosis. A combined PET and MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) has provided major insights into the disease's natural history, and many studies have focussed on possible correlations between MRI findings and the clinical manifestations of MS. In contrast, there are few reports on possible relationships between functional imaging data and cognitive function. The present study assessed the relationship between clinical presentation and combined anatomical and functional imaging data in MS. Twenty patients with definite MS underwent MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) to evaluate cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and oxygen metabolism (rCMRO2). The relationships between these neuroimaging findings and clinical data, including the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), Mini-mental status scale, Hasegawa Dementia Scale and relapse time, were evaluated with Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. A general reduction in rCBF and rCMRO2 in the gray and white matter were found in the MS patients. EDSS was correlated with the number and size of the lesions on MRI and was negatively correlated with rCMRO2. A correlation between the decrease in rCMRO2 and the level of cognitive impairment was also found. The severity of cerebral hypometabolism was also related to the number of relapses. Morphological and functional findings obtained by MRI and PET are closely related to the clinical status in MS. Our results suggest that measurement of cerebral metabolism in MS has the potential to be an objective marker for monitoring disease activity and to provide prognostic information. (author)

  9. [18F]CFA as a clinically translatable probe for PET imaging of deoxycytidine kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woosuk; Le, Thuc M; Wei, Liu; Poddar, Soumya; Bazzy, Jimmy; Wang, Xuemeng; Uong, Nhu T; Abt, Evan R; Capri, Joseph R; Austin, Wayne R; Van Valkenburgh, Juno S; Steele, Dalton; Gipson, Raymond M; Slavik, Roger; Cabebe, Anthony E; Taechariyakul, Thotsophon; Yaghoubi, Shahriar S; Lee, Jason T; Sadeghi, Saman; Lavie, Arnon; Faull, Kym F; Witte, Owen N; Donahue, Timothy R; Phelps, Michael E; Herschman, Harvey R; Herrmann, Ken; Czernin, Johannes; Radu, Caius G

    2016-04-12

    Deoxycytidine kinase (dCK), a rate-limiting enzyme in the cytosolic deoxyribonucleoside (dN) salvage pathway, is an important therapeutic and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging target in cancer. PET probes for dCK have been developed and are effective in mice but have suboptimal specificity and sensitivity in humans. To identify a more suitable probe for clinical dCK PET imaging, we compared the selectivity of two candidate compounds-[(18)F]Clofarabine; 2-chloro-2'-deoxy-2'-[(18)F]fluoro-9-β-d-arabinofuranosyl-adenine ([(18)F]CFA) and 2'-deoxy-2'-[(18)F]fluoro-9-β-d-arabinofuranosyl-guanine ([(18)F]F-AraG)-for dCK and deoxyguanosine kinase (dGK), a dCK-related mitochondrial enzyme. We demonstrate that, in the tracer concentration range used for PET imaging, [(18)F]CFA is primarily a substrate for dCK, with minimal cross-reactivity. In contrast, [(18)F]F-AraG is a better substrate for dGK than for dCK. [(18)F]CFA accumulation in leukemia cells correlated with dCK expression and was abrogated by treatment with a dCK inhibitor. Although [(18)F]CFA uptake was reduced by deoxycytidine (dC) competition, this inhibition required high dC concentrations present in murine, but not human, plasma. Expression of cytidine deaminase, a dC-catabolizing enzyme, in leukemia cells both in cell culture and in mice reduced the competition between dC and [(18)F]CFA, leading to increased dCK-dependent probe accumulation. First-in-human, to our knowledge, [(18)F]CFA PET/CT studies showed probe accumulation in tissues with high dCK expression: e.g., hematopoietic bone marrow and secondary lymphoid organs. The selectivity of [(18)F]CFA for dCK and its favorable biodistribution in humans justify further studies to validate [(18)F]CFA PET as a new cancer biomarker for treatment stratification and monitoring. PMID:27035974

  10. FDG-PET scan in patients with clinically and/or radiologically suspicious colorectal cancer recurrence but normal CEA

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Jun; Povoski Stephen P; Bloomston Mark; Sarikaya Ismet; Hall Nathan C; Knopp Michael V; Martin Edward W

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Although frequently used for tumor surveillance, the sensitivity of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) to detect recurrent colorectal cancer (CRC) is not optimal. Fluorine 18-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography (18F FDG-PET) scans promise to improve recurrent CRC detection. We aimed to review PET scans of patients with clinically and/or radiologically suspicious tumor recurrence but normal CEA. Methods A retrospective review of an electronic database of 308 pat...

  11. COMPET: High resolution high sensitivity MRI compatible pre-clinical PET scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COMPET is a pre-clinical MRI compatible PET scanner which decouples sensitivity and resolution by the use of a novel detector design. The detector has been built using 8×8cm2 square layers consisting of 30 LYSO crystals (2×3×80mm2) interleaved with 24 Wavelength Shifting Fibers (WLS) (3×1×80mm3). By stacking several layers into a module, the point-of-interaction (POI) can be measured in 3D. Four layers form a PET ring where the sensitivity can be increased by stacking several layers. The layers can be stacked so that no inter-crystal or inter-module gap is formed. COMPET has used four assembled layers for module and scanner characterization. The modules are connected to the COMPET data-acquisition chain and the reconstructed images are produced with the novel geometry-independent COMPET image reconstruction algorithm. Time and energy resolution have been resolved and found to be around 4 ns and 14% respectively. Tests for MRI interference and count rate performance have been carried out. The reconstruction algorithm has been verified with data acquired by means of a COMPET full ring PET scanner

  12. Diagnosis of pancreatic cancer using fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET). Usefulness and limitations in clinical reality''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present review will provide an overview of the literature concerning the FDG PET diagnosis of pancreatic cancer and a summary from our experience of 231 cases of pancreatic lesions. FDG PET can effectively differentiate pancreatic cancer from benign lesion with high accuracy. Newly-developed PET scanners can detect small pancreatic cancers, up to 7 mm in diameter, by their high resolution, which could make a great contribution to the early detection of resectable and potentially curable pancreatic cancers. FDG PET is useful and cost-beneficial in the pre-operative staging of pancreatic cancer because an unexpected distant metastasis can be detected by whole-body PET in about 40% of the cases, which results in avoidance of unnecessary surgical procedures. FDG PET is also useful in evaluation of the treatment effect, monitoring after the operation and detection of recurrent pancreatic cancers. However, there are some drawbacks in PET diagnosis. A relatively wide overlap has been reported between semiquantitative uptake values obtained in cancers and those in inflammatory lesions. As for false-positive cases, active and chronic pancreatitis and autoimmune pancreatitis sometimes show high FDG accumulation and mimic pancreatic cancer with a shape of focal uptake. There were 8 false negative cases in the detection of pancreatic cancer by FDG PET, up to 33 mm in diameter, mainly because of their poor cellularity in cancer tissues. In addition, there are 19% of cancer cases with a decline in FDG uptake from 1 hr to 2 hr scan. FDG PET was recently applied to and was shown to be feasible in the differential diagnosis of cystic pancreatic lesions, such as intraductal papillary mucinous tumor of the pancreas. Further investigations are required to clarify the clinical value of FDG PET in predicting prognosis of the pancreatic patients. (author) 124 refs

  13. The application of PET, SPECT and MRS in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET and SPECT provide the means to studying in vivo the neurochemical, hemodynamic or metabolic consequences of the degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamineric system in Parkinson's disease (PD). Activation studies using cerebral blood flow and metabolism measurements during a motor task reveal an impaired ability to activate the supplementary motor area and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in PD. The extent of striatal dopaminergic denervation can be quantified with PET and SPECT. Striatal uptake of 18F-dopa is markedly decreased in PD, more in the putamen than in the caudate nucleus, and inversely correlates with the severity of motor signs and with duration of disease. PET and SPECT make possible the assessment by noninvasive means of the changes in dopamine receptor density. Meanwhile, MRS can reveal changes in concentration of several hydrogenate and phosphoric compounds in the brain. The functional information of brain in PD can be obtained with these complementary techniques. (authors)

  14. Combined PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D. L.; Pichler, B. J.; Gückel, B.;

    2015-01-01

    This paper summarises key themes and discussions from the 4th international workshop dedicated to the advancement of the technical, scientific and clinical applications of combined positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems that was held in Tübingen, Germany, from...... February 23 to 27, 2015. Specifically, we summarise the three days of invited presentations from active researchers in this and associated fields augmented by round table discussions and dialogue boards with specific topics. These include the use of PET/MRI in cardiovascular disease, paediatrics, oncology......, neurology and multi-parametric imaging, the latter of which was suggested as a key promoting factor for the wider adoption of integrated PET/MRI. Discussions throughout the workshop and a poll taken on the final day demonstrated that attendees felt more strongly that PET/MRI has further advanced in both...

  15. The impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT on the clinical strategies of patients with known or suspected lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT is a whole-body molecular imaging modality with increasing application for staging, re-staging and guiding management in lung cancer. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging on clinical strategies in lung cancer. Methods: From July 2007 till December 2007, 18F-FDG PET/CT studies were performed in a total 245 lung cancer cases confirmed by pathology before or during treatment by at least one procedure of surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Clinical management data was acquired through questionnaires sent to the referring physicians. Cases with questionnaires completed both before and after the PET/CT scan were en-rolled in this study. Treatment modality includes one of following: surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and follow-up. Change in management was defined in 2 ways: inter-modality and intra-modality. Results: Of a total 245 cases ( 166 males, 79 females, and average age 60.6 years), 49.8% cases (122/245) were for initial staging, and 50.2% (123/245) for re-staging during or after completion of treatment. Staging was changed in 26.5% of initial staging cases (65/245), in which 17.1% (42/245) were up-graded, 9.4% (23/245) were down-graded, while 5.7% (14/245) were staged according to the PET/CT result by the referring physicians. As a result, PET/CT affected 32.2% (79/245) of the lung cancer cases in TNM staging. PET/CT also changed treatment strategies in 51.8% (127/245) of the cases, including 15.9% (39/245) inter-modality and 35.9% (88/245) intra-modality. Conclusions: 18F-FDG PET/CT improves the accuracy of TNM staging and re-staging in patients with known or suspected lung cancer. It also significantly affects management and treatment strategies. (authors)

  16. Recent advances in iterative reconstruction for clinical SPECT/PET and CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Statistical iterative reconstruction is now widely used in clinical practice and has contributed to significant improvement in image quality in recent years. Although primarily used for reconstruction in emission tomography (both single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET)) there is increasing interest in also applying similar algorithms to x-ray computed tomography (CT). There is increasing complexity in the factors that are included in the reconstruction, a demonstration of the versatility of the approach. Research continues with exploration of methods for further improving reconstruction quality with effective correction for various sources of artefact

  17. Clinical and [18F] dopa PET findings in early Parkinson's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Morrish, P K; Sawle, G V; Brooks, D J

    1995-01-01

    Twenty seven patients with recent onset (mean symptom duration 22 (SD 14) months, Hoehn and Yahr score 1.8 (SD 0.7)) Parkinson's disease were studied with [18F]dopa PET. There was a correlation between putamen influx (Ki) and clinical rating, but not symptom duration. In 11 patients with hemi-Parkinson's disease of recent onset there were significant differences between normal (mean 0.0123 (SD 0.0023)), asymptomatic (mean 0.0099 (0.0020)) and symptomatic (mean 0.0070 (00.014)) putamen Kis. Th...

  18. Comparison of clinical and physics scoring of PET images when image reconstruction parameters are varied

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study the quantitative and qualitative image quality (IQ) measurements with clinical judgement of IQ in positron emission tomography (PET) were compared. The limitations of IQ metrics and the proposed criteria of acceptability for PET scanners are discussed. Phantom and patient images were reconstructed using seven different iterative reconstruction protocols. For each reconstructed set of images, IQ was scored based both on the visual analysis and on the quantitative metrics. The quantitative physics metrics did not rank the reconstruction protocols in the same order as the clinicians' scoring of perceived IQ (Rs = -0.54). Better agreement was achieved when comparing the clinical perception of IQ to the physicist's visual assessment of IQ in the phantom images (Rs = +0.59). The closest agreement was seen between the quantitative physics metrics and the measurement of the standard uptake values (SUVs) in small tumours (Rs = +0.92). Given the disparity between the clinical perception of IQ and the physics metrics a cautious approach to use of IQ measurements for determining suspension levels is warranted. (authors)

  19. Clinical application of positron emission tomography for diagnosis of dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, Kazunari [Hyogo Brain and Heart Center, Himeji (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    Clinical applications of PET studies for dementia are reviewed in this paper. At the mild and moderate stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD), glucose metabolism is reduced not only in the parietotemporal region but also in the posterior cingulate and precuneus. At the advanced stage of AD, there is also a metabolic reduction in the frontal region. In AD patients, glucose metabolism is relatively preserved in the pons, sensorimotor cortices, primary visual cortices, basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum. In patients with dementia with Lewy bodies, glucose metabolism in the primary visual cortices is reduced, and this reduction appears to be associated with the reduction pattern in AD patients. In patients with frontotemporal dementia, reduced metabolism in the frontotemporal region is the main feature of this disease, but reduced metabolism in the basal ganglia, and/or parietal metabolic reduction can be associated with the frontotemporal reduction. When corticobasal degeneration is associated with dementia, the reduction pattern of dementia is similar to the reduction pattern in AD and the hallmarks of diagnosing corticobasal degeneration associated with dementia are a reduced metabolism in the primary sensorimotor region and/or basal ganglia and an asymmetric reduction in the two hemispheres. FDG-PET is a very useful tool for the diagnosis of early AD and for the differential diagnosis of dementia. I also describe clinical applications of PET for the diagnosis of dementia in Japan. (author)

  20. Clinical application of positron emission tomography for diagnosis of dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical applications of PET studies for dementia are reviewed in this paper. At the mild and moderate stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD), glucose metabolism is reduced not only in the parietotemporal region but also in the posterior cingulate and precuneus. At the advanced stage of AD, there is also a metabolic reduction in the frontal region. In AD patients, glucose metabolism is relatively preserved in the pons, sensorimotor cortices, primary visual cortices, basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum. In patients with dementia with Lewy bodies, glucose metabolism in the primary visual cortices is reduced, and this reduction appears to be associated with the reduction pattern in AD patients. In patients with frontotemporal dementia, reduced metabolism in the frontotemporal region is the main feature of this disease, but reduced metabolism in the basal ganglia, and/or parietal metabolic reduction can be associated with the frontotemporal reduction. When corticobasal degeneration is associated with dementia, the reduction pattern of dementia is similar to the reduction pattern in AD and the hallmarks of diagnosing corticobasal degeneration associated with dementia are a reduced metabolism in the primary sensorimotor region and/or basal ganglia and an asymmetric reduction in the two hemispheres. FDG-PET is a very useful tool for the diagnosis of early AD and for the differential diagnosis of dementia. I also describe clinical applications of PET for the diagnosis of dementia in Japan. (author)

  1. ECAT ART - a continuously rotating PET camera: performance characteristics, initial clinical studies, and installation considerations in a nuclear medicine department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in image reconstruction techniques have permitted the development of a commercial, rotating, partial ring, fully 3D scanner, the ECAT ART. The system has less than one-half the number of bismuth germanate detectors compared with a full ring scanner with the equivalent field of view, resulting in reduced capital cost. The performance characteristics, implications for installation in a nuclear medicine department, and clinical utility of the scanner are presented in this report. The sensitivity (20 cm diameter x 20 cm long cylindrical phantom, no scatter correction) is 11400 cps.kBq-1.ml-1. This compares with 5800 and 40500 cps.kBq-1.ml-1in 2D and 3D respectively for the equivalent full ring scanner (ECAT EXACT). With an energy window of 350-650 keV the maximum noise equivalent count (NEC) rate was 27 kcps at a radioactivity concentration of ∝15 kBq .ml -1in the cylinder. Spatial resolution is ∝6 mm full width at half maximum on axis degrading to just under 8 mm at a distance of 20 cm off axis. Installation and use within the nuclear medicine department does not appreciably increase background levels of radiation on gamma cameras in adjacent rooms and the dose rate to an operator in the same room is 2 μSv .h -1for a typical fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) study with an initial injected activity of 370 MBq. The scanner has been used for clinical imaging with 18F-FDG for neurological and oncological applications. Its novel use for imaging iron-52 transferrin for localising erythropoietic activity demonstrates its sensitivity and resolution advantages over a conventional dual-headed gamma camera. The ECAT ART provides a viable alternative to conventional full ring PET scanners without compromising the performance required for clinical PET imaging. (orig.). With 9 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Calcitonin radioimmunoassay: clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioimmunoassay for human Calcitonin (hCT) was established: antisera were produced by immunizing goats with synthetic hCT; 7.5 μg hCT were labelled with 1 mCi 125J; hCT of different quantities in the range between 0.1 to 20 ng/ml served as standard. Separation of free from antibody bound tracer was done using the charcoal procedure. - This RIA-system was sensitive to determine 0.1 ng/ml; the normal range lying below 0.5 ng/ml. This assay was used to study the following clinical problems: 1) in 31 patients, with a thyroid tumor, diagnosis of calcitonin producing medullary thyroid carcinoma was proven. Serum calcitonin of these patients were lying between 1.7 and 120 ng/ml. Clinical signs of this disease are nonspecific, so CT determination is of importance for early diagnosis and control of therapy. In patients with a high tumor risk pentapastrin stimulation of the C-cells reveals calcitonin secretion above normal, if a medullary thyroid carcinoma is present. 2) two patients with pheochromocytoma showed elevated levels of CT before operation; after removal of the tumor serum CT was normalized. Extracts of the adreno-medullary tumor revealed immunoreactive CT corresponding to 4 and 1 ng/ml wet weight. - 3) CT is used for therapy of Paget's disease of the bone, so control of antibody development in the patients is necessary. In 25 patients with Paget's disease no antibody production against the injected hormone was evident. (orig.)

  3. Calcitonin radioimmunoassay. Clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioimmunoassay for human calcitonin (hCT) was established. Antisera were produced by immunizing goats with synthetic hCT; 7.5 μg of hCT was labelled with 1 mCi of 125I; hCT served as a standard in the range between 0.1 to 20 ng/ml. Separation of free from antibody-bound tracer was done with a charcoal procedure. The RIA system had a sensitivity of 0.1 ng/ml, the normal range lying below 0.5 ng/ml. The assay was used to study the following clinical problems: (1) In 35 patients with a thyroid tumour, diagnosis of calconin-producing medullary thyroid carcinoma was proven. Serum CT of these patients lay between 1.7 and 120 ng/ml. Clinical signs of this disease are non-specific, so CT determination is important for early diagnosis and control of therapy. In patients with a high tumour risk, pentagastrin stimulation of the C-cells reveals CT secretion above normal if a medullary thyroid carcinoma is present. (2) Two patients with pheochromocytoma showed elevated levels of hCT before operation; after removal of the tumour, the serum CT levels became normal. Extracts of the adrenomedullary tumour revealed immunoreactive CT corresponding to 1 and 4 ng/mg wet weight. (3) hCT is used in the therapy of Paget's disease of the bone, so it is necessary to check the production of antibodies in the patient. In 25 patients with Paget's disease no antibody production against the injected hormone was evident. (author)

  4. NIRS report of investigations for the development of the next generation PET apparatus. FY 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present status of studies conducted by representative technology fields for the development of the next generation PET apparatus, and the summary of opinions given by investigators of nuclear medicine are reported. The former involves chapters of: Summary of representative technologies for the development of the next generation PET apparatus; Count rate analysis of PET apparatuses for the whole body and small animals by PET simulator; Scintillator; DOI (depth of interaction) detector-evaluation of the detector with 256-ch fluorescence polarization-photomultiplier tubes (FP-PMT) trial apparatus etc; Examination of multi-slice DOI-MR compatible detector for PET; Development of application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for processing the front-end signals; Detector simulation; Circuit for processing PET detector signals; Signal processing-coincidence circuit; Data collection system; Signal processing technology for the next generation PET; Reconstruction of statistical PET image using DOI signals; Monte Carlo simulation and Unique directions-PET for infants and for the whole body autonomic nervous systems and mental activity; and Actual design and evaluation of image reconstruction by statistical means. Opinions are: Progress of clinical PET apparatus; Desirable PET drugs and apparatuses; From clinical practice for the development of the next generation PET apparatus; From clinical psychiatric studies for the development; From application of drug development and basic researches; From brain PET practice; From clinical PET practice; and The role of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in PET development. Also involved is the publication list. (N.I.)

  5. PET performance and MRI compatibility evaluation of a digital, ToF-capable PET/MRI insert equipped with clinical scintillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schug, David; Wehner, Jakob; Dueppenbecker, Peter Michael; Weissler, Bjoern; Gebhardt, Pierre; Goldschmidt, Benjamin; Salomon, Andre; Kiessling, Fabian; Schulz, Volkmar

    2015-09-01

    We evaluate the MR compatibility of the Hyperion-IID positron emission tomography (PET) insert, which allows simultaneous operation in a clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. In contrast to previous investigations, this work aims at the evaluation of a clinical crystal configuration. An imaging-capable demonstrator with an axial field-of-view of 32 mm and a crystal-to-crystal spacing of 217.6 mm was equipped with LYSO scintillators with a pitch of 4 mm which were read out in a one-to-one coupling scheme by sensor tiles composed of digital silicon photomultipliers from Philips Digital Photon Counting (DPC 3200-22). The PET performance degradation (energy resolution and coincidence resolution time (CRT)) was evaluated during simultaneous operation of the MRI scanner. We used clinically motivated imaging sequences as well as synthetic gradient stress test sequences. Without activity of the MRI scanner, we measured for trigger scheme 1 (first photon trigger) an energy resolution of 11.4% and a CRT of 213 ps for a narrow energy (NE) window using five 22Na point-like sources. When applying the synthetic gradient sequences, we found worst-case relative degradations of the energy resolution by 5.1% and of the CRT by 33.9%. After identifying the origin of the degradations and implementing a fix to the read-out hardware, the same evaluation revealed no degradation of the PET performance anymore even when the most demanding gradient stress tests were applied. The PET performance of the insert was initially evaluated using the point sources, a high-activity phantom and hot-rod phantoms in order to assess the spatial resolution. Trigger schemes 2-4 delivered an energy resolution of 11.4% as well and CRTs of 279 ps, 333 ps and 557 ps for the NE window, respectively. An isocenter sensitivity of 0.41% using the NE window and 0.71% with a wide energy window was measured. Using a hot-rod phantom, a spatial resolution in the order of 2 mm was demonstrated and the

  6. Virtual colonoscopy: clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virtual colonoscopy (VC), also known as computed tomography Colonography (CTC), is a non-invasive test for the examination of the colon based on volumetric, thin-collimation CT acquisition of a cleansed and air-distended colon. The technique is easy, less labour-intensive than barium enema and conventional colonoscopy, and is inherently safer. Several studies demonstrate the ability of VC in the detection of colonic neoplastic lesions, not only large carcinomas, but also polyps. Currently, the most widely accepted clinical indication is incomplete or unsuccessful colonoscopy, which may be the result of redundant colon, patient intolerance to the procedure, spasm not resolving even with the use of spasmolytics, obstructing colo-rectal cancer. VC is also used to detect cancer in frail and immobile patients to avoid sedation during colonoscopy or the turning required during barium enema. The use of VC in patients under surveillance following colo-rectal cancer surgery is under investigation. Further studies are necessary in order to assess the cost-effectiveness of this approach. For colo-rectal cancer screening, a practical approach is to consider VC as a currently credible alternative screening method and as a reasonable alternative to the other colo-rectal cancer screening tests when a patient is unable or unwilling to undergo conventional colonoscopy. (orig.)

  7. Pediatric DXA: clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binkovitz, Larry A. [Columbus Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Columbus, OH (United States); Sparke, Paul [Capital University, Department of Chemistry, Columbus, OH (United States); Henwood, Maria J. [Columbus Children' s Hospital, Department of Endocrinology, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2007-07-15

    Normal bone mineral accrual requires adequate dietary intake of calcium, vitamin D and other nutrients; hepatic and renal activation of vitamin D; normal hormone levels (thyroid, parathyroid, reproductive and growth hormones); and neuromuscular functioning with sufficient stress upon the skeleton to induce bone deposition. The presence of genetic or acquired diseases and the therapies that are used to treat them can also impact bone health. Since the introduction of clinical DXA in pediatrics in the early 1990s, there has been considerable investigation into the causes of low bone mineral density (BMD) in children. Pediatricians have also become aware of the role adequate bone mass accrual in childhood has in preventing osteoporotic fractures in late adulthood. Additionally, the availability of medications to improve BMD has increased with the development of bisphosphonates. These factors have led to the increased utilization of DXA in pediatrics. This review summarizes much of the previous research regarding BMD in children and is meant to assist radiologists and clinicians with DXA utilization and interpretation. (orig.)

  8. A retrospective analysis of the impact of 18F-FDG PET scans on clinical management of 133 breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: While it is well-known that there is 18F-PDG uptake in breast tumors, clinical impact of 18F-FDG PET in managing breast cancer patients is not well-studied. Methods: One hundred and thirty-three consecutive breast cancer patients from May 1996 to June 2000 were studied. All patients were treated and being followed. Reasons of referral included equivocal conventional studies, staging/re-staging, clinical suspicion of recurrence, and elevated serum tumor markers. Clinical status at 6 months post PET is used as the gold standard in lesions of worsening versus stable or improving. Results: PET was 69% sensitive and 80% specific in predicting clinical stage at 6 months. This 69% of the patients who got worse at 6 months was PET positive and 80% of the patients who were stable or improving at 6 months were PET negative. There was a significant association between PET results and clinical outcome, after adjusting for stage of disease (p=0.04), or for the treatment patients received (P<0.01). Negative PET results changed therapy as often as positive ones did. PET influenced treatment decisions in 74% of the patients referred for study. Conclusion: PET holds promise as a sensitive and specific modality in following treated breast cancer patients. PET results contain information on 6 month outcome that is independent of stage or past treatment and influence patient management

  9. Amyloid PET Screening for Enrichment of Early-Stage Alzheimer Disease Clinical Trials: Experience in a Phase 1b Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevigny, Jeff; Suhy, Joyce; Chiao, Ping; Chen, Tianle; Klein, Gregory; Purcell, Derk; Oh, Joonmi; Verma, Ajay; Sampat, Mehul; Barakos, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is being investigated as a screening tool to identify amyloid-positive patients as an enrichment strategy for Alzheimer disease (AD) clinical trial enrollment. In a multicenter, phase 1b trial, patients meeting clinical criteria for prodromal or mild AD underwent florbetapir PET scanning at screening. PET, magnetic resonance imaging, and coregistered PET/magnetic resonance imaging scans were reviewed by 2 independent readers and binary visual readings tabulated. Semiquantitative values of cortical to whole cerebellar standard uptake value ratios were computed (threshold 1.10). Of 278 patients with an evaluable PET scan, 170 (61%) and 185 (67%) were amyloid-positive by visual reading and quantitative analysis, respectively; 39% were excluded from the study due to an amyloid-negative scan based on visual readings. More ApoE ε4 carriers than noncarriers were amyloid-positive (80% vs. 43%). Comparison of visual readings with quantitative results identified 21 discordant cases (92% agreement). Interreader and intrareader agreements from visual readings were 98% and 100%, respectively. Amyloid PET imaging is an effective and feasible screening tool for enrollment of amyloid-positive patients with early stages of AD into clinical trials. PMID:26885819

  10. FDG PET scans as evaluation of clinical response to dendritic cell vaccination in patients with malignant melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell-Noerregaard, Lotte; Hendel, Helle W; Johannesen, Helle H; Alslev, Louise; Svane, Inge Marie

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Measurements of tumour metabolism by [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) have been successfully applied to monitor tumour response after chemo- and chemo-radiotherapy and may not have the same limitations as other morphological imaging techniques. In this st...... in CT scans might be due to oedema or immune-infiltrates and not progression of the disease. Thus, further investigation into the contribution of PET scans to the evaluation of cancer immunotherapy is needed....... PET scans to the CT evaluation of patients treated with DC vaccines, a more detailed picture of the single lesions was found. This seems to improve the clinical evaluation of the treatment. The lack of correlation between the PET and CT scans suggests that some of the increases in target lesions seen...

  11. Clinical usefulness of 18F-FDG PET-CT for patients with gallbladder cancer and cholangiocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reports concerning the clinical usefulness of 18F 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose integrated positron emission and computed tomography (18F-FDG PET-CT) for patients with gallbladder cancer and cholangiocarcinoma are relatively scarce. The purpose of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of PET-CT in relation to a conventional imaging modality, multidetector row CT (MDCT), for patients with gallbladder cancer and cholangiocarcinoma. Ninety-nine patients with suspected gallbladder cancer and cholangiocarcinoma who underwent both PET-CT and MDCT for initial staging were included in our study. The results of these two imaging modalities for evaluating primary tumors, regional lymph nodes and distant metastases were compared with the final diagnoses based on pathological or clinical findings. A maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of 3.65 was found to be the best cutoff value for detecting a malignant tumor. The overall values for the sensitivities, specificities, positive predictive values (PPVs), negative predictive values (NPVs) and the accuracies of PET-CT and MDCT for the detection of a primary tumor were 90.2, 70.6, 93.7, 60.0, 86.9% and 84.2, 70.6, 93.2, 48.0, 81.8%, respectively. PET-CT demonstrated no significant advantage over MDCT for the diagnosis of a primary tumor. PET-CT showed a significantly higher PPV (94.1 vs. 77.5%, P=0.04) than that found for MDCT in the diagnosis of regional lymph node metastasis. Additionally, PET-CT showed a significantly higher sensitivity (94.7 vs. 63.2%, P=0.02) than that found for MDCT in the diagnosis of distant metastasis. PET-CT is valuable for detecting regional lymph node involvement and unsuspected distant metastases that are not diagnosed by MDCT. (author)

  12. Functional diagnosis of cancer using PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical application of PET imaging of auto activation derived from C-12 ion radiotherapy was studied. We have introduced the patient fixation system for auto activation PET measurements. Using this fixation system, we can get PET images with the same patient positioning as with patient positioning of Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) therapy planning CT. It is very important to perform the PET measurements under exactly same patient positioning as HIMAC therapy to compare RI distributions. We performed some clinical PET measurements and got superimposed images of PET and CT planning of HIMAC therapy patients. We tried to use a fitting method, automatic multi modality image registration method (AMIR method) of the Dr. View applications. In this method, we fitted the transmission images of PET to planning CT images at the start, and then superimposed emission images on the planning CT images. Our fitting results were relatively good. But some problems were found out. The most important one was the difference of patients breathing phases between PET examination and CT imaging. The difference of patients breathing phases should cause fitting errors of the fusion images of PET and CT especially in chest and abdominal regions. We think that the breathing phases of PET and CT should be in phase with each other to perform precise fitting of the two modalities. (author)

  13. Mammascintigraphy: fundamentals, protocols, clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiopharmaceuticals, methods and results of clinical application of mammascintigraphy are reviewed. The main advantage of mammascintigraphy is its higher (at least 90%) specificity in comparison with X-ray mammography, possibility of using it in patients with X-ray dense gland, predicting cancer metastases and follow-up of tumor regression during chemotherapy. Mammascintigraphy is an effective reliable method of accurate diagnosis of breast cancer, which should be introduced in clinical practice of Russian breast cancer control centers as soon as possible

  14. Feasibility of simultaneous PET/MR of the carotid artery: first clinical experience and comparison to PET/CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Knudsen, Andreas; Hag, Anne Mette Fisker;

    2013-01-01

    min after injection. Subsequently, PET/CT was performed. Regions of interest (ROI) were drawn slice by slice to include the carotid arteries and standardized uptake values (SUV) were calculated from both datasets independently. Quantitative comparison of 18F-FDG uptake revealed a high congruence...

  15. Clinical value of {sup 11}C-methionine PET/CT in patients with plasma cell malignancy: comparison with {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamoto, Yuji; Kurihara, Kensuke; Nakatani, Koya; Togashi, Kaori [Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Nishizawa, Masatoshi; Yamashita, Kouhei; Kondo, Tadakazu; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi [Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Hematology and Oncology, Kyoto (Japan)

    2013-05-15

    PET/CT using FDG has been widely used for the imaging of various malignant tumours, including plasma cell malignancy (PCM), but {sup 11}C-methionine (MET), as a radiolabelled amino acid tracer, may also be useful because PCM is able to activate protein synthesis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical value of PET/CT imaging using MET in PCM, including multiple myeloma, compared with that of FDG PET/CT. The study group comprised 20 patients with histologically proven PCM who underwent FDG PET/CT and MET PET/CT scans before (n = 6) or after (n = 14) treatment. Semiquantitative analysis was performed on a lesion basis. We also visually evaluated the scans qualitatively using a five-point scale (0, negative; 1, probably negative; 2, equivocal; 3, probably positive; 4, positive) on a lesion and a patient basis. The results were compared between the two scans. Active PCM was confirmed in 15 patients, including two patients with extramedullary lesions. Uptake of MET tended to be higher (maximum standardized uptake value 10.3 {+-} 5.6, mean {+-} SD) than that of FDG (3.4 {+-} 2.7, p < 0.001), and more lesions of grade 3 or 4 were depicted by MET (MET 156 lesions vs. FDG 58 lesions). On a patient basis, two patients were accurately diagnosed only by MET. In the remaining 18 patients, consistent results were obtained, but potential upgrade of staging or restaging was necessary in 6 of 11 positive patients because more abnormal lesions were demonstrated by MET. The patient-based sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MET for restaging were 89 %, 100 % and 93 %, respectively, while those of FDG were 78 %, 100 % and 86 %, respectively. MET revealed an equal or greater number of lesions in PCM than FDG. MET may be especially useful when negative or inconclusive findings are obtained by FDG despite highly suspicious indications of recurrence. (orig.)

  16. Clinical value of 11C-methionine PET/CT in patients with plasma cell malignancy: comparison with 18F-FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET/CT using FDG has been widely used for the imaging of various malignant tumours, including plasma cell malignancy (PCM), but 11C-methionine (MET), as a radiolabelled amino acid tracer, may also be useful because PCM is able to activate protein synthesis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical value of PET/CT imaging using MET in PCM, including multiple myeloma, compared with that of FDG PET/CT. The study group comprised 20 patients with histologically proven PCM who underwent FDG PET/CT and MET PET/CT scans before (n = 6) or after (n = 14) treatment. Semiquantitative analysis was performed on a lesion basis. We also visually evaluated the scans qualitatively using a five-point scale (0, negative; 1, probably negative; 2, equivocal; 3, probably positive; 4, positive) on a lesion and a patient basis. The results were compared between the two scans. Active PCM was confirmed in 15 patients, including two patients with extramedullary lesions. Uptake of MET tended to be higher (maximum standardized uptake value 10.3 ± 5.6, mean ± SD) than that of FDG (3.4 ± 2.7, p < 0.001), and more lesions of grade 3 or 4 were depicted by MET (MET 156 lesions vs. FDG 58 lesions). On a patient basis, two patients were accurately diagnosed only by MET. In the remaining 18 patients, consistent results were obtained, but potential upgrade of staging or restaging was necessary in 6 of 11 positive patients because more abnormal lesions were demonstrated by MET. The patient-based sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MET for restaging were 89 %, 100 % and 93 %, respectively, while those of FDG were 78 %, 100 % and 86 %, respectively. MET revealed an equal or greater number of lesions in PCM than FDG. MET may be especially useful when negative or inconclusive findings are obtained by FDG despite highly suspicious indications of recurrence. (orig.)

  17. RAY-SCAN 64 PET/CT性能测试与临床测试%Performance Testing and Clinical Trials of RAY-SCAN 64 PET/CT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田涧; 丁翼晨; 杨昆; 任秋实

    2015-01-01

    我国PET-CT等高端医疗器械市场被国外产品长期垄断,屈指可数的国产设备远低于市场需求。北京锐视康科技发展有限公司完全掌握了PET/CT的核心器件及整机生产的全套技术,研发成功型号为RAY-SCAN 64 PET/CT,并于2014年2月通过国家食品药品监督管理总局的评审获得注册许可证。严格按照国家标准对该设备进行性能测试,CT的空间分辨率为0.35 mm,PET的最优分辨率达到3.4 mm,不低于市场主流机型的性能指标。在解放军总医院和北京大学附属北京肿瘤医院完成临床测试,分别对头部、胸部、腹部、盆腔和病灶区域的病例进行图像质量分析,并在同等测试条件下与国外两家公司的相似性能设备对比,发现无显著性差异。%The PET-CT (Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography) market in China has long been monopolized by imported products. However, current medical equipment designed in China is far from meeting the clinical requirements. ARRAYS Medical Imaging Corporation has a thorough knowledge of the core techniques of PET-CT and production of the integrated system. Its new product, RAY-SCAN 64 PET/CT, demonstrated excellence in the performance test and was successfully validated by China Food and Drug Administration (CFDA) in February2014. According to the test result, the spatial resolution of CT is 0.35 mm and the best resolution of PET achieves 3.4 mm, which indicates RAY-SCAN 64 PET/CT is comparable with the leading products in the market. In its clinical test, the image quality of brain, chest, abdomen, pelvic and lesion region scans were respectively analyzed by the General Hospital of Chinese People's Liberation Army and Beijing Cancer Hospital. Moreover, in comparison with two products from foreign companies under the same testing conditions, RAY-SCAN 64 PET/CT demonstrated no signiifcant differences in its clinical performance.

  18. [Polyethylene terephthalate (PET)--health aspects and food packaging application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwiek-Ludwicka, Kazimiera

    2003-01-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) due to its physicochemical properties, especially regidity and glass-like transparency is widely used as food packaging material. The relevant legislation states that substances may not migrate from food contacting materials in quantities that may cause undesirable changes in organoleptic properties of food coming into contact with such material. The lists of substances authorized for food contact plastic materials and requirements for the final product were established. The requirements concern global migration limits (60 mg/kg or 10 mg/dm2) and specific migration limits (SML) set for substances which, when migrate into food in grater quantities may cause risk for human health. For the products manufactured from PET the specific migration limits were set for terephthalic acid (7.5 mg/kg), for isophthalic acid (5 mg/kg), for isophthalic acid dimethyl ester (0.05 mg/kg) and for ethylene and diethylene glycol (30 mg/kg). PET may undergo thermal degradation resulting in formation of acetaldehyde, which may influence organoleptic characteristics of packaged foods changing taste and smell. PMID:14531083

  19. Clinical Significance of Myocardial Uptake on F-18 FDG PET/CT Performed in Oncologic Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake of myocardium is influenced by various factors. Increased glycolysis, and subsequent increased F-18 FDG uptake has been reported in ischemic cardiomyopathy. However, clinical significance of incidentally found myocardial F-18 FDG uptake has not been clarified. We retrospectively reviewed the degree and pattern of myocardial uptake in patients without history of ischemic heart disease who underwent torso F-18 FDG PET/CT for evaluation of neoplastic disease. From January 2005 to June 2009, 77 patients who underwent F-18 FDG PET/CT and Tc-99m sestamibi stress/rest SPECT within 3 months were enrolled. Of 77 patients, 55 (71.4%) showed increased F-18 FDG uptake in the myocardium. In this population, 40 showed uniform uptake pattern, while 15 showed focal uptake. In patients with uniform uptake, 17 showed decreased uptake in the septum without perfusion defect on myocardial SPECT. Remaining 23 patients showed uniform uptake, with 1 reversible perfusion defect and 1 fixed perfusion defect. In 15 patients with focal uptake, 9 showed increased F-18 FDG uptake in the base, and only 1 of them showed reversible perfusion defect on myocardial SPECT. In the remaining 6 focal uptake group, 4 had reversible perfusion defect in the corresponding wall, and 1 had apical hypertrophy. We demonstrated that septal defect pattern and basal uptake pattern in the myocardium may represent normal variants. Focal myocardial uptake other than normal variants on oncologic torso F-18 FDG PET/CT with routine fasting protocol may suggest ischemic heart disease, thus further evaluation is warranted

  20. Improved dead-time correction for PET scanners: application to small-animal PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pile-up and dead-time are two main causes of nonlinearity in the response of a PET scanner as a function of activity in the field of view (FOV). For a given scanner and acquisition system, pile-up effects depend on the material and size of the object being imaged and on the distribution of activity inside and outside the FOV, because these factors change the singles-to-coincidences ratio (SCR). Thus, it is difficult to devise an accurate correction that would be valid for any acquisition. In this work, we demonstrate a linear relationship between SCR and effective dead-time, which measures the effects of both dead-time (losses) and pile-up (gains and losses). This relationship allows us to propose a simple method to accurately estimate dead-time and pile-up corrections using only two calibration acquisitions with, respectively, a high and low SCR. The method has been tested with simulations and experimental data for two different scanner geometries: a scanner with large area detectors and no pile-up rejection, and a scanner composed of two full rings of smaller detectors. Our results show that the SCR correction method is accurate within 7%, even for high activities in the FOV, and avoids the bias of the standard single-parameter method. (paper)

  1. Improved dead-time correction for PET scanners: application to small-animal PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, E.; Herraiz, J. L.; España, S.; Herranz, E.; Desco, M.; Vaquero, J. J.; Udías, J. M.

    2013-04-01

    Pile-up and dead-time are two main causes of nonlinearity in the response of a PET scanner as a function of activity in the field of view (FOV). For a given scanner and acquisition system, pile-up effects depend on the material and size of the object being imaged and on the distribution of activity inside and outside the FOV, because these factors change the singles-to-coincidences ratio (SCR). Thus, it is difficult to devise an accurate correction that would be valid for any acquisition. In this work, we demonstrate a linear relationship between SCR and effective dead-time, which measures the effects of both dead-time (losses) and pile-up (gains and losses). This relationship allows us to propose a simple method to accurately estimate dead-time and pile-up corrections using only two calibration acquisitions with, respectively, a high and low SCR. The method has been tested with simulations and experimental data for two different scanner geometries: a scanner with large area detectors and no pile-up rejection, and a scanner composed of two full rings of smaller detectors. Our results show that the SCR correction method is accurate within 7%, even for high activities in the FOV, and avoids the bias of the standard single-parameter method.

  2. A simple on-column preparation of [11C]choline. Automation and adaptation to routine production for clinical positron emission tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    [11C]Choline is currently a potential PET radiopharmaceutical for tumor imaging. For its routine PET application we have developed an automated synthesis system based on the Sep-Pak [11C]methylation method. A simple and highly sensitive method for the detection of residual 2-dimethylaminoethanol (DMAE) in [11C]choline injections was also developed by the combination of headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Using this system, [11C]choline ready for injection can be obtained in a decay corrected radiochemical yield of 88% with a radiochemical purity of >99% after optimizing reaction parameters. The total synthesis time was 16 min after the end of irradiation. The simplicity, the high efficiency, and the use of disposable components are advantageous for routine clinical use. (author)

  3. Evaluation of efficacy and clinical impact of FDG-PET 27 patients with surgery of newly diagnosed colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to assess the potential clinical benefit of positron emission tomography (PET) with Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) in patients with colorectal cancer. A total of 27 patients with surgery of newly diagnosed colorectal cancer who were examined preoperatively by FDG-PET between July 2002 and December 2004 were retrospectively analyzed in this study. FDG-PET detected 89% of primary tumors. FDG-PET depicted lymph node metastases in 4 of 9 patients (sensitivity, 44%) and true-negative in 17 of 18 patients (specificity, 94%). FDG-PET depicted liver metastases in 3 of 3 patients (sensitivity, 100%) and true-negative in 22 of 24 patients (specificity, 91%). A comparison of the FDG uptake and the clinicopathologic findings showed that there was no significant association between FDG uptake and the macro finding type, the depth of invasion and histological type. Five of 8 cases with a preoperative diagnosis as lymph-node negative were diagnosed histologically as lymph-node positive, in which the tumor was less than 10 mm in maximum horizontal size, so its size can be a significant factor. FDG-PET can serve as a valuable tool for detecting primary lesions with preoperative colorectal cancer. (author)

  4. FDG-PET/CT in oncology. German guideline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FDG-PET/CT examinations combine metabolic and morphologic imaging within an integrated procedure. Over the past decade PET/CT imaging has gained wide clinical acceptance in the field of oncology. This FDG-PET/CT guideline focuses on indications, data acquisition and processing as well as documentation of FDG-PET/CT examinations in oncologic patients within a clinical and social context specific to Germany. Background information and definitions are followed by examples of clinical and research applications of FDG-PET/CT. Furthermore, protocols for CT scanning (low dose and contrast-enhanced CT) and PET emission imaging are discussed. Documentation and reporting of examinations are specified. Image interpretation criteria and sources of errors are discussed. Quality control for FDG and PET/CT-systems, qualification requirements of personnel as well as legal aspects are presented. (orig.)

  5. FDG PET/CT in Crohn's disease: correlation of quantitative FDG PET/CT parameters with clinical and endoscopic surrogate markers of disease activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saboury, Babak; Salavati, Ali; Brothers, Alex; Basu, Sandip; Torigian, Drew A. [University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kwee, Thomas C.; Lam, Marnix G.E.H. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Hustinx, Roland [University Hospital of Liege, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Liege (Belgium); Louis, Edouard [University Hospital of Liege, Division of Gastroenterology, Liege (Belgium); Alavi, Abass [University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-04-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility and potential clinical utility of assessment of Crohn's disease (CD) activity by {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT employing a new quantitative approach. A total of 22 subjects (mean age 37) with CD who had undergone FDG PET/CT followed by ileocolonoscopy within 1 week were included in this analysis. The CD endoscopy index of severity (CDEIS) for various bowel segments was calculated. The CD activity index (CDAI) was evaluated, and fecal calprotectin was measured. On PET, regions with increased FDG uptake in large bowel were segmented with an adaptive contrast-oriented thresholding algorithm, and metabolically active volume (MAV), uncorrected mean standardized uptake value (SUV{sub mean}), partial volume-corrected SUV{sub mean} (PVC-SUV{sub mean}), SUV{sub max}, uncorrected total lesion glycolysis (TLG = MAV x SUV{sub mean}), and PVC total lesion glycolysis (PVC-TLG = MAV x PVC-SUV{sub mean}) were measured. Global CD activity score (GCDAS) was calculated as the sum of PVC-TLG over all clinically significant FDG-avid regions in each subject. Correlations between regional PET quantification measures (SUVs, TLGs) and CDEIS were calculated. Correlations between the global PET quantification measure (GCDAS, global SUVs) with CDAI, fecal calprotectin, CDEIS, and CRP level were also calculated. SUV{sub max}, PVC-SUV{sub mean}, and PVC-TLG significantly correlated with segment CDEIS subscores (r = 0.50, r = 0.69, and r = 0.31, respectively; p < 0.05). GCDAS significantly correlated with CDAI and fecal calprotectin (r = 0.64 and r = 0.51, respectively; p < 0.05). By employing this new quantitative approach, we were able to calculate indices of regional and global CD activity, which correlated well with both clinical and pathological disease activity surrogate markers. This approach may be of clinical importance in measuring both global disease activity and treatment response

  6. Clinical applications of breath testing

    OpenAIRE

    Paschke, Kelly M; Mashir, Alquam; Dweik, Raed A.

    2010-01-01

    Breath testing has the potential to benefit the medical field as a cost-effective, non-invasive diagnostic tool for diseases of the lung and beyond. With growing evidence of clinical worth, standardization of methods, and new sensor and detection technologies the stage is set for breath testing to gain considerable attention and wider application in upcoming years.

  7. Established, emerging and future applications of FDG-PET/CT in the uterine cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitajima, K., E-mail: kitajima@med.kobe-u.ac.j [PET Diagnosis, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan); Murakami, K. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kaji, Y. [Radiology, Dokkyo University School of Medicine, Mibu (Japan); Sakamoto, S. [PET center, Dokkyo Medical University Hospital, Mibu (Japan); Sugimura, K. [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    Integrated positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) is a useful technique to acquire both glucose metabolic and anatomic imaging data using a single device in a single diagnostic session and has opened a new field in clinical oncologic imaging. FDG-PET/CT has been used successfully for the staging, optimization of treatment, re-staging, therapy monitoring, and prognostic prediction of uterine cervical cancer and endometrial cancer as well as various malignant tumours. The present review discusses the current role of FDG-PET/CT in the management of uterine cancer, discussing its usefulness and limitations in the imaging of these patients.

  8. Robotic preparation of Sodium Acetate C 11 Injection for use in clinical PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium Acetate C 11 Injection is a radiopharmaceutical commonly used for clinical studies with positron emission tomography (PET). We have designed a fully-automated robotic system for the compounding of this 20-minute half-lived tracer in the clinical setting. The system is comprised of five modular workstations that are configured in a flexible manner to accommodate all of the steps in the production of the labeled drug. The Trapping Station isolates cyclotron-produced [11C]CO2 gas from the target and directs carbonation of methylmagnesium Grignard in diethyl ether. The Heating Station hydrolyzes the intermediate, and removes ether and unreacted [11C]CO2 from the mixture. The Extraction Station removes ionic and organic contaminants from the drug using solid-phase extraction (AG 11A8 and C18 resin). The Filtration Station sterilizes the radiopharmaceutical, and tests membrane patency post filtration. The Assay Station measures the weight and radioactivity content of the Final Product Container, facilitating calculation of activity concentration in a remote manner. Rapid quality control methodology has also been developed that is suitable for pre-release analysis of the drug product. For a 7.5 min irradiation with a 40 μA proton beam, 223-300 mCi of Acetate C 11 Injection with purity meeting USP standards is produced within 23 min. This robotic system is a reliable method for producing Sodium Acetate C 11 Injection, USP in the clinical setting with minimal personnel exposure. Moreover, its design flexibility permits synthesis of additional 11C- or 18F-labeled PET tracers within the same shielded hot cell

  9. The clinical significance and management of lesion motion due to respiration during PET/CT scanning

    OpenAIRE

    Callahan, Jason; Kron, Tomas; Schneider-Kolsky, Michal; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Lesion movement during positron emission tomography (PET) scan acquisition due to normal respiration is a common source of artefact. A PET scan is acquired in multiple couch positions of between 2 and 5 min duration with the patient breathing freely. A PET-avid lesion will become blurred if affected by respiratory motion, an effect similar to that created when a person moves in a photograph. This motion also frequently causes misregistration between the PET and computed tomography (C...

  10. An introduction to PET/CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since its introduction in 1998, dual-modality PET/CT imaging has received great attention in the medical community. Patients are examined with both CT and PET in a whole-body single examination in the same scanner and fusion can be obtained directly obviating the need for software registration. The CT images are used for anatomic reference of the tracer uptake patterns imaged in PET, as well as for attenuation correction of the PET data. This review discusses the technical background of PET with F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose, CT and combined PET/CT devices. Clinical applications in oncology are considered. Fusion of the anatomic information provided by CT and the metabolic information provided by PET in PET/CT imaging allows a higher diagnostic accuracy for lesion localisation than PET plus CT performed independently. Image artefacts can result from CT-based attenuation methodology that can overcorrect dense objects generating hot spot artefacts in attenuation correction PET images and mismatches in CT and PET studies due to respiratory movements and the different patient positioning between both examinations. (author)

  11. [(18)F]-Organotrifluoroborates as Radioprosthetic Groups for PET Imaging: From Design Principles to Preclinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, David M

    2016-07-19

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is revolutionizing our ability to visualize in vivo targets for target validation and personalized medicine. Of several classes of imaging agents, peptides afford high affinity and high specificity to distinguish pathologically distinct cell types by the presence of specific molecular targets. Of various available PET isotopes, [(18)F]-fluoride ion is preferred because of its excellent nuclear properties and on-demand production in hospitals at Curie levels. However, the short half-life of (18)F and its lack of reactivity in water continue to challenge peptide labeling. Hence, peptides are often conjugated to a metal chelator for late-stage, one-step labeling. Yet radiometals, while effective, are neither as desirable nor as available as [(18)F]-fluoride ion. Despite considerable past success in identifying semifeasible radiosyntheses, significant challenges continue to confound tracer development. These interrelated challenges relate to (1) isotope/prosthetic choice; (2) bioconjugation for high affinity; (3) high radiochemical yields, (4) specific activities of >1 Ci/μmol to meet FDA microdose requirements; and (5) rapid clearance and in vivo stability. These enduring challenges have been extensively highlighted, while a single-step, operationally simple, and generally applicable means of labeling a peptide with [(18)F]-fluoride ion in good yield and high specific activity has eluded radiochemists and nuclear medicine practitioners for decades. Radiosynthetic ease is of primordial importance since multistep labeling reactions challenge clinical tracer production. In the past decade, as we sought to meet this challenge, appreciation of reactions with aqueous fluoride led us to consider organotrifluoroborate (RBF3(-)) synthesis as a means of rapid aqueous peptide labeling. We have applied principles of mechanistic chemistry, knowledge of chemical reactivity, and synthetic chemistry to design stable RBF3(-)s. Over the past 10 years

  12. PET and diagnostic technology evaluation in a global clinical process. DGN's point of view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotzerke, J. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Dresden (Germany); Dietlein, M. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Koeln (Germany); Gruenwald, F. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Bockisch, A. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Essen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    therapy of malignancies will be improved continuously. It is the claim of the health insurances to implement innovative therapeutic approaches in controlled clinical trials with tools of quality control. The monitoring committee is responsible for the safety of the patients. PET is part of the health care. Internationally accepted rules for clinical trials stipulate that any interim analyses of those trials are confidential as long as recruitment is active. The delay until evidence is documented by the published final analysis is methodologically accepted and not a characteristic of PET. (7) Procedures in nuclear medicine without the use of PET-tracers with short half-life will increase the radiation exposure of the patients; the use of non-PET-tracers with longer half-life is in contravention of the German regulation of radiation protection. (orig.)

  13. The quantification of dynamic FET PET imaging and correlation with the clinical outcome in patients with glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Frank; Ehmer, Julia; Piroth, Marc D.; Eble, Michael J.; Coenen, Heinz H.; Kaiser, Hans-Juergen; Schaefer, Wolfgang M.; Buell, Ulrich; Boy, Christian

    2009-09-01

    The PET tracer O-(2-[18F]Fluoroethyl)-l-tyrosine (FET) has been shown to be valuable for different roles in the management of brain tumours. The aim of this study was to evaluate several quantitative measures of dynamic FET PET imaging in patients with resected glioblastoma. We evaluated dynamic FET PET in nine patients with histologically confirmed glioblastoma. Following FET PET, all subjects had radiation and chemotherapy. Tumour ROIs were defined by a threshold-based region-growing algorithm. We compared several standard measures of tumour uptake and uptake kinetics: SUV, SUV/background, distribution volume ratio (DVR), weighted frame differences and compartment model parameters. These measures were correlated with disease-free and overall survival, and analysed for statistical significance. We found that several measures allowed robust quantification. SUV and distribution volume did not correlate with clinical outcome. Measures that are based on a background region (SUV/BG, Logan-DVR) highly correlated with disease-free survival (r = -0.95, p survival. Some advanced measures also showed a prognostic value but no improvement over the simpler methods. We conclude that FET PET probably has a prognostic value in patients with resected glioblastoma. The ratio of SUV to background may provide a simple and valuable predictive measure of the clinical outcome. Further studies are needed to confirm these explorative results.

  14. Quantitative carotid PET/MR imaging: clinical evaluation of MR-Attenuation correction versus CT-Attenuation correction in 18F-FDG PET/MR emission data and comparison to PET/CT

    OpenAIRE

    Bini, Jason; Robson, Philip M.; Calcagno, Claudia; Eldib, Mootaz; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2015-01-01

    Current PET/MR systems employ segmentation of MR images and subsequent assignment of empirical attenuation coefficients for quantitative PET reconstruction. In this study we examine the differences in the quantification of 18F-FDG uptake in the carotid arteries between PET/MR and PET/CT scanners. Five comparisons were performed to asses differences in PET quantification: i) PET/MR MR-based AC (MRAC) versus PET/MR CTAC, ii) PET/MR MRAC versus PET/CT, iii) PET/MR MRAC with carotid coil versus P...

  15. Use of PET/CT scanning in cancer patients: technical and practical considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Griffeth, Landis K.

    2005-01-01

    This overview of the oncologic applications of positron emission tomography (PET) focuses on the technical aspects and clinical applications of a newer technique: the combination of a PET scanner and a computed tomography (CT) scanner in a single (PET/CT) device. Examples illustrate how PET/CT contributes to patient care and improves upon the previous state-of-the-art method of comparing a PET scan with a separate CT scan. Finally, the author presents some of the results from studies of PET/C...

  16. FDG-PET in gynecologic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 18-F deoxyglucose (FDG) is a molecular imaging modality that detects metabolic alternation in tumor cells. In various human cancers, FDG-PET shows a potential clinical benefit in screening, tumor characterization, staging, therapeutic follow-up and detecting recurrence. In gynecologic cancers, FDG-PET is also known to be effective in characterization of adnexal masses, detection of recurrence, and lymph node invasion. This review discusses the clinical feasibility and future clinical application of this imaging modality in patients with cervical cancer, ovarian cancer and other gynecologic cancers

  17. Application of PET/CT Orientation Gamma Knife in the Body Position%PET/CT在体部γ刀定位中应用体会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建国; 聂青; 康静波; 张丽萍; 齐文杰

    2009-01-01

    Obiective To elaborate the application of PCT/CT orientation Gamma Knife in the body.Methods From May, 2007 to May, 2008, PET/CT equipment was used on 120 cases with gamma knife body positioning and image fusion, Re-sults The PET/CT scan may not have iodine in the contrast agent to enhance the effective conduct of tumor imaging and CT position provides more simple and more accurate image information to guide target(GTV) of the outline. Conclusion The PET/CT in the gamma knife treatment can improve in the positioning accuracy of GIN, and improve treatment opportunity for iodine allergy patients.%目的:阐述PCT/CT在体部γ刀定位中的应用.方法:2007-05-2008-05,利用PET/CT设备对120例患者进行俸部γ,刀定位及图像融合.结果:用PET/CT扫描可在不用碘造影剂增强情况下进行肿瘤有效显像.较单纯CT定位获得更丰富和准确的图像信息,有助于指导靶区(GTV)的勾画.结论:PET/CT在γ,刀治疗定位中明显提高了GTV的定位精度,增加了碘过敏患者的治疗机会.

  18. Clinical applications of cells labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blood cells labelled with radionuclides are reviewed and main applications are described. Red blood cell labelling by both random and specific principle. A table with most important clinical uses, 99mTc labelling of RBC are described pre tinning and in vivo reduction of Tc, in vitro labelling and administration of labelled RBC and in vivo modified technique. Labelled leucocytes with several 99mTc-complex radiopharmaceuticals by in vitro technique and specific monoclonal s for white cells(neutrofiles). Labelled platelets for clinical use and research by in vitro technique and in vivo labelling

  19. fMRI. Basics and clinical applications. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulmer, Stephan [Medizinisch Radiologisces Institut (MRI), Zuerich (Switzerland); Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie; Jansen, Olav (eds.) [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Inst. fuer Neuroradiologie

    2013-11-01

    State of the art overview of fMRI. Covers technical issues, methods of statistical analysis, and the full range of clinical applications. Revised and expanded edition including discussion of novel aspects of analysis and further important applications. Includes comparisons with other brain mapping techniques and discussion of potential combined uses. Since functional MRI (fMRI) and the basic method of BOLD imaging were introduced in 1993 by Seiji Ogawa, fMRI has evolved into an invaluable clinical tool for routine brain imaging, and there have been substantial improvements in both the imaging technique itself and the associated statistical analysis. This book provides a state of the art overview of fMRI and its use in clinical practice. Experts in the field share their knowledge and explain how to overcome diverse potential technical barriers and problems. Starting from the very basics on the origin of the BOLD signal, the book covers technical issues, anatomical landmarks, the full range of clinical applications, methods of statistical analysis, and special issues in various clinical fields. Comparisons are made with other brain mapping techniques, such as DTI, PET, TMS, EEG, and MEG, and their combined use with fMRI is also discussed. Since the first edition, original chapters have been updated and new chapters added, covering both novel aspects of analysis and further important clinical applications.

  20. The clinical value of 18F-FDG PET-CT in diagnosis of the pleural or peritoneal carcinomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of 18F-FDG PET-CT in diagnosis of the pleural or peritoneal carcinomatosis. Methods: A total of 37 patients with pleural effusion or ascites of unknown origin were analyzed retrospectively. All patients underwent whole body 18F-FDG PET-CT. The 18F-FDG distributional pattern and the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of lesions were analyzed. The final diagnosis of all cases were established based on the results of catamnestic analysis,tumor markers assay, histopathology or clinical follow-up. Results: Of all the 37 cases, 29 had positive findings on 18F-FDG PET-CT,of which 26 were pleural or peritoneal carcinomatosis and 3 were pleural or peritoneal tuberculosis; 8 patients had negative findings on 18F-FDG PET-CT, of which 6 were pleural or peritoneal benign lesions and 2 were peritoneal carcinomatosis. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, negative predictive value of 18F-FDG PET-CT in diagnosis of peritoneal carcinomatosis were 92.9%, 66.7%, 86.5%, 89.7% and 75.0% respectively. The SUVmax between the ring-form and strip-type lesions were significantly different (5.97±3.39 vs. 2.89±0.92, t=2.93, P<0.05). Conclusions: 18F-FDG PET-CT is simple,noninvasive and high sensitive in detecting pleural or peritoneal carcinomatosis, and may be an ideal technique of highly clinical usefulness in the diagnosis of the pleural or peritoneal carcinomatosis. (authors)

  1. Current status and future perspective of PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a nuclear medicine imaging modality that consists of systemic administration to a subject of a radiopharmaceutical labeled with a positron-emitting radionuclide. Following administration, its distribution in the organ or structure under study can be assessed as a function of time and space by (1) detecting the annihilation radiation resulting from the interaction of the positrons with matter, and (2) reconstructing the distribution of the radioactivity from a series of that used in computed tomography (CT). The nuclides most generally exhibit chemical properties that render them particularly desirable in physiological studies. The radionuclides most widely used in PET are F-18, C-11, O-15 and N-13. Regarding to the number of the current PET Centers worldwide (based on ICP data), more than 300 PET Centers were in operation in 2000. The use of PET technology grew rapidly compared to that in 1992 and 1996, particularly in the USA, which demonstrates a three-fold rise in PET installations. In 2001, 194 PET Centers were operating in the USA. In 1994, two clinical and research-oriented PET Centers at Seoul National University Hospital and Samsung Medical Center, was established as the first dedicated PET and Cyclotron machines in Korea, followed by two more PET facilities at the Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Ajou Medical Center, Yonsei University Medical Center, National Cancer Center and established their PET Center. Catholic Medical School and Pusan National University Hospital have finalized a plan to install PET machine in 2002, which results in total of nine PET Centers in Korea. Considering annual trends of PET application in four major PET centers in Korea in Asan Medical Center recent six years (from 1995 to 2000), a total of 11,564 patients have been studied every year and the number of PET studies has shown steep growth year upon year. We had, 1,020 PET patients in 1995. This number increased to 1,196, 1,756, 2,379, 3

  2. The Clinical Role of Dual-Time-Point 18F-FDG PET/CT in Differential Diagnosis of the Thyroid Incidentaloma

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sinae; Park, Taegyu; Park, Soyeon; Pahk, Kisoo; Rhee, Seunghong; Cho, Jaehyuk; Jeong, Eugene; Kim, Sungeun; CHOE, JAE GOL

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid incidentalomas are common findings during imaging studies including 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for cancer evaluation. Although the overall incidence of incidental thyroid uptake detected on PET imaging is low, clinical attention should be warranted owing to the high incidence of harboring primary thyroid malignancy. We retrospectively reviewed 2,368 dual-time-point 18F-FDG PET/CT cases that were undertaken for cancer eval...

  3. Biosensor and its Clinical Application

    OpenAIRE

    Amandeep kaur1; Minni Verma; Kamaljit Singh

    2013-01-01

    A biosensor is a device for the detection of an analyte that combines a biological component with a physicochemical detector component. The biological component of a biosensor may be the enzyme, whole cells, organelles, tissues, receptor antibodies, nucleic acid, etc. Applications of biosensor are widespread in healthcare, clinical diagnostics, veterinary medicines and chemical industry. Electrochemical biosensors have emerged as the most commonly used biosensor e.g. commercial glucose biosen...

  4. Clinical applications of immunoglobulin: update

    OpenAIRE

    Marcia Cristina Zago Novaretti; Carla Luana Dinardo

    2011-01-01

    Human immunoglobulin is the most used blood product in the clinical practice. Immunoglobulin applications have increased quickly since the elucidation of its immunomodulatory and antiinflammatory properties which turned this blood product into a precious tool in the treatment of numerous diseases that present with humoral immune deficiency or that cause immune system dysfunction. Currently, the approved indications for Ig are: primary immunodeficiencies, secondary immunodeficiencies (multiple...

  5. Clinical significance of patterns of incidental thyroid uptake at 18F-FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incidental uptake of 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) in the thyroid gland is not uncommonly encountered in day-to-day practice of oncological 18F-FDG positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). These are often felt to be “nuisance lesions” by referring clinicians and radiologists alike. However, recognition of the importance of different patterns of FDG uptake in the thyroid gland and knowledge of the possible underlying aetiologies are crucial in ensuring that patients are managed appropriately in the clinical context of their primary diagnosis, as the underlying pathological condition may be clinically important in a significant minority of such cases. This review describes the various patterns of 18F-FDG uptake within the thyroid and discusses the clinical significance and possible impact on patient management. Incidental low-grade homogeneous diffuse increased thyroid 18F-FDG uptake is usually seen in the patients with chronic thyroiditis, Grave's disease, and hypothyroidism. Thyroid function tests and antibody profiling are advised in these patients. Incidental focal 18F-FDG thyroid uptake should raise the possibility of underlying malignancy. Ultrasound with or without fine-needle aspiration cytology is usually recommended for the evaluation of these lesions. Heterogeneous uptake with prominent focal uptake in the thyroid should be further evaluated to exclude malignancy

  6. Clinical impact of time-of-flight and point response modeling in PET reconstructions: a lesion detection study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-of-flight (TOF) and point spread function (PSF) modeling have been shown to improve PET reconstructions, but the impact on physicians in the clinical setting has not been thoroughly investigated. A lesion detection and localization study was performed using simulated lesions in real patient images. Four reconstruction schemes were considered: ordinary Poisson OSEM (OP) alone and combined with TOF, PSF, and TOF + PSF. The images were presented to physicians experienced in reading PET images, and the performance of each was quantified using localization receiver operating characteristic. Numerical observers (non-prewhitening and Hotelling) were used to identify optimal reconstruction parameters, and observer SNR was compared to the performance of the physicians. The numerical models showed good agreement with human performance, and best performance was achieved by both when using TOF + PSF. These findings suggest a large potential benefit of TOF + PSF for oncology PET studies, especially in the detection of small, low-intensity, focal disease in larger patients. (paper)

  7. Comparison of clinical efficacy of second look operation and FDG-PET scan in patients with ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is to investigate whether FDG-PET scan can substitute for second look operation in patients with ovarian cancer showing complete response with chemotherapy. From Jan. 1999 to Oct. 1999, 10 patients with advanced ovarian cancer who showed clinical complete response with 6 cycles of combination chemotherapy were registered in KCCH. These patients showed no residual tumors in conventional radiologic imaging studies (CT or MRI), normal tumor marker, no evidence of disease by physical examination. PET scans and second look operation were performed in 10 patients with advanced ovarian cancer (3 patients with stage IIc, 2 patients with stage IIIb, 5 patients with IIIc), who showed complete response with cytoreductive surgery and 6 cycles of post-operative adjuvant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy. Median age of patients was 45 years, and serous cystadenocarcinoma was most common histologic type. None showed active lesion in pelvis and abdomen with FDG-PET scan (SUV; > 3.5 kg/ml), and I patient showed active lesion in lung field. On second look operations, 5 patients (50%) showed positive result on multiple blind biopsy. The patient with active lesion on FDG-PET scan in lung field confirmed to have metastatic lesions by chest CT scan. In conclusion, FDG-PET scan is not useful for detection of small ovarian cancer lesions in pelvis and abdomen, and cannot substitute for second look operation to determine pathologic complete response

  8. Clinical Utility of Amyloid PET Imaging in the Differential Diagnosis of Atypical Dementias and Its Impact on Caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensaïdane, Mohamed Reda; Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu; Poulin, Stéphane; Buteau, François-Alexandre; Guimond, Jean; Bergeron, David; Verret, Louis; Fortin, Marie-Pierre; Houde, Michèle; Bouchard, Rémi W; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Laforce, Robert

    2016-04-18

    Recent studies have supported a role for amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in distinguishing Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology from other pathological protein accumulations leading to dementia. We investigated the clinical utility of amyloid PET in the differential diagnosis of atypical dementia cases and its impact on caregivers. Using the amyloid tracer 18F-NAV4694, we prospectively scanned 28 patients (mean age 59.3 y, s.d. 5.8; mean MMSE 21.4, s.d. 6.0) with an atypical dementia syndrome. Following a comprehensive diagnostic workup (i.e., history taking, neurological examination, blood tests, neuropsychological evaluation, MRI, and FDG-PET), no certain diagnosis could be arrived at. Amyloid PET was then conducted and classified as positive or negative. Attending physicians were asked to evaluate whether this result led to a change in diagnosis or altered management. They also reported their degree of confidence in the diagnosis. Caregivers were met after disclosure of amyloid PET results and completed a questionnaire/interview to assess the impact of the scan. Our cohort was evenly divided between positive (14/28) and negative (14/28) 18F-NAV4694 cases. Amyloid PET resulted in a diagnostic change in 9/28 cases (32.1%: 17.8% changed from AD to non-AD, 14.3% from non-AD to AD). There was a 44% increase in diagnostic confidence. Altered management occurred in 71.4% (20/28) of cases. Knowledge of amyloid status improved caregivers' outcomes in all domains (anxiety, depression, disease perception, future anticipation, and quality of life). This study suggests a useful additive role for amyloid PET in atypical cases with an unclear diagnosis beyond the extensive workup of a tertiary memory clinic. Amyloid PET increased diagnostic confidence and led to clinically significant alterations in management. The information gained from that test was well received by caregivers and encouraged spending quality time with their loved ones. PMID:27104896

  9. Flipchip bonding of thin Si dies onto PET foils: possibilities and applications

    OpenAIRE

    van den Brand, Jeroen; Kusters, Roel; Cauwe, Maarten; van den Ende, Daan; Erinc, Muge

    2011-01-01

    Low cost large area flexible electronic products are expected to be used in a wide range of applications and in large quantities in our society. Examples of this include sensor packages added to food or conformal intelligent patches that monitor a patient's well-being. Because of their large area, the preferred substrate material for these applications will be low cost materials like polyesters (PEN/PET). Intelligence or communicative capabilities are preferably added to these devices by inte...

  10. Methodological studies into the applicability of positron emission tomography (PET) in light-ion beam tumor therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For reconstruction of measured activity distributions, a multiplicative iteration scheme was used which, however, does not fulfill the clinical requirement of availability of reconstructed activity distributions within a few minutes after measuring. This disadvantage was set off by the development of an empirical algorithm for determination of the 3D-distribution of the intersection points of all possible coincidence line pairs. This algorithm was then applied for the reconstruction of the positron emitter distributions measured during range measurement of light ions. For the simple, compact source distributions and small number of measured coincidences in this case, the method of intersecting point computation is better than the iterative method in that it is significantly faster and yields images of comparable quality. On the basis of these results, a PET system was set up for clinical applications at the irradiation system for experimental light-ion beam therapy at GSI Darmstadt. (orig./DG)

  11. Significance of chronic marked hyperglycemia on FDG-PET. Is it really problematic for clinical oncologic imaging?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the adverse effects of chronic marked hyperglycemia on clinical diagnostic performance of positron emission tomography (PET) using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Fifty-seven scans of 54 patients, who received FDG-PET for the diagnosis of various cancer(s), and who showed high plasma glucose level of more than 200 mg/dl at the time of administration of FDG in spite of at least 4-h fasting, were retrospectively analyzed. In the clinical follow-up, this high plasma glucose was confirmed as chronic hyperglycemia derived from uncontrolled diabetes (n=32) and untreated diabetes (n=25). Based on the final diagnosis of malignancy obtained by histopathology or clinical follow-up for at least 6 months, the diagnostic performance of visual PET analysis was evaluated. Excluding nine scans of nine patients without sufficient follow-up, final diagnosis was obtained in 48 scans of 45 patients. In 36 scans of 36 patients, at least one malignant lesion was finally confirmed, and true-positive and false-negative results were obtained in 30 and six cases, respectively. Six cases showed false-negative results due to low FDG-avid pathological characteristics (hepatocellular carcinoma, etc.), chemotherapeutic effect or small tumor size. Overall, the patient-based sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and diagnostic accuracy were 83, 83, 94, 63 and 83%, respectively. In lesion-based diagnosis, 56 of 75 lesions (74%) were depicted by PET, while 19 lesions were negative on PET, also due to low FDG-avid characteristics or small size (less than 15 mm). At the time of chronic hyperglycemia (not acute hyperglycemia), the adverse effect caused by high plasma glucose level was minimum. The FDG uptake of the tumor maintained a sufficiently high level for visual clinical diagnosis in most cases, except in the cases of low FDG-avid tumors or small lesions (15 mm in size). (author)

  12. Nuclear medicine. Basic knowledge and clinical applications. 7. rev. and enl. ed.; Nuklearmedizin. Basiswissen und klinische Anwendung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schicha, Harald [Universitaetsklinikum Koeln (Germany). Medizinisches Versorgungszentrum II; Schober, Otmar [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2013-11-01

    The book on basic knowledge and clinical applications of nuclear medicine covers the following issues: The first general part: principles of nuclear medicine; physical fundamentals; radiopharmaceutical chemistry; measuring techniques: gamma detectors, gamma spectrometry, gamma camera, SPECT, PET, PET/CT, PET/NMR, image processing and communication; nuclear medical examinations: metabolic and pharmacological kinetics, scintigraphic methods, criteria for the use; quality assurance; dosimetry and radiation protection, radiation risks and patients exposure, benefit-risk considerations. The second part covers endocrine organs, carcinomas, skeleton and bone joints, inflammations, lymph system, cardiovascular system, lungs, central nervous system, kidneys and urinary system, gastrointestinal tract, other scintigraphic examinations.

  13. PET Neuroimaging: Insights on Dystonia and Tourette syndrome and potential applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierpaolo eAlongi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Primary Dystonia (pD is a movement disorder characterized by sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements, postures, or both. Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (GTS is a childhood-onset neuropsychiatric developmental disorder characterised by motor and phonic tics, which could progress to behavioural changes. GTS and obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD are often seen in comorbidity, also suggesting a possible overlap in the pathophysiological bases of these two conditions. PET techniques are of considerable value in detecting functional and molecular abnormalities in vivo, according to the adopted radioligands. For example, PET is the unique technique that allows in vivo investigation of neurotransmitter systems, providing evidence of changes in GTS or pD. For example, presynaptic and postsynaptic dopaminergic studies with PET have shown alterations compatible with dysfunction or loss of D2-bearing neurons, increased synaptic dopamine levels, or both. Measures of cerebral glucose metabolism with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG PET are very sensitive in showing brain functional alterations as well. 18F-FDG PET data have shown metabolic changes within the cortico-striato-pallido-thalamo-cortical and cerebello-thalamo-cortical networks, revealing possible involvement of brain circuits not limited to basal ganglia in pD and GTS. The aim of this work is to overview PET consistent neuroimaging literature on pD and GTS that has provided functional and molecular knowledge of the underlying neural dysfunction. Furthermore we suggest potential applications of these techniques in monitoring treatments.

  14. Hyperthermia: Rational and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past 20 years, research in the application of hyperthermia (HT), primarily as an adjuvant to radiation therapy (XRT), for the management of locally-advanced or recurrent malignancies, has waxed and waned in interest in the United States. Initial enthusiasm based on in vitro and murine tumor studies, was severely dampened by the results of early clinical trails. One initial clinical Phase III trial, however, employed applicators which were frequently unable to obtain adequate tumor heating, failed to sufficiently monitor tumor and normal tissue temperatures, and selected inappropriate tumors (based on size and depth) for therapy. Fortunately, subsequent clinical trials have benefited from the lessons learned in earlier attempts. Recently, three European-based, Phase III randomized trials enrolling large numbers of patients have demonstrated significantly improved local control rates for superficially-located metastatic melanomas, chest wall recurrences from breast cancer, and deep-seated locally-advanced tumors of the uterine cervix and urinary bladder. In addition, continued improvements in HT applicators and a better understanding of thermal dosimetry should permit further advances in trial design for the clinical use of HT as an adjuvant to XRT. This refresher course will focus on four areas: (1) a review of progress made in thermal dose descriptors with emphasis on their use in prescribing HT treatments and on the correlation of thermal and thermal dose parameters with clinical outcome, (2) tumor site-specific selection for HT studies based on sites that can be heated with currently available equipment, and tumors where improved local control will result in increased chance of patient cure or significant palliation, (3) site-specific results and examples of responses to XRT-HT, and (4) an overview of the results of eleven randomized Phase III clinical studies comparing XRT alone to XRT plus HT. It is hoped that those attending the refresher course will

  15. Clinical applications of immunoglobulin: update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Cristina Zago Novaretti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Human immunoglobulin is the most used blood product in the clinical practice. Immunoglobulin applications have increased quickly since the elucidation of its immunomodulatory and antiinflammatory properties which turned this blood product into a precious tool in the treatment of numerous diseases that present with humoral immune deficiency or that cause immune system dysfunction. Currently, the approved indications for Ig are: primary immunodeficiencies, secondary immunodeficiencies (multiple myeloma or chronic lymphoid leukemia, Kawasaki syndrome, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, Guillain Barré syndrome, graft-versus-host disease following bone marrow transplantation and repeat infections in HIV children. On the other hand, there are numerous "off-label" indications of immunoglobulin, which represent 20-60% of all clinical applications of this drug. It is important to study all these indications and, above all, the scientific evidence for its use, in order to provide patients with a new therapeutic option without burdening the health system. This review results from a wide selection of papers identified in the Pubmed and Lilacs scientific electronic databases. A group of descriptors were used from human immunoglobulin to the names of each disease that immunoglobulin is clinically applied. Our main objective is to list the numerous indications of immunoglobulin, both authorized and "off-label" and to analyze these indications in the light of the most recent scientific evidence.

  16. Using PET with {sup 18}F-AV-45 (florbetapir) to quantify brain amyloid load in a clinical environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camus, V.; Tauber, C.; Hommet, C.; Mondon, K.; Cottier, J.P.; Beaufils, E.; Ribeiro, M.J.; Vercouillie, J. [UMR INSERM U930-CNRS ERL 3106, Tours (France); Universite Francois Rabelais de Tours, Tours (France); CHRU de Tours, Tours (France); Payoux, P.; Tafani, M. [INSERM U825, Toulouse (France); Universite Paul Sabatier de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); CHRU de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Barre, L. [Groupe de Developpements Methodologiques en Tomographie par Emission de Positons, CEA/DSV/I2BM/CI-NAPS UMR6232, Caen (France); Universite de Caen Basse Normandie, Caen (France); Desgranges, B.; La Joie, R.; Chetelat, G.; La Sayette, V. de; Eustache, F. [INSERM U1077, Caen (France); Universite de Caen Basse Normandie - UMR-S1077, Caen (France); Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, UMR-S1077, Caen (France); Voisin, T.; Vellas, B. [Universite Paul Sabatier de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); INSERM U1027, Toulouse (France); CHRU de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Gissot, V. [CIC-IT /CIC INSERM 202, Tours (France); CHRU de Tours, Tours (France); Vierron, E. [UMR INSERM U930-CNRS ERL 3106, Tours (France); Universite Francois Rabelais de Tours, Tours (France); Guilloteau, D. [UMR INSERM U930-CNRS ERL 3106, Tours (France); Universite Francois Rabelais de Tours, Tours (France); CIC-IT /CIC INSERM 202, Tours (France); CHRU de Tours, Tours (France)

    2012-04-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of brain amyloid load has been suggested as a core biomarker for Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aim of this study was to test the feasibility of using PET imaging with {sup 18}F-AV-45 (florbetapir) in a routine clinical environment to differentiate between patients with mild to moderate AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) from normal healthy controls (HC). In this study, 46 subjects (20 men and 26 women, mean age of 69.0 {+-} 7.6 years), including 13 with AD, 12 with MCI and 21 HC subjects, were enrolled from three academic memory clinics. PET images were acquired over a 10-min period 50 min after injection of florbetapir (mean {+-} SD of radioactivity injected, 259 {+-} 57 MBq). PET images were assessed visually by two individuals blinded to any clinical information and quantitatively via the standard uptake value ratio (SUVr) in the specific regions of interest, which were defined in relation to the cerebellum as the reference region. The mean values of SUVr were higher in AD patients (median 1.20, Q1-Q3 1.16-1.30) than in HC subjects (median 1.05, Q1-Q3 1.04-1.08; p = 0.0001) in the overall cortex and all cortical regions (precuneus, anterior and posterior cingulate, and frontal median, temporal, parietal and occipital cortex). The MCI subjects also showed a higher uptake of florbetapir in the posterior cingulate cortex (median 1.06, Q1-Q3 0.97-1.28) compared with HC subjects (median 0.95, Q1-Q3 0.82-1.02; p = 0.03). Qualitative visual assessment of the PET scans showed a sensitivity of 84.6% (95% CI 0.55-0.98) and a specificity of 38.1% (95% CI 0.18-0.62) for discriminating AD patients from HC subjects; however, the quantitative assessment of the global cortex SUVr showed a sensitivity of 92.3% and specificity of 90.5% with a cut-off value of 1.122 (area under the curve 0.894). These preliminary results suggest that PET with florbetapir is a safe and suitable biomarker for AD that can be used routinely in a

  17. Using PET with 18F-AV-45 (florbetapir) to quantify brain amyloid load in a clinical environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of brain amyloid load has been suggested as a core biomarker for Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aim of this study was to test the feasibility of using PET imaging with 18F-AV-45 (florbetapir) in a routine clinical environment to differentiate between patients with mild to moderate AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) from normal healthy controls (HC). In this study, 46 subjects (20 men and 26 women, mean age of 69.0 ± 7.6 years), including 13 with AD, 12 with MCI and 21 HC subjects, were enrolled from three academic memory clinics. PET images were acquired over a 10-min period 50 min after injection of florbetapir (mean ± SD of radioactivity injected, 259 ± 57 MBq). PET images were assessed visually by two individuals blinded to any clinical information and quantitatively via the standard uptake value ratio (SUVr) in the specific regions of interest, which were defined in relation to the cerebellum as the reference region. The mean values of SUVr were higher in AD patients (median 1.20, Q1-Q3 1.16-1.30) than in HC subjects (median 1.05, Q1-Q3 1.04-1.08; p = 0.0001) in the overall cortex and all cortical regions (precuneus, anterior and posterior cingulate, and frontal median, temporal, parietal and occipital cortex). The MCI subjects also showed a higher uptake of florbetapir in the posterior cingulate cortex (median 1.06, Q1-Q3 0.97-1.28) compared with HC subjects (median 0.95, Q1-Q3 0.82-1.02; p = 0.03). Qualitative visual assessment of the PET scans showed a sensitivity of 84.6% (95% CI 0.55-0.98) and a specificity of 38.1% (95% CI 0.18-0.62) for discriminating AD patients from HC subjects; however, the quantitative assessment of the global cortex SUVr showed a sensitivity of 92.3% and specificity of 90.5% with a cut-off value of 1.122 (area under the curve 0.894). These preliminary results suggest that PET with florbetapir is a safe and suitable biomarker for AD that can be used routinely in a clinical environment

  18. OSSI-PET: Open-Access Database of Simulated [(11)C]Raclopride Scans for the Inveon Preclinical PET Scanner: Application to the Optimization of Reconstruction Methods for Dynamic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Marie-Paule; Charil, Arnaud; Callaghan, Paul; Wimberley, Catriona; Busso, Florian; Gregoire, Marie-Claude; Bardies, Manuel; Reilhac, Anthonin

    2016-07-01

    A wide range of medical imaging applications benefits from the availability of realistic ground truth data. In the case of positron emission tomography (PET), ground truth data is crucial to validate processing algorithms and assessing their performances. The design of such ground truth data often relies on Monte-Carlo simulation techniques. Since the creation of a large dataset is not trivial both in terms of computing time and realism, we propose the OSSI-PET database containing 350 simulated [(11)C]Raclopride dynamic scans for rats, created specifically for the Inveon pre-clinical PET scanner. The originality of this database lies on the availability of several groups of scans with controlled biological variations in the striata. Besides, each group consists of a large number of realizations (i.e., noise replicates). We present the construction methodology of this database using rat pharmacokinetic and anatomical models. A first application using the OSSI-PET database is presented. Several commonly used reconstruction techniques were compared in terms of image quality, accuracy and variability of the activity estimates and of the computed kinetic parameters. The results showed that OP-OSEM3D iterative reconstruction method outperformed the other tested methods. Analytical methods such as FBP2D and 3DRP also produced satisfactory results. However, FORE followed by OSEM2D reconstructions should be avoided. Beyond the illustration of the potential of the database, this application will help scientists to understand the different sources of noise and bias that can occur at the different steps in the processing and will be very useful for choosing appropriate reconstruction methods and parameters. PMID:26863655

  19. Implementation and initial clinical experience of offline PET/CT-based verification of scanned carbon ion treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: We report on the implementation of offline PET/CT-based treatment verification at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Centre (HIT) and present first clinical cases for post-activation measurements after scanned carbon ion irradiation. Key ingredient of this in-vivo treatment verification is the comparison of irradiation-induced patient activation measured by a PET scanner with a prediction simulated by means of Monte Carlo techniques. Material and methods: At HIT, a commercial full-ring PET/CT scanner has been installed in close vicinity to the treatment rooms. After selected irradiation fractions, the patient either walks to the scanner for acquisition of the activation data or is transported using a shuttle system. The expected activity distribution is obtained from the production of β+-active isotopes simulated by the FLUKA code on the basis of the patient-specific treatment plan, post-processed considering the time course of the respective treatment fraction, the estimated biological washout of the induced activity and a simplified model of the imaging process. Results: We present four patients with different indications of head, head/neck, liver and pelvic tumours. A clear correlation between the measured PET signal and the simulated activity pattern is observed for all patients, thus supporting a proper treatment delivery. In the case of a pelvic tumour patient it was possible to detect minor treatment delivery inaccuracies. Conclusions: The initial clinical experience proves the feasibility of the implemented strategy for offline confirmation of scanned carbon ion irradiation and therefore constitutes a first step towards a comprehensive PET/CT-based treatment verification in the clinical routine at HIT

  20. FDG PET in non-pharmacological therapy in Alzheimer's disease; cerebral metabolic increase correlates with clinical improvement after cognitive therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In management of AD, pharmacological treatment alone using acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (AChEI) is general consensus, and provides beneficial effect to prolong their progression. Combined non-pharmacological therapy, especially cognitive therapy is recently having attention with expectation of improvement in cognitive ability. This study examined the effect of combined cognitive therapy in AD patients who were maintaining AChEI using FDG PET. Four patients (689 yrs) who diagnosed as probable Alzheimer's disease based on the NINCDS-ADRDA criteria participated in this study. 12-week cognitive therapy comprised seven fields to enhance orientation, memory, recall, visuo-motor organization, categorization and behavior modification/sequencing. They received 45-minute sessions twice per week with maintaining their previous medication. Clinical improvement was assessed by comprehensive neuropsychological tests. Two FDG PET studies were performed before cognitive therapy and in the middle of the therapy, and compared to evaluate the effect of cognitive therapy to cerebral metabolism. Two of 4 patients whose initial cognitive impairment was milder had clinical improvement after 12 weeks, the rest who were more severely impaired failed to have clinical improvement. Regional cerebral hypometabolism on initial PET was correlated with their functional status. Follow up PET of two responders demonstrated the increases in regional metabolism in the temporal and/or frontal cortex, which was associated their functional improvement. Cerebral metabolism in poor responders were minimally increased or no changed. This preliminary data suggests that cognitive therapy is potentially useful to stabilize or improve cognitive and functional performance in AD patients with relatively mild cognitive dysfunction. And FDG PET could demonstrate possible candidates for cognitive therapy and the effect of the therapy

  1. Computer applications in clinical psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Oana Zamoşteanu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The computer-assisted analysis is not currently a novelty, but a necessity in all areas of psychology. A number of studies that examine the limits of the computer assisted and analyzed interpretations, also its advantages. A series of studies aim to assess how the computer assisting programs are able to establish a diagnosis referring to the presence of certain mental disorders. We will present the results of one computer application in clinical psychology regarding the assessment of Theory of Mind capacity by animation.

  2. Computer applications in clinical psychology

    CERN Document Server

    Zamoşteanu, Alina Oana

    2012-01-01

    The computer-assisted analysis is not currently a novelty, but a necessity in all areas of psychology. A number of studies that examine the limits of the computer assisted and analyzed interpretations, also its advantages. A series of studies aim to assess how the computer assisting programs are able to establish a diagnosis referring to the presence of certain mental disorders. We will present the results of one computer application in clinical psychology regarding the assessment of Theory of Mind capacity by animation.

  3. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anu, Sharma; Gayatri, Sharma

    2016-05-01

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  4. Towards advanced OCT clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillin, Mikhail; Panteleeva, Olga; Agrba, Pavel; Pasukhin, Mikhail; Sergeeva, Ekaterina; Plankina, Elena; Dudenkova, Varvara; Gubarkova, Ekaterina; Kiseleva, Elena; Gladkova, Natalia; Shakhova, Natalia; Vitkin, Alex

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we report on our recent achievement in application of conventional and cross-polarization OCT (CP OCT) modalities for in vivo clinical diagnostics in different medical areas including gynecology, dermatology, and stomatology. In gynecology, CP OCT was employed for diagnosing fallopian tubes and cervix; in dermatology OCT for monitoring of treatment of psoriasis, scleroderma and atopic dermatitis; and in stomatology for diagnosis of oral diseases. For all considered application, we propose and develop different image processing methods which enhance the diagnostic value of the technique. In particular, we use histogram analysis, Fourier analysis and neural networks, thus calculating different tissue characteristics as revealed by OCT's polarization evolution. These approaches enable improved OCT image quantification and increase its resultant diagnostic accuracy.

  5. The Clinical Usefulness of {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT in Patients with Systemic Autoimmune Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jong Ryool; Song, Ho Chun; Kang, Sae Ryung; Yoo, Su Woong; Kim, Jahae; Chong, Ari; Min, Jung Joon; Bom, Hee Seung; Lee, Shin Seok; Park, Youg Wook [Chonnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Individuals with systemic autoimmune disease have an increased susceptibility to both inflammation and malignancy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT in patients with systemic autoimmune disease. Forty patients diagnosed with systemic autoimmune disease were enrolled. Diagnostic accuracy of FDG PET/CT for detecting malignancy was assessed. FDG PET/CT findings, including maximum standardized uptake (SUVmax) of lymphadenopathy (LAP), liver, bone marrow, spleen, joint and muscles, were considered for the characterization of LAPs. FDG PET/CT could detect metabolically activated lesions in 36 out of 40 patients (90%) including inflammatory lesions in 28 out of 32 patients (88%). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of FDG PET/CT for the detection of malignancy were 100, 67, 70, 25, and 100%, respectively. Multiple LAPs were found in 25 of 40 patients (63%), and comprised three malignancies, four cases of tuberculosis, and 18 reactive changes. A SUVmax ratio of bone marrow to liver below 0.78 could distinguish malignancy from tuberculosis + reactive change (AUC=1.000, sensitivity: 100%, specificity: 100%). The SUVmax ratio of spleen to liver in the reactive group was also significantly higher than that in the malignancy group (P=0.014). SUVmax of LAP in the TB group was significantly higher than that in the reactive group (P=0.040). PET/CT is useful in detecting and differentiating inflammation and malignancy in patients with systemic autoimmune disease. Frequent false positive interpretations can be minimized by consideration of FDG uptake in bone marrow and spleen.

  6. Non-oncological positron emission tomography (PET): brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows evaluation of the central nervous system function. Imaging of regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism, and of several neurotransmission systems may be obtained using PET. PET quantification is accurate and has good test-retest reliability. For research purposes, PET has been used to study brain physiology, to explore neurological and psychiatric diseases pathophysiology and for the new drugs research and development. F.D.G. is the only PET radioligand with clinical application. Following criteria of evidence-based medicine, the clinical indications of F.D.G.-PET are: evaluation of treated gliomas, pre surgical study of partial refractory epilepsy and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease when it is impossible to differentiate clinically from fronto-temporal dementia

  7. Clinical impact of [18F]FDG-PET in oncology evaluated by the referring physicians during year 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The first study evaluating directly by the referring physician the clinical impact of [18F]-FDG PET on modification of patient's management was performed only recently in California by means of a questionnaire. We have used the same methodology to evaluate this clinical impact during the opening year of our PET center in France. A questionnaire was sent to the referring physician of each of the 476 patients who had at least one routine FDG-PET examination during the year 2000. Of 348 responses (response rate 73 %), the disease was upstaged in 26 % of the cases and downstaged in 9 %. Inter-modality management changes (change from a scheduled therapeutic modality for a different one) were reported in 37 % of the cases and intra-modality changes in 9 %. Those modification rates were respectively 38 % and 7 % in recurrence of colorectal cancer (153 patients), 47 % and 7 % in lung cancer (118 patients), 16 % and 23 % in lymphoma (43 patients), 25 % and 6 % in the staging of head and neck cancers (32 patients). When comparing with the corresponding studies performed in California using the same questionnaire, there were no significant differences between the rates of inter-modality management changes (43 % versus 37 %). In contrast, intra-modality management changes were less frequent in our survey (17 % versus 9 %), except for lymphoma (10 % versus 23 %). Globally, the clinical impact of FDG PET was similar, with a higher rate of response to the questionnaire in our study (73 % versus 35 %) which yields a better confidence in the values that are reported here. An extensive survey of literature (including data published as abstracts until 2000) was recently published by Gambhir et al., including more than 3000 patients in the clinical settings of our study. The mean value for the rate of changing patient's management was 31 %. That means that the clinical impact observed in our study (46 %) performed on the opening year of our dedicated-PET center reached the

  8. DICOM for quantitative imaging biomarker development: a standards based approach to sharing clinical data and structured PET/CT analysis results in head and neck cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clunie, David; Ulrich, Ethan; Bauer, Christian; Wahle, Andreas; Brown, Bartley; Onken, Michael; Riesmeier, Jörg; Pieper, Steve; Kikinis, Ron; Buatti, John; Beichel, Reinhard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Imaging biomarkers hold tremendous promise for precision medicine clinical applications. Development of such biomarkers relies heavily on image post-processing tools for automated image quantitation. Their deployment in the context of clinical research necessitates interoperability with the clinical systems. Comparison with the established outcomes and evaluation tasks motivate integration of the clinical and imaging data, and the use of standardized approaches to support annotation and sharing of the analysis results and semantics. We developed the methodology and tools to support these tasks in Positron Emission Tomography and Computed Tomography (PET/CT) quantitative imaging (QI) biomarker development applied to head and neck cancer (HNC) treatment response assessment, using the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM®) international standard and free open-source software. Methods. Quantitative analysis of PET/CT imaging data collected on patients undergoing treatment for HNC was conducted. Processing steps included Standardized Uptake Value (SUV) normalization of the images, segmentation of the tumor using manual and semi-automatic approaches, automatic segmentation of the reference regions, and extraction of the volumetric segmentation-based measurements. Suitable components of the DICOM standard were identified to model the various types of data produced by the analysis. A developer toolkit of conversion routines and an Application Programming Interface (API) were contributed and applied to create a standards-based representation of the data. Results. DICOM Real World Value Mapping, Segmentation and Structured Reporting objects were utilized for standards-compliant representation of the PET/CT QI analysis results and relevant clinical data. A number of correction proposals to the standard were developed. The open-source DICOM toolkit (DCMTK) was improved to simplify the task of DICOM encoding by introducing new API abstractions

  9. DICOM for quantitative imaging biomarker development: a standards based approach to sharing clinical data and structured PET/CT analysis results in head and neck cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Andriy; Clunie, David; Ulrich, Ethan; Bauer, Christian; Wahle, Andreas; Brown, Bartley; Onken, Michael; Riesmeier, Jörg; Pieper, Steve; Kikinis, Ron; Buatti, John; Beichel, Reinhard R

    2016-01-01

    Background. Imaging biomarkers hold tremendous promise for precision medicine clinical applications. Development of such biomarkers relies heavily on image post-processing tools for automated image quantitation. Their deployment in the context of clinical research necessitates interoperability with the clinical systems. Comparison with the established outcomes and evaluation tasks motivate integration of the clinical and imaging data, and the use of standardized approaches to support annotation and sharing of the analysis results and semantics. We developed the methodology and tools to support these tasks in Positron Emission Tomography and Computed Tomography (PET/CT) quantitative imaging (QI) biomarker development applied to head and neck cancer (HNC) treatment response assessment, using the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM(®)) international standard and free open-source software. Methods. Quantitative analysis of PET/CT imaging data collected on patients undergoing treatment for HNC was conducted. Processing steps included Standardized Uptake Value (SUV) normalization of the images, segmentation of the tumor using manual and semi-automatic approaches, automatic segmentation of the reference regions, and extraction of the volumetric segmentation-based measurements. Suitable components of the DICOM standard were identified to model the various types of data produced by the analysis. A developer toolkit of conversion routines and an Application Programming Interface (API) were contributed and applied to create a standards-based representation of the data. Results. DICOM Real World Value Mapping, Segmentation and Structured Reporting objects were utilized for standards-compliant representation of the PET/CT QI analysis results and relevant clinical data. A number of correction proposals to the standard were developed. The open-source DICOM toolkit (DCMTK) was improved to simplify the task of DICOM encoding by introducing new API abstractions

  10. Learning Nuclear Chemistry through Practice: A High School Student Project Using PET in a Clinical Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, Lucia; Adamsen, Tom Christian Holm

    2013-01-01

    Practical experience is vital for promoting interest in science. Several aspects of chemistry are rarely taught in the secondary school curriculum, especially nuclear and radiochemistry. Therefore, we introduced radiochemistry to secondary school students through positron emission tomography (PET) associated with computer tomography (CT). PET-CT…

  11. Clinical efficacy of FDG-PET scan as preoperative diagnostic tool in cervical cancer stage Ib and IIa: comparison between the results of FDG-PET scan and operative findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was done to evaluate the clinical feasibility of FDG-PET scan for routine preoperative diagnostic methods in cervical carcinoma. PET-scans were performed from March, 1999 to November, 1999. There were 6 stage Ib and 7 IIa patients and all patients were performed radical hysterectomy and bilateral pelvic lymph node dissections and were evaluated by FDG-PET scan before operation. The mean age of the patients were 50.3 years old. Six cases had lymph node metastases by pelvis MRI, and three cases by FDG-PET scan. We could not find any lymph node metastases at surgery in 3 patients (50.0%) among 6 patients who were diagnosed by nodal metastases by pelvis MRI. And we found 1 patients with nodal metastases who had negative findings by pelvis MRI. By FDG-PET scan, we could find metastases in all positive patients. But we also found 2 additional metastatic cases in the patients with negative findings. In this study, the comparison was very difficult due to the individual differences in the comparison would be made by site-specific not person. The sensitivity of MRI and FDG-PET scan were 50.0% and 30.0%. The specificity were 94.1 % and 95.6%. The positive predictive value were 55.6 % and 50.0 %. In conclusion, we could find any superiority of FDG-PET scan in the diagnosis of lymph node metastases the pelvis MRI. So there are limitations to use the FDG-PET scan in the routine preoperative diagnostic tools in cervical cancer. But if we have more experiences to use the FDG-PET scan such as precise cut-off value of SUV and combination of other imaging technique, the FDG-PET scan are still promising diagnostic tools in cervical cancer

  12. Application of a semi-automatic ROI setting system for brain PET images to animal PET studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ProASSIST, a semi-automatic ROI (region of interest) setting system for human brain PET images, has been modified for use with the canine brain, and the performance of the obtained system was evaluated by comparing the operational simplicity for ROI setting and the consistency of ROI values obtained with those by a conventional manual procedure. Namely, we created segment maps for the canine brain by making reference to the coronal section atlas of the canine brain by Lim et al., and incorporated them into the ProASSIST system. For the performance test, CBF (cerebral blood flow) and CMRglc (cerebral metabolic rate in glucose) images in dogs with or without focal cerebral ischemia were used. In ProASSIST, brain contours were defined semiautomatically. In the ROI analysis of the test image, manual modification of the contour was necessary in half cases examined (8/16). However, the operation was rather simple so that the operation time per one brain section was significantly shorter than that in the manual operation. The ROI values determined by the system were comparable with those by the manual procedure, confirming the applicability of the system to these animal studies. The use of the system like the present one would also merit the more objective data acquisition for the quantitative ROI analysis, because no manual procedure except for some specifications of the anatomical features is required for ROI setting. (author)

  13. The Application of Clinical Genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurer MH

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Martin H MaurerDepartment of Physiology and Pathophysiology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; Mariaberg Hospital for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Gammertingen, GermanyIn 2012, The Application of Clinical Genetics enters its fifth year of publication. The journal has had a change of Editor-in-Chief: Dr David H Tegay stepped down and I was appointed to serve as the new Editor-in-Chief. As his successor, I thank Dr Tegay for his great work for the journal. I hope I can continue his successful editorial contributions. Moreover, I thank the many reviewers for their sustained support of the journal.The Application of Clinical Genetics is dedicated to open access publishing – as all Dove Press journals are. This means that authors will be charged for the publication process, but the acceptance of a manuscript is based solely on its scientific quality. This is what I will be responsible for as Editor-in-Chief. The team at Dove Press is a constant help with all administrative duties concerning peer reviewal, and I want to express my thanks for their prompt and reliable help. The field of clinical genetics is facing new challenges with the broad availability of large-scale screening methods for gene mutations, such as high-throughput sequencing and biochips. This means that ethical issues regarding the handling of genetic information must be addressed, both for the individual and for society.1–3 For example, sequencing of cell-free, fetal nucleic acids in the maternal blood to locate fetal aneuploidy, especially trisomy 21, may become broadly available soon, with even faster results than conventional methods such as amniocentesis.

  14. {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi. Clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucerius, Jan [Maastricht Univ. Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht; Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat; Biersack, Hans-Juergen (eds.) [Universitaetsklinikum Bonn (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2012-07-01

    {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi is a single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radiotracer that was introduced into clinical routine for myocardial perfusion imaging more than two decades ago. Although today the main application of {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi SPECT remains the imaging of myocardial perfusion, it is also an accepted and well-proven imaging technique for a variety of oncologic and non-oncologic applications, including brain, breast, and thyroid cancer and thyroid and parathyroid adenoma. Its efficacy in a range of indications ensures that {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi SPECT will remain widely used despite the rapid diffusion of 18F-FDG PET. {sup 99m}Tc-Sestamibi - Clinical Applications provides a detailed and informative overview of almost all the oncologic and non-oncologic applications of {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi SPECT, including several relatively rare indications. Different disease-related protocols for {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi SPECT are presented, and for each disease a comprehensive summary of the relevant pathology and epidemiology is provided. Throughout, there is a strong emphasis on the practical aspects of use of this popular tracer, including instructions for the preparation of several commercially available tracer kits. Clinical practitioners will find this book to be an invaluable guide to the application and benefits of {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi SPECT in both the inpatient and the outpatient setting. (orig.)

  15. Bonding bare die LEDs on PET foils for lighting applications: thermal design modeling and bonding experiments

    OpenAIRE

    van den Ende, Daan; Kusters, Roel; Cauwe, Maarten; A de Waal; van den Brand, Jeroen

    2012-01-01

    Integration of LEDs on flexible foil substrates is of interest for flexible lighting applications and flexible photonic devices. A matrix of LEDs on a foil combined with a diffuser can be a potential alternative for flexible OLED lighting devices. Preferably, these LEDs are integrated in an unpackaged, bare die form as it reduces cost, footprint and thickness. As a substrate, preferably low cost materials like polyesters (PET) are being used, especially for large area devices. However, the us...

  16. A compact high resolution flat panel PET detector based on the new 4-side buttable MPPC for biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Wen, Jie; Ravindranath, Bosky; O`Sullivan, Andrew W.; Catherall, David; Li, Ke; Wei, Shouyi; Komarov, Sergey; Tai, Yuan-Chuan

    2015-09-01

    Compact high-resolution panel detectors using virtual pinhole (VP) PET geometry can be inserted into existing clinical or pre-clinical PET systems to improve regional spatial resolution and sensitivity. Here we describe a compact panel PET detector built using the new Though Silicon Via (TSV) multi-pixel photon counters (MPPC) detector. This insert provides high spatial resolution and good timing performance for multiple bio-medical applications. Because the TSV MPPC design eliminates wire bonding and has a package dimension which is very close to the MPPC's active area, it is 4-side buttable. The custom designed MPPC array (based on Hamamatsu S12641-PA-50(x)) used in the prototype is composed of 4×4 TSV-MPPC cells with a 4.46 mm pitch in both directions. The detector module has 16×16 lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystal array, with each crystal measuring 0.92×0.92×3 mm3 with 1.0 mm pitch. The outer diameter of the detector block is 16.8×16.8 mm2. Thirty-two such blocks will be arranged in a 4×8 array with 1 mm gaps to form a panel detector with detection area around 7 cm×14 cm in the full-size detector. The flood histogram acquired with 68Ge source showed excellent crystal separation capability with all 256 crystals clearly resolved. The detector module's mean, standard deviation, minimum (best) and maximum (worst) energy resolution were 10.19%, ±0.68%, 8.36% and 13.45% FWHM, respectively. The measured coincidence time resolution between the block detector and a fast reference detector (around 200 ps single photon timing resolution) was 0.95 ns. When tested with Siemens Cardinal electronics the performance of the detector blocks remain consistent. These results demonstrate that the TSV-MPPC is a promising photon sensor for use in a flat panel PET insert composed of many high resolution compact detector modules.

  17. A compact high resolution flat panel PET detector based on the new 4-side buttable MPPC for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compact high-resolution panel detectors using virtual pinhole (VP) PET geometry can be inserted into existing clinical or pre-clinical PET systems to improve regional spatial resolution and sensitivity. Here we describe a compact panel PET detector built using the new Though Silicon Via (TSV) multi-pixel photon counters (MPPC) detector. This insert provides high spatial resolution and good timing performance for multiple bio-medical applications. Because the TSV MPPC design eliminates wire bonding and has a package dimension which is very close to the MPPC's active area, it is 4-side buttable. The custom designed MPPC array (based on Hamamatsu S12641-PA-50(x)) used in the prototype is composed of 4×4 TSV-MPPC cells with a 4.46 mm pitch in both directions. The detector module has 16×16 lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystal array, with each crystal measuring 0.92×0.92×3 mm3 with 1.0 mm pitch. The outer diameter of the detector block is 16.8×16.8 mm2. Thirty-two such blocks will be arranged in a 4×8 array with 1 mm gaps to form a panel detector with detection area around 7 cm×14 cm in the full-size detector. The flood histogram acquired with 68Ge source showed excellent crystal separation capability with all 256 crystals clearly resolved. The detector module's mean, standard deviation, minimum (best) and maximum (worst) energy resolution were 10.19%, ±0.68%, 8.36% and 13.45% FWHM, respectively. The measured coincidence time resolution between the block detector and a fast reference detector (around 200 ps single photon timing resolution) was 0.95 ns. When tested with Siemens Cardinal electronics the performance of the detector blocks remain consistent. These results demonstrate that the TSV-MPPC is a promising photon sensor for use in a flat panel PET insert composed of many high resolution compact detector modules

  18. A compact high resolution flat panel PET detector based on the new 4-side buttable MPPC for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qiang, E-mail: wangqiang@mir.wustl.edu [Washington University in St Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Wen, Jie; Ravindranath, Bosky; O' Sullivan, Andrew W. [Washington University in St Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Catherall, David [Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO 63103 (United States); Li, Ke; Wei, Shouyi; Komarov, Sergey [Washington University in St Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Tai, Yuan-Chuan, E-mail: taiy@mir.wustl.edu [Washington University in St Louis, MO 63110 (United States)

    2015-09-11

    Compact high-resolution panel detectors using virtual pinhole (VP) PET geometry can be inserted into existing clinical or pre-clinical PET systems to improve regional spatial resolution and sensitivity. Here we describe a compact panel PET detector built using the new Though Silicon Via (TSV) multi-pixel photon counters (MPPC) detector. This insert provides high spatial resolution and good timing performance for multiple bio-medical applications. Because the TSV MPPC design eliminates wire bonding and has a package dimension which is very close to the MPPC's active area, it is 4-side buttable. The custom designed MPPC array (based on Hamamatsu S12641-PA-50(x)) used in the prototype is composed of 4×4 TSV-MPPC cells with a 4.46 mm pitch in both directions. The detector module has 16×16 lutetium yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) crystal array, with each crystal measuring 0.92×0.92×3 mm{sup 3} with 1.0 mm pitch. The outer diameter of the detector block is 16.8×16.8 mm{sup 2}. Thirty-two such blocks will be arranged in a 4×8 array with 1 mm gaps to form a panel detector with detection area around 7 cm×14 cm in the full-size detector. The flood histogram acquired with {sup 68}Ge source showed excellent crystal separation capability with all 256 crystals clearly resolved. The detector module's mean, standard deviation, minimum (best) and maximum (worst) energy resolution were 10.19%, ±0.68%, 8.36% and 13.45% FWHM, respectively. The measured coincidence time resolution between the block detector and a fast reference detector (around 200 ps single photon timing resolution) was 0.95 ns. When tested with Siemens Cardinal electronics the performance of the detector blocks remain consistent. These results demonstrate that the TSV-MPPC is a promising photon sensor for use in a flat panel PET insert composed of many high resolution compact detector modules.

  19. A Virtual Clinical Trial of FDG-PET Imaging of Breast Cancer: Effect of Variability on Response Assessment1

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Robert L.; Elston, Brian F.; Doot, Robert K.; Lewellen, Thomas K.; Mankoff, David A.; Kinahan, Paul E

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is growing interest in using positron emission tomography (PET) standardized uptake values (SUVs) to assess tumor response to therapy. However, many error sources compromise the ability to detect SUV changes. We explore relationships between these errors and overall SUV variability. METHODS: We used simulations in a virtual clinical trial framework to study impacts of error sources from scanning and analysis effects on assessment of SUV changes. We varied tumor diameter, s...

  20. ROC study of maximum likelihood estimator human brain image reconstructions in PET clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the progress to date in carrying out Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) studies comparing Maximum Likelihood Estimator A(MLE) and Filtered Backprojection (FBP) reconstructions of normal and abnormal human brain PET data in a clinical setting. A previous statistical study of reconstructions of the Hoffman brain phantom with real data indicated that the pixel-to-pixel standard deviation in feasible MLE images is approximately proportional to the square root of the number of counts in a region, as opposed to a standard deviation which is high and largely independent of the number of counts in FBP A preliminary ROC study carried out with 10 non-medical observers performing a relatively simple detectability task indicates that, for the majority of observers, lower standard deviation translates itself into a statistically significant detectability advantage in MLE reconstructions. The initial results of ongoing tests with four experienced neurologists/nuclear medicine physicians are presented. Normal cases of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) cerebral metabolism studies and abnormal cases in which a variety of lesions have been introduced into normal data sets have been evaluated. The authors report on the results of reading the reconstructions of 90 data sets, each corresponding to a single brain slice. It has become apparent that the design of the study based on reading single brain slices is too insensitive and the authors propose a variation based on reading three consecutive slices at a time, rating only the center slice

  1. PET/MRI: Technical challenges and recent advances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jin Ho; Choi, Yong; Im, Ki Chun [Molecular Imaging Research and Education Laboratory, Dept. of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Integrated positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which can provide complementary functional and anatomical information about a specific organ or body system at the molecular level, has become a powerful imaging modality to understand the molecular biology details, disease mechanisms, and pharmacokinetics in animals and humans. Although the first experiment on the PET/MRI was performed in the early 1990s, its clinical application was accomplished in recent years because there were various technical challenges in integrating PET and MRI in a single system with minimum mutual interference between PET and MRI. This paper presents the technical challenges and recent advances in combining PET and MRI along with several approaches for improving PET image quality of the PET/MRI hybrid imaging system.

  2. Clinical Significance of Focal Breast Lesions Incidentally Identified by 18F-FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated the incidence and malignant risk of focal breast lesions incidentally detected by 18F-FDG PET/CT. Various PET/CT findings of the breast lesions were also analyzed to improve the differentiation between benign from malignant focal breast lesions. The subjects were 3,768 consecutive 18F-FDG PET/CT exams performed in adult females without a history of breast cancer. A focal breast lesion was defined as a focal 18F-FDG uptake or a focal nodular lesion on CT image irrespective of 18F-FDG uptake in the breasts. The maximum SUV and CT pattern of focal breast lesions were evaluated, and were compared with final diagnosis. The incidence of focal breast lesions on PET/CT in adult female subjects was 1.4% (58 lesions in 53 subjects). In finally confirmed 53 lesions of 48 subjects, 11 lesions of 8 subjects (20.8%) were proven to be malignant. When the PET/CT patterns suggesting benignancy (maximum attenuation value > 75 HU or 20) were added as diagnostic criteria of PET/CT to differentiate benign from malignant breast lesions along with maximum SUV, the area under ROC curve of PET/CT was significantly increased compared with maximum SUV alone (0.680±0.093 vs. 0.786±0.076, p18F-FDG PET/CT is not low, deserving further diagnostic confirmation. Image interpretation considering both 18F-FDG uptake and PET/CT pattern may be helpful to improve the differentiation from malignant and benign focal breast lesion

  3. Quantitative carotid PET/MR imaging: clinical evaluation of MR-Attenuation correction versus CT-Attenuation correction in (18)F-FDG PET/MR emission data and comparison to PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bini, Jason; Robson, Philip M; Calcagno, Claudia; Eldib, Mootaz; Fayad, Zahi A

    2015-01-01

    Current PET/MR systems employ segmentation of MR images and subsequent assignment of empirical attenuation coefficients for quantitative PET reconstruction. In this study we examine the differences in the quantification of (18)F-FDG uptake in the carotid arteries between PET/MR and PET/CT scanners. Five comparisons were performed to asses differences in PET quantification: i) PET/MR MR-based AC (MRAC) versus PET/MR CTAC, ii) PET/MR MRAC versus PET/CT, iii) PET/MR MRAC with carotid coil versus PET/MR MRAC without coil, iv) PET/MR MRAC scan 2 versus PET/MR MRAC scan 1, and v) PET/MR CTAC versus PET/CT. Standardized uptakes values (SUV) mean and SUV maximum were calculated for six regions-of-interests: left and right carotid arteries, left and right lungs, spine and muscle. Pearson's Correlation and Bland-Altman plots were used to compare SUV mean and maximum within each ROI of each patient. PET/MR emission data reconstructed with MRAC versus PET/MR emission data reconstructed with CTAC had percent differences of SUV mean ranging from -2.0% (Absolute Difference, -0.02) to 7.4% (absolute difference, 0.06). Percent differences within the carotid arteries proved to correlate well with differences of SUV mean of 5.4% (Absolute Difference, 0.07) in the left carotid and 2.7% (Absolute Difference, 0.03) in the right carotid. Pearson's correlation and Bland-Altman of PET/MR with MRAC versus PET/MR with CTAC showed high correlation between SUV mean (R(2)=0.80, mean difference 0.03 ± 0.18 SUV, p=0.3382), demonstrating excellent correlation within ROIs analyzed. The results of this study support the use of (18)F-FDG PET/MR for quantitative measure of inflammation in the carotid arteries. PMID:26069863

  4. (18)F-FDG PET/CT in the early prediction of pathological response in aggressive subtypes of breast cancer: review of the literature and recommendations for use in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groheux, David; Mankoff, David; Espié, Marc; Hindié, Elif

    2016-05-01

    Early assessment of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) might be helpful in avoiding the toxicity of ineffective chemotherapy and allowing refinement of treatment. We conducted a review of the literature regarding the applicability of (18)F-FDG PET/CT to the prediction of an early pathological response in different subgroups of breast cancer. Clinical research in this field has intensified in the last few years. Early studies by various groups have shown the potential of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in the early assessment of response to NAC. However, interim PET/CT in breast cancer has not yet gained wide acceptance compared to its use in other settings such as lymphomas. This is in part due to a lack of consensus that early evaluation of response can be used to direct change in therapy in the neoadjuvant breast cancer setting, and only limited data showing that response-adaptive therapy leads to improved outcomes. However, one major element that has hampered the use of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in directing neoadjuvant therapy is its evaluation in populations with mixed subtypes of breast cancer. However, major improvements have occurred in recent years. Pilot studies have highlighted the need for considering breast cancer subtype and the type of treatment, and have offered criteria for the use of PET/CT for the early prediction of response in specific settings. (18)F-FDG PET/CT has considerable potential for the early prediction of pathological complete response to NAC in aggressive subtypes such as triple-negative or HER2-positive breast cancers. The results of a multicentre trial that used early metabolic response on (18)F-FDG PET/CT as a means to select poor responders to adapt neoadjuvant treatment have recently been published. Other trials are ongoing or being planned. PMID:26758726

  5. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the early prediction of pathological response in aggressive subtypes of breast cancer: review of the literature and recommendations for use in clinical trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groheux, David [Saint-Louis Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris Cedex 10 (France); INSERM/CNRS UMR944/7212, University Paris-Diderot, PRES Paris Cite, Paris (France); Mankoff, David [University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia (United States); Espie, Marc [INSERM/CNRS UMR944/7212, University Paris-Diderot, PRES Paris Cite, Paris (France); Saint-Louis Hospital, Department of Medical Oncology, Breast Diseases Centre, Paris (France); Hindie, Elif [University of Bordeaux, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Haut-Leveque Hospital, Bordeaux (France)

    2016-05-15

    Early assessment of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) might be helpful in avoiding the toxicity of ineffective chemotherapy and allowing refinement of treatment. We conducted a review of the literature regarding the applicability of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT to the prediction of an early pathological response in different subgroups of breast cancer. Clinical research in this field has intensified in the last few years. Early studies by various groups have shown the potential of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the early assessment of response to NAC. However, interim PET/CT in breast cancer has not yet gained wide acceptance compared to its use in other settings such as lymphomas. This is in part due to a lack of consensus that early evaluation of response can be used to direct change in therapy in the neoadjuvant breast cancer setting, and only limited data showing that response-adaptive therapy leads to improved outcomes. However, one major element that has hampered the use of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in directing neoadjuvant therapy is its evaluation in populations with mixed subtypes of breast cancer. However, major improvements have occurred in recent years. Pilot studies have highlighted the need for considering breast cancer subtype and the type of treatment, and have offered criteria for the use of PET/CT for the early prediction of response in specific settings. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT has considerable potential for the early prediction of pathological complete response to NAC in aggressive subtypes such as triple-negative or HER2-positive breast cancers. The results of a multicentre trial that used early metabolic response on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT as a means to select poor responders to adapt neoadjuvant treatment have recently been published. Other trials are ongoing or being planned. (orig.)

  6. 18F-FDG PET/CT in the early prediction of pathological response in aggressive subtypes of breast cancer: review of the literature and recommendations for use in clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early assessment of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) might be helpful in avoiding the toxicity of ineffective chemotherapy and allowing refinement of treatment. We conducted a review of the literature regarding the applicability of 18F-FDG PET/CT to the prediction of an early pathological response in different subgroups of breast cancer. Clinical research in this field has intensified in the last few years. Early studies by various groups have shown the potential of 18F-FDG PET/CT in the early assessment of response to NAC. However, interim PET/CT in breast cancer has not yet gained wide acceptance compared to its use in other settings such as lymphomas. This is in part due to a lack of consensus that early evaluation of response can be used to direct change in therapy in the neoadjuvant breast cancer setting, and only limited data showing that response-adaptive therapy leads to improved outcomes. However, one major element that has hampered the use of 18F-FDG PET/CT in directing neoadjuvant therapy is its evaluation in populations with mixed subtypes of breast cancer. However, major improvements have occurred in recent years. Pilot studies have highlighted the need for considering breast cancer subtype and the type of treatment, and have offered criteria for the use of PET/CT for the early prediction of response in specific settings. 18F-FDG PET/CT has considerable potential for the early prediction of pathological complete response to NAC in aggressive subtypes such as triple-negative or HER2-positive breast cancers. The results of a multicentre trial that used early metabolic response on 18F-FDG PET/CT as a means to select poor responders to adapt neoadjuvant treatment have recently been published. Other trials are ongoing or being planned. (orig.)

  7. Validation of an optimized SPM procedure for FDG-PET in dementia diagnosis in a clinical setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Perani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostic accuracy in FDG-PET imaging highly depends on the operating procedures. In this clinical study on dementia, we compared the diagnostic accuracy at a single-subject level of a Clinical Scenarios, b Standard FDG Images and c Statistical Parametrical (SPM Maps generated via a new optimized SPM procedure. We evaluated the added value of FDG-PET, either Standard FDG Images or SPM Maps, to Clinical Scenarios. In 88 patients with neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer's Disease—AD, Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration—FTLD, Dementia with Lewy bodies—DLB and Mild Cognitive Impairment—MCI, 9 neuroimaging experts made a forced diagnostic decision on the basis of the evaluation of the three types of information. There was also the possibility of a decision of normality on the FDG-PET images. The clinical diagnosis confirmed at a long-term follow-up was used as the gold standard. SPM Maps showed higher sensitivity and specificity (96% and 84%, and better diagnostic positive (6.8 and negative (0.05 likelihood ratios compared to Clinical Scenarios and Standard FDG Images. SPM Maps increased diagnostic accuracy for differential diagnosis (AD vs. FTD; beta 1.414, p = 0.019. The AUC of the ROC curve was 0.67 for SPM Maps, 0.57 for Clinical Scenarios and 0.50 for Standard FDG Images. In the MCI group, SPM Maps showed the highest predictive prognostic value (mean LOC = 2.46, by identifying either normal brain metabolism (exclusionary role or hypometabolic patterns typical of different neurodegenerative conditions.

  8. Clinical value of FDG-PET/CT in suspected paraneoplastic syndromes: a retrospective analysis of 137 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) are relatively infrequent manifestations appearing before or after a cancer declares itself. Autoimmune mechanisms may be involved, but their cause and pathogenesis are often unknown. Due to disparity of symptoms, PNS remain a major diagnostic challenge. We examined the value of FDG-PET/CT for ruling in or out malignancy in a heterogeneous group of patients with suspected PNS. We retrospectively extracted data from all patients referred 2009-2013 with suspected PNS. Data included age, sex, follow-up period, scan report, further diagnostic procedures, and final clinical diagnosis. Conclusions of the scan reports were compared to the final follow-up outcome as determined during an average follow-up of 31 months (range 6-51.5) in patients who were not diagnosed with cancer in immediate continuation of a positive PET/CT scan. A total of 137 patients were included. Main causes for referral were neurological (n = 67), rheumatological (n = 25), dermatological (n = 18), nephrological (n = 6), haematological (n = 2), abnormal biochemistry (n = 11), and others (n = 8). The cancer prevalence was 8.8 %. The FDG-PET/CT results were as follows: nine true positives, 22 false positives, 103 true negatives, and three false negatives. Corresponding diagnostic values were: sensitivity 75 %, specificity 82 %, accuracy 82 %, and positive and negative predictive values of 29 % and 97 %, respectively. FDG-PET/CT has in patients with suspected PNS an impressively high negative predictive value and may be of value in ruling out PNS, the more so, the more the number of false positives can be minimized or used in differential diagnosis. We believe that FDG-PET/CT may become an important adjunct to the work-up and triage of patients with suspected PNS. (orig.)

  9. Clinical value of FDG-PET/CT in suspected paraneoplastic syndromes: a retrospective analysis of 137 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoern Kristensen, Stine; Hess, Soeren; Petersen, Henrik; Hoeilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming [Odense University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense (Denmark)

    2015-12-15

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) are relatively infrequent manifestations appearing before or after a cancer declares itself. Autoimmune mechanisms may be involved, but their cause and pathogenesis are often unknown. Due to disparity of symptoms, PNS remain a major diagnostic challenge. We examined the value of FDG-PET/CT for ruling in or out malignancy in a heterogeneous group of patients with suspected PNS. We retrospectively extracted data from all patients referred 2009-2013 with suspected PNS. Data included age, sex, follow-up period, scan report, further diagnostic procedures, and final clinical diagnosis. Conclusions of the scan reports were compared to the final follow-up outcome as determined during an average follow-up of 31 months (range 6-51.5) in patients who were not diagnosed with cancer in immediate continuation of a positive PET/CT scan. A total of 137 patients were included. Main causes for referral were neurological (n = 67), rheumatological (n = 25), dermatological (n = 18), nephrological (n = 6), haematological (n = 2), abnormal biochemistry (n = 11), and others (n = 8). The cancer prevalence was 8.8 %. The FDG-PET/CT results were as follows: nine true positives, 22 false positives, 103 true negatives, and three false negatives. Corresponding diagnostic values were: sensitivity 75 %, specificity 82 %, accuracy 82 %, and positive and negative predictive values of 29 % and 97 %, respectively. FDG-PET/CT has in patients with suspected PNS an impressively high negative predictive value and may be of value in ruling out PNS, the more so, the more the number of false positives can be minimized or used in differential diagnosis. We believe that FDG-PET/CT may become an important adjunct to the work-up and triage of patients with suspected PNS. (orig.)

  10. Present and future of clinical cardiovascular PET imaging in Europe - a position statement by the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology (ECNC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This position statement was prepared by the European Council of Nuclear Cardiology and summarises the current and future potential of PET as a clinical cardiovascular diagnostic imaging tool. The first section describes how methodological developments have positively influenced the transition of PET from a research tool towards a clinical diagnostic test. In the second section, evidence in support of its superior diagnostic accuracy, its value to guide decision making and to predict outcome and its cost effectiveness is summarised. The third section finally outlines new PET-based approaches and concepts, which will likely influence clinical cardiovascular medicine in the future. The notion that integration of cardiac PET into healthcare systems and disease management algorithms will advance quality of care is increasingly supported by the literature highlighted in this statement. (orig.)

  11. Current status and future role of brain PET/MRI in clinical and research settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, P.; Barthel, H.; Sabri, O. [University Hospital Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Drzezga, A. [University Hospital Cologne, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Koeln (Germany)

    2015-01-09

    Hybrid PET/MRI systematically offers a complementary combination of two modalities that has often proven itself superior to the single modality approach in the diagnostic work-up of many neurological and psychiatric diseases. Emerging PET tracers, technical advances in multiparametric MRI and obvious workflow advantages may lead to a significant improvement in the diagnosis of dementia disorders, neurooncological diseases, epilepsy and neurovascular diseases using PET/MRI. Moreover, simultaneous PET/MRI is well suited to complex studies of brain function in which fast fluctuations of brain signals (e.g. related to task processing or in response to pharmacological interventions) need to be monitored on multiple levels. Initial simultaneous studies have already demonstrated that these complementary measures of brain function can provide new insights into the functional and structural organization of the brain. (orig.)

  12. Current status and future role of brain PET/MRI in clinical and research settings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hybrid PET/MRI systematically offers a complementary combination of two modalities that has often proven itself superior to the single modality approach in the diagnostic work-up of many neurological and psychiatric diseases. Emerging PET tracers, technical advances in multiparametric MRI and obvious workflow advantages may lead to a significant improvement in the diagnosis of dementia disorders, neurooncological diseases, epilepsy and neurovascular diseases using PET/MRI. Moreover, simultaneous PET/MRI is well suited to complex studies of brain function in which fast fluctuations of brain signals (e.g. related to task processing or in response to pharmacological interventions) need to be monitored on multiple levels. Initial simultaneous studies have already demonstrated that these complementary measures of brain function can provide new insights into the functional and structural organization of the brain. (orig.)

  13. Implementation of an Automated Respiratory Amplitude Gating Technique for PET/CT: Clinical Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Guoping; Chang, Tingting; Pan, Tinsu; Clark, John W.; Mawlawi, Osama R.

    2009-01-01

    Amplitude gating techniques have recently been shown to be better at suppressing respiratory motion artifacts than phase gating. However, most commercial PET/CT scanners are equipped with phase gating capabilities only. The objective of this article was to propose and evaluate using patient studies an automated respiratory amplitude gating technique that could be implemented on current whole-body PET/CT scanners. A primary design feature of the proposed technique is to automatically match the...

  14. Clinical use of quantitative cardiac perfusion PET: rationale, modalities and possible indications. Position paper of the Cardiovascular Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciagrà, Roberto; Passeri, Alessandro; Bucerius, Jan; Verberne, Hein J; Slart, Riemer H J A; Lindner, Oliver; Gimelli, Alessia; Hyafil, Fabien; Agostini, Denis; Übleis, Christopher; Hacker, Marcus

    2016-07-01

    Until recently, PET was regarded as a luxurious way of performing myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, with excellent image quality and diagnostic capabilities that hardly justified the additional cost and procedural effort. Quantitative perfusion PET was considered a major improvement over standard qualitative imaging, because it allows the measurement of parameters not otherwise available, but for many years its use was confined to academic and research settings. In recent years, however, several factors have contributed to the renewal of interest in quantitative perfusion PET, which has become a much more readily accessible technique due to progress in hardware and the availability of dedicated and user-friendly platforms and programs. In spite of this evolution and of the growing evidence that quantitative perfusion PET can play a role in the clinical setting, there are not yet clear indications for its clinical use. Therefore, the Cardiovascular Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, starting from the experience of its members, decided to examine the current literature on quantitative perfusion PET to (1) evaluate the rationale for its clinical use, (2) identify the main methodological requirements, (3) identify the remaining technical difficulties, (4) define the most reliable interpretation criteria, and finally (5) tentatively delineate currently acceptable and possibly appropriate clinical indications. The present position paper must be considered as a starting point aiming to promote a wider use of quantitative perfusion PET and to encourage the conception and execution of the studies needed to definitely establish its role in clinical practice. PMID:26846913

  15. Integrated Whole Body MR/PET: Where Are We?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Hye Jin [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Sung [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong Min [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-01

    Whole body integrated magnetic resonance imaging (MR)/positron emission tomography (PET) imaging systems have recently become available for clinical use and are currently being used to explore whether the combined anatomic and functional capabilities of MR imaging and the metabolic information of PET provide new insight into disease phenotypes and biology, and provide a better assessment of oncologic diseases at a lower radiation dose than a CT. This review provides an overview of the technical background of combined MR/PET systems, a discussion of the potential advantages and technical challenges of hybrid MR/PET instrumentation, as well as collection of possible solutions. Various early clinical applications of integrated MR/PET are also addressed. Finally, the workflow issues of integrated MR/PET, including maximizing diagnostic information while minimizing acquisition time are discussed.

  16. PET、MRI和PET/MRI多模式分子显像在脑胶质瘤中的应用%Application of PET, MRI and PET/MRI multi-mode imaging in brain gliomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙娜; 赵晋华; 乔文礼

    2012-01-01

    神经影像学在颅内肿瘤尤其是脑胶质瘤的诊断、分级、疗效及预后评估等方面有重要的临床价值.不同模式的PET显像可用于评估肿瘤的位置、范围及其生物活性.MRI不仅可提供高对比度和分辨率的软组织信息,还可提供肿瘤功能代谢方面的一些信息.PET/MRI综合了二者的优势,实现了对大脑形态、功能、代谢和分子信息的同时评估.本文主要综述PET、MRI和PET/MRI在脑胶质瘤显像中的应用.%Neuroimaging plays an important role in diagnosis, classification, assessment of efficacy and prognosis of intracranial tumors, especially brain gliomas. Multi-mode positron emission tomography (PET) imaging can be used to assess the location, extent and biological activity of the tumor. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can delineate tissue with high contrast and resolution, and provide some metabolic information of the tumor. The newly developed imaging equipment, PET/MRI, combining the advantages of both, can simultaneously assess the morphologic, functional and metabolic and molecular information on the brain. This review focuses on the application of PET, MRI and PET/MRI in brain gliomas.

  17. Clinical value of {sup 18}F-fluorodihydroxyphenylalanine positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18}F-DOPA PET/CT) for detecting pheochromocytoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luster, Markus; Zeich, Katrin; Glatting, Gerhard; Buck, Andreas K.; Solbach, Christoph; Reske, Sven N. [University of Ulm, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ulm (Germany); Karges, Wolfram [RWTH Aachen, Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Aachen (Germany); Pauls, Sandra [University of Ulm, Department of Radiology, Ulm (Germany); Verburg, Frederik A. [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Dralle, Henning [University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of General, Visceral and Vascular Surgery, Halle (Germany); Neumaier, Bernd [University of Ulm, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ulm (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Neurologische Forschung, Section for Radiochemistry, Cologne (Germany); Mottaghy, Felix M. [University of Ulm, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ulm (Germany); RWTH Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    In detecting pheochromocytoma (PHEO), positron emission tomography (PET) with the radiolabelled amine precursor {sup 18}F-fluorodihydroxyphenylalanine ({sup 18}F-DOPA) offers excellent specificity, while computed tomography (CT) provides high sensitivity and ability to localize lesions; therefore, the combination of these modalities could be advantageous in this setting. The aim of this study was to investigate whether combined {sup 18}F-DOPA PET/CT more accurately detects and localizes PHEO lesions than does each modality alone. {sup 18}F-DOPA PET, CT and {sup 18}F-DOPA PET/CT images of 25 consecutive patients undergoing diagnostic scanning of suspected sporadic or multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 syndrome-associated PHEO were reviewed retrospectively in randomized sequence. Two blinded observers scored the images regarding the likelihood of PHEO being present and localizable. Results were correlated with subsequent clinical history and, when available, histology. Of the 19 lesions detected by all three modalities, PET identified each as positive for PHEO, but was unable to definitively localize 15 of 19 (79%). CT could definitively localize all 19 lesions, but could not definitively diagnose or exclude PHEO in 18 of 19 (95%) lesions. Furthermore, CT falsely identified as negative for PHEO one lesion which was judged to be positive for this tumor by both PET and PET/CT. Only in PET/CT scans were all 19 lesions accurately characterized and localized. On a per-patient basis, the sensitivity of {sup 18}F-DOPA PET/CT for PHEO was 100% and the specificity 88%, with a 100% positive predictive value and an 88% negative predictive value. {sup 18}F-DOPA PET/CT more accurately diagnoses and localizes adrenal and extra-adrenal masses suspicious for PHEO than do {sup 18}F-DOPA PET or CT alone. (orig.)

  18. Hungarian experiences with PET/CT applications from a radiation protection point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In Hungary PET examinations started about 10 years ago meanwhile PET/CT examinations have been carried out since 2005 with two new PET/CT centers and two medical accelerators (baby cyclotrons). The upcoming PET/CT applications represent the highest patient exposures in medical diagnostics with potentially the highest staff exposures as well. The radiopharmaceutical, which is solely F-18 FDG in the actual Hungarian practice is transported in sealed ampoules in doses between 5-20 GBq. The dispensing of the doses and filling of the syringes are carried out in automatic dedicated hot cells. The glucose labelled with F- 18 radioisotope (half life is 1 10 minutes) with a dose 370 MBq (for average patient) filled into a syringe is injected into a blood vessel of the patient. Then, the patient becomes the most significant radiation source of nuclear medicine. According to our measurements, the dose rates rise between 30-50 μSv/h at I m from the patient surface. The radiation is a very highly penetrating annihilation gamma radiation with an energy of 511 keV. The appropriate level of shielding needed should be determined amongst the active patients (two are waiting for examination, one is examined, 1 or 2 are waiting after examination) and the members of the staff and the inactive environment. The task is an optimalisation process, since the reasonable value of dose constraint should be decided. For lack of relevant national regulation, it is the task of our Institute to determine the appropriate radiation protection requirements for the PET/CT centers. One of the two new Centers started in 2005 has been surveyed for months. Altogether 1092 measurements were carried out. On the base of measurements, it is proven that I mSv/year effective dose can be introduced as dose constraint for each separable source of exposures to the staff, namely for the administration of the radiopharmaceuticals, the radiation of active patients and the PET/CT examination. The

  19. Multi-technique hybrid imaging in PET/CT and PET/MR: what does the future hold?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Galiza Barbosa, F; Delso, G; Ter Voert, E E G W; Huellner, M W; Herrmann, K; Veit-Haibach, P

    2016-07-01

    Integrated positron-emission tomography and computed tomography (PET/CT) is one of the most important imaging techniques to have emerged in oncological practice in the last decade. Hybrid imaging, in general, remains a rapidly growing field, not only in developing countries, but also in western industrialised healthcare systems. A great deal of technological development and research is focused on improving hybrid imaging technology further and introducing new techniques, e.g., integrated PET and magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI). Additionally, there are several new PET tracers on the horizon, which have the potential to broaden clinical applications in hybrid imaging for diagnosis as well as therapy. This article aims to highlight some of the major technical and clinical advances that are currently taking place in PET/CT and PET/MRI that will potentially maintain the position of hybrid techniques at the forefront of medical imaging technologies. PMID:27108800

  20. Impact of initial PET/CT staging in terms of clinical stage, management plan, and prognosis in 592 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Satoshi; Rohren, Eric M.; Macapinlac, Homer A. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Unit 1483, Houston, TX (United States); Khiewvan, Benjapa [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Unit 1483, Houston, TX (United States); Mahidol University, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, 2 Prannok Road Siriraj, Bangkoknoi, Bangkok (Thailand); Fox, Patricia S.; Bassett, Roland L. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Biostatistics, Unit 1411, Houston, TX (United States); Swisher, Stephen G. [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Unit 1489, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Our objective was to determine the impact of initial {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT (PET/CT) staging on clinical stage and the management plan and the prognostic value of PET/CT in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We retrospectively reviewed the records of 592 patients with NSCLC who were referred to The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center during 2002/2011 and had both PET/CT and conventional CT for initial staging. Clinical stages and management plans were compared between PET/CT and CT. The impact of PET/CT on management plans was considered medium/high when PET/CT changed the planned treatment modality or treatment intent. PET/CT and CT stages were compared with all-cause mortality and survival rates. We also assessed potential prognostic factors for progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). PET/CT changed the stage in 170 patients (28.7 %; 16.4 % upstaged, 12.3 % downstaged). PET/CT had a medium/high impact on the management plan in 220 patients (37.2 %). PFS and OS were significantly worse in patients with upstaged disease than in patients with no change in stage (median PFS 29.0 vs. 53.8 months, P < 0.001; median OS:64.7 vs. 115.9 months, P = 0.006). PFS and OS were significantly worse in patients with medium/high impact of PET/CT than in patients with no/low impact of PET/CT (median PFS 24.7 vs. 60.6 months, P < 0.001; median OS 64.7 vs. 115.9 months, P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, a medium/high impact of PET/CT was an independent predictor of worse PFS (hazard ratio, HR, 1.73; 95 % CI 1.30 - 2.29; P = 0.0002) and OS (HR 1.84; 95 % CI 1.26 - 2.69; P = 0.002). Initial PET/CT staging not only impacts stage and management plan but also has prognostic value. (orig.)

  1. Impact of initial PET/CT staging in terms of clinical stage, management plan, and prognosis in 592 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our objective was to determine the impact of initial 18F-FDG PET/CT (PET/CT) staging on clinical stage and the management plan and the prognostic value of PET/CT in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We retrospectively reviewed the records of 592 patients with NSCLC who were referred to The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center during 2002/2011 and had both PET/CT and conventional CT for initial staging. Clinical stages and management plans were compared between PET/CT and CT. The impact of PET/CT on management plans was considered medium/high when PET/CT changed the planned treatment modality or treatment intent. PET/CT and CT stages were compared with all-cause mortality and survival rates. We also assessed potential prognostic factors for progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). PET/CT changed the stage in 170 patients (28.7 %; 16.4 % upstaged, 12.3 % downstaged). PET/CT had a medium/high impact on the management plan in 220 patients (37.2 %). PFS and OS were significantly worse in patients with upstaged disease than in patients with no change in stage (median PFS 29.0 vs. 53.8 months, P < 0.001; median OS:64.7 vs. 115.9 months, P = 0.006). PFS and OS were significantly worse in patients with medium/high impact of PET/CT than in patients with no/low impact of PET/CT (median PFS 24.7 vs. 60.6 months, P < 0.001; median OS 64.7 vs. 115.9 months, P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, a medium/high impact of PET/CT was an independent predictor of worse PFS (hazard ratio, HR, 1.73; 95 % CI 1.30 - 2.29; P = 0.0002) and OS (HR 1.84; 95 % CI 1.26 - 2.69; P = 0.002). Initial PET/CT staging not only impacts stage and management plan but also has prognostic value. (orig.)

  2. A study on development of fast silicon photomultipliers for TOF-PET Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    micro-pixels with 66 % fill factor. At this condition, the dynamic range was appropriate for measurement of 511 keV gamma photons with LYSO coupling. Additionally integrated quenching capacitors were fabricated with the Metal-Insulator-Metal (MIM) structure which is commonly used in standard CMOS processes. Quenching capacitor Cq with 30 fF successfully modified the single photon pulse shape of SiPM. The initial current in the single photon pulse shape was increased, so, the pulse shape became shaper than conventional SiPMs. This sharper pulse shape shortens the rise time of PET detectors coupled to LYSO. 10 to 90 % rise time of the PET detector based on Cq integrated SiPM was 22.5 ns while the normal SiPM has 34.3 ns. The performance of fabricated SiPM was experimentally evaluated with parameters such as reverse bias characteristics, single photoelectron spectrum, gain, dark count rate, energy resolution, and Photon Detection efficiency (PDE). The breakdown voltage was around 16.5 V, so the operating voltage was 17 V to 18V. The gain was obtained with the mean spacing method from single photoelectron spectra, and high gain about 2x106 was measured. In Na-22 spectrum measurements, the energy resolution was better than 15 % FWHM at 511 keV which is good enough to use in PET. The experimental results show its feasibility to use in TOF-PET application. The fabricated SiPM has better performances than commercial SiPMs except for dark count rates. Due to N+ formation by the direct arsenic implantation, dark count rate was higher than commercials. As a future work, the SiPM fabrication process scheme is needed to study in order to reduce the dark count rate

  3. Application of the in-beam PET therapy monitoring on precision irradiations with helium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main goal of the present dissertation was to extend the in-beam PET method to new ion types. It was shown that the in-beam PET method can also be applied for 3He irradiations. For this experiments on a 3He beam were performed. The activity yield is at equal applied dose about three times larger than at 12C irradiations. The reachable range resolution is smaller than 1 mm. At the irradiation of an inhomogeneous phantom it was shown that a contrast between different materials is resolvable. From the experimentally determined reaction rates cross sections for the reactions leading to positron emitters were performed. The data taken in the 3He experiments were compared those obtained in carbon-ion experiments as well as literature data for proton irradiations. A comparison with the calculations of the simulation program SHIELD-HIT was performed. A collection of cross-section models and the established requirements for a simulation program applicable for in-beam PET are preparing for further work

  4. Clinical applications of percutaneous vertebroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the clinical applications of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP). Methods: Fifty-seven patients underwent 79 PVP including 6 vertebral hemangiomas with 6 PVP, 9 osteoporosis with 16 PVP, and 42 vertebral malignant tumors with 57 PVP. PVP was done with radiopaque bone cement under the CT guidance. The ratio of powdery polymethyl methacrylate to liquid methyl methacrylate was 4:1. The ropy paste was mixed and slowly injected using 1 ml syringe. Results: Bone cement presented as dot form in 3 PVP, spot form in 6 PVP, group form in 42 PVP, and homogenous form in 28 PVP. The density and form of bone cement were unchanged on follow-up imaging. No further compression of vertebral body occurred. The analgesic effectiveness was 100% (15/15 patients) in begin lesions and 90.5% (38/42 patients) in malignant tumors, and the analgesic time began from PVP to 7 days and lasted for 6 months. Conclusion: The indications of PVP are the vertebral hemangioma, vertebral osteoporosis, osteolytic metastases, and other osteolytic diseases. No complication was seen in this group

  5. Prostaglandins: pharmacology and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, S M; Hillier, K

    1974-01-01

    Prostaglandin research has been 1 of the most stimulating features of biomedical investigation in the past decade. Interest developed at a time of expanding knowledge of hormonal and neurohormonal behavior and research work received a tremendous impetus in the early 1960s with the elucidation in Sweden of the chemical structures of prostaglandins, followed by the discovery of their biosynthetic pathways. The original findings of large amounts of prostaglandin in the male accessory genital glands and their secretions, and subsequent discovery in the menstrual and amniotic fluids linked these substances with human production. As a result of further investigation, clinical applications of prostaglandins for the induction of labor and termination of early unwanted pregnancies have been developed. Apart from the functions of the prostaglandins in the reproductive area, they have been shown to have a widespread distribution in the body and produce many different pharmacological effects. Prostaglandins are thought to be involved in the regulation of blood pressure and through their vascular effects have therapeutic potential in the treatment of hypertension and peripheral vascular disease. Through their bronchodilator effect, some prostaglandins may become useful in the treatment of asthma. PMID:4611742

  6. Marketing applications for dental clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Čevela, Josef

    2010-01-01

    The essay deals with the marketing strategy of the dental clinic, more specifically the dental clinic Sorriso DENTAL s.r.o. It also analyses and describes the marketing mix. Based on these things, it offers certain recommendations for the clinic and its marketing conception.

  7. Monte Carlo modeling of a clinical PET scanner by using the GATE dedicated computer code; Modelagem Monte Carlo de um PET Scanner clinico utilizando o codigo dedicado GATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Igor Fagner; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Universidade de Pernambuco (UPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Escola Politecnica; Vieira, Jose Wilson [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    This paper demonstrates more possible detailed the GATE simulated architecture involved in the 4D modeling of a General Electric PET scanner, the Advance. So, it were used data present in the literature on the configuration of GE modelled PET. The obtained results which were the 3D components of PET creation, and the simulation of 4D phenomena as the source decay and the gantry whirl, exhibit the potential of tool in emission tomograph modelling

  8. Assessment of clinical utility of 18F-FDG PET in patients with head and neck cancer: a probability analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to calculate disease probabilities based on data of patients with head and neck cancer in the register of our institution and to perform a systematic review of the available data on the accuracy of PET in the primary assessment and follow-up of patients with head and neck cancer. The pre-test probability of head and neck cancer among patients in our institutional data registry was assessed. Then the published literature was selected and appraised according to a standard protocol of systematic reviews. Two reviewers independently selected and extracted data on study characteristics, quality and accuracy. Accuracy data were used to form 2 x 2 contingency tables and were pooled to produce summary receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and summary likelihood ratios for positive and negative testing. Finally post-test probabilities were calculated on the basis of the pre-test probabilities of this patient group. All patients had cytologically or histologically proven cancer. The prevalence of additional lymph node metastases on PET in staging examinations was 19.6% (11/56), and that of locoregional recurrence on restaging PET was 28.6% (12/42). In the primary assessment of patients, PET had positive and negative likelihood ratios of 3.9 (2.56-5.93) and 0.24 (0.14-0.41), respectively. Disease probabilities were therefore 49.4% for a positive test result and 5.7% for a negative test result. In the assessment of recurrence these values were 3.96 (2.8-5.6) and 0.16 (0.1-0.25), resulting in probabilities of 49.7% and 3.8%. PET evaluation for involvement of lymph nodes had positive and negative likelihood ratios of 17.26 (10.9-27.3) and 0.19 (0.13-0.27) for primary assessment and 11.0 (2.93-41.24) and 0.14 (0.01-1.88) for detection of recurrence. The probabilities were 81.2% and 4.5% for primary assessment and 73.3% and 3.4% for assessment of recurrence. It is concluded that in this clinical setting the main advantage of PET is the

  9. Clinical application of functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Described is the present state of clinical application of fMRI in the preoperative assessment of brain tumors, and plasticity in and pathophysiology of central diseases. For the tumor resection, fMRI is useful for risk assessment of postoperative nerve dysfunction, for selection of the patient rather suitable for brain mapping at the invasive surgery than at the pre-operation and for guidance of the operation itself. Preoperative fMRI alone can neither distinguish the regions of the primary and secondary functions nor exhibit the relation between the tumor and white matter fibers but there are compensatory means for these drawbacks. Benefit of preoperative fMRI has not yet been based on the evidence on double blind trials. Combination of fMRI imaging and electroencephalography (EEG) finding has shown that, in generalized epilepsy, extensive and stimulated activation occurs in both frontal/occipital regions and in thalamus area, respectively, and that the concomitant lowered activities are conceivably the reflection of burst discharge in normal brain functions. Plasticity in the human brain has been demonstrated by fMRI in cerebral vascular diseases, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Pathogenesis of Parkinson disease and depression has been better understood by fMRI investigations revealing regions with elevated and reduced activities. Studies of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder have shown similar change of activities with functional reductions of the right dorsolateral frontal anterior area and of dorsal frontal cingulate gyrus, together with stimulated wider regions to given tasks. As above, fMRI has greatly contributed to our understanding of diseases of central nervous system and is to be expected to expand wider in this field. (T.T.)

  10. RRIA applications in clinical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When laboratory tests are limited to the measurement of substances in gram quantities, and occasionally milligrams micrograms, the development of radioisotope techniques made possible by first determining substances in very low concentrations in biological fluids. The combination of radioisotopes with high specificity binding proteins made possible the sensitivity and specificity to accurately measure physiological concentrations of substances at the level of micrograms, nanograms picograms (10-6, 10-9, 10-12 respectively). Radioimmunoassay development and later the immunoradiometric assays was a breakthrough in Laboratory Medicine. The main advantages are their specificity, sensitivity and reproducibility, which together with the constancy of the isotopic signal, and durability make this method one of the fattest of modern technology. The disadvantages are the need for special equipment, and also the use of radioactive isotopes, which involves subject to multiple rules for the use, storage and disposal of these products, according to the laws of each country and international standards. Other applications of isotope techniques are the receptor assays (RRA), very diverse in terms of objectives and methods, and depend mainly on the characteristics of the receiver. Are used mainly in tissue fragments extracted by biopsy or surgery, and currently especially in detecting hormone receptors in malignant tissues, which can guide as to the subsequent course of action regarding the patient. These tests are generally used with very specific interests, usually develop in living cells, or fragments of freshly obtained tissues, as also the internalization process of hormone-receptor complex is considered essential. isotopes may also be used in clinical research to measure products of enzymatic assays, or malignant abnormal tissue, or even to assess the purity of particular biological product capable of being isotopically labeled. (author)

  11. Incidental Breast Lesions Identified by 18F-FDG PET/CT: Which Clinical Variables Differentiate between Benign and Malignant Breast Lesions?

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Kyung Min; Kim, Hye Jung; Jung, Su Jin; Lim, Hyo Soon; Lee, Sang Woo; Cho, Seung Hyun; Jang, Yun-Jin; Lee, Hui Joong; Kim, Gab Chul; Jung, Jin Hyang; Park, Ji Young

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of our study was to evaluate the risk of malignancy and to determine which clinical variables differentiate between benign and malignant focal breast lesions found incidentally on 18F-flourodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomography (FDG PET/CT). Methods From March 2005 to October 2011, 21,224 women with no history of breast cancer underwent FDG PET/CT at three university-affiliated hospitals. We retrospectively identified 214 patients with incidental fo...

  12. Clinical experience with a commercially available negative oral contrast medium in PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausegger, K.; Reinprecht, P. [Roentgendiagnostisches Zentralinstitut, LKH Klagenfurt (Austria); Kau, T. [Roentgendiagnostisches Zentral Inst., Klagenfurt (Austria); Igerc, I.; Lind, P. [Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin und Spezielle Endokrinologie, LKH Klagenfurt (Austria)

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: to evaluate a commercially available negative oral contrast material for PET/CT. Material and methods: in a prospective series of 49 patients, Mukofalk {sup registered}, which is a vegetarian-based substance, was used as a negative oral contrast medium in whole body PET/CT studies. Mukofalk was administered during a time period of 1.5 hours before the examination. Quality of small bowl distension and eventual pathological tracer uptake in the intestine were evaluated. Results: distension of the small bowel was excellent or good in 41 (85%) and poor in 8 (15%) patients. Mild tracer uptake in the small bowel was observed in 5 patients (10.2%) and moderate uptake in another 2 patients (4%). In none of these patients did the F-18 FDG uptake interfere with image interpretation. Conclusion: Mukofalk {sup registered} can be used as a negative oral contrast medium in PET/CT studies. (orig.)

  13. Clinical experience with a commercially available negative oral contrast medium in PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: to evaluate a commercially available negative oral contrast material for PET/CT. Material and methods: in a prospective series of 49 patients, Mukofalk registered, which is a vegetarian-based substance, was used as a negative oral contrast medium in whole body PET/CT studies. Mukofalk was administered during a time period of 1.5 hours before the examination. Quality of small bowl distension and eventual pathological tracer uptake in the intestine were evaluated. Results: distension of the small bowel was excellent or good in 41 (85%) and poor in 8 (15%) patients. Mild tracer uptake in the small bowel was observed in 5 patients (10.2%) and moderate uptake in another 2 patients (4%). In none of these patients did the F-18 FDG uptake interfere with image interpretation. Conclusion: Mukofalk registered can be used as a negative oral contrast medium in PET/CT studies. (orig.)

  14. Clinical Workflow Considerations for Implementation of Continuous-Bed-Motion PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuff, Shelley N; Osborne, Dustin

    2016-06-01

    Within the last 3 y, a new type of technology has emerged for PET imaging that uses a continuous-bed-motion (CBM) acquisition. For technologists, this type of acquisition requires some modifications of the standard approach to PET protocols and imaging workflows. There are several key aspects of CBM that technologists need to learn and understand when transitioning from traditional step-and-shoot PET imaging to this new technology, including differences in acquisition type, image quality, and protocol setup as well as the impact that CBM can have on workflow. This article explains how CBM differs from step and shoot and focuses on the issues critical for technologists to know when first using this technology. PMID:27102661

  15. Clinical Impact of Time-of-Flight and Point Response Modeling in PET Reconstructions: A Lesion Detection Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefferkoetter, Joshua; Casey, Michael; Townsend, David; Fakhri, Georges El

    2013-01-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) and point spread function (PSF) modeling have been shown to improve PET reconstructions, but the impact on physicians in the clinical setting has not been thoroughly investigated. A lesion detection and localization study was performed using simulated lesions in real patient images. Four reconstruction schemes were considered: ordinary Poisson OSEM (OP) alone and combined with TOF, PSF, and TOF+PSF. The images were presented to physicians experienced in reading PET images, and the performance of each was quantified using localization receiver operating characteristic (LROC). Numerical observers (non-prewhitening and Hotelling) were used to identify optimal reconstruction parameters, and observer SNR was compared to the performance of the physicians. The numerical models showed good agreement with human performance, and best performance was achieved by both when using TOF+PSF. These findings suggest a large potential benefit of TOF+PSF for oncology PET studies, especially in the detection of small, low-intensity, focal disease in larger patients. PMID:23403399

  16. {sup 13}N-ammonia myocardial perfusion imaging with a PET/CT scanner: impact on clinical decision making and cost-effectiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegrist, Patrick T.; Husmann, Lars; Knabenhans, Martina; Gaemperli, Oliver; Valenta, Ines; Hoefflinghaus, Tobias [University Hospital Zurich, Cardiovascular Center, Zurich (Switzerland); Scheffel, Hans; Stolzmann, Paul; Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich, Cardiovascular Center, Zurich (Switzerland); University Zurich, Center for Integrative Human Physiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of the study is to determine the impact of {sup 13}N-ammonia positron emission tomography (PET) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) on clinical decision making and its cost-effectiveness. One hundred consecutive patients (28 women, 72 men; mean age 60.9 {+-} 12.0 years; range 24-85 years) underwent {sup 13}N-ammonia PET scanning (and computed tomography, used only for attenuation correction) to assess myocardial perfusion in patients with known (n = 79) or suspected (n = 8) coronary artery disease (CAD), or for suspected small-vessel disease (SVD; n = 13). Before PET, the referring physician was asked to determine patient treatment if PET would not be available. Four weeks later, PET patient management was reassessed for each patient individually. Before PET management strategies would have been: diagnostic angiography (62 of 100 patients), diagnostic angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI; 6 of 100), coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG; 3 of 100), transplantation (1 of 100), or conservative medical treatment (28 of 100). After PET scanning, treatment strategies were altered in 78 patients leading to: diagnostic angiography (0 of 100), PCI (20 of 100), CABG (3 of 100), transplantation (1 of 100), or conservative medical treatment (76 of 100). Patient management followed the recommendations of PET findings in 97% of the cases. Cost-effectiveness analysis revealed lower costs of EUR206/patient as a result of PET scanning. In a population with a high prevalence of known CAD, PET is cost-effective and has an important impact on patient management. (orig.)

  17. PET/MR brain imaging: evaluation of clinical UTE-based attenuation correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the greatest challenges in PET/MR imaging is that of accurate MR-based attenuation correction (AC) of the acquired PET data, which must be solved if the PET/MR modality is to reach its full potential. The aim of this study was to investigate the performance of Siemens' most recent version (VB20P) of MR-based AC of head PET data, by comparing it to CT-based AC. Methods:18F-FDG PET data from seven lymphoma and twelve lung cancer patients examined with a Biograph mMR PET/MR system were reconstructed with both CT-based and MR-based AC, avoiding sources of error arising when comparing PET data from different systems. The resulting images were compared quantitatively by measuring changes in mean SUV in ten different brain regions in both hemispheres, as well as the brainstem. In addition, the attenuation maps (μ maps) were compared regarding volume and localization of cranial bone. The UTE μ maps clearly overestimate the amount of bone in the neck, while slightly underestimating the amount of bone in the cranium, and the localization of bone in the cranial region also differ from the CT μ maps. In air/tissue interfaces in the sinuses and ears, the MRAC method struggles to correctly classify the different tissues. The misclassification of tissue is most likely caused by a combination of artefacts and the insufficiency of the UTE method to accurately separate bone. Quantitatively, this results in a combination of overestimation (0.5-3.6 %) and underestimation (2.7-5.2 %) of PET activity throughout the brain, depending on the proximity to the inaccurate regions. Our results indicate that the performance of the UTE method as implemented in VB20P is close to the theoretical maximum of such an MRAC method in the brain, while it does not perform satisfactorily in the neck or face/nasal area. Further improvement of the UTE MRAC or other available methods for more accurate segmentation of bone should be incorporated. (orig.)

  18. PET/MR brain imaging: evaluation of clinical UTE-based attenuation correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aasheim, Lars Birger [Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Trondheim (Norway); St. Olavs University Hospital, Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Trondheim (Norway); Karlberg, Anna [St. Olavs University Hospital, Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Trondheim (Norway); Goa, Paal Erik [St. Olavs University Hospital, Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Trondheim (Norway); NTNU, Department of Physics, Trondheim (Norway); Haaberg, Asta [NTNU, Department of Neuroscience, Trondheim (Norway); St. Olavs University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Trondheim (Norway); Soerhaug, Sveinung [St. Olavs University Hospital, Department of Thoracic Medicine, Trondheim (Norway); Fagerli, Unn-Merete [St. Olavs University Hospital, Department of Oncology, Trondheim (Norway); NTNU, Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Trondheim (Norway); Eikenes, Live [Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Trondheim (Norway)

    2015-08-15

    One of the greatest challenges in PET/MR imaging is that of accurate MR-based attenuation correction (AC) of the acquired PET data, which must be solved if the PET/MR modality is to reach its full potential. The aim of this study was to investigate the performance of Siemens' most recent version (VB20P) of MR-based AC of head PET data, by comparing it to CT-based AC. Methods:{sup 18}F-FDG PET data from seven lymphoma and twelve lung cancer patients examined with a Biograph mMR PET/MR system were reconstructed with both CT-based and MR-based AC, avoiding sources of error arising when comparing PET data from different systems. The resulting images were compared quantitatively by measuring changes in mean SUV in ten different brain regions in both hemispheres, as well as the brainstem. In addition, the attenuation maps (μ maps) were compared regarding volume and localization of cranial bone. The UTE μ maps clearly overestimate the amount of bone in the neck, while slightly underestimating the amount of bone in the cranium, and the localization of bone in the cranial region also differ from the CT μ maps. In air/tissue interfaces in the sinuses and ears, the MRAC method struggles to correctly classify the different tissues. The misclassification of tissue is most likely caused by a combination of artefacts and the insufficiency of the UTE method to accurately separate bone. Quantitatively, this results in a combination of overestimation (0.5-3.6 %) and underestimation (2.7-5.2 %) of PET activity throughout the brain, depending on the proximity to the inaccurate regions. Our results indicate that the performance of the UTE method as implemented in VB20P is close to the theoretical maximum of such an MRAC method in the brain, while it does not perform satisfactorily in the neck or face/nasal area. Further improvement of the UTE MRAC or other available methods for more accurate segmentation of bone should be incorporated. (orig.)

  19. A modular data acquisition system for high resolution clinical PET scanners

    OpenAIRE

    Sportelli, Giancarlo

    2010-01-01

    En las últimas dos décadas, la Tomografía por Emisión de Positrones (PET) ha demostrado ser una modalidad clave para el estudio de la biología del cúncer y trastornos cardíacos, y para la realizaciún imágenes moleculares, una tecnica que permite la terapia individualizada de la enfermedad [Weissleder01]. La mejor característica de la PET es su sensibilidad: es la tecnica que proporciona imúagenes moleculares con la mayor sensibilidad, y las imúagenes de cuerpo entero que produce no pueden ser...

  20. Clinical value of FDG-PET for therapy monitoring of malignant lymphoma - results of a retrospective study in 72 patients; Klinische Wertigkeit der FDG-PET zur Therapiekontrolle bei malignen Lymphomen - Ergebnisse einer retrospektiven Studie an 72 Patienten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremerius, U.; Kroell, U.; Zimny, M.; Buell, U. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Fabry, U.; Osieka, R. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Medizinische Klinik 4; Neuerburg, J. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik

    1999-06-01

    Aim of the present retrospective study was to validate the clinical value of FDG-PET for therapy control of malignant lymphoma. Method: 72 patients (41 non-Hodgkin lumphomas, 29 Hodgkin`s disease, 2 unclassified) received static FDG-PET scans of initially involved regions (n=53) or of the entire neck and trunk (n=19) after therapy. CT imaging (n=70) and serum LDH measurement (n=64) were also performed. Results were validated either by biopsy (n=7) or by clinical follow-up (n=65). The predictive value of PET was analysed in relation to different prognostic factors (stage, recurrence status, number of prior therapy regimen). Results: PET obtained a sensitivity of 88%, a specificity of 83% and an overall accuracy of 85% for detection of residual disease. The values for CT were 84%, 31% resp. 54%, and for serum LDH 50%, 92% and 73%. The predictive value of PET was related to the prevalence of residual disease. PET predicted complete remission in more than 90% of patients with moderate risk (stage I-III, no relapse, no more than two different therapy regimens). In high risk patients, however, the negative predictive value of PET was 50-67%. Conclusion: FDG-PET is more accurate than CT imaging and LDH measurement for therapy monitoring of malignant lymphoma. Therapy success can be reliably predicted in patients with moderate risk. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Retrospektive Validierung der klinischen Wertigkeit von FDG-PET zur Therapiekontrolle bei Patienten mit malignen Lymphomen. Methode: 72 Patienten erhielten nach Therapie eines malignen Lymphoms (41 Non-Hodgkin-Lymphome, 29 Morbus Hodgkin, 2 unklassifiziert) eine statische FDG-PET im Bereich initial befallener Regionen (n=53) oder von Hals und Koerperstamm (n=19), sowie CT (n=70) und LDH-Bestimmung im Serum (n=64). Die Resultate wurden durch Biopsien (n=7) oder durch den klinischen Verlauf (n=65) validiert. Die praediktive Wertigkeit der PET wurde in Abhaengigkeit von verschiedenen Risikofaktoren (Stadium, Rezidivstatus

  1. Comparison of 18F-FDG PET/CT and PET/MRI in patients with multiple myeloma

    OpenAIRE

    Sachpekidis, Christos; Hillengass, Jens; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Mosebach, Jennifer; Pan, Leyun; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia

    2015-01-01

    PET/MRI represents a promising hybrid imaging modality with several potential clinical applications. Although PET/MRI seems highly attractive in the diagnostic approach of multiple myeloma (MM), its role has not yet been evaluated. The aims of this prospective study are to evaluate the feasibility of 18F-FDG PET/MRI in detection of MM lesions, and to investigate the reproducibility of bone marrow lesions detection and quantitative data of 18F-FDG uptake between the functional (PET) component ...

  2. 90Nb: potential radionuclide for application in immuno-PET. Development of appropriate production strategy and first in vivo evaluation of 90Nb-labeled monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine is a modern and highly effective tool for the detection and treatment of oncological disease. Molecular imaging based on radiotracers includes single photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET), which provide non-invasive tumor visualization on nano- and picomolar level, respectively. Currently, many novel tracers for more precise discovery of small tumors and metastases have been introduced and are under investigation. Many of them are protein-based biomolecules which nature herself produces as antigens for the eradication of tumor cells. Antibodies and antibody fragments play an important role in tumor diagnostics and treatment. PET imaging with antibodies and antibody fragments is called immuno-PET. The main issue that needs to be addressed is that appropriate radiotracers with half-lives related to the half-lives of biomolecules are needed. The development of novel radiotracers is a multistep, complicated task. This task includes the evaluation of production, separation and labeling strategy for chosen radionuclide. Finally, the biomolecule-radionuclide complex should be stable in time. An equally important factor is the economic suitability of the production strategy, which will lead to a key decision for future application of the developed radionuclide. In recent work, 90Nb has been proposed as a potential candidate for application in immuno-PET. Its half-life of 14.6 hours is suitable for application with antibody fragments and some intact antibodies. 90Nb has a relatively high positron branching of 53% and an optimal energy of β+ emission of 0.35 MeV that can provide high quality of imaging with low dose of used radionuclide. First proof-of-principle studies have shown that 90Nb: (i) can be produced in sufficient amount and purity by proton bombardment of natural zirconium target (ii) can be isolated from target material with appropriate radiochemical purity (iii) may be used for labeling of monoclonal

  3. Comparison of prone versus supine 18F-FDG-PET of locally advanced breast cancer: Phantom and preliminary clinical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Jason M.; Rani, Sudheer D.; Li, Xia; Whisenant, Jennifer G.; Abramson, Richard G. [Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 and Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 (United States); Arlinghaus, Lori R. [Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 (United States); Lee, Tzu-Cheng [Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); MacDonald, Lawrence R.; Partridge, Savannah C. [Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Kang, Hakmook [Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 and Department of Biostatistics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 (United States); Linden, Hannah M. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Kinahan, Paul E. [Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Yankeelov, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.yankeelov@vanderbilt.edu [Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 (United States); Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 (United States); Department of Physics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37232 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Previous studies have demonstrated how imaging of the breast with patients lying prone using a supportive positioning device markedly facilitates longitudinal and/or multimodal image registration. In this contribution, the authors’ primary objective was to determine if there are differences in the standardized uptake value (SUV) derived from [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in breast tumors imaged in the standard supine position and in the prone position using a specialized positioning device. Methods: A custom positioning device was constructed to allow for breast scanning in the prone position. Rigid and nonrigid phantom studies evaluated differences in prone and supine PET. Clinical studies comprised 18F-FDG-PET of 34 patients with locally advanced breast cancer imaged in the prone position (with the custom support) followed by imaging in the supine position (without the support). Mean and maximum values (SUV{sub peak} and SUV{sub max}, respectively) were obtained from tumor regions-of-interest for both positions. Prone and supine SUV were linearly corrected to account for the differences in 18F-FDG uptake time. Correlation, Bland–Altman, and nonparametric analyses were performed on uptake time-corrected and uncorrected data. Results: SUV from the rigid PET breast phantom imaged in the prone position with the support device was 1.9% lower than without the support device. In the nonrigid PET breast phantom, prone SUV with the support device was 5.0% lower than supine SUV without the support device. In patients, the median (range) difference in uptake time between prone and supine scans was 16.4 min (13.4–30.9 min), which was significantly—but not completely—reduced by the linear correction method. SUV{sub peak} and SUV{sub max} from prone versus supine scans were highly correlated, with concordance correlation coefficients of 0.91 and 0.90, respectively. Prone SUV{sub peak} and SUV{sub max} were

  4. Clinical diagnosis and surgical management of diaphragmatic retroperitoneal perirenal fat and kidney herniation in a pet rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ruey-Shyuan; Chu, Che-Chu; Wang, Hsien-Chi; Chen, Kuan-Sheng

    2016-06-15

    CASE DESCRIPTION A 6-year-old 2.08-kg (4.58-lb) neutered male Lionhead-mix pet rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) was examined because of sneezing and increased respiratory effort. CLINICAL FINDINGS On the basis of the rabbit's radiographic findings, a diagnosis of diaphragmatic retroperitoneal perirenal fat and kidney herniation was made. Nine months later, physical examination revealed increased respiratory rate and effort and slightly decreased body weight. Thoracic radiography revealed decreased lung aeration and further craniomedial displacement of the right kidney, compared with the initial evaluation findings, suggesting progressive herniation of the retroperitoneal perirenal fat. TREATMENT AND OUTCOME During exploratory celiotomy, a tear in the right dorsal tendinous portion of the diaphragm was noted. The right kidney and perirenal fat were found to be displaced into the thorax. Diaphragmatic herniorrhaphy was performed after replacement of the right kidney and the perirenal fat in the retroperitoneal space. The rabbit recovered uneventfully from anesthesia and surgery. Clinical signs did not recur during the following 16 months. CLINICAL RELEVANCE For rabbits with increased respiratory effort, diaphragmatic retroperitoneal perirenal fat and kidney herniation should be included as a differential diagnosis. As illustrated by the case described in this report, appropriate surgical management can provide a successful outcome for affected pet rabbits. PMID:27270063

  5. Clinically unrecognized pulmonary aspiration during gastrointestinal endoscopy with sedation: A potential pitfall interfering the performance of 18F-FDG PET for cancer screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We found several cases with unexpected pulmonary abnormalities on the 18F-FDG PET scan after the gastrointestinal endoscopy with sedation during a compact health check-up course, interfering the interpretations of 18F-FDG PET scan for cancer screening. The current studies aimed to analyze the incidence and the clinical relevance of this pulmonary finding. Materials and methods: From June to December 2009, 127 subjects undergoing the sequential gastrointestinal endoscopy with sedation and 18F-FDG PET scan within 48 h as part of routine health check-up were retrospectively enrolled in this study. The incidence of abnormal pulmonary findings and their SUVmax of FDG were calculated and correlated with the clinical manifestations. Results: Five subjects had abnormal 18F-FDG PET findings but pulmonary symptoms were only found in 2. The SUVmax did not seem to reflect the severity of pulmonary symptoms or the need of intervention. Although the incidence of unrecognized pulmonary aspiration featuring inflammation detected by the 18F-FDG PET scan was high (3.94%, 5/127), the incidence of events needed intervention remained low (0.79%, 1/127), similar to those previously reported literatures. Conclusions: Although higher incidence of pulmonary aspiration in this study, it probably reflects the better sensitivity of 18F-FDG PET for inflammation. The low incidence of clinical events needed intervention may still reflect the safety of sedation used for gastrointestinal endoscopy. Proper arrangement of the sequential examinations if subjects need both gastrointestinal endoscopy with sedation and 18F-FDG PET is important to reduce the interference degrading the performance of 18F-FDG PET in cancer screening, diagnosis or staging.

  6. Early clinical experience and impact of 18F-FDG PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutte, Henrik; Højgaard, Liselotte; Kjaer, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the influence and impact of [F]- fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) in Denmark. METHODS: A standardized questionnaire was sent to the referring physicians of 743 consecutive cases between January 2000 and December 2001. The questionnaire was designed t...

  7. Clinical evidence on PET-CT for radiation therapy planning in gastro-intestinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large number of histological and anatomically distinct malignancies originate from the gastro-intestinal (GI) tract. Radiotherapy (RT) plays an increasing role in the multimodal treatment of most of these malignancies. The proximity of different organs at risk such as the kidneys, the spinal cord and the small bowel and the potential toxicity associated with combined treatment modalities make accurate target volume delineation imperative. The ability of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to visualize a so-called 'biological target volume' (BTV) may be helpful in this respect. Currently the most widely used tracer for diagnosis, staging, restaging and response assessment is [18F]Fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG). Promising preliminary results in esophageal, pancreatic and anorectal cancers and colorectal liver metastasis suggest that FDG-PET might provide us with additional information useful in target volume delineation. Poor image resolution and a low sensitivity for lymph node detection currently obstructs its widespread implementation. Moreover, validation in large prospective trials and the pathological validation of the correct tumor volume is still lacking. In hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and gastric adenocarcinoma there is currently little evidence for the use of FDG-PET in target delineation. However more extensive research is warranted before the true value of FDG-PET in these sites can be assessed. Also other tracers are constantly being developed and investigated. Up to now however none of these tracers has found its way into the daily practice of target volume delineation.

  8. Clinical impact of FDG-PET/CT on colorectal cancer staging and treatment strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus K; Hess, Søren; Alavi, Abass;

    2014-01-01

    FDG-PET/CT is rarely used for initial staging of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). Surgical resection of primary tumor and isolated metastases may result in long-term survival or presumed cure, whereas disseminated disease contraindicates operation. We analyzed a retrospective material to el...

  9. Fast and simple preparation of 68Ga-citrate for routine clinical PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karin M; Kaufmann, Jens; Mewis, Dennis;

    2013-01-01

    The imaging of infectious and inflammatory diseases using gallium-67 (⁶⁷Ga) citrate scintigraphy has been a well-established diagnostic tool for decades. In recent times, interest has focused on PET using the short-lived positron emitting radioisotope ⁶⁸Ga. ⁶⁸Ga is not only more readily available...

  10. Fast and simple preparation of 68Ga-citrate for routine clinical PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karin M; Kaufmann, Jens; Mewis, Dennis;

    The imaging of infectious and inflammatory diseases using gallium-67 (⁶⁷Ga) citrate scintigraphy has been a well-established diagnostic tool for decades. In recent times, interest has focused on PET using the short-lived positron emitting radioisotope ⁶⁸Ga. ⁶⁸Ga is not only more readily available...

  11. Magnetic Nanoparticles From Fabrication to Clinical Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Thanh, Nguyen TK

    2012-01-01

    Offering the latest information in magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) research, Magnetic Nanoparticles: From Fabrication to Clinical Applications provides a comprehensive review, from synthesis, characterization, and biofunctionalization to clinical applications of MNPs, including the diagnosis and treatment of cancers. This book, written by some of the most qualified experts in the field, not only fills a hole in the literature, but also bridges the gaps between all the different areas in this field. Translational research on tailored magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications spans a variet

  12. Serial 18F-FDG-PET/CT during radiotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a prospective clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The primary aim of this prospective study was to use serial 18F-FDG PET/CT to evaluate the trend of the tumor's maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) during radiotherapy (RT) on patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: 60 patients with primary biopsy-proven NPC were prospectively enrolled into the study, approved by the institutional review board of our hospital. All patients underwent four /18F-FDG PET/CT scans: one initial scan before RT/ cisplatin based concurrent chemo radiotherapy, at the point of 50 Gy during RT, the end of RT, and one month after RT, respectively. Results: There was a significant difference (Pmax of primary site among pre treatment and post treatment at the dose of 50 Gy, at the end of RT and one month after RT. There was also significant difference (Pmax of neck nodes site. However, there was significant difference of the SUVmax between histological WHO type Ⅱ B and type Ⅱ A in the primary site (P=0.044) (67% reduction at dose 50 Gy for type Ⅱ B vs. 55% for type Ⅱ A) but not in the lymph nodes. Conclusions: Serial 18F-FDG-PET/CT scan demonstrates significant decreasing values of the tumor's SUVmax during and after radiotherapy in NPC. The most significant reduction was at the point 50 Gy and SUV is reduced to basal level (≤2.5) at one month after RT both in primary site and lymph nodes. WHO type Ⅱ B has more dramatic response than type Ⅱ A at the primary site but not in lymph node. The study indicates that inflammation caused by RT do not significantly influence the uptake on 18F-FDG PET in NPC. Therefore, early PET scan during or right after RT instead of conventional 3 months interval after RT is indicated to evaluate tumor response and develop individualized adaptive radiotherapy in NPC. (authors)

  13. Clinical utility of spatially normalized PET and SPECT to evaluate patients with memory and cognitive impairments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We assessed cerebral metabolism and blood flow in patients with memory and other cognitive impairment using the easy Z score imaging system (eZIS) and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) of FDG-PET and SPECT scans. Twenty patients with dementia (12 Alzheimer's disease (AD), 3 diffuse Lewy body disease (DLB), and 2 frontotemporal dementia (FTD)) and twenty with diffuse axonal injury (DAI) and cognitive impairments were studied with FDG-PET and ECD-SPECT. All images were analyzed using eZIS with the same processing procedures, including smoothing, normalization, and z-transformation, and compared to a database of normals. Z score maps were super-imposed on 3D MRI brain images. Group analyses were performed using SPM. Age-related declines in cerebral metabolism and blood flow were observed in the anterior cingulate association area. In contrast, reductions in these cerebral functions correlated best with severity of AD in the posterior cingulate association areas. In DLB and FTD, eZIS analysis of PET and SPECT revealed reductions of cerebral functions in specific areas. DAI showed low metabolism and blood flow in mesiofrontal cortex including the anterior cingulate association area. Dysfunction of the anterior cingulate association area in DAI, which resembled age-related cognitive decline, may be responsible for cognitive impairments. Overall, PET and SPECT scans showed significant correlations according to the type of dementia. Spatially normalized maps contributed to PET and SPECT image interpretation for patients with memory and cognitive impairments because better 3D visualization allowed more objective and systematic investigations. (author)

  14. PET / MRI vs. PET / CT. Indications Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hybrid techniques in Nuclear Medicine is currently a field in full development for diagnosis and treatment of various medical conditions. With the recent advent of PET / MRI much it speculated about whether or not it is superior to PET / CT especially in oncology. The Conference seeks to clarify this situation by dealing issues such as: State of the art technology PET / MRI; Indications Oncology; Some clinical cases. It concludes by explaining the oncological indications of both the real and current situation of the PET / MRI. (author)

  15. Application of the in-beam PET therapy monitoring on precision irradiations with helium ions; Anwendung des in-beam PET Therapiemonitorings auf Praezisionsbestrahlungen mit Helium-Ionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, F.

    2008-02-19

    The main goal of the present dissertation was to extend the in-beam PET method to new ion types. It was shown that the in-beam PET method can also be applied for {sup 3}He irradiations. For this experiments on a {sup 3}He beam were performed. The activity yield is at equal applied dose about three times larger than at {sup 12}C irradiations. The reachable range resolution is smaller than 1 mm. At the irradiation of an inhomogeneous phantom it was shown that a contrast between different materials is resolvable. From the experimentally determined reaction rates cross sections for the reactions leading to positron emitters were performed. The data taken in the {sup 3}He experiments were compared those obtained in carbon-ion experiments as well as literature data for proton irradiations. A comparison with the calculations of the simulation program SHIELD-HIT was performed. A collection of cross-section models and the established requirements for a simulation program applicable for in-beam PET are preparing for further work.

  16. Administered activities of {sup 18}F-FDG PET clinics in pediatrics patients in Brazil- preliminary study; Atividades administradas de {sup 18}F-FDG aos pacientes pediatricos nas clinicas PET no Brasil - estudo preliminar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Cassio Miri, E-mail: cmo@cdtn.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (PCTN/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares; Silva, Teogenes A. da, E-mail: silvata@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Sa, Lidia V. de, E-mail: lidia@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    A survey was conducted among the Brazilian clinical PET, with the purpose of investigating the activities administered to pediatric oncology patients and assess whether significant differences between the protocols adopted. In addition, this survey can cooperate to the suggestion diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in nuclear medicine. Although the methodology for delivering doses by most clinics be based on patient's weight, the results showed variations of up to 191, 6% between the activities administered in clinics, even for similar devices. The average value of the distribution of activities reported was 4.46 {+-} 1,6 MBq /kg. These data demonstrate the need for harmonization and optimization of {sup 18}F-FDG/PET procedures, as well as training for professionals involved in the clinical routine.

  17. Application of 13N-NH3 PET in the evaluation of hypometabolic brain lesions on 18F-FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the usefulness of 13N-NH3 PET in detecting brain lesions which show hypometabolism on 18F-FDG PET. Methods: 13N-NH3 PET imaging was performed for a prospective study in 18 patients with brain lesions that showed hypometabolism compared with normal brain tissue on 18F-FDG PET scans. Fourteen patients underwent 18F-FDG PET imaging for initial diagnosis and 4 patients for detection of astrocytoma recurrence (13 males, 5 females, age 20-68 (42.4 ± 12.6) years). Ten gliomas, 1 metastatic tumor, 1 dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumor (DNT) and 6 non-neoplastic lesions (including 3 cases of radiation necrosis, 2 cases of encephalitic foci, and 1 case of ischemic lesion) were verified by histopathological examination (n=13) or clinical follow-up (n=5). The tumor-to-contralateral brain tissue ratios (T/C) were calculated by the ROI method. The diagnostic efficacy of 13N-NH3 PET was evaluated. Paired t test and two-sample t test were performed to analyze the differences of T/C between different groups. Results: Seven (5 astrocytomas and 2 glioblastomas) of 12 brain tumors (sensitivity: 58%, 7/12) showed increased 13N-NH3 uptake (higher uptake than the contralateral brain tissue), while 3 low-grade gliomas, 1 metastatic tumor, and 1 DNT showed decreased 13N-NH3 uptake (no uptake or lower uptake than the contralateral brain tissue). The uptake ratio of 13N-NH3 was significantly higher than that of 18F-FDG (1.24 ± 0.66 vs 0.67 ± 0.24, t=-3.740, P<0.05) in the tumors. All six non-neoplastic lesions showed decreased 13N-NH3 uptake (specificity: 6/6). The T/C ratios of 18F-FDG and 13N-NH3 in the non-neoplastic lesions were 0.68 ±0.15 and 0.70 ±0.19, respectively, and there was no significant difference between them (t=-0.246, P>0.05). The T/C ratio of 13N-NH3 in the tumors was significantly higher than that in the non-neoplastic lesions (1.24 ± 0.53 vs 0.70 ± 0.19, t=2.624, P<0.05). Conclusion: 13N-NH3 PET imaging may be helpful to detect and

  18. A novel metric for quantification of homogeneous and heterogeneous tumors in PET for enhanced clinical outcome prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmim, Arman; Schmidtlein, C. Ross; Jackson, Andrew; Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Marcus, Charles; Ashrafinia, Saeed; Soltani, Madjid; Subramaniam, Rathan M.

    2016-01-01

    Oncologic PET images provide valuable information that can enable enhanced prognosis of disease. Nonetheless, such information is simplified significantly in routine clinical assessment to meet workflow constraints. Examples of typical FDG PET metrics include: (i) SUVmax, (2) total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and (3) metabolic tumor volume (MTV). We have derived and implemented a novel metric for tumor quantification, inspired in essence by a model of generalized equivalent uniform dose as used in radiation therapy. The proposed metric, denoted generalized effective total uptake (gETU), is attractive as it encompasses the abovementioned commonly invoked metrics, and generalizes them, for both homogeneous and heterogeneous tumors, using a single parameter a. We evaluated this new metric for improved overall survival (OS) prediction on two different baseline FDG PET/CT datasets: (a) 113 patients with squamous cell cancer of the oropharynx, and (b) 72 patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed, where the subjects were subdivided into two groups using the median threshold, from which the hazard ratios (HR) were computed in Cox proportional hazards regression. For the oropharyngeal cancer dataset, MTV, TLG, SUVmax, SUVmean and SUVpeak produced HR values of 1.86, 3.02, 1.34, 1.36 and 1.62, while the proposed gETU metric for a  = 0.25 (greater emphasis on volume information) enabled significantly enhanced OS prediction with HR  =  3.94. For the pancreatic cancer dataset, MTV, TLG, SUVmax, SUVmean and SUVpeak resulted in HR values of 1.05, 1.25, 1.42, 1.45 and 1.52, while gETU at a  = 3.2 (greater emphasis on SUV information) arrived at an improved HR value of 1.61. Overall, the proposed methodology allows placement of differing degrees of emphasis on tumor volume versus uptake for different types of tumors to enable enhanced clinical outcome prediction.

  19. Feasibility study for PET - The right choice for establishing PET in emerging countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: PET represents a new step forward in evaluating function of internal organs and has proven to be very useful in Oncology, Cardiology, Neurology and in the field of infection and inflammation. In response to growing interest in the PET technology IAEA Department of the Technical Cooperation and the Institute of Pathophysiology and Nuclear Medicine from Skopje, Macedonia initiated a feasibility study for evaluation of local conditions for PET implementation in Macedonia as a part of the new project cycle (2007-2009). This paper potentially will be contribute to the challenges of establishing PET in emerging countries, because Macedonia is a part of the Members States who are still in the planning stage of acquiring clinical PET. For the purposes of this feasibility study, ''Importance of establishing PET facilities in Republic of Macedonia'' several options were evaluated, and the workframe were created. The main points of this study are: - to create a strategy for the provision of positron emission tomography in the country, including Basic principles of PET, Clinical application of PET and International status of PET; - to evaluate the current status in Macedonia and relevant health statistics for the project; - to indicate all recommendation for the further evaluation (technological and scientific issues, raw materials and supplier); - economic evaluation of diagnostic imaging technologies, including price of PET and costeffectiveness analysis; - to analyze location, infrastructural and environmental conditions, work space, organization and overhead costs; - to create the implementation scheduling and the budget for the project with financial analysis and investment evaluation; - to see current problems and their solutions; - to evaluate optimal clinical indications for PET imaging; - to estimate reimbursement for PET. Conclusion: the importance of this feasibility study is: - to show the interest for the PET implementation in republic of Macedonia

  20. Clinical impact of [18F]FDG-PET in patients with suspected recurrent breast cancer based on asymptomatically elevated tumor marker serum levels. A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the impact of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) on the detection of recurrent breast cancer based on asymptomatically elevated tumor markers levels. Whole-body FDG-PET was performed in 30 patients with suspected recurrent breast cancer and asymptomatic tumor marker increase but negative or equivocal other imaging modality results. A blood sample was drawn in each case for marker assay (CA 15-3 and CEA) on the same day as the FDG-PET. All of these 30 asymptomatic patients had either CA 15-3>32 U/ml or CEA>5 ng/ml. The final diagnosis of recurrent breast cancer was established by operation/biopsy histopathological findings or clinical follow-up for >1 year by additional morphological imaging techniques. Among the 30 patients, the final diagnosis of recurrent breast cancer was established in 38 sites in 28 patients. FDG-PET accurately detected 35/38 sites in 25/28 patients with recurrence. The diagnostic sensitivity and accuracy of FDG-PET in patients with suspected recurrent breast cancer and asymptomatically elevated tumor markers were 96 and 90%, respectively. FDG-PET is a useful technique for detecting recurrent breast cancer suspected from asymptomatically elevated tumor markers levels and has an important clinical impact on the management of these patients. (author)

  1. The clinical value and pitfalls of 18F-fluoroethylcholine PET/CT imaging in the diagnosis of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of 18F-fluoroethylcholine (FECH) PET/CT imaging in the diagnosis of prostate cancer and to investigate its physiological or non-cancerous uptake. Methods: The subjects consisted of 30 patients (age ranged from 56 to 83 years, mean age 61 years) with pathologically confirmed prostate cancer, in whom 18F-FECH and 18F-FDG PET/CT scans were undertaken from October 2009 to December 2011. The sensitivity and accuracy of the two tracers in detecting prostate cancer were compared.SUVmax was obtained for quantitative analysis. χ2 test and t test were used for statistic analysis. Results: Of the 30 patients, 41 lesions presented high uptake in prostate region. The sensitivity and accuracy for diagnosing prostate cancer with 18F-FECH PET/CT were 87.9% (29/33) and 82.9%(34/41), respectively, while the sensitivity and accuracy with 18F-FDG PET/CT were 36.4% (12/33) and 36.6% (15/41), respectively. There were significant differences in sensitivity and accuracy between the two methods (χ2=8.1 and 11.1, both P<0.05). Physiological uptake appeared in the liver, pancreas, spleen, salivary gland, and also, owing to renal excretion,in the urinary tract. The SUVmax in liver and pancreas were 10.1 ± 1.6 and 6.1 ± 1.1, respectively. The SUVmax was 6.0 ± 2.2 in prostate cancer, while it was 2.6 ± 1.3 in benign lesions (t=2.9, P<0.05). Other abnormalities that were not related to prostate cancer were detected in 10 patients. Of these 10 patients, there were 6 with inflammation, 1 with lymphoma, 1 with tuberculosis, 1 with lung cancer and 1 with germinoma in pineal body. Conclusions: 18F-FECH PET/CT is promising for diagnosis of prostate cancer.Understanding the biodistribution and pitfalls of 18F-FECH is very important for image interpretation. (authors)

  2. Clinical Utility of 4D FDG-PET/CT Scans in Radiation Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aristophanous, Michalis, E-mail: maristophanous@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Berbeco, Ross I.; Killoran, Joseph H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Yap, Jeffrey T. [Department of Radiology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Sher, David J.; Allen, Aaron M.; Larson, Elysia; Chen, Aileen B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The potential role of four-dimensional (4D) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in radiation treatment planning, relative to standard three-dimensional (3D) PET/CT, was examined. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with non-small-cell lung cancer had sequential 3D and 4D [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT scans in the treatment position prior to radiation therapy. The gross tumor volume and involved lymph nodes were contoured on the PET scan by use of three different techniques: manual contouring by an experienced radiation oncologist using a predetermined protocol; a technique with a constant threshold of standardized uptake value (SUV) greater than 2.5; and an automatic segmentation technique. For each technique, the tumor volume was defined on the 3D scan (VOL3D) and on the 4D scan (VOL4D) by combining the volume defined on each of the five breathing phases individually. The range of tumor motion and the location of each lesion were also recorded, and their influence on the differences observed between VOL3D and VOL4D was investigated. Results: We identified and analyzed 22 distinct lesions, including 9 primary tumors and 13 mediastinal lymph nodes. Mean VOL4D was larger than mean VOL3D with all three techniques, and the difference was statistically significant (p < 0.01). The range of tumor motion and the location of the tumor affected the magnitude of the difference. For one case, all three tumor definition techniques identified volume of moderate uptake of approximately 1 mL in the hilar region on the 4D scan (SUV maximum, 3.3) but not on the 3D scan (SUV maximum, 2.3). Conclusions: In comparison to 3D PET, 4D PET may better define the full physiologic extent of moving tumors and improve radiation treatment planning for lung tumors. In addition, reduction of blurring from free-breathing images may reveal additional information regarding regional disease.

  3. Utility of PET-CT in coronary artery diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron Emission tomography (PET) is a powerful noninvasive technique to study function of cellular and biochemical processes of living being since more than three decades. It started as an investigative tool to probe cardiac physiologic processes such as myocardial perfusion, metabolism, neuronal innervation and receptor function. In the beginning, PET myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) was used for assessment of coronary blood flow in research applications or for assessment of living or dead myocytes (i.e myocardial viability) or to guide clinical management in high risk patients. Over the last decade, there is a paradigm shift in use of PET MPI for routine clinical evaluation of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Presently, this procedure is done not only in large academic institutions but also at the community hospitals of USA. The factors contributing to this shift in use of PET MPI including the exponential growth and availability of combined PET/CT systems which were driven primarily by imaging for cancer, easy availability of generator produced radiotracer like 82 Rubidium(Rb), changes in reimbursement in USA and the increasing clinical evidence supporting the value of PET/CT MPI. This brief lecture will focus on PET radiotracers in CAD evaluation, quantitative myocardial blood flow measurement, viability assessment and PET/CT MPI applications. (author)

  4. The progression of PET/CT in pediatric malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET/CT has become a major mean for discriminating benign and malignant tumors, finding the primary tumor, staging, restaging, evaluating the response of treatment,predicting the survivors and guiding the operation, radiotherapy, chemotherapy in adults since it was applied in clinic,but it has been rarely applied in children. There exists some difference between internal and overseas in the application of PET/CT in pediatric malignant tumors based on the relative literatures analysis. It is related to the low level of medical radionuclides knowledge and lack of the knowledge about the application of PET/CT in pediatric malignant tumors, and all of these induce less carry out of the pediatric PET/CT imaging, lack of the experience, eventually form a vicious circle. This article mainly described the above two aspects, in order to promote the application of PET/CT in pediatric malignant tumors. (authors)

  5. Cardiovascular hybrid imaging using PET/MRI; Kardiovaskulaere Hybridbildgebung mit PET/MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nensa, Felix; Schlosser, Thomas [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie und Neuroradiologie

    2014-12-15

    The following overview provides a summary of the state of the art and research as well as potential clinical applications of cardiovascular PET/MR imaging. PET/MRI systems have been clinically available for a few years, and their use in cardiac imaging has been successfully demonstrated. At this period in time, some of the technical difficulties that arose at the beginning have been solved; in particular with respect to MRI-based attenuation correction, caution should be exercised with PET quantification. In addition, many promising technical options are still in the developmental stage, such as MRI-based motion correction of PET data resulting from simultaneous MR acquisition, and are not yet available for cardiovascular imaging. On the other hand, PET/MRI has been used to demonstrate significant pathologies such as acute and chronic myocardial infarction, myocarditis or cardiac sarcoidosis; future applications in clinical routine or within studies appear to be possible. In coming years additional studies will have to be performed to prove diagnostic gain at a reasonable cost-benefit ratio before valid conclusions are possible regarding the clinical utility and future of cardiovascular PET/MR imaging.

  6. Clinical Application of Point Diji

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    栾继萍

    2004-01-01

    @@ Diji (SP 8) is a cleft point of the Spleen Channel of Foot-Taiyang. Its indications include abdominal pain, diarrhea, edema, dysmenorrhea and certain other symptoms caused by incoordination between the liver and the spleen. Either taking the point alone or together with some other adjunct points in clinical practice, the author has obtained satisfactory curative effects.

  7. Preoperative imaging of charcot neuroarthropathy. Does the additional application of {sup 18}F-FDG-PET make sense?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoepfner, S. [Abt. fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Giessen und Marburg, Standort Giessen (Germany); Krolak, C. [Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie, Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Kessler, S. [Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Tiling, R. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    With about 4 million diabetics in Germany and presumed inclination over the following years the treatment of diabetic complications like diabetic foot will become an even more important point. The management of Charcot's foot has undergone fundamental change in the last few years. Formerly, treatment was almost exclusively limited to non surgical measures; since the late 1990's, however, current practice has shifted to early, stage-appropriate surgical therapy. The aim of the present prospective study was to investigate the value of positron emission tomography (PET) in the pre-operative work-up of Charcot's foot. PET were compared to magnetic resonance tomography (MRI). Patients, methods: MRI and PET imaging were used as part of the preoperative work-up in 18 patients with Type II diabetes mellitus. The diagnosis of Charcot's foot requiring surgical treatment were made on the basis of clinical and radiologic criteria. Results: of 46 Charcot's lesions confirmed at surgery, 44 and 35 were detected by means of PET and MRI, respectively. PET can be used in the work-up of patients with metal implants where the MRI does not show adequate findings. PET shows the areas of detritus formation exhibit only moderately increased glucose metabolism and at visual interpretation do not usually impress as typical for acute osteomyelitis. Average SUV values stood at 1.2 (range: 0.5-2.9). Conclusions: the differentiation between Charcot's lesions and floride osteomyelitis provides the surgeon with important additional information, which is often unavailable from MRI. Because of this important additional data, PET could be considered preferable to morphologic imaging (CT, projection radiography) in the preoperative work-up of Charcot's foot. (orig.)

  8. Impact of 11C-choline PET/CT on clinical decision making in recurrent prostate cancer: results from a retrospective two-centre trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this retrospective two-centre study was to investigate the clinical impact of 11C-choline PET/CT on treatment management decisions in patients with recurrent prostate cancer (rPCa) after radical therapy. Enrolled in this retrospective study were 150 patients (95 from Bologna, 55 from Wuerzburg) with rPCa and biochemical relapse (PSA mean ± SD 4.3 ± 5.5 ng/mL, range 0.2-39.4 ng/mL) after radical therapy. The intended treatment before PET/CT was salvage radiotherapy of the prostatic bed in 95 patients and palliative androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in 55 patients. The effective clinical impact of 11C-choline PET/CT was rated as major (change in therapeutic approach), minor (same treatment, but modified therapeutic strategy) or none. Multivariate binary logistic regression analysis included PSA level, PSA kinetics, ongoing ADT, Gleason score, TNM, age and time to relapse. Changes in therapy after 11C-choline PET/CT were implemented in 70 of the 150 patients (46.7 %). A major clinical impact was observed in 27 patients (18 %) and a minor clinical impact in 43 (28.7 %). 11C-choline PET/CT was positive in 109 patients (72.7 %) detecting local relapse (prostate bed and/or iliac lymph nodes and/or pararectal lymph nodes) in 64 patients (42.7 %). Distant relapse (paraaortic and/or retroperitoneal lymph nodes and/or bone lesions) was seen in 31 patients (20.7 %), and both local and distant relapse in 14 (9.3 %). A significant difference was observed in PSA level and PSA kinetics between PET-positive and PET-negative patients (p 0.05). In both centres the same criteria to validate PET-positive findings were used: in 17.3 % of patients by histology and in 82.7 % of patients by correlative imaging and/or clinical follow-up (follow-up mean 20.5 months, median 18.3 months, range 6.2-60 months). 11C-Choline PET/CT had a significant impact on therapeutic management in rPCa patients. It led to an overall change in 46.7 % of patients, with a major clinical change

  9. Clinical role of early dynamic FDG-PET/CT for the evaluation of renal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Reiko; Abe, Koichiro; Sakai, Shuji [Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kondo, Tsunenori; Tanabe, Kazunari [Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Department of Urology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    We studied the usefulness of early dynamic (ED) and whole-body (WB) FDG-PET/CT for the evaluation of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). One hundred patients with 107 tumours underwent kidney ED and WB FDG-PET/CT. We visually and semiquantitatively evaluated the FDG accumulation in RCCs in the ED and WB phases, and compared the accumulation values with regard to histological type (clear cell carcinoma [CCC] vs. non-clear cell carcinoma [N-CCC]), the TNM stage (high stage [3-4] vs. low stage [1-2]), the Fuhrman grade (high grade [3-4] vs. low grade [1-2]) and presence versus absence of venous (V) and lymphatic (Ly) invasion. In the ED phase, visual evaluation revealed no significant differences in FDG accumulation in terms of each item. However, the maximum standardized uptake value and tumour-to-normal tissue ratios were significantly higher in the CCCs compared to the N-CCCs (p < 0.001). In the WB phase, in contrast, significantly higher FDG accumulation (p < 0.001) was found in RCCs with a higher TNM stage, higher Furman grade, and the presence of V and Ly invasion in both the visual and the semiquantitative evaluations. ED and WB FDG-PET/CT is a useful tool for the evaluation of RCCs. (orig.)

  10. Clinical Significance of F 18 FP CIT Dual Time Point PET Imaging in Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the diagnostic value of dual time point F 18 FP CIT PET imaging in idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). Twenty four patients with PD (mean age 69.6) and 18 healthy people (mean age 70.26) underwent two sequential PET/CT scans (dual time point imaging) at 90 and 210 min after F 18 FP CIT injection. Tracer activity of region of interest was measured in the caudate, putamen and a reference region in the brain from both time points. The outcome parameter was the striatooccipital ratio (SOR). Normal SOR values were obtained in the control group. The percent change in tracer activity between 90 and 210 min images was calculated. The SOR values and the percent change in tracer activity were compared between the patients and healthy control group. The SOR values for the caudate, anterior and posterior putamen at both 90 and 210 min images were significantly reduced in the patients with PD. The lowest P value was obtained for the anterior and posterior putamen (p<0.001) at both time points. There were significant differences of the percent change in tracer activity for the anterior and posterior putamen in the two groups (p=0.01) F 18 FP CIT PET scans at 90 and 210 min after injection are both able to diagnose PD. Therefore, the 90 min image by itself in sufficient for diagnosing PD.

  11. Impact of fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in the management of patients with cancer and other serious disorders: a clinical case based approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this pictorial review, the impact of FDG-PET is illustrated with specific clinical case examples that would demonstrate the power and promise of this molecular imaging technique in managing a wide variety of disorders. The case vignettes depicted in this communication represent the ones where this modality can be utilized in the routine clinical scenario and can prove substantially beneficial to the patients of cancer and other serious disorders. Related discussions are drawn along with individual cases to enable the readers understand the further prospects of PET that are being explored at the present. (author)

  12. Prognostic value of metabolic parameters and clinical impact of {sup 18}F-fluorocholine PET/CT in biochemical recurrent prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colombie, M.; Bailly, C.; Rusu, D.; Rousseau, N. [Institut de Cancerologie de l' Ouest Rene Gauducheau, Nuclear Medicine, 44805 Nantes-St Herblain Cedex (France); Campion, L. [ICO Cancer Center, Statistics, Saint-Herblain (France); Nantes University, Nantes-Angers Cancer Research Center, INSERM U892-CNRS UMR 6299, Nantes (France); Rousseau, T. [Urologic Clinic Nantes-Atlantis, Saint Herblain (France); Mathieu, C. [University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Nantes (France); Ferrer, L. [ICO Cancer Center, Physics, Saint-Herblain (France); Kraeber-Bodere, F. [Institut de Cancerologie de l' Ouest Rene Gauducheau, Nuclear Medicine, 44805 Nantes-St Herblain Cedex (France); University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Nantes (France); Nantes University, Nantes-Angers Cancer Research Center, INSERM U892-CNRS UMR 6299, Nantes (France); Rousseau, C. [Institut de Cancerologie de l' Ouest Rene Gauducheau, Nuclear Medicine, 44805 Nantes-St Herblain Cedex (France); Nantes University, Nantes-Angers Cancer Research Center, INSERM U892-CNRS UMR 6299, Nantes (France)

    2015-11-15

    To evaluate the therapeutic impact of {sup 18}F-fluorocholine (FCH) PET/CT in biochemical recurrent prostate cancer (PC) and to investigate the value of quantitative FCH PET/CT parameters in predicting progression-free survival (PFS). This retrospective study included 172 consecutive patients with PC who underwent FCH PET/CT for biochemical recurrence. Mean rising PSA was 10.7 ± 35.0 ng/ml. Patients with positive FCH PET were classified into three groups: those with uptake only in the prostatic bed, those with locoregional disease, and those with distant metastases. Referring physicians were asked to indicate the hypothetical therapeutic strategy with and without the FCH PET/CT results. Clinical variables and PET parameters including SUVmax, SUVpeak, SUVmean, total lesion choline kinase activity (TLCKA) and standardized added metabolic activity (SAM) were recorded and a multivariate analysis was performed to determine the factors independently predicting PFS. In 137 of the 172 patients, the FCH PET/CT scan was positive, and of these, 29.9 % (41/137) had prostatic recurrence, 42.3 % (58/137) had pelvic lymph node recurrence with or without prostatic recurrence, and 27.7 % (38/137) had distant metastases. The FCH PET/CT result led to a change in treatment plan in 43.6 % (75/172) of the 172 patients. Treatment was changed in 49.6 % (68/137) of those with a positive FCH PET/CT scan and in 20 % (7/35) of those with a negative FCH PET/CT scan. After a median follow-up of 29.3 months (95 % CI 18.9 - 45.9 months), according to multivariate analysis age <70 years, SAM ≥23 and SUVmean ≥3 were parameters independently predicting PFS. A nomogram constructed using the three parameters showed 49 months of PFS in patients with the best scores (0 or 1) and only 11 months in patients with a poor score (score 3). This study indicates that a positive FCH PET result in PC patients with biochemical recurrence predicts a shorter PFS and confirms the major impact of the FCH PET

  13. Prognostic value of metabolic parameters and clinical impact of 18F-fluorocholine PET/CT in biochemical recurrent prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the therapeutic impact of 18F-fluorocholine (FCH) PET/CT in biochemical recurrent prostate cancer (PC) and to investigate the value of quantitative FCH PET/CT parameters in predicting progression-free survival (PFS). This retrospective study included 172 consecutive patients with PC who underwent FCH PET/CT for biochemical recurrence. Mean rising PSA was 10.7 ± 35.0 ng/ml. Patients with positive FCH PET were classified into three groups: those with uptake only in the prostatic bed, those with locoregional disease, and those with distant metastases. Referring physicians were asked to indicate the hypothetical therapeutic strategy with and without the FCH PET/CT results. Clinical variables and PET parameters including SUVmax, SUVpeak, SUVmean, total lesion choline kinase activity (TLCKA) and standardized added metabolic activity (SAM) were recorded and a multivariate analysis was performed to determine the factors independently predicting PFS. In 137 of the 172 patients, the FCH PET/CT scan was positive, and of these, 29.9 % (41/137) had prostatic recurrence, 42.3 % (58/137) had pelvic lymph node recurrence with or without prostatic recurrence, and 27.7 % (38/137) had distant metastases. The FCH PET/CT result led to a change in treatment plan in 43.6 % (75/172) of the 172 patients. Treatment was changed in 49.6 % (68/137) of those with a positive FCH PET/CT scan and in 20 % (7/35) of those with a negative FCH PET/CT scan. After a median follow-up of 29.3 months (95 % CI 18.9 - 45.9 months), according to multivariate analysis age <70 years, SAM ≥23 and SUVmean ≥3 were parameters independently predicting PFS. A nomogram constructed using the three parameters showed 49 months of PFS in patients with the best scores (0 or 1) and only 11 months in patients with a poor score (score 3). This study indicates that a positive FCH PET result in PC patients with biochemical recurrence predicts a shorter PFS and confirms the major impact of the FCH PET result on

  14. Clinical application of fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of treatments and clinical experiments with neutrons (from a medical d+T neutron generator with an output of 1012 neutrons per second) are reported and discussed. Data on RBE values are presented after single doses and multiple fractions of neutrons and 60Co-gamma rays on pulmonary metastases. The results of pilot studies on head and neck tumours, brain tumours and pelvic tumours are discussed. The accuracy of the calculated dose is tested with some in-vivo experiments during neutron irradiation of the pelvis. Estimations of RBE values for tumour control, skin damage and intestinal damage after fractionated neutron therapy are dealt with and the results obtained in treatment of sarcomas are discussed. The preliminary results are given of some clinical trials in Amsterdam. Also some data from other centres are reviewed. From these data some remarks about the future of neutron therapy are made. (Auth.)

  15. Application of separable parameter space techniques to multi-tracer PET compartment modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jeff L.; Morey, A. Michael; Kadrmas, Dan J.

    2016-02-01

    Multi-tracer positron emission tomography (PET) can image two or more tracers in a single scan, characterizing multiple aspects of biological functions to provide new insights into many diseases. The technique uses dynamic imaging, resulting in time-activity curves that contain contributions from each tracer present. The process of separating and recovering separate images and/or imaging measures for each tracer requires the application of kinetic constraints, which are most commonly applied by fitting parallel compartment models for all tracers. Such multi-tracer compartment modeling presents challenging nonlinear fits in multiple dimensions. This work extends separable parameter space kinetic modeling techniques, previously developed for fitting single-tracer compartment models, to fitting multi-tracer compartment models. The multi-tracer compartment model solution equations were reformulated to maximally separate the linear and nonlinear aspects of the fitting problem, and separable least-squares techniques were applied to effectively reduce the dimensionality of the nonlinear fit. The benefits of the approach are then explored through a number of illustrative examples, including characterization of separable parameter space multi-tracer objective functions and demonstration of exhaustive search fits which guarantee the true global minimum to within arbitrary search precision. Iterative gradient-descent algorithms using Levenberg-Marquardt were also tested, demonstrating improved fitting speed and robustness as compared to corresponding fits using conventional model formulations. The proposed technique overcomes many of the challenges in fitting simultaneous multi-tracer PET compartment models.

  16. Region specific optimization of continuous linear attenuation coefficients based on UTE (RESOLUTE): application to PET/MR brain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladefoged, Claes N.; Benoit, Didier; Law, Ian; Holm, Søren; Kjær, Andreas; Højgaard, Liselotte; Hansen, Adam E.; Andersen, Flemming L.

    2015-10-01

    The reconstruction of PET brain data in a PET/MR hybrid scanner is challenging in the absence of transmission sources, where MR images are used for MR-based attenuation correction (MR-AC). The main challenge of MR-AC is to separate bone and air, as neither have a signal in traditional MR images, and to assign the correct linear attenuation coefficient to bone. The ultra-short echo time (UTE) MR sequence was proposed as a basis for MR-AC as this sequence shows a small signal in bone. The purpose of this study was to develop a new clinically feasible MR-AC method with patient specific continuous-valued linear attenuation coefficients in bone that provides accurate reconstructed PET image data. A total of 164 [18F]FDG PET/MR patients were included in this study, of which 10 were used for training. MR-AC was based on either standard CT (reference), UTE or our method (RESOLUTE). The reconstructed PET images were evaluated in the whole brain, as well as regionally in the brain using a ROI-based analysis. Our method segments air, brain, cerebral spinal fluid, and soft tissue voxels on the unprocessed UTE TE images, and uses a mapping of R2* values to CT Hounsfield Units (HU) to measure the density in bone voxels. The average error of our method in the brain was 0.1% and less than 1.2% in any region of the brain. On average 95% of the brain was within  ±10% of PETCT, compared to 72% when using UTE. The proposed method is clinically feasible, reducing both the global and local errors on the reconstructed PET images, as well as limiting the number and extent of the outliers.

  17. Cyclotron/PET project in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Positron Computed Tomography (PET) is a tri dimensional image technique which shows biochemical information. PET is used in neurology and cardiology diseases. The National Center Cyclotron PET has been found to research, development and health science applications.

  18. An observational study of the potential for human exposures to pet-borne diazinon residues following lawn applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examined the potential for pet dogs to be an important pathway for transporting diazinon residues into homes and onto its occupants following residential lawn applications. The primary objectives were to investigate the potential exposures of occupants and their pet dogs to diazinon after an application to turf at their residences and to determine if personal contacts between occupants and their pet dogs resulted in measurable exposures. It was conducted from April to August 2001 before the Agency phased out all residential uses of diazinon in December 2004. Six families and their pet dogs were recruited into the study. Monitoring was conducted at pre-, 1, 2, 4, and 8 days post-application of a commercial, granular formulation of diazinon to the lawn by the homeowner. Environmental samples collected included soil, indoor air, carpet dust, and transferable residues from lawns and floors. Samples collected from the pet dogs consisted of paw wipes, fur clippings, and transferable residues from the fur by a technician or child wearing a cotton glove(s). First morning void (FMV) urine samples were collected from each child and his/her parent on each sampling day. Diazinon was analyzed in all samples, except urine, by GC-MS. The metabolite 2-isopropyl-4-methyl-6-hydroxypyrimidine (IMPy) was analyzed in the urine samples by HPLC-MS/MS. Mean airborne residues of diazinon on day 1 post-application were at least six times higher in both the living rooms (235±267 ng/m3) and children's bedrooms (179±246 ng/m3) than at pre-application. Mean loadings of diazinon in carpet dust samples were at least 20 times greater on days 2, 4, and 8 post-application than mean loadings (0.03±0.04 ng/cm2) at pre-application. The pet dogs had over 900 times higher mean loadings of diazinon residues on their paws on day 1 post-application (88.1±100.1 ng/cm2) compared to mean loadings (2) at pre-application. The mean diazinon loadings on the fur clippings were at least 14 times

  19. Developments of large-area APD arrays for future applications to PET technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon avalanche photodiodes (APD) are solid-state devices which have internal gain. Since the good features of both photodiodes (PDs) and photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) are shared in a single device, APD offers new design for physics experiments and devices for nuclear medicine. In particular, thanks to its high quantum efficiency (QE) and low noise, reverse-type APDs generally show much better energy resolution than traditional PMTs when coupled to various scintillators. Most recently, we have developed various large area reverse-type APDs with Hamamatsu Photonics, up to 32 x 32 mm2 square area. Such large dimensions have been awaited by researchers world-wide, and further extend the potential of APDs for various application such as in space science and nuclear medicine. For example, the use of APDs in space experiments is now validated thanks to successful launch of the Cute 1.7+APD II, which has measured both electron/proton distributions in Low Earth Orbit at E >9 keV. Moreover, the mission successfully demonstrated an active gain control system to keep the APD gain stable under moderate temperature variations. In other aspects, an APD is a compact, high performance light sensor that could be used in the strong magnetic field MRIs. An ultimate spatial resolution as better as sub-mm will be possible by adopting small pixel, high density APD pixels. Future PET detectors with time-of-flight (TOF) capability may be expected thanks to very fast time response of the APD devices. As a first step, we have developed a versatile APD-based positron emission tomography (PET) modules for future applications in high resolution, fast medical imaging. We will also discuss future use of digital (Geiger-mode) APDs, such as multi-pixel photon counter (MPPCs) in similar medical imaging applications. (author)

  20. Proton radiography for clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamonti, C., E-mail: cinzia.talamonti@unifi.i [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Reggioli, V. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Bruzzi, M. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via S. Marta 3, I-50139 Firenze (Italy); Bucciolini, M. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Civinini, C. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Marrazzo, L. [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Menichelli, D. [INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Finland) (Italy); Dipartimento di Energetica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, via S. Marta 3, I-50139 Firenze (Italy); Pallotta, S. [Dipartimento di Fisiopatologia Clinica, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); INFN, sezione di Firenze, via G. Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, v.le Morgagni 85, I-50134 Firenze (Italy); Randazzo, N. [INFN, sezione di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Sipala, V. [INFN, sezione di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Catania, via S. Sofia 64, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

    2010-01-11

    Proton imaging is not yet applied as a clinical routine, although its advantages have been demonstrated. In the context of quality assurance in proton therapy, proton images can be used to verify the correct positioning of the patient and to control the range of protons. Proton computed tomography (pCT) is a 3D imaging method appropriate for planning and verification of proton radiation treatments, because it allows evaluating the distributions of proton stopping power within the tissues and can be directly utilized when the patient is in the actual treatment position. The aim of the PRoton IMAging experiment, supported by INFN, and the PRIN 2006 project, supported by MIUR, is to realize a proton computed radiography (pCR) prototype for reconstruction of proton images from a single projection in order to validate the technique with pre-clinical studies and, eventually, to conceive the configuration of a complete pCT system. A preliminary experiment performed at the 250 MeV proton synchrotron of Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) allowed acquisition of experimental data before the completion of PRIMA project's prototype. In this paper, the results of the LLUMC experiment are reported and the reconstruction of proton images of two phantoms is discussed.

  1. Proton radiography for clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton imaging is not yet applied as a clinical routine, although its advantages have been demonstrated. In the context of quality assurance in proton therapy, proton images can be used to verify the correct positioning of the patient and to control the range of protons. Proton computed tomography (pCT) is a 3D imaging method appropriate for planning and verification of proton radiation treatments, because it allows evaluating the distributions of proton stopping power within the tissues and can be directly utilized when the patient is in the actual treatment position. The aim of the PRoton IMAging experiment, supported by INFN, and the PRIN 2006 project, supported by MIUR, is to realize a proton computed radiography (pCR) prototype for reconstruction of proton images from a single projection in order to validate the technique with pre-clinical studies and, eventually, to conceive the configuration of a complete pCT system. A preliminary experiment performed at the 250 MeV proton synchrotron of Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) allowed acquisition of experimental data before the completion of PRIMA project's prototype. In this paper, the results of the LLUMC experiment are reported and the reconstruction of proton images of two phantoms is discussed.

  2. Cranial MRI: Current clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human MR images were first published by the Nottingham group in 1980. Since that time, there have been steady improvements in image quality and significant reductions in imaging time. After initial studies by the Hammersmith group in London, investigators at UCSF published studies comparing CT with MR, clearly demonstrating the higher sensitivity of MR to pathologic intracranial processes. Since that time, several investigators have demonstrated the efficacy of MR in the evaluation of a wide range of intracranial pathologic processes, including neoplasms, demyelinating disease, trauma, and congenital abnormalities. In the authors' studies comparing MR with CT in 400 consecutive cases of suspected CNS pathology, MR detected abnormalities which were not seen on CT in 30 percent of these cases. MR has become established as the imaging modality of choice in the evaluation of a broad range of CNS abnormalities and is rapidly being implemented not only at university medical centers but also in community hospitals and free-standing clinics. This chapter deals with fundamental principles of MR image interpretation and provides insight into current clinical indications for MR in intracranial disorders

  3. Clinical applications of transient elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyu Sik; Kim, Seung Up

    2012-06-01

    Chronic liver disease represents a major public health problem, accounting for significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. As prognosis and management depend mainly on the amount and progression of liver fibrosis, accurate quantification of liver fibrosis is essential for therapeutic decision-making and follow-up of chronic liver diseases. Even though liver biopsy is the gold standard for evaluation of liver fibrosis, non-invasive methods that could substitute for invasive procedures have been investigated during past decades. Transient elastography (TE, FibroScan®) is a novel non-invasive method for assessment of liver fibrosis with chronic liver disease. TE can be performed in the outpatient clinic with immediate results and excellent reproducibility. Its diagnostic accuracy for assessment of liver fibrosis has been demonstrated in patients with chronic viral hepatitis; as a result, unnecessary liver biopsy could be avoided in some patients. Moreover, due to its excellent patient acceptance, TE could be used for monitoring disease progression or predicting development of liver-related complications. This review aims at discussing the usefulness of TE in clinical practice. PMID:22893866

  4. Treatment planning for heavy ion radiotherapy: clinical implementation and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clinical implementation and application of a novel treatment planning system (TPS) for scanned ion beams is described, which is in clinical use for carbon ion treatments at the German heavy ion facility (GSI). All treatment plans are evaluated on the basis of biologically effective dose distributions. For therapy control, in-beam positron emission tomography (PET) and an online monitoring system for the beam intensity and position are used. The absence of a gantry restricts the treatment plans to horizontal beams. Most of the treatment plans consist of two nearly opposing lateral fields or sometimes orthogonal fields. In only a very few cases a single beam was used. For patients with very complex target volumes lateral and even distal field patching techniques were applied. Additional improvements can be achieved when the patient's head is fixed in a tilted position, in order to achieve sparing of the organs at risk. In order to test the stability of dose distributions in the case of patient misalignments we routinely simulate the effects of misalignments for patients with critical structures next to the target volume. The uncertainties in the range calculation are taken into account by a margin around the target volume of typically 2-3 mm, which can, however, be extended if the simulation demonstrates larger deviations. The novel TPS developed for scanned ion beams was introduced into clinical routine in December 1997 and was used for the treatment planning of 63 patients with head and neck tumours until July 2000. Planning strategies and methods were developed for this tumour location that facilitate the treatment of a larger number of patients with the scanned heavy ion beam in a clinical setting. Further developments aim towards a simultaneous optimization of the treatment field intensities and more effective procedures for the patient set-up. The results demonstrate that ion beams can be integrated into a clinical environment for treatment planning and

  5. Clinical applications of computerized thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbar, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Computerized or digital, thermography is a rapidly growing diagnostic imaging modality. It has superseded contact thermography and analog imaging thermography which do not allow effective quantization. Medical applications of digital thermography can be classified in two groups: static and dynamic imaging. They can also be classified into macro thermography (resolution greater than 1 mm) and micro thermography (resolution less than 100 microns). Both modalities allow a thermal resolution of 0.1 C. The diagnostic power of images produced by any of these modalities can be augmented by the use of digital image enhancement and image recognition procedures. Computerized thermography has been applied in neurology, cardiovascular and plastic surgery, rehabilitation and sports medicine, psychiatry, dermatology and ophthalmology. Examples of these applications are shown and their scope and limitations are discussed.

  6. PET in oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dresel, Stefan (ed.) [HELIOS Klinikum Berlin-Buch, Berlin (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2008-07-01

    In the management of oncologic diseases, modern imaging modalities contribute heavily to the decision of which form of treatment - local or systemic, surgical or interdisciplinary - will be most efficient. The addition of functional image information to conventional staging procedures helps improve the diagnostic pathway. The information needed for therapeutic management and for follow-up can be provided by correlative imaging such as positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) or PET/CT. This book is a comprehensive compilation of the accumulated knowledge on PET and PET/CT in oncology, covering the entire spectrum from solidly documented indications, such as staging and monitoring of lung and colorectal cancer, to the application of PET/CT in head and neck surgery, gynecology, radiation therapy, urology, pediatrics etc. It is aimed at nuclear medicine and radiology specialists as well as physicians interested in the possibilities and limitations of PET and PET/CT in oncology. (orig.)

  7. Performance evaluation of a compact PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system for small animal imaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Qingyang [Department of Electrical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Shi [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Ma, Tianyu, E-mail: maty@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China); Wu, Jing; Liu, Hui; Xu, Tianpeng; Xia, Yan; Fan, Peng; Lyu, Zhenlei; Liu, Yaqiang [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory of Particle & Radiation Imaging (Tsinghua University), Ministry of Education, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-06-21

    PET, SPECT and CT imaging techniques are widely used in preclinical small animal imaging applications. In this paper, we present a compact small animal PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system. A dual-functional, shared detector design is implemented which enables PET and SPECT imaging with a same LYSO ring detector. A multi-pinhole collimator is mounted on the system and inserted into the detector ring in SPECT imaging mode. A cone-beam CT consisting of a micro focus X-ray tube and a CMOS detector is implemented. The detailed design and the performance evaluations are reported in this paper. In PET imaging mode, the measured NEMA based spatial resolution is 2.12 mm (FWHM), and the sensitivity at the central field of view (CFOV) is 3.2%. The FOV size is 50 mm (∅)×100 mm (L). The SPECT has a spatial resolution of 1.32 mm (FWHM) and an average sensitivity of 0.031% at the center axial, and a 30 mm (∅)×90 mm (L) FOV. The CT spatial resolution is 8.32 lp/mm @10%MTF, and the contrast discrimination function value is 2.06% with 1.5 mm size cubic box object. In conclusion, a compact, tri-modality PET/SPECT/CT system was successfully built with low cost and high performance.

  8. Performance evaluation of a compact PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system for small animal imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET, SPECT and CT imaging techniques are widely used in preclinical small animal imaging applications. In this paper, we present a compact small animal PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system. A dual-functional, shared detector design is implemented which enables PET and SPECT imaging with a same LYSO ring detector. A multi-pinhole collimator is mounted on the system and inserted into the detector ring in SPECT imaging mode. A cone-beam CT consisting of a micro focus X-ray tube and a CMOS detector is implemented. The detailed design and the performance evaluations are reported in this paper. In PET imaging mode, the measured NEMA based spatial resolution is 2.12 mm (FWHM), and the sensitivity at the central field of view (CFOV) is 3.2%. The FOV size is 50 mm (∅)×100 mm (L). The SPECT has a spatial resolution of 1.32 mm (FWHM) and an average sensitivity of 0.031% at the center axial, and a 30 mm (∅)×90 mm (L) FOV. The CT spatial resolution is 8.32 lp/mm @10%MTF, and the contrast discrimination function value is 2.06% with 1.5 mm size cubic box object. In conclusion, a compact, tri-modality PET/SPECT/CT system was successfully built with low cost and high performance

  9. Performance evaluation of a compact PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system for small animal imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qingyang; Wang, Shi; Ma, Tianyu; Wu, Jing; Liu, Hui; Xu, Tianpeng; Xia, Yan; Fan, Peng; Lyu, Zhenlei; Liu, Yaqiang

    2015-06-01

    PET, SPECT and CT imaging techniques are widely used in preclinical small animal imaging applications. In this paper, we present a compact small animal PET/SPECT/CT tri-modality system. A dual-functional, shared detector design is implemented which enables PET and SPECT imaging with a same LYSO ring detector. A multi-pinhole collimator is mounted on the system and inserted into the detector ring in SPECT imaging mode. A cone-beam CT consisting of a micro focus X-ray tube and a CMOS detector is implemented. The detailed design and the performance evaluations are reported in this paper. In PET imaging mode, the measured NEMA based spatial resolution is 2.12 mm (FWHM), and the sensitivity at the central field of view (CFOV) is 3.2%. The FOV size is 50 mm (∅)×100 mm (L). The SPECT has a spatial resolution of 1.32 mm (FWHM) and an average sensitivity of 0.031% at the center axial, and a 30 mm (∅)×90 mm (L) FOV. The CT spatial resolution is 8.32 lp/mm @10%MTF, and the contrast discrimination function value is 2.06% with 1.5 mm size cubic box object. In conclusion, a compact, tri-modality PET/SPECT/CT system was successfully built with low cost and high performance.

  10. Lubiprostone: Clinical applications beyond constipation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shailendra Kapoor

    2009-01-01

    In comparison to polyethylene glycol, lubiprostone offers other advantages and is increasingly being used as an adjunctive agent in diagnostic as well as management strategies not only in gastroenterology,but in other fields. For instance, lubiprostone exerts beneficial effects in cystic fibrosis tissues. It augmernts the chloride secretion in these cells by activating non-cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) secretion of chloride by afflicted respiratory epithelia.Lubiprostone also seems to improve visualization of the gastrointestinal tract during procedures such as colonoscopy. This is especially true if the lubiprostone is administered prior to bowel cleansing with agents such as polyethylene glycol electrolyte (PEG-E).Lubiprostone also enhances and stimulates contraction in colonic as well as gastric muscles and may thus further contribute as a prokinetic agent. Besides these effects, lubiprostone also causes hyperpolarization in other tissues such as uterine muscle cells. This may prove to be of significant clinical benefit in the management of uterine pathologies in the near future.

  11. Clinical application of percutaneous nephrostomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value and safety of percutaneous nephrostomy(PCN) in patients with obstruction of renal uremia. Methods: X-ray or CT-guided PCN by using Seldinger's technique was performed in 65 patients (85 kidneys), among of them, 40 patients had hydronephtosis because of invading or oppression of tumors, and 25 patients with calcul would undergo pcrcutaneous nephrostolithotomy (PCNL). Results: The success rate of puncture was 95% at first attempt and 100% after regulate of puncture needle. The improvement of renal function was marked in the patients with hydronephrosis after drainage and PCNL was finished successfully in the patients with calcul, No severe complications occurred. Conclusion: PCN is a safe and effective procedure for patients with obstructive uropathy and has important role in improving of renal functiong and building access for PCNL. (authors)

  12. Clinical applications of hepatocyte transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giada Pietrosi; Giovanni Battista Vizzini; Salvatore Gruttadauria; Bruno Gridelli

    2009-01-01

    The shortage of organ donors is a problem worldwide, with approximately 15% of adult patients with lifethreatening liver diseases dying while on the waiting list. The use of cell transplantation for liver disease is an attempt to correct metabolic defects, or to support liver function as a bridge to liver transplantation and, as such, has raised a number of expectations. Most of the available studies briefly reported here focus on adult hepatocyte transplantation (HT), and the results are neither reproducible nor comparable, because the means of infusion, amount of injected cells and clinical variability differ among the studies. To better understand the specific role of HT in the management of end-stage liver disease, it is important that controlled studies, designed on the principles of evidence-based medicine, be done in order to guarantee the reproducibility of results.

  13. Stenting:84 Cases of Clinical Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUANG Yongsong

    2002-01-01

    Objective To evaluate clinical application of therapeutic stenting. Methods 84 cases were managed with stents clinically, 136 procedures of intervention in all. The cases were suffering from portal hypertension of cirrhosis, stricture of inferior vana cava, superior vana cava syndrome, post- operative esophageal stricture, narrowig of femoral, common carotid, renal, superior mesentery arteries and biliary tract, etc. Results Therapeutic stenting achieves clinical effects completely different from conventional intemal medicine and surgery. Conclusion Therapeutic stenting is clinically unique, dramatically effective, with minor risks and worthy promoting.

  14. Is {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT indicated in patients with clinical, biochemical or radiological suspicion of neuroendocrine tumour?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosini, Valentina [S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria di Bologna, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi, Nuclear Medicine, Pad 30, Bologna (Italy); Campana, Davide; Tomassetti, Paola [S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Internal Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Nanni, Cristina; Cambioli, Silvia; Fanti, Stefano [S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Nuclear Medicine, Bologna (Italy); Rubello, Domenico [Ospedale S. Maria della Misericordia, Nuclear Medicine, Rovigo (Italy)

    2012-08-15

    In recent years, {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-peptides positron emission tomography (PET)/CT has been increasingly used to study patients with neuroendocrine tumours (NET). However, performing specialized examinations in the appropriate contest is mandatory for both medical and economic reasons. The aim of the study is to evaluate the potential usefulness of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT in patients with suspected NET. Among the patients undergoing {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT at our centre, we reviewed those studied for suspected NET based on the presence of either clinical signs/symptoms or imaging or raised biochemical markers or a combination of these conditions. PET/CT results were compared with clinical and imaging follow-up of at least 1 year or pathology. Overall 131 suspected NET cases were included. The most common condition considered suspicious for NET was the increase of blood markers (66), followed by inconclusive findings at conventional imaging (CI, 41), clinical signs/symptoms (10), equivocal {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET (7) or somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS, 4), or a combination of the above (3). PET/CT results were true-positive in 17 cases, true-negative in 112 and false-negative in 2 (overall sensitivity 89.5 %, specificity 100 %). Interestingly, increased blood markers and clinical signs/symptoms were associated with the lowest frequency of true-positive findings (1/66 and 1/10, respectively), while CI findings were confirmed in one third of the cases (13/41). Overall, the incidence of NET in the studied population was 14.5 % (19/131). Our data confirm the good accuracy (98 %) of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT in NET lesion detection. However, our results also suggest that {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT may not be routinely recommended in patients with a suspicion of NET based on the mere detection of increased blood markers or clinical symptoms. Positive CI alone or in association with clinical/biochemical findings is on the contrary associated with

  15. Is 68Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT indicated in patients with clinical, biochemical or radiological suspicion of neuroendocrine tumour?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, 68Ga-DOTA-peptides positron emission tomography (PET)/CT has been increasingly used to study patients with neuroendocrine tumours (NET). However, performing specialized examinations in the appropriate contest is mandatory for both medical and economic reasons. The aim of the study is to evaluate the potential usefulness of 68Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT in patients with suspected NET. Among the patients undergoing 68Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT at our centre, we reviewed those studied for suspected NET based on the presence of either clinical signs/symptoms or imaging or raised biochemical markers or a combination of these conditions. PET/CT results were compared with clinical and imaging follow-up of at least 1 year or pathology. Overall 131 suspected NET cases were included. The most common condition considered suspicious for NET was the increase of blood markers (66), followed by inconclusive findings at conventional imaging (CI, 41), clinical signs/symptoms (10), equivocal 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET (7) or somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS, 4), or a combination of the above (3). PET/CT results were true-positive in 17 cases, true-negative in 112 and false-negative in 2 (overall sensitivity 89.5 %, specificity 100 %). Interestingly, increased blood markers and clinical signs/symptoms were associated with the lowest frequency of true-positive findings (1/66 and 1/10, respectively), while CI findings were confirmed in one third of the cases (13/41). Overall, the incidence of NET in the studied population was 14.5 % (19/131). Our data confirm the good accuracy (98 %) of 68Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT in NET lesion detection. However, our results also suggest that 68Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT may not be routinely recommended in patients with a suspicion of NET based on the mere detection of increased blood markers or clinical symptoms. Positive CI alone or in association with clinical/biochemical findings is on the contrary associated with a higher probability of true

  16. Measuring serotonin synthesis: from conventional methods to PET tracers and their (pre)clinical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The serotonergic system of the brain is complex, with an extensive innervation pattern covering all brain regions and endowed with at least 15 different receptors (each with their particular distribution patterns), specific reuptake mechanisms and synthetic processes. Many aspects of the functioning of the serotonergic system are still unclear, partially because of the difficulty of measuring physiological processes in the living brain. In this review we give an overview of the conventional methods of measuring serotonin synthesis and methods using positron emission tomography (PET) tracers, more specifically with respect to serotonergic function in affective disorders. Conventional methods are invasive and do not directly measure synthesis rates. Although they may give insight into turnover rates, a more direct measurement may be preferred. PET is a noninvasive technique which can trace metabolic processes, like serotonin synthesis. Tracers developed for this purpose are α-[11C]methyltryptophan ([11C]AMT) and 5-hydroxy-L-[β-11C]tryptophan ([11C]5-HTP). Both tracers have advantages and disadvantages. [11C]AMT can enter the kynurenine pathway under inflammatory conditions (and thus provide a false signal), but this tracer has been used in many studies leading to novel insights regarding antidepressant action. [11C]5-HTP is difficult to produce, but trapping of this compound may better represent serotonin synthesis. AMT and 5-HTP kinetics are differently affected by tryptophan depletion and changes of mood. This may indicate that both tracers are associated with different enzymatic processes. In conclusion, PET with radiolabelled substrates for the serotonergic pathway is the only direct way to detect changes of serotonin synthesis in the living brain. (orig.)

  17. Measuring serotonin synthesis: from conventional methods to PET tracers and their (pre)clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, Anniek K.D.; Waarde, Aren van; Willemsen, Antoon T.M. [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); Bosker, Fokko J. [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, University Center of Psychiatry, Groningen (Netherlands); Luiten, Paul G.M. [University of Groningen, Center for Behavior and Neurosciences, Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Haren (Netherlands); Boer, Johan A. den [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, University Center of Psychiatry, Groningen (Netherlands); Kema, Ido P. [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Groningen (Netherlands); Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); University Hospital Ghent, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium)

    2011-03-15

    The serotonergic system of the brain is complex, with an extensive innervation pattern covering all brain regions and endowed with at least 15 different receptors (each with their particular distribution patterns), specific reuptake mechanisms and synthetic processes. Many aspects of the functioning of the serotonergic system are still unclear, partially because of the difficulty of measuring physiological processes in the living brain. In this review we give an overview of the conventional methods of measuring serotonin synthesis and methods using positron emission tomography (PET) tracers, more specifically with respect to serotonergic function in affective disorders. Conventional methods are invasive and do not directly measure synthesis rates. Although they may give insight into turnover rates, a more direct measurement may be preferred. PET is a noninvasive technique which can trace metabolic processes, like serotonin synthesis. Tracers developed for this purpose are {alpha}-[{sup 11}C]methyltryptophan ([{sup 11}C]AMT) and 5-hydroxy-L-[{beta}-{sup 11}C]tryptophan ([{sup 11}C]5-HTP). Both tracers have advantages and disadvantages. [{sup 11}C]AMT can enter the kynurenine pathway under inflammatory conditions (and thus provide a false signal), but this tracer has been used in many studies leading to novel insights regarding antidepressant action. [{sup 11}C]5-HTP is difficult to produce, but trapping of this compound may better represent serotonin synthesis. AMT and 5-HTP kinetics are differently affected by tryptophan depletion and changes of mood. This may indicate that both tracers are associated with different enzymatic processes. In conclusion, PET with radiolabelled substrates for the serotonergic pathway is the only direct way to detect changes of serotonin synthesis in the living brain. (orig.)

  18. The influence of different contrast medium concentrations and injection protocols on quantitative and clinical assessment of FDG–PET/CT in lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verburg, Frederik A., E-mail: fverburg@ukaachen.de [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, P. Debyelaan 25, 6229 HX Maastricht (Netherlands); Kuhl, Christiane K. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Pietsch, Hubertus [Bayer Pharma AG, Berlin, Müllerstrasse 178, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Palmowski, Moritz [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Mottaghy, Felix M. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, P. Debyelaan 25, 6229 HX Maastricht (Netherlands); Behrendt, Florian F. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    Objectives: To compare the effects of two different contrast medium concentrations for use in computed X-ray tomography (CT) employing two different injection protocols on positron emission tomography (PET) reconstruction in combined 2-{sup 18}F-desoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT in patients with a suspicion of lung cancer. Methods: 120 patients with a suspicion of lung cancer were enrolled prospectively. PET images were reconstructed with the non-enhanced and venous phase contrast CT obtained after injection of iopromide 300 mg/ml or 370 mg/ml using either a fixed-dose or a body surface area adapted injection protocol. Maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUVmax and SUVmean) and contrast enhancement (HU) were determined in the subclavian vein, ascending aorta, abdominal aorta, inferior vena cava, portal vein, liver and kidney and in the suspicious lung lesion. PET data were evaluated visually for the presence of malignancy and image quality. Results: At none of the sites a significant difference in the extent of the contrast enhancement between the four different protocols was found. However, the variability of the contrast enhancement at several anatomical sites was significantly greater in the fixed dose groups than in the BSA groups for both contrast medium concentrations. At none of the sites a significant difference was found in the extent of the SUVmax and SUVmean increase as a result of the use of the venous phase contrast enhanced CT for attenuation. Visual clinical evaluation of lesions showed no differences between contrast and non-contrast PET/CT (P = 0.32). Conclusions: Contrast enhanced CT for attenuation correction in combined PET/CT in lung cancer affects neither the clinical assessment nor image quality of the PET-images. A body surface adapted contrast medium protocol reduces the interpatient variability in contrast enhancement.

  19. The influence of different contrast medium concentrations and injection protocols on quantitative and clinical assessment of FDG–PET/CT in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To compare the effects of two different contrast medium concentrations for use in computed X-ray tomography (CT) employing two different injection protocols on positron emission tomography (PET) reconstruction in combined 2-18F-desoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT in patients with a suspicion of lung cancer. Methods: 120 patients with a suspicion of lung cancer were enrolled prospectively. PET images were reconstructed with the non-enhanced and venous phase contrast CT obtained after injection of iopromide 300 mg/ml or 370 mg/ml using either a fixed-dose or a body surface area adapted injection protocol. Maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUVmax and SUVmean) and contrast enhancement (HU) were determined in the subclavian vein, ascending aorta, abdominal aorta, inferior vena cava, portal vein, liver and kidney and in the suspicious lung lesion. PET data were evaluated visually for the presence of malignancy and image quality. Results: At none of the sites a significant difference in the extent of the contrast enhancement between the four different protocols was found. However, the variability of the contrast enhancement at several anatomical sites was significantly greater in the fixed dose groups than in the BSA groups for both contrast medium concentrations. At none of the sites a significant difference was found in the extent of the SUVmax and SUVmean increase as a result of the use of the venous phase contrast enhanced CT for attenuation. Visual clinical evaluation of lesions showed no differences between contrast and non-contrast PET/CT (P = 0.32). Conclusions: Contrast enhanced CT for attenuation correction in combined PET/CT in lung cancer affects neither the clinical assessment nor image quality of the PET-images. A body surface adapted contrast medium protocol reduces the interpatient variability in contrast enhancement

  20. Clinical value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in detecting viable tumor, recurrence and metastases of hepato-cellular carcinoma after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Accurate evaluation of treatment result of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by conventional imaging is difficult. The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical value of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT for detecting residual viable tumor, recurrence and metastases in patients with HCC after TACE. Methods: Twenty-two patients with HCC after TACE were investigated with 18F-FDG PET/CT. The accuracy of FDG PET/CT was determined by the histopathological results or evidences of clinical follow-up. Results: Of all 22 HCC patients after TACE, 18 had intra- and (or) extrahepatic lesions, detected by FDG PET/CT. Six-teen patients had intrahepatic FDG-avid lesion(s). Of the 16 patients, five had intrahepatic FDG-avid lesions located at both lipiodol-rich and -deprive regions, 13 had associated extrahepatic metastases. Of the two HCC patients who had no intrahepatic FDG-avid lesion, there were extrahepatic FDG-avid lesions at the retroperitoneal lymph nodes. In all, 15 HCC had extrahepatic lesions identified by FDG PET/CT. There were lung and lymph nodes (n = 9), bone (n = 2), tumor thrombus at portal vein (n - 1) and diaphragm crus (n = 1). Two patients were false negative. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy of FDG PET/CT in detecting intra- and (or) extrahepatic lesions after TACE were 88.9% (16/18) vs 94.7 % (18/19), 4/4 vs 3/3, and 90.9% (20/22) vs 95.5% (21/22), respectively. Conclusion: 18F-FDG PET/CT is potential useful for detection both intra- and (or) extrahepatic lesions in HCC patients after TACE. (authors)

  1. Advances in PET Physics and Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The historical development of positron emission tomography (PET) is marked by numerous significant technological accomplishments driven by an unprecedented collaboration between multi-disciplinary groups of investigators with backgrounds in medical sciences, physics, chemistry, mathematics, bioengineering, and computer science. During the last two decades, functional and metabolic imaging using PET has advanced elegantly and steadily gained importance in the clinical and research arenas. Significant progress has been made by scanner manufacturers and academic research groups in the design of dedicated high-resolution 3-D PET units; however, emerging clinical and research applications of functional brain imaging promise even greater levels of accuracy and precision and therefore impose more constraints with respect to the intrinsic performance of the PET scanner and the quantitative analysis capabilities of the provided software. The development of optimized PET detection geometries combined with high performance detector technologies and compact designs of PET scanners have become the goal of active research groups both in academic and corporate settings. Thus, there are many different design paths being pursued and it will be interesting to see what technologies become the most successful in the future. In addition to being a powerful clinical tool, PET is also used in small laboratory animal research to visualize and track certain molecular processes associated with diseases such as cancer, heart disease and neurological disorders in living small animal models of disease. During the past decade there has been substantial research and energy devoted to the development of high resolution preclinical PET systems for rodent research. This work has resulted in the development of numerous research prototypes as well as several commercially available high-resolution PET systems. The challenges of advancing PET's capabilities and some of the new imaging system

  2. Laser scatter in clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, Ed; Geddie, William

    2008-02-01

    Brightfield Laser Scanning Imaging (BLSI) is available on Laser Scanning Cytometers (LSCs) from CompuCyte Corporation. Briefly, digitation of photodetector outputs is coordinated with the combined motions of a small diameter (typically 2 to 10 microns) laser beam scanning a specimen in the Y direction (directed by a galvanometer-driven scanning mirror) and the microscope stage motion in the X direction. The output measurements are assembled into a two-dimensional array to provide a "non-real" digital image, where each pixel value reports the amount of laser-scattered light that is obtained when the laser beam is centered on that location. Depending on the detector positions, these images are analogous to Differential Interference Contrast or Phase Contrast microscopy. We report the incorporation of the new laser scattering capabilities into the workflow of a high-volume clinical cytology laboratory at University Health Network, Toronto, Canada. The laboratory has been employing LSC technology since 2003 for immunophenotypic fluorescence analysis of approximately 1200 cytological specimens per year, using the Clatch methodology. The new BLSI component allows visualization of cellular morphology at higher resolution levels than is possible with standard brightfield microscopic evaluation of unstained cells. BLSI is incorporated into the triage phase, where evaluation of unstained samples is combined with fluorescence evaluation to obtain specimen background levels. Technical details of the imaging methodology will be presented, as well as illustrative examples from current studies and comparisons to detailed, but obscure, historical studies of cytology specimens based on phase contrast microscopy.

  3. 18F-Fluoride-PET in Skeletal Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone scintigraphy using 99mTc-labeled phosphate agents has long been the standard evaluation method for whole skeletal system. However, recent shortage of 99mTc supply and advanced positron emission tomography (PET) technology evoked the attention to surrogate radiopharmaceuticals and imaging modalities for bone. Actually, fluorine-18 (18F) was the first bone seeking radiotracer before the introduction of 99mTc-labeled agents even though its clinical application failed to become pervasive anymore after the rapid spread of Anger type gamma camera systems in early 1970s. However, rapidly developed PET technology made us refocus on the usefulness of 18F as a PET tracer. Early study comparing 18F-Na PET scan and planar bone scintigraphy reported that PET has higher sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of metastatic bone lesions than planar bone scan. Subsequent reports comparing between PET and both planar and SPECT bone image also revealed better results of PET scan in similar study groups. Rapid clinical application of PET/CT also accumulated considerable amount of experiences in skeletal evaluation and this modality is known to have better diagnostic power than stand alone PET system as well as bone scan. Furthermore 18F-Na PET/CT revealed better or at least equal results in detection of primary and metastatic bone lesions compared with CT and MRI. Therefore, it is obvious that 18F-Na PET/CT has potential to become new imaging modality for practical skeletal evaluation so continuous and careful evaluation of this modality and radiopharmaceutical must be required

  4. Clinical applications of cobalt-radionuclides in neuro-imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the studies embodied in this thesis was to investigate the clinical applicability of Co in euro-imaging using positron emission tomography (PET). To this purpose, a set of closely related pilot studies were performed in patients suffering from several neurological diseases affecting the brain. Chapter 2 discusses the physiological role of Co and both indications and complications of Co-administration in the past. The probable deposition mechanism of Co is described, potential (absence of) evidence of Co mimicking Ca in vivo is discussed, a comparison is made with other tracer-analogues (Ga, TI, Rb) and several hypotheses with respect to the pharmacokinetic behaviour of Co and the role of (inflammatory) proteins and cells are forwarded. The etiologic mechanism(s), clinical symptoms, Ca-related pathophysiology and (most recent) imaging techniques are reviewed of Multiple Sclerosis, cerebrovascular stroke, traumatic brain injury and primary brain tumours. The major goal of these respective reviews is both a rough outline of present insights and near-future developments and an assessment of the (im)possibilities in visualising the actual substrate of disease. Since Co is assumed to reflect (the common pathway of) Ca, an application of Co (based on cell-decay and inflammation) may be hypothesised in all of the diseases mentioned. These considerations served as a theoretical basis for our further studies in clinical practice. Chapter 3 (Original reprints) presents the actual results, whil Chapter 4 (General discussion) reflects on lessons that can be learned from the present work and consequently formulates some suggestions for future (extended) studies. The contours of possible new emerging areas of interest (dementia of the Alzheimer type; vascular dementia; stunned myocardium) are drawn in continuation of the foregoing studies. 47 refs

  5. Clinical applications of cobalt-radionuclides in neuro-imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, H.M.L

    1998-04-01

    The aim of the studies embodied in this thesis was to investigate the clinical applicability of Co in euro-imaging using positron emission tomography (PET). To this purpose, a set of closely related pilot studies were performed in patients suffering from several neurological diseases affecting the brain. Chapter 2 discusses the physiological role of Co and both indications and complications of Co-administration in the past. The probable deposition mechanism of Co is described, potential (absence of) evidence of Co mimicking Ca in vivo is discussed, a comparison is made with other tracer-analogues (Ga, TI, Rb) and several hypotheses with respect to the pharmacokinetic behaviour of Co and the role of (inflammatory) proteins and cells are forwarded. The etiologic mechanism(s), clinical symptoms, Ca-related pathophysiology and (most recent) imaging techniques are reviewed of Multiple Sclerosis, cerebrovascular stroke, traumatic brain injury and primary brain tumours. The major goal of these respective reviews is both a rough outline of present insights and near-future developments and an assessment of the (im)possibilities in visualising the actual substrate of disease. Since Co is assumed to reflect (the common pathway of) Ca, an application of Co (based on cell-decay and inflammation) may be hypothesised in all of the diseases mentioned. These considerations served as a theoretical basis for our further studies in clinical practice. Chapter 3 (Original reprints) presents the actual results, whil Chapter 4 (General discussion) reflects on lessons that can be learned from the present work and consequently formulates some suggestions for future (extended) studies. The contours of possible new emerging areas of interest (dementia of the Alzheimer type; vascular dementia; stunned myocardium) are drawn in continuation of the foregoing studies. 47 refs.

  6. Clinical value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in differentiation between benign lesions and lung cancer for large shadows in patients with pneumoconiosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王艳丽

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical value ofF-FDG PET/CT in the differentiation between benign lesions and lung cancer for large shadows in patients with pneumoconiosis.Methods A retrospective study was conducted in21 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of pneumoconiosis who had a total of 37 large shadows in the lung fields as

  7. Clinical impact of 18F-FDG-PET/CT in the extra cardiac work-up of patients with infective endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmar, Ali; Ozcan, Cengiz; Diederichsen, Axel C P;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical importance of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT used in the extra cardiac work-up of patients with infective endocarditis (IE). BACKGROUND: IE is a serious condition with a significant mortality. Besides the degree of valvular involvement, the...

  8. Functional imaging in oncology. Clinical applications. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, Antonio [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiology; MRI Health Time Group, Jaen (Spain); Vilanova, Joan C. [Girona Univ. (Spain). Clinica Girona - Hospital Sta. Caterina; Hygino da Cruz, L. Celso Jr. (ed.) [CDPI and IRM, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Dept. of Radiology; Rossi, Santiago E. [Centro de Diagnostico, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-06-01

    Easy-to-read manual on new functional imaging techniques in oncology. Explains current clinical applications and outlines future avenues. Includes numerous high-quality illustrations to highlight the major teaching points. In the new era of functional and molecular imaging, both currently available imaging biomarkers and biomarkers under development are expected to lead to major changes in the management of oncological patients. This two-volume book is a practical manual on the various imaging techniques capable of delivering functional information on cancer, including diffusion MRI, perfusion CT and MRI, dual-energy CT, spectroscopy, dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, PET, and hybrid modalities. This second volume considers the applications and benefits of these techniques in a wide range of tumor types, including their role in diagnosis, prediction of treatment outcome, and early evaluation of treatment response. Each chapter addresses a specific malignancy and is written by one or more acclaimed experts. The lucid text is complemented by numerous high-quality illustrations that highlight key features and major teaching points.

  9. Functional imaging in oncology. Clinical applications. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easy-to-read manual on new functional imaging techniques in oncology. Explains current clinical applications and outlines future avenues. Includes numerous high-quality illustrations to highlight the major teaching points. In the new era of functional and molecular imaging, both currently available imaging biomarkers and biomarkers under development are expected to lead to major changes in the management of oncological patients. This two-volume book is a practical manual on the various imaging techniques capable of delivering functional information on cancer, including diffusion MRI, perfusion CT and MRI, dual-energy CT, spectroscopy, dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, PET, and hybrid modalities. This second volume considers the applications and benefits of these techniques in a wide range of tumor types, including their role in diagnosis, prediction of treatment outcome, and early evaluation of treatment response. Each chapter addresses a specific malignancy and is written by one or more acclaimed experts. The lucid text is complemented by numerous high-quality illustrations that highlight key features and major teaching points.

  10. Automated production of [¹⁸F]VAT suitable for clinical PET study of vesicular acetylcholine transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xuyi; Bognar, Christopher; Zhang, Xiang; Gaehle, Gregory G; Moerlein, Stephen M; Perlmutter, Joel S; Tu, Zhude

    2016-01-01

    Automated production of a promising radiopharmaceutical (-)-(1-(8-(2-[(18)F]fluoroethoxy)-3-hydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-2-yl)-piperidin-4-yl)(4-fluorophenyl)methanone ([(18)F]VAT) for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter(VAChT) was achieved using a two-step procedure in a current Good Manufacturing Practices fashion. The production of [(18)F]VAT was accomplished in approximately 140 min, with radiochemical yield of ~15.0% (decay corrected), specific activity>111 GBq/µmol, radiochemical purity>99% and mass of VAT ~3.4 μg/batch (n>10). The radiopharmaceutical product meets all quality control criteria for human use, and is suitable for clinical PET studies of VAChT. PMID:26408913

  11. Assessment of Local Control after Laser-Induced Thermotherapy of Liver Metastases from Colorectal Cancer: Contribution of FDG-PET in Patients with Clinical Suspicion of Progressive Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denecke, T.; Steffen, I.; Hildebrandt, B.; Ruehl, R.; Streitparth, F.; Lehmk uhl, L.; Langrehr, J.; Ricke, J.; Amthauer, H.; Lopez Haenninen, E. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Bereiche Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Medizinische Klinik mit Schwerpunkt Haematologie Onkologie, and Klinik fuer Allgemein-, Viszeral-, und T ransplantationschirurgie, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Charite - Universitaetsmedizi n Berlin, (Germany)

    2007-10-15

    Background: Management of patients after locally ablative treatment of liver metastases requires exact information about local control and systemic disease status. To fulfill these requirements, whole-body imaging using positron emission tomography with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) is a promising alternative to morphologic imaging modalities such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Purpose: To evaluate FDG-PET for the assessment of local control and systemic disease in patients with clinical suspicion of tumor progression after laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) of colorectal liver metastases. Material and Methods: In 21 patients with suspicion of progressive disease after LITT, whole-body FDG-PET was performed. The presence of viable tumor within treated lesions, new liver metastases, and extrahepatic disease was evaluated visually and semi quantitatively (maximal standard uptake value [SUVmax], tumor-to-normal ratio [T/N]). The standard of reference was histopathology (n = 25 lesions) and/or clinical follow-up (>12 months) including contrast-enhanced MRI of the liver. Results: Among 54 metastases treated with LITT, 29 had residual tumor. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of SUVmax (area under the curve (AUC) 0.990) and T/N (AUC 0.968) showed a significant discrimination level of negative or positive lesion status with an equal accuracy of 94% (51/54). The overall accuracy of visual FDG-PET was 96% (52/54), with one false-negative lesion among six examined within 3 days after LITT, and one false-positive lesion examined 54 days after LITT. In the detection of new intra- and extrahepatic lesions, FDG-PET resulted in correct alteration of treatment strategy in 43% of patients (P = 0.007). Conclusion: FDG-PET is a promising tool for the assessment of local control and whole-body restaging in patients with clinical suspicion of tumor progression after locally ablative treatment of colorectal liver metastases with

  12. PET/MR in oncology: an introduction with focus on MR and future perspectives for hybrid imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Balyasnikova, Svetlana; Löfgren, Johan; de Nijs, Robin; Zamogilnaya, Yanna; Højgaard, Liselotte; Fischer, Barbara M

    2012-01-01

    After more than 20 years of research, a fully integrated PET/MR scanner was launched in 2010 enabling simultaneous acquisition of PET and MR imaging. Currently, no clinical indication for combined PET/MR has been established, however the expectations are high. In this paper we will discuss some of the challenges inherent in this new technology, but focus on potential applications for simultaneous PET/MR in the field of oncology. Methods and tracers for use with the PET technology will be fami...

  13. MEDICINAL VESICULATION THERAPY AND ITS CLINICAL APPLICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; LIU Haijing; SUN Zhanling

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the authors introduce medicinal vesiculation therapy from its origin, points for attention in clinical application, and their individual experiences. In clinical application, the authors advocate: ① avoid using drugs that are over-irritating in the property, and strictly controlling the dose of drugs end the duration of application,②) in selection of drugs, some factors as patients' conditions, the season, the geographic location, etc. should be taken into account. In the present paper, 3 typical cases of bronchial asthma, tonsil swelling and facial paralysis treated with medicinal vesiculation therapy are introduced. Clinical practice demonsetrates that this therapy is economical,simple and convenient and fairly effective in treatment of some chronic diseases.

  14. NEMA and clinical evaluation of a novel brain PET-CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogg, Kira S.; Toole, Terrence; Ouyang, Jinsong; Zhu, Xuping; Normandin, Marc; Johnson, Keith; Alpert, Nathaniel M.; Fakhri, Georges El

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the performance of a novel mobile human brain/small animal PET-CT system, developed by Photo Diagnostic Systems Inc. The scanner has a 35.7-cm diameter bore and a 22-cm axial extent. The detector ring has 7 modules each with 3×4 cerium-doped lutetium yttrium orthosilicate crystal blocks, each consisting of 22×22 outer layer and 21×21 inner layer crystals, each layer 1 cm thick. Light is collected by 12×12 SiPMs. The integrated CT can be used for attenuation correction and anatomical localization. The scanner was designed as a low-cost device that nevertheless produces high-quality PET images with the unique capability of battery-powered propulsion, enabling use in many settings. Methods Spatial resolution, sensitivity and noise-equivalent count rate (NECR) were measured based on the National Electrical Manufacturers Association NU2-2012 procedures. Reconstruction was done with tight energy and timing cuts: 400-650 keV and 7ns, and loose cuts: 350-700 keV and 10ns. Additional image quality measurements were made from phantoms, human, and animal studies. Performance was compared to a reference scanner (ECAT Exact HR+) with comparable imaging properties. Results The full-width half-max transverse resolution at 1 cm (10 cm) radius is 3.2 mm (5.2 mm radial, 3.1 mm tangential) and the axial resolution is 3.5 mm (4.0 mm). For tight (loose) cuts, a sensitivity of 7.5 (11.7) kcps/MBq at the center increases to 8.8 (13.9) kcps/MBq at a 10 cm radial offset. The maximum NECR of 19.5 (22.7) kcps was achieved for an activity concentration of 2.9 kBq/ml. Contrast recovery for 4:1 hot cylinder to warm background was 76% for the 25 mm diameter cylinder, but decreased with decreasing cylinder size. The quantitation agrees within 2% of the known activity distribution and concentration. Brain phantom and human scans have shown agreement in SUV values and image quality with the HR+. Conclusion We have characterized the performance of the NeuroPET

  15. The usefulness of dynamic O-(2-18F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine PET in the clinical evaluation of brain tumors in children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunkl, Veronika; Cleff, Corvin; Stoffels, Gabriele; Judov, Natalie; Sarikaya-Seiwert, Sevgi; Law, Ian; Bøgeskov, Lars; Nysom, Karsten; Andersen, Sofie B; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Fink, Gereon R; Reifenberger, Guido; Shah, Nadim J; Coenen, Heinz H; Langen, Karl-Josef; Galldiks, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Experience regarding O-(2-(18)F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ((18)F-FET) PET in children and adolescents with brain tumors is limited. METHODS: Sixty-nine (18)F-FET PET scans of 48 children and adolescents (median age, 13 y; range, 1-18 y) were analyzed retrospectively. Twenty-six scans to...... by receiver-operating-characteristic curve analyses using histology or clinical course as a reference. RESULTS: In patients with newly diagnosed cerebral lesions, the highest accuracy (77%) to detect neoplastic tissue (19/26 patients) was obtained when the maximum TBR was 1.7 or greater (area under...

  16. TH-E-BRF-11: Dynamic Treatment of Clinical Margins Beyond the PET-Avid Target in Emission Guided Radiation Therapy: A Retrospective Patient Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanduri, A; Mazin, S [RefleXion Medical, Burlingame, CA (United States); Fan, Q [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Yang, J; Graves, E; Loo, B [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Yamamoto, T [UC Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Emission guided radiation therapy (EGRT) is a new modality that uses PET emissions for direct real-time tumor tracking. Radiation beamlets are delivered along PET lines of response (LOR's) by a fast rotating PET-Linac closed ring gantry. In this work, we develop a scheme to treat clinical margins defined proximal to the moving PET-avid tumor, while maintaining EGRT's inherent real-time tracking ability. Methods: The principle of EGRT is to deliver radiation along PET emission paths to concentrate dose in the PET-avid gross tumor volume (GTV). To account for adjacent non- PET avid regions in the clinical volume (CTV) a method was developed that expands the set of radiation beamlet responses to include the effective margin extension from the GTV to the CTV. An LOR detection may now Result in multiple beamlet responses: one along the original LOR, and others that are adjacent to it in the direction of margin extension. Evaluation studies were performed on a 4D digital patient as well as a clinical breast cancer patient with moving lung tumors. Emission data were obtained using GATE and a commercial PET scanner. Dose delivery was simulated using VMC++. For the patient study, Philips Pinnacle was used for planning and Mirada RTx was used for deformable dose registration across multiple breathing phases. Results: Compared with IMRT, the EGRT margin extension method achieved a 25.3% and 9.0% relative increase in dose to 95% of the CTV for the digital and clinical patients, respectively. The corresponding CTV dose increases without margin extension were 9.7% and 1.4%. The organs at risk doses were kept similar or lower for EGRT in both cases, with tumor tracking preserved. Conclusions: With the capability of accurate treatment of the moving CTV, EGRT has the potential to enable a practical and effective implementation of 4D biologically guided radiation therapy. Authors SRM and AN are stockholders of RefleXion Medical.

  17. TH-E-BRF-11: Dynamic Treatment of Clinical Margins Beyond the PET-Avid Target in Emission Guided Radiation Therapy: A Retrospective Patient Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Emission guided radiation therapy (EGRT) is a new modality that uses PET emissions for direct real-time tumor tracking. Radiation beamlets are delivered along PET lines of response (LOR's) by a fast rotating PET-Linac closed ring gantry. In this work, we develop a scheme to treat clinical margins defined proximal to the moving PET-avid tumor, while maintaining EGRT's inherent real-time tracking ability. Methods: The principle of EGRT is to deliver radiation along PET emission paths to concentrate dose in the PET-avid gross tumor volume (GTV). To account for adjacent non- PET avid regions in the clinical volume (CTV) a method was developed that expands the set of radiation beamlet responses to include the effective margin extension from the GTV to the CTV. An LOR detection may now Result in multiple beamlet responses: one along the original LOR, and others that are adjacent to it in the direction of margin extension. Evaluation studies were performed on a 4D digital patient as well as a clinical breast cancer patient with moving lung tumors. Emission data were obtained using GATE and a commercial PET scanner. Dose delivery was simulated using VMC++. For the patient study, Philips Pinnacle was used for planning and Mirada RTx was used for deformable dose registration across multiple breathing phases. Results: Compared with IMRT, the EGRT margin extension method achieved a 25.3% and 9.0% relative increase in dose to 95% of the CTV for the digital and clinical patients, respectively. The corresponding CTV dose increases without margin extension were 9.7% and 1.4%. The organs at risk doses were kept similar or lower for EGRT in both cases, with tumor tracking preserved. Conclusions: With the capability of accurate treatment of the moving CTV, EGRT has the potential to enable a practical and effective implementation of 4D biologically guided radiation therapy. Authors SRM and AN are stockholders of RefleXion Medical

  18. Performance of FBK low-afterpulse NUV silicon photomultipliers for PET application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, A.; Acerbi, F.; Gola, A.; Paternoster, G.; Piemonte, C.; Zorzi, N.

    2016-03-01

    The improvement of the coincidence resolving time (CRT) is one of the key factors for the next generation of positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are strong candidates to substitute photo multipliers tubes because of their compactness, ruggedness and insensitivity to magnetic fields. In order to achieve the best CRT, the SiPM should have high PDE which can be obtained increasing the bias voltage. We recently improved the NUV SiPM technology, with the addition of a new substrate type that provides significantly lower afterpulsing probability (Low-AP). This enables to extend the maximum bias voltage and thus obtain higher PDE. Additionally, we implemented a lower electric field version (Low-F) to reduce the field-enhanced thermal generation components of the dark count rate. In this work we present results of energy and timing resolution for PET application, using LYSO scintillator crystals, and coupled with 3 × 3 mm2 NUV SiPMs of three types: non-Low-AP, Low-AP and Low-AP + Low-F. All the devices reach very similar energy resolutions, around 9.5 %, and close to the intrinsic limit of the LYSO. Concerning the timing resolution, we found that the Low-AP substrate achieves an improvement of the CRT of ≈ 30 ps, confirmed with the Low-F. Using 4 × 4 mm2 Low-AP SiPMs coupled to 3 × 3 × 5 mm3 and 3.8 × 3.8 × 22 mm3 LYSO crystals we obtained CRTs of 130 and 200 ps FWHM, respectively.

  19. Medical laser application: translation into the clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka, Ronald; Stepp, Herbert; Hennig, Georg; Brittenham, Gary M.; Rühm, Adrian; Lilge, Lothar

    2015-06-01

    Medical laser applications based on widespread research and development is a very dynamic and increasingly popular field from an ecological as well as an economic point of view. Conferences and personal communication are necessary to identify specific requests and potential unmet needs in this multi- and interdisciplinary discipline. Precise gathering of all information on innovative, new, or renewed techniques is necessary to design medical devices for introduction into clinical applications and finally to become established for routine treatment or diagnosis. Five examples of successfully addressed clinical requests are described to show the long-term endurance in developing light-based innovative clinical concepts and devices. Starting from laboratory medicine, a noninvasive approach to detect signals related to iron deficiency is shown. Based upon photosensitization, fluorescence-guided resection had been discovered, opening the door for photodynamic approaches for the treatment of brain cancer. Thermal laser application in the nasal cavity obtained clinical acceptance by the introduction of new laser wavelengths in clinical consciousness. Varicose veins can be treated by innovative endoluminal treatment methods, thus reducing side effects and saving time. Techniques and developments are presented with potential for diagnosis and treatment to improve the clinical situation for the benefit of the patient.

  20. Clinical applications of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in carcinoma of unknown primary

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Man; YU Jin-ming; ZHAO Wei; ZHANG Pin-liang; JU Gui-fang; FU Zheng; ZHANG Guo-li; KONG Li; YANG Yan-qin; MA Yi-dong

    2011-01-01

    Background Carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP) encompasses a heterogeneous group of tumors with varying clinical features. The management of patients of CUP remains a clinical challenge. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical applications of integrated 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) information in patients with CUP,including detecting the occult primary tumor and effecting on disease therapy.Methods One hundred and forty-nine patients with histologically-proven metastases of CUP were included. For all patients,the conventional diagnostic work-up was unsuccessful in localizing the primary site. Whole-body PET/CT images were obtained approximately 60 minutes after intravenous injection of 350-425 MBq of 18F-FDG.Results In 24.8% of patients,FDG PET/CT detected primary tumors that were not apparent after conventional workup.In this group of patients,the overall sensitivity,specificity,and accuracy rates of FDG PET/CT in detecting unknown primary tumors were 86.0%,87.7%,and 87.2%,respectively. FDG PET/CT imaging also led to the detection of previously unrecognized metastases in 29.5% of patients. Forty-seven (31.5%,47 of 149) patients underwent a change in therapeutic management.Conclusions FDG PET/CT is a valuable tool in patients with CUP,because it assisted in detecting unknown primary tumors and previously unrecognized distant metastases,and optimized the mangement of these patients.

  1. Comparison of single and dual layer detector blocks for pre-clinical MRI–PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dual or multi-layer crystal blocks have been proposed to minimise the radial blurring effect in PET scanners with small ring diameters. We measured two potential PET detector blocks' performance in a configuration which would allow 16 blocks in a ring which could be inserted in a small animal 7T MRI scanner. Two crystal sizes, 1.60×1.60 mm2 and 1.20×1.20 mm2, were investigated. Single layer blocks had 10 or 12 mm deep crystals, the dual layer blocks had 4 mm deep crystals on the top layer and 6 mm deep crystals on the bottom layer. The crystals in the dual layer blocks are offset by ½ of the crystal pitch to allow for purely geometric crystal identification. Both were read out with SensL 4×4 SiPM arrays. The software identifies 64 crystals in the single layer and either 85 or 113 crystals in the dual layer array, (either 49 or 64 in the lower layers and 36 or 49 in the upper layers). All the crystals were clearly visible in the crystal identification images and their resolvability indexes (average FWHM/crystal separation) were shown to range from 0.29 for the best single layer block to 0.33 for the densest dual layer block. The best coincidence response FWHM was 0.95 mm for the densest block at the centre of the field. This degraded to 1.83 mm at a simulated radial offset of 16 mm from the centre, while the single layer crystals blurred this result to 3.4 mm. The energy resolution was 16.4±2.2% averaged over the 113 crystals of the densest block

  2. Clinical relevance of F-18 FDG PET for imaging of neuroendocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuroendocrine tumors are characterized immunocytochemically by the expression of different peptides and biogenic amines. Hormones induce their biological action by binding to and stimulating specific membrane-associated rece