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Sample records for clinical periodontal status

  1. Periodontal microbiota and clinical periodontal status in a rural sample in southern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papapanou, P N; Teanpaisan, R; Obiechina, N S; Pithpornchaiyakul, W; Pongpaisal, S; Pisuithanakan, S; Baelum, V; Fejerskov, O; Dahlén, G

    2002-10-01

    We sought to determine (i) the association of subgingival bacterial profiles to clinical periodontal status in a population with limited access to dental care in Thailand, and (ii) the external validity of our earlier findings from a similar study in rural China. We examined 356 subjects, 30-39 yr old and 50-59 yr old, with respect to clinical periodontal status and subgingival plaque at maximally 14 sites per subject. Checkerboard hybridizations were used to analyse a total of 4343 samples. The prevalence of the 27 species investigated ranged between 87.2% and 100%. Discriminant analysis based on microbial profiles classified correctly 67.5% of all deep (> or = 5 mm) and 64.2% of all shallow sites, and 67.4% of all subjects with and 69.3% of all subjects without > or = 3 deep pockets. High colonization by 'red complex' bacteria was four times as likely (95% Confidence Limits (CL) 2.5-6.6) in subjects with > or = 10 sites with attachment loss of > or = 5 mm, and 4.3 times as likely (95% CL 2.6-7.1) in subjects with > or = 30 such sites. The data confirmed (i) the ubiquitous prevalence of the bacteria investigated in subjects with no regular access to dental care; and (ii) the high odds for periodontal pathology conferred by increased levels of specific periodontal bacteria.

  2. Clinical periodontal status and inflammatory cytokines in gestational diabetes mellitus.

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    Özçaka, Özgün; Ceyhan-Öztürk, Banu; Gümüş, Pınar; Akcalı, Aliye; Nalbantsoy, Ayşe; Buduneli, Nurcan

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to compare clinical periodontal findings as well as gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and serum levels of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and IL-33 between women with and without gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Serum and GCF samples were collected, full-mouth recordings comprising plaque index, bleeding on probing and probing depth were performed in 96 females with GDM (cases) and 65 non-diabetic pregnant females (controls). Age, smoking status, pre-pregnancy body mass index, pregnancy outcomes were recorded. Serum and GCF IL-10, IL-33, TNF-α levels were determined. The GDM group was significantly older than the control group with an age difference of 3.27 years (mean ages were 32.05 and 28.78 years, respectively) (pperiodontal health during pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of Periodontal Clinical Status on Salivary Levels of Glutathione Reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Correa, Yésica Alejandra; Isaza-Guzmán, Diana María; Tobón-Arroyave, Sergio Iván

    2016-06-01

    Inadequate antioxidant balance may play a role in the excessive tissue breakdown in periodontitis. Because aggressive periodontitis (AgP) not only differs from chronic periodontitis (CP) in terms of clinical manifestations, this study investigates whether the salivary levels of glutathione reductase (GR) may be linked with periodontal status. Saliva samples from patients with CP (n = 121), patients with AgP (n = 18), and healthy controls (n = 69) were collected. Periodontal status was assessed by criteria based on probing depth, clinical attachment level, and extent and severity of periodontal breakdown. GR salivary levels were analyzed by spectrophotometry. The association among GR concentration and CP or AgP was analyzed individually and adjusted for confounding using multivariate binary logistic regression models. GR levels not only differed significantly between the two periodontitis groups, being significantly greater in patients with AgP, but also were significantly greater than those observed in healthy controls. Synchronously, positive significant correlations between salivary GR concentration and clinical parameters were observed. After binary logistic regression analysis, both GR salivary levels ≥15.38 and ≥24.20 mU/mL were associated independently with CP and AgP, respectively. A significant interaction effect was also detected between increased GR salivary concentration and aging in the CP group. Increased GR salivary concentration may be a strong/independent prognostic indicator of the amount and extent of oxidative stress-induced periodontal damage in both CP and AgP. Likewise, saliva samples might reflect an interactive effect of GR levels associated with the aging-related cumulative characteristics of periodontal damage in CP.

  4. Periodontal status in infertile women attending in vitro fertilization clinics

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    Godavarthi Lalasa

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limits of this study, it can be concluded that altered hormonal levels in infertile women undergoing assisted reproductive therapy and infertile women not undergoing this treatment can lead to increased attachment loss, suggesting that these women may require constant periodontal monitoring.

  5. Periodontal status in post-menopausal osteoporosis: a preliminary clinical study in Taiwanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, E-Chin; Gau, Ching-Hwa; Hsieh, Yao Dung; Chang, Cheng-Yang; Fu, Earl

    2004-08-01

    Osteoporosis and periodontitis are common diseases affecting post-menopausal women; however, the exact relationship between the diseases is still uncertain. The purposes of this study were to examine the periodontal status in a group of type I post-menopausal women with and without osteoporosis and to elucidate the possible role of the osteoporosis in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. Thirty-four patients (18 in the osteoporotic and 16 in the non-osteoporotic group) were selected from 329 post-menopausal Taiwanese women who had completed radiographic measurements of spinal bone mineral density and received full-mouth periodontal examination. Periodontal measurements, including O'Leary plaque index, probing depths, clinical attachment level, and gingival recession, on 6 sites of each tooth of full mouth were examined and recorded by 1 examiner. Significantly greater probing depth was noted at the interproximal, but not at the facio-lingual, osteoporotic sites if compared to those non-osteoporotic sites. The depth was also significantly influenced by the examining factors of plaque accumulation, tooth location, and jaws. By individual jaw, increased attachment loss accompanied by greater probing depth and gingival recession was found at the osteoporotic sites on mandible if compared to non-osteoporotic sites. On maxilla, however, less gingival recession and attachment loss were observed at the osteoporotic sites. In the present study, increased attachment loss accompanied by greater probing depth and gingival recession was found at the osteoporotic sites on mandible. However, the parameters were also influenced by the examining factors of plaque accumulation, tooth location, and jaws. Therefore, we suggest that post-menopausal osteoporosis may play a role in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease, especially on the mandible, although the etiology of periodontal disease is still multi-factorial.

  6. Comparison of clinical periodontal status among habitual smokeless-tobacco users and cigarette smokers.

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    Kulkarni, Varun; Uttamani, Juhi Raju; Bhatavadekar, Neel B

    2016-02-01

    Investigating the comparative effect of cigarette smoking and smokeless-tobacco use on periodontal health. There is a dearth of studies comparing the effects of smoking and smokeless tobacco on periodontal health. Smokeless tobacco is emerging as a major public health hazard, but is often neglected as a risk factor by many clinicians. A cross-sectional study of 286 subjects was conducted. The participants were divided into mutually exclusive groups (i.e. any subject who had the habit of both smoking as well as smokeless tobacco usage was excluded from the study), as follows: a smoking group (SG; n=121); a smokeless-tobacco group (ST; n=81); and a non-tobacco-consuming group (NT; n=84). Data were obtained using a questionnaire and by clinical examination. The Periodontal Disease Index (PDI) and Oral Hygiene Index-Simplified (OHI-S) were used to clinically evaluate the periodontal and dental health status of the subjects. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify statistical correlations. The Plaque Index was higher in the ST group than in the SG group and was statistically significantly higher in the ST group than in the NT group. Probing depth and gingival inflammation (components of the PDI) were also higher in the ST group than in the SG and NT groups, but this was not statistically significant. Within the limits of the study, and for this study population, the impact on the periodontium as a result of smokeless tobacco use appeared to be comparable with that of smoking tobacco. The results of this study affirm the need to consider smokeless tobacco as a possible contributory factor to periodontal disease, in addition to smoking, and to counsel patients accordingly. Further randomised clinical trials are necessary to validate the long-term impact of smokeless tobacco on periodontal disease. © 2015 FDI World Dental Federation.

  7. Effect on periodontal status of rotary electric toothbrushes vs. manual toothbrushes during periodontal maintenance. I. Clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, R L; Murray, P; Robertson, P B

    1989-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the Rotadent rotary electric toothbrush with conventional toothbrushing for its effectiveness in controlling supragingival plaque and gingival inflammation in periodontal maintenance patients. Forty subjects who had received periodontal treatment, including periodontal surgery, for moderate to advanced periodontitis and were on a 3-month periodontal maintenance were divided into two equal groups matched for age and sex. One group used conventional toothbrushing, dental floss, and toothpicks and the other used only the rotary electric toothbrush for a 12-month study period. Single-blind clinical assessments (Plaque Index, Gingival Index, bleeding tendency, pocket depth, and loss of attachment) were made at baseline and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after baseline. Subgingival debridement was performed 1 week after the baseline assessment and the 6- and 12-month examinations. Plaque removal was reinforced at 3-month intervals. Both groups had significantly improved scores (P less than 0.01) for Gingival Index and bleeding tendency during the 12-month period, but no differences were found between the groups at any examination. These results indicate that the rotary electric toothbrush is as effective for plaque removal and control of gingival inflammation as a combination of conventional toothbrushing, flossing, and toothpicks for patients in periodontal maintenance.

  8. Clinical Evaluation of Periodontal Tissue Status in Prosthodontic Treatment of Patients with Partial Tooth Loss and Generalized Periodontitis

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    A. Kushlyk

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of selection and application of dental prostheses in periodontal disease is especially relevant in case of severe generalized periodontitis, which is accompanied by mobile tooth removal resulting in overloading the periodontium of the remaining teeth as well as the increase in tooth mobility. Therefore, in generalized periodontitis, it is important to apply the method of direct dental prosthetic rehabilitation since, in case of partial tooth loss, it will prevent the development of generalized periodontitis complications. The objective of the research was to improve the effectiveness of combination therapy for patients with generalized periodontitis and partial tooth loss applying the developed method of direct fixed dental prosthetic rehabilitation based on the study of the periodontal status. Materials and methods. The study included 129 patients with general periodontitis, II-III degree and partial tooth loss over the age of 45 years. According to prosthodontic treatment, all the patients were divided into three groups: Group I consisted of 42 (20 women and 22 men patients who immediately after tooth extraction were rehabilitated with the application of direct plastic laminar immediate prosthesis and selective tooth grinding; permanent dental prosthetic rehabilitation was performed 6 weeks after tooth extraction; Group II included 43 (21 women and 22 men patients who underwent traditional permanent dental prosthetic rehabilitation using fixed dental bridges 6 weeks after mobile tooth removal and wound healing; Group III comprised 44 (21 women and 23 men patients who immediately after mobile tooth removal were rehabilitated with the application of direct fixed sectional dental bridge (Ukrainian patent UA 20995. 2007 Feb 15 and selective tooth grinding; permanent dental prosthetic rehabilitation was performed 6 months after tooth extraction. The control group consisted of 26 people with intact dentitions over the age of 45 years

  9. Periodontal Status of Postmenopausal Women

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    Timur V. Melkumyan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to compare the periodontal status in postmenopausal women with osteopenia and osteoporosis. Material and Methods: We examined 43 postmenopausal women aged from 55 to 74 years. Material assessment of bones in every patient was performed by means of dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA from two points on the skeleton – part of the femur neck and between the first and fourth lumbar vertebrae. A lipid blood test was done for patients of both groups. All patients were divided into two groups (the 1st with osteopenia, and the 2nd with osteoporosis. All patients were subjected to an oral clinical examination: the periodontal examination was composed of Plaque Index (PI, Pocket Score (PS, and Papillary Bleeding Index (PBI. X-ray analysis was performed for every patient. Results: The results of the clinical periodontal examination demonstrated that the mean PBI in patients in the 1st group had no significant differences from the PBI in patients in the 2nd group. PI value and PS findings in patients with general osteoporosis also had no statistical differences from the same parameters in patients with osteopenia. Conclusion: Under the circumstances of these patients’ characteristics and within the limits of the present study, we concluded that there is no significant difference in the periodontal status of postmenopausal women with systemic osteopenia and with osteoporosis.

  10. Clinical evaluation of dental and periodontal status in a group of oncological patients before chemotherapy.

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    López-Galindo, Mónica Paula; Bagán, José V; Jiménez-Soriano, Yolanda; Alpiste, Francisco; Camps, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the dental status of 88 cancer patients before chemotherapy. Eighty-eight patients with cancer in different body locations were studied and compared with a control group. Dental plaque was assessed by means of the Silness and Löe index, dental status with the DMFT index, and periodontal status with the modified CPI index. In the oncological patients the mean Silness and Löe index was 1.28-/+0.11. Patients showed multiple missing teeth (mean number 7.55-/+0.80); the mean number of decayed teeth was 2.10-/+0.36; and the mean number of filled teeth was 2.27-/+0.37. As to periodontal status, the mean modified CPI index was 1.45-/+0.11. In the control group, the mean Silness and Löe index was 0.94-/+0.00. The mean number of decayed teeth was 1.21-/+0.25; the mean number of missing teeth was 4.97-/+0.67; and the mean number of filled teeth was 4.82-/+0.44. The mean modified CPI index was 1.29-/+0.10. Oncological patients in our study showed more dental plaque versus healthy patients and more decayed and missing teeth. However, patients in the control group showed more filled teeth than cancer patients. Periodontal status as determined by the modified CPI index was similar in both patient groups.

  11. Clinical evaluation of dental and periodontal status in a group of oncological patients before chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    López Galindo, Mónica Paula; Bagán Sebastián, José Vicente; Jiménez Soriano, Yolanda; Alpiste Illueca, Francisco M.; Camps Herrero, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the dental status of 88 cancer patients before chemotherapy. Material and methods: Eighty-eight patients with cancer in different body locations were studied and compared with a control group. Dental plaque was assessed by means of the Silness and Löe index, dental status with the DMFT index, and periodontal status with the modified CPI index. Results: In the oncological patients the mean Silness and Löe index was 1.28±0.11. Patients showed multiple missing teeth (m...

  12. Self – perceived and clinically diagnosed dental and periodontal health status among young adults and their implications for epidemiological surveys

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    Sgan-Cohen Harold D

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical (normative and subjective (self-assessment evaluation of caries and periodontal diseases have been reported to demonstrate a significant disparity. The dental public health team is obligated to recognize and understand this gap. The objectives of the study were to investigate the practical values of using questionnaires (self–perceived assessment as compared to clinical examinations (normative assessment and to evaluate the implications of the results in understanding the public's perception of oral health. Methods The investigation was performed on 4920, 21 year-old Israeli adults upon release from compulsory military service between 1996 and 1998. Participants were asked to fill in a questionnaire inquiring how they would rate their personal dental and periodontal health levels. Clinical examinations, employing the DMFT and CPITN indices, were performed to determine normative oral health status. Perceived and normative assessments were compared for sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and overall proportions using the clinical examinations as a gold standard. Results The sensitivity (disease perception for dental status was found to be 0.34, while the specificity (health perception was found to be 0.83. The positive predictive value for perceived dental status was found to be 0.68, whereas the negative predictive value was found to be 0.54. The sensitivity for perceived periodontal status was found to be 0.28, while the specificity was found to be 0.83. The positive predictive value for perceived periodontal status was found to be 0.05, whereas the negative predictive value was found to be 0.97. Regarding the overall proportions, a large discrepancy was found between self–assessment and professional assessment for both dental and periodontal health status. Conclusions Self-assessment questionnaires were of low value in evaluating oral health status both in the individual and public

  13. The Periodontal Status and Associated Systemic Health Problems among an Elderly Population Attending the Outpatient Clinics of a Dental School.

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    Jafer, Mohammed

    2015-12-01

    Periodontal diseases are associated with systemic health and health behaviors; the purpose of this study was to investigate periodontal health status and its association with systemic health and health behaviors in the elderly. Data was collected from 300 random Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) dental school patient charts, aged 65 or higher. A modified WHO form was used to collect the date on: periodontal conditions using the community periodontal index (CPI), demographics, systemic health and certain health behaviors. Community periodontal index collected data for six sextants. Descriptive tests and bivariate analytic tests, Chi-square test and computation of odds ratio, investigated any association between certain periodontal conditions and demographic as well as systemic health attributes. In the study cohort, the average age was 73.7 ± 6.8 years. Moderate periodontitis (38.9%) was the most prevalent periodontal health condition, while severe periodontitis was the least prevalent periodontal health (6.1%). Nearly 30% of the cohort had healthy periodontium. Only insurance status was associated with healthy periodontium (p periodontitis was the most prevalent among the studied subjects. A positive association was found with the insurance status of the subjects and the healthy periodontium. No association was found between periodontal disease and smoking, alcohol consumption, diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

  14. Presence of crevicular fluid Prostaglandin E2 in relation with clinical and radiographic periodontal status

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    Javier Elpidio Monzón

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 is present in gingival crevicular fluid the (GCF and is evidenced in periodontal disease (PD. However, there are no enough reports to correlate the PGE2 concentrations in GCF in periodontal health and disease with clinical and radiographic indicators, age and gender. Hence, the present study is aimed to estimate the levels of PGE2 in GCF of subjects without periodontal disease (SEP and periodontal disease (CEP. Materials and Methods: 99 subjects were selected, 33 without PD (G1 and 66 with PD, 33 with gingivitis (G2 and 33 with periodontitis (G3, which were submitted to a clinical and radiographic diagnosis, registering samples FGC, being stored, centrifuged and refrigerated for preservation. Subsequently the concentration of crevicular PGE2 was measured by using the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, determining the concentration of each subject. Results: PGE2 was detected in all the samples. The G1 presented a concentration of 28.82 ± 2.88 pg / mL, G2 44.91 ± 4.37 pg / mL and G3 148.67 ± 74.74 pg / mL (0.0001. PGE2 levels were significantly correlated with bleeding on probing, probing depth, attachment loss and bone loss (0.05. PGE2 levels were modified by age, but not gender. Conclusion: It is well known that activated inflammatory cells produce inflammatory mediators that stimulate the production of PGE2. The findings of this study demonstrate an increased concentration of PGE2 in FCG according to the presence of greater severity of PD. PGE2 may be considered as a biomarker in PD progression. However, controlled, longitudinal studies are needed to confirm this possibility.

  15. Clinical and postextraction evaluation of periodontal disease indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Rajashri Kolte; Abhay Kolte; Pooja Wattamwar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clinical attachment level is the most frequently used and acceptable parameter in monitoring periodontal status in diseased individual and denotes patterns of periodontal destruction. Awareness of root morphology and the condition of the periodontal tissues is essential for reliable periodontal pocket probing and for effective debridement of root surfaces. Clinically, it is challenging to observe exact nature of complex periodontal attachment loss. The aim of the present study was...

  16. Longitudinal study on clinical and microbial analysis of periodontal status in pregnancy

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    Fernanda Campos MACHADO

    Full Text Available Abstract This study was aimed to provide a longitudinal overview of the subgingival bacterial microbiome using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH technique, in women in the second trimester of pregnancy (between 14 and 24 weeks, and 48 h and 8 weeks postpartum. Of 31 women evaluated during pregnancy, 24 returned for the 48-h and 18 for their 8-week exams postpartum. Probing depth (PD, bleeding on probing, clinical attachment level, and presence of calculus were recorded. Subgingival plaque samples were collected, and FISH was used to identify the numbers of eight periodontal pathogens. Friedman test was used to compare differences between follow-up examinations, followed by a multiple comparison test for a post hoc pairwise comparison. Clinically, a significantly greater number of teeth with PD = 4–5 mm were found during pregnancy than on postpartum examinations. Microbial analysis showed a statistically significant decrease in cell count over the study period for Prevotella nigrescens. P. intermedia, Campylobacter rectus, and Porphyromonas gingivalis also decrease, although not significantly, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans increased. No significant changes were found for Fusobacterium nucleatum, Treponema denticola, or Tannerella forsythia. Our data demonstrate a change in the subgingival microbiota during pregnancy, at least for P. nigrescens.

  17. Salivary levels of suspected periodontal pathogens in relation to periodontal status and treatment.

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    von Troil-Lindén, B; Torkko, H; Alaluusua, S; Jousimies-Somer, H; Asikainen, S

    1995-11-01

    The primary ecological niche for suspected periodontal pathogens seems to be the subgingival area, even though periodontal pathogens are also frequently recovered from saliva. The interrelationship of different periodontal conditions and the salivary levels of suspected periodontal pathogens is not known. In the present study, salivary levels of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Campylobacter rectus, and Peptostreptococcus micros were determined by bacterial culture and related to clinical periodontal status in 40 subjects with either advanced, moderate, or initial/no periodontitis. Culture-positive subjects harbored the 5 bacterial species in mean numbers ranging from 2 x 10(5) to 6 x 10(7) colony-forming units (CFU)/mL saliva. A. actinomycetemcomitans was found in none and P. gingivalis in one of the subjects with initial periodontitis, whereas both species were found in 33% and 44%, respectively, of the subjects with moderate periodontitis and in 60% and 40%, respectively, of the subjects with advanced periodontitis. The mean numbers of CFU/mL of P. intermedia, C. rectus and P. micros were significantly higher in subjects with advanced periodontitis than in subjects with initial/no periodontitis. Ten patients with advanced periodontitis were treated mechanically and with adjunctive systemic metronidazole, and were re-examined 1 and 6 months after treatment. Periodontal treatment eradicated or significantly reduced the levels of salivary periodontal pathogens for half a year, whereas in untreated subjects, the levels and the detection frequencies generally remained fairly stable. In conclusion, the results showed that the salivary levels of periodontal pathogens reflect the periodontal status of the patient.

  18. Periodontal status and serum creatine kinase levels among young ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: It is hypothesized that soccer players with periodontal disease exhibit raised serum creatine kinase (CK) levels as compared to those without periodontal disease. We assessed the clinical gingival status and serum CK levels among young soccer players. Materials and Methods: Demographic data were ...

  19. Family history of periodontal disease and prevalence of smoking status among adult periodontitis patients: a cross-sectional study.

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    Ziukaite, L; Slot, D E; Loos, B G; Coucke, W; Van der Weijden, G A

    2017-11-01

    What is the family history of periodontal disease and the prevalence of smoking status among patients with professionally diagnosed periodontitis? Are these factors related to extent and severity of periodontitis? Over a 10-year period, referred patients from a clinic for periodontology in the Netherlands were examined in a cross-sectional study. Patients received at the intake appointment a full-mouth periodontal examination. Data regarding family history of periodontitis and smoking status were recorded. A total of 5375 adult periodontitis patients were included in this study sample with a mean age of 50 years. The prevalence of smoking was 34% and 37% of the subjects had at least one parent or sibling with periodontitis. The chance to have severe periodontitis was higher if the patient was male, smoker or had a brother with periodontitis. Being male, smoker and having a parent with periodontitis were significantly associated with a larger extent of periodontitis. Within the investigated population familial aggregation, smoking status, age and gender are factors that were related to extent and severity of adult periodontitis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Periodontal status during pregnancy and postpartum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Different studies have documented an association between periodontal disease and low birth-weight delivery. Hence, knowledge of periodontal status during pregnancy and postpartum is important in order to reduce the risks of both diseases. This study aimed to analyze periodontal status at successive stages of pregnancy and 3–6 weeks postpartum in women with initial periodontal alterations. Materials and methods Ninety-six pregnant women were examined at 8–10 weeks (pregnancy diagnosis, baseline), 21–23 weeks and 34–36 weeks of gestation and at 40 days postpartum to record plaque scores, clinically assessed gingival inflammation and probing depth (mean depth and % sites with depth >3 mm). Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Type 1 (α) error was established at 0.05 Results Plaque Index increased (p = 0.043) throughout pregnancy (baseline, 42%±0.18); 21–23 weeks, 42.6%±0.14; 34–36 weeks, 45.6%±0.13 and decreased postpartum (44.8%±0–13). Gingival Index increased (ppregnancy (baseline, 56.7%±0.20; 21–23 weeks, 66.36%±0.17; 34–36 weeks, 74.5%±0.18) and decreased postpartum (59.3%±0.21). Probing Depth increased (ppregnancy (baseline, 2.51±0.05; 21–23 weeks, 2.63±0.053; 34–36 weeks 2.81±0.055) and decreased postpartum (2.54±0.049). Percentage of sites with Probing Depth >3 mm increased (ppregnancy (baseline, 17.6%±0.16; 21–23 weeks, 23.9%±0.17; 34–36 weeks, 31.1%±0.17) and decreased postpartum (21.2%±0.17) but remained significantly (p<0.02) higher than at baseline. Conclusion Periodontal status deteriorates during gestation but improves postpartum. PMID:28538740

  1. Oral conditions, periodontal status and periodontal treatment need of chronic kidney disease patients

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    Modupeoluwa Omotunde Soroye

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Majority of the CKD patients reviewed had poor periodontal status with code 2 TN. We, therefore, recommend nonsurgical periodontal treatment for all CKD patients to improve their oral health and forestall the systemic effects of periodontal pathology.

  2. Clinical and postextraction evaluation of periodontal disease indicators

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    Rajashri Kolte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical attachment level is the most frequently used and acceptable parameter in monitoring periodontal status in diseased individual and denotes patterns of periodontal destruction. Awareness of root morphology and the condition of the periodontal tissues is essential for reliable periodontal pocket probing and for effective debridement of root surfaces. Clinically, it is challenging to observe exact nature of complex periodontal attachment loss. The aim of the present study was to evaluate patterns of periodontal destruction based on vertical and horizontal attachment loss. Materials and Methods: A total of 200 extracted teeth were obtained from chronic periodontitis patients. Prior to extraction, clinical measurements were recorded and after extraction, the teeth were stained with crystal violet. Root length, vertical and horizontal attachment loss were measured using digital caliper. Results: There was a significant difference between clinical attachment level and vertical attachment loss for both maxillary and mandibular teeth. Mean vertical attachment loss varied between 5.17 mm and 9.17 mm. Interproximal surfaces exhibited statistically significant vertical attachment loss in both maxillary and mandibular dentition. Results indicated that vertical attachment loss was more severe with teeth belonging to the anterior sextant whereas the horizontal attachment loss was more pronounced with posterior teeth. Conclusion: Both vertical and horizontal attachment loss were observed in all periodontally involved teeth. There was a difference in clinical measurements and actual periodontal status denoted by postextraction staining. These findings have an impact on determining the prognosis and appropriate treatment plan for patients.

  3. Clinical and postextraction evaluation of periodontal disease indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolte, Rajashri; Kolte, Abhay; Wattamwar, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    Clinical attachment level is the most frequently used and acceptable parameter in monitoring periodontal status in diseased individual and denotes patterns of periodontal destruction. Awareness of root morphology and the condition of the periodontal tissues is essential for reliable periodontal pocket probing and for effective debridement of root surfaces. Clinically, it is challenging to observe exact nature of complex periodontal attachment loss. The aim of the present study was to evaluate patterns of periodontal destruction based on vertical and horizontal attachment loss. A total of 200 extracted teeth were obtained from chronic periodontitis patients. Prior to extraction, clinical measurements were recorded and after extraction, the teeth were stained with crystal violet. Root length, vertical and horizontal attachment loss were measured using digital caliper. There was a significant difference between clinical attachment level and vertical attachment loss for both maxillary and mandibular teeth. Mean vertical attachment loss varied between 5.17 mm and 9.17 mm. Interproximal surfaces exhibited statistically significant vertical attachment loss in both maxillary and mandibular dentition. Results indicated that vertical attachment loss was more severe with teeth belonging to the anterior sextant whereas the horizontal attachment loss was more pronounced with posterior teeth. Both vertical and horizontal attachment loss were observed in all periodontally involved teeth. There was a difference in clinical measurements and actual periodontal status denoted by postextraction staining. These findings have an impact on determining the prognosis and appropriate treatment plan for patients.

  4. Periodontal status of Pakistani orthodontic patients

    OpenAIRE

    MOOSA, Yousuf; HAN, Ling Na; SAFDAR, Jawad; SHEIKH, Omair Ahmed; PAN, Ya Ping

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the periodontal status of orthodontic patients and non-orthodontic patients, aged 15–28 years, of both genders. The cross-sectional study included 100 orthodontic and 100 non-orthodontic patients evaluated using a Community Periodontal Index for Treatment Need (CPITN) probe on the index teeth. A questionnaire was distributed to the participants to assess and evaluate the use of oral hygiene aids. The data were analyzed using SPSS v...

  5. Periodontal health status and smoking among young adults.

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    Vered, Yuval; Livny, Alon; Zini, Avi; Sgan-Cohen, Harold D

    2008-09-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the periodontal status and present smoking habits among a representative sample of young adult Israelis and to investigate possible associations. A representative sample of young adult Israelis was examined and interviewed on the day of release from compulsory military service. Collected data included demographic background (gender, education level, family size and father's country of origin) and current smoking habits. Clinical examination included the recording of periodontal health status according to the Community Periodontal Index (CPI). Seven thousand and fifty-six young adults were examined. Sixteen per cent were classified as CPI 0, 78% as CPI 1-2 and 6% as CPI 3-4. In total, 36% of the sample reported a current smoking habit. Periodontal status was significantly improved among non-smokers, females and children of fathers born in Israel or Western countries. Only 7% of the participants demonstrated signs of periodontitis and most young adults did not smoke; a dose-response association was revealed between present smoking habits and periodontal disease.

  6. Validity of Self-Reported Periodontal Status in the Florida Dental Care Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Litaker, Mark S

    2007-07-01

    Our objectives were to assess the validity of self-reported periodontal status by quantifying the 1) concordance between self-reported and clinical status at baseline; and 2) validity using a multivariable regression of self-reported periodontal status and sociodemographic status. The Florida Dental Care Study was a prospective study that used a population-based, stratified random sample of 873 persons in four counties of north Florida who were ≥45 years of age at baseline. Analyses used baseline data derived from in-person interviews and clinical periodontal examinations. Multivariable logistic regressions were done to quantify the relationships between the outcome (clinically determined periodontal attachment level) and predictors (self-reported dental symptoms, self-reported dental behaviors, sociodemographic circumstances, and clinically determined number of remaining teeth). Self-rated "gum" health and presence of a loose tooth were the only periodontal measures that were associated significantly with clinically determined periodontal status in multivariable regressions. The validity of self-reported periodontal status improved when the threshold of severity was increased. Significant racial differences in the validity of self-reports were evident. Self-reported measures of periodontal status were related to clinically measured periodontal attachment loss and warranted classifying their validity as "moderate" and useful for some circumstances. © 2007 American Academy of Periodontology.

  7. The Effects of Antimicrobial Peptide Nal-P-113 on Inhibiting Periodontal Pathogens and Improving Periodontal Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease consists of chronic gingival inflammation characterized by both degradation of the periodontal connective tissue and alveolar bone loss. Drug therapy is used as an auxiliary treatment method in severe chronic periodontitis, aggressive periodontitis, and periodontitis-associated systemic disease. Nal-P-113, a modified antimicrobial peptide, specifically replaces the histidine residues of P-113 with the bulky amino acid β-naphthylalanine, and our previous studies have verified that this novel peptide is not toxic to the human body within a certain concentration range. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Nal-P-113 on periodontal pathogens and periodontal status in clinical studies. In a split-mouth clinical trial, the pocket depth and bleeding index values tended to decrease in the experimental group compared with those in the control group. SEM results verified that Nal-P-113 restrained the maturation of plaque. Based on real-time polymerase chain reaction, the levels of Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus gordonii, Treponema denticola, and Porphyromonas gingivalis in subgingival plaque were decreased when the subjects were given Nal-P-113. Bacterial growth curve analysis and a biofilm susceptibility assay verified that Nal-P-113 at a concentration of 20 μg/mL restrained the growth of S. gordonii, F. nucleatum, and P. gingivalis and biofilm formation. Therefore, Nal-P-113 effectively reduces periodontal pathogens and ameliorates periodontal status.

  8. Assessment of Periodontal Tissue Status in Patients with Generalized Periodontitis and Essential Hypertension

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    T I Vicharenko

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vascular disorders play a significant role in the development of dystrophic inflammatory process. There is a direct correlation between the degree of damage to blood vessels in the jaw and a depth of the destructive process in periodontal tissue. A certain role is played by endogenous factors, such as: age, vitamin deficiency, diabetes mellitus, essential hypertension and others. Clinical and epidemiological studies using pathological techniques showed significant changes in vascular wall of the artery in the periodontium, the interdental artery in particular.  Atherosclerosis, essential hypertension and periodontal pathology were proven to occur in individuals older than 40 years. The objective of the research was to determine periodontal tissue status in patients with stage II hypertension and generalized periodontitis of II degree of severity. Materials and methods. The study involved 36 patients with stage II hypertension and generalized periodontitis of II degree of severity (the main group. The patients’ age ranged from 35 to 54 years. The control group included 10 patients of corresponding age without generalized periodontitis and somatic pathology. To assess the status of periodontal tissues, we applied the Papillary-Marginal-Attached Index and the Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs. When diagnosing periodontal disease, the classification of M.F. Danilevskyi was used. Results. The analysis of the indicators of the Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs index showed the following results: in patients of the main group, the index was 2.38±0.07 points (p<0.001 pointing out a need for a course of professional oral hygiene. In patients of the control group, the index was 0.5±0.17 points indicating that there was no need for treatment, however, there was a need for improving oral hygiene. The indicators of the Papillary-Marginal-Attached Index in the main group were 55.49±1.96 points pointing out a severe degree of

  9. Periodontal status of Pakistani orthodontic patients

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    Yousuf MOOSA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the periodontal status of orthodontic patients and non-orthodontic patients, aged 15–28 years, of both genders. The cross-sectional study included 100 orthodontic and 100 non-orthodontic patients evaluated using a Community Periodontal Index for Treatment Need (CPITN probe on the index teeth. A questionnaire was distributed to the participants to assess and evaluate the use of oral hygiene aids. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 17, and various comparisons were performed using the chi-square test. The study revealed that there was a statistically significant association in CPITN scores between the orthodontic and non-orthodontic patients (p < 0.01. The study showed that patients undergoing orthodontic treatment have increased plaque accumulation and probing depth resulting in periodontal tissue destruction. Proper oral hygiene practices and interdental aids should be employed to control plaque.

  10. Subgingival microbiota dysbiosis in systemic lupus erythematosus: association with periodontal status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Jôice Dias; Calderaro, Débora Cerqueira; Ferreira, Gilda Aparecida; Mendonça, Santuza Maria Souza; Fernandes, Gabriel R; Xiao, E; Teixeira, Antônio Lúcio; Leys, Eugene J; Graves, Dana T; Silva, Tarcília Aparecida

    2017-03-20

    Periodontitis results from the interaction between a subgingival biofilm and host immune response. Changes in biofilm composition are thought to disrupt homeostasis between the host and subgingival bacteria resulting in periodontal damage. Chronic systemic inflammatory disorders have been shown to affect the subgingival microbiota and clinical periodontal status. However, this relationship has not been examined in subjects with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The objective of our study was to investigate the influence of SLE on the subgingival microbiota and its connection with periodontal disease and SLE activity. We evaluated 52 patients with SLE compared to 52 subjects without SLE (control group). Subjects were classified as without periodontitis and with periodontitis. Oral microbiota composition was assessed by amplifying the V4 region of 16S rRNA gene from subgingival dental plaque DNA extracts. These amplicons were examined by Illumina MiSeq sequencing. SLE patients exhibited higher prevalence of periodontitis which occurred at a younger age compared to subjects of the control group. More severe forms of periodontitis were found in SLE subjects that had higher bacterial loads and decreased microbial diversity. Bacterial species frequently detected in periodontal disease were observed in higher proportions in SLE patients, even in periodontal healthy sites such as Fretibacterium, Prevotella nigrescens, and Selenomonas. Changes in the oral microbiota were linked to increased local inflammation, as demonstrated by higher concentrations of IL-6, IL-17, and IL-33 in SLE patients with periodontitis. SLE is associated with differences in the composition of the microbiota, independently of periodontal status.

  11. Association between susceptible genotypes to periodontitis and clinical outcomes of periodontal regenerative therapy: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzopoulos, G-S; Koidou, V-P

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this review is to systematically investigate the effect of a susceptible genotype to periodontitis with the clinical outcomes of periodontal regeneration. Based on a focused question, an electronic search identified 155 unique citations. Three journals (Journal of Periodontology, Journal of Clinical Periodontology and Journal of Periodontal Research), references of relevant studies and review articles were hand-searched. Two independent reviewers implementing eligibility inclusion criteria selected the studies. Of the 155, four studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All studies were published between 2000 and 2004 and the samples' size was 40 to 86 patients. Polymorphisms of Interleukin-1 (IL-1) gene were included in all. Three out of four studies failed to identify an association between susceptible genotypes to periodontitis and clinical outcomes of periodontal regeneration, while one found an association. The heterogeneity and small number of studies included prevented the conduct of a meta-analysis. No studies were identified evaluating the effect of other genotypes and as a result only IL-1 genotype studies were included. Within the limits of the present review, no direct conclusion for the effect of a susceptible IL-1 genotype status to the clinical outcome after periodontal regeneration could be drawn. The need of more qualitative studies to explore a possible association emerges.

  12. The clinical assessment of aggressive periodontitis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Chan-Myung; You, Hyung-Keun; Jeong, Seong-Nyum

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Few epidemiologic studies have investigated aggressive periodontitis in Koreans, but such studies of disease prevalence and other clinical characteristics would be invaluable in providing proper treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of aggressive periodontitis and to measure the extent of associated periodontal breakdown. Methods The study population consisted of 1,692 patients who visited the Department of Periodontology, Wonkwang Daejeon Dental Hospital from ...

  13. Smoking and periodontal disease: clinical evidence for an association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moimaz, Suzely Adas Saliba; Zina, Lívia Guimarães; Saliba, Orlando; Garbin, Cleá Adas Saliba

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the periodontal condition and smoking status, according to dose and duration information, and to estimate the percentage of subjects with periodontitis attributable to cigarette smoking in a representative adult rural population in southern Brazil. Bivariate statistical analysis was used to evaluate the association of smoking status with periodontitis in a cross-sectional study comprising 165 dentate individuals, aged 35 to 66 years, subjected to oral clinical examination of six sites per tooth in all sextants. The prevalence of periodontitis (having > or = 1 pocket of > or = 4 mm around the index teeth) in the population was 35.2%. Overall, 13.9% had a cumulative loss of attachment > 4 mm; 35.7% of subjects were current smokers, classified as heavy (average 25.3 pack years), moderate (average 14.6 pack years) and light smokers (average 3.1 pack years). Statistical analysis showed that current smokers had an 11 times (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.69 to 26.62) and former smokers had a nine times (95% CI = 3.29 to 25.96) greater probability of having established periodontitis compared with non-smokers. The number of pack years (P = 0.0004) and years of smoking exposure (P = 0.0013) were associated with an increased prevalence of periodontitis. The number of current smokers with periodontitis might be reduced by 80%, had they not smoked cigarettes. Of the subjects with periodontitis, 64% could be prevented among current smokers by eliminating tobacco consumption. Cigarette smoking was strongly associated with periodontitis, and there was a relationship with dose and duration of smoking. These findings contributed to the evidence of smoking as a risk factor for periodontal disease and support the importance of dose-response analysis on determining the strength of this association.

  14. Periodontal status affects C-reactive protein and lipids in patients with stable heart disease from a tertiary care cardiovascular clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Manuela F; Montenegro, Marlon M; Furtado, Mariana V; Polanczyk, Carisi A; Rösing, Cassiano K; Haas, Alex N

    2014-04-01

    There are scarce data on the impact of the periodontal condition in the control of biomarkers in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of this study is to assess whether periodontal inflammation and tissue breakdown are associated with C-reactive protein (CRP) and lipids in patients with stable heart disease. This cross-sectional study included 93 patients with stable coronary artery disease (57 males; mean age: 63.5 ± 9.8 years) who were in outpatient care for at least 6 months. After applying a structured questionnaire, periodontal examinations were performed by two calibrated periodontists in six sites per tooth at all teeth. Blood samples were collected from patients on the day of periodontal examination to determine levels of CRP, lipids, and glycated hemoglobin. Multiple linear regression models were fitted to evaluate the association among different periodontal and blood parameters controlling for sex, body mass index, glycated hemoglobin, use of oral hypoglycemic drugs, and smoking. Overall, the sample presented high levels of periodontal inflammation and tissue breakdown. Unadjusted mean concentrations of triglycerides (TGs), very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and glucose were significantly higher in individuals with severe periodontitis. When multiple linear regression models were applied, number of teeth with clinical attachment loss ≥6 mm and presence of severe periodontitis were significantly associated with higher CRP concentrations. Bleeding on probing was significantly associated with TGs, total cholesterol, and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In this sample of patients with stable CVD, current periodontal inflammation and tissue breakdown are associated with cardiovascular inflammatory markers, such as CRP and lipid profile.

  15. The clinical assessment of aggressive periodontitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chan-Myung; You, Hyung-Keun; Jeong, Seong-Nyum

    2011-06-01

    Few epidemiologic studies have investigated aggressive periodontitis in Koreans, but such studies of disease prevalence and other clinical characteristics would be invaluable in providing proper treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of aggressive periodontitis and to measure the extent of associated periodontal breakdown. The study population consisted of 1,692 patients who visited the Department of Periodontology, Wonkwang Daejeon Dental Hospital from January to December, 2010. Clinical parameters (probing depth, gingival recession, periodontal attachment loss) were measured by a single examiner, and radiographic examination was performed at the baseline. Twenty-eight (1.65%) patients showed clinical features of aggressive periodontitis, of which 27 patients exhibited the generalized form, and 1 exhibited the localized form. There was no significant difference between the percentage of male and female patients. The probing pocket depth of the maxillary first molar was deeper than that of the other teeth and gingival recession was also the most serious at the maxillary first molar. The periodontal attachment loss was the highest at the maxillary first molar. The average number of missing teeth was 1.29 per subject. Loss of the second molar was prominent. Within the limitations of this study, the periodontal breakdown evaluated by attachment loss was found to be most severe at the first molars of aggressive periodontitis patients. However, further large scale multicenter studies are necessary to access more precise data, including prevalence.

  16. Periodontal status of rural inhabitants in Prek Russey, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasena, Najith; Ikeda, Noriaki; Win, Kyu Kyu Swe; Yamaguchi, Yoshiko; Takehara, Tadamichi; Miyazaki, Hideo

    2002-01-01

    There is a paucity of information pertaining to oral disease patterns including periodontal disease in Cambodia, which is just emerging from a 20-year ruin. A house-to-house survey was conducted to assess the periodontal status of 1948 subjects aged 15-74 years in a rural commune in Cambodia using Community Periodontal Index (CPI) and measuring Attachment Loss (LA). The periodontal status of Cambodians increased with age as indicated by both CPI and LA. Calculus was the most common finding among Cambodians pointing to overall poor oral hygiene levels. Notwithstanding the poor oral hygiene, however, the severe periodontitis as denoted by > or = 6mm periodontal pockets was rare even in the elderly while edentulousness was not frequently observed until 65 years. Preventive programmes targeting periodontal disease in Cambodia should focus on oral health education and simple oral hygiene instructions while the ubiquitous calculus could be dealt with oral prophylaxis.

  17. Periodontal status and treatment needs among cardiac patients at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A self-administered questionnaire was used to obtain socio-demographic information, followed by clinical examination for dental plaque, gingival bleeding, calculus, periodontal pockets (PPT) and gingival recession. To enable determination of periodontal treatment needs, data for periodontal conditions was transformed ...

  18. The clinical, microbiological and systemic characteristics of periodontitis and their changes after periodontal therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bizzarro, S.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to study 1. the relationship between periodontitis and systemic conditions and 2. the effect of 4 periodontal treatment modalities on clinical and microbiological periodontal parameters as well as systemic conditions. Our results showed that periodontitis is associated

  19. Clinical evaluation in periodontitis patient after curettage

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    Widowati Witjaksono

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Curettage is used in periodontics to scrap off the gingival wall of a periodontal pocket, and is needed to reduce loss of attachment (LOA by developing new connective tissue attachment in patients with periodontitis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the success of curettage by the formation of tissue attachment. This clinical experiment was done by comparing LOA before curettage, 2 weeks and 3 weeks after curettage on 30 teeth with the indication of curettage. Study population were periodontitis patient who attending dental clinic at Hospital University Science Malaysia (HUSM with inclusion criteria good general health condition, 18 to 55 years old male or female and presented with pocket depth > 3mm. The teeth were thoroughly scaling before intervention and evaluated by measuring the periodontal attachment before curettage, two weeks and three weeks after curettage. Repeated measure ANOVA and Paired T Test were used to analyze the data. The result of the study showed that there was reduction in the periodontal attachment loss in periodontitis patient after curettage either in the anterior or posterior teeth which were supported by statistical analysis. This study concluded that curettage could make reattachment of the tissue

  20. Periodontal status, salivary immunoglobulin, and microbial counts after short exposure to an isolated environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Balwant; Kaur, Jasdeep

    2013-01-01

    Salivary flow rate, immunoglobulin, and periodontal status were affected during a simulated Skylab mission. The effect is more prominent after long-duration space flights and can persist for several weeks after landing. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of a simulated Mars environment on periodontal status and levels of salivary microorganisms and immunoglobulins in the human oral cavity. Twelve healthy male volunteers were studied before, at 1 and 2 weeks, and after completion of a mission in an isolated, confined simulated Mars environment at the Mars Desert Research Station, USA. We conducted a current stress test, measured salivary immunoglobulin, cortisol, α-amylase, salivary flow rate, and levels of plaque and salivary microbes, and assessed clinical periodontal parameters (probing depth, bleeding on probing, and clinical loss of attachment). Salivary IgG levels and Streptococcus mutans activity were significantly higher at 1 week. Values for clinical periodontal parameters (probing depth, bleeding on probing, and clinical loss of attachment) significantly differed at 1 week. Stress might be caused by the difficulty of the mission rather than the isolated environment, as mission duration was quite short. Periodontal condition might worsen due to poor oral hygiene during the mission. The present findings show that all periodontal conditions and levels of oral bacteria and stress after completion of the simulated Mars mission differed from those at baseline. To verify the relationship between stress status and periodontal health in simulated Mars missions, future studies using larger patient samples and longer follow-up will be required.

  1. The clinical, microbiological and systemic characteristics of periodontitis and their changes after periodontal therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Bizzarro, S.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to study 1. the relationship between periodontitis and systemic conditions and 2. the effect of 4 periodontal treatment modalities on clinical and microbiological periodontal parameters as well as systemic conditions. Our results showed that periodontitis is associated with a prothrombotic state, a condition involved in the development of cardiovascular diseases. In particular alveolar bone loss and the host immune response to two established periodontal pathogenic ...

  2. Periodontal status and Prevotella intermedia antibody in acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soejima, Hirofumi; Oe, Yoko; Nakayama, Hideki; Matsuo, Katsuhiko; Fukunaga, Takashi; Sugamura, Koichi; Kawano, Hiroaki; Sugiyama, Seigo; Shinohara, Masanori; Izumi, Yuichi; Ogawa, Hisao

    2009-11-12

    We performed periodontal examination and measured serum antibody levels against Prevotella intermedia in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Composite periodontal risk scores were significantly higher in the ACS group than in the coronary artery disease (CAD) group. Serum antibody levels were higher in the ACS group than in the CAD group and those were significantly correlated with the composite periodontal risk scores. These results provided important information about the status of P. intermedia infection in patients with ACS.

  3. Periodontal status according to community Peridontal Index among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To study the periodontal health status of Mtwara adult population aged 40+ years. Design: A cross-sectional descriptive study. Settings: Mtwara Rural district. Main outcome measures: Presence of gingival bleeding on gentle probing, dental calculus, probing periodontal pocket depth (PPD): 4-5 mm or 6+ mm, ...

  4. Periodontal status and some variables among pregnant women in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In effect increased prevalence of dental caries, gingivitis, periodontitis and tooth mobility may be encountered in pregnancy. ... Oral health education should be included as an integral part of antenatal care to increase the women awareness. ... Keywords: Oral hygiene, Periodontal status, Pregnant women, Variables ...

  5. Comparative Evaluation of Periodontal Status of Chronic Renal Failure Patients and Systemically Healthy Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Radhika; Kumar, Uttam; Mallapragada, Siddharth; Agarwal, Pallavi

    2018-03-01

    Periodontitis, a chronic infectious disease, affects most of the population at one time or the other and its expression is a combination of hosts, microbial agents, and environmental factors. Extensive literature exists for the relationship between periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Only a few studies performed in a limited number of patients have reported peri-odontal health status in chronic renal failure patients. Hence, the aim of the present study is to assess and compare the periodontal status of patients with chronic renal failure undergoing dialysis, predialysis with systemically healthy individuals. A total of 90 patients were divided into three groups. Group I: 30 renal dialysis patients. Group II: 30 predialysis patients. Control group comprised 30 systemically healthy patients who formed group III. Periodontal examination was carried out using oral hygiene index-simplified (OHI-S), plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), probing depth, and clinical attachment loss. The results of the study showed that the periodontal status of patients with chronic renal failure undergoing dialysis (dialysis group) and patients with chronic renal failure not undergoing renal dialysis (predialysis) when compared with systemically healthy subjects showed significantly higher mean scores of OHI-S, PI, and clinical attachment loss. Thus, patients with chronic renal failure showed poor oral hygiene and higher prevalence of periodontal disease. The dental community's awareness of implications of poor health within chronic renal failure patients should be elevated.

  6. Periodontal conditions in vegetarians: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staufenbiel, I; Weinspach, K; Förster, G; Geurtsen, W; Günay, H

    2013-08-01

    Investigations about possible correlations between vegetarian diet and periodontal conditions are rare and characterized by small case numbers. The aim of this clinical study was to investigate the influence of a vegetarian diet on periodontal parameters with an appropriate sample size. A total of 200 patients, 100 vegetarians and 100 non-vegetarians, were included in the study. All patients were examined including a full mouth assessment of the periodontal and dental conditions. In addition, a questionnaire was handed out to ask for patients' oral hygiene habits and level of education. For statistical analysis the Mann-Whitney Test (χ(2) for analysis of the questionnaire) was applied (level of significance: Pvegetarians versus 41.72 years non-vegetarians). Vegetarians had significantly lower probing pocket depths (P=0.039), bleeding on probing (P=0.001), periodontal screening index (P=0.012), a better hygiene index (Pvegetarians. Furthermore, vegetarians had a higher level of education (PVegetarians revealed better periodontal conditions (less inflammation signs, less periodontal damage and a better dental home care). However, it should be considered that vegetarians are not only avoiding meat in their nutrition but are also characterized by an overall healthier life style.

  7. Periodontal Status in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ayub Rigi-Ladiz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regarding the negative effects of inflammatory disease including periodontal infections on cardiovascular diseases, this study was carried out in order to investigate the periodontal status of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD referring to two hospitals in Zahedan. Materials and Methods: In this study, 100 patients with CAD who referred to Khatam-al-Anbia and Imam Ali Hospitals in Zahedan were examined. After clinical examination, periodontal parameters PD (probing depth, AL (attachment level, PI (plaque index, and GR (gingival recession were determined. Preparing the radiography, the average percentage of bone resorption overall the mouth was measured and registered. The results were analyzed using SPSS-17. Results: Plaque accumulation in 92% of the subjects of study was more than 10%. Pocket depth in the patients was as follows: 18% of the patients had less than 2 mm PD; 13% of them 2-2.99 mm; 43% with 3-45.99 mm PD and 26% of them had deep pocket (> 5 mm. In relation to attachment loss, the results were as follows: in 9% of the patients 1-2 mm; 41% of them 3-4 mm, and for 50% of the patients AL was more than 5 mm. the average of gingival recession in the subjects was 3.31±1.9. Considering bone resorption, 6.7% of the people had less than 20% resorption, 46.7% had 20-39% resorption and in 46.7% of them, resorption was 40-60%. Conclusion: In this study, affliction to periodontal diseases was said to be the cause of Coronary Artery Disease.

  8. Periodontal status among patients with diabetes in Nuuk, Greenland

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    Amanda Lamer Schjetlein

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes is becoming more common in the Greenlandic population. Patients with diabetes are more prone to periodontal disease. Periodontal status may have an effect on metabolic control. Objective: The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of periodontitis amongst patients with diabetes in Nuuk, Greenland, and secondly, to observe if dental care was associated with improved periodontal status and metabolic control. Study design: Observational cross-sectional study and a pilot study of a dental care intervention. Methods: Sixty-two Greenlandic patients with diabetes were included in the study. Data were collected from the Electronic Medical Records (EMR, in addition to a telephone interview. Patients were offered 3 dental examinations with a 3-month interval. The dental examinations consisted of a full-mouth assessment of number of remaining teeth and assessment of periodontal status. Patients received scaling and root planing, together with information and instructions on oral hygiene. Information on glycated haemoglobin (HbA1C values was collected from the EMR at each dental examination. Results: In this study, 21.0% (13/62 of patients with diabetes had periodontitis. About 42% had less than 20 teeth. The association between diabetes and periodontitis was known by 20 out of the 62 patients. Over half of the patients had been to a dental examination within the last year. The prevalence of periodontitis decreased significantly from 21.0 to 0% (p<0.001 after 3 dental examinations. No change in HbA1C levels was observed (p=0.440. Conclusion: Periodontitis was common among patients with diabetes in Nuuk. Dental health status based on Periodontal Screening Index (PSI and bleeding on probing (BOP seemed to improve after dental health care, indicating a need for increased awareness among patients and health care professionals. HbA1C levels were not improved among the patients.

  9. Comparative periodontal status of human immunodeficiency virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There are diverse reports on the prevalence and severity of chronic periodontitis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive persons. Few studies have been carried out in developing countries in Sub.Saharan Africa. This study was aimed at comparing the prevalence and severity of chronic periodontitis of ...

  10. Comparative periodontal status of human immunodeficiency virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    was independent of lower education. Key words: Chronic periodontitis, community periodontal index, human immunodeficiency virus -positive, Nigeria. Date of Acceptance: 12-Apr-2015. Address for correspondence: Dr. KA Umeizudike,. Department of Preventive Dentistry, Faculty of Dental Sciences,. College of Medicine of ...

  11. The effects of thyroid hormone abnormalities on periodontal disease status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, Talal M; Wang, Bing-Yan; Cohen, Robert E

    2011-10-01

    Thyroid hormones play an important role in the regulation of physiologic processes. Thyroid disease can lead to imbalance in the homeostasis of the body and affect the healing capacity of tissues. However, limited data are available regarding the relationship between thyroid hormone imbalance (thyroid disease) and periodontal health. This review is carried out to summarize the relationship between thyroid disease and periodontal status. PUBMED and MEDLINE searches of both human and animal studies were performed to investigate the relationship between thyroid disease, periodontal status, and dental implants. Results suggest that thyroid diseases may affect the status of periodontal diseases, especially in hypothyroid conditions. The duration from disease onset to treatment of thyroid disorders may be critical, since uncontrolled thyroid disease may result in destruction of the periodontium. Further controlled studies are needed to explore the relationship between thyroid hormone imbalance and periodontal status. Periodontal therapies, including dental implant placement, appear to be safe with no increase in treatment failure, so long as the status of the thyroid gland is controlled.

  12. Treatment of periodontal intrabony defects using autologous periodontal ligament stem cells: a randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Fa-Ming; Gao, Li-Na; Tian, Bei-Min; Zhang, Xi-Yu; Zhang, Yong-Jie; Dong, Guang-Ying; Lu, Hong; Chu, Qing; Xu, Jie; Yu, Yang; Wu, Rui-Xin; Yin, Yuan; Shi, Songtao; Jin, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background Periodontitis, which progressively destroys tooth-supporting structures, is one of the most widespread infectious diseases and the leading cause of tooth loss in adults. Evidence from preclinical trials and small-scale pilot clinical studies indicates that stem cells derived from periodontal ligament tissues are a promising therapy for the regeneration of lost/damaged periodontal tissue. This study assessed the safety and feasibility of using autologous periodontal ligament stem ce...

  13. Total Antioxidant Capacity and Total Oxidant Status in Saliva of Periodontitis Patients in Relation to Bacterial Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Taowen; Andrukhov, Oleh; Haririan, Hady; Müller-Kern, Michael; Liu, Shutai; Liu, Zhonghao; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    The detection of salivary biomarkers has a potential application in early diagnosis and monitoring of periodontal inflammation. However, searching sensitive salivary biomarkers for periodontitis is still ongoing. Oxidative stress is supposed to play an important role in periodontitis progression and tissue destruction. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and total oxidant status (TOS) in saliva of periodontitis patients compared to healthy controls and their relationship with periodontopathic bacteria and periodontal disease severity. Unstimulated saliva was collected from 45 patients with generalized severe periodontitis and 37 healthy individuals and the TAC/TOS were measured. In addition, salivary levels of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Fusobacterium nucleatum in saliva were measured. Salivary TAC was lower in periodontitis patients compared to healthy controls. Moreover, a significant negative correlation of salivary TAC with clinical attachment loss was observed in periodontitis patients. No significant difference in the salivary TOS was observed between periodontitis patients and healthy controls. Bacterial load was enhanced in periodontitis patients and exhibited correlation with periodontal disease severity but not with salivary TAC/TOS. Our data suggest that changes in antioxidant capacity in periodontitis patients are not associated with increased bacterial load and are probably due to a dysregulated immune response. PMID:26779448

  14. Total antioxidant capacity and total oxidant status in saliva of periodontitis patients in relation to bacterial load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taowen eZhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of salivary biomarkers has a potential application in early diagnosis and monitoring of periodontal inflammation. However, searching sensitive salivary biomarkers for periodontitis is still ongoing. Oxidative stress is supposed to play an important role in periodontitis progression and tissue destruction. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated total antioxidant capacity (TAC and total oxidant status (TOS in saliva of periodontitis patients compared to healthy controls and their relationship with periodontopathic bacteria and periodontal disease severity. Unstimulated saliva was collected from 45 patients with generalized severe periodontitis and 37 healthy individuals and the TAC/TOS were measured. In addition, salivary levels of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Fusobacterium nucleatum in saliva were measured. Salivary TAC was lower in periodontitis patients compared to healthy controls. Moreover, a significant negative correlation of salivary TAC with clinical attachment loss was observed in periodontitis patients. No significant difference in the salivary TOS was observed between periodontitis patients and healthy controls. Bacterial load was enhanced in periodontitis patients and exhibited correlation with periodontal disease severity but not with salivary TAC/TOS. Our data suggest that changes in antioxidant capacity in periodontitis patients are not associated with increased bacterial load and are probably due to a dysregulated immune response.

  15. Periodontal pathogen detection in gingiva/tooth and tongue flora samples from 18- to 48-month-old children and periodontal status of their mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, E Y; Tanner, A C R; Milgrom, P; Mokeem, S A; Riedy, C A; Spadafora, A T; Page, Roy C; Bruss, J

    2002-02-01

    Few studies have detected periodontal pathogens in young children, and when detected the prevalence has been relatively low. In this epidemiological study, we determined the prevalence of periodontal pathogen colonization in young children and examined the relationship between periodontitis in mothers and detection of periodontal pathogens in their children aged 18-48 months. Children were selected and enrolled randomly into the study; tongue and gingival/tooth plaque samples were harvested and analyzed by DNA probe checkerboard assay for Porphyromonas gingivalis and Bacteroides forsythus. Clinical measurements included a gingival bleeding score in the children and a periodontal screening and recording (PSR) score in the mothers. Mothers having one or more periodontal sites with probing depths > 5.5 mm were classified as having periodontitis. In this population, 71% (66/93) of the 18- to 48-month-old children were infected with at least one periodontal pathogen. Detection rates for children were 68.8% for P. gingivalis and 29.0% for B. forsythus. About 13.8% (11/80) of children had gingival bleeding in response to a toothpick inserted interproximally. Children in whom B. forsythus was detected were about 6 times more likely to have gingival bleeding than other children. There was no relationship between bleeding and detection of P. gingivalis. 17.0% (16/94) of the mothers had periodontitis. When all mother-child pairs were considered, the periodontal status of the mother was found not to be a determinant for detection of periodontal pathogens in the floral samples from the children. However, the odds ratio that a daughter of a mother with periodontitis would be colonized was 5.2 for B. forsythus. A much higher proportion of children in this population were colonized by P. gingivalis and/or B. forsythus than has been previously reported for other populations. A modest level of association between manifestations of periodontitis in mothers and detection of B

  16. Effect of nonsurgical periodontal treatment on clinical response and glycemic control in type 2 diabetic patients with periodontitis: Controlled clinical trial

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    Ajitha Kanduluru

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (type 2 DM and chronic periodontitis are common chronic diseases in adults in the world population. Once periodontal disease is established, the chronic nature of this infection may contribute to worsening of diabetic status leading to more severe diabetes-related complications. It has been proposed that the relation of periodontitis and diabetes is bidirectional. Objectives: The objective was to compare the clinical response and glycemic control in type 2 DM patients with periodontitis, before and after the nonsurgical periodontal treatment with controls. Materials and Methods: A total 70 type 2 DM patients with chronic generalized moderate periodontitis was divided into 2 groups. Treatment group (35 received one stage full mouth scaling and root planning plus oral hygiene instructions; the control group (35 received only oral hygiene instructions. At baseline, 1 st month and 3 rd month, the clinical periodontal parameters (plaque index [PI], gingival index [GI], pocket depth [PD], clinical attachment loss [CAL], gingival recession [GR], and bleeding on probing [BOP] and glycemic parameters (fasting blood sugar [FBS], and postprandial blood sugar [PPBS] were recorded, whereas the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c was recorded only at baseline and 3rd month. The collected data were subjected to statistical analysis. Results: When comparing the mean scores of clinical parameters for both the groups, there was a significant difference in all clinical parameters, that is, mean PI, GI, BOP, PD, CAL scores except mean GR, whereas for the glycemic parameters, there was a significant difference in mean FBS; PPBS values and no significant difference in mean percentage of HbA1c for treatment group at 3 rd month follow-up. Conclusion: Findings of the present study showed that nonsurgical periodontal treatment resulted in lower glycemic levels and the reduction of clinical parameters of periodontal infection, confirming the

  17. Association between Periodontal Status, Oral Hygiene Status and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of oral hygiene of individuals reasonably reflects their gingival and periodontal health, as the soft and hard deposits on the tooth are implicated in gingivitis, periodontitis, dental caries and halitosis. The newer studies linking periodontal disease with systemic problem have necessitated the need to assess oral ...

  18. Rapidly progressive periodontitis. A distinct clinical condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, R C; Altman, L C; Ebersole, J L; Vandesteen, G E; Dahlberg, W H; Williams, B L; Osterberg, S K

    1983-04-01

    We report radiographic, clinical, historical, and laboratory observations on seven patients selected to illustrate the features and characteristics of rapidly progressive periodontitis, with the aim of establishing this disease as a distinct clinical entity. This form of periodontitis is seen most commonly in young adults in their twenties, but it can occur in postpubertal individuals up to approximately 35 years of age. During the active phase, the gingival tissues are extremely inflamed and there is hemorrhage, proliferation of the marginal gingiva, and exudation. Destruction is very rapid, with loss of much of the alveolar bone occurring within a few weeks or months. This phase may be accompanied by general malaise, weight loss, and depression, although these symptoms are not seen in all patients. The disease may progress, without remission, to tooth loss, or alternatively, it may subside and become quiescent with or without therapy. The quiescent phase is characterized by the presence of clinically normal gingiva that may be tightly adapted to the roots of teeth with very advanced bone loss and deep periodontal pockets. The quiescent phase may be permanent, it may persist for an indefinite period, or the disease activity may return. Most patients with rapidly progressive periodontitis have serum antibodies specific for various species of Bacteroides, Actinobacillus, or both, and manifest defects in either neutrophil or monocyte chemotaxis. Affected patients generally respond favorably to treatment by scaling and open or closed curettage, especially when accompanied by standard doses of antibiotics for conventional time periods. A small minority of patients do not respond to any treatment, including antibiotics, and the disease progresses inexorably to tooth loss even in the presence of aggressive periodontal therapy and maintenance. At the present time it is not possible to distinguish prior to treatment which individuals will respond to therapy and which will

  19. Comparison between probiotic lozenges and drinks towards periodontal status improvement of orthodontic patients

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    Natasia Melita Kohar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fixed orthodontic appliances may interfere with daily oral hygiene procedure, causing more abundant plaque accumulation, therefore increasing the risk of periodontal disease. Probiotic methods represent a breakthrough approach in maintaining oral health and preventing periodontal disease. Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the effect between probiotic lozenges containing Lactobacillus reuteri and probiotic drinks containing Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota towards periodontal status of orthodontic patients. Method: Fixed orthodontic patients (n=30 from Faculty of Dentistry, Trisakti University Dental Hospital were included in this clinical trial. Periodontal status consisting of Plaque Index (PlI, Interdental Hygiene Index (HYG, and Papillary Bleeding Index (PBI were then recorded from each patient. All patients received the phase one of periodontal treatment, as well as plaque control instruction. The subjects (n=10/gp were randomly assigned to one of three groups; control group; probiotic lozenges group (Biogaia®; and probiotic drinks group (Yakult®. For 14 days, the probiotic groups were instructed to use the probiotic. Periodontal index improvement (PlI, HYG, and PBI was found in all groups after 14 days research periode. These indices were then analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis analysis test. Result: It was found that L. reuteri and L. casei strain Shirota may improve periodontal status in fixed orthodontic patients. The best results were obtained from probiotic lozenges group. However, the results were not statistically significant (p>0.05. Conclusion: It was concluded that probiotics consumption containing L. reuteri and L. casei strain Shirota may slightly improve periodontal status in fixed orthodontic patients.

  20. Honeybee propolis extract in periodontal treatment: A clinical and microbiological study of propolis in periodontal treatment

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    Amita Coutinho

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Subgingival irrigation with propolis extract as an adjuvant to periodontal treatment was more effective than scaling and root planing as assessed by clinical and microbiological parameters.

  1. [The clinical study of IgA nephropathy with severe chronic periodontitis and aggressive periodontitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y L; Qiao, M; Xu, Z H; Zou, G M; Ma, L L; Li, W G; Xu, B H

    2016-01-05

    To explore the clinical characteristics of IgA nephropathy (IgAN) with severe chronic periodontitis and aggressive periodontitis. A total of 436 hospitalized patients who underwent renal needle biopsy in the department of nephrology of China-Japan Friendship Hospital from November 2013 to December 2014 were recruited in the study and blindly had periodontal examination. The patients were divided into IgAN group and non-IgAN group according to the renal pathology. The patients with IgAN were further categorized as non-periodontitis, chronic periodontitis and aggressive peridontitis group by Haas classification. The chronic periodontitis group was continually divided into mild, moderate and severe periodontitis group. The levels of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in gingival crevicular fluid were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The prevalence of periodontitis in the study was 88.3% (385/436). The prevalence of chronic periodontitis and aggressive periodontitis were higher in patients with IgAN than those with non-IgAN (Pperiodontitis was correlated with pathologic grading of IgAN (r=0.48, Pperiodontitis, those with severe chronic and aggressive periodontitis had more severe pathology, more frequent recurrent gross hematuria, higher levels of 24 h proteinuria, serum triglyceride and uric acid, higher periodontal probing depth and clinical attatchment level, as well as higer levels of IL-1β and IL-6, but had lower creatinine clearance rate (all Paggressive periodontitis was higher in patients with IgAN. Chronic periodontitis is correlated with the onset and development of IgAN. Patients with IgAN have worse condition with the aggravation of periodontitis.

  2. Association between salivary sialic acid and periodontal health status among smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawzali, Jwan Ibrahim

    2016-07-01

    Smoking is an environmental risk factor causing poor dental health. Sialic acid is a salivary marker of oxidative stress for research of periodontal diseases. To identify diagnostic sialic acid fraction and its scavenger effect for periodontal diseases among smokers and periodental health status. This study carried out in the Khanzad specialized dental center - Erbil city. The study population is composed of 62 convenient samples. A structured interview questionnaire form was used to collect data about socio-demographic properties and smoking history. Clinical measurements were carried out to measure periodontal health status. Un-stimulated whole saliva samples were collected for measuring sialic acid fractions. Statistical package for social science (SPSS, version 18), was used for analysis and odds ratio. Risk of smoking increased significantly in young to mid ages, which included most of the current smokers, with periodontal diseases, and high total free sialic acid. Risk of periodontitis and teeth missing increased significantly by long duration of smoking, bad tooth brushing, and poor eating habits. Risk of teeth mobility and loss decreased significantly by early smoking cessation and low income. High levels of free sialic acid correlated significantly in current smokers with medium and deep pocket depth. Salivary free sialic acid may be used as a diagnostic oxidative stress biomarker for periodontal diseases among young current smokers. Cumulative destructive effect of long duration of smoking on the periodontum can be controlled by smoking cessation, good oral hygiene and diet habit in early old ages.

  3. Evaluation of micronutrient (Zinc, Magnesium, and Copper levels in serum and glycemic status after nonsurgical periodontal therapy in type 2 diabetic patients with chronic periodontitis

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    Gopalakrishnan Sundaram

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To find out the effect of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on serum zinc (Zn, magnesium (Mg, and copper (Cu concentration and glycemic status in type 2 diabetes with chronic periodontitis (CP. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty patients were included in this study, which was further divided into three groups. Group 1 consisted of forty patients with CP, Group 2 consisted of forty patients of CP with controlled diabetes, and Group 3 consisted of forty patients of CP with uncontrolled diabetes. Periodontal parameters such as plaque index, gingival index, bleeding on probing, pocket depth, and clinical attachment levels (CALs were evaluated. Blood samples were collected to assess the levels of fasting blood sugar, glycosylated hemoglobin, Zn, Mg, and Cu. All parameters were evaluated at baseline and 3 months after nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Results: The results showed statistically significant reduction in all the clinical parameters within the groups except for the CAL in group 1 patients (P = 0.05. The glycemic status also showed a statistically significant reduction after treatment (P < 0.001. The intragroup comparison was taken between the values of micronutrients, showed substantial increase in the levels of both Zn and Mg and decrease in the level of Cu after nonsurgical periodontal treatment (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Patients with diabetes and periodontitis had altered metabolism of Zn, Mg, and Cu contributing to the progression and complication of diabetes mellitus and periodontitis. Nonsurgical periodontal treatment improved the variation and concentration of plasma micronutrients and also the periodontal status and glycemic level.

  4. Oral Microbiota, Periodontal Status, and Osteoporosis in Postmenopausal Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Vigueras, Scarlette; Martínez-Garriga, Blanca; Sánchez, María Carmen; Sanz, Mariano; Estrugo-Devesa, Albert; Vinuesa, Teresa; López-López, José; Viñas, Miguel

    2016-02-01

    Alterations in hormone levels during menopause decrease bone density and may worsen oral health, favoring the growth of periodontal pathogens, whose detection could improve the diagnosis of periodontitis. The aim of this study is to detect and quantify the main periodontal pathogens in the oral microbiota of postmenopausal females and to explore the relationship between clinical and periodontal parameters. This was an observational cross-sectional study of 76 postmenopausal females. Dental examinations and sampling for microbiologic evaluation were performed, and a history of osteoporosis/osteopenia was collected. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used for detecting and quantifying Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn), Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Campylobacter rectus (Cr), and Tannerella forsythia (Tf). The results obtained were subjected to statistical analyses. Statistical significance was defined as P Periodontitis was detected in 77.1% of females with osteoporosis/osteopenia (P >0.05). A significant correlation was found between osteoporosis and missing teeth. T. forsythia and C. rectus were detected in 100% of the samples, Fn and Pg in 98.7%, and Aa in 73.7%. Osteoporosis did not influence the prevalence of periodontitis among postmenopausal females. The presence of periodontopathogenic bacteria was not sufficient to confirm disease. A preventive maintenance program for postmenopausal females, particularly osteoporotic females, who are at greater risk of tooth loss, could minimize the potential effects of bone loss on periodontal tissues.

  5. Evaluation of the Periodontal Status of Abutment Teeth in Removable Partial Dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, André Ricardo Maia; da Silva Lobo, Fábio Daniel; Miranda, Mónica Célia Pereira; Framegas de Araújo, Filipe Miguel Soares; Santos Marques, Tiago Miguel

    2017-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the use of removable partial dentures affects the periodontal status of abutment teeth. An observational cross-sectional study was done on a sample of patients rehabilitated with removable partial dentures (2010 to 2013). At a recall appointment, a clinical examination was done to collect data related to the rehabilitation and periodontal status of the abutment teeth. Of 145 invited patients, 54 attended the requested follow-up appointment (37.2%). Mean patient age was 59.1 years, and the study population was 42.6% male and 57.4% female. The mean follow-up time for the prosthesis was 26 months. Abutment teeth had higher values in all periodontal variables (P removable partial dentures is affected by these rehabilitations. A recall program for these patients involving removable prosthodontics and periodontology appointments is mandatory.

  6. Amelogenesis imperfecta and localised aggressive periodontitis: A rare clinical entity

    OpenAIRE

    Gundannavar, Gayatri; Rosh, Radhika M.; Chandrasekaran, Shoba; Hussain, Ahad M.

    2013-01-01

    This case report presents two female patients whose chief complaint was discoloration of teeth. On careful clinical examination it was found that the patients had features of amelogenesis imperfecta and localised aggressive periodontitis. This article will give an insight of clinical and radiographic features of amelogenesis imperfecta with localised aggressive periodontitis, which is a rare clinical entity.

  7. Periodontal status and serum creatine kinase levels among young ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-12-02

    Dec 2, 2015 ... Games. In this study,[11] 302 athletes from Africa, the United states of America, and Europe were recruited. The results. Periodontal status and serum creatine ... 2012 games was poor which with negatively influenced their .... Muscle damage produced during a simulated badminton match in competitive.

  8. Periodontal Status and Some Variables among Pregnant Women in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    variables such as trimester and dental visits were statistically significant. Conclusion: This study indicated that the gestational age of pregnancy and dental visits have a definite impact on the periodontal status. Oral health education should be included as an integral part of antenatal care to increase the women awareness.

  9. Periodontal Status and Oral Health Related Quality of Life among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to evaluate the periodontal status of diabetic patients receiving care at the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital ... A total of 53 persons (43.3%) reported that their lives were less satisfying because of problems with their teeth or dentures while 49 (40.2%) perceived that their poor ...

  10. Periodontal Status of Adolescents in Surulere, Lagos State, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    83% of the subjects presented predominately with the worst condition recorded, code 2 (i.e. calculus), which is a reversible condition. A mean of 0.6 healthy sextants, 2.3 bleeding sextants and 3.1 calculus-accumulated sextants was calculated. A statistical difference in periodontal status was noted with age, the younger ...

  11. Assessment of periodontal status in smokeless tobacco chewers and nonchewers among industrial workers in North Bengaluru

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    Dinta Kathiriya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: More than one-third of the tobacco consumed in India is of smokeless form. While the smokeless tobacco (ST products have been strongly associated with oral cancer, the association between ST and periodontal disease is less clear. The present study was conducted on industrial workers because in premises, there is a ban on smoking tobacco and hence workers tend to consume more of ST products. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess periodontal status in ST chewers and nonchewers among industrial workers in North Bengaluru. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional analytical study was conducted on 800 industrial workers (400 ST chewers and 400 nonchewers of North Bengaluru. Information regarding ST habits was obtained using the Global Adult Tobacco Survey questionnaire, followed by clinical examination to assess periodontal status using the community periodontal index and attachment loss. The comparison between chewers and nonchewers was done using Pearson's Chi-square test. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the difference of periodontal status and loss of attachment (LOA between chewers and nonchewers. Results: ST chewing habit was observed the maximum (46.5% among age group 25–44 years. Most of male chewers had habit of chewing gutkha followed by khaini, and majority of the female chewers were using khaini followed by betel nut quid. A significantly higher prevalence of bleeding on probing and calculus was found among nonchewers. ST chewers had 2.06 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.55–2.75 times more risk of developing periodontal pockets and 2.23 (95% CI: 1.68–2.98 times more risk of having LOA when compared with nonchewers. Conclusions: ST has deleterious effects on the periodontium. Hence, it is one of the important risk factors for periodontal disease.

  12. Prevalence of Clinical Periodontitis and Putative Periodontal Pathogens among South Indian Pregnant Women

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    Chaitanya Tellapragada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of recent understanding of the association of periodontal infections and adverse pregnancy outcomes, the present investigation was undertaken to study the periodontal infections among 390 asymptomatic pregnant women and to find an association of bacterial etiologies with the disease. Prevalence of gingivitis was 38% and clinical periodontitis was 10% among the study population. Subgingival plaque specimens were subjected to multiplex PCR targeting ten putative periodontopathogenic bacteria. Among the periodontitis group, high detection rates of Porphyromonas gingivalis (56%, Prevotella nigrescens (44%, Treponema denticola (32%, and Prevotella intermedius (24% were noted along with significant association with the disease (P<0.05.

  13. Chair-side quantitative oral-microflora screening for assessing familial correlation of periodontal status and caries prevalence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Kai Huang

    Full Text Available AIM: Our goal was to investigate the relationship between clinical status and the presence of carious or periodontal pathogens among parent-child familial pairs. Clinical practices of risk assessment with consideration of familial pathogen interaction might reduce the need for therapy, improve patient outcomes, and ultimately reduce oral disease burden. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this study, we enrolled 30 parent-child pairs, with the children exhibiting complete deciduous dentition or mixed dentition with only permanent first molars. Clinical statuses were evaluated using caries and periodontal disease indicators, including the sum of decay and the number of missing or filled teeth (DMFT for adults, decay, extraction caused by dental disease, and filled teeth (deft, for children, probing depth, and plaque control record (PCR. Supra- and sub-gingival bacteria were determined based on semi-quantitative measurements of microbial infection by using data from the Dentocult(® SM test (caries-related organisms and the PerioCheck(® test (periodontal disease-related organisms. RESULTS: No statistically significant relationship was detected between the prevalence of periodontal pathogens and that of cariogenic pathogens in the oral cavity. However, the clinical status of caries (DMFT was negatively correlated with the clinical status of periodontal disease (pocket depth in parents who were infected with dominant periodontal pathogens (r = -0.59, p<0.01. Parents' DMFT scores were positively correlated with children's deft and PCR scores. PCR and deft scores of children appeared to decrease significantly with the parent's pocket depth. CONCLUSION: The study showed that the quantity of caries pathogens were not significant related to periodontal pathogens, but the caries clinical outcome is negative related with periodontal clinical outcome between familial pairs.

  14. A randomized controlled trial of pre-conception treatment for periodontal disease to improve periodontal status during pregnancy and birth outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Xiong, Xu; Su, Yi; Zhang, Yiming; Wu, Hongqiao; Jiang, Zhijun; Qian, Xu

    2013-12-09

    Evidence has suggested that periodontal disease is associated with an increased risk of various adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes. However, several large clinical randomized controlled trials failed to demonstrate periodontal therapy during pregnancy reduced the incidence of adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes. It has been suggested that the pre-conception period may be an optimal period for periodontal disease treatment rather than during pregnancy. To date, no randomized controlled trial (RCT) has examined if treating periodontal disease before pregnancy reduces adverse birth outcomes. This study aims to examine if the pre-conception treatment of periodontal disease will lead to improved periodontal status during late pregnancy and subsequent birth outcomes. A sample of 470 (235 in each arm of the study) pre-conception women who plan to conceive within one year and with periodontal disease will be recruited for the study. All participants will be randomly allocated to the intervention or control group. The intervention group will receive free therapy including dental scaling and root planning (the standard therapy), supragingival prophylaxis, and oral hygiene education. The control group will only receive supragingival prophylaxis and oral hygiene education. Women will be followed throughout their pregnancy and then to childbirth. The main outcomes include periodontal disease status in late pregnancy and birth outcomes measured such as mean birth weight (grams), and mean gestational age (weeks). Periodontal disease will be diagnosed through a dental examination by measuring probing depth, clinical attachment loss and percentage of bleeding on probing (BOP) between gestational age of 32 and 36 weeks. Local and systemic inflammatory mediators are also included as main outcomes. This will be the first RCT to test whether treating periodontal disease among pre-conception women reduces periodontal disease during pregnancy and prevents adverse birth outcomes. If

  15. Periodontal Disease Status in an Isolated Greek Adult Population

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    N. A. Chrysanthakopoulos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the present study was to examine the periodontal condition of an adult population in three isolated regions in Greece and to determine the association of periodontal disease with several demographic, behavioral and environmental factors.Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 640 individuals, aged 20to69 years from three isolated regions. The following indices were assessed: Pocket Depth (PD, Clinical Attachment Level (CAL, Dental Plaque, Calculus and Bleeding on Probing (BOP. Statistical analysis was accomplished by multiple linear regression model which was used to assess the association between the mean clinical attachment loss and clinical, demographic and behavioral parameters.Results: The samples of the study showed high levels of dental plaque, dental calculus and BOP. The final multivariate model showed that age (p=0.000, gender (p=0.016 and presence of calculus (p=0.000 were associated with the mean clinical attachment loss. Age (p=0.000, gender (p=0.000 and dental plaque (p=0.027 were associated with gingival recession, while age (p=0.018 and gender (p=0.000 were associated with probing depth. Bleeding on probing, dental plaque, toothbrush frequency, level of education, tobacco consumption and reasons for dental visits were not associated with the mean clinical attachment loss.Conclusion: Periodontal disease consists of a complicated destructive condition of the Periodontal tissue with a.multi-factorial etiology. Oral hygiene instructions and a regular dental follow-up could play a significant role in the prevention of periodontal disease.Key Words: Periodontal Disease; Epidemiology; Risk Factors

  16. Periodontal health status in patients treated with the Invisalign® system and fixed orthodontic appliances: A 3 months clinical and microbiological evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levrini, Luca; Mangano, Alessandro; Montanari, Paola; Margherini, Silvia; Caprioglio, Alberto; Abbate, Gian Marco

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this prospective study was to compare the periodontal health and the microbiological changes via real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in patients treated with fixed orthodontic appliances and Invisalign® system (Align Technology, Santa Clara, California). Materials and Methods: Seventy-seven patients were enrolled in this study and divided into three groups (Invisalign® group, fixed orthodontic appliances group and control group). Plaque index, probing depth, bleeding on probing were assessed. Total biofilm mass and periodontal pathogens were analyzed and detected via real-time PCR. All these data were analyzed at the T0 (beginning of the treatment) T1 (1-month) and T2 (3 months); and statistically compared using the Mann–Whitney test for independent groups. Results: After 1-month and after 3 months of treatment there was only one sample with periodontopathic anaerobes found in patient treated using fixed orthodontic appliances. The Invisalign® group showed better results in terms of periodontal health and total biofilm mass compared to the fixed orthodontic appliance group. A statistical significant difference (P Invisalign® System show a superior periodontal health in the short-term when compared to patients in treatment with fixed orthodontic appliances. Invisalign® should be considered as a first treatment option in patients with risk of developing periodontal disease. PMID:26430371

  17. Periodontal health status in patients treated with the Invisalign(®) system and fixed orthodontic appliances: A 3 months clinical and microbiological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levrini, Luca; Mangano, Alessandro; Montanari, Paola; Margherini, Silvia; Caprioglio, Alberto; Abbate, Gian Marco

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to compare the periodontal health and the microbiological changes via real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in patients treated with fixed orthodontic appliances and Invisalign(®) system (Align Technology, Santa Clara, California). Seventy-seven patients were enrolled in this study and divided into three groups (Invisalign(®) group, fixed orthodontic appliances group and control group). Plaque index, probing depth, bleeding on probing were assessed. Total biofilm mass and periodontal pathogens were analyzed and detected via real-time PCR. All these data were analyzed at the T0 (beginning of the treatment) T1 (1-month) and T2 (3 months); and statistically compared using the Mann-Whitney test for independent groups. After 1-month and after 3 months of treatment there was only one sample with periodontopathic anaerobes found in patient treated using fixed orthodontic appliances. The Invisalign(®) group showed better results in terms of periodontal health and total biofilm mass compared to the fixed orthodontic appliance group. A statistical significant difference (P < 0.05) at the T2 in the total biofilm mass was found between the two groups. Patients undergoing orthodontic treatment with the Invisalign(®) System show a superior periodontal health in the short-term when compared to patients in treatment with fixed orthodontic appliances. Invisalign(®) should be considered as a first treatment option in patients with risk of developing periodontal disease.

  18. Correlation of sense of coherence with oral health behaviors, socioeconomic status, and periodontal status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Kommuri Sahithi; Doshi, Dolar; Kulkarni, Suhas; Reddy, Bandari Srikanth; Reddy, Madupu Padma

    2016-01-01

    The sense of coherence (SOC) has been suggested to be highly applicable concept in the public health area because a strong SOC is stated to decrease the likelihood of perceiving the social environment as stressful. This reduces the susceptibility to the health-damaging effect of chronic stress by lowering the likelihood of repeated negative emotions to stress perception. The demographic data and general information of subjects' oral health behaviors such as frequency of cleaning teeth, aids used to clean teeth, and dental attendance were recorded in the self-administered questionnaire. The SOC-related data were obtained using the short version of Antonovsky's SOC scale. The periodontal status was recorded based on the modified World Health Organization 1997 pro forma. The total of 780 respondents comprising 269 (34.5%) males and 511 (65.5%) females participated in the study. A significant difference was noted among the subjects for socioeconomic status based on gender ( P = 0.000). The healthy periodontal status (community periodontal index [CPI] code 0) was observed for 67 (24.9%) males and 118 (23.1%) females. The overall SOC showed statistically negative correlation with socioeconomic status scale ( r = -0.287). The CPI and loss of attachment (periodontal status) were significantly and negatively correlated with SOC. The present study concluded that a high level of SOC was associated with good oral health behaviors, periodontal status, and socioeconomic status.

  19. Correlation of sense of coherence with oral health behaviors, socioeconomic status, and periodontal status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kommuri Sahithi Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The sense of coherence (SOC has been suggested to be highly applicable concept in the public health area because a strong SOC is stated to decrease the likelihood of perceiving the social environment as stressful. This reduces the susceptibility to the health-damaging effect of chronic stress by lowering the likelihood of repeated negative emotions to stress perception. Materials and Methods: The demographic data and general information of subjects' oral health behaviors such as frequency of cleaning teeth, aids used to clean teeth, and dental attendance were recorded in the self-administered questionnaire. The SOC-related data were obtained using the short version of Antonovsky's SOC scale. The periodontal status was recorded based on the modified World Health Organization 1997 pro forma. Results: The total of 780 respondents comprising 269 (34.5% males and 511 (65.5% females participated in the study. A significant difference was noted among the subjects for socioeconomic status based on gender (P = 0.000. The healthy periodontal status (community periodontal index [CPI] code 0 was observed for 67 (24.9% males and 118 (23.1% females. The overall SOC showed statistically negative correlation with socioeconomic status scale (r = −0.287. The CPI and loss of attachment (periodontal status were significantly and negatively correlated with SOC. Conclusion: The present study concluded that a high level of SOC was associated with good oral health behaviors, periodontal status, and socioeconomic status.

  20. Periodontal status among adolescents in Georgia. A pathfinder study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liran Levin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of the present pathfinder study was to screen and map the periodontal status of Georgian population in accordance with the guidelines of the World Health Organization for population based surveys. Methods. During 2012, a pathfinder study was conducted to collect this data. For the periodontal portion of the study, 15-year-old school children were examined in the capital city of Tbilisi as well as in two other large cities and 4 smaller villages. All participants were examined by a trained dental team in a classroom using a dental mirror and a periodontal probe. Periodontal examination included plaque scores, calculus scores, probing depth measurements and bleeding on probing. These measurements were recorded for the Ramfjord index teeth. Results. A total of 397 15-year-old participants were examined in this pathfinder study. There were 240 females (60.45% and 157 males (39.55%. Of the total participants 196 (49.37% were urban adolescents while 201 (50.63% were from rural communities. Mean probing depth was 3.34 ± 0.57 mm with a range of 1 to 10 mm; a relatively high proportion (34.26% of these subjects presented with at least one site with pockets of 5 mm or deeper. Males presented with greater plaque, calculus and probing depths than females. When urban and rural populations were compared, urban participants presented with more plaque, probing depths and bleeding on probing. Greater pocket depths were found to be related to the presence of plaque calculus and bleeding on probing. Conclusions. Overall, rather high incidences of periodontal pockets ≥ 5 mm were detected in this population. This data should serve to prepare further more detailed epidemiological studies that will serve to plan and implement prevent and treat strategies for periodontal diseases in Georgia and also help make manpower decisions.

  1. Effect of irregular interproximal dental restorations on periodontal status

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    Matvijenko Vladimir B.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Research of effects that irregular interproximal dental restoration have on supporting structures of the teeth and examination of evolution and course of changes in tissue structure is quite a poorly studied topic. Aim of this study is to examine and assess clinical and radiological changes in periodontal tissue caused by irregular interproximal dental restoration in particular group of patients with different age and sex. Methods. Irregularities which were assesed in this study are divided into two groups: a gap (cracks occurring between dental restorations and the gingival walls in Class II cavities, b prominence of dental fillings out of the teeth anatomical sphere, resulting with the positive step in gum third of tooth in Class II cavities. The study was based on whether in the particular forms of irregularities of the dental restorations are differences in the degree of change in the periodontal tissue, depending on the material from which the restoration is made, and the materials used were composite fillings and amalgams. Results of this study show that irregular dental fillings significantly affect the inflammatory response in periodontal tissue. Irregularities in the form of unfilled space cause major changes in periodontal tissue. Composite fillings cause a higher degree of inflammation in relation to amalgam fillings. Conclusion. Improper tooth fillings cause periodontal tissue damages.

  2. Periodontal Health Status and Associated Factors: Findings of a Prenatal Oral Health Program in South Brazil

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    Marta Silveira da Mota Krüger

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aims of this study were to evaluate the periodontal health of pregnant women and to investigate the association of periodontal status with demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, as well as medical and dental history. Materials and Methods. A total of 311 pregnant women were interviewed to obtain sociodemographic data along with medical and dental histories. Clinical examinations were performed to record the presence of visible plaque, gingival bleeding, and caries activity. The periodontal condition was evaluated by Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN in one tooth of each sextant (16, 11, 26, 36, 31, and 46. Results. After the adjustment analysis, the presence of visible plaque remained the main determinant of gingival bleeding (OR = 2.91, CI = 1.91–4.48. First-trimester pregnancy status was also a predictor, with a lower prevalence of gingival bleeding observed in the second (OR = 0.87, CI = 0.77–0.99 and third (OR = 0.82, CI = 0.73–0.93 trimesters. Conclusion. In pregnant women, the presence of dental plaque and first-trimester pregnancy status were the main implicated factors predicting gingival bleeding.

  3. Comparative assessment of Oral Hygiene and Periodontal status among children who have Poliomyelitis at Udaipur city, Rajasthan, India

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    Nagarajappa, Ramesh; Sharda, Archana; Asawa, Kailash; Tak, Aniruddh; Jalihal, Sagar

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess and compare the oral hygiene and periodontal status among children with Poliomyelitis having upper limb disability, lower limb disability and both upper and lower disability at Udaipur city, Rajasthan, India. Study design: Total sample comprised of 344 Poliomyelitis children (upper limb disability: 33.4%; lower limb disability: 33.7%; both upper and lower limb disability: 32.9%) in the age group of 12-15 years. Clinical examination included recording Simplified Oral Hygiene Index and Community Periodontal Index. Analysis of variance (ANOVA), multiple logistic and stepwise linear regression were used for statistical analysis. Results: The mean OHI-S (2.52±1.05) score was found to be highest among children who had both upper and lower limb disability (poral hygiene and periodontal status was limb involved in the disability. Conclusion: The results of the study depicted an overall poor oral hygiene and periodontal status of the group. It was recognized that limbs involved in the disability had an impact on the oral hygiene and periodontal condition. The situation in this specialized population draws immediate attention for an integrated approach in improving the oral health and focus towards extensive research. Key words:Poliomyelitis, upper limb disability, lower limb disability, oral hygiene, periodontal status. PMID:22549671

  4. Clinical Assessment of Drug Adjunctive Therapy Effects in Association with Chronic Generalized Periodontitis and Osteoporotic Disease*

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    Ursarescu Irina-Georgeta

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study proposes an assessment of the clinical effects on periodontal level generated by the adjunctive periodontal therapy with sub-antimicrobial doses of doxycycline in patients with chronic periodontitis and osteoporosis.

  5. Periodontal health status in patients treated with the Invisalign® system and fixed orthodontic appliances: A 3 months clinical and microbiological evaluation

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    Levrini, Luca; Mangano, Alessandro; Montanari, Paola; Margherini, Silvia; Caprioglio, Alberto; Abbate, Gian Marco

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this prospective study was to compare the periodontal health and the microbiological changes via real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in patients treated with fixed orthodontic appliances and Invisalign® system (Align Technology, Santa Clara, California). Materials and Methods: Seventy-seven patients were enrolled in this study and divided into three groups (Invisalign® group, fixed orthodontic appliances group and control group). Plaque index, probing depth, bleedi...

  6. Inflammatory biomarkers in saliva: assessing the strength of association of diabetes mellitus and periodontal status with the oral inflammatory burden.

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    Yoon, Angela J; Cheng, Bin; Philipone, Elizabeth; Turner, Ryan; Lamster, Ira B

    2012-05-01

    To determine the strength of association of type 2 diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease with the oral inflammatory burden, as assessed by markers of inflammation in saliva. Unstimulated saliva samples were collected from 192 subjects with or without type 2 diabetes. β-glucuronidase (βG) was measured via a fluorometric array and interlukin-1β (IL-1β) via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The concentration of both mediators was evaluated in relationship to clinical parameters, severity of periodontal disease and diabetes status. Regression analysis demonstrated that diabetes and periodontal disease was independently and positively correlated with increased concentration of βG in saliva (p periodontal disease with the level of βG in saliva was greater than the strength of association of the diabetic status. IL-1β concentration in saliva was primarily associated with the severity of periodontal disease (p diabetes (p = 0.50). This study examined the nature of the inflammatory response in the oral cavity as assessed by inflammatory markers in saliva. Both periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus were independently associated with the oral inflammatory burden, in which the effect of periodontal disease was more pronounced. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Vitamin D status and 5-year changes in periodontal disease measures among postmenopausal women: the Buffalo OsteoPerio Study.

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    Millen, Amy E; Andrews, Christopher A; LaMonte, Michael J; Hovey, Kathleen M; Swanson, Mya; Genco, Robert J; Wactawski-Wende, Jean

    2014-10-01

    Vitamin D is hypothesized to prevent periodontal disease progression through its immune-modulating properties and its role in maintaining systemic calcium concentrations. The authors investigated associations between plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] (collected 1997 to 2000) and the 5-year change in periodontal disease measures from baseline (1997 to 2000) to follow-up (2002 to 2005) among 655 postmenopausal women in a Women's Health Initiative Observational Study ancillary study. Exploratory analyses were conducted in 628 women who also had 25(OH)D measures at follow-up. Four continuous measures of the 5-year change in periodontal disease were assessed using alveolar crest height (ACH), clinical attachment level (CAL), probing depth (PD), and percentage of gingival sites that bled on assessment. Linear regression was used to estimate β-coefficients, standard errors, and P values corresponding to change in periodontal disease (a 1-mm change in ACH, CAL, or PD or a 1-unit change in the percentage of gingival sites that bled) for a 10-nmol/L difference in 25(OH)D. Models were adjusted for age, education, dental visit frequency, smoking, diabetes status, current medications affecting bone health, baseline measures of periodontal disease, body mass index, and recreational physical activity. No statistically significant associations were observed between baseline 25(OH)D and change in periodontal disease measures, overall or in a subset (n = 442) of women with stable 25(OH)D concentrations [25(OH)D change periodontal disease status. No association between baseline 25(OH)D and the subsequent 5-year change in periodontal disease measures was observed. Vitamin D status may not influence periodontal disease progression. More studies are needed to confirm these results.

  8. Assessment of periodontal status following the alignment of impacted permanent maxillary canine teeth.

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    Szarmach, I J; Szarmach, J; Waszkiel, D; Paniczko, A

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effect of orthodontic movement of the impacted canines after surgical exposure and alignment on the periodontal status of the transpositioned and adjacent teeth as well as to compare certain parameters with those of spontaneously erupted teeth. Twenty-four patients (mean age 18.4 +/- 3.66) with unilaterally impacted 24 canines were enrolled in the study. The following parameters were assessed: pocket depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), platelet index (PI) of Silness and Löe, and modified sulcus bleeding index (SBI). Optic density of the alveolar bone along the root surface of the aligned canine was analysed based on digital radiological images made with the right angle technique. Control group consisted of spontaneously erupted teeth. In comparison to the control group, in the orthodonticaly treated group PD was found to increase on the mesial buccal and palatal surfaces of the first premolar (p aligned canine (p aligned tooth were statistically significant (p alignment zone and the control, and there was no link between the method of treatment and periodontal status, either. The alignment of the impacted permanent maxillary canines poses a risk of periodontal deterioration. Patients subjected to surgical-orthodontic treatment require periodic periodontal follow-ups.

  9. Orthodontic-aided extraction of impacted third molar to improve the periodontal status of the neighboring tooth.

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    Guida, Luigi; Cuccurullo, Gian Paolo; Lanza, Alessandro; Tedesco, Mario; Guida, Agostino; Annunziata, Marco

    2011-09-01

    In the present clinical report, we describe the management and the long-term (3-year) outcome of a periodontally compromised lower second molar healed by orthodontic-aided extraction of the neighboring impacted third molar. A healthy 21-year-old woman referred signs and symptoms of pericoronitis of impacted tooth 48 and periodontal injury on the distal aspect of tooth 47. The wisdom tooth was surgically exposed, and an orthodontic appliance was anchored to the neighboring teeth to stimulate eruption. After 5 months, third molar could be easily extracted. Three years after extraction, clinical and radiographic controls revealed a complete healing of the periodontal defect. Orthodontic-aided extraction of impacted third molars may improve the periodontal status of the neighboring tooth. This protocol is not free from drawbacks and limitations and should be applied only when third-molar extraction is associated with a concrete risk of postoperative complications.

  10. Impact of Cranberry Juice Enriched with Omega-3 Fatty Acids Adjunct with Nonsurgical Periodontal Treatment on Metabolic Control and Periodontal Status in Type 2 Patients with Diabetes with Periodontal Disease.

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    Zare Javid, Ahmad; Maghsoumi-Norouzabad, Leila; Ashrafzadeh, Elnaz; Yousefimanesh, Hojat Allah; Zakerkish, Mehrnoosh; Ahmadi Angali, Kambiz; Ravanbakhsh, Maryam; Babaei, Hosein

    2018-01-01

    Cranberries, high in polyphenols, have been associated with a favorable glycemic response in patients with type 2 diabetes and also are beneficial for oral health. Because type 2 diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease have a physiological relationship, this study aimed to evaluate the hypothesis that cranberry juice enriched with omega-3 will improve glycemic and lipid profiles and periodontal status in patients with diabetes with periodontal disease. In this randomized clinical trial, 41 patients with diabetes (age 35-67 years) with periodontal disease were recruited and randomly assigned to 4 groups: control (C; n = 12), receiving omega-3 (I1; n = 10, 1 g/ twice daily), cranberry juice (I2; n = 9, 200 ml, twice daily), and cranberry juice enriched with omega-3 (I3; n = 10, 200 ml, containing 1 g omega-3) twice daily for 8 weeks. Nonsurgical periodontal therapy was provided for all patients during the study. Fasting blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin, lipid profile, probing depth, anthropometric indices, and 3-day 24-hour dietary recalls were measured pre- and postintervention. Glycated hemoglobin was decreased significantly in I1 and I3 groups. Serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels increased significantly in the I3 group compared to baseline and compared to I1 and I2 groups. Probing depth was significantly reduced in all groups postintervention. Consumption of cranberry juice enriched with omega-3 can be beneficial as adjuvant therapy with nonsurgical periodontal therapy in decreasing glycated hemoglobin, increasing HDL-C, and improving periodontal status in patients with diabetes with periodontal disease.

  11. Clinical evaluation of endodotic therapy on periodontal tissue healing in chronic advanced periodontitis

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    Sadeghi R.

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: There is a controversy about the relationship between pulpal and periodontal diseases. The interrelationship between pulp and periodontium could have an important effect on the treatment plan of the tooth. Purpose: The aim of the present research is to evaluate root canal therapy effects on periodontal healing of teeth with chronic advanced periodontitis. Materials and Methods: In this randomized controlled clinical trial 32 single rooted teeth which had necrotic pulp or irreversible pulpitis in 7 patients with chronic advanced periodontitis were selected based on specific criteria. Using a split mouth design, teeth were randomly put in two groups of test and control. In the test group root canal therapy ,scaling & root planing were done.In the control group, only scaling & root planing were performed. Clinical parameters including Pocket Depth (PD, Clinical Attachment Level (CAL, mobility, pattern of bone destruction and plaque index (PI were evaluated in two groups at base line, 1 and 3 months after treatment. Appropriate tests such as paired Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney were performed. Results: Statistically significant reductions were found in the test group when comparing baseline and one-month post treatment values for Clinical Attachment level (CAL but not after 3-months. In the control group the CAL reductions were not statistically significant between baseline and one month post-treatment, but a increase were observed between one month and three months after treatment. There was a statstically significant difference between the test and the control groups. Other parameters didn’t show any significant differences in each group and between two groups. Conclusion: Since clinical attachment level was the most important parameter we found it can high lighted the role of pathogene with pulpal origin in progression of periodeontal disease and it is concluded that beside periodontal treatment in some advanced periodontal

  12. Influence of estrogen and osteopenia/osteoporosis on clinical periodontitis in postmenopausal women.

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    Reinhardt, R A; Payne, J B; Maze, C A; Patil, K D; Gallagher, S J; Mattson, J S

    1999-08-01

    In Western societies, more than one-third of the female population above age 65 suffers from signs and symptoms of osteoporosis, a disorder characterized by low bone mass. Estrogen deficiency is the dominant pathogenic factor for osteoporosis in women. The impact of estrogen deficiency and osteopenia/osteoporosis on periodontitis is unclear, partially due to the lack of longitudinal studies evaluating clinical signs of gingival inflammation and periodontitis progression. The purpose of this investigation was to analyze prospectively the influence of serum estradiol levels and osteopenia/osteoporosis on common clinical measurements of periodontal disease over a 2-year period. Fifty-nine moderate/advanced adult periodontitis patients and 16 non-periodontitis subjects, all within 5 years after menopause at baseline, completed the study. Serum estradiol levels (E2) were measured yearly by 125I radioimmunoassay, and osteopenia/osteoporosis was determined by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry of the lumbar spine. Posterior interproximal clinical measurements were obtained every 6 months for the periodontitis patients, including explorer-detectable supragingival plaque, bleeding on probing (BOP) and relative clinical attachment level (RCAL). Baseline probing depths, smoking history, and demographic data also were collected. Data indicated that baseline demographic measurements and bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine were not different between E2-deficient and E2-sufficient subjects. Smoking activity (packs smoked/day, years smoked) was higher in periodontitis patients (P=0.0001). E2-sufficient periodontitis subjects had a higher frequency of supragingival plaque without increasing gingival inflammation. E2 status did not influence the percentage of sites losing RCAL for either periodontitis or non-periodontitis groups, but when non-smoking osteopenic/osteoporotic periodontitis patients were evaluated, E2-deficient subjects had more BOP (43.8% versus 24.4%, P or

  13. Predictors of clinical outcomes after periodontal treatment of aggressive periodontitis: 12-month randomized trial.

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    Haas, Alex Nogueira; Silva-Boghossian, Carina Maciel; Colombo, Ana Paula; Albandar, Jasim; Oppermann, Rui Vicente; Rösing, Cassiano Kuchenbecker; Susin, Cristiano

    2016-05-20

    Little is known about the factors that may be used in clinical practice to predict the therapeutic response of aggressive periodontitis patients. The aim of this study was to determine predictors of clinical outcomes after non-surgical treatment of aggressive periodontitis. A total of 24 patients (aged 13-26 years) received oral hygiene instructions, as well as subgingival scaling and root planing. Twelve subjects received systemic azithromycin at random. Clinical variables were assessed at baseline, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Baseline microbiological assessment was performed by checkerboard DNA-DNA hybridization. Multivariable models used generalized estimating equations. There were significant improvements in the entire sample in regard to pocket depth, clinical attachment level and bleeding on probing. Significant predictors of a reduction in mean pocket depth were: use of azithromycin, non-molar teeth, generalized disease and baseline pocket depth. Absence of plaque predicted a 0.22 mm higher attachment gain, whereas a baseline pocket depth ≥7 mm predicted a 1.36 mm higher attachment loss. Azithromycin, plaque, and baseline pocket depth were significant predictors of bleeding on probing. The concomitant presence of all three red complex species predicted a 0.78 mm higher attachment loss. It may be concluded that dental plaque, tooth type, disease extent, baseline pocket depth, and use of azithromycin were significant predictors of the clinical response to treatment for aggressive periodontitis in young individuals. Moreover, the presence of multiple periodontal pathogens may predict challenges in achieving a favorable outcome for aggressive periodontitis.

  14. Treatment of periodontal intrabony defects using autologous periodontal ligament stem cells: a randomized clinical trial.

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    Chen, Fa-Ming; Gao, Li-Na; Tian, Bei-Min; Zhang, Xi-Yu; Zhang, Yong-Jie; Dong, Guang-Ying; Lu, Hong; Chu, Qing; Xu, Jie; Yu, Yang; Wu, Rui-Xin; Yin, Yuan; Shi, Songtao; Jin, Yan

    2016-02-19

    Periodontitis, which progressively destroys tooth-supporting structures, is one of the most widespread infectious diseases and the leading cause of tooth loss in adults. Evidence from preclinical trials and small-scale pilot clinical studies indicates that stem cells derived from periodontal ligament tissues are a promising therapy for the regeneration of lost/damaged periodontal tissue. This study assessed the safety and feasibility of using autologous periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) as an adjuvant to grafting materials in guided tissue regeneration (GTR) to treat periodontal intrabony defects. Our data provide primary clinical evidence for the efficacy of cell transplantation in regenerative dentistry. We conducted a single-center, randomized trial that used autologous PDLSCs in combination with bovine-derived bone mineral materials to treat periodontal intrabony defects. Enrolled patients were randomly assigned to either the Cell group (treatment with GTR and PDLSC sheets in combination with Bio-oss(®)) or the Control group (treatment with GTR and Bio-oss(®) without stem cells). During a 12-month follow-up study, we evaluated the frequency and extent of adverse events. For the assessment of treatment efficacy, the primary outcome was based on the magnitude of alveolar bone regeneration following the surgical procedure. A total of 30 periodontitis patients aged 18 to 65 years (48 testing teeth with periodontal intrabony defects) who satisfied our inclusion and exclusion criteria were enrolled in the study and randomly assigned to the Cell group or the Control group. A total of 21 teeth were treated in the Control group and 20 teeth were treated in the Cell group. All patients received surgery and a clinical evaluation. No clinical safety problems that could be attributed to the investigational PDLSCs were identified. Each group showed a significant increase in the alveolar bone height (decrease in the bone-defect depth) over time (p 0.05). This study

  15. Periodontal disease in diabetic patients - clinical and histopathological aspects.

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    Corlan Puşcu, Dorina; Ciuluvică, Radu Constantin; Anghel, Andreea; Mălăescu, Gheorghe Dan; Ciursaş, Adina Nicoleta; Popa, Gabriel Valeriu; Agop Forna, Doriana; Busuioc, Cristina Jana; Siloşi, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease is one of the most frequent diseases affecting people all over the world. The relation between periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus raised the interest both of dentists and doctors treating metabolic diseases, as the two conditions influence one another. In our study, we analyzed a number of 75 patients with diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease that presented to the medical consultory for conditions of the dental maxillary system. The clinical study showed that periodontal disease and diabetes may affect young adults as well, still this pathological association more frequently appears after the age of 50. The disease was identified especially in the women living in urban area. The clinical examination of the dental maxillary system identified the presence of gingival ulcerations, dental calculus, gingival bleeding, radicular leftovers with anfractuous margins, fixed prostheses with an inappropriate cervical adjustment. Of the systemic diseases associated to periodontal disease and diabetes mellitus, there was observed that 66.66% of the patients also suffered from cardiovascular diseases (high blood pressure, ischemic cardiopathy, heart failure), and 37.33% suffered from obesity. The histopathological and immunohistochemical tests highlighted the presence of an inflammatory chronic, intense reaction, mainly formed of lymphocytes, plasmocytes, macrophages and granulocytes, heterogeneously disseminated and alteration of the structure of marginal and superficial periodontium. The inflammatory reaction in the patients with periodontal disease and diabetes was more intense than in the patients with periodontal disease without diabetes.

  16. Microbiological and Clinical Effects of Sitafloxacin and Azithromycin in Periodontitis Patients Receiving Supportive Periodontal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Takako; Okui, Takafumi; Ito, Harue; Nakajima, Mayuka; Honda, Tomoyuki; Shimada, Yasuko; Tabeta, Koichi; Akazawa, Kohei; Yamazaki, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-04

    Sitafloxacin (STFX) is a newly developed quinolone that has robust antimicrobial activity against periodontopathic bacteria. We previously reported that oral administration of STFX during supportive periodontal therapy was as effective as conventional mechanical debridement under local anesthesia microbiologically and clinically for 3 months. The aim of the present study was to examine the short-term and long-term microbiological and clinical effects of systemic STFX and azithromycin (AZM) on active periodontal pockets during supportive periodontal therapy. Fifty-one patients receiving supportive periodontal therapy were randomly allocated to the STFX group (200 mg/day of STFX for 5 days) or the AZM group (500 mg/day of AZM for 3 days). The microbiological and clinical parameters were examined until 12 months after the systemic administration of each drug. The concentration of each drug in periodontal pockets and the antimicrobial susceptibility of clinical isolates were also analyzed. The proportions of red complex bacteria, i.e., Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia, which are the representative periodontopathic bacteria, were significantly reduced at 1 month and remained lower at 12 months than those at baseline in both the STFX and AZM groups. Clinical parameters were significantly improved over the 12-month period in both groups. An increase in the MIC of AZM against clinical isolates was observed in the AZM group. These results indicate that monotherapy with systemic STFX and AZM might be an alternative treatment during supportive periodontal therapy in patients for whom invasive mechanical treatment is inappropriate. (This study has been registered with the University Hospital Medical Information Network-Clinical Trials Registry [UMIN-CTR] under registration number UMIN000007834.). Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Lipid peroxidation levels and total oxidant/antioxidant status in serum and saliva from patients with chronic and aggressive periodontitis. Oxidative stress index: a new biomarker for periodontal disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltacıoğlu, Esra; Yuva, Pınar; Aydın, Güven; Alver, Ahmet; Kahraman, Cemil; Karabulut, Erdem; Akalın, Ferda Alev

    2014-10-01

    In this study, levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), which is a significant product of lipid peroxidation (LPO), total oxidant status (TOS), total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), and the oxidative stress index (OSI), a novel value as a marker of periodontal disease activity, are investigated in serum and saliva from patients with chronic (CP) and generalized aggressive (GAgP) periodontitis. A total of 98 patients (33 with CP, 35 patients with GAgP, and 30 periodontally healthy controls) enrolled in the study. After clinical measurements and sample collection, the MDA level, TOS, and TAOC were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography and a novel automatic colorimetric method. The OSI was calculated as [(TOS/TAOC) × 100]. Although the salivary MDA levels and serum and salivary TOS and OSI values were significantly higher in the periodontitis groups than in the control group (P 0.05). Furthermore, oxidative stress parameters were higher in the GAgP group than in the CP group (except the serum and salivary MDA levels and serum TAOC). Significant positive and negative correlations were observed between periodontal parameters and the MDA levels and TOS, TAOC, and OSI values (except serum MDA) (P periodontitis and are closely associated with clinical periodontal status. Furthermore, the OSI may be a useful and practical parameter for evaluating periodontal disease activity.

  18. Correlation of periodontal status and bone mineral density in postmenopausal women: a digital radiographic and quantitative ultrasound study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwanath, S B; Kumar, Veerendra; Kumar, Sheela; Shashikumar, Pratibha; Shashikumar, Y; Patel, Punit Vaibhav

    2011-01-01

    Data suggest that postmenopausal women with osteoporosis are at an increased risk for periodontal attachment loss and tooth loss; however, the extent of relationship between these two diseases is still not clear. The aim of the study was to evaluate the correlation of periodontal status and bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal women. The study population included 60 postmenopausal women aged 50-60 years (mean±SD: 55.5±3.4 years). Periodontal status was examined by plaque index, bleeding index, probing depth, and clinical attachment level (CAL). Digital panoramic radiograph was taken to measure the maxillary and mandibular alveolar bone density values. Skeletal (calcaneal) BMD was measured by quantitative ultrasound technique for T-score values. The recorded data for T-score, maxillary and mandibular alveolar bone densities, and periodontal status were subjected to statistical analysis for correlation and regression procedures. The results showed that mandibular alveolar (r=0.907, P0.05). Calcaneal BMD was related to alveolar bone loss and, to a lesser extent, to clinical attachment loss, implicating postmenopausal bone loss as a risk indicator for periodontal disease in postmenopausal women.

  19. Effect of smoking on potential salivary markers of periodontal disease: A clinical and biochemical study

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    Narender Dev Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tobacco smoking exerts a harmful effect on the periodontal tissues manifested by periodontal pockets, attachment loss, and periodontal bone loss. Various factors contribute to the deleterious periodontal effects of smoking, including alteration of both microbial and host response factors. Moreover, smoking may exert effects throughout the cytokine network. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of smoking on periodontal biomarkers possibly related to the development of periodontitis including inflammatory mediators and pro-inflammatory cytokines in saliva. Materials and Methods: A total of sixty subjects aged 30–55 years were included in the study and divided into three groups: systemically and periodontally healthy individuals (Group 1, subjects with pocket probing depth (PPD ≥5 mm and clinical attachment loss (CAL of ≥2 mm (Group 2, and a subjects smoking (≥10 cigarettes a day with periodontal parameters of Group 2 (Group 3. Periodontal parameters of PPD, CAL, gingival index (GI, and plaque index were measured using standard indices and criteria. Three milliliters of unstimulated saliva was taken, and salivary tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α and matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8 were determined using ELISA technique. Results: The mean GI was lowest for Group 3, but the mean probing depth of Group 3 (4.93 ± 0.41 was highest. The mean TNF-α level of Group 3 was significantly different and higher as compared to Group 1 and Group 2 (24.32 ± 8.32 ng/ml vs. 6.43 ± 2.65 ng/ml, q = 16.14; P< 0.001. Similarly, the mean MMP-8 level of Group 3 (461.71 ± 58.01 ng/ml was significantly different (P < 0.001 and higher as compared to Group 1 (192.96 ± 134.89 ng/ml and Group 2 (347.83 ± 206.72 ng/ml. Both markers showed positive and significant correlation with their periodontal status. Conclusion: Our study clearly indicates a profound effect of smoking on salivary markers of periodontal disease (TNF-α and

  20. CLINICAL AND MICROBIOLOGICAL DATA IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS.

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    Christina Popova

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is an infectious disease concerning supporting tissues of the teeth. The primary etiological agent for disease development and progression is the subgingival biofilm, but recently it is known that host factors may modify the pathological process or may affect the severity and /or extent. The increasing levels of some specific pathogenic subgingival bacteria such as Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Prevotella intermedia and others can result in periodontal destruction and possibly correlate with disease severity. Data from controlled studies show high prevalence of P. gingivalis, T. forsythia and Tr. denticola which represent the red complex (coexistence of these three species in patients with moderate and severe chronic periodontitis. Parallel investigation of probing depth (PD and clinical attachment level (CAL with the microbiological testing may give a confirmation of relation between subgingival pathogenic bacteria and severity of periodontitis.

  1. Assessment of Periodontal Status of Surgically Exposed and Orthodontically Aligned Impacted Maxillary Canines

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    Adina Coșarcă

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the periodontal status of impacted canines after 5 years following completion of the combined surgical and orthodontic treatment. Materials and methods: We examined 20 labially impacted canines and 20 palatally impacted canines at 5 years after the end of treatment. We assessed the periodontal status of these teeth. Results: Different outcomes were found regarding the probing depth and the amount of keratinized gingiva in the two mentioned groups of teeth. Conclusions: The assessed periodontal indices may signal the appearance of a periodontal disease around the teeth that were surgically and orthodontically treated

  2. Evaluation of clinical periodontal conditions in smokers and non-smokers

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    Lucinara Ignez Tavares Luzzi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Given that tobacco smoking habit is a risk factor for periodontal diseases, the aim of this study was to compare clinical periodontal aspects between smokers and non-smokers. The clinical status were assessed in 55 patients, 29 smokers and 26 non-smokers, aged 30 to 50 years, with mean age of 40. The clinical parameters used were: probing depth (PD, plaque index (PI, gingival index (GI, clinical attachment level (CAL, gingival recession (GR and gingival bleeding index (GBI for arches (upper and lower and teeth (anterior and posterior. Tooth loss was also evaluated in both groups. Multiple regression analysis showed: tendency of greater probing depth and clinical attachment level means for smokers; greater amount of plaque in smokers in all regions; greater gingival index means for non-smokers with clinical significance (p<0.05 in all regions. Although, without statistical significance, the analysis showed greater gingival bleeding index means almost always for non-smokers; similar gingival recession means in both groups and tendency of upper tooth loss in smokers and lower tooth loss in non-smokers. The findings of this study showed that clinical periodontal parameters may be different in smokers when compared to non-smokers and that masking of some periodontal signs can be a result of nicotine's vasoconstrictor effect.

  3. Clinical and microbiological effects of the initial periodontal therapy

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    Predin Tanja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Periodontitis is a destructive inflammatory disease of the tooth-supporting tissues, primarily caused by Gram-negative microorganisms. Thus, the primary objective of cause-related initial periodontal therapy is disruption and removal of the subgingival biofilm. Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and microbiological effects of the initial therapy in patients diagnosed with chronic periodontitis. Methods. Forty patients with chronic periodontitis were included in the study. As a part of the clinical assessment undertaken prior to the initial therapy, as well as one month and three months post-therapy, plaque index, gingival index, papilla bleeding index, probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level were recorded. Microbiological testing was performed prior to the initial therapy and three months after therapy. Polymerase chain reaction assays were used to determine the presence of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythensis, Prevotella intermedia and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. Results. All clinical parameters were significantly reduced after therapy. The prevalence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans was reduced by 22.5%, which was a statistically significant decrease compared to the baseline. The prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythensis and Prevotella intermedia tended to decrease after therapy; however, the difference did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion. The results of the present study demonstrated the beneficial effects of the initial periodontal therapy on both the clinical and microbiological parameters. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175075

  4. Periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001059.htm Periodontitis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Periodontitis is inflammation and infection of the ligaments and ...

  5. Pengaruh Status Sosial Budaya pada Kondisi Jaringan Periodontal Selama Masa Kehamilan

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    Peni Pujiastuti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of socio-cultural status on periodontal condition in pregnant women has been reported by a number of researches. This study aimed to investigate the effect of socio-cultural status on periodontal condition in pregnancy. The periodontal condition was evaluated for 84 pregnant women at their first, second, and third trimesters. The clinic indices include gingival index, plaque index, and the amount of subgingival plaque bacterial colonies. Statistical testing used one way Anova at 95% confidence level (α = 0.05, and t-test for the differences in the gingivitis severity of each group. The results of the study showed that gingival index, plaque index, and the amount of subgingival plaque bacterial colonies increased gradually in the first, second, and third trimesters, and that most severe gingivitis in pregnant women was associated with low level of education and unemployment. The conclusion of this study showed (1 increasing severity of gingivitis in pregnancy, (2 higher level of education is related to lower severity of gingivitis, and (3 employed women have lower rate of severe gingivitis than unemployed women.

  6. Low density lipoprotein levels linkage with the periodontal status patients of coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nafisah Ibrahim; Masulili, Sri Lelyati C.; Lessang, Robert; Radi, Basuni

    2017-02-01

    Studies found an association between periodontitis and coronary heart disease (CHD), but relationship between periodontal status CHD patients with LDL (Low Density Lipoprotein) levels, as risk factors for atherosclerosis, has not been studied. Objective: To analyze relationship between LDL and periodontal status CHD. Methods: Periodontal status of 60 CHD, 40 controls were examined (PBI, PPD, CAL) and their blood was taken to assess levels of LDL. Result: Found significant differences LDL (p=0.005), correlation between LDL with PPD (p=0.003) and CAL CHD (p=0.013), and PPD (p=0.001), CAL (p=0.008) non-CHD, but no significant correlation between LDL with PBI CAD (p=0.689) and PBI non-CHD (p=0.320). Conclusion: There is a correlation between the LDL levels with periodontal status.

  7. Comparative assessment of oral hygiene and periodontal status among children who have Poliomyelitis at Udaipur city, Rajasthan, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Mridula; Nagarajappa, Ramesh; Sharda, Archana; Asawa, Kailash; Tak, Aniruddh; Jalihal, Sagar

    2012-11-01

    To assess and compare the oral hygiene and periodontal status among children with Poliomyelitis having upper limb disability, lower limb disability and both upper and lower disability at Udaipur city, Rajasthan, India. Total sample comprised of 344 Poliomyelitis children (upper limb disability: 33.4%; lower limb disability: 33.7%; both upper and lower limb disability: 32.9%) in the age group of 12-15 years. Clinical examination included recording Simplified Oral Hygiene Index and Community Periodontal Index. Analysis of variance (ANOVA), multiple logistic and stepwise linear regression were used for statistical analysis. The mean OHI-S (2.52 ± 1.05) score was found to be highest among children who had both upper and lower limb disability (phealthy sextants were found among those with only lower limb disability (4.53 ± 2.05) and among those with both upper and lower limb disability (0.77 ± 1.39), respectively (poral hygiene and periodontal status was limb involved in the disability. The results of the study depicted an overall poor oral hygiene and periodontal status of the group. It was recognized that limbs involved in the disability had an impact on the oral hygiene and periodontal condition. The situation in this specialized population draws immediate attention for an integrated approach in improving the oral health and focus towards extensive research.

  8. Status Oral Higiene Dan Periodontal Pada Pasien Diabetes Melitus Dan Non- Diabetes Di RSUD Dr. Pirngadi

    OpenAIRE

    Butar-Butar, Mardiah Rizqo

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes melitus adalah penyakit gangguan metabolisme ditandai dengan meningkatnya kadar gula darah yang terjadi karena kelainan sekresi insulin, kerja insulin, atau kedua-duanya. Diabetes melitus merupakan salah satu penyakit sistemik yang berperan sebagai faktor risiko penyakit periodontal. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui status oral higiene dan periodontal dan odd rasio periodontitis pada pasien Diabetes melitus dan non-Diabetes. Rancangan penelitian adalah case-control. Popul...

  9. Periodontal Status and Some Variables among Pregnant Women in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Periodontal Diseases is one of the most common chronic disorders of infectious origin known in humans. It may present as gingivitis or periodontitis. Gingivitis is the inflammatory condition of the soft tissues surrounding the teeth and periodontitis, the destruction of the supporting structures of the teeth, including the ...

  10. The effect of menstrual cycle on periodontal health - a clinical and microbiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shourie, Varsha; Dwarakanath, Chini Doraswamy; Prashanth, Gujjar Vittalrao; Alampalli, Ramesh Vishwanathmurthy; Padmanabhan, Shyam; Bali, Shweta

    2012-01-01

    Fluctuations in female sex hormones result in changes in the gingival and periodontal tissues. The purpose of this study was to compare the periodontal status of premenopausal women at different time points during their menstrual cycle and to find the associated subgingival microbiota. One hundred premenopausal women participated in the study and were divided into two groups: group I consisted of 50 subjects with clinically healthy gingival, and group II consisted of 50 subjects with chronic gingivitis. Group II was further divided into group IIa and group IIb. Group IIa consisted of 25 subjects who did not receive any periodontal therapy during the study period. All the examinations were performed at three points during the menstrual cycle: ovulation (OV), pre-menstruation (PM) and menstruation (M). Plaque Index (PI), Gingival Index (GI), Papillary Bleeding Index (PBI), probing depth (PD), subgingival temperature (ST) recording, gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) collection, and estimation and microbiological examination using the benzoyl-DL-arginine-naphthylamide (BANA) test was carried out. For group IIb subjects, all the examinations were performed again during the next menstrual cycle, which followed 4 weeks after periodontal therapy. Women with clinically healthy gingiva exhibited negligible changes throughout the menstrual cycle, whereas women with gingivitis showed aggravated inflammation during ovulation and pre-menstruation as compared to menstruation. However, there was no alteration in subgingival microbiota. After treating gingivitis, the next menstrual cycle following 4 weeks after periodontal therapy was monitored, and no periodontal changes were detected. Ovarian hormones have a negligible effect on clinically healthy periodontium. However, these hormones may exaggerate pre-existing inflammation in gingival tissues, but the clinical significance of these changes remains uncertain.

  11. Dental Students' Reflections on Quality of Periodontal Care in Dental School Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Sangeetha; Powell, Charles; De la Rosa, Laurice; Mittal, Anuj; Johnson, Lonnie

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze dental students' descriptions of and reflections on the periodontal care they provided for their patients in dental school clinics. All students enrolled in the final year of the DDS program in 2011-14 at the University of Colorado School of Dental Medicine were required to complete a self-assessment of the periodontal care they provided for patients. Assessments from 263 students were compiled and qualitatively analyzed. The key reasons given for not providing good care were identified and then stratified as student/school-dependent or patient-dependent factors. Among these students, 63.1% reported that the periodontal care they provided for their patients was inadequate. Some of the student/school-dependent factors were multiple providers involved in patient care (22.8%), student oversight (21.3%), licensure and academic requirements (20.9%), limited clinic operator sessions (19.4%), clinical rotations to other sites (18.3%), and students' interest in/emphasis on other areas of dentistry (17.9%). Some of the patient-dependent factors were patient scheduling compliance (61.6%), patient finances (46.4%), medical status (20.5%), urgent dental needs (18.3%), emphasis only on restorative care (17.5%), periodontal care awareness (16.4%), and patients' oral hygiene compliance (11.5%). This analysis of students' attitudes, challenges they faced, and patient-related factors that influenced the delivery of periodontal care helped to facilitate changes in the curriculum and school policies to optimize clinical instruction and patient care in periodontics.

  12. Periodontal changes following molar intrusion with miniscrews

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    Shahin Bayani

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, these results suggest that not only periodontal status was not negatively affected by intrusion, but also there were signs of periodontal improvement including attachment gain and shortening of clinical crown height.

  13. An evaluation of generalized periodontitis treatment, based on diagnostics of pathological teeth mobility, using periotestometry. Clinical review

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    Т. І. Matviykiv

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim – to evaluate the effectiveness of the periodontal treatment using the method of periotestometry at the stage of early periodontal pathology diagnostics and record physiological mobility shift into pathological mobility. Materials and methods. Observed and treated 117 patients, diagnosed with chronic generalized periodontitis (GP of I–II degree (chronic course. Сlinical status of the oral cavity was evaluated based on: Yasynovsky Probe (immigration of leukocytes into the oral cavity, PMA Index, Greene–Vermillion hygienical index, Kulazhenko Probe. At the stages of complex periodontal treatment the measurements of the teeth mobility (in the area of the teeth involved in the pathological process, prosthetic appliances were carried out using automative pulse method periotestometry by application of the "Periotest-M" device (V. I. Herelyuk, T. I. Matviykiv, 2014. Results. At the stage of early diagnostics of periodontal pathology based on the results of mobility measurements, the change of physiological mobility into a pathological was assessed. Upon receipt of sustainability of pathological mobility indicators, as well as clinical indeces the remission of dystrophic-inflammatory processes in the periodontium were evaluated. Conclusion. Evaluating the effectiveness of GP treatment based on the study of pathological teeth mobility using periotestometry allows to optimize and correct complex periodontal treatment on its stages. An addidion of the periotestometry method on the stages of generalized periodontitis treatment will prolongate remission of this pathology in the future. chronic periodontitis; tooth mobility; periotestometry; combined modality therapy

  14. The influence of smoking on clinical periodontal disease

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    Ina Hendiani

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease has very complex and multi factor etiology. Plaque bacteria is the main cause of periodontal disease and another risk factor that also plays a role is a smoking habit. Cigarette product such as nicotine can influence the development of periodontal disease that can directly and systemically damage the function of PMN cell. The research was conducted by taking a clinical examination on the smoking influence that covers the number of cigarettes and the period of smoking, and kind of cigarette to the worse of periodontal disease, and by measuring the epithelial attachment loss and the bleeding index. The research was conducted to 152 male aged 20-45 years old, comprised 80 smokers and 72 nonsmokers at the Clinic of Faculty of Dentistry Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta. The result of the research showed that smoking gave influence on the worse of the periodontal disease. There was a profound relationship between the smoking period and the number of cigarettes consumed everyday indicated by the epithelial attachment loss. Smoking did not enhance gingival bleeding. The relationship between kinds of cigarette and the gingival bleeding score and the epithelial attachment loss did not show a significant bleeding.

  15. Periodontal status in 18-year-old Lithuanian adolescents: An epidemiological study

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    Eglė Bendoraitienė

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The results of our study showed that the periodontal and oral hygiene status of 18-year-old Lithuanian population could be characterized as poor. In total, 77.1% of the study participants were found to have periodontal conditions such as gum bleeding, dental calculus, and shallow pockets. The anterior teeth of the mandible were most frequently affected.

  16. The sociodemographic characteristics, periodontal health status, and subgingival microbiota of patients with chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus: a case-control study in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Liu, Jingbo; Tan, Lisi; Yu, Ning; Lin, Li; Geng, Fengxue; Zhang, Dongmei; Pan, Yaping

    2013-08-01

    In China, chronic periodontitis (CP) is common in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The purpose of this study is to identify the sociodemographic characteristics associated with such patients and to assess the periodontal health status and subgingival microbiota of patients with CP and T2DM (T2DMCP) in the Chinese population. A total of 150 patients with T2DMCP and 306 patients with CP without any systemic disease completed questionnaires, underwent clinical periodontal examinations and participated in diabetes-related parameter examinations. Subgingival plaques were obtained to determine the prevalence and amounts of selected oral bacterial species using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR, respectively. The income level and mean body mass index (BMI) of the patients with T2DMCP were significantly higher than those of the patients with CP. Additionally, the patients with T2DMCP were more likely to be urban residents, and they had significantly more severe periodontitis than did the patients with CP. In the patients with T2DMCP, the prevalence and amounts of Treponema denticola and Tannerella forsythia were significantly higher than those in the patients with CP. Finally, compared with the patients with CP, the patients with T2DMCP had a significantly lower prevalence and amount of Prevotella intermedia. Compared with the patients with CP, the patients with T2DMCP were more likely to be urban residents and generally had higher incomes, higher mean BMI, and poorer periodontal health status. Higher levels of T. denticola and T. forsythia and lower levels of P. intermedia were identified in the subgingival plaque of the patients with T2DMCP.

  17. Effect of hyaluronan on periodontitis: A clinical and histological study

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    Gauri Gontiya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Conventional, non-surgical periodontal therapy consists of supra- and subgingival tooth debridement. However, it is a technically demanding procedure and is not always efficient at eradicating all periodontal pathogens and in reducing inflammation. Therefore, local subgingival application of other chemotherapeutic agents may be used as an adjunct to non-surgical therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical and histological outcomes of local subgingival application of 0.2% hyaluronic acid gel (GENGIGEL® as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP in chronic periodontitis patients. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty sites were chosen from 26 patients with chronic periodontitis (criteria being periodontal pockets ≥5mm. Experimental sites additionally received HA gel subgingivally at baseline, 1 st , 2 nd , and 3 rd week. Clinical parameters were re-assessed at 4 th , 6 th , and 12 th week. At 4 th week recall, a gingival biopsy was obtained from test and control site for histologic examination. Results: Intra-group analysis of all the clinical parameters at all sites from baseline to 4 th , 6 th , and 12 th week showed statistically significant changes. Experimental sites showed statistically significant improvement in Gingival index and Bleeding index at 6 th and 12 th week when compared with control sites. However, no statistically significant differences were observed in the PPD and RAL between control and experimental sites at 4 th , 6 th , and 12 th week time interval. No statistically significant association was found between the histological grading of the sites that received HA treatment. Conclusion: Subgingival placement of 0.2% HA gel along with SRP provided a significant improvement in gingival parameters. However, no additional benefit was found in periodontal parameters. Histologically, experimental sites showed reduced inflammatory infiltrate, but it was not statistically significant.

  18. Periodontal status and oral health behavior in hospitalized patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavsar, Neeta Vijay; Dave, Bela Dilip; Brahmbhatt, Nilam Ashokkumar; Parekh, Rishikesh

    2015-08-01

    We evaluated the periodontal health status and oral health behavior among hospitalized patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) to assess the association of COPD with dental health. A group of 100 hospitalized patients with COPD and a group of 100 age, sex, and race-matched control patients were included in this study. Detailed case histories along with standardized measures of oral health including gingival index, plaque index (PI), and simplified oral hygiene index (OHI) were estimated and compared. Probing depths and clinical attachment levels (CALs) were recorded at four sites per tooth. C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in saliva and serum were also measured. The study subjects had similar demographics and distribution in either group. Patients with COPD had significantly lower brushing frequency, poor periodontal health (OHI and PI), greater gingival inflammation, and deeper pockets/CALs compared to controls. Further COPD patients had significantly higher serum and salivary CRP levels compared to control groups. Lower brushing frequency, poor oral health, and presence of destructive periodontal disease were observed among patients with COPD, which warrants promoting dental care and oral health knowledge as an integrated approach to treating COPD patients.

  19. The relationship between selected measures of periodontal status and demographic and behavioural risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Bruce A; Selwitz, Robert H

    2005-07-01

    To assess differences between selected periodontal measures by demographic and behavioural factors in a nationally representative sample of the United States. Data for 11,347 person's ages 20-79 years from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) were used. Indices and measures constructed from NHANES III data used for this study were: derived community periodontal index (dCPI), attachment loss extent index (ALEI), attachment loss (AL) scores, and a Periodontal Status Measure (PSM) developed for this study. The influence of demographic and behavioural factors varied across the four indices examined in multivariate cumulative logistic models. Moreover, there was significant effect modification by cigarette smoking with age in the ALEI and AL models. The odds ratio (OR) of increasing periodontal disease status among 20-39 year olds as measured by AL or ALEI for current smokers compared with non-smokers were OR=6.2 (95% confidence interval (CI)=4.1, 8.7) and OR=5.6 (95% CI=3.7, 8.7), respectively. In a similar comparison, the OR for dCPI was 2.6 (95% CI=1.7, 3.8). Furthermore, Mexican American ethnicity was generally not significant in any models using dCPI, PSM, AL, or ALEI and prior dental visit was more likely to be significant only in the dCPI and PSM models. Among the well-known demographic and behavioural influences on periodontal health status, some, such as race/ethnicity and prior dental visit status have different relationships with differing periodontal measures employed to assess periodontal status. Moreover, potential interactions among cofactors also are dependent upon the measure selected. Periodontal research findings may be influenced significantly by periodontal measure selection and its affect on measurement validity. This may have particular relevance to issues concerning disease surveillance and assessing reduction of disparities in oral health. Consequently, a renewed approach to developing appropriate measures for

  20. Clinical Outcomes after Regenerative Periodontal Therapy with Emdogain

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    Beresescu Gabriela Felicia

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Regeneration is defined as a reconstruction of a lost part of the body in such a way that the structure and function of the lost tissue are completely restored. The aim of this study is to compare the clinical outcomes of intrabony defects treatment using regenerative periodontal therapy with enamel matrix proteins (Emdogain, EMD with a control group.

  1. Clinical parameters associated with periodontitis in untreated persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lembariti, BS; Van't Hof, MA; Pilot, T; Van Palenstein-Helderman, WH

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between clinical parameters and periodontitis in a population receiving no regular prophylactic dental care. From a sample of 164 adult rural and urban Tanzanian subjects aged between 30 and 44 years, 16% were identified with

  2. Assessment of Periodontal Status of Surgically Exposed and Orthodontically Aligned Impacted Maxillary Canines

    OpenAIRE

    Adina Coșarcă; Mariana Păcurar; Cecilia Petrovan; Alina Ormenișan

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the periodontal status of impacted canines after 5 years following completion of the combined surgical and orthodontic treatment. Materials and methods: We examined 20 labially impacted canines and 20 palatally impacted canines at 5 years after the end of treatment. We assessed the periodontal status of these teeth. Results: Different outcomes were found regarding the probing depth and the amount of keratinized gingiva in the two mentioned groups of t...

  3. A cross-sectional study to assess the effect of dental fluorosis on periodontal status

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    Amandeep Chopra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The effect of fluoride in the reduction of dental caries is well established, its effect on periodontal tissues is enigmatic. Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate the association between dental fluorosis and the periodontal status. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 600 subjects suffering from fluorosis. Variables such as age, gender, and smoking, which could act as covariates for the periodontal disease were recorded. The oral examination included assessment of oral hygiene index-simplified (OHI-S, community periodontal index and treatment need, and assessment of dental fluorosis by Jackson's fluorosis index. Results: Periodontitis was more common in females than in males. As the age advances, the rate of periodontal disease increases steadily. Periodontitis was significantly associated with poor oral hygiene and tobacco usage. As the degree of fluorosis increased, the severity of gingivitis reduced and periodontitis increased. Conclusion: There is a strong association between the degree of dental fluorosis and periodontal disease along with other factors such as age, gender, OHI-S, and tobacco usage.

  4. Periodontal clinical and microbiological characteristics in healthy versus generalized aggressive periodontitis families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Mabelle de F; Casati, Marcio Z; Taiete, Tiago; Vale, Hugo F do; Nociti, Francisco Humberto; Sallum, Enilson Antônio; Silvério, Karina G; Casarin, Renato C V

    2015-10-01

    Generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAP) is a severe and multifactorial disease in which a familial aggregation and a specific microbiological profile have been suggested. Thus, this case-control study evaluated the clinical and subgingival microbial profile of GAP subjects and their families compared to healthy families. Fifteen families with parents presenting periodontal health and 15 with parents with a history of GAP were selected. Each family should have at least one child between 6 and 12 years old. Plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), and periodontal probing depth (PPD), as well as Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) amounts (by qPCR), were assessed from all subjects. Children of GAP families showed a higher PI, GI, and PPD when compared to children of healthy families (p ≤ 0.05). A higher frequency of detection and amounts of Aa was observed in GAP children compared to children of healthy families (p ≤ 0.05). Moreover, a significant association between Aa amounts and gingival bleeding was observed in children (p ≤ 0.05, r = 0.37). Children from GAP families have worst clinical conditions, i.e. higher levels of PI, GI, and PPD, a more pathogenic microbiological profile, and the amount of Aa are associated with a higher marginal inflammation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The Effect of Resveratrol Supplementation in Adjunct with Non-surgical Periodontal Treatment on Blood Glucose, Triglyceride, Periodontal Status and Some Inflammatory Markers in Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Periodontal Disease

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    Ahmad Zare Javid

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease are two chronic and common diseases with close relationship together affecting public health and quality of life. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of resveratrol supplementation in adjunct with non-surgical periodontal treatment (NST on blood glucose, triglyceride, periodontal status and inflammatory markers in type 2 diabetic patients with periodontal disease. Materials and Methods: This double-blind clinical trial study was conducted on 43 diabetic patients with periodontitis referred to the Endocrinology Clinic at Golestan Hospital in Ahvaz, Iran. All subjects were randomly assigned into two groups of intervention and control. The intervention and control groups received either 480 mg/d resveratrol or placebo capsules (2 PCs for four weeks. All subjects underwent non-surgical periodontal therapy during the intervention period. Anthropometric parameters, 24-hour dietary recall, fasting blood sugar, insulin, insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, triglycerides, pocket depth (PD, IL6 and TNF&alpha were evaluated in all subjects pre- and post-intervention. Results: The mean serum levels of fasting insulin and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR were significantly (P=0.02, P=0.045, respectively lower in the intervention group compared with the control group (10.42 ± 0.28 and 10.92 ± 0.9 3.66 ± 0.97 and 4.49 ± 1.56, respectively . Moreover, significant difference (P < 0.001 was obtained in the mean pocket depth (PD between the intervention and control groups (2.35 ± 0.6 and 3.38 ± 0.5, respectively post-intervention. In the intervention group, the mean serum level of IL6 was reduced significantly (P= 0.039 post-intervention (1.58 ± 1.06 and 2.19± 1.09. No significant differences were seen in the mean levels of fasting blood sugar, triglycerides, IL6 and TNF&alpha between the two groups post-intervention. Conclusions: It is suggested that resveratrol may be recommended as

  6. Periodontal status and treatment needs of primary school teachers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    284 had calculus accumulation and 109 had shallow pockets while 11 had deep periodontal pocketing. Majority (80.6%) of the teachers had poor oral hygiene and 43 ( 10.6%) had one or more mobile teeth. A higher proportion of rural based teachers had periodontal pockets compared to those in urban areas (38.5% vs.

  7. Periodontal condition in patients of the specialist Outpatient Clinics at the Institute of Rural Health in Lublin, Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawłowicz, Agnieszka; Bachanek, Teresa; Klijer, Magdalena; Chałas, Renata

    2018-03-14

    Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammation which, if remains untreated, can lead to the loss of teeth and supporting structures. Evidence data support the relationship of periodontal disease with the development and course of diseases such as heart attack, stroke, hypertension, chronic renal diseases, rheumatoid arthritis or diabetes. The aim of the study was to conduct an assessment of periodontal status and periodontal needs in people from the rural environment who were patients of selected specialist outpatient clinics at the Institute of Rural Health in Lublin, Poland. The examined population included 450 patients. The Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs, which is a measure of the assessment of the selected periodontal symptoms incidence, was used. The obtained data was discussed and analyzed with Chi-square test. The data obtained revealed that a healthy periodontium occurred only in 5.1% of respondents, tartar in 41.6%, pathological pockets of 3.5-5.5 mm in 23.6%, and pockets deeper than 5.5 mm in 5.8% of patients. Most people with healthy periodontium were in the youngest age group. In the analyzed group, 7.1% of patients required specialized comprehensive periodontal treatment, and only 6.5% of the examined persons did not show any need for periodontal treatment. Patients of specialist clinics of the Institute of Rural Health who formed the analyzed group, had affected periodontium which required comprehensive periodontal treatment. The alarmingly high percentage of people over 55 years of age with advanced periodontopathy may translate into an increased risk of cause-and-effect incidence of systemic diseases.

  8. Periodontal status among type II diabetic and nondiabetic individuals in Chennai, India: A comparative study

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    R Kesavan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Periodontitis is referred to as the sixth complication of diabetes mellitus. If left untreated, periodontitis can lead to tooth loss, thereby compromising a patient's ability to maintain a proper diet and affecting the quality of life. Aim: To assess the periodontal status among type II diabetic and nondiabetic individuals in Chennai city. Materials and Methods: A hospital based cross-sectional comparative study was conducted among diabetics and nondiabetic population attending a government hospital in Chennai city. The WHO Oral Health Assessment Form (1997 was used to assess the periodontal status. The final sample size of the study was 1000 which included 500 diabetics and 500 nondiabetics. Results: This study showed a significant association between the diabetic status and periodontal disease. The severity of periodontal disease was high among diabetics when compared to nondiabetics. The mean number of sextants with shallow pockets was 0.76 ± 1.20 among diabetics and 0.49 ± 0.86 among nondiabetics (P < 0.0001. The mean number of sextants with Loss of Attachment score of 1 (4–5 mm was 0.67 ± 1.05 among diabetics and 0.32 ± 0.70 among nondiabetics. Conclusion: Periodontal disease was more frequent and severe in diabetic patients as compared to nondiabetics although there are a number of questions need to be answered in future research.

  9. Comparative assessment of Oral Hygiene and Periodontal status among children who have Poliomyelitis at Udaipur city, Rajasthan, India

    OpenAIRE

    Tak, Mridula; Nagarajappa, Ramesh; Sharda, Archana; Asawa, Kailash; Tak, Aniruddh; Jalihal, Sagar

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess and compare the oral hygiene and periodontal status among children with Poliomyelitis having upper limb disability, lower limb disability and both upper and lower disability at Udaipur city, Rajasthan, India. Study design: Total sample comprised of 344 Poliomyelitis children (upper limb disability: 33.4%; lower limb disability: 33.7%; both upper and lower limb disability: 32.9%) in the age group of 12-15 years. Clinical examination included recording Simplified Oral Hygie...

  10. Evaluation of periodontal status and effectiveness of non-surgical treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Taiwan for a 1-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auyeung, Ling; Wang, Pei-Wen; Lin, Rue-Tsuan; Hsieh, Ching-Jung; Lee, Pei-Yu; Zhuang, Rui-Yeh; Chang, Hsueh-Wen

    2012-05-01

    The periodontal status and effects of non-surgical periodontal treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease are assessed. One-hundred patients with type 2 diabetes (mean ± SD hemoglobin (Hb)A1c level: 7.3% ± 0.94%) and periodontal disease were recruited for this study. The group with moderate-to-severe periodontal disease included patients with >1 tooth with a probing depth (PD) ≥5 mm and >2 teeth with a clinical attachment loss (AL) ≥ 6mm, and the group with mild periodontal disease included patients with 2 affected with a clinical AL ≥ 6mm. Patients (28 patients in the mild group and 72 patients in the moderate-to-severe group) underwent non-surgical periodontal treatments. We analyzed differences in serum concentrations of metabolic parameters (glycated hemoglobin and low-density lipoprotein), inflammatory parameters (interleukin [IL]-1β and C-reactive protein [CRP]), and periodontal parameters between the two groups before treatment and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months post-therapy. Seventy-five patients with diabetes (21 patients in the mild group and 54 patients in the moderate-to-severe group) completed the study. Significant differences in the plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), PD, and clinical AL at examination times were observed in the whole cohort (P periodontal treatment improved and maintained the periodontal health of patients with well-controlled diabetes, but no significant reduction of metabolic parameters was observed over a 1-year period.

  11. Examiner alignment and assessment in clinical periodontal research.

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    Hefti, Arthur F; Preshaw, Philip M

    2012-06-01

    Periodontal research typically relies on clinical examiners to assess variables such as gingival inflammation, plaque scores or probing depths as a means of determining treatment outcomes or for performing group comparisons. The quality of the gathered information is dependent, to a large extent, on the skills of the examiner(s) and on the validity of the assessment methods that are used. Attempts have been made to increase the objectivity of periodontal assessments, for example by introducing scoring systems for gingival inflammation, but within these systems there is often considerable scope for variation when interpreting the scoring criteria, leading to subjectivity when assigning scores to individual periodontal sites. This has led to an awareness of the importance of examiner alignment and assessment to improve the data quality by standardizing techniques and improving examiner reliability. Examiner alignment and assessment is used in preference to the term 'examiner calibration' because calibration implies comparison with an accurate or 'gold' standard, which is not available in periodontal research. In this review, we consider the historical perspective that led to the development of clinical scoring systems for periodontal research using gingival inflammation as an example. A clinical protocol for undertaking examiner alignment and assessment is presented, and we review the common sources of error and bias that can lead to difficulties in aligning examiners, and consider how they can be eliminated. It is particularly important that subjects who are recruited to the examiner alignment and assessment study present with a comparable level of disease to the subjects who will ultimately be recruited to the planned clinical trial. Another challenge in examiner alignment and assessment is applying appropriate statistical tests to assess the outcome of the alignment exercise. In the periodontal literature, the statistic kappa is frequently used to confirm an

  12. Clinical response to non-surgical periodontal treatment in patients with interleukin-6 and interleukin-10 polymorphisms

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    Doufexi, Aikaterini-Ellisavet; Kouvatsi, Anastasia

    2017-01-01

    Background Genetic polymorphisms are commonly associated with altered transcriptional activity and possibly make individuals more susceptible to periodontal disease development, increased disease severity and poor treatment outcome. The study aimed to determine the effect of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) -572 G/C (rs1800796) and IL-10 -592 C/A (rs1800872) polymorphisms on the outcomes of non-surgical periodontal therapy in a Caucasian population. Material and Methods Sixty-eight patients with chronic periodontal disease were grouped according to their genotype: IL-6, IL-10, IL-6 and IL-10 susceptible (SCP) and non-susceptible (NSCP). All individuals were clinically evaluated at the first visit, and blood sample were collected from patients after checking the inclusion and exclusion criteria of the study. All patients received non-surgical periodontal therapy from a single-blinded periodontist. Clinical periodontal measurements were repeated 45 days after therapy. Results This population mean aged 47.63 years included 52.2% females and 58.2% non-smokers. Following DNA separation and genotyping, 65.7% of patients were homozygous carriers of the IL-6 - 572G; 49.3% were carriers of the IL-10 -592A- allele (AA and CA genotypes); and 35.8% carried SCP genotypes for both polymorphisms. The clinical parameters after therapy were not associated with the genotype status. The multiple logistic regression analysis did not show any statistically significant association between the genotypes and the variables tested. Conclusions Within the limitations of this longitudinal study, it can be suggested that IL-6 -572 G/C and IL-10 -592 C/A polymorphisms as well as their combination do not influence the outcome of nonsurgical periodontal therapy in Caucasian patients diagnosed with chronic periodontal disease. Key words:Gene polymorphism, genetics, interleukins, periodontal disease, treatment outcome. PMID:28624837

  13. REAL TIME PCR IDENTIFICATION FOR TARGET ADJUNCTIVE ANTIBIOTIC THERAPY OF SEVERE CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS. PART I - CLINICAL RESULTS.

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    Kamen Kotsilkov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The periodontal pathology is of great social importance due to the vast distribution in the human population. The adjunctive antibiotic administration could improve the healing in such cases but the latest data of the continuingly growing antibiotic resistance requires more precise approaches of antibiotic selection. The contemporary molecular diagnostic methods could offer the required precision for the microbiological identification in order to achieve better control of the periodontitis. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to compare the microbiological effectiveness of adjunctive antibiotic administration with the mechanical periodontal therapy. METHODS: 30 patients with severe chronic periodontitis were enrolled in this study and were divided in 3 groups: Control group – with mechanical debridement only. Test group 1 – with combined adjunctive antibiotic administration using Amoxicillin+ Metronidazole. Test group 2 – with target antibiotic administration according to the resuts from the Real Time PCR identification. RESULTS: A considerable improvement of the periodontal status was reported in all treatment groups. The most positive results were in the group with target antibiotic administration were all tested clinical parameters showed the best improvement with statistically significant changes in sites with PD7mm and CAL>5mm. CONCLUSION: The adjunctive antibiotic administration demonstrates better clinical effectiveness concerning the reduction of the severely affected sites in cases with severe generalized chronic periodontitis compared to the mechanical therapy alone. From all examined groups the target approach has statistically significant better results. These results suggest that this approach is recommended in cases with high prevalence of deep pockets.

  14. Clinical Characteristics of Localized Aggressive Periodontitis in Primary Dentition.

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    Miller, Karina; Treloar, Tina; Guelmann, Marcio; Rody, Wellington; Shaddox, Luciana M

    2017-10-31

    Due to the low prevalence of localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP), clinical characteristics of LAP in primary dentition are derived from a few case reports/series in the literature. The goal of this study was to determine common clinical characteristics such as bone and root resorption patterns, in a series of cases with LAP in primary dentition. We hypothesize these cases present aggressive periodontal bone destruction starting mostly around first primary molars and atypical root resorption patterns. We have evaluated 33 LAP cases in primary dentition for pattern of bone destruction, root resorption and early exfoliation. Cases evaluated were aged 5-12 (mean=8.7 years). Thirty cases presented more severe bone loss on first than second molars, with relatively fast progression to second molars, altered pattern of root resorption, mostly external (n=16) and early exfoliation of primary teeth due to periodontal bone loss, rather than physiologic root resorption (n=11). This study showed common clinical characteristics found in LAP in primary molars, including possible initiation on first primary molars and abnormal root resorption patterns. These characteristics are important to be early identified and treated in order to prevent possible progression into the permanent dentition.

  15. Association between salivary sialic acid and periodontal health status among smokers

    OpenAIRE

    Jwan Ibrahim Jawzali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Smoking is an environmental risk factor causing poor dental health. Sialic acid is a salivary marker of oxidative stress for research of periodontal diseases. Aims: To identify diagnostic sialic acid fraction and its scavenger effect for periodontal diseases among smokers and periodental health status. Subject and method: This study carried out in the Khanzad specialized dental center – Erbil city. The study population is composed of 62 convenient samples. A structured inter...

  16. Estado periodontal y necesidad de tratamiento en pacientes GES 60 años de Villa Alemana Periodontal status and treatment needs in 60 years-old GES patients from Villa Alemana

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    C Rojas González

    2010-08-01

    periodontal status of the group of adults of 60 years-old. Nowadays, the GES Program “Integral Oral Health for 60 Years-old Adults” aims to improve their quality life. Objectives: Determine the periodontal status and treatment needs of adults aged 60 belonging to primary care health center of Villa Alemana. Patients and Methods: A total of 124 patients, randomly selected, were examined. It was effectuated an extra and intraoral examination, registering: oral hygiene, bleeding index, clinical attachment loss, probing depth and PSR. Statistical analysis and Chi-square test were done. Results: 90.32% of sample showed a poor oral hygiene, the patients presented a bleeding index of 68.42% on average, 100% of sample presented clinical attachment loss and 14.51% showed on average probing depths greater than or equal to 5 mm. All the patients need some periodontal treatment, and an 82.3% needs comprehensive periodontal treatment. Conclusions: 60 years-old adults showed a poor periodontal status determined by oral hygiene, bleeding index, clinical attachment loss and probing depths, showing an important deterioration of periodontal health of this population. All the 60 years-old adults need some kind of periodontal therapy, while an 82.3% needs a comprehensive periodontal treatment.

  17. Periodontal disease status and associated risk factors in patients attending a Dental Teaching Hospital in Rawalpindi, Pakistan

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    Syed Akhtar Hussain Bokhari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Investigators have identified an association of socio-demographic and medical factors with periodontal risk. This study observed status and association of periodontal disease and associated risk factors/indictors. Materials and Methods: All patients attending a dental teaching hospital were interviewed for socio-demographic and medical information through a structured questionnaire. Participants were examined for periodontal status using the community periodontal index (CPI, by a single examiner during September to November 2012. An association of age, gender, smoking habit, systemic conditions, and oral hygiene measures with periodontal status ([periodontitis CPI score ≥3]/nonperiodontitis [CPI score ≤2] was analyzed by applying Chi-square test and forward selection stepwise regression analysis. Results: One thousand nine hundred and eighteen patients were examined during the study period. The findings revealed that 63.5% of the subjects had CPI score ≤2 (nonperiodontitis, while 34.5% were found with CPI score ≥3 (periodontitis. Age, gender, occupation, smoking, diabetes, arthritis, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, stress, medications, and oral hygiene habits of using tooth powder or tooth brushing were significantly (P ≤ 0.037 associated with periodontal status. Regression analysis showed a significant association of age, occupation, and smoking with periodontitis. Conclusion: This study observed prevalence of periodontitis in one-fourth of study sample. The study confirmed various socio-demographic risk factors/indictors associated with increased risk of periodontitis.

  18. Effect of diabetes on periodontal status of a population with poor oral health.

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    Tanwir, Farzeen; Altamash, Mohammad; Gustafsson, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes is a global health problem and its prevalence is increasing worldwide. The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of diabetes on the periodontal status of a Pakistani population with poor oral hygiene. Eighty-eight individuals with diabetes and 80 non-diabetic individuals were recruited from a disadvantaged district in Karachi, Pakistan. The group with diabetes comprised 50 males and 38 females, and the non-diabetic group 43 males and 37 females. All underwent clinical and radiographic examination. The average numbers of teeth in the diabetes and non-diabetes groups were 24 and 26, respectively. The odds ratio (OR) for missing or fewer teeth was 2.3 times higher for diabetics than for non-diabetics (CI 1.32-4.14; ppoor oral hygiene, diabetes has had a strongly negative influence on oral health: diabetic patients have fewer teeth, more plaque, and a higher prevalence of moderate to severe periodontal disease than non-diabetics.

  19. Periodontal status in oral mucous membrane pemphigoid: initial results of a case-control study.

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    Arduino, P G; Farci, V; D'Aiuto, F; Carcieri, P; Carbone, M; Tanteri, C; Gardino, N; Gandolfo, S; Carrozzo, M; Broccoletti, R

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the periodontal status of mucous membrane pemphigoid (MMP) patients and compare it with that of healthy controls. A prospective study was undertaken to examine the impact of gingival MMP lesions on the human periodontium of 29 patients. Parameters evaluated included full mouth plaque score (FMPS), full mouth bleeding upon probing scores, probing depths (PD), gingival recession, clinical attachment level (CAL), mobility score, furcation involvement, number of missing teeth and Machtei criteria. All periodontal parameters recorded were increased in cases when compared to controls in univariate statistics. The mean differences between groups in PD (0.8±0.2mm, 95% CI 0.3-1.3), CAL (1.3±0.4mm, 95% CI 0.4-2.2), FMPS (41.0±6.2%, 95% CI 28.7-53.4), FMBS (16.2±6.6%, 95% CI 3.0-29.4) and tooth loss (2±1 teeth, 95% CI 1-3) were all statistically significant (Pcontrols due to a substantial difference in oral hygiene. Oral health should be promoted in MMP. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. A randomized controlled trial of pre-conception treatment for periodontal disease to improve periodontal status during pregnancy and birth outcomes

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    Jiang, Hong; Xiong, Xu; Su, Yi; Zhang, Yiming; Wu, Hongqiao; Jiang, Zhijun; Qian, Xu

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence has suggested that periodontal disease is associated with an increased risk of various adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes. However, several large clinical randomized controlled trials failed to demonstrate periodontal therapy during pregnancy reduced the incidence of adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes. It has been suggested that the pre-conception period may be an optimal period for periodontal disease treatment rather than during pregnancy. To date, no randomized cont...

  1. The Study of Mothers’ Periodontal Status and Newborn’s Low Birth Weight

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    M. Shirinzad

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Recent studies have presented evidence that periodontal disease in pregnant women may be a determining factor for newborn’s low birth weight. The present investigation was carried out to verify whether there is an association between maternal periodontal disease and low birth weight of newborns.Materials and Methods: This was a case-control study on 330 women, containing 110 mothers having live newborns with weight 2500 g (control group. The existence of an association between periodontal disease and newborn’s low birth weight was evaluated by means of analytic statistics that considered other risk factors for low weight. The two groups were compared with regard to urinary infection, preeclampsia, premature rupture of membrane, placenta previa, primiparous, smoking, age, height, socioeconomic status and periodontal disease.Results: There were no statistically significant differences between the case and control groups for any of the covariables (P>0.05, but there was significant differences for principal independent variable (periodontal disease P<0.05.Conclusion: Results indicated a positive association between periodontal disease and newborn’s low birth weight. Thus periodontal disease is a possible risk factor for low birth weight.

  2. Treating chronic periodontitis: current status, challenges, and future directions

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    Luciana M Shaddox

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Luciana M Shaddox1,2, Clay B Walker2Departments of 1Periodontology, 2Department Oral Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USAAbstract: Periodontitis affects roughly one-third of the US population. A timely diagnosis of chronic periodontitis at its earliest stage is essential to avoid more challenging severe stages of the disease. Most cases of slight and moderate chronic periodontitis can be successfully managed by mechanical removal and/or reduction of subgingival bacterial biofilms and calculus. However, any factor that affects either the local environment or the host response may contribute to progression of the disease and a poor treatment response. Thus, it is essential that clinicians are aware of etiologic and risk factors associated with disease development and progression in order to plan and execute a successful treatment. This paper reviews a variety of risk factors, both local and systemic, that can impact the successful treatment of chronic periodontitis.Keywords: periodontal disease, gingivitis, treatment, risk factors

  3. Oral hygiene and periodontal status among Terapanthi Svetambar Jain monks in India.

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    Jain, Manish; Mathur, Anmol; Kumar, Santhosh; Duraiswamy, Prabu; Kulkarni, Suhas

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of the study was to determine the oral hygiene levels and periodontal status among Jain monks attending a Chaturmass in Udaipur, India. To date, no study has been conducted on Jain monks. The study comprises of 180 subjects and the overall response rate was 76% among them. Oral hygiene status was assessed by the Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (OHI-S) of Greene, Vermillion14 (1964), and periodontal status was assessed by the Community Periodontal Index. Additional information was collected regarding food habits, education level and oral hygiene habits. Analysis of variance (ANOVA), Chi Square Test and Step-wise multiple linear regression analysis were carried out using SPSS Software (11.0). The results showed that the oral hygiene status of Jain monks was poor and only 5.6% of the subjects had good oral hygiene. Overall periodontal disease prevalence was 100% with bleeding and shallow pocket contributing a major part (72.8%) among all the age groups (p oral hygiene habits, caloric intake and education level explained a variance of 11.7% for the Oral hygiene index collectively. The findings confirmed that Jain monks have poor oral hygiene and an increased prevalence of periodontal disease compared to that of the similarly aged general population because, as a part of their religion, many Jain individuals avoid brushing their teeth especially during fasting, keeping in mind not to harm the microorganisms present in the mouth.

  4. Association between diabetes-related factors and clinical periodontal parameters in type-2 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Eun-Kyong; Lee, Sang Gyu; Choi, Youn-Hee; Won, Kyu-Chang; Moon, Jun Sung; Merchant, Anwar T; Lee, Hee-Kyung

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence consistently shows that diabetes is a risk factor for increased prevalence of gingivitis and periodontitis. But there is a controversy about the relationship between diabetes related factors and periodontal health. The aim of the present study is to explore the relationship between diabetes related factors such as glycosylated hemoglobin, fasting blood glucose, duration of diabetes and compliance to diabetes self management and periodontal health status. Methods Periodonta...

  5. Clinical application of CO2 laser in periodontal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayase, Yasuhiro

    1994-09-01

    CO2 lasers in particular are expected to have many dental applications because the CO2 laser beam exhibits strong tissue transpirative actions, such as instant coagulation, carbonization, and vaporization, and because its wavelength at 10.6 micrometers is fully absorbed by water so that the ability to make precise incisions with a high degree of safety is excellent, without damaging the deep tissues. However, clinical application of the CO2 laser has been slowed since a fiber which can conduct the laser beam to the oral cavity has only recently developed. This new fiber is an extremely flexible fiber with a minimum bending radius of 20 mm and utilizes pulse wave modes that have improved the handling characteristics in the mouth, and this has enabled us to apply the CO2 laser to a variety of periodontal conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of CO2 lasers for the early treatment of inflammation and pain relief of acute periodontitis, curettage of periodontal pockets, healing after excision of gingiva, and early improvement of gingivitis.

  6. Assessment of oral health status and periodontal treatment needs among rural, semi-urban, urban, and metropolitan population of Gurgaon District, Haryana State

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    Harpreet Singh Grover

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Role of various etiologic factors in periodontal disease has been investigated by means of epidemiologic surveys and clinical studies. The community periodontal index of treatment needs (CPITN provides a picture of the public health requirements in the periodontal field, which is essential for national oral health policy-making and specific interventions. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 4000 individuals among rural, semi-urban, and metro population of Gurgaon District, Haryana State, to find out the oral health status and periodontal treatment needs (TNs using CPITN index. Results: An inference was drawn from the results that among 4000 participants from all the four population groups' maximum, i.e., 63.80% of individuals needed TN2 whereas 18.20% of individuals needed TN3 and 18.10% of individuals needed TN1. Conclusion: It can be concluded with a word of hope and a word of warning. Hope lies in the fact that the measurement of periodontal diseases by epidemiological study of this condition is improving and receiving wide spread attention. The warning lies in the varied nature of the condition which goes to make up periodontal disease and perplexing ways in which these conditions blend. In addition to dental practitioner, periodontist and public health workers must devote more time and effort toward controlling periodontal disease than they seem to be devoting at present.

  7. Design features of the Diabetes and Periodontal Therapy Trial (DPTT): a multicenter randomized single-masked clinical trial testing the effect of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in subjects with type 2 diabetes and chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engebretson, S; Gelato, M; Hyman, L; Michalowicz, B S; Schoenfeld, E

    2013-11-01

    Evidence suggests that periodontitis is associated with prevalent and incident type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), raising the question of whether periodontitis treatment may improve glycemic control in patients with T2DM. Meta-analyses of mostly small clinical trials suggest that periodontitis treatment results in a modest reduction in glycosylated hemoglobin (Hb) A1c. The purpose of the Diabetes and Periodontal Therapy Trial (DPTT) was to determine if periodontal treatment reduces HbA1c in patients with T2DM and periodontitis. DPTT was a phase-III, single-masked, multi-center, randomized trial with a planned enrollment of 600 participants. Participants were randomly assigned to receive periodontal treatment immediately (Treatment Group) or after 6 months (Control Group). HbA1c values and clinical periodontal measures were determined at baseline and 3 and 6 months following randomization. Medication usage and dosing were assessed at each visit. Periodontal treatment consisted of scaling and root planing for a minimum of two 90-minute sessions, plus the use of an antibacterial mouth rinse for at least 32 days afterwards. The primary outcome was change in HbA1c from baseline to 6 months and the trial was powered to detect a between-group difference of 0.6%. Secondary outcomes included changes in periodontal clinical measures, fasting plasma glucose, the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA2) and the need for rescue diabetes or periodontal therapy. Dental and medical researchers collaborated to recruit, treat and monitor participants with two chronic diseases to determine if treatment of one condition affects the status of the other. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Design Features of the Diabetes and Periodontal Therapy Trial (DPTT): A Multicenter Randomized Single-Masked Clinical Trial Testing the Effect of Non-surgical Periodontal Therapy on Glycosylated Hemoglobin (HbA1c) Levels in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes and Chronic Periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests that periodontitis is associated with prevalent and incident type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), raising the question of whether periodontitis treatment may improve glycemic control in patients with T2DM. Meta-analyses of mostly small clinical trials suggest that periodontitis treatment results in a modest reduction in glycosylated hemoglobin (Hb) A1c. Purpose The purpose of the Diabetes and Periodontal Therapy Trial (DPTT) was to determine if periodontal treatment reduces HbA1c in patients with T2DM and periodontitis. Methods DPTT was a phase-III, single-masked, multi-center, randomized trial with a planned enrollment of 600 participants. Participants were randomly assigned to receive periodontal treatment immediately (Treatment Group) or after 6 months (Control Group). HbA1c values and clinical periodontal measures were determined at baseline and 3 and 6 months following randomization. Medication usage and dosing were assessed at each visit. Periodontal treatment consisted of scaling and root planing for a minimum of two 90-minute sessions, plus the use of an antibacterial mouth rinse for at least 32 days afterwards. The primary outcome was change in HbA1c from baseline to 6 months and the trial was powered to detect a between-group difference of 0.6%. Secondary outcomes included changes in periodontal clinical measures, fasting plasma glucose, the Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA2) and the need for rescue diabetes or periodontal therapy. Conclusion Dental and medical researchers collaborated to recruit, treat and monitor participants with two chronic diseases to determine if treatment of one condition affects the status of the other. PMID:24080100

  9. Clinical research activity in periodontal medicine: a systematic mapping of trial registers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsarrat, Paul; Blaizot, Alessandra; Kémoun, Philippe; Ravaud, Philippe; Nabet, Cathy; Sixou, Michel; Vergnes, Jean-Noel

    2016-05-01

    The primary aim of the study was to systematically map registration records on periodontal medicine in clinical trial registers. The secondary aim was to assess the evolution of periodontal medicine in clinical periodontal research as a whole. We searched all registration records related to periodontology in the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. For registration records classified in the field of periodontal medicine, we assigned the 2015 MeSH(®) term for the most precisely corresponding systemic condition. Fifty-seven systemic conditions have been hypothesized to be linked with periodontal diseases, covering nearly 2% of the diseases indexed in MeSH. In addition to diabetes, cardiovascular disease or preterm birth, other systemic conditions have been the subject of registration records, such as anaemia, liver diseases, dyspepsia or ankylosing spondylitis. A trend towards increasing diversification of systemic conditions has appeared over time. About a third of registration records in clinical periodontal research deals with periodontal medicine. Periodontal medicine now constitutes an important part of clinical periodontal research. Research activity in periodontal medicine has grown continuously since the early 2000s, and exploration of registers gives a useful up-to-date snapshot of this constantly evolving field of research. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Human papilloma virus in oral mucosa and its association with periodontal status of gynecologically infected women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster-Rossello, Liliana; Ribotta, Estela; Cuffini, Cecilia; Fuster-Juan, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether Human Papillomavirus was present in tongue and periodontium of periodontally healthy and diseased women who had genital lesions caused by the virus. Thirty non-menopausal women, systemically healthy and diagnosed with gynecological HPV lesions, were referred by the Gynecology Service Department of the University Maternal Neonatal Hospital of the City of Cordoba. Anamnesis, oral mucosa examination and periodontal clinical assessment were performed. Three brush samples were taken per patient: two from the same periodontal location (external epithelium of the gum and internal epithelium of the periodontal sulcus/pocket), and the third from the tongue. The 90 samples were submitted to Pap cytology and Polymerase Chain Reaction. The data were statistically analyzed by "Chi Square Test" (χ2) and "Kappa Index" (κ). High prevalence of HPV was found in the tongue (30%) and periodontal tissues (15%). High risk (HR) genotype -16 was detected with the highest percentage (67%), and genotypes -52 and -6 were also detected. Whenever HPV was present in periodontal location, it was also identified in the tongue of the same patients, of whom 88.89% reported that they practiced oral sex. Is worth noting the clinical finding of stomatologic lesions compatible with foliate papillitis in patients with positive intraoral HPV. High prevalence of HPV was found in the female population in Cordoba, with genotype -16 being detected at the highest percentage. No positive correlation was found between HPV and higher incidence and severity of periodontal lesions.

  11. [Periodontal disease as an early clinical sign of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Maldonado, E; Aguirre-Acevedo, D C; García-Ospina, G P; Lopera, F

    The clinical signs of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) are expressed mainly in the nervous system and recently reports also situate them in the retina. To determine the prevalence and risk of periodontal disease in subjects from families with a history of CADASIL mutation in the department of Antioquia, Colombia. A cross-sectional study was conducted, with subjects being assigned to the CADASIL group or a control group according to genotyping for the R1031C and C455R mutation in Notch3. Each participant voluntarily signed the informed consent document and was submitted to neurological, neuropsychological and periodontal evaluation. No significant differences were found between the two groups according to age, sex, schooling, tobacco smoking, cognitive status, functional status and the presence of natural teeth. The frequency of soft plaque, gingivitis and periodontal disease was significantly higher in the group of carriers of the CADASIL mutation than in the control group. The CADASIL group had six times more risk of having soft plaque above or equal to 20% than the control group. Prevalence of gingivitis above or equal to 10% was observed in all the members of the CADASIL group. The people in the CADASIL group had five times more risk of suffering periodontal disease than the control group. Carriers of the CADASIL mutation displayed a higher prevalence and risk of periodontal disease.

  12. Relationship of periodontal clinical parameters with bacterial composition in human dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujinaka, Hidetake; Takeshita, Toru; Sato, Hirayuki; Yamamoto, Tetsuji; Nakamura, Junji; Hase, Tadashi; Yamashita, Yoshihisa

    2013-06-01

    More than 600 bacterial species have been identified in the oral cavity, but only a limited number of species show a strong association with periodontitis. The purpose of the present study was to provide a comprehensive outline of the microbiota in dental plaque related to periodontal status. Dental plaque from 90 subjects was sampled, and the subjects were clustered based on bacterial composition using the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism of 16S rRNA genes. Here, we evaluated (1) periodontal clinical parameters between clusters; (2) the correlation of subgingival bacterial composition with supragingival bacterial composition; and (3) the association between bacterial interspecies in dental plaque using a graphical Gaussian model. Cluster 1 (C1) having high prevalence of pathogenic bacteria in subgingival plaque showed increasing values of the parameters. The values of the parameters in Cluster 2a (C2a) having high prevalence of non-pathogenic bacteria were markedly lower than those in C1. A cluster having low prevalence of non-pathogenic bacteria in supragingival plaque showed increasing values of the parameters. The bacterial patterns between subgingival plaque and supragingival plaque were significantly correlated. Chief pathogens, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, formed a network with other pathogenic species in C1, whereas a network of non-pathogenic species, such as Rothia sp. and Lautropia sp., tended to compete with a network of pathogenic species in C2a. Periodontal status relates to non-pathogenic species as well as to pathogenic species, suggesting that the bacterial interspecies connection affects dental plaque virulence.

  13. Serum antibodies to periodontal bacteria as diagnostic markers of periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Bruce A; Herrera-Abreu, Miriam; Lerche-Sehm, Julia; Vlachojannis, Christian; Pikdoken, Levent; Pretzl, Bernadette; Schwartz, Aaron; Papapanou, Panos N

    2009-04-01

    Assessment of periodontal conditions in epidemiologic studies usually requires a clinical examination, which is resource-intensive. We investigated the ability of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to periodontal bacteria to reflect clinical periodontal status. We used checkerboard immunoblotting to assess serum IgG levels to 19 species, including established/putative periodontal pathogens and non-pathogenic bacteria, in 5,747 dentate adults aged > or = 40 years who participated in the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 1988 and 1994. Three earlier described alternative definitions of periodontitis were used, based on specific combinations of probing depth and attachment level values. Optimized elevated titer thresholds and corresponding sensitivities and specificities were calculated for each definition. Titers significantly associated with periodontitis were identified in univariable and multivariable logistic regression models. Parsimonious models were subsequently developed using age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, smoking, and diagnosed diabetes. In unadjusted models, high titers to Porphyromonas gingivalis were most strongly associated with periodontitis across all definitions (odds ratio, 2.07 to 2.74; P periodontitis, whereas high Eubacterium nodatum titers were associated with periodontal health in two of three definitions. Receiver operating characteristic curves for the parsimonious multivariable models showed that the area under the curve ranged between 0.72 and 0.78. Serum IgG titers to selected periodontal species, combined with demographic and behavioral characteristics, resulted in a moderately accurate classification of periodontal status in epidemiologic studies. The external validity of these findings must be examined further.

  14. Type-2 diabetes mellitus, metabolic control, serum inflammatory factors, lifestyle, and periodontal status

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    Movva, Leela R.; Ho, Dominic K.L.; Corbet, Esmonde F.; Leung, W. Keung

    2014-01-01

    Type-2 diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease are complex human diseases. Pathogenesis of both ailments is multifactorial, involving chronic disease courses with varied clinical presentations. It is well established in the scientific literature that both diseases are interrelated; in particular, individuals suffering from diabetes are at a higher risk of developing periodontitis. The present review analyzed, using a hypothetical model, the complex factors that may influence the two disease...

  15. Prevalence of herpesviruses in gingivitis and chronic periodontitis: relationship to clinical parameters and effect of treatment

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    Rucha Shah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Assess the prevalence of herpesviruses in healthy subjects, gingivitis, and chronic periodontitis patients, to assess the relationship between the prevalence of herpesviruses and periodontal clinical parameters, and to evaluate the effect of phase-I therapy on the level of viral detection. Materials and Methods: Hundred patients consisting of 20 healthy subjects, 40 gingivitis, and 40 chronic periodontitis were included in the study. Clinical parameters recorded included plaque index, gingival index, sulcus bleeding index, probing depth, and clinical attachment level. The gingivitis and chronic periodontitis patients received phase-I periodontal therapy including oral hygiene instructions, full mouth scaling for gingivitis patients and scaling and root planing for chronic periodontitis patients. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF was collected, and the presence of herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1, HSV-2, cytomegalovirus, and Epstein–Barr virus (EBV was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Recording of periodontal parameters as well as GCF collection was performed at baseline and 6 weeks postphase-I therapy. Results: At baseline, the levels of HSV-1 and EBV detection were lower in healthy controls as compared to gingivitis (P < 0.05 and chronic periodontitis cases (P < 0.001. Phase-I therapy led to reduction in the amount of HSV-1 and EBV in gingivitis patients (P < 0.05 and for HSV-1, human cytomegalovirus and EBV in chronic periodontitis patients (P < 0.05 in comparison to baseline. The prevalence of EBV in chronic periodontitis patients was positively associated with increased gingival index, probing depth and loss of clinical attachment (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Higher prevalence of HSV-1 and EBV viruses in GCF of gingivitis and chronic periodontitis suggests a strong association between these viruses and periodontal diseases and periodontal therapy can lead to a reduction in herpesviruses at infected sites.

  16. EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF HORMONAL SUBSTITUTION THERAPY UPON THE PERIODONTAL STATUS IN FEMALE PATIENTS DURING PRE- AND POST-MENOPAUSE

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    Irina Ursărescu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Scope of the study. To evaluate the bone mass loss in women, during menopause and post-menopause (a period associated with a deficit of estrogen and the effect of the substitution hormonal therapy. Materials and method. The experimental group included 46 female subjects, evaluated in the beginning of menopause and also at post-menopause, with and without hormonal substitution therapy (in the moment of the consultation. The periodontal clinical (probing depth, CPITN, index of gingival recession, index of dental mobility, index of furcation involvement and radiological indices were evaluated, on following the evolution of the periodontal status from the first consultation in the 3 years. Results. It has been demonstrated that, in patients with periodontitis, early onset menopause and the estrogen deficit, the frequency of gingival bleeding on probing and the clinical loss of attachment were higher, comparatively with the patients having followed a hormonal substitution therapy. Discussion. Apparently, estrogen has a protecting effect upon the periodontium and also upon the severity of the periodontal disease. More than that, the alveolar bone that may be affected by osteoporosis also contributes to the benefic effects of HT, in preventing osteoporosis, the risk of suffering the negative effects of edentation in postmenopause women who receive HT being lower. Conclusions. The present study evidenced the increased incidence of both gingivitis and periodontal pathology, of the ratio of edentation in women at menopause, while the absence of the hormonal substitution therapy seems to be associated with the severity of the periodontal disease.

  17. The role of socioeconomic status, dental service use and oral health practices on periodontal health.

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    Holde, Gro Eirin; Baker, Sarah R; Jönsson, Birgitta

    2018-04-22

    To utilise Andersen's behavioral model as the theoretical framework to examine direct and indirect relationships between population characteristics, oral health behaviours and periodontitis and oral health impacts. The model was tested in a general adult population (n = 1,886) in Norway, using structural equation modelling. Socioeconomic status, sense of coherence (SOC), dental anxiety, perceived treatment need, oral health behaviours and oral health impact profile (OHIP-14) were collected through questionnaire. Periodontal examinations consisted of full-mouth recordings. Andersen's model explained a large part of the variance in use of dental services (58%) and oral health-related impacts (55%), and to a less extent periodontitis (19%). More social structure and stronger SOC was related to more enabling resources, which in turn was associated with more use of dental services. More use of dental services was related to more periodontitis and more periodontitis was associated with increased oral health impacts. There was no association between use of dental services and oral health impacts. The result demonstrated complex relationships between population characteristics, oral health-related behaviours and oral health outcomes. The findings suggest a need for further studies examining the effectiveness of dental health care utilization related to periodontitis prevention and control. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Periodontal status, tooth loss and self-reported periodontal problems effects on oral impacts on daily performances, OIDP, in pregnant women in Uganda: a cross-sectional study

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    Rwenyonyi Charles M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important aim of antenatal care is to improve maternal health- and well being of which oral health is an important part. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of oral impacts on daily performances (OIDP during pregnancy, using a locally adapted OIDP inventory, and to document how periodontal status, tooth-loss and reported periodontal problems are related to oral impacts. Methods Pregnant women at about 7 months gestational age who were members of a community based multi-center cluster randomized community trial: PROMISE EBF: Safety and Efficacy of Exclusive Breast feeding in the Era of HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa, were recruited in the district of Mbale, Eastern Uganda between January 2006 and June 2008. A total of 877 women (participation rate 877/886, 98%, mean age 25.6, sd 6.4 completed an interview and 713 (participation rate 713/886, 80.6%, mean age 25.5 sd 6.6 were examined clinically with respect to tooth-loss and according to the Community Periodontal Index, CPI. Results Seven of the original 8 OIDP items were translated into the local language. Cronbach's alpha was 0.85 and 0.80 in urban and rural areas, respectively. The prevalence of oral impacts was 25% in the urban and 30% in the rural area. Corresponding estimates for CPI>0 were 63% and 68%. Adjusted ORs for having any oral impact were 1.1 (95% CI 0.7-1.7, 1.9 (95% CI 1.2-3.1, 1.7 (1.1-2.7 and 2.0 (0.9-4.4 if having respectively, CPI>0, at least one tooth lost, tooth loss in molars and tooth loss in molar-and anterior regions. The Adjusted ORs for any oral impact if reporting periodontal problems ranged from 2.7(95% CI 1.8-4.2 (bad breath through 8.6(95% CI 5.6-12.9 (chewing problem to 22.3 (95% CI 13.3-35.9 (toothache. Conclusion A substantial proportion of pregnant women experienced oral impacts. The OIDP impacts were most and least substantial regarding functional- and social concerns, respectively. The OIDP varied systematically with tooth loss in

  19. Serum, saliva, and gingival crevicular fluid osteocalcin: their relation to periodontal status and bone mineral density in postmenopausal women.

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    Bullon, Pedro; Goberna, Berta; Guerrero, Juan M; Segura, Juan J; Perez-Cano, Ramon; Martinez-Sahuquillo, Angel

    2005-04-01

    Periodontitis and osteoporosis are characterized by the loss of bone mass. Osteocalcin levels have been postulated as a marker of inhibition of bone formation. The aim of the present study was to assess plasma, saliva, and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) levels of osteocalcin and correlate them with periodontitis and osteoporosis. Seventy-three postmenopausal women, over 35 years old, were recruited for the study. Serum, saliva, and GCF osteocalcin were measured. Vertebral bone mineral density was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Differences between groups were assessed by analysis of variance (ANOVA), chi-square test, and non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test. Thirty-four (46.6%) were classified in the normal healthy bone group, 11 women (15.1%) in the osteopenic group, and 28 women (38.4%) in the osteoporotic group. No statistically significant differences between these densitometric groups were observed in probing depth (P = 0.24); clinical attachment level (P = 0.11); or mean osteocalcin concentrations in serum, saliva, and GCF. Twenty-seven (37.0%) of the women were classified without periodontitis (NPG) and 63.0% (N = 46) with periodontal disease (PG). There were no statistical differences in serum and saliva osteocalcin concentrations between these two groups. GCF osteocalcin concentrations were significantly higher in the PG women than in the NPG group (P = 0.008). Mean probing depth correlated significantly with GCF osteocalcin concentrations (r = 0.35; P = 0.002). The results further support the concept that osteocalcin levels in GCF correlates with periodontal but not with osteoporosis status.

  20. Evaluation of oral and periodontal status of leprosy patients in Dindigul district

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    S A Jacob Raja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: After the introduction of the multidrug therapy, the incidence of leprosy is decreasing every year. However, periodontal complaints are commonly seen in these patients due to compromised immunity and impaired oral hygiene. The aim of the present study is to assess the oral and periodontal status of the leprosy patients in Dindigul district. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 62 patients treated in a leprosy center at Dindigul district. Among these, 22 (35.5% were female patients and 40 were male patients (64.5%. Age ranges between 40 and 70 with the mean age being 52. Facial changes, periodontal status, dental caries, attrition, tooth loss, plaque index (Silness and Loe, and calculus component of oral hygiene index-simplified were assessed. Results: Majority of the patients presented with loss of eyebrows and eyelashes, saddle nose, ocular involvement, and leonine facies. Gingival recession (54.8% was a predominant finding followed by tooth loss (69.5%, mobility (60.86%, attrition (56%, chronic pulpitis (34.7%, and dental caries (26%. Most of the patients had severe periodontitis. Conclusions: Compromised immunity and altered autonomy pave way for many dental complaints such as periodontitis and deposits in tooth with poor oral hygiene. Awareness about the oral health problems and reinforcement of oral hygiene should be insisted to the leprosy patients to prevent further morbidity.

  1. Different treatment strategies are applied to patients with the same periodontal status in general dentistry.

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    Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Götrick, Bengt; Hallström, Hadar; Jansson, Henrik; Knutsson, Kerstin

    2014-05-01

    To analyse how general dental practitioners (GDPs) and dental hygienists judge and plan to treat patients with different periodontal conditions. Seventy-seven GDPs and 50 dental hygienists in a Swedish county, Halland, participated in a questionnaire study. The response rate was 94%. The questionnaire consisted of four simulated patient cases and an attached answer sheet. The patient cases had different periodontal status, ranging from healthy to moderate bone loss with general inflammation. The clinicians judged the periodontal status as healthy or diseased. If judged as diseased the clinicians suggested a diagnosis, selected treatment options and estimated the number of treatment sessions for each patient case. The clinicians were compared to each other regarding their judgement, as healthy or diseased, diagnostics and treatment. Three out of four patients were judged both as healthy and diseased by different clinicians. If judged as diseased the patients were diagnosed as having gingivitis or periodontitis. Regardless of the clinicians' former judgement and diagnostics there were no differences (p > 0.05) in the selected treatment options but there was a difference (p treatment sessions. Clinicians' judgement of the same periodontal condition, as healthy or diseased, varies, which partly results in different treatment decisions considering the number of treatment sessions. The suggested number of treatment sessions varied also between clinicians even if they judged and diagnosed the condition likewise. The willingness to treat and suggested treatment options were not influenced by the variation in judgement and diagnostics.

  2. Correlation of alkaline phosphatase activity to clinical parameters of inflammation in smokers suffering from chronic periodontitis

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    Vishakha Grover

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Current clinical periodontal diagnostic techniques emphasize the assessment of clinical and radiographic signs of periodontal diseases which can provide a measure of history of disease. Hence, new methodologies for early identification and determination of periodontal disease activity need to be explored which will eventually result in expedited treatment. Aim: To evaluate the correlation of alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF to clinical parameters of periodontal inflammation in smokers with chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Study population included 15 smoker male patients in the age group of 35–55 years suffering from moderate generalized chronic periodontitis with history of smoking present. Following parameters were evaluated at baseline, 1 month and 3 months after scaling and root planing: plaque index, bleeding index, probing pocket depth (PD, relative attachment level (RAL, and GCF ALP activity. Statistical Analysis Used: Independent variables for measurements over time were analyzed by using Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results: A statistically significant reduction in all the clinical parameters and GCF ALP activity was observed from baseline to 1 month and 3 months. A correlation was observed between change in GCF ALP activity and PD reduction as well as gain in RAL at 3 months. Conclusion: The present study emphasizes that total ALP activity could be used as a marker for periodontal disease activity in smokers. Estimation of changes in the levels of this enzyme has a potential to aid in the detection of progression of periodontal disease and monitoring the response to periodontal therapy.

  3. A clinical study of the relationship between diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rajhans, Neelima S.; Kohad, Ramesh M.; Chaudhari, Viren G.; Mhaske, Nilkanth H.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease is not clear, even though studied intensively. From the available data, it seemed reasonable to believe that diabetics were more susceptible to periodontal disease than non-diabetics. Aim: The present study was to clinically evaluate the relationship of diabetes mellitus with periodontal disease along with various parameters. Materials and Methods: Fifteen hundred patients with diabetes mellitus were examined. A thorough oral ...

  4. Gingival and periodontal changes in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization treatment: A clinical study

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    Leena Smadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of in vitro fertilization (IVF treatment on different parameters of periodontal status. Settings and Design: This was a clinical observational study. Materials and Methods: One hundred and seventy-nine patients who underwent IVF treatment according to the standard IVF protocols were examined using the simplified oral hygiene, gingival index (GI, sulcus bleeding index (SBI, and determining the clinical attachment loss (CAL. A full-mouth examination except for the third molars was performed at 4 sites per tooth (mesiobuccal, distobuccal, mesiolingual, and distolingual. Periodontal evaluation was performed before infertility treatment, at the end of infertility treatment, and 14 days after embryo transfer. Statistical Analysis: The Kruskal–Wallis or Fisher's tests were used to compare the median or mean values as appropriate. Results: The oral hygiene index simplified was 0.49, 0.32, and 0.37 at pretreatment, on the day of human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG trigger, and on the day of the pregnancy test, respectively. The GI showed significant differences before and after treatment. The mean GI was 0.13 at pretreatment compared to 0.51 and 0.53 on the days of HCG trigger and of the pregnancy test, respectively. The same trend was seen for SBI. There were no differences in CAL among the three examinations. There was no difference between the two groups except for GI (0.71 vs. 0.48 for a positive pregnancy test vs. nonpregnancy, respectively. Conclusions: IVF medications and a superphysiological condition affect oral health, particularly gingival and periodontal statuses, and likely complicate the relationship between infertility, sex hormones, and infertility management. Larg-scale studies are needed to confirm the effect of such treatment on oral health.

  5. Periodontics and prosthodontics: goals, objectives, and clinical reality.

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    Malament, K A

    1992-02-01

    Prosthodontics and periodontics are collaborative disciplines. A successful prosthesis depends on a healthy periodontal environment, and periodontal health depends on the continued integrity of the prosthodontic restoration. To facilitate this collaboration, prosthodontists should not only appreciate the periodontic implications of gingival displacement procedures and tooth preparation, but should be knowledgeable about the types of gingival tissues, osseous topography, occlusal effects, and their implications for abutment choice. Working as a team, the periodontist can identify for the prosthodontist a patient's periodontal strengths and limitations. In that way, the prosthodontist can then assume responsibility for a given treatment plan based on a mutual understanding of the critical factors involved.

  6. Oral hygiene practices, periodontal conditions, dentition status and self-reported bad mouth breath among young mothers, Tanzania.

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    Mumghamba, E G S; Manji, K P; Michael, J

    2006-11-01

    To determine the oral hygiene practices, periodontal conditions, dentition status and self-reported bad mouth breath (S-BMB) among young mothers. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study conducted at Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. A total of 302 postpartum mothers, aged 14-44 years, were interviewed on oral hygiene practices and S-BMB using structured questionnaire. Oral hygiene, dentition and periodontal status were assessed using the Community Periodontal Index probe and gingival recessions (GR) using Williams Periodontal probe. Tooth brushing practice was 99%; tongue brushing (95%), plastic toothbrush users (96%), chewing stick (1%), wooden toothpicks (76%), dental floss (oral health promotion and periodontal therapy are recommended. This study provides baseline information on oral health status and the complaint on bad mouth breath which necessitates in the future need for objective assessment, diagnosis and management of bad mouth breath for enhanced social and professional interaction without embarrassment.

  7. Association between diabetes-related factors and clinical periodontal parameters in type-2 diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence consistently shows that diabetes is a risk factor for increased prevalence of gingivitis and periodontitis. But there is a controversy about the relationship between diabetes related factors and periodontal health. The aim of the present study is to explore the relationship between diabetes related factors such as glycosylated hemoglobin, fasting blood glucose, duration of diabetes and compliance to diabetes self management and periodontal health status. Methods Periodontal health of 125 participants with type-2 diabetes mellitus was measured by the number of missing teeth, community periodontal index (CPI), Russell’s periodontal index and papillary bleeding index. Information on sociodemographic factors, oral hygiene behavior, duration and compliance to self management of diabetes, levels of glycosylated hemoglobin(HbA1c) and fasting blood glucose(FBG) were collected by interview and hospital medical records. Statistically, independent t-test, an analysis of variance (ANOVA), chi-squared test and multiple regression analyses were used to assess the association between diabetes-related factors and periodontal health. Results Periodontal parameters including the number of missing teeth and papillary bleeding index were significantly influenced by duration of diabetes, FBG and compliance to self management of diabetes. CPI was significantly influenced by duration of diabetes, FBG and HbA1C. And Russell’s periodontal index was significantly influenced by duration of diabetes, FBG, HbA1C and compliance to self management of diabetes. Results of multiple linear regression analysis showed that the duration of diabetes showed significant positive correlation with all of the periodontal health parameters, except for missing teeth. HbA1c was correlated with Russell's periodontal and papillary bleeding index. FBG and compliance to self management of diabetes were correlated with missing teeth and papillary bleeding index respectively. Conclusions

  8. Association between diabetes-related factors and clinical periodontal parameters in type-2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Kyong; Lee, Sang Gyu; Choi, Youn-Hee; Won, Kyu-Chang; Moon, Jun Sung; Merchant, Anwar T; Lee, Hee-Kyung

    2013-11-07

    Evidence consistently shows that diabetes is a risk factor for increased prevalence of gingivitis and periodontitis. But there is a controversy about the relationship between diabetes related factors and periodontal health. The aim of the present study is to explore the relationship between diabetes related factors such as glycosylated hemoglobin, fasting blood glucose, duration of diabetes and compliance to diabetes self management and periodontal health status. Periodontal health of 125 participants with type-2 diabetes mellitus was measured by the number of missing teeth, community periodontal index (CPI), Russell's periodontal index and papillary bleeding index. Information on sociodemographic factors, oral hygiene behavior, duration and compliance to self management of diabetes, levels of glycosylated hemoglobin(HbA1c) and fasting blood glucose(FBG) were collected by interview and hospital medical records. Statistically, independent t-test, an analysis of variance (ANOVA), chi-squared test and multiple regression analyses were used to assess the association between diabetes-related factors and periodontal health. Periodontal parameters including the number of missing teeth and papillary bleeding index were significantly influenced by duration of diabetes, FBG and compliance to self management of diabetes. CPI was significantly influenced by duration of diabetes, FBG and HbA1C. And Russell's periodontal index was significantly influenced by duration of diabetes, FBG, HbA1C and compliance to self management of diabetes. Results of multiple linear regression analysis showed that the duration of diabetes showed significant positive correlation with all of the periodontal health parameters, except for missing teeth. HbA1c was correlated with Russell's periodontal and papillary bleeding index. FBG and compliance to self management of diabetes were correlated with missing teeth and papillary bleeding index respectively. Diabetes-related factors such as duration of

  9. Periodontal Status and Risk Factors among Adults of Sebha City (Libya

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    Syed Wali Peeran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed at assessing the periodontal status and risk factors like age, gender, tooth brushing habit, and smoking among the adult population of Sebha city, Libya. 452 adults, aged 35–54 years, comprised the study sample. 266 (58.84% were females and 186 (41.15% were males. Data was collected by interview and clinical examination using CPI of CPITN index. Chi-square test and ANOVA were used for statistical analysis at 5% level of significance. Results indicate that 76.32% used toothbrush and paste; 8.84% were current smokers and were all males. Majority, 52.65% were, detected with shallow pockets followed by 30.08% with calculus, 12.17% had deep pockets, 3.31% had bleeding, and only 1.33% were healthy. Age, gender, current smoking status and frequency of tooth brushing showed statistically significant difference with CPI codes. Health professionals can utilize this data to identify individuals at risk and to target population level interventions.

  10. [The expression and clinical significance of IL-35 in periodontitis and oral lichen planus].

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    Wang, Yu; Jin, Ying; Wang, Yi-Yue; Xu, Dan-Ni; Lin, Xiao-Ping

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the influence of IL-35 in the pathogenesis of periodontitis and oral lichen planus, and the correlation between periodontitis and oral lichen planus patients. The gingival crevicular fluid(GCF) and serum were collected from patients with oral lichen planus (n=20), periodontitis (n=20), periodontitis and oral lichen planus (n=20) and healthy controls (n=12). The patients' basic information, probing depth, clinical attachment loss, gingival index, sulcus bleeding index were measured and collected. The expression of IL-35 in GCF and serum was detected by ELISA. SPSS19.0 software package was used for statistical analysis. The concentration of IL-35 in patients with periodontitis and oral lichen planus was significantly higher than that of other groups(Plichen planus may increase the concentration of IL-35 both in serum and GCF. The expression of IL-35 was positively correlated with periodontitis and oral lichen planus.

  11. Condição periodontal de um subgrupo populacional do município de Guarulhos, SP Periodontal status of a population subgroup from Guarulhos, SP

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    Fátima de Lourdes Bolzan Pion

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo transversal determinou a condição periodontal e sua associação com fatores de risco em uma amostra de conveniência de 588 indivíduos atendidos na Universidade Guarulhos, entre 1999 e 2003. Características geográficas, demográficas e comportamentais, parâmetros bucais e periodontais foram tabulados e analisados em SPSS 11.5. Os testes t Student e Qui-quadrado determinaram a significância (p 3,0 mm com fatores de risco (por exemplo: idade, sexo, fumo e comportamentais. A análise de regressão linear multivariada determinou a associação entre exposição aos fatores de risco e doença. A população estudada com média de idade de 36,1 ± 14,5 anos foi composta principalmente por mulheres (72,1% e minoria fumante (13,3%. Os valores médios de dentes ausentes e profundidade de sondagem (PS foram de 5,7 ± 5,9 dentes e 2,2 ± 0,8 mm, respectivamente. A prevalência de PS > 3,0mm (valor referência foi de 13,5%; e a distribuição regional da população de acordo com este critério foi: centro, 2,0%; zona oeste, 17,8%; zona leste, 38,0%; zona sul, 6,7% ; e zona norte, 35,5%. As freqüências médias dos índices de placa e sangramento a sondagem foram de 75,3% e 34,1%, respectivamente. A condição periodontal exibiu correlação com idade, fumo e presença de biofilme supragengival. Exceto pela última, estas variáveis também mostraram associação pela análise de regressão multivariada. A população estudada exibiu elevado grau de inflamação gengival e baixo percentual de bolsas periodontais, estando a condição periodontal associada à idade e ao hábito de fumar.This cross-sectional study determined the periodontal status and its association with risk factors in a convenience sample of 588 subjects seen at the dental clinic of Guarulhos University from 1999 to 2003. To reach the study objectives, geographic, demographic and behavioral characteristics, as well as, oral and periodontal parameters were tabulated and

  12. Cross-talk between clinical and host-response parameters of periodontitis in smokers.

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    Nagarajan, R; Miller, C S; Dawson, D; Al-Sabbagh, M; Ebersole, J L

    2017-06-01

    Periodontal diseases are a major public health concern leading to tooth loss and have also been shown to be associated with several chronic systemic diseases. Smoking is a major risk factor for the development of numerous systemic diseases, as well as periodontitis. While it is clear that smokers have a significantly enhanced risk for developing periodontitis leading to tooth loss, the population varies regarding susceptibility to disease associated with smoking. This investigation focused on identifying differences in four broad sets of variables, consisting of: (i) host-response molecules; (ii) periodontal clinical parameters; (iii) antibody responses to periodontal pathogens and oral commensal bacteria; and (iv) other variables of interest, in a population of smokers with (n = 171) and without (n = 117) periodontitis. Bayesian network structured learning (BNSL) techniques were used to investigate potential associations and cross-talk between the four broad sets of variables. BNSL revealed two broad communities with markedly different topology between the populations of smokers, with and without periodontitis. Confidence of the edges in the resulting network also showed marked variations within and between the periodontitis and nonperiodontitis groups. The results presented validated known associations and discovered new ones with minimal precedence that may warrant further investigation and novel hypothesis generation. Cross-talk between the clinical variables and antibody profiles of bacteria were especially pronounced in the case of periodontitis and were mediated by the antibody response profile to Porphyromonas gingivalis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Oral hygiene, periodontal status and treatment needs among 12-year-old students, Castro, Chile, 2014.

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    Mariana Wauters

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to determine the level of oral hygiene, periodontal status and treatment needs, indicating if there are differences between men and women, in 12-year-old students from Castro, Los Lagos region, during March and April of 2014. A cross-sectional study was carried out. A total of 242 12-year-old students from municipal and subsidized private schools in Castro were selected through a stratified random sample representative of each school. Students were evaluated by a calibrated examiner to determine the Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (OHI-S and the Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN. Data were transferred to a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet and statistically analyzed to calculate the amount and percentage of the variables. Mann-Whitney U-test was used for comparison between genders. From the total, 59.5% of the students have regular hygiene. Also, 86.4% of the assessed adolescents have gingivitis and 13.6% of them have periodontitis. The periodontal treatment need indicates that 58% of the students require oral hygiene instructions and scaling. No statistically significant differences were found for gender. There is a higher prevalence of periodontal diseases associated with regular oral hygiene than the regional and national reference in 12-year-old adolescents in Castro. Then, it is necessary to teach and promote specific public health strategies based on epidemiological data

  14. Periodontal status and oral health-related quality of life in elderly residents of aged care homes in Delhi.

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    Rekhi, Amit; Marya, Charu Mohan; Oberoi, Sukhvinder Singh; Nagpal, Ruchi; Dhingra, Chandan; Kataria, Sakshi

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the associations between clinical periodontal findings and oral health-related quality of life in elderly people residing in the aged care homes of Delhi, India. A cross-sectional study was carried out among 500 residents of aged care homes across Delhi. Data were collected by carrying out clinical oral examinations and by filling a self-administered questionnaire. Oral health-related quality of life was assessed by a pretested Hindi version of the Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI-Hi). Periodontal status was assessed using the Community Periodontal Index - CPI, and loss of attachment and tooth mobility was assessed using a modified Miller's index. Of a total of 500 participants, 221 (44.20%) were men and 279 (55.80%) were women The mean additive score GOHAI score was 41.57 ± 6.07 and the mean number of negative impacts or mean simple count GOHAI score was 6.27 ± 1.54. Mean GOHAI scores were significantly higher among men than women, and were found to be decreasing continuously with the increasing age categories. Tooth mobility and loss of attachment scores were found to be significantly associated with oral health-related quality of life, whereas Community Periodontal Index scores showed a negative correlation with it. The geriatric population, especially those in aged care homes, is a special need group because of their inability to access dental care rather than some particular feature of their oral or general health The findings of the present study point to a need to improve access to oral healthcare for this elderly population. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  15. Periodontal status following trapezoidal and semilunar flaps in apicectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chindia, M L; Valderhaug, J

    1995-09-01

    Apicectomy is offered where routine endodontics cannot resolve periapical inflammation. This study compared the influence on periodontal attachment level of two surgical procedures, the trapezoidal (TF) and the semilunar (SF) flaps. Twenty patients aged 16-44 years (mean 23.2 years), were randomly assigned to either flap procedure. Prior to surgery the patients received periodontal prophylaxis and oral hygiene instruction. Records were made of gingival indices, pocket depth and the distance from the cemento-enamel junction to the bottom of the gingival pocket. The measurements involved buccal surfaces of 13 to 23. The TF flap extended from 14 to 24 between the interdental papillae, whereas the SF flap was carried in a semi circle from 14 to 24 about 2mm from the attached gingiva. The surgical wounds were closed with black silk sutures. Antibiotics and analgesics were prescribed. Sutures were removed after one week. On recall after 6, 12 and 24 weeks the same measurements as before surgery were made. No statistically significant change was observed in pocket depth or attachment level between TF and SF flaps (p > 0.05). However, the TF flap produced less noticeable scarification than the SF flap.

  16. General Immune Status and Oral Microbiology in Patients with Different Forms of Periodontitis and Healthy Control Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jana; Jentsch, Holger; Stingu, Catalina-Suzana; Sack, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Objective Immunological processes in the etiopathogenesis of periodontitis, especially the aggressive form, are not well understood. This study examined clinical as well as systemic immunological and local microbiological features in healthy controls and patients with different forms of periodontitis. Materials and Methods 14 healthy subjects, 15 patients diagnosed with aggressive periodontitis, and 11 patients with chronic periodontitis were recruited. Periodontal examination was performed and peripheral blood was collected from each patient. Lymphocyte populations as well as the release of cytokines by T-helper cells were determined by flow cytometry and enzyme linked immunosorbent spot assay. Subgingival plaque samples were taken from each individual and immediately cultivated for microbiological examination. Results When stimulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with lipopolysaccharide, a higher IL-1β release was found in patients with moderate chronic periodontitis compared to the other groups (pperiodontitis showed the highest percentage of memory B-cells without class switch (p = 0.01). The subgingival plaque differed quantitatively as well as qualitatively with a higher number of Gram-negative anaerobic species in periodontitis patients. Prevotella denticola was found more often in patients with aggressive periodontitis (pperiodontitis, seems to be associated with an activation of the systemic immune response. Conclusion Differences between aggressive periodontitis and moderate chronic periodontitis are evident, which raises the question of an inadequate balance between systemic immune response and bacterial infection in aggressive periodontitis. PMID:25299619

  17. A Clinical Validation of Self-Reported Periodontitis Among Participants in the Black Women's Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaton, Brenda; Gordon, Nicholas B; Garcia, Raul I; Rosenberg, Lynn; Rich, Sharron; Fox, Matthew P; Cozier, Yvette C

    2017-06-01

    There is a paucity of data on the validity of self-report of periodontal disease in African Americans. The Black Women's Health Study (BWHS), a United States national cohort study of 59,000 black women followed via mailed questionnaires since 1995, offered the opportunity to clinically validate self-reported periodontitis among a sample of participants. Oral health questionnaires were sent to study participants residing in Massachusetts. Respondents living in the Boston metro area were invited for clinical examination. Self-reports were compared with clinical data obtained from the 77 women (mean age: 59 years) who were examined. The authors examined the predictive ability of individual and combined questionnaire items with respect to clinical periodontal disease severity. Validation parameters were calculated for each question, and receiver operating characteristic statistics were generated to compare questionnaire items. Periodontitis prevalence in the validation sample was 24% for severe periodontitis and 61% for moderate disease. Performance of individual questionnaire items with respect to predicting periodontitis was better for severe compared with moderate disease. Combinations of questionnaire items improved the predictive ability with respect to severe disease beyond that of individual questionnaire items. Prevalence of severe periodontitis was similar to other age-comparable populations, without regard for race or sex, whereas prevalence of total periodontitis (moderate and severe) among women of similar age and/or race was much higher. Predictive ability of questionnaire items assessed in the BWHS was similar to that in other studies.

  18. Monozygotic twins are discordant for chronic periodontitis: clinical and bacteriological findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torres de Heens, G.L.; Loos, B.G.; van der Velden, U.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess, in monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twin pairs in whom the proband of the twin pair was suffering from moderate to severe chronic periodontitis, the contribution of genetics, periodontal pathogens and lifestyle factors towards the clinical

  19. Comparison of oral hygiene and periodontal status in patients with clefts of palate and patients with unilateral cleft lip, palate and alveolus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutthineni Ramesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was conducted to analyze and compare the oral hygiene and periodontal status in patients with clefts of palate (CP and patients with unilateral cleft lip, palate and alveolus (UCLPA. Materials and Methods: The study group consisted of 120 cleft patients. Subjects were divided into two groups of 60 each. Group I - patients with UCLPA and Group II - patients with CP. For comparison, all the four quadrants were defined, Q1-right upper quadrant, Q2-left upper quadrant, Q3-left lower quadrant and Q4-right lower quadrant, in both groups and the following parameters were recorded: Plaque Index (PI, Silness and Loe, Sulcus Bleeding Index (SBI, Muhlemann and Son, Probing Pocket Depth (PPD, Clinical Attachment Level (CAL, Mobility Index (Miller and Radiographic Amount of Bone Loss. Results: The periodontal destruction was seen to be higher in UCLPA patients compared with CP patients. The poor oral hygiene status, as indicated by higher values of PI, and the periodontal status, evaluated by SBI, PPD, CAL, mobility and Radiographic Amount of Bone Loss, were higher in patients with UCLPA than in patients with CP. Conclusion: In this study, patients with cleft lip, palate and alveolus had poor oral hygiene and periodontal status compared with patients with cleft palate.

  20. Periodontal status and pathogenic bacteria after gastric bypass: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales-Peres, Sílvia Helena de Carvalho; de Moura-Grec, Patrícia Garcia; Yamashita, Joselene Martinelli; Torres, Elza Araujo; Dionísio, Thiago José; Leite, Celso Vieira de Souza; Sales-Peres, Arsenio; Ceneviva, Reginaldo

    2015-06-01

    The aim this study was to evaluate the influence of gastric bypass surgery (GBS) on periodontal disease and quantify the periodontopathogenic bacteria in patients undergoing this surgery. This prospective study was composed of 50 patients who underwent bariatric surgery and the data collection was performed in three periods pre-operative, 6 (6M) and 12 months (12 M) postoperative. The oral clinical examination to assess periodontal disease; gingival fluid sample collection for quantification of the periodontopathogenic bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, and Prevotella intermedia using q-PCR; body mass index (BMI) and for collection of the individual's health-related data from medical files. There was a significant reduction in serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and glucose levels after surgery. The mean probing pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment level (CAL) increased significantly in the postoperative period of 6 months (p = 0.001). In the same period, the amount of P. gingivalis increased (p = 0.028) and the other bacteria decreased slightly (p > 0.050). In the presence of P. gingivalis, T. forsythia, T. denticola and P. intermedia, a poor periodontal condition was observed. The periodontal disease increased in severity and P. gingivalis increased after GBS. A systemic inflammation resolution due to bariatric surgery in obese subjects does not seem to affect the course of periodontal disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Evaluation of association between psychological stress and serum cortisol levels in patients with chronic periodontitis - Estimation of relationship between psychological stress and periodontal status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshni Jaiswal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stress classically describes a destructive notion that can have a bearing on one's physical and mental health. It may also add to an increased propensity to periodontal disease. Aim: To investigate the association between psychological stress and serum cortisol levels in patients with chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Forty subjects were recruited from the outpatient department at the Department of Periodontics, from a college in Mangalore, divided into two groups, i.e., twenty as healthy controls and twenty were stressed subjects with chronic periodontitis. The clinical examination included the assessment of probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level and oral hygiene index-simplified. Serum cortisol levels were estimated biochemically using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method and the estimation of psychological stress was done by a questionnaire. Results: Descriptive statistics such as mean and standard deviation was used to review the collected data. Independent sample t-test was used for comparison and correlation was evaluation using Pearson's correlation test. As per our observation, high serum cortisol levels and psychological stress are positively linked with chronic periodontitis establishing a risk profile showing a significant correlation (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Routine serum cortisol assessment may be a reasonable and a valuable investigative indicator to rule out stress in periodontitis patients as it should be considered as an imperative risk factor for periodontal disease.

  2. Evaluation of association between psychological stress and serum cortisol levels in patients with chronic periodontitis - Estimation of relationship between psychological stress and periodontal status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Roshni; Shenoy, Nina; Thomas, Biju

    2016-01-01

    Stress classically describes a destructive notion that can have a bearing on one's physical and mental health. It may also add to an increased propensity to periodontal disease. To investigate the association between psychological stress and serum cortisol levels in patients with chronic periodontitis. Forty subjects were recruited from the outpatient department at the Department of Periodontics, from a college in Mangalore, divided into two groups, i.e., twenty as healthy controls and twenty were stressed subjects with chronic periodontitis. The clinical examination included the assessment of probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level and oral hygiene index-simplified. Serum cortisol levels were estimated biochemically using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method and the estimation of psychological stress was done by a questionnaire. Descriptive statistics such as mean and standard deviation was used to review the collected data. Independent sample t -test was used for comparison and correlation was evaluation using Pearson's correlation test. As per our observation, high serum cortisol levels and psychological stress are positively linked with chronic periodontitis establishing a risk profile showing a significant correlation ( P < 0.05). Routine serum cortisol assessment may be a reasonable and a valuable investigative indicator to rule out stress in periodontitis patients as it should be considered as an imperative risk factor for periodontal disease.

  3. [Clinical reasoning of impact of contemporary partial dentures constructions on the condition of periodontal tissues of patients with generalized periodontitis of I-II severity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochkina, N A

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was the evaluation of the effectiveness of using partial dentures made of thermoplastic materials for patients with generalized periodontitis of I-II degree of severity based on the results of clinical research. The effect of partial dentures made of acrylic, metal and thermoplastic materials with and without splinting elements of fixation on the state of periodontal tissues in patients with generalized periodontitis was studied. The results of clinical studies of patients periodontal tissues condition ,who have had dental defects on the background I-II severity of GP using partial splinting elements of fixation showed a significant improvement in oral hygiene, positive change in activity indicators current of generalized periodontitis. The group of patients for whom were made orthopedic constructions of thermoplastic masses, noticed reducing of the depth of periodontal pockets, tooth mobility, bleeding and inflammation of the interdental papillae and the gingival margin.

  4. Cost analysis of Periodontitis management in public sector specialist dental clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this paper is to quantify the cost of periodontitis management at public sector specialist periodontal clinic settings and analyse the distribution of cost components. Methods Five specialist periodontal clinics in the Ministry of Health represented the public sector in providing clinical and cost data for this study. Newly-diagnosed periodontitis patients (N = 165) were recruited and followed up for one year of specialist periodontal care. Direct and indirect costs from the societal viewpoint were included in the cost analysis. They were measured in 2012 Ringgit Malaysia (MYR) and estimated from the societal perspective using activity-based and step-down costing methods, and substantiated by clinical pathways. Cost of dental equipment, consumables and labour (average treatment time) for each procedure was measured using activity-based costing method. Meanwhile, unit cost calculations for clinic administration, utilities and maintenance used step-down approach. Patient expenditures and absence from work were recorded via diary entries. The conversion from MYR to Euro was based on the 2012 rate (1€ = MYR4). Results A total of 2900 procedures were provided, with an average cost of MYR 2820 (€705) per patient for the study year, and MYR 376 (€94) per outpatient visit. Out of this, 90% was contributed by provider cost and 10% by patient cost; 94% for direct cost and 4% for lost productivity. Treatment of aggressive periodontitis was significantly higher than for chronic periodontitis (t-test, P = 0.003). Higher costs were expended as disease severity increased (ANOVA, P = 0.022) and for patients requiring surgeries (ANOVA, P periodontitis patients at public sector specialist settings were substantial and comparable with some non-communicable diseases. These findings provide basis for identifying potential cost-reducing strategies, estimating economic burden of periodontitis management and performing economic

  5. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN INITIAL PROBING DEPTH AND CHANGES IN THE CLINICAL PARAMETERS FOLLOWING NON-SURGICAL PERIODONTAL TREATMENT IN CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Süleyman Emre MESELİ

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between initial probing depth (IPD and changes in clinical parameters following non-surgical periodontal treatment (NPT in chronic periodontitis patients. Subjects and Methods: A total of 1672 periodontal pockets having 3mm≤IPD≤9mm of depth in 15 chronic periodontitis patients were included. NPT consisting of oral hygiene instructions, scaling and root planing was applied in two sessions. Probing depth (PD, clinical attachment level, gingival recessions (GR were measured before and eight weeks after treatment. Pocket sites were grouped according to their IPD and root number as single- or multi-rooted teeth. Results: Other than the sites having 3 mm IPD, PD reduction and GR increase were significant in all groups (p<0.001. Attachment gains (AG were significant in all single-rooted teeth (p<0.001 again except those having IPD=3mm. However, AG was significant in multi-rooted teeth having only 7mm≤IPD≤9mm (p<0.05. Positive correlations were observed between IPD and PD reduction, GR increase and AG in single-rooted teeth (p<0.001. Furthermore, positive correlations were found between IPD and PD reduction and GR increase in multi-rooted teeth (p<0.001, but there was no correlation between IPD and AG. Conclusion: NPT may lead to positive association between IPD and PD reduction as well as GR increase, which is independent from tooth root anatomy.

  6. Clinical, psychophysiological and psychological aspects of risk factors of periodontal disease development in clinically healthy persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.N. Nikulina

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to determine risk factors of periodontal disease development, psychophysiological personal types and their interrelations in clinically healthy persons. 47 first-year cadets of St.-Petersburg Military School of radio electronics have been examined. This group of respondents has been chosen by presence of such social stressor as change of place of living (97,9% cadets have arrived in St.-Petersburg from other cities and republics of the Russian Federation and strict disciplinary conditions. The research has revealed a low level of oral hygiene, cases of mild gingivitis in most respondents. The general mental state of group under study is characterized by raised level of personal anxiety and low indices of reactive anxiety. The examined group has demonstrated anxiety, tension, indecision and lowered stress stability. Clinically healthy persons are more liable to develop inflammatory and inflammatory-destructive periodontal diseases. It was possible to determine psychophysiological features correlated with physiological parameters of risk degree of periodontal diseases. It may have a great significance in defining of periodontal disease etiology and pathogenesis

  7. Association of bone mineral density with periodontal status in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anuradha; Sharma, Rajinder K; Siwach, Ram C; Tewari, Shikha; Narula, Satish C

    2014-11-01

    Menopausal changes expose an individual towards risk of various pathologies during midlife transition. This study aimed to investigate the possible association of bone mineral density (BMD) with periodontal parameters in early postmenopausal Indian women. In 78 dentate postmenopausal female patients periodontal examination was performed including clinical attachment loss, pocket depth, plaque index and sulcular bleeding index. Alveolar crestal height was measured on proximal surfaces of all posterior teeth except third molars with the help of bitewing radiographs. Patient's BMD was assessed with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Statistical analysis was performed to assess the correlation between BMD and periodontal parameters. Pocket depth, clinical attachment loss and alveolar crestal height were found to have negative and statistically significant (P = -0.000 each) correlation with T-score, with the value of Pearson's correlation coefficient being -0.474, -0.426, and -0.419 respectively. Number of teeth lost due to periodontitis was not significantly correlated with T-score (P > 0.05). Results of anova and the post-hoc Tukey test revealed a statistically significant difference of mean clinical attachment loss, pocket depth and alveolar crestal height for the osteoporotic versus osteopenic group and the osteoporotic versus normal group. However, between the osteopenic and normal group, the differences of mean were statistically nonsignificant (P > 0.05). Body mass index was found to have a weakly positive (r = 0.376) and statistically significant (P = 0.001) correlation with T-score. Bone mineral density is an important risk indicator for periodontitis in postmenopausal women. Number of teeth lost due to periodontitis is not significantly affected by the BMD of the early postmenopausal phase. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. [Clinical and periodontal predictive factors of severity in gingival recession (GR)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Rubio, Antonio; Bujaldón Daza, Antonio Luis; Rodríguez Archilla, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Gingival recession is an unsightly condition due to root exposure. It can lead to dental hypersensitivity, root caries, and tooth loss. To determine the influence of different clinical and periodontal parameters on the severity of gingival recession evaluated at four periods: initial, 6, 12, and 18 months of follow-up. Forty patients with gingival recession were included in the study. Sociodemographic data, systemic diseases, harmful habits, dental hygiene habits, parafunctional habits, and orthodontic treatment were collected. Periodontal status (plaque index, gingival bleeding index, attached gingiva loss, pocket probing depth, and attachment loss) was also measured. None of the clinical parameters studied influenced the number of teeth with gingival recession. Smokers showed a higher number of teeth with attached gingiva loss (p=0.03). A direct relationship between the severity of gingival recession and plaque index (p=0.02) or 4-6 mm attachment loss (p=0.04) was observed. At six months of follow-up, gingival index was the only parameter that influenced the severity of gingival recession (p=0.01).

  9. Salivary interleukin-17 and tumor necrosis factor-α in relation to periodontitis and glycemic status in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürsoy, Ulvi Kahraman; Yildiz Çiftlikli, Sinem; Könönen, Eija; Gürsoy, Mervi; Doğan, Başak

    2015-09-01

    Poorly-controlled glycemic status in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is suggested to play a role in the periodontal inflammatory process by aggregating the local cytokine response. Our objectives were to profile salivary interleukin (IL)-17 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels in subjects with T2DM and to examine their relevance for the periodontal health status and glycemic control levels. Unstimulated whole saliva samples, together with full-mouth periodontal recordings (plaque index [PI], bleeding on probing [BOP %], gingival index [GI], probing pocket depth [PPD], and clinical attachment level [CAL]), were collected from 123 subjects with T2DM. Additionally, demographic and general health parameters, including fasting blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), were collected. Salivary IL-17 and TNF-α concentrations were analyzed using the Luminex®-xMAP™ technique. Subjects with poorly-controlled T2DM (HbA1c ≥ 7) had elevated serum triglyceride (P periodontal disease in T2DM. The association between PPD and IL-17 in saliva, however, is independent from the effect of glycemic status. © 2014 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. The Effect of Diabetes Mellitus Type I on Periodontal and Dental Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Rokhsareh; Taleghani, Ferial; Mohammadi, Samira; Zohri, Zahra

    2017-07-01

    Diabetes mellitus type I is a chronic metabolic disease with an autoimmune origin. The initial manifestations mainly appear during childhood and its prevalence is on the rise in many countries. Some of the complications of diabetes mellitus are problems related to oro-dental structures and periodontal diseases. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the relationship between diabetes mellitus type I and dental and periodontal status in Tehran, Iran. This cross-sectional study was carried out on 50 patients with diabetes mellitus type I who were under treatment in the Diabetic Patients' Center in Tehran and 50 healthy individuals who did not have diabetes, all recruited from schools. The subjects were divided into two age groups of 6-12 and 13-18 years. In test group, HbA1c (glycosylated haemoglobin) level of the patients was collected from the medical records of Association of Diabetic Patients. To make sure that the control subjects did not suffer from diabetes mellitus, their blood glucose was measured with the Glucocard 01 blood glucose monitoring kit (GT-1920, Japan). The periodontal and dental status were assessed using dmft/DMFT (Decayed, Missing, Filled Permanent Teeth), GI (Gingival Index), PPD (Periodontal Pocket Depth), PI (Plaque Index) and CI (Calculus Index). The data obtained from each group were compared statistically using the Mann-Whitney test and Kruskal Wallis Test. There was increase in PPD, GI and DMFT values with aging, with no significant differences between the diabetic and non-diabetic groups. PI and DMFT not only increased with aging but also were higher in both age groups in patients with diabetes compared to healthy subjects (pdiabetic patients (pperiodontal indices (pdiabetes mellitus type I are more susceptible to periodontal diseases and tooth loss and such problems might be aggravated with aging.

  11. Periodontal status of teeth restored with crowns and its contralateral homologue, Valdivia- Chile.

    OpenAIRE

    Israel Antonio Juárez; Sofía Larroulet; Makarena Ojeda; Cristian Rosas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: To determine periodontal status of fixes single prostheses (FSP) made during the year 2013 in Austral University of Chile, and its contralateral homologue (CH).Methods: All patients with FSP made during 2013, that met the selection criteria and agreed to participate were evaluated. During the year 2014 was measured: probing depth, attachment level; bleeding on probing and dental plaque index for each FSP and CH; and consigned biological width invasion. Were measured one FSP...

  12. Periodontal pathogens in atheromatous plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Saroj K; Mukherjee, Manish; Kaushik, R; Sen, Sourav; Kumar, Mukesh

    2014-01-01

    There has been increasing attention paid in recent years to the possibility that oral bacterial infection, particularly periodontal disease may influence the initiation and or progression of systemic diseases. These studies confirm the observation that heart disease is the most commonly found systemic condition in patients with periodontal disease. Moreover, the literature has also highlighted substantial evidence indicating the presence of Gram-negative periodontal pathogens in atheromatous plaques. This study intends to investigate the possible association between periodontal health and coronary artery disease by evaluating periodontal status, association between the periodontal plaque and coronary atheromatous plaques for presence of micro-organisms such as, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Tannerella forsythia. A case-control study was designed with seven patients who had undergone coronary endarterectomy for cardiovascular disease and 28 controls. The periodontal examination for cases was performed 1 day before vascular surgery and the controls were clinically examined. The atheromatous plaque sample collected during endarterectomy and the intraoral plaque samples were subjected to polymerase chain reaction for identification of A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, P. intermedia and T. forsythia. The presence of periodontal bacteria DNA in coronary atheromatous plaques and sub-gingival plaque samples of the same patients was confirmed by this study. CONCLUSION A correlation was established between putative bacteria contributing to atheromatous plaques and species associated with periodontal disease. One particularly important study to be carried out is the investigation of a possible clinically meaningful reduction in coronary heart disease resulting from the prevention or treatment of periodontal disease.

  13. A clinical study of the relationship between diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajhans, Neelima S; Kohad, Ramesh M; Chaudhari, Viren G; Mhaske, Nilkanth H

    2011-10-01

    The relationship between diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease is not clear, even though studied intensively. From the available data, it seemed reasonable to believe that diabetics were more susceptible to periodontal disease than non.diabetics. The present study was to clinically evaluate the relationship of diabetes mellitus with periodontal disease along with various parameters. Fifteen hundred patients with diabetes mellitus were examined. A thorough oral examination was carried out and relevant history was recorded for all the patients. Results indicated that the prevalence of periodontal disease in diabetic patients was 86.8%. It can be concluded that poorer the glycemic control, and longer the duration of diabetes, the greater will be the prevalence and severity of periodontal disease.

  14. Correlation between clinical and radiographic findings on the occurrence of furcation involvement in patients with periodontitis

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    Estela Santos Gusmão

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Taking into consideration the method employed and the results obtained, it may be concluded that the clinical and radiographic examinations performed are effective tools for diagnosing furcation involvement in teeth affected with periodontal disease.

  15. Cost analysis of periodontitis management in public sector specialist dental clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd-Dom, Tuti; Ayob, Rasidah; Mohd-Nur, Amrizal; Abdul-Manaf, Mohd R; Ishak, Noorlin; Abdul-Muttalib, Khairiyah; Aljunid, Syed M; Ahmad-Yaziz, Yuhaniz; Abdul-Aziz, Hanizah; Kasan, Noordin; Mohd-Asari, Ahmad S

    2014-05-20

    The objective of this paper is to quantify the cost of periodontitis management at public sector specialist periodontal clinic settings and analyse the distribution of cost components. Five specialist periodontal clinics in the Ministry of Health represented the public sector in providing clinical and cost data for this study. Newly-diagnosed periodontitis patients (N = 165) were recruited and followed up for one year of specialist periodontal care. Direct and indirect costs from the societal viewpoint were included in the cost analysis. They were measured in 2012 Ringgit Malaysia (MYR) and estimated from the societal perspective using activity-based and step-down costing methods, and substantiated by clinical pathways. Cost of dental equipment, consumables and labour (average treatment time) for each procedure was measured using activity-based costing method. Meanwhile, unit cost calculations for clinic administration, utilities and maintenance used step-down approach. Patient expenditures and absence from work were recorded via diary entries. The conversion from MYR to Euro was based on the 2012 rate (1€ = MYR4). A total of 2900 procedures were provided, with an average cost of MYR 2820 (€705) per patient for the study year, and MYR 376 (€94) per outpatient visit. Out of this, 90% was contributed by provider cost and 10% by patient cost; 94% for direct cost and 4% for lost productivity. Treatment of aggressive periodontitis was significantly higher than for chronic periodontitis (t-test, P = 0.003). Higher costs were expended as disease severity increased (ANOVA, P = 0.022) and for patients requiring surgeries (ANOVA, P sector specialist settings were substantial and comparable with some non-communicable diseases. These findings provide basis for identifying potential cost-reducing strategies, estimating economic burden of periodontitis management and performing economic evaluation of the specialist periodontal programme.

  16. Relationship between quantitative measurement of Porphyromonas gingivalis on dental plaque with periodontal status of patients with coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwiyanti, Stephani; Soeroso, Yuniarti; Sunarto, Hari; Radi, Basuni

    2017-02-01

    Coronary heart disease is a narrowing of coronary artery due to plaque build-up. [1] Chronic periodontitis increases risk of cardiovascular disease. P.gingivalis is linked to both diseases. Objective: to analyse quantitative difference of P.gingivalis on dental plaque and its relationship with periodontal status of CHD patient and control. Methods: Periodontal status of 66 CHD patient and 40 control was checked. Subgingival plaque was isolated and P.gingivalis was measured using real-time PCR. Result: P.gingivalis of CHD patient differs from control. P.gingivalis is linked to pocket depth of CHD patient. Conclusion: P.gingivalis count of CHD patient is higher than control. P.gingivalis count is not linked to any periodontal status, except for pocket depth of CHD patient.

  17. Clinical features and some mechanisms of formation of inflammatoty periodontal diseases at women in the postmenopausal period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanina A.I.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose to determine clinical morphologic features of development of inflammatoty periodontal diseases at women in the postmenopausal period medical examination of 90 patients was carried out. It was established that a postmenopausal osteoporosis is risk factor of development periodontal diseases. In formation of periodontal diseases at women during this period the important role is played hormonal changes

  18. Health insurance status is associated with periodontal disease progression among Gullah African-Americans with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, Nicole M; Slate, Elizabeth H; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar; Fernandes, Jyotika K; Leite, Renata S

    2011-01-01

    Assess periodontal disease progression among GullahAfrican Americans with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) according to health insurance coverage. From an ongoing clinical trial among T2DM Gullah, we extracted a cohort that was previously enrolled in a cross-sectional study (N=93). Comparing prior exam to trial initiation, total tooth sites/person with periodontal disease progression events [evaluated separately: 2+ mm of clinical attachment loss (CAL), 2+ mm increased periodontal probing depths (PPD), bleeding on probing (BOP) emergence] were evaluated according to health insurance coverage using regression techniques appropriate for data with different counts of potential events per subject (varying tooth sites available). We used negative binomial regression techniques to account for overdispersion and fit multivariable models that also included baseline glycemic control (poor: glycated hemoglobin > OR =7 percent, well: glycated hemoglobin periodontitis, age, gender, body mass index, annual income, and oral hygiene behaviors. Final models included health insurance status, other significant predictors, and any observed confounders. Privately insured were most prevalent (41.94 percent), followed by uninsured (23.66 percent), Medicare (19.35 percent), and Medicaid (15.05 percent). Those with poor glycemic control (65.59 percent) were more prevalent than well-controlled (34.41 percent). CAL events ranged from 0 to 58.8 percent tooth sites/ person (11.83 +/- 12.44 percent), while PPD events ranged from 0 to 44.2 percent (8.66 +/- 10.97 percent) and BOP events ranged from 0 to 95.8 percent (23.65 +/- 17.21 percent). Rates of CAL events were increased among those who were uninsured [rate ratio (RR) = 1.75, P = 0.02], Medicare-insured (RR = 1.90, P = 0.03), and Medicaid-insured (RR = 1.89, P = 0.06). Increased access to health care, including dental services, may achieve reduction in chronic periodontal disease progression (as determined by CAL) for this study population

  19. Health insurance status is associated with periodontal disease progression among Gullah African Americans with type-2 diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, Nicole M.; Slate, Elizabeth H.; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar; Fernandes, Jyotika K.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Assess periodontal disease progression among Gullah-African-Americans with Type-2 diabetes-mellitus (T2DM) according to health insurance coverage. METHODS From an ongoing clinical trial among T2DM Gullah, we extracted a cohort that was previously enrolled in a cross-sectional study (N=93). Comparing prior exam to trial initiation, total tooth-sites/person with periodontal-disease-progression-events (evaluated separately: 2+mm of clinical-attachment-loss [CAL], 2+mm increased periodontal-probing-depths [PPD], bleeding-on-probing [BOP] emergence) were evaluated according to health insurance coverage using regression techniques appropriate for data with different counts of potential events per subject (varying tooth-sites available). We used negative-binomial regression techniques to account for overdispersion and fit multivariable models that also included baseline glycemic-control (poor: glycated-hemoglobin ≥7%, well: glycated-hemoglobin periodontitis, age, gender, body-mass-index (BMI), annual income, and oral hygiene behaviors. Final models included health insurance status, other significant predictors, and any observed confounders. RESULTS Privately-insured were most prevalent (41.94%), followed by uninsured (23.66%), Medicare (19.35%), and Medicaid (15.05%). Those with poor-glycemic-control (65.59%) were more prevalent than well-controlled (34.41%). CAL-events ranged 0–58.8% tooth-sites/person (11.83±12.44%), while PPD-events ranged 0–44.2% (8.66±10.97%) and BOP-events ranged 0–95.8% (23.65±17.21%). Rates of CAL-events were increased among those who were uninsured (RR=1.75, p=0.02), Medicare-insured (RR=1.90, p=0.03), and Medicaid-insured (RR=1.89, p=0.06). CONCLUSIONS Increased access to healthcare, including dental services, may achieve reduction in chronic periodontal disease progression (as determined by CAL) for this study population. These results are very timely given the March 2010 passing of the U.S. healthcare reform bills. PMID

  20. The effect on clinical parameters of periodontal inflammation following non-surgical periodontal therapy with ultrasonics and chemotherapeutic cooling solutions : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sluijs, Marjolein; van der Sluijs, Eveline; van der Weijden, Fridus; Slot, Dagmar Else

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To establish the added effect of a chemotherapeutic cooling solution in an ultrasonic device on clinical parameters of periodontal inflammation following non-surgical periodontal therapy. Methods: The MEDLINE-PubMed, Cochrane-CENTRAL, and the EMBASE databases were searched. Probing pocket depth

  1. [Systemic bone mineral density versus clinical periodontal condition: cross-sectional study in postmenopausal women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Fernanda Ferreira; Loureiro, Flávia Helen Furtado; Alves, Cláudia Maria Coêlho; Pereira, Adriana de Fátima Vasconcelos; Oliveira, Ana Emília Figueiredo de

    2008-01-01

    To assess the systemic bone mineral density (BMD) and the periodontal situation in postmenopausal women, to understand the possible role of osteoporosis as a risk factor for periodontal disease. The sample was comprised of 47 postmenopausal women, divided into 3 groups: 14 patients with normal bones (G1), 17 with osteopenia (G2) and 16 patients with osteoporosis (G3). Data was obtained using bone mineral density (BMD), obtained by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in the lumbar area (L1-L4). Periodontal condition was evaluated by Gingival Index (GI), Plaque Index (PI) and Clinical Attachment Level (CAL). Results were analyzed and submitted to statistical treatment, through the One Way ANOVA: (alpha=0.05) test and the Pearson's Correlation test (alpha=0.01). GI, PI and CAL variables did not disclose a significant difference in the periodontal situation of postmenopausal women A significant correlation between periodontal parameters GI, PI and CAL (pperiodontal parameters (GI, PI and CAL) and systemic bone condition of postmenopausal women, evaluated by BMD (p>0.01). The periodontal situation of postmenopausal women does not depend on the systemic bone mass and there is no significant correlation between BMD and periodontal parameters. However, further longitudinal surveys are required to understand osteoporosis as a risk factor of periodontal disease.

  2. Relationship of clinical and microbiological variables in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakalauskiene, Jurgina; Kubilius, Ricardas; Gleiznys, Alvydas; Vitkauskiene, Astra; Ivanauskiene, Egle; Šaferis, Viktoras

    2014-10-08

    The aim of the study was to analyze how metabolic control of type 1 diabetes is related to clinical and microbiological periodontal parameters. The study involved 56 subjects aged from 19 to 50 years divided into 2 groups: healthy subjects (the H group), and diabetic (type 1 diabetes) patients with chronic untreated generalized periodontitis (the DM group). The glycosylated hemoglobin value (HbA1c) was determined using the UniCel DxC 800 SYNCHRON System (Beckman Coulter, USA), and the concentration in blood was measured by the turbidimetric immunoinhibition method. A molecular genetic assay (Micro-IDent plus, Germany) was used to detect periodontopathogenic bacteria in plaque samples. Periodontitis was confirmed by clinical and radiological examination. Fusobacterium nucleatum, Capnocytophaga species, and Eikenella corrodens were the most frequently found bacteria in dental plaque samples (77.8%, 66.7%, and 33.4%, respectively), whereas Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans was identified 40.7% less frequently in the DM group than in the H group. The strongest relationship was observed between the presence of 2 periodontal pathogens - F. nucleatum and Capnocytophaga spp. - and poorer metabolic control in type 1 diabetes patients (HbA1c) and all clinical parameters of periodontal pathology. Periodontal disease was more evident in type 1 diabetic patients, and the prevalence of periodontitis was greatly increased in subjects with poorer metabolic control.

  3. Evaluation of a new periodontal probe tip design. A clinical and in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartoukian, S R; Palmer, R M; Wilson, R F

    2004-10-01

    In the search for an accurate periodontal probe which does not frequently penetrate the pocket base, a new tip has been designed which is flattened, and of 1 mm width and 0.45 mm thickness. This study aimed to evaluate the physico-mechanical and clinical properties of this probe (test) in comparison to a conventional 0.5 mm circular probe (control). Photoelastic stress analysis was undertaken for test and control probe tips at 3.15 and 5 N loads. To assess probing validity, the clinical probing depth with each probe (0.25 N force) at 125 sites on 27 teeth (27 subjects), was compared with the post-extraction connective tissue level measurement. Also evaluated were probing reproducibility (1200 sites in 25 subjects) and patient comfort (30 subjects). Using photoelastic stress analysis, the test probe demonstrated lower stresses and less local stress concentration than the control. Clinically, the test probe measured close to the post-extraction gold standard in greater frequency than the control - 26 versus 11 readings (21% versus 9%) exactly matched, and 90 versus 67 (72% versus 54%) were within +/-0.5 mm of the laboratory measurement. The test probe was, on average, 0.13 mm coronal to the connective tissue attachment level, whereas the control penetrated 0.27 mm past this level. The intraclass correlation between clinical and laboratory readings was greater for the test than the control (r=0.81 and 0.74, respectively). Although the control probe overestimated probing depth more markedly at bleeding (0.41 mm) than at non-bleeding (0.15 mm) sites, the relative position of the test probe hardly differed with inflammatory status (-0.11 and -0.14 mm, respectively). Each probe demonstrated good clinical reproducibility. However, the test probe examination was more comfortable for the patient. This new periodontal probe tip appears to have greater validity, good reproducibility and produces less patient discomfort. Copyright Blackwell Munksgaard, 2004

  4. Current Status and Future Development of Cell Transplantation Therapy for Periodontal Tissue Regeneration

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    Toshiyuki Yoshida

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that stem cell transplantation can regenerate periodontal tissue, and several clinical trials involving transplantation of stem cells into human patients have already begun or are in preparation. However, stem cell transplantation therapy is a new technology, and the events following transplantation are poorly understood. Several studies have reported side effects and potential risks associated with stem cell transplantation therapy. To protect patients from such risks, governments have placed regulations on stem cell transplantation therapies. It is important for the clinicians to understand the relevant risks and governmental regulations. This paper describes the ongoing clinical studies, basic research, risks, and governmental controls related to stem cell transplantation therapy. Then, one clinical study is introduced as an example of a government-approved periodontal cell transplantation therapy.

  5. Association between erectile dysfunction and chronic periodontitis: A clinical study

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    Ranjit Singh Uppal

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: It may be concluded that chronic periodontitis and ED are associated with each other. However, further large scale studies with confounder analysis and longitudinal follow-up are warranted to explore the link between these two diseases.

  6. Efficacy of stem cells on periodontal regeneration: Systematic review of pre-clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassi, S A; Sergio, N Z; Misawa, M Y O; Villar, C C

    2017-10-01

    This systematic review aims to evaluate mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) periodontal regenerative potential in animal models. MEDLINE, EMBASE and LILACS databases were searched for quantitative pre-clinical controlled animal model studies that evaluated the effect of local administration of MSC on periodontal regeneration. The systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement guidelines. Twenty-two studies met the inclusion criteria. Periodontal defects were surgically created in all studies. In seven studies, periodontal inflammation was experimentally induced following surgical defect creation. Differences in defect morphology were identified among the studies. Autogenous, alogenous and xenogenous MSC were used to promote periodontal regeneration. These included bone marrow-derived MSC, periodontal ligament (PDL)-derived MSC, dental pulp-derived MSC, gingival margin-derived MSC, foreskin-derived induced pluripotent stem cells, adipose tissue-derived MSC, cementum-derived MSC, periapical follicular MSC and alveolar periosteal cells. Meta-analysis was not possible due to heterogeneities in study designs. In most of the studies, local MSC implantation was not associated with adverse effects. The use of bone marrow-derived MSC for periodontal regeneration yielded conflicting results. In contrast, PDL-MSC consistently promoted increased PDL and cementum regeneration. Finally, the adjunct use of MSC improved the regenerative outcomes of periodontal defects treated with membranes or bone substitutes. Despite the quality level of the existing evidence, the current data indicate that the use of MSC may provide beneficial effects on periodontal regeneration. The various degrees of success of MSC in periodontal regeneration are likely to be related to the use of heterogeneous cells. Thus, future studies need to identify phenotypic profiles of highly regenerative MSC populations. © 2017 John Wiley

  7. Impact of periodontal status on oral health-related quality of life in patients with and without type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, F C; Wassall, R R; Preshaw, P M

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the impact of periodontal status on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) in patients with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). 61 patients with T2DM and 74 non-diabetic patients matched for age, gender and periodontal status (health, gingivitis, chronic periodontitis) were recruited. The oral health impact profile (OHIP)-49 was self-completed by all participants at baseline and by the patients with periodontitis at 3 months and 6 months after non-surgical periodontal therapy. There were no significant differences in the overall OHIP-49 summary scores between patients with T2DM (median; interquartile range; 37.0; 19.5-61.0) and without T2DM (30.4; 16.8-51.0) (p>0.05). Among non-diabetic patients, there were significantly higher OHIP-49 scores (indicating poorer OHRQoL) in patients with gingivitis (41.0; 19.7-75.7) and periodontitis (33.0; 19.9-52.5) compared to patients who were periodontally healthy (11.1; 7.1-34.5) (pdisability domains following periodontal treatment, indicating an improvement in OHRQoL. In contrast, there were no statistically significant changes in OHIP-49 scores following periodontal treatment in the patients with diabetes. T2DM does not impact on overall OHRQoL as measured by OHIP-49. Chronic periodontitis and gingivitis were associated with poorer OHRQoL in non-diabetic patients, with evidence of improvements following periodontal treatment, but no such effects were observed in patients with diabetes. Gingivitis and periodontitis are associated with reduced OHRQoL compared to periodontal health in non-diabetic patients, with improvements following treatment of periodontitis. No impact of type 2 diabetes on OHRQoL was noted; this may be related to the burden of chronic disease (diabetes) minimising the impact of oral health issues on OHRQoL. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. To evaluate the comparative status of oral health practices, oral hygiene and periodontal status amongst visually impaired and sighted students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ashish; Gupta, Jyoti; Aggarwal, Vyom; Goyal, Chinu

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the comparative status of oral health practices, oral hygiene, and periodontal status amongst visually impaired and sighted students. In this study, 142 visually impaired children from a blind school in the age group of 6-18 years were enrolled with a similar number of age and sex matched sighted students studying in different schools of Chandigarh. The outcome variables were oral hygiene practices, oral hygiene status, and periodontal status. The visually impaired had been found to have better oral hygiene practices, a nonsignificant difference of oral hygiene scores but a significantly high value for bleeding scores as compared to sighted students. Age wise comparisons showed that bleeding scores were highly significant in 9-11 years and 12-14 years age group as compared to 6-8 years and 15-18 years age group. It could be related that the increased prevalence of bleeding sites despite of better oral hygiene practices in visually impaired group might be the result of their handicap to visualize plaque. ©2012 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Effects of periodontal treatment on the medical status of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Joichiro; Hasegawa, Akihiko; Hayashi, Kohei; Suzuki, Takafumi; Ishii, Makiko; Otsuka, Hideharu; Yatabe, Kazuhiro; Goto, Seiichi; Tatsumi, Junichi; Shin, Kitetsu

    2017-04-21

    Studies have demonstrated that periodontal disease is associated with the development of systemic complications in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate which markers among various systemic disease parameters are affected by periodontal treatment in patients with T2DM. Twelve patients with T2DM were given oral hygiene instructions and subsequent subgingival scaling and root planing. The periodontal status was recorded, and blood and urine samples were taken to measure various parameters of glucose control and systemic status at baseline and 1 month following the periodontal treatment. Serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. After the periodontal treatment, the glycated hemoglobin value was significantly improved. The levels of urinary N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and albumin, which are markers of renal dysfunction, also decreased significantly after treatment. Among the parameters measured in serum, the γ-glutamyl transpeptidase level, which is usually interpreted as a marker of liver dysfunction, was significantly reduced. The serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were also significantly reduced by periodontal treatment. Within the limitations of this pilot study, periodontal treatment may be effective not only in improving metabolic control, but also in reducing the risk of diabetic kidney and liver disease in patients with T2DM.

  10. Periodontal treatment during pregnancy decreases the rate of adverse pregnancy outcome: a controlled clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    SANT’ANA, Adriana Campos Passanezi; de CAMPOS, Marinele R.; PASSANEZI, Selma Campos; de REZENDE, Maria Lúcia Rubo; GREGHI, Sebastião Luiz Aguiar; PASSANEZI, Euloir

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of non-surgical treatment of periodontal disease during the second trimester of gestation on adverse pregnancy outcomes. Material and Methods Pregnant patients during the 1st and 2nd trimesters at antenatal care in a Public Health Center were divided into 2 groups: NIG – "no intervention" (n=17) or IG- "intervention" (n=16). IG patients were submitted to a non-surgical periodontal treatment performed by a single periodontist consisting of scaling and root planning (SRP), professional prophylaxis (PROPH) and oral hygiene instruction (OHI). NIG received PROPH and OHI during pregnancy and were referred for treatment after delivery. Periodontal evaluation was performed by a single trained examiner, blinded to periodontal treatment, according to probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), plaque index (PI) and sulcular bleeding index (SBI) at baseline and 35 gestational weeks-28 days post-partum. Primary adverse pregnancy outcomes were preterm birth (0.05) at IG and worsening of all periodontal parameters at NIG (ppregnancy outcomes was 47.05% in NIG and 6.25% in IG. Periodontal treatment during pregnancy was associated to a decreased risk of developing adverse pregnancy outcomes [OR=13.50; CI: 1.47-123.45; p=0.02]. Conclusions Periodontal treatment during the second trimester of gestation contributes to decrease adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:21552714

  11. Periodontal status in pregnant women in comparison with non-pregnant individuals

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    R Surekha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Our understanding of pathogenesis of periodontal disease has changed remarkably over a few decades. Rather than being confined to periodontium, periodontal disease may have a wide ranging systemic effects. It is now recognized that it shares most of the common risk factors for diabetes, coronary heart disease preterm low birth weight, miscarriage or early pregnancy loss and preeclampsia. Materials and Methods: The study group comprised of 400 women (200 pregnant women and 200 non-pregnant with an age range of 18-40 years. Maternal demographic and medical data were collected. Periodontal examinations included: Oral hygiene index (OHI-S, gingival index (GI, pocket probing depth and clinical attachment loss (CAL. Results: The results were analyzed using test of proportion when OHI-S was compared in pregnant women with that of non-pregnant individuals, there was no significant difference in good oral hygiene group (P = 0.187, Z = 1.32. When the GI index was evaluated, a definite statistical difference was noted in mild, moderate and severe gingivitis (P - 0.000, Z = 0.365; P - 0.00, Z = 4.17; P - 0.000, Z = 0.75. CAL index revealed a statistical difference was observed healthy periodontium, mild, moderate and severe periodontitis in both pregnant and non-pregnant women (P = −0.000, Z = 3.65; P - 0.000, Z = 5.83; P - 0.001, Z - 3.24; P - 0.000, Z - 6.47. Conclusion: The present study conducted supports the hypothesis that there is a definite correlation between the pregnant women and poor oral hygiene (gingivitis and periodontitis as compared with the non-pregnant controls.

  12. Effectiveness of lifestyle change plus dental care (LCDC) program on improving glycemic and periodontal status in the elderly with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saengtipbovorn, Saruta; Taneepanichskul, Surasak

    2014-06-16

    Currently, there is an increased prevalence of diabetes mellitus among the elderly. To minimize adverse effects on glycemic control, prevention and management of general and oral complications in diabetic patients is essential. The purpose of the present study is to assess the effectiveness of a Lifestyle Change plus Dental Care (LCDC) program to improve glycemic and periodontal status in the elderly with type 2 diabetes. A quasi-experimental study was conducted in Health Centers 54 (intervention) and 59 (control) from October 2013 to January 2014. 66 diabetic patients per health center were included. At baseline, the intervention group attended a 20 minute lifestyle and oral health education program, individual lifestyle counseling using motivational interviewing (MI), application of self regulation manual, and individual oral hygiene instruction. The intervention group received booster education every visit by viewing a 15 minute educational video. The control group received a routine program. Participants were assessed at baseline and 3 month follow up for glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), body mass index (BMI), periodontal status, knowledge, attitude and practice of oral health and diabetes mellitus. Data were analyzed by using descriptive statistic, Chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, t-test, and multiple linear regression. After the 3 month follow up, a multiple linear regression analysis showed that the intervention group was significantly negatively correlated in both glycemic and periodontal status. Participants in the intervention group had significantly lower glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), plaque index score, gingival index score, pocket depth, clinical attachment level (CAL), and percentage of bleeding on probing (BOP) when compared to the control group. The combination of lifestyle change and dental care in one program improved both glycemic and periodontal status in the elderly with type 2

  13. Correlation of periodontal status and bone mineral density in postmenopausal women: A digital radiographic and quantitative ultrasound study

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    S B Vishwanath

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Calcaneal BMD was related to alveolar bone loss and, to a lesser extent, to clinical attachment loss, implicating postmenopausal bone loss as a risk indicator for periodontal disease in postmenopausal women.

  14. Clinical effect of a dentifrice containing three kinds of bactericidal ingredients on periodontal disease: a pilot study in patients undergoing supportive periodontal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Daichi; Kinumatsu, Takashi; Yokomizo, Atsushi; Tanaka, Miki; Egawa, Masahiro; Makino-Oi, Asako; Tomita, Sachiyo; Saito, Atsushi

    2018-02-09

    This study aimed to evaluate clinically the effect of a novel dentifrice containing three kinds of bactericidal ingredients on periodontal disease. This was a single-arm, prospective clinical study that enrolled patients with periodontitis undergoing supportive periodontal therapy. Periodontal examination, microbiological testing of saliva samples, and evaluation of inflammatory markers (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α) in gingival crevicular fluid were performed. After 4 weeks of the use of test dentifrice, these parameters were re-evaluated. The use of dentifrice was also subjectively evaluated by clinicians and participants. Among 30 participants, there were significant improvements in the periodontal and microbiological parameters, and the level of interleukin-1β in the gingival crevicular fluid, following the use of the test dentifrice. In clinicians' subjective evaluation of the overall usefulness of the dentifrice, 'mild' and 'moderate' improvement accounted for 83% of the total responses. In the participants' subjective evaluation, the majority indicated their experience of the use as favorable. Within the limitations of this study, it is suggested that the progression of periodontal disease during the supportive periodontal therapy can be prevented by the use of the test dentifrice. Trial registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry (UMIN-CTR) 000023175. Date of formal registration: July 14, 2016 ( https://upload.umin.ac.jp/cgi-open-bin/ctr/ctr_view.cgi?recptno=R000026716 ).

  15. Levels of interleukin-1β in gingival crevicular fluid in patients with coronary heart disease and its relationship to periodontal status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenggogeny, Putri; Masulili, Sri Lelyati C.; Tadjoedin, Fatimah M.; Radi, Basuni

    2017-02-01

    Periodontitis is a risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). Both diseases are an inflammatory diseases and have the same potential pathogenic mechanisms. Interleukin-1β as a pro-inflammatory main cytokine, can be found in this both diseases. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) derived from the serum of gingival sulcus, affected by inflammatory mechanism and the amount of this fluid will increase in that situation. Objective: To analyze the relationship of interleukin-1β levels in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of CHD and non-CHD patients with periodontal status. Methods: Oral clinical examination (plaque index, bleeding on probing, pocket depth and clinical attachment loss) for 35 subjects with CHD and 35 non CHD were checked, laboratory test to measure the levels of Interleukin-1β was checked with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: There was no significant differences between interleukin-1β levels in CHD and non-CHD patients (p>0.05); there was no significant difference between the level of Interleukin-1β with periodontal status in CHD and control (non CHD) patients (p>0.05). Conclusions: levels of Interleukin-1β in CHD patients do not have a relationships with plaque index, pocket depth and clinical attachment loss, but has a relationships with bleeding on probing.

  16. Association between tobacco smoking and periodontal status among bank employees of Meerut city

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    Shilpi Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Periodontal diseases are currently understood to be more complex by nature than previously considered. It is multifactorial. It is not only produced by bacteria, but also by numerous local and systemic factors. Smoking may be considered as one of the major risk factor for periodontal diseases and early loss of teeth. Aim: To assess the periodontal status and early loss of teeth among smokers and nonsmokers of bank employees of Meerut city. Materials and Methods: All the available bank employees of 72 banks were included in the study. The investigator was trained and calibrated before the start of the study. Information about age, sex, religion, occupation, education, tooth brushing frequency, smoking habit, associated systemic diseases, awareness about oral health were recorded by investigator using WHO oral health assessment form (1997. Results: Sextants affected with deep pockets among smokers was 59.8% compared to nonsmokers 31.2% was statistically significant (P < 0.05. A teeth lost among smokers was 62.45% compared to nonsmokers was 35.86%, respectively (P < 0.05.

  17. The usefulness of using Ramfjord teeth in predicting periodontal status of a Tanzanian adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumghamba, E G S; Pitiphat, W; Matee, M I N; Simon, E; Merchant, A T

    2004-01-01

    The only partial mouth index that has been validated against full-mouth examinations in the East African population is the CPITN (Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs). Since the Ramfjord index can potentially shorten the examination time by almost half, we evaluated Ramfjord teeth in predicting full-mouth periodontal status of an adult population in Tanzania. Pocket depth was measured for 192 consecutive patients aged from 15 to 77 years (36 years old on average); 86 (45%) females referred to the Department of Restorative Dentistry, Muhimbili National Hospital, Tanzania between January 1997 and December 1999, and the mean pocket depth for full-mouth and Ramfjord teeth was calculated. The correlation between the mean pocket depth calculated from the full-mouth and Ramfjord teeth was 0.96. The beta coefficient for the mean pocket depth measured by Ramfjord teeth to predict the full-mouth mean was 0.94, and was not affected by adjustment for age, missing teeth or sex. This overall high agreement between Ramjford teeth and full-mouth periodontal pocket situation confirms the epidemiological validity of Ramfjord's dental sample in our setting.

  18. Periodontal status of mentally handicapped school children in Caracas, Venezuela. A cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Morales-Chávez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is a chronic multifactor pathology, characterized by the progressive destruction of the dental structures support tissues. Patients with some type of disability have a higher predisposition to develop periodontal disease, due to bad hygiene, product of their motor and psychological deficiencies, and to their systemic alterations that difficult the defense against periodontopathogenic microorganisms. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the periodontal status of a group of children with special needs, and a control group. 47 patients with mental retardation and Down syndrome from three special education centers, and 31 healthy patients of ages ranging from 6 to 15 years, were dentally evaluated, to determine their plaque index, gingival index, and the presence of calculus. After gathering the data and tabulating the results, a 1.08 plaque index was determined, and a gingival index of 1.03, corresponding to a mild gingivitis in the study group. On the other hand, on the group of regular patients, there was a 1.08 PI and a 0.96 GI. Calculus percentage was similar on both groups. However, a large percentage of children with mild gingival inflammation was observed in the group of special patients (53.19%, compared to the control group (29%.

  19. Detection and diagnosis of periodontal conditions amenable to prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preshaw, Philip M

    2015-01-01

    Gingivitis and chronic periodontitis are highly prevalent chronic inflammatory diseases. Gingivitis affects the majority of people, and advanced periodontitis is estimated to affect 5-15% of adults. The detection and diagnosis of these common diseases is a fundamentally important component of oral health care. All patients should undergo periodontal assessment as part of routine oral examination. Periodontal screening using methods such as the Basic Periodontal Examination/Community Periodontal Index or Periodontal Screening Record should be performed for all new patients, and also on a regular basis as part of ongoing oral health care. If periodontitis is identified, full periodontal assessment is required, involving recording of full mouth probing and bleeding data, together with assessment of other relevant parameters such as plaque levels, furcation involvement, recession and tooth mobility. Radiographic assessment of alveolar bone levels is driven by the clinical situation, and is required to assess bone destruction in patients with periodontitis. Risk assessment (such as assessing diabetes status and smoking) and risk management (such as promoting smoking cessation) should form a central component of periodontal therapy. This article provides guidance to the oral health care team regarding methods and frequencies of appropriate clinical and radiographic examinations to assess periodontal status, to enable appropriate detection and diagnosis of periodontal conditions.

  20. Detection and diagnosis of periodontal conditions amenable to prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Gingivitis and chronic periodontitis are highly prevalent chronic inflammatory diseases. Gingivitis affects the majority of people, and advanced periodontitis is estimated to affect 5-15% of adults. The detection and diagnosis of these common diseases is a fundamentally important component of oral health care. All patients should undergo periodontal assessment as part of routine oral examination. Periodontal screening using methods such as the Basic Periodontal Examination/Community Periodontal Index or Periodontal Screening Record should be performed for all new patients, and also on a regular basis as part of ongoing oral health care. If periodontitis is identified, full periodontal assessment is required, involving recording of full mouth probing and bleeding data, together with assessment of other relevant parameters such as plaque levels, furcation involvement, recession and tooth mobility. Radiographic assessment of alveolar bone levels is driven by the clinical situation, and is required to assess bone destruction in patients with periodontitis. Risk assessment (such as assessing diabetes status and smoking) and risk management (such as promoting smoking cessation) should form a central component of periodontal therapy. This article provides guidance to the oral health care team regarding methods and frequencies of appropriate clinical and radiographic examinations to assess periodontal status, to enable appropriate detection and diagnosis of periodontal conditions. PMID:26390822

  1. A comparative clinical evaluation of diet intake and effect of various nutritions on aggressive periodontitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapare, Sagar Arjun; Rao, P Krishna; Reddy, R Vamshidhar; Kumar, Mg Manoj; Gorthi, Vss Chandana; Raju, Pv Krishnam

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect various dietary nutrients in aggressive periodontitis patients. A total of 85 patients were selected and divided into two groups, 45 patients are with aggressive periodontitis and 40 patients are healthy. Periodontal parameters such as oral hygiene index, Russels periodontal index and radiograph were taken. The food consumption survey was conducted in all the households of subjects both in control and experimental group. The individual of food intake of the subjects was assessed by the oral questionnaire (24 hours recall) method. The quantity of raw foods used for various preparations and volumes of cooked quantities of such preparations in terms of standardized cups were noted. Body measurements were taken on all the subjects, standing height using a height measuring rod and weight in standard weighing machine. Aggressive periodontitis is seen in young individual and mostly in females; majority of the patients of both groups belongs to low socioeconomic group. Body mass index which is a refection of nutritional status of an individual indicated that chronically energy defcient subjects in experimental group appeared to be higher. The average food and nutrient intake in control group was slightly better than that of experimental group. The diet survey indicated marginal and negligible defciencies in aggressive periodontitis patients compared to controls, and this coupled with chronically energy defciency as indicated by body mass index, calls for a detailed study of this aspect of aggressive periodontitis. The present study indicates that nutritional infuences point to a needle of suspicion toward the etiology of aggressive periodontitis.

  2. Relationship between alexithymia and chronic periodontitis | Sezer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The participants were divided into a chronic periodontitis group (n = 114) and a control group (n = 108) with no history of periodontitis. The Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS‑20) was used to evaluate alexithymia status of the subjects. Clinical data were collected on parameters such as the plaque index, bleeding on probing, ...

  3. A correlative study of the clinical and radiographic signs of periodontal disease in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.M.; Zontine, W.J.; Willits, N.H.

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-four dogs admitted for routine teeth cleaning were selected arbitrarily to undergo a periodontal examination and a dental radiographic examination before the dental procedure. Data pertaining to the physical and radiographic manifestations of periodontal disease of 783 teeth were collected. All dogs had lesions consistent with periodontal disease, ranging from mild gingivitis and minimal plaque accumulation to severely inflamed gingiva, exuberant calculus formation, and root exposure. Of the 783 teeth examined, 153 (20%) had a pocket depth greater than or equal to 4 mm and less than or equal to 9 mm. Data regarding these teeth were subjected to statistical analysis. The clinical signs of plaque, calculus, mobility, pocket depth, and furcation were positively associated with radiographic signs of periodonta disease. The association between grossly evident gingivitis and radiographic signs of periodontal disease was not significant. Conditional probability analysis was applied to determine confidence intervals for the probability of a radiographic sign of periodontal disease occurring given that a clinical sign of periodontal disease occurs. (author)

  4. Oxidative Stress and Periodontal Disease in Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Erhan; Akalin, Ferda Alev; Genc, Tolga; Cinar, Nese; Erel, Ozcan; Yildiz, Bulent Okan

    2016-03-01

    Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the jaws and is more prevalent in obesity. Local and systemic oxidative stress may be an early link between periodontal disease and obesity. The primary aim of this study was to detect whether increased periodontal disease susceptibility in obese individuals is associated with local and systemic oxidative stress. Accordingly; we analyzed periodontal status and systemic (serum) and local (gingival crevicular fluid [GCF]) oxidative status markers in young obese women in comparison with age-matched lean women.Twenty obese and 20 lean women participated. Periodontal condition was determined by clinical periodontal indices including probing depth, clinical attachment level, gingival index, gingival bleeding index, and plaque index. Anthropometric, hormonal, and metabolic measurements were also performed. Blood and GCF sampling was performed at the same time after an overnight fasting. Serum and GCF total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), and total oxidant status (TOS) levels were determined, and oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated.Clinical periodontal analyses showed higher gingival index and gingival bleeding index in the obese group (P = 0.001 for both) with no significant difference in probing depth, clinical attachment level, and plaque index between the obese and the lean women. Oxidant status analyses revealed lower GCF and serum TAOC, and higher GCF and serum OSI values in the obese women (P periodontal indices showed significant correlations with body mass index, insulin, and lipid levels, and also oxidant status markers.Our results suggest that young obese, otherwise healthy, women show findings of early periodontal disease (gingival inflammation) compared with age-matched healthy lean women, and that local/periodontal oxidative stress generated by obesity seems to be associated with periodontal disease.

  5. Effects of chlorhexidine preprocedural rinse on bacteremia in periodontal patients: a randomized clinical trial

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    Rodrigo Dalla Pria Balejo

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: Single dose of systemic antibiotics and short-term use of mouthwashes reduce bacteremia. However, the effects of a single dose of preprocedural rinse are still controversial. This study evaluated, in periodontally diseased patients, the effects of a pre-procedural mouth rinse on induced bacteremia. Material and Methods: Systemically healthy individuals with gingivitis (n=27 or periodontitis (n = 27 were randomly allocated through a sealed envelope system to: 0.12% chlorhexidine pre-procedural rinse (13 gingivitis and 13 periodontitis patients or no rinse before dental scaling (14 gingivitis and 15 periodontitis patients. Periodontal probing depth, clinical attachment level, plaque, and gingival indices were measured and subgingival samples were collected. Blood samples were collected before dental scaling, 2 and 6 minutes after scaling. Total bacterial load and levels of P. gingivalis were determined in oral and blood samples by real-time polymerase chain reaction, while aerobic and anaerobic counts were determined by culture in blood samples. The primary outcome was the antimicrobial effect of the pre-procedural rinse. Data was compared by Mann-Whitney and Signal tests (p<0.05. Results: In all sampling times, polymerase chain reaction revealed higher blood bacterial levels than culture (p<0.0001, while gingivitis patients presented lower bacterial levels in blood than periodontitis patients (p<0.0001. Individuals who experienced bacteremia showed worse mean clinical attachment level (3.4 mm vs. 1.1 mm and more subgingival bacteria (p<0.005. The pre-procedural rinse did not reduce induced bacteremia. Conclusions: Bacteremia was influenced by periodontal parameters. In periodontally diseased patients, pre-procedural rinsing showed a discrete effect on bacteremia control.

  6. Pro-oxidant status and matrix metalloproteinases in apical lesions and gingival crevicular fluid as potential biomarkers for asymptomatic apical periodontitis and endodontic treatment response

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    Dezerega Andrea

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxidative stress and matrix metalloproteinases -9 and -2 are involved in periodontal breakdown, whereas gingival crevicular fluid has been reported to reflect apical status. The aim of this study was to characterize oxidant balance and activity levels of MMP -2 and -9 in apical lesions and healthy periodontal ligament; and second, to determine whether potential changes in oxidant balance were reflected in gingival crevicular fluid from asymptomatic apical periodontitis (AAP-affected teeth at baseline and after endodontic treatment. Methods Patients with clinical diagnosis of AAP and healthy volunteers having indication of tooth extraction were recruited. Apical lesions and healthy periodontal ligaments, respectively, were homogenized or processed to obtain histological tissue sections. Matrix metalloproteinase -9 and -2 levels and/or activity were analyzed by Immunowestern blot, zymography and consecutive densitometric analysis, and their tissue localization was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. A second group of patients with AAP and indication of endodontic treatment was recruited. Gingival crevicular fluid was extracted from AAP-affected teeth at baseline, after endodontic treatment and healthy contralateral teeth. Total oxidant and antioxidant status were determined in homogenized tissue and GCF samples. Statistical analysis was performed using STATA v10 software with unpaired t test, Mann-Whitney test and Spearman's correlation. Results Activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 along with oxidant status were higher in apical lesions (p Conclusions Apical lesions display an oxidant imbalance along with increased activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 and might contribute to AAP progression. Oxidant imbalance can also be reflected in GCF from AAP-affected teeth and was restored to normal levels after conservative endodontic treatment. These mediators might be useful as potential biomarkers for chair-side complementary diagnostic

  7. Effects of chlorhexidine preprocedural rinse on bacteremia in periodontal patients: a randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balejo, Rodrigo Dalla Pria; Cortelli, José Roberto; Costa, Fernando Oliveira; Cyrino, Renata Magalhães; Aquino, Davi Romeiro; Cogo-Müller, Karina; Miranda, Taís Browne; Moura, Sara Porto; Cortelli, Sheila Cavalca

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Single dose of systemic antibiotics and short-term use of mouthwashes reduce bacteremia. However, the effects of a single dose of preprocedural rinse are still controversial. This study evaluated, in periodontally diseased patients, the effects of a pre-procedural mouth rinse on induced bacteremia. Material and Methods: Systemically healthy individuals with gingivitis (n=27) or periodontitis (n = 27) were randomly allocated through a sealed envelope system to: 0.12% chlorhexidine pre-procedural rinse (13 gingivitis and 13 periodontitis patients) or no rinse before dental scaling (14 gingivitis and 15 periodontitis patients). Periodontal probing depth, clinical attachment level, plaque, and gingival indices were measured and subgingival samples were collected. Blood samples were collected before dental scaling, 2 and 6 minutes after scaling. Total bacterial load and levels of P. gingivalis were determined in oral and blood samples by real-time polymerase chain reaction, while aerobic and anaerobic counts were determined by culture in blood samples. The primary outcome was the antimicrobial effect of the pre-procedural rinse. Data was compared by Mann-Whitney and Signal tests (pperiodontitis patients (pbacteria (pperiodontal parameters. In periodontally diseased patients, pre-procedural rinsing showed a discrete effect on bacteremia control. PMID:29211279

  8. Clinical and microbiological characterization of localized aggressive periodontitis: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oettinger-Barak, O; Sela, M N; Sprecher, H; Machtei, E E

    2014-06-01

    Localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP) is an infectious periodontal disease which generally affects young people. Recent data suggest the involvement of different bacterial species in different populations. The causative bacterial species in Israel has never been identified despite a high prevalence of LAgP in this population. The objectives of this study were to characterize the bacterial microbiota of periodontal pockets within an Israeli LAgP population who were also clinically assessed. Twenty-one LAgP patients (test) and 12 chronic periodontitis patients (control) were examined. Bacterial samples were collected from periodontal pockets and analysed by both culture and polymerase chain reaction techniques. Mann-Whitney U test and chi-square test were used to compare results between the groups. Higher levels of Parvimonas micra (>10(6) ), Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (>10(5) ), Fusobacterium nucleatum/F. periodonticum (>10(6) ), and Tannerella forsythia (levels of 10(5) to 10(6) bacteria) were detected in the LAgP group compared to the control (p periodontal bacterial flora of LAgP patients in Israel is mainly comprised of P. micra, A. actinomycetemcomitans, F. nucleatum/F. periodonticum and T. forsythia. Similar population based studies of each population will improve the quality of treatment of LAgP when individual sampling is not possible. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  9. [Correlation between periodontal disease and osteoporosis using panoramic radiographic parameters for diagnosed osteoporosis in dental clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otogoto, Jun-ichi; Ota, Norio

    2003-05-01

    The correlation between periodontal disease and osteoporosis was evaluated by comparing age, panoramic radiographic and clinical parameters of periodontal disease. Diagnosis of osteoporosis in periodontal diseased patients was evaluated by panoramic radiographic parameters (mandibular cortical width:MCW). Subjects which had more than 20 teeth and examined by panoramic radiography were untreated adults with periodontal disease who were free of other systemic disease. The following parameters were examined on panoramic X-ray film:alveolar bone loss (ABL), mandibular bone mass with the use of mandibular cortical width (MCW). ABL was significantly higher and MCW significantly lower in the postmenopausal group (>6 years after menopause). The number of teeth was significantly lower and CAL significantly higher in the postmenopausal group (>11 years after menopause). Age and ABL correlated positively in men and women. Years after menopause and ABL and MCW and CAL in the postmenopausal group were correlated positively. Women whose MCW was less than mean - 2 SD should be diagnosed with osteoporosis. Our results demonstrated that periodontal disease correlates with osteoporosis, and MCW could be useful in detecting of osteoporosis in women with periodontal disease.

  10. Effect of periodontal treatment on serum C-reactive protein level in obese and normal-weight women affected with chronic periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Zahrani, M.S.; Alghamdi, H.S.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of conventional periodontal therapy on serum C-reactive protein (CRP) level and periodontal status in obese and normal-weight chronic periodontitis patients. METHODS: This is a controlled clinical trial conducted at the King Abdulaziz University Faculty of

  11. Periodontal treatment during pregnancy decreases the rate of adverse pregnancy outcome: a controlled clinical trial

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    Adriana Campos Passanezi Sant'Ana

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of non-surgical treatment of periodontal disease during the second trimester of gestation on adverse pregnancy outcomes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Pregnant patients during the 1st and 2nd trimesters at antenatal care in a Public Health Center were divided into 2 groups: NIG - "no intervention" (n=17 or IG- "intervention" (n=16. IG patients were submitted to a non-surgical periodontal treatment performed by a single periodontist consisting of scaling and root planning (SRP, professional prophylaxis (PROPH and oral hygiene instruction (OHI. NIG received PROPH and OHI during pregnancy and were referred for treatment after delivery. Periodontal evaluation was performed by a single trained examiner, blinded to periodontal treatment, according to probing depth (PD, clinical attachment level (CAL, plaque index (PI and sulcular bleeding index (SBI at baseline and 35 gestational weeks-28 days post-partum. Primary adverse pregnancy outcomes were preterm birth (0.05 at IG and worsening of all periodontal parameters at NIG (p<0.0001, except for PI. Signifcant differences in periodontal conditions of IG and NIG were observed at 2nd examination (p<0.001. The rate of adverse pregnancy outcomes was 47.05% in NIG and 6.25% in IG. Periodontal treatment during pregnancy was associated to a decreased risk of developing adverse pregnancy outcomes [OR=13.50; CI: 1.47-123.45; p=0.02]. CONCLUSIONS: Periodontal treatment during the second trimester of gestation contributes to decrease adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  12. Type-2 diabetes mellitus, metabolic control, serum inflammatory factors, lifestyle, and periodontal status

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    Leela R. Movva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Type-2 diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease are complex human diseases. Pathogenesis of both ailments is multifactorial, involving chronic disease courses with varied clinical presentations. It is well established in the scientific literature that both diseases are interrelated; in particular, individuals suffering from diabetes are at a higher risk of developing periodontitis. The present review analyzed, using a hypothetical model, the complex factors that may influence the two diseases indirectly, including lifestyle, obesity, diabetes control, oral health behavior, and serum inflammatory factors, and even quality of life. In this review, special attention was given to exploring plausible theoretical or practical explanations of the interrelations and the contemporary evidence base underpinning these. Since the impact of individual general or oral health quality of life factors are substantial, it is very important for health care professionals to appreciate the influence of these factors as controlling these help assist in management of both type-2 diabetes and periodontal diseases thus reducing the social burden of these two complex disease in various populations.

  13. Periodontal Vaccines

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    Daisy Happy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is an infectious disease caused by predominantly gram-negative, anaerobic bacteria like P. gingivalis, A. actinomycetemcomitans T. denticola and T. forsythus etc.. Various immunization approaches both as active and passive immunization, against periodontal pathogens have been explored either using the whole microorganism or their specific virulence factors. Non-human primate and other study models have demonstrated raised production of specific antibody titers against various antigens without any recognizable systemic side-effects. But, the current status of our understanding in the field of vaccines against periodontal disease is incomplete. Ongoing research & collaborative efforts can result in development of functional periodontal vaccine for human use in future.

  14. Localized juvenile periodontitis or localized aggressive periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Maria

    2002-01-01

    In general, the new term "localized aggressive periodontitis" replaces what was previously known as "localized juvenile periodontitis." Similarly, "generalized aggressive periodontitis" replaces what used to be called "generalized juvenile periodontitis." Aggressive periodontitis is a specific type of periodontitis with clearly identifiable clinical and laboratory findings, making it sufficiently different from chronic periodontitis and warranting separate classification. Not all the characteristics must be present to assign a diagnosis or classify the disease. The diagnosis may be based on clinical, radiographic, and historical data, and laboratory testing may not be essential for assigning a diagnosis.

  15. Periodontal treatment effects on endothelial function and cardiovascular disease biomarkers in subjects with chronic periodontitis: protocol for a randomized clinical trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Ramírez Escobar, Jorge Hernán; Contreras, Adolfo; Arce, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Background Periodontal disease (PD) is an infectious clinical entity characterized by the destruction of supporting tissues of the teeth as the result of a chronic inflammatory response in a susceptible host. It has been proposed that PD as subclinical infection may contribute to the etiology and to the pathogenesis of several systemic diseases including Atherosclerosis. A number of epidemiological studies link periodontal disease/edentulism as independent risk factor for acute myocardial ...

  16. Prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus in People Clinically Diagnosed with Periodontitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Epidemiologic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziukaite, Laura; Slot, Dagmar E; Van der Weijden, Fridus A

    2017-11-10

    Diabetes mellitus and periodontitis are complex chronic diseases with an established bidirectional relationship. This systematic review evaluated in subjects with professionally diagnosed periodontitis the prevalence and odds of having diabetes. The MEDLINE-PubMed, CENTRAL and EMBASE databases were searched. Prevalence of diabetes mellitus among subjects with periodontitis were extracted or if possible calculated. From the 803 titles and abstracts that came out of the search, 29papers met the initial criteria. Prevalence of diabetes was 9.4% among subjects with periodontitis and 12.8%among subjects without periodontitis. Based on sub-analysis, for subjects with periodontitis, the prevalence of diabetes was 6.5%when diabetes was self-reported, compared to 17.3%when diabetes was clinically assessed. The highest prevalence of diabetes among subjects with periodontitis was observed in studies originating from Asian countries(17.2%,n=16647) and the lowest in studies describing populations from Europe(4.3%(n=7858). The overall odds ratio for diabetes patients to be among subjects with periodontitis as compared to those without periodontitis was 2.59(95%CI[2.12;3.15]). A substantial variability in the definitions of periodontitis, combination of self-reported and clinically assessed diabetes, lack of confounding for diabetes control in included studies introduces estimation bias. The overall prevalence and odds of having diabetes is higher within periodontitis populations compared to people without periodontitis. Self-reported diabetes underestimates the prevalence when compared to this condition assessed clinically. Geographical differences were observed: the highest diabetes prevalence among subjects with periodontitis was observed in studies conducted in Asia and the lowest in studies originating from Europe. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. [Residual pocket depth after periodontal regenerative procedures. Clinical relevance and interpretation of meta-analyses data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidlin, Patrick R; Hauri, Dimitri; Krähenmann, Michael A; Puhan, Milo A; Attin, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Meta-analyses allow to combine results systematically and to obtain more precise quantitative results on the efficacy of a therapy. For the clinician, the comparison of two therapy modalities is particularly of interest. Several meta-analyses exist in the field of periodontal regenerative procedures. The problem is that the results are difficult to interpret for the clinician. It is only the clinical effect that can indicate the superiority of a certain treatment modality, e.g. remaining periodontal pockets. The aim of the present systematic review was the re-evaluation of studies of existing meta-analyses and to determine the probability of remaining periodontal pockets of more than 3 respectively 5 mm after active therapy. The probability of remaining periodontal pockets over 3 respectively 5 mm was significantly higher after periodontal flap procedure without regenerative procedures, compared to guided tissue regeneration (GTR) or the use of enamel matrix derivatives. Moreover, the probability of remaining pockets over 3 mm was with GTR on average 57% and with the use of enamel maxtrix derivatives 74%. Using the cut-off value of 5 mm this probability was reduced to 8 and 17%, respectively. A new clinical attachment that was less than 50% of the original level was to be expected in 29% (GTR) and 15% using enamel matrix derivatives. This statistical interpretation permits not only the clinician, but also the patient to compare the efficacy of the different treatment modalities using the probability of primary clinical effect outcomes.

  18. Medical and Periodontal Clinical Parameters in Patients at Different Levels of Chronic Renal Failure

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    Caroline Perozini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the clinical periodontal and medical parameters in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF at different levels of renal disease. Background. CRF is a progressive and irreversible loss of renal function associated with a decline in the glomerular filtration rate. Periodontal disease is a destructive inflammatory disease affecting periodontal tissues that shows high prevalence in patients with CRF. Materials and Methods. 102 CRF patients were included and divided into an early stage group (EG, predialysis group (PDG, and hemodialysis group (HDG. The medical parameters were taken from the patients’ records. Results. Periodontal clinical condition differed among the CRF groups. Clinical attachment loss was greater in the HDG and PDG group compared to the EG (p=0.0364; the same was observed in the Plaque Index (p=0.0296; the others periodontal parameters did not show any differences. Ferritin levels were significantly higher in the HDG when compared to the EG and PGD (p<0.0001, and fibrinogen was higher in PDG compared with the others (p<0.0001; the triglycerides also showed higher values in the HDG compared with the other groups (p<0.0001. Conclusion. The patients with renal involvement should have a multidisciplinary approach to an improvement in their oral and systemic health.

  19. Impact of Periodontitis Case Criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongstad, Johanne; Enevold, Christian; Christensen, Lisa Bøge

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Associations of risk factors/indicators with periodontitis may depend on the included case criterion. The objective was to evaluate differences in outcome by applying five periodontitis case definitions for cross-sectional associations with lifestyle factors among participants...... of The Danish Health Examination Survey (DANHES). METHODS: A total of 4,402 adults aged 18-96 years from the general health examination of DANHES had a periodontal examination consisting of half-mouth registration at 6 sites per tooth including probing pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment level (CAL......). Periodontitis was defined according to severe periodontitis, EWP-specific, meanCAL≥2.55mm, CAL-tertile, and PPD-CAL definition. Multivariable logistic regression models fitted the association of age, gender, smoking status, diabetes, educational level, alcohol consumption, body mass index, physical activity...

  20. Oral hygiene and periodontal status in the primitive hidden tribe of Patalkot, a tribal area in Central India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastav, Arpan; Maurya, Rajkumar; Shukla, Chandresh; Sahu, Trilok; Chauhan, Neeraj; Azad, Antriksh; Dubey, Ashutosh

    2018-01-01

    Very little is known about the hard to reach tribal communities in India and one such community is a primitive hidden and isolated tribe group of Bharia people in Patalkot. Their health problems need special attention as they have very limited access to health care. The aim of this study is to assess the oral hygiene and periodontal status in the primitive tribe group of Bharias in Patalkot, Madhya Pradesh, India. A descriptive cross-sectional study was undertaken with sample size of 462 patients. The sample was selected using simple random technique. A predefined pro forma was used to record information about oral hygiene practices and tobacco-related habits. Oral Hygiene Index-simplified (OHI-S), Community Periodontal Index (CPI), and loss of attachment (LOA) were used to assess oral hygiene and periodontal status, respectively. The prevalence of periodontal disease based on CPI scores showed that 35.4 % had periodontal pocket > 6mm. It was also found that 27.9% people had attachment loss of 6-8mm. Mean Debris Index-simplified, Calculus Index-simplified, and OHI-S for the participants were 1.59 ± 0.73, 0.99 ± 0.70, and 2.56 ± 1.36, respectively. Poor oral hygiene status was found in 36.3% of Bharias. Higher prevalence of periodontal diseases and poor oral hygiene status in Bharia people can be attributed mainly to their difficult terrain, isolation, very low literacy level, socioeconomic status, and cultural practices.

  1. Oral hygiene and periodontal status in the primitive hidden tribe of Patalkot, a tribal area in Central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpan Shrivastav

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Very little is known about the hard to reach tribal communities in India and one such community is a primitive hidden and isolated tribe group of Bharia people in Patalkot. Their health problems need special attention as they have very limited access to health care. The aim of this study is to assess the oral hygiene and periodontal status in the primitive tribe group of Bharias in Patalkot, Madhya Pradesh, India. Materials and Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was undertaken with sample size of 462 patients. The sample was selected using simple random technique. A predefined pro forma was used to record information about oral hygiene practices and tobacco-related habits. Oral Hygiene Index-simplified (OHI-S, Community Periodontal Index (CPI, and loss of attachment (LOA were used to assess oral hygiene and periodontal status, respectively. Results: The prevalence of periodontal disease based on CPI scores showed that 35.4 % had periodontal pocket > 6mm. It was also found that 27.9% people had attachment loss of 6-8mm. Mean Debris Index-simplified, Calculus Index-simplified, and OHI-S for the participants were 1.59 ± 0.73, 0.99 ± 0.70, and 2.56 ± 1.36, respectively. Poor oral hygiene status was found in 36.3% of Bharias. Conclusion: Higher prevalence of periodontal diseases and poor oral hygiene status in Bharia people can be attributed mainly to their difficult terrain, isolation, very low literacy level, socioeconomic status, and cultural practices.

  2. CLINICAL EFFECTIVENESS OF TREATMENT THE PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC APICAL PERIODONTITIS

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    N. G. Gadzhula

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. The success of endodontic treatment is provided by a thorough instrumental and antiseptic treatment of infected root canals, and it depends on the composition of filling material, the degree of adhesion to dentin, hermetic obturation of apical foramen, solubility of sealer. Objective. The study was aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of root canal obturation with BioRootTM RCS sealer in the treatment of patients with chronic apical periodontitis. Methods. Endodontic treatment of 23 teeth in 20 patients with chronic apical periodontitis by method of lateral compaction of gutta-percha was carried out. In the main group root canals were obturated with BioRootTM RCS, in the control group the canals were filled with Apexit Plus. The percentage of efficient or non-efficient cases was evaluated on the basis of radiographic comparison of treated chronic apical periodontitis immediately after obturation, in three, six months and one year. Radiographic conditions were defined as existing state, improvement and worsening. Results. In a year of dynamic evaluation the final results were: in the main group – 54.55% of the patients had complete bone healing, in 27.27% of cases the focus of bone destruction was decreased by ½ or more of the initial sizes, 18.18% – resorption lesion was decreased by less than ½; in the control group – 33.33% of improvement, 25.0% of existing state and 41.66% of worsening. Conclusions. BioRootTM RCS using for root canals obturation in the treatment of chronic apical periodontitis we proved the high effectiveness of the treatment undertaken: complete healing or improvement of radiographic conditions of periapical bone destruction with X-ray signs of bone regeneration.

  3. Commentary on: periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontics (PAOO) - a clinical dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binderman, Itzhak; Gadban, Nasser; Bahar, Hila; Herman, Avishai; Yaffe, Avinoam

    2010-09-01

    It is apparent that tooth movement is enhanced by procedures that elevate the remodeling of alveolar bone, and of periodontal and gingival fibrous tissues. The periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontics (PAOO) also termed as Wilckodontics, involves full-thickness labial and lingual alveolar flaps accompanied with limited selective labial and lingual surgical scarring of cortical bone (corticotomy). Most of the authors suggest that the RAP is the major stimulus for alveolar bone remodeling, enabling the PAOO. However, we propose that detachment of the bulk of dentogingival and interdental fibers from coronal part of root surfaces by itself should suffice to stimulate alveolar bone resorption mainly on its PDL surfaces, leading to widening of the periodontal ligament space which largely attributes to accelerated osteogenic orthodontics. Moreover this limited fiberotomy also disrupts transiently the positional physical memory of dentition (PPMD), allowing accelerated tooth movement. During retention period, a new biological and physical connectivity is generated that could be termed as new positional memory of the dental arch. Copyright © 2010 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. [Clinical and clinico-histological markers in chronic destructive adult periodontitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Vallejo, G; García Rodríguez, M D; Tejerina Lobo, J M; López Sánchez, A F; De la Roca, C

    1989-05-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the significance and interrelationship of clinical parameters and their association with histologic changes in advanced destructive periodontitis. 158 patients with PDI greater than 4 (Ramfjord) were selected, evaluating the size, contouring, bleeding, consistency, colour and gingival pain. Epithelial ulceration of soft periodontal pockets were also evaluated. The results showed a statistically significant association between purplish colour and gingival fibrosis and advanced stage of the disease. Gingival bleeding on probing was the most important clinical parameter in advanced phases of the disease, either alone or in association with other parameters such as the presence of epithelial ulcerations. The Periodontal Disease Index (Ramfjord) has proven effective in the evaluation of generalized patterns of disease.

  5. Clinical and histological characterization of an aggressive periodontitis case associated with unusual root canal curvatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratul, Ştefan Ioan; Roman, Alexandra; Şurlin, Petra; Petruţiu, Ştefan Adrian; Buiga, Petronela; Mihu, Carmen Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the histological and clinical characteristics in a severe generalized aggressive periodontitis case associated with multiple root curvatures and the complex therapeutic approach of the severe periodontal destructions. The patient received a complex therapy, including periodontal non-surgical, regenerative and reconstructive approaches, and also endodontic and prosthetic treatments. Recall appointments were fixed at 3-month intervals. One year after the finalization of the active therapy, a hyperplasic, inflamed interdental papilla associated with a recurrent clinical attachment loss was diagnosed at the mesial aspect of the right maxillary second premolar. A biopsy was harvested for histological examination and the recurrent site was treated. The histological study revealed important modifications of the epithelial layer and of the connective tissue of the gingiva. An extremely accentuated pattern of the gingival rete ridges at the epithelial-connective tissue junction, the presence of inflammatory cells infiltrating the epithelial layer and lamina propria and the disorganization of the fascicules of collagen fibers were observed. The inflammatory infiltrate was dominated by plasma and monocytic-like cells as immunohistochemical analyses highlighted. The complex therapeutic approach led to a satisfactory aesthetic and functional outcome. The severe root curvatures may be an unusual trait in this generalized aggressive periodontitis case substantially increasing the amount and the costs of non-periodontal procedures. In this case, the cell make-up of the inflammatory infiltrate and the paucity of collagen in the infiltrated tissue portions are considered to correspond to a fully developed recurrent lesion.

  6. Association of Treponema spp. with canine periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordhoff, Marcel; Rühe, Bärbel; Kellermeier, Claudia; Moter, Annette; Schmitz, Rose; Brunnberg, Leo; Wieler, Lothar H

    2008-03-18

    To evaluate the association of oral Treponema (T.) spp. with severity of canine periodontitis, subgingival plaque samples of dogs of various breeds undergoing surgery were investigated. A wide range of oral Treponema spp. was analysed by a molecular and culture-independent approach applying DNA-DNA dot blot hybridization analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization using Treponema specific oligonucleotide probes specific for phylogenetic groups I-VII of oral treponemes as well as probes specific for T. socranskii and T. denticola. To assess the periodontal status of affected dogs clinical parameters were measured and the periodontal status was classified from grade 0 (physiological periodont) to 3 (severe periodontitis). The periodontal status correlated significantly with an increasing concentration of volatile sulfur compounds (VSC, r=0.854) determined with a Halimeter, indicating a positive correlation between the presence of VSC-producing bacteria and periodontitis. In this study Treponema spp. of phylogenetic groups III, V-VII were not detected in any sample, whereas T. denticola-like treponemes were found only in 2 of 51 animals. However, treponemes belonging to phylogenetic groups I, II and IV of oral treponemes or T. socranskii were found in up to 64.84% of the dogs. The detection rate of Treponema spp. was significantly associated with an increased periodontal status. Treponemes present in periodontal lesions were also visualized by fluorescence in situ hybridization of gingival biopsies showing Treponema spp. not only in the microbial biofilm but also within the gingival tissue. The data presented here indicate that oral Treponema spp. are associated with canine periodontitis. Similar to human periodontitis, treponemes of groups I, II and IV and T. socranskii were found more frequently the higher the degree of periodontitis was.

  7. Periodontal abscess as a possible oral clinical sign in the diagnosis of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus of elderly in a dental clinic set up - a 7-year cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagl, Adel S

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the periodontal abscess as a possible oral clinical diagnostic criteria for the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in the elderly. In this clinical outpatient department, cross-sectional study of 84 months, 143 212 subjects between the ages of 40 and 84 years were screened for the presence of periodontal abscess. Relevant medical and dental histories were recorded using a questionnaire. The subjects who fulfilled the inclusion criteria of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus, presence of periodontal abscess, and absence of other systemic disease were referred for laboratory diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (HbA1c). The subjects tested positive for the diabetes were noted, statistical evaluation was undertaken to correlate between undiagnosed diabetes mellitus and periodontal abscess. It was found out that 0.05% undiagnosed diabetes was noted among the 143 212 patients. Among the 143 212 subjects, 1352 met the inclusion criteria having periodontal abscess. Mean age of the participants was 57 ± 14.2 years. Among the 1352 subjects with periodontal abscess: 793 (58.65%) subjects had increased HbA1c (≥6.5% or 47.5 mmol/mol or 7.8 mmol/L); 559 (41.35%) individuals reported to have normal HbA1c (≤6.5% or 47.5 mmol/mol or 7.8 mmol/L). The difference was found to be statistically significant. Periodontal abscess can be considered as possible oral clinical diagnostic criteria for the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. Elderly individuals visiting dental clinics need to be given due attention to find out the possibility of having this systemic condition. Medical fraternities are advised to consider oral health parameters in the evaluation of the medical status of elderly individuals. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. The adjunctive effect of tenoxicam during non-surgical periodontal treatment on clinical parameters and gingival crevicular fluid levels of MMP-8 and TNF-α in patients with chronic periodontitis - randomized, double-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgören, Ozgür; Develioglu, Hakan; Güncü, Güliz; Akman, Abdullah; Berker, Ezel

    2014-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cytokines play a role of extracellular matrix degradation and remodelling, and are significantly involved in the course of periodontal disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the adjunctive effect of administering an oxicam non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), tenoxicam, during non-surgical (phase 1) periodontal treatment on clinical parameters and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) levels of MMP-8 and TNF-α in subjects with chronic periodontitis. A total of 32 subjects with chronic periodontitis were randomized into two groups: 1) phase I periodontal treatment + NSAID and 2) phase I periodontal treatment + placebo. Phase I periodontal therapy consisted of scaling and root planning (SPR), which was provided by a single therapist masked with respect to group assignment. Patients in group 1 received a systemic NSAID (20 mg tenoxicam tablet once daily for 10 days). Clinical measures and GCF samples were obtained immediately prior to periodontal treatment and 30 days afterwards from all subjects. Clinical measures included a plaque index, gingival index, gingival bleeding time index, probing depth, and clinical attachment level. The MMP-8 and TNF-α levels in the GCF were assayed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. With the exception of clinical attachment level, all clinical measures showed a significant (p 0.05). Treatment exhibited no effect on TNF-α levels (p > 0.05). There was also no statistically significant difference in clinical measurements after treatment between the two groups (p > 0.05). Moreover, the post treatment MMP-8 level in group 1 was statistically significant higher than the placebo group (p < 0.05). The adjunctive administration of tenoxicam during phase I periodontal treatment decreases MMP-8 levels in gingival crevicular fluid in patients with chronic periodontitis. But no benefits were observed.

  9. National pathfinder survey of periodontal status and treatment needs in The Gambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegbembo, A O; Adeyinka, A; Danfillo, I S; Mafeni, J O; George, M O; Aihveba, N; Thorpe, S J; Enwonwu, C O

    2000-03-01

    The aim of the pathfinder survey was to assess the periodontal status and treatment needs in The Gambia. A multistage stratified random sampling technique was used to obtain a sample of 1,235 (or 0.1% of the national population). The study was conducted according to the World Health Organisation's criteria (WHO, 1987). The WHO J2 software programme was used to analyse the data. Not more than 12% of subjects in any age group had healthy periodontal tissues. Two to three sextants were healthy among those under the age of 35 years. Shallow (4-5 mm) pockets were present in all ages. However, less than one sextant was involved among subjects younger than 25 years. Despite the high prevalence of pockets, few sextants were edentulous. The majority of subjects needed oral hygiene instructions and oral prophylaxis. Of the subjects between the ages of 8 and 29 years, 5-28% needed complex treatment in only half of a sextant. Similarly, 38% and 80% of older subjects needed complex treatment in 0.8-1.9 sextants. A national oral health plan in The Gambia should focus on health education and provision of oral prophylaxis by trained auxiliary health care workers. In conclusion, there is a need to develop a functional district oral health services system in The Gambia.

  10. Periodontal Ligament Visibility (PLV): validation of PLV to determine adult status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, V S; McDonald, F; Andiappan, M; Roberts, G

    2017-12-01

    Gradual obliteration of the Periodontal Ligament Visibility (PLV) of lower third molars indicates increasing age. This is used to help determine whether or not an age disputed subject is above or below the 18 year threshold. The main focus was to determine, in test subjects of known age, whether the PLV system used 'blind' is able to reliably indicate whether the subject was a child (age 18). A total of 250 normal subjects in the age range 16 to 26 years, from the archives of Guy's Hospital in London, UK, were used to validate the system of PLV. The radiographic assessment of PLV1 was used to categorize four grades of PLV. It was found that for both females and males PLV-C and PLV-D gave very high probabilities (p = 1.000) of the test subjects being of adult status. Periodontal Ligament Visibility has the potential to play an important part in the assessment of age disputed asylum seekers who look adult and claim to be children.

  11. Clinical and Microbiological Effects of Photodynamic Therapy Associated with Non-surgical Treatment in Aggressive Periodontitis

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    Mohammad Taghi Chitsazi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of adjunctive photodynamic therapy (PDT in the treatment of aggressive periodontitis. Materials and methods. A total of 24 patients with clinical diagnosis of aggressive periodontitis received scaling and root planing (SRP for periodontal treatment. In a split-mouth design study, the teeth of one quadrant of each arch with ≥4 mm of probing depth were selected randomly for additional treatment with PDT (test group. PDT was performed with a diode laser beam with a wavelength of 670-690 nm and a power of 75 Mw. The control group consisted of selected teeth of the contralateral quadrant (SRP only. Before any treatment, subgingival plaque samples were collected by an endodontic paper cone for microbiological analysis by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR for detection of Aggregatibacter actinomy-cetecommitans. Clinical parameters including clinical attachment loss (CAL as primary outcome, plaque index (PI, bleed-ing on probing (BOP, probing depth (PD and gingival recession (REC were measured at baseline and after 90 days. Inter-group and intra-group statistical analyses were performed. Results. Treatment groups showed an improvement in all the clinical parameters and a significant reduction in the counts of A. actinomycetecommitans at 90 days compared to baseline (P 0.05. Conclusion. Within the limitations of this study, the results did not show additional benefits from PDT as an adjunctive treatment for patients with aggressive periodontitis.

  12. Knowledge of risk factors and the periodontal disease-systemic link in dental students' clinical decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Lynn Roosa; Walker, Mary P; Kisling, Rebecca E; Liu, Ying; Williams, Karen B

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluated second-, third-, and fourth-year dental students' ability to identify systemic conditions associated with periodontal disease, risk factors most important for referral, and medications with an effect on the periodontium and their ability to apply this knowledge to make clinical decisions regarding treatment and referral of periodontal patients. A twenty-one question survey was administered at one U.S. dental school in the spring semester of 2012 to elicit the students' knowledge and confidence regarding clinical reasoning. The response rate was 86 percent. Periodontal risk factors were accurately selected by at least 50 percent of students in all three classes; these were poorly controlled diabetes, ≥6 mm pockets posteriorly, and lack of response to previous non-surgical therapy. Confidence in knowledge, knowledge of risk factors, and knowledge of medications with an effect on the periodontium improved with training and were predictive of better referral decision making. The greatest impact of training was seen on the students' ability to make correct decisions about referral and treatment for seven clinical scenarios. Although the study found a large increase in the students' abilities from the second through fourth years, the mean of 4.6 (out of 7) for the fourth-year students shows that, on average, those students missed correct treatment or referral on more than two of seven clinical cases. These results suggest that dental curricula should emphasize more critical decision making with respect to referral and treatment criteria in managing the periodontal patient.

  13. An investigation on clinical, radiological and biochemical methods for assessing periodontitis activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, P.T.M.

    1987-01-01

    In order to recognize in which stage rapidly progressing destruction of periodontal ligament fibers occurs, a number of diagnostic methods are studied in this thesis. It turns out that the actual much utilized clinical methods can not be improved while radiological and biochemical diagnositic methods are much more promising. 106 refs.; 20 figs.; 36 tabs

  14. Effect of nonsurgical periodontal therapy and strict plaque control on preterm/low birth weight: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidlich, Patricia; Moreira, Carlos Heitor C; Fiorini, Tiago; Musskopf, Marta L; da Rocha, José M; Oppermann, Maria Lucia R; Aass, Anne M; Gjermo, Per; Susin, Cristiano; Rösing, Cassiano K; Oppermann, Rui V

    2013-01-01

    This randomized controlled clinical trial was carried out to assess the effect of comprehensive nonsurgical periodontal treatment and strict plaque control performed during pregnancy on the reduction of preterm and/or low birth weight rates (PTLBW). Three hundred and three women were randomly allocated to receive periodontal treatment either during pregnancy (n = 147, test group) or after delivery (n = 156, control group). During pregnancy, the control group received only one session of supragingival scaling and oral hygiene instruction. In contrast, the test group received comprehensive periodontal treatment including multiple sessions of scaling and root planing, oral hygiene instructions, and frequent maintenance visits. At baseline, periodontal inflammation was observed in approximately 50% of sites and attachment loss affected controls, women in the test group had significant reductions in the percentage of sites with plaque (48.5% vs. 10.3%, p control significantly improved periodontal health; however, no reduction of PTLBW rates was observed. Thus, remaining periodontal inflammation posttreatment cannot explain the lack of effect of periodontal treatment on PTLBW. Clinical relevance This study demonstrated that periodontal diseases may be successfully treated during pregnancy. Our results do not support a potential beneficial effect of periodontal treatment on PTLBW.

  15. Does laterally rotated flap design influence the short-term periodontal status of second molars and postoperative discomfort after partially impacted third molar surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Yavuz Tolga; Mollaoglu, Nur; Ozmeriç, Nurdan

    2015-06-01

    To assess the influence of the surgical removal of partially impacted third molars (3Ms) and compare the effects of a 3-cornered laterally rotated flap (LRF) with primary closure (flap 1) and an envelope flap with secondary closure (flap 2) on the short-term periodontal status of the adjacent second molars (2Ms). We also assessed the postoperative complications after removal of the partially impacted 3M. A split mouth, randomized clinical study was designed. The study sample included patients with bilateral partially impacted 3Ms. The primary predictor variable was the type of flap design (flaps 1 and 2). The primary outcome variable was periodontal status (gingival recession [GR], probing depth [PD], plaque index [PI], and gingival index) of the 2Ms measured preoperatively and 90 days postoperatively. The secondary outcome variables were postoperative complications, including pain, facial swelling, alveolitis, and local wound infection. The other variables included gender, position of the 3Ms, and surgical difficulty. We performed descriptive, comparative, correlation, and multivariate analyses. The sample included 28 patients aged 18 to 28 years. The GR, PD, and PI values with the flap 2 design were greater than those with the flap 1 design (P surgery considerably influences the early periodontal health of the 2Ms and postoperative discomfort. However, although the 3-cornered LRF design might cause more pain and swelling, it could be the method of choice for partially impacted 3M surgery because of the early periodontal healing. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Association between markers of cardiovascular risk and clinical parameters of periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Eduardo Gomes Domingues

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Periodontal disease is an inflammatory response to bacteria that reside in the gum tissue and can have systemic repercussion. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between periodontitis and markers of cardiovascular risk. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Ninety selected patients were assigned into two groups in accordance with their levels of probing pocket depth (PPD and Clinical Attachment Level (CAL: control group, n= 45 (< 4 sites with PPD ≥ 4.0 mm and CAL ≥ 3.0 mm and case group, n= 45 (≥ 30% of sites with PPD ≥ 4.0 mm and CAL ≥3.0 mm. Plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein, high sensitive CRP, high-density lipoproteins (HDL-c and electronegative low density lipoproteins (LDL were assessed in all participants. Data from medical history and socioeconomic level were also collected from patients. RESULT: Plasma levels of HDL-c were lower in subjects with periodontal disease (p = 0.016 and were inversely associated with the number of sites with PPD ≥ 3 mm (rho= -0.325 and number of sites with PPD ≥ 3 mm and CAL ≥ 3 mm (rho= -0.216. These associations remained significant after adjustments for dental plaque and smoking using Univariate Analysis of Covariance (p < 0.05. Adjusted odds ratio between periodontal disease and levels of HDL-c was 0.94 (CI95% 0.88-0.99 after adjusting for age, smoking and dental plaque. Other investigated markers of cardiovascular risk were not related to periodontal disease. CONCLUSION: Clinical parameters of periodontitis were inversely associated with plasma concentrations of HDL-c.

  17. Longitudinal assessment of periodontal status in patients with nickel allergy treated with conventional and nickel-free braces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazzini, Camila Alessandra; Marques, Leandro Silva; Ramos-Jorge, Maria Letícia; Júnior, Gilberto Oliveira; Pereira, Luciano José; Paiva, Saul Martins

    2012-07-01

    To perform a longitudinal comparison of periodontal status in allergic individuals treated with conventional and nickel-free braces. Forty-two individuals allergic to nickel were randomly divided into two groups: those receiving conventional braces (n  =  21) and those receiving nickel-free braces (n  =  21). Periodontal status (gingival hyperplasia, change in color and bleeding) was assessed before treatment (T0) and at 3-month intervals for 12 months (T1, T2, T3, and T4), using the Löe Index. Evaluations were performed blindly by a single, calibrated examiner, followed by prophylaxis and orientations regarding oral hygiene. Data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U-test for comparisons of the gingival index between groups and Friedman's test for successive comparisons between sessions in the same group (P ≤ .05). Periodontal status did not differ between groups in the initial 9 months of treatment, whereas significant differences were found at T3 and T4 (.039 and .047, respectively). Individuals wearing conventional appliances had higher mean gingival index scores than those wearing nickel-free braces. Individuals with an allergy to nickel exhibit better periodontal health when treated with nickel-free braces than with conventional braces.

  18. Long term effects of exposure to ionizing irradiation on periodontal health status – the Tinea Capitis cohort study

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    Siegal eSadetzki

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies among long term survivors of childhood cancer who had received high dose irradiation therapy of 4-60 Gy, demonstrated acute and chronic dental effects including periodontal diseases. However, the possible effects of low to moderate doses of radiation on dental health are sparse. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between childhood exposure to low-moderate doses of ionizing radiation and periodontal health following 50 years from the exposure. The study population included 253 irradiated subjects (treated for Tinea Capitis in the 1950s and, 162 non-irradiated subjects, treated for Tinea Capitis in the 1950s. The estimated dose to the teeth was 0.2-0.4Gy. Dental examination was performed according to the Community Periodontal Index (CPI. Socio-economic and health behavior variables were obtained through a personal questionnaire. Periodontal disease was operationally defined as deep periodontal pockets. A multivariate logistic regression model was used for the association of irradiation status and other independent variables with periodontal status.The results showed that among the irradiated subjects, 23% (95% CI 18%-28% demonstrated complete edentulousness or insufficient teeth for CPI scoring as compared to 13% (95% CI 8%-19% among the non-irradiated subjects (p=0.01. Periodontal disease was detected among 54% of the irradiated subjects as compared to 40% of the non-irradiated (p=0.008. Controlling for education and smoking, the ORs for the association between radiation and periodontal disease were 1.61 (95% CI 1.01-2.57 and 1.95 (95% CI 1.1-3.5 for ever never and per 1 Gy absorbed in the salivary gland, respectively. In line with other studies, a protective effect for periodontal diseases among those with high education and an increased risk for ever smokers were observed. In conclusion, childhood exposure to low-moderate doses of ionizing radiation might be associated with later outcomes of dental health. The

  19. Periodontal pathogens in atheromatous plaque

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    Saroj K. Rath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There has been increasing attention paid in recent years to the possibility that oral bacterial infection, particularly periodontal disease may influence the initiation and or progression of systemic diseases. These studies confirm the observation that heart disease is the most commonly found systemic condition in patients with periodontal disease. Moreover, the literature has also highlighted substantial evidence indicating the presence of Gram-negative periodontal pathogens in atheromatous plaques. Aim: This study intends to investigate the possible association between periodontal health and coronary artery disease by evaluating periodontal status, association between the periodontal plaque and coronary atheromatous plaques for presence of micro-organisms such as, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Tannerella forsythia. Materials and methods: A case-control study was designed with seven patients who had undergone coronary endarterectomy for cardiovascular disease and 28 controls. The periodontal examination for cases was performed 1 day before vascular surgery and the controls were clinically examined. The atheromatous plaque sample collected during endarterectomy and the intraoral plaque samples were subjected to polymerase chain reaction for identification of A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, P. intermedia and T. forsythia. Results: The presence of periodontal bacteria DNA in coronary atheromatous plaques and sub-gingival plaque samples of the same patients was confirmed by this study. CONCLUSION A correlation was established between putative bacteria contributing to atheromatous plaques and species associated with periodontal disease. One particularly important study to be carried out is the investigation of a possible clinically meaningful reduction in coronary heart disease resulting from the prevention or treatment of periodontal disease.

  20. Comparison of clinical values between cone beam computed tomography and conventional intraoral radiography in periodontal and infrabony defect assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suphanantachat, Supreda; Tantikul, Keenna; Tamsailom, Suphot; Kosalagood, Pasupen; Nisapakultorn, Kanokwan; Tavedhikul, Kanoknadda

    2017-08-01

    The use of CBCT for periodontal diagnosis and treatment plan is limited. The aim of this study is to compare the assessment of periodontal conditions and infrabony defects between conventional intraoral radiography (IOR) and CBCT. The study included 25 subjects who had periodontitis and at least two infrabony defects. All subjects received clinical periodontal examination, IOR and CBCT. Three periodontists assigned periodontal diagnosis and prognosis of each tooth. For teeth with infrabony defects, the number of defect walls and treatment was determined. IOR and CBCT assessment was compared. There were 666 teeth and 123 infrabony defects. The overall concordance between IOR and CBCT for periodontal diagnosis, prognosis, infrabony defect type and infrabony defect treatment were 79.3%, 69.5%, 44.7% and 64.2%, respectively. IOR underestimated diagnosis, prognosis and the number of infrabony defect walls at 16.4%, 24% and 37.4%, respectively. IOR and CBCT had poor concordance for periodontal regeneration (43.3%). Tooth extraction was more prevalent when assessed by CBCT (35.0% vs 22.7%). CBCT had excellent interexaminer agreement (Fleiss' kappa 0.87-0.94) and higher percentage of complete agreement among examiners than IOR for all assessments. IOR underestimated the severity and prognosis of periodontal disease. CBCT was superior to IOR for evaluation of infrabony defect morphology and treatment. CBCT provides excellent agreement among examiners on periodontal and infrabony defect assessment.

  1. Periodontal treatment effects on endothelial function and cardiovascular disease biomarkers in subjects with chronic periodontitis: protocol for a randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Periodontal disease (PD) is an infectious clinical entity characterized by the destruction of supporting tissues of the teeth as the result of a chronic inflammatory response in a susceptible host. It has been proposed that PD as subclinical infection may contribute to the etiology and to the pathogenesis of several systemic diseases including Atherosclerosis. A number of epidemiological studies link periodontal disease/edentulism as independent risk factor for acute myocardial infarction, peripheral vascular disease, and cerebrovascular disease. Moreover, new randomized controlled clinical trials have shown an improvement on cardiovascular surrogate markers (endothelial function, sICAM, hsPCR level, fibrinogen) after periodontal treatment. Nonetheless, such trials are still limited in terms of external validity, periodontal treatment strategies, CONSORT-based design and results consistency/extrapolation. The current study is designed to evaluate if periodontal treatment with scaling and root planning plus local delivered chlorhexidine improves endothelial function and other biomarkers of cardiovascular disease in subjects with moderate to severe periodontitis. Methods/Design This randomized, single-blind clinical trial will be performed at two health centers and will include two periodontal treatment strategies. After medical/periodontal screening, a baseline endothelium-dependent brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and other systemic surrogate markers will be obtained from all recruited subjects. Patients then will be randomized to receive either supragingival/subgingival plaque cleaning and calculus removal plus chlorhexidine (treatment group) or supragingival plaque removal only (control group). A second and third FMD will be obtained after 24 hours and 12 weeks in both treatment arms. Each group will consist of 49 patients (n = 98) and all patients will be followed-up for secondary outcomes and will be monitored through a coordinating

  2. Periodontal treatment effects on endothelial function and cardiovascular disease biomarkers in subjects with chronic periodontitis: protocol for a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arce Roger M

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Periodontal disease (PD is an infectious clinical entity characterized by the destruction of supporting tissues of the teeth as the result of a chronic inflammatory response in a susceptible host. It has been proposed that PD as subclinical infection may contribute to the etiology and to the pathogenesis of several systemic diseases including Atherosclerosis. A number of epidemiological studies link periodontal disease/edentulism as independent risk factor for acute myocardial infarction, peripheral vascular disease, and cerebrovascular disease. Moreover, new randomized controlled clinical trials have shown an improvement on cardiovascular surrogate markers (endothelial function, sICAM, hsPCR level, fibrinogen after periodontal treatment. Nonetheless, such trials are still limited in terms of external validity, periodontal treatment strategies, CONSORT-based design and results consistency/extrapolation. The current study is designed to evaluate if periodontal treatment with scaling and root planning plus local delivered chlorhexidine improves endothelial function and other biomarkers of cardiovascular disease in subjects with moderate to severe periodontitis. Methods/Design This randomized, single-blind clinical trial will be performed at two health centers and will include two periodontal treatment strategies. After medical/periodontal screening, a baseline endothelium-dependent brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD and other systemic surrogate markers will be obtained from all recruited subjects. Patients then will be randomized to receive either supragingival/subgingival plaque cleaning and calculus removal plus chlorhexidine (treatment group or supragingival plaque removal only (control group. A second and third FMD will be obtained after 24 hours and 12 weeks in both treatment arms. Each group will consist of 49 patients (n = 98 and all patients will be followed-up for secondary outcomes and will be monitored

  3. Periodontal treatment effects on endothelial function and cardiovascular disease biomarkers in subjects with chronic periodontitis: protocol for a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Jorge H; Arce, Roger M; Contreras, Adolfo

    2011-02-16

    Periodontal disease (PD) is an infectious clinical entity characterized by the destruction of supporting tissues of the teeth as the result of a chronic inflammatory response in a susceptible host. It has been proposed that PD as subclinical infection may contribute to the etiology and to the pathogenesis of several systemic diseases including Atherosclerosis. A number of epidemiological studies link periodontal disease/edentulism as independent risk factor for acute myocardial infarction, peripheral vascular disease, and cerebrovascular disease. Moreover, new randomized controlled clinical trials have shown an improvement on cardiovascular surrogate markers (endothelial function, sICAM, hsPCR level, fibrinogen) after periodontal treatment. Nonetheless, such trials are still limited in terms of external validity, periodontal treatment strategies, CONSORT-based design and results consistency/extrapolation. The current study is designed to evaluate if periodontal treatment with scaling and root planning plus local delivered chlorhexidine improves endothelial function and other biomarkers of cardiovascular disease in subjects with moderate to severe periodontitis. This randomized, single-blind clinical trial will be performed at two health centers and will include two periodontal treatment strategies. After medical/periodontal screening, a baseline endothelium-dependent brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and other systemic surrogate markers will be obtained from all recruited subjects. Patients then will be randomized to receive either supragingival/subgingival plaque cleaning and calculus removal plus chlorhexidine (treatment group) or supragingival plaque removal only (control group). A second and third FMD will be obtained after 24 hours and 12 weeks in both treatment arms. Each group will consist of 49 patients (n = 98) and all patients will be followed-up for secondary outcomes and will be monitored through a coordinating center. The primary outcomes

  4. Effect of periodontal status of rotary electric toothbrushes vs. manual toothbrushes during periodontal maintenance. II. Microbiological results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, P A; Boyd, R L; Robertson, P B

    1989-07-01

    We compared the use of a rotary electric toothbrush with conventional toothbrushing for their effectiveness in modulating the subgingival microbiota. Forty subjects who had received periodontal treatment for moderate to advanced periodontitis and were on 3-month periodontal maintenance were divided into two equal groups matched for age and sex. One group used only the rotary tooth cleaner and the other group used conventional toothbrushing, dental floss, and toothpicks for 12 months. Subgingival plaque samples (two sites per patient) were taken from 10 subjects per group at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months and analyzed for percentage of obligate anaerobes and colony-forming units of black-pigmented Bacteroides, Fusobacterium, Actinomyces, Streptococcus, and Veillonella spp. The percentage of spirochetes and motile rods was determined by darkfield microscopy. Results showed that levels of obligate anaerobes, Fusobacterium, and Actinomyces and percentage of spirochetes and motile rods decreased significantly (P less than 0.05), while levels of Streptococcus spp. increased (P less than 0.05) for both groups. However, there was no significant difference between the two groups, indicating that the rotary tooth cleaner and conventional toothbrushing are equally effective in controlling gingivitis and fostering a less pathogenic microflora.

  5. with gingivitis and periodontitis referring Resalat Dental Clinic, Chaleshtor in 2015

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    MS Khafari ghosheh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract   Background & aim: Entamoeba gingivalis and Trichomonas tenax are oral protozoa that could cause periodontitis and gingivitis. The present study was done to determine the prevalence of these two protozoa in people over 14 years with periodontitis and gingivitis.   Methods: In this descriptive, cross-sectional study, 540 patients referring Resalat Dental Clinic, Shahrekord were enrolled and assigned in two groups of 270 patients with periodontitis and gingivitis and270 healthy individuals. The prepared specimens were examined by extensive wet procedures, Gimsa staining and Trichorom staining. Data were analyzed by chi-square, Fisher’s exact test, and logistic regression in SPSSv.20.   Results: No E. gingivalis- and T. tenax-positive cases were seen in the healthy group. The prevalence of E. gingivalis and T. tenax was obtained 3% by extensive wet procedure, 1.9% by Trichoderma staining, and 0.7% by Giemsa staining respectively. By logistic regression model, none of variables of age, gender, place of residence, smoking, tooth brushing, flossing, and oral PH were associated protozoan infection of E. gingivalis and T. tenax (P>0.05. Conclusion: In patients with periodontitis and gingivitis referred to the dental clinic, parasitic infections were attenuated to gingivialis and trichomoniasis vaginalis, and possibly other non-parasitic agents, including bacteria or other microorganisms, may play a role.    

  6. The clinical and systemic effects of periodontal treatment in diabetic and non-diabetic obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taşdemir, Zekeriya; Özsarı Taşdemir, Funda; Koçyiğit, İsmail; Yazıcı, Cevat; Gürgan, Cem A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the response to periodontal management in obese individuals with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus (DM) and obese individuals without DM. Changes in clinical and biochemical parameters were also investigated. Seventeen obese patients with poorly controlled DM and 14 obese non-DM patients with generalized chronic periodontitis were enrolled. The anthropometric measurements, periodontal parameters, and serum levels of lipid (triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol) and glucose (fasting plasma glucose [FPG], insulin, insulin resistance [IR], hemoglobin [Hb]A1c) metabolism, pro-inflammatory mediators (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, tumor necrosis factor-α [TNF-α] and Pentraxim-3), and interleukin-6 were measured before and at 3 months, and 6 months after full-mouth scaling and root planing (FM-SRP) together with full-mouth disinfection (FMD). A significant reduction in TNF-α (P periodontal healing. However, significant changes in FPG (P clinical outcome of FM-SRP and FMD.(J Oral Sci 58, 523-531, 2016).

  7. A survey of floss frequency, habit and technique in a hospital dental clinic & private periodontal practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segelnick, Stuart L

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine floss frequency, habits and techniques of patients entering a private periodontal office (office site) vs. a hospital dental clinic (hospital site). It was found that the flossing frequency in a hospital dental clinic is far less than in a private practice, and patients who do floss may not be using the proper flossing technique. Patients need more instruction and care with regard to their interproximal oral hygiene.

  8. Referring periodontal patients: clinical decision making by dental and dental hygiene students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Karen B; Burgardt, Grayson J; Rapley, John W; Bray, Kimberly K; Cobb, Charles M

    2014-03-01

    Referral of periodontal patients requires development of a complex set of decision making skills. This study was conducted to determine criteria used by dental and dental hygiene students regarding the referral of periodontal patients for specialty care. Using mixed methods, a thirteen-item survey was developed to elicit the students' perceptions of their knowledge, confidence regarding managing patients, and clinical reasoning related to periodontal patients. The instrument was administered during the summer prior to (T1) and at the end of the students' final year (T2) of training. Seventy-nine dental students (81 percent of total class) and thirty dental hygiene students (83 percent of total class) completed T1. At T2, forty-two dental (44 percent of total class) and twenty-six dental hygiene students (87 percent of total class) completed the questionnaire. While 90 percent of dental and 96 percent of dental hygiene respondents reported a willingness to refer patients with active disease to specialists, only 40 percent of dental and 36 percent of dental hygiene respondents reported confidence in diagnosing, treating, and appropriately referring such patients. The students' ability to recognize critical disease and risk factors influencing referral was good; however, clinical application of that knowledge indicated a gap between knowledge and applied reasoning. The students' attitudes about the importance of periodontal disease and their perceived competence to identify critical disease risk factors were not significantly related (p>0.05) to correct clinical decisions in the case scenarios. The study concludes that dental and dental hygiene curricula should emphasize both the acquisition and application of knowledge regarding criteria for referral of periodontal patients.

  9. Chlorhexidine varnish implemented treatment strategy for chronic periodontitis: A clinical and microbial study

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    D Manikandan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the short-term clinical and microbiological effect of chlorhexidine varnish when used as an adjuvant to scaling and root planing in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: A split-mouth design was conducted in 11 patients suffering from chronic periodontitis. The control site underwent scaling and root planing, and the experimental site was additionally treated with chlorhexidine varnish application. Clinical parameters, namely, gingival index (GI, plaque index (PI, bleeding on probing (BoP, probing pocket depth (PPD, and clinical attachment level were recorded at baseline, 1 month, and 3 months postoperatively. Furthermore, microbial examination of the plaque samples was done at baseline, 1 month, and 3 months. Results: Both treatment strategies showed significant improvement in GI, PI, BoP, PPD, and clinical attachment level, at both follow-up visits by comparison with baseline levels. At study termination, chlorhexidine varnish implemented treatment strategy resulted in additional improvement in the clinical parameters, and more reduction in the total anaerobic count at 1 month and 3 months. Conclusions: These findings suggest that a chlorhexidine varnish implemented treatment strategy along with scaling and root planing may improve the clinical outcome for the treatment of chronic periodontitis in comparison to scaling and root planing alone.

  10. Hubungan antara Pengetahuan, Sikap, dan Perilaku terhadap Pemeliharaan Kebersihan Gigi dan Mulut dengan Status Kesehatan Periodontal Pra Lansia di Posbindu Kecamatan Indihiang Kota Tasikmalaya

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    Culia Rahayu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Proses penuaan merupakan salah satu faktor sistemik yang mempengaruhi respon tubuh terhadap terjadinya penyakit periodontal. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui hubungan antara pengetahuan, sikap dan perilaku terhadap pemeliharaan kebersihan gigi dan mulut dengan status kesehatan periodontal pra lansia. Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian non eksperimental, dengan rancangan cross sectional. Subjek penelitian berjumlah 225 orang pra lansia dari 9 Posbindu di Kecamatan Indihiang Tasikmalaya, yang diambil dengan cara purposive sampling. Variabel pengaruh terdiri dari pengetahuan, sikap dan perilaku terhadap pemeliharaan kebersihan gigi dan mulut. Variabel pengetahuan diukur menggunakan kuesioner tertutup dengan pilihan jawaban benar atau salah. Variabel sikap dan perilaku diukur menggunakan kuesioner dibuat menurut skala Likert. Kuesioner telah diuji validitas (koefisien korelasi ≥ 0,30 dan uji reliabilitas (alpha cronbach >0,60. Variabel terpengaruh adalah status kesehatan periodontal yang diukur menggunakan indeks CPITN. Analisa data menggunakan analisis korelasi dan regresi berganda. Hasil analisis regresi berganda menunjukkan bahwa variabel pengetahuan, sikap dan perilaku terhadap pemeliharaan kebersihan gigi dan mulut mempunyai hubungan signifikan terhadap status kesehatan periodontal (F =30,681 dan p =0,001, dan memberikan kontribusi pengaruh sebesar 29,4% (R² = 0,294 terhadap status kesehatan periodontal. Perilaku terhadap pemeliharaan kebersihan gigi dan mulut memberikan kontribusi pengaruh paling besar terhadap status kesehatan periodontal yaitu sebesar 6,9%. Kesimpulan dari penelitian ini adalah semakin baik pengetahuan, sikap dan perilaku terhadap pemeliharaan kebersihan gigi dan mulut, semakin baik status kesehatan periodontal pra lansia. Perilaku terhadap pemeliharaan kebersihan gigi dan mulut memberikan kontribusi pengaruh paling besar terhadap status kesehatan periodontal pra lansia. Correlation Between Knowledge, Attitude

  11. Periodontal health status, oral mucosal lesions and adverse oral habits among sea food industry employees of Bhubaneswar, Odisha

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    Gunjan Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Industrial employees are often readily available and constitute a well-defined population group although not representing nationwide samples. Aim: To assess the periodontal status, prevalence of oral mucosal lesions, and adverse oral habits among seafood industry employees of Bhubaneswar. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive survey was conducted among 21–60 years old 790 seafood industry employees. The questionnaire was designed to record demographic details, routine oral hygiene habits, adverse oral habits, community periodontal index, and prevalence of oral mucosal lesions. One-way analysis of variance and t-test analysis were used. Results: The majority of the subjects (72.6% used toothbrush and toothpaste to clean their teeth. Smoking and pan chewing was recorded among 130 (16.5% and 188 (23.8% subjects, respectively. The prevalence of periodontal disease was 86.1% among the study population. The prevalence of calculus among the age group 39–48 years was statistically significant across the age groups. Females as compared to males had lower attachment loss levels. About 56 (7% subjects had leukoplakia and 7 (0.8% subjects had acute necrotizing gingivitis. Conclusions: The findings of this study provided an insight into the periodontal health status, adverse oral habits, routine oral hygiene practices, and the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions of sea food industry employees, which may be useful in designing and planning oral health promotion programs.

  12. Assessment of periodontal status of the patients with dental fluorosis in area with natural high levels of fluoride: A cross-sectional survey

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    Ketan Sukumar Vora

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental fluorosis exhibits as enamel mottling, surface irregularities, leading to plaque accumulation and periodontal diseases. It may cause failure of cemental resorption leading to hypercementosis and causes osteonecrosis of alveolar bone leading to reduced bone height. The study is conducted in Raichur, being known as one of the highest fluoride containing area in Karnataka with level of fluoride in drinking water approximately 3.5-5.5 ppm. This is an effort to find an association between dental fluorosis and periodontal diseases. Aims: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of severity of dental fluorosis on the periodontal status in the patients assessed. Settings and Design: This cross-sectional, epidemiological survey was carried out at rural parts of Raichur. Materials and Methods: One hundred and eleven subjects with dental fluorosis were selected for the study with age range of 15-45 years. Assessment of dental fluorosis and periodontal status was done by Dean′s Community Fluorosis Index (DCFI and Ramfjord′s Periodontal Index (RPI, respectively. Statistical Analysis Used: Analysis of variance (ANOVA test, chi-square test, and Spearman′s correlation coefficient. Results: A statistically significant relation was found between severity of dental fluorosis and severity of periodontal diseases (Spearman′s correlation coefficient 0.88, significant. Discussion: Dental fluorosis may have significant effect on periodontal condition. But, further studies on the periodontal status of subjects from naturally high water fluoride regions from different parts of India are essential.

  13. Relationship between Gram negative enteric rods, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, and clinical parameters in periodontal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M Ardila

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The association between Gram negative enteric rods and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in periodontal diseases has received little attention in the literature. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between these organisms and clinical parameters of periodontal disease. Materials and Methods: Clinical parameters and occurrence of Gram-negative enteric rods and A. actinomycetemcomitans were examined in 76 patients with chronic periodontitis. Chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests were used to determine differences in clinical variables versus the presence or absence of both microorganisms. Correlation among both organisms and clinical data were determined using Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Results: Gram-negative enteric rods and A. actinomycetemcomitans were detected in 20 (26.3% and 18 (23.7% individuals, respectively. A total of 14 (18.4% patients harbored both microorganisms studied. There were significantly positive correlations between enteric rods and presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans (r=0.652, P<0.0001. Both microorganisms were significant and positively correlated with probing depth (PD, clinical attachment level, and bleeding on probing (P<0.0001. The mean PD (mm of the sampled sites was significantly deeper in patients with presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans and Gram-negative enteric rods. Conclusion: The results of the present study suggest a strong positive correlation between Gram-negative enteric rods and A. actinomycetemcomitans in the population studied. This finding must be taken into account when considering the best therapeutic approach, including the utilization of antimicrobials. The adverse clinical outcomes observed in presence of these microorganisms could have implications in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease and a possible impact on outcomes after treatment.

  14. Nonsurgical periodontal therapy with/without diode laser modulates metabolic control of type 2 diabetics with periodontitis: a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koçak, E.; Sağlam, M.; Kayış, S.A.; Dündar, N.; Kebapçılar, L.; Loos, B.G.; Hakki, S.S.

    2016-01-01

    In order to evaluate whether nonsurgical periodontal treatment with/without diode laser (DL) decontamination improves clinical parameters, the levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM), and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) in gingival crevicular fluid and metabolic

  15. Periodontal Therapy Effects on Nitrite Related to Oral Bacteria: A 6-Month Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortelli, Sheila C; Costa, Fernando O; Rodrigues, Edson; Cota, Luis O M; Cortelli, Jose R

    2015-08-01

    Nitrite is a biologic factor relevant to oral and systemic homeostasis. Through an oral bacteria reduction process, it was suggested that periodontal therapy and chlorhexidine (CHX) rinse could affect nitrite levels, leading to negative effects, such as an increase in blood pressure. This 6-month randomized clinical trial evaluated the effects of periodontal therapeutic protocols on salivary nitrite and its relation to subgingival bacteria. One hundred patients with periodontitis were allocated randomly to debridement procedures in four weekly sections (quadrant scaling [QS]) or within 24 hours (full-mouth scaling [FMS]) in conjunction with a 60-day CHX (QS + CHX and FMS + CHX), placebo (QS + placebo and FMS + placebo), or no mouthrinse (QS + none and FMS + none) use. Real-time polymerase chain reaction determined total bacterial, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, Streptococcus oralis, and Actinomyces naeslundii levels. Salivary nitrite concentration was determined with Griess reagent. Data were analyzed statistically at baseline and 3 and 6 months by analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, and Spearman correlation tests (P periodontal pockets. The relationship between nitrite and bacterial levels appears weak. Short-term scaling exhibited a greater influence on nitrite concentrations then long-term CHX use.

  16. In vivo inflammation mapping of periodontal disease based on diffuse reflectance spectral imaging: a clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanth, Chandra Sekhar; Betsy, Joseph; Jayanthi, Jayaraj L.; Nisha, Unni G.; Prasantila, Janam; Subhash, Narayanan

    2013-02-01

    Since conventional techniques using periodontal probes have inherent drawbacks in the diagnosis of different grades of gingival inflammation, development of noninvasive screening devices becomes significant. Diffuse reflectance (DR) spectra recorded with white light illumination is utilized to detect periodontal inflammation from the oxygenated hemoglobin absorption ratio R620/R575. A multispectral imaging system is utilized to record narrow-band DR images at 575 and 620 nm from the anterior sextant of the gingivia of 15 healthy volunteers and 25 patients (N=40). An experienced periodontist assesses the level of gingival inflammation at each site through periodontal probing and assigns diagnosis as healthy, mild, moderate, or severe inflammation. The DR image ratio R620/R575 computed for each pixel (8-μm resolution) from the monochrome images is pseudo-color-mapped to identify gingival inflammation sites. The DR image ratio values at each site are compared with clinical diagnosis to estimate the specificity and sensitivity of the DR imaging technique in inflammation mapping. The high diagnostic accuracy is utilized to detect underlying inflammation in six patients with a previous history of periodontitis.

  17. Management of cannabis-induced periodontitis via resective surgical therapy: A clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh; Kang, Philip

    2017-03-01

    There is a lack of clinical research on the potential effect of cannabis use on the periodontium as well as its effect on treatment outcomes. The aim of this case report is to illustrate the clinical presentation of periodontal disease in a young woman who was a chronic cannabis user, as well as successful treatment involving motivating the patient to quit cannabis use and undergo nonsurgical and surgical therapy. A 23-year-old woman sought care at the dental clinic for periodontal treatment. During a review of her medical history, the patient reported using cannabis frequently during a 3-year period, which coincided with the occurrence of gingival inflammation. She used cannabis in the form of cigarettes that were placed at the mandibular anterior region of her mouth for prolonged periods. Localized prominent papillary and marginal gingival enlargement of the anterior mandible were present. The mandibular anterior teeth showed localized severe chronic periodontitis. The clinicians informed the patient about the potentially detrimental consequences of continued cannabis use; she was encouraged to quit, which she did. The clinicians performed nonsurgical therapy (scaling and root planing) and osseous surgery. The treatment outcome was evaluated over 6 months; improved radiographic and clinical results were observed throughout the follow-up period. Substantial availability and usage of cannabis, specifically among young adults, requires dentists to be vigilant about clinical indications of cannabis use and to provide appropriate treatments. Behavioral modification, nonsurgical therapy, and surgical therapy offer the potential for successful management of cannabis-related periodontitis. Copyright © 2017 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Bleeding on probing as it relates to smoking status in patients enrolled in supportive periodontal therapy for at least 5 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramseier, Christoph A; Mirra, Damiano; Schütz, Christian; Sculean, Anton; Lang, Niklaus P; Walter, Clemens; Salvi, Giovanni E

    2015-02-01

    To relate the mean percentage of bleeding on probing (BOP) to smoking status in patients enrolled in supportive periodontal therapy (SPT). Retrospective data on BOP from 8'741 SPT visits were related to smoking status among categories of both periodontal disease severity and progression (instability) in patients undergoing dental hygiene treatment at the Medi School of Dental Hygiene (MSDH), Bern, Switzerland 1985-2011. A total of 445 patients were identified with 27.2% (n = 121) being smokers, 27.6% (n = 123) former smokers and 45.2% (n = 201) non-smokers. Mean BOP statistically significantly increased with disease severity (p = 0.0001) and periodontal instability (p = 0.0115) irrespective of the smoking status. Periodontally stable smokers (n = 30) categorized with advanced periodontal disease demonstrated a mean BOP of 16.2% compared to unstable smokers (n = 15) with a mean BOP of 22.4% (p = 0.0291). Assessments of BOP in relation to the percentage of sites with periodontal probing depths (PPD) ≥ 4 mm at patient-level yielded a statistically significantly decreased proportion of BOP in smokers compared to non-smokers and former smokers (p = 0.0137). Irrespective of the smoking status, increased mean BOP in SPT patients relates to disease severity and periodontal instability while smokers demonstrate lower mean BOP concomitantly with an increased prevalence of residual PPDs. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Post-Surgical Clinical Monitoring of Soft Tissue Wound Healing in Periodontal and Implant Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippi, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Clinical features of surgical soft tissue wound healing in dentistry have been rarely discussed in the international literature. The aim of the present paper is to highlight both the main clinical findings of surgical wound healing, especially in periodontal and implant dentistry, and the wound healing monitoring procedures which should be followed. Wound inspection after careful food and plaque debridement is the essential part of wound healing monitoring. Periodontal and peri-implant probing should be performed only after tissue healing has been completed and not on a weekly basis in peri-implant tissue monitoring. Telephone follow-up and patient self-assessment scales can also be used the days following surgery to monitor the most common surgical complications such as pain, swelling, bleeding, and bruising. Wound healing monitoring is an important concern in all surgical procedures since it allows to identify signs or/and symptoms possibly related to surgical complications.

  20. The clinical and radiological assessment of periodontal bone loss treatment using Emdogain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokajuk, G; Pawińska, M; Kedra, B A

    2006-01-01

    ADMISSION: Emdogain is the only one biomaterial using biomicra effect which is practiced in periodontal surgery. The purpose of the study was a clinical and radiological assessment of bone loss treatment using Emdogain. There were 19 persons examined (11 women and 8 men) which have bone loss treated. Initial and monitoring examination after 10 months embraced clinical parameters such as PPD, CAL and radiological--based on intraoral x-ray pictures. Emdogain treatment was made according to surgical procedures. The research has shown reduction of the depth of periodontal pockets average about 3.4 mm and attachment connective tissue growth about 2.2 mm. Bone loss filling was on 67.1% level. Bone loss filling and growth of connective tissue attachment are in our research lower than in most of the others publications. Our observation concerned 10 months period so we should expect better effects after longer time. MOTIONS: Emdogain is safe and effective regeneration material.

  1. Evaluation of periodontal status adjacent to interproximal surfaces restored with composite resin, in comparison with non-restored interproximal surfaces

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    Elvia Christina Barros de Almeida

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the periodontal status of interproximal surfaces restored with composite resin, in comparison with non-restored interproximal surfaces. Methods: In 65 patients, we analyzed 145 restored surfaces and 145 non-restored surfaces. Results: Most of the restored surfaces (54.3% showed radiographic alterations, which was shown to be higher among restorations with clinically detected proximal excess (56.8% x 52.8%; with lack of restorative material (64.5% x 51.4%; in restorations with proximal overhang (67.7% x 44.4%; in teeth with gingival inflammation?/bleeding (55.1% x 40.0% and in teeth with probing depth exceeding 3 mm (64.3% x 52.9%. However, there were no significant associations for these variables. Of the non-restored surfaces, 24.4% showed radiographic alterations, however there were no significant associations. Conclusion: The results showed a statistical significance for radiographic alterations in restored and non-restored surfaces.

  2. Expanded Disability Status Scale-Based Disability and Dental-Periodontal Conditions in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatipoglu, Hasan; Canbaz Kabay, Sibel; Gungor Hatipoglu, Mujgan; Ozden, Hilmi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between different disability states in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) as determined by the expanded disability status scale (EDSS) and dental-periodontal measures. Eighty patients with MS (64 females and 16 males) were included in this study. Data on MS types, attack frequency, disease duration, EDSS scores and orofacial complaints prior to an MS attack were obtained from medical records. The plaque index (PI), probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), gingival index (GI), decayed-missing-filled teeth (DMFT) index and number of present teeth were measured during one dental examination for each subject. The MS patients were divided into the following 2 groups based on their EDSS scores: low physical disability (L-DS) and high physical disability (H-DS). Differences in dental parameters between groups of low and high disability were investigated. p disability in MS patients. In addition, some maxillofacial-oral complaints prior to an MS attack were observed. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Assessment of liver fibrosis stage influence on clinical course of periodontal diseases in patients with chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. М. Slaba

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim. To assess the influence of liver fibrosis stage on the clinical course of periodontal diseases in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Material and Methods. 122 patients with chronic hepatitis C, treated at the 7th department ofLvivRegionalInfectiousDiseasesHospital during 2013 – 2015 were included into dental investigation. The periodontal disease was diagnosed in accordance with the classification of M. F. Danilevsky (1994. The clinical condition of periodontium was assessed by the papillary marginal alveolar index (PMA in the modification ofParma, by the periodontal index – PI (AL Russel, 1956, by the Muhlemann and Son index – the degree of bleeding in the region of the gingival papilla (PBI. The stage of liver fibrosis was determined according to the medical history. The significance of the difference between two or more relative indicators was calculated using the Fisher test with the Metropolis algorithm. The correlation dependence between the clinical condition of periodontal tissues and the stage of liver fibrosis in patients with viral hepatitis C was studied using the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Results. The highest percentage of patients with stage of liver fibrosis F0 (70.00 ± 15.28 % was registered in patients with healthy periodont, the lowest - in patients with generalized periodontitis of the third stage (7.89 ± 4.37 %. The highest frequency of patients with the stage of liver fibrosis F3 (73.68 ± 7.14 % was also observed in persons suffering from generalized periodontitis stage III (73.68 ± 7.14 %. Conclusions. The distribution of periodontal lesion severity statistically significant (p < 0.001 depended on the stage of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Direct (R = 0.70; p < 0.001 strong correlation between the clinical state of periodontal tissues and the stage of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C (using the Spearman rank correlation coefficient has been determined

  4. Retrospective evaluation of the clinical management of patients with periodontal abscesses attending a teaching hospital

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    Modupeoluwa Omotunde Soroye

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to examine the clinical management of patients who attended a Nigerian teaching hospital with periodontal abscesses. Setting and Design: This is a retrospective study among patients who attended the Periodontics Clinic of the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Rivers State, Nigeria, between January 2008 and December 2015. Patients and Methods: Information about the diagnosis was obtained from the departmental log book, and case notes were retrieved from record department. Data collection elicited information on age, sex, tribe, frequency of tooth brushing, dental attendance, medical history, clinical features, involved tooth/teeth, and treatment received. Statistical Analysis Used: Epi info version 3.5.1 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Patients aged between 15 and 87 years, with a mean age of 35.53 ± 19.30 years. Majority of patients were males, had minor ethnic extractions, had some form of education, first dental clinic attendees, indulged in once-daily toothbrushing, fully dentate, and had fair/poor oral hygiene. A total of 8.8% and 31.6% of the participants smoked cigarettes and consumed alcohol, respectively. A fifth of the participants had systemic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and peptic ulcer disease. Majority of the participants (91.2% had severe pain. About two-fifths had periodontal abscess around the incisors and the molars. The upper right quadrant was mostly involved (31.6%. Two-fifth of the patients had extraction done. Conclusion: Data from this study revealed periodontal abscess as a severely painful condition in naÏve dental patients, successfully treated mainly through extraction of the implicated tooth/teeth. This implies that oral health awareness and regular dental attendance may prevent its occurrence.

  5. Using clinical cases to stimulate active learning in a short periodontal continuing professional development course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koole, Sebastiaan; Thevissen, Eric; Lindén, Ulf; Klinge, Björn; de Bruyn, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    A case-based approach was used in a two-day periodontal continuing professional development course as a strategy to stimulate active learning. The present study investigates the outcome of this course format in terms of feasibility, perceived efficiency as a learning approach and reported individual learning goals. The study was performed in five identical courses entitled'risk analysis and treatment in periodontal patients'at Malmö University between 2011-2014. Before the course, clinical cases were used to activate participants' prior knowledge and to attune their focus on the course content. During the course, cases were discussed to synchronise theory with practical application. A pre- and end-course questionnaire were developed to evaluate participants' characteristics (age, clinical expertise, experience and expectations), perceptions on feasibility and instructiveness and emerged individual learning goals. The participants (39 dentists and 78 dental hygienists) reported an average preparation time of 62 minutes (range 2-190) and had positive perceptions on the accessibility, instructiveness and difficulty of cases. Expectations ranged between refreshing, acquiring new knowledge and mastering the course subject. Most reported learning goals were related to daily clinical practice including the development of a treatment plan, when to continue non-surgical treatment or to extract teeth/perform surgery, the approach to periodontitis, how to motivate non-compliant patients and when to refer. Conclusion: The use of clinical cases to stimulate active learning in a short-term continuing professional development periodontal course was positively perceived by the dentists and dental hygienists in terms of feasibility and learning potential.

  6. Antibiotic susceptibility of periodontal Streptococcus constellatus and Streptococcus intermedius clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rams, Thomas E; Feik, Diane; Mortensen, Joel E; Degener, John E; van Winkelhoff, Arie J

    2014-12-01

    Streptococcus constellatus and Streptococcus intermedius in subgingival dental plaque biofilms may contribute to forms of periodontitis that resist treatment with conventional mechanical root debridement/surgical procedures and may additionally participate in some extraoral infections. Because systemic antibiotics are often used in these clinical situations, and little is known of the antibiotic susceptibility of subgingival isolates of these two bacterial species, this study determined the in vitro susceptibility to six antibiotics of fresh S. constellatus and S. intermedius clinical isolates from human periodontitis lesions. A total of 33 S. constellatus and 17 S. intermedius subgingival strains, each recovered from separate patients with severe chronic periodontitis (n = 50) before treatment, were subjected to antibiotic gradient strip susceptibility testing with amoxicillin, azithromycin, clindamycin, ciprofloxacin, and doxycycline on blood-supplemented Mueller-Hinton agar and to the inhibitory effects of metronidazole at 16 mg/L in an enriched Brucella blood agar dilution assay. Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing interpretative standards were used to assess the results. Clindamycin was the most active antibiotic against S. constellatus (minimum inhibitory concentration at 90% [MIC90] 0.25 mg/L), and amoxicillin was most active against S. intermedius (MIC90 0.125 mg/L). A total of 30% of the S. constellatus and S. intermedius clinical isolates were resistant in vitro to doxycycline, 98% were only intermediate in susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, and 90% were resistant to metronidazole at 16 mg/L. Subgingival S. constellatus and S. intermedius exhibited variable antibiotic susceptibility profiles, potentially complicating empirical selection of periodontitis antibiotic therapy in patients who are species positive.

  7. Relationship between depression and chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararajan, Shiyamali; Muthukumar, Santhanakrishnan; Rao, Suresh Ranga

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic, multifactorial, polymicrobial disease causing inflammation in the supporting structures of the teeth. There is a plethora of nonoral risk factors which can be quoted to aid in the development of chronic periodontitis. According to WHO, depression is a common mental disorder that presents with depressed mood, loss of interest or pleasure, feelings of guilt, disturbed sleep or appetite, low energy and poor concentration. Depression is associated with negligent oral health care and another mechanism proposed disturbance in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis system and hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid system, which can affect the periodontal status by affecting the immune system. The aim of this study was to assess the association between periodontal clinical parameters and depression rating. The study design is a case-control study with 35 patients each in case and control group. The periodontal parameters taken for measurement were probing depth and clinical attachment loss. Depression was calculated using Beck's depression scale. The statistical analysis was performed by means of SPSS software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA; version 17.0 under windows 2000). Student's t-test was used to determine the relationship between the clinical periodontal parameters and depression. Self-reported scoring of depression by using Beck's depression inventory has shown that periodontal patients had a significantly higher total depression score than normal controls. This study reveals that there is a direct correlation between the severity of periodontal disease and the severity of depression in patients.

  8. Is the Periodontal Status a Risk Factor for the Development of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-05-16

    May 16, 2017 ... 2nd ed. Berlin: Springer-Verlag; 2000. p. 585-607. 3. Albandar JM. Epidemiology and risk factors of periodontal diseases. Dent Clin North Am 2005;49:517-32. 4. Heitz-Mayfield LJA. Disease progression: Identification of high- risk groups and individuals for periodontitis. J Clin Periodontol. 2005;32:196-09.

  9. Meta-analysis of five photodisinfection clinical trials for periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Roger C.; Loebel, Nicolas G.; Andersen, Dane M.

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy(PDT) has been demonstrated to effectively kill human periopathogens in vitro. To evaluate the efficacy of PDT in vivo a series of clinical trials was carried out in multiple centers and populations. Clinical parameters including clinical attachment level, pocket probing depth and bleeding on probing were all evaluated. All groups received the standard of care, scaling and root planing, and the treatment group additionally received a single treatment of PDT. Of the total 309 patients and over 40,000 pockets treated in these 5 trials it was determined that photodynamic therapy provided a statistically significant improvement in clinical parameters over scaling and root planing alone.

  10. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in dental plaque of children and their parents: is it related to their periodontal status and oral hygiene?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsami, A; Petropoulou, P; Kafritsa, Y; Mentis, Y A; Roma-Giannikou, E

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the possible presence of H. pylori in subgingival dental plaque of children with upper gastrointestinal symptoms, as well as of their parents' and to detect any association between the presence of H. pylori and oral hygiene together with the periodontal status of children and their parents. The study comprised of 35 children with upper gastrointestinal symptoms, aged 4 to 14 years and 45 family members (mothers and/or fathers). Gastric biopsies were collected from all children for CLO-test, histology and culture. Serology was used to assess the H. pylori infection status of their parents. Before endoscopy, subgingival dental plaque from children and their parents were collected from 4 healthy and 4 diseased sites, and the clinical indices (gingival index, plaque index, bleeding on probing, pocket depth, loss of clinical attachment) after plaque collection were recorded. The Chi-square test was performed to investigate possible differences between children and their parents and logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association of parental infection status with that of children. 15 out of 35 children (42.86%) were found H. pylori-positive. In 6 out of the 15 infected children (40%) H. pylori was also identified in their subgingival plaque samples, as well as in one among the 20 non infected children. The presence of H. pylori in dental plaque was significantly associated with its presence in the gastric antrum (p=0.0274). H. pylori was identified in the dental plaque of 7 mothers corresponding to children with positive PCR in their dental plaque and of 4 fathers (one corresponding with his child found H. pylori positive in dental plaque). Children who had H. pylori identified in their dental plaque belonged to families with members also having H. pylori in dental plaque. No significant relationship between periodontal clinical parameters and detection of H. pylori in dental plaque in both children and their parents was found. However

  11. Alveolar Bone Morphology Following Periodontally Accelerated Osteogenic Orthodontics: A Clinical and Radiographic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chackartchi, Tali; Barkana, Idit; Klinger, Avigdor

    The aim of this study was to analyze alveolar bone morphology following periodontally accelerated osteogenic orthodontics. Treated patients were called for a full periodontal examination and a cone beam computed tomography scan. Mean treatment time was 6.08 months. Mean probing pocket depth was 2.7 mm. No gingival recessions were noted. In the maxilla, buccal plate thickness was 0.48 to 2.14 mm. In the mandible, bone thickness was 0.2 to 1.82 mm. Root fenestrations and dehiscences were present in up to 40% of the anterior teeth. Although clinical outcomes were favorable, due to the presence of multiple posttreatment bone fenestrations and dehiscences, a revision of the treatment protocol might be considered.

  12. [Correlation between clinical parameters and quantitative analysis of inflammatory infiltrate. Importance in the diagnosis of active periodontal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendieta Fiter, C

    1989-05-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the destruction in chronic periodontal disease occurs in relatively short periods of time which are followed of prolonged periods of inactivity. These bursts of activity are characterized by an increase in the inflammatory reaction. It has been the purpose of this paper to study the correlation between the clinical measurements of periodontal disease and the histomorphometric quantification of areas of dense inflammatory infiltrate. The results of this study show that the clinical parameters that measure gingival inflammation or loss of periodontal attachment are useful to distinguish pathology from normal (p less than 0.003), but lack sensitivity to detect burst of periodontal disease activity (p greater than 0.05).

  13. Biofilms and apical periodontitis: study of prevalence and association with clinical and histopathologic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricucci, Domenico; Siqueira, José F

    2010-08-01

    This study evaluated the prevalence of bacterial biofilms in untreated and treated root canals of teeth evincing apical periodontitis. The associations of biofilms with clinical conditions, radiographic size, and the histopathologic type of apical periodontitis were also investigated. The material comprised biopsy specimens from 106 (64 untreated and 42 treated) roots of teeth with apical periodontitis. Specimens were obtained by apical surgery or extraction and were processed for histopathologic and histobacteriologic techniques. Bacteria were found in all but one specimen. Overall, intraradicular biofilm arrangements were observed in the apical segment of 77% of the root canals (untreated canals: 80%; treated canals: 74%). Biofilms were also seen covering the walls of ramifications and isthmuses. Bacterial biofilms were visualized in 62% and 82% of the root canals of teeth with small and large radiographic lesions, respectively. All canals with very large lesions harbored intraradicular biofilms. Biofilms were significantly associated with epithelialized lesions (cysts and epithelialized granulomas or abscesses) (p granulomas was 95%, 83%, and 69.5%, respectively. No correlation was found between biofilms and clinical symptoms or sinus tract presence (p > 0.05). Extraradicular biofilms were observed in only 6% of the cases. The overall findings are consistent with acceptable criteria to include apical periodontitis in the set of biofilm-induced diseases. Biofilm morphologic structure varied from case to case and no unique pattern for endodontic infections was identified. Biofilms are more likely to be present in association with longstanding pathologic processes, including large lesions and cysts. Copyright 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. PhD Thesis (Presentation - Slides): " Association between periodontitis and endothelial dysfunction: Clinical significance and physiopathological mechanisms "

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez, Jorge H.

    2014-01-01

    Thesis Dissertation (Slides) --- Related publications Ramirez, Jorge H; R, Arce; Parra, Beatriz; Bravo, Luis E.; Gutierrez, Sonia Jackeline; Jaramillo, Adriana; Vivas, Juliana; Gonzalez, Viviana; JE, Soto; Otalvaro A; J, Consuegra; A, Contreras (2014): Periodontal therapy does not improve cardiovascular disease biomarkers: results of a randomized clinical trial. figshare. http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1098548 Ramirez JH, Arce RM, Contreras A. Periodontal treatment effects ...

  15. INfluence of Successful Periodontal Intervention in REnal Disease (INSPIRED): study protocol for a randomised controlled pilot clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Praveen; Cockwell, Paul; Dietrich, Thomas; Ferro, Charles; Ives, Natalie; Chapple, Iain L C

    2017-11-13

    trial later, data on cardio-renal function, periodontal health and patient-reported outcomes will be collected at each time point. This pilot randomised controlled trial will investigate the viability of undertaking a larger-scale study investigating the effect of treating periodontitis and maintaining periodontal health on cardio-renal outcomes in patients with CKD. National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) Clinical Research Network (UKCRN ID: 18458), ID: ISRCTN10227738 . Registered retrospectively to both registers on 23 April 2015.

  16. The effects of periodontal treatment on diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, George W

    2003-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus and periodontal diseases are common chronic diseases in the United States. Periodontal infection may adversely affect glycemic control in people with diabetes. This article reviews the evidence regarding how treatment of periodontal diseases affects glycemic control. The review consisted of a MEDLINE literature search to identify primary research reports on the relationship between periodontal therapy and changes in glycemic control. The review identified three randomized clinical trials and nine nonrandomized clinical follow-up studies. The strength, quantity and breadth of evidence are varied, precluding clear-cut guidance for determining whether treating periodontal infection has a beneficial effect on glycemic control. Despite the variation and limitations in the literature, evidence supports the concept that periodontal diseases can contribute to poorer glycemic control in people with diabetes. Although the evidence is not unequivocal, it provides sufficient support for additional investigations of the effect of preventing and treating periodontal infections on managing glycemic control. Sufficient evidence exists to incorporate oral examinations and periodontal care in management regimens for people with diabetes. It is prudent to assess patients' glycemic control status and communicate the importance of referring patients with diabetes for thorough oral health evaluations and necessary care.

  17. IL-6 and IL-10 gene polymorphisms in patients with aggressive periodontitis: effects on GCF, serum and clinic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirim Gorgun, Emine; Toker, Hulya; Korkmaz, Ertan Mahir; Poyraz, Omer

    2017-01-16

    Genetic variations observed in cytokines affect periodontitis susceptibility. The aim of this study was to investigate interleukin(IL)-6(-174) and IL-10(-597) gene polymorphisms in generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP) patients. Also, we aimed to evaluate the effects of IL-6 and IL-10 gene polymorphisms on the clinical outcomes of non-surgical periodontal therapy and cytokine levels in gingival crevicular fluid(GCF) and serum. Fifty-three patients with GAgP and 50 periodontally healthy individuals were included in this study. Clinical parameters, GCF and blood samples were collected at baseline and at 6-week. Non-surgical periodontal therapy was performed in patients with GAgP. Gene analysis were determined by PCR-RFLP(polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism) and cytokine levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA).GAgP patients showed significant improvement on clinical parameters after periodontal therapy(pperiodontal therapy, while patients with IL-6(-174) GG genotype had higher levels of GCF IL-10 levels.

  18. Non-inflammatory destructive periodontal disease: a clinical, microbiological, immunological and genetic investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Repeke

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis comprises a group of multifactorial diseases in which periodontopathogens accumulate in dental plaque and trigger host chronic inflammatory and immune responses against periodontal structures, which are determinant to the disease outcome. Although unusual cases of non-inflammatory destructive periodontal disease (NIDPD are described, their pathogenesis remains unknown. A unique NIDPD case was investigated by clinical, microbiological, immunological and genetic tools. The patient, a non-smoking dental surgeon with excessive oral hygiene practice, presented a generalized bone resorption and tooth mobility, but not gingival inflammation or occlusion problems. No hematological, immunological or endocrine alterations were found. No periodontopathogens (A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, F. nucleatum and T. denticola or viruses (HCMV, EBV-1 and HSV-1 were detected, along with levels of IL-1β and TNF-a in GCF compatible with healthy tissues. Conversely ALP, ACP and RANKL GCF levels were similar to diseased periodontal sites. Genetic investigation demonstrated that the patient carried some SNPs, as well HLA-DR4 (*0404 and HLA-B27 alleles, considered risk factors for bone loss. Then, a less vigorous and diminished frequency of toothbrushing was recommended to the patient, resulting in the arrest of alveolar bone loss, associated with the return of ALP, ACP and RANKL in GCF to normality levels. In conclusion, the unusual case presented here is compatible with the previous description of NIDPD, and the results that a possible combination of excessive force and frequency of mechanical stimulation with a potentially bone loss prone genotype could result in the alveolar bone loss seen in NIDPD.

  19. Periodontal status and its risk factors among young adults of the Sebha city (Libya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Wali Peeran

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: The result of this study provides baseline information for planning a preventive program. With preventive procedures being implemented at this young age, there is a possibility that the prevalence of periodontal disease will be lesser during adulthood.

  20. Synchrotron radiation analysis of possible correlations between metal status in human cementum and periodontal disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, R.R.; Naftel, S.J.; Nelson, A.J.; Edwards, M.; Mithoowani, H.; Stakiw, J. (UWO); (Saskatchewan)

    2010-03-16

    Periodontitis is a serious disease that affects up to 50% of an adult population. It is a chronic condition involving inflammation of the periodontal ligament and associated tissues leading to eventual tooth loss. Some evidence suggests that trace metals, especially zinc and copper, may be involved in the onset and severity of periodontitis. Thus we have used synchrotron X-ray fluorescence imaging on cross sections of diseased and healthy teeth using a microbeam to explore the distribution of trace metals in cementum and adhering plaque. The comparison between diseased and healthy teeth indicates that there are elevated levels of zinc, copper and nickel in diseased teeth as opposed to healthy teeth. This preliminary correlation between elevated levels of trace metals in the cementum and plaque of diseased teeth suggests that metals may play a role in the progress of periodontitis.

  1. Clinical and microbiological effects of initial periodontal therapy in conjunction with amoxicillin and clavulanic acid in patients with adult periodontitis : A randomised double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkel, EG; van Winkelhoff, AJ; Barendregt, DS; van der Weijden, GA; Timmerman, MF; van der Velden, U

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical and microbiological effects of initial periodontal therapy in conjunction with systemic amoxicillin plus clavulanic acid in adult periodontitis patients using a double-blind, parallel-group, and placebo-controlled protocol. 21 patients

  2. Periodontal assessment of postmenopausal women receiving risedronate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo, Leena; Bissada, Nabil F; Liu, James

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare periodontal status of postmenopausal women with mild to moderate osteoporosis who use risedronate therapy with those who do not. In this cross-sectional study, a total of 60 age-matched postmenopausal women with mild to moderate osteoporosis diagnosed by a bone density scan T score below -2.5 at either spine or hip were divided into two groups. Women in the experimental group had used systemic risedronate once weekly (35 mg) for at least 3 months. Women in the control group had never used bisphosphonate therapy. The periodontal status of each subject was evaluated through a clinical periodontal examination including evaluation of periodontal probing depth, gingival recession, gingival index, plaque score, attachment loss, and alveolar bone level. The significance in differences between the two groups was assessed using two-tailed paired t tests. Significant differences (P periodontal probing depth (2.6 vs 2.9 mm), gingival index (0.37 vs 0.71), plaque score (56.2 vs 77.0), attachment loss (2.8 vs 3.2 mm), and alveolar bone level (3.1 and 4.0), respectively. Gingival recession parameters did not differ significantly. Five of six periodontal parameters evaluated show that postmenopausal women with mild to moderate osteoporosis using risedronate therapy have healthier periodontal status than those who do not use bisphosphonates. Women using risedronate therapy show significantly less plaque accumulation, less gingival inflammation, lower probing depths, less periodontal attachment loss, and greater alveolar bone levels. These observations suggest that risedronate therapy may play a beneficial role in periodontal status.

  3. Evolution, current status and advances in application of platelet concentrate in periodontics and implantology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Amit Arvind

    2017-05-16

    Platelet concentrates (PC) [platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet-rich fibrin (PRF)] are frequently used for surgical procedures in medical and dental fields, particularly in oral and maxillofacial surgery, plastic surgery and sports medicine. The objective of all these technologies is to extract all the elements from a blood sample that could be used to improve healing and promote tissue regeneration. Although leukocyte rich and leukocyte poor PRP's have their own place in literature, the importance of non-platelet components in a platelet concentrate remains a mystery. PC have come a long way since its first appearance in 1954 to the T-PRF, A-PRF and i-PRF introduced recently. These PC find varied applications successfully in periodontics and implant dentistry as well. However, the technique of preparation, standing time, transfer process, temperature of centrifuge, vibration, etc ., are the various factors for the mixed results reported in the literature. Until the introduction of a proper classification of terminologies, the PC were known by different names in different countries and by different commercial companies which also created a lot of confusion. This review intends to clarify all these confusion by briefing the exact evolution of PC, their preparation techniques, recent advances and their various clinical and technical aspects and applications.

  4. [The clinical study on the use of diode laser irradiation in the treatment of periodontal-endodontic combined lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuangao; Wang, Xiao; Xu, Jingling; Zhou, Xin; Xie, Kexian

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the adjunctive effect of diode laser irradiation for the treatment of periodontal-endodontic combined lesions. 30 cases with periodontal-endodontic combined lesions were selected. All cases were randomly divided into experimental group and control group (n=15). In the control group, patients were treated with root canal therapy and conservative periodontal treatment (scaling and root planning), and patients in the experimental group were treated with root canal therapy and conservative periodontal treatment followed by diode laser irradiation. Clinical measurements including pocket probing depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL), modified bleeding index (mBI), periapical index (PAI) were taken before treatment (baseline). Three and six months after the treatment, the adjunctive effects of diode laser in the treatment of periodontal-endodontic combined lesions were evaluated. Three months after the treatment, the average PPD, CAL and mBI levels were reduced significantly in both groups. But the average PPD reduction in the experimental group was significantly greater (Plaser as an adjunct procedure in the treatment of periodontal-endodontic combined lesions can aid in achieving success.

  5. Use of diode laser 980 nm as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. A randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Ugo; Nastri, Livia; Piccolomini, Raffaele; d'Ercole, Simonetta; Mazza, Clelia; Guida, Luigi

    2008-10-01

    The primary goal of periodontal therapy is the removal of supra and subgingival bacterial deposits by mechanical debridement consisting in scaling and root-planing (SRP) using manual or power-driven instruments. The complete removal of bacteria and their toxins from periodontal pockets is not always achieved with conventional mechanical treatment. The use of lasers as an adjunctive therapy for periodontal disease may improve tissue healing by bactericidal and detoxification effects. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of Diode laser used as adjunctive therapy of SRP to that of SRP alone for non surgical periodontal treatment in patients with chronic periodontitis. Nineteen pairs of teeth with untreated chronic periodontitis were selected in 13 patients and randomly treated by SRP alone (control group) or by SRP + laser irradiation (test group). Clinical measurements (PPD, CAL, BOP, GI, PI) were performed before treatment at baseline (T0) and at T1 (after 4 weeks), T2 (8 weeks), T3 (12 weeks), T4 (6 months). Subgingival plaque samples were taken at baseline and after treatment and examined for 8 periopathogens bacteria using PCR technique. The present study showed that the additional treatment with diode laser may lead to a slightly improvement of clinical parameters, whereas no significant differences between test and control group in reduction of periodontopathogens were found.

  6. A Clinical and Radiographic Evaluation of Periodontal Regenerative Potential of PerioGlas®: A Synthetic, Resorbable Material in Treating Periodontal Infrabony Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, Neelathil Lisa; Abraham, Sathish; Rao, H N Shama; Sridhar, N; Moon, Ninad; Barde, Dhananjay H

    2014-06-01

    Study of the clinical application of bioactive glass in treating periodontal defects has been gaining momentum. Studies in the past have hypothesized that bioactive glass resulted in an improvement of bony lesion when compared with open flap debridement. Considering that there were very few studies in the Indian dental literature involving the analysis of PerioGlas®- A particulate Bioglass in intrabony defects, the present clinical trial aimed to clinically and radiographically evaluate the efficacy of PerioGlas® and compare it to open debridement as control in the treatment of human periodontal osseous (three and two wall) defects in South Indian population. Ten patients with chronic periodontitis within the age group of 30-45 years having at least two pockets with depth of ≥6 mm exhibiting vertical osseous defects were selected for the study. A total of 20 defect sites were randomly assigned to one of the two treatment modalities such that 10 sites (experimental) received PerioGlas® material after open flap debridement and 10 sites with open flap debridement (controls). Plaque index and gingival index (GI) were recorded at baseline, 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months and 9 months, whereas probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment level and gingival recession (GR) were recorded at baseline, 6 and 9 months postoperatively. Linear radiographic measurements were carried out at baseline, 6 and 9 months to evaluate the defect fill, defect resolution and change in the alveolar crest height (ACH). Both experimental and control site showed a significant reduction in plaque and GI, and a slight increase in GR. The mean reduction in PPD for experimental and control site was 4.4 ± 0.34 mm and 3.2 ± 0.1 mm, respectively. Gain in clinical attachment at experimental and control site was 4.4 ± 0.21 and 3.4 ± 0.11, respectively which on comparison was statistically non-significant for both sites. The radiographic mean defect fill for experimental site was 1.73 mm. The

  7. Clinical evaluation of intrabony defects in localized aggressive periodontitis patients with and without bioglass- an in-vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, K V; Anuradha, B R; Srikanth, G; Chandra, P M; Anupama, T; Durga, P M

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive periodontitis is a specific type of periodontitis with clearly identifiable clinical characteristics such as rapid attachment loss, bone destruction and familial aggregation. Regeneration of mineralized tissues affected by aggressive periodontitis comprises a major scientific and clinical challenge. In recent years some evidence has been provided that bioactive glass is also capable of supporting the regenerative healing of periodontal lesions. The aim of this clinical and radiological prospective study was to evaluate the efficacy of bioactive glass in the treatment of intra-bony defects in patients with localized aggressive periodontitis. Twelve localized aggressive periodontitis patients with bilaterally located three-walled intra-bony defect depth = 2 mm, preoperative probing depths = 5 mm were randomly treated either with the bioactive glass or without the bioactive glass. The clinical parameters plaque index, gingival index, probing depth, gingival recession, clinical attachment level, and mobility were recorded prior to surgery as well as 12 months after surgery. Intraoral radiographs were digitized to evaluate the bone defect depth at baseline and 12 months after the surgery. After 12 months, a reduction in probing depth of 3.92 + 0.313 mm (P < 0.001) and a gain in clinical attachment level of 4.42+0358mm (P < 0.001) were registered in the test group. In the control group, a reduction in probing depth of 2.5 +0.230mm (P <0.001) and a gain in clinical attachment level of 2.58 + 0.149 mm (P <0.001) was recorded. Radiographically, the defects were found to be filled by 2.587 + 0.218 mm (P < 0.001) in the test group and by 0.1792 + 0.031mm (P < 0.001) in the control group. Changes in gingival recession showed no significant differences. . Highly significant improvements in the parameters Probing depth, Clinical attachment level, and Bone defect depth were recorded after 12 months, with regenerative material.

  8. Proposing a Novel, Three-level Definition of Periodontitis 
using Probing Depth, Clinical Attachment Loss and Bleeding on Probing: Analysis of a Rural Chinese Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Xi Yan; He, Lu; Ouyang, Xiang Ying

    To propose a novel, three-level (severe, moderate, mild) case definition using probing depth (PD), clinical attachment loss (CAL) and bleeding on probing (BOP) for epidemiologic studies on periodontitis. Case definitions (DEF) 1-30 with PD, CAL and BOP were made. Based on data from epidemiologic research in Chengde (Hebei Province, China) in 1992, prevalence of periodontitis by DEF1-30 was calculated and compared with a reference (definitions by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/American Academy of Periodontology in 2012). Sensitivity, specificity, Youden Index, Cohen's kappa coefficient (CKC) and the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) were calculated for the definitions selected. DEF1 and DEF18 for periodontitis, DEF2, DEF3, DEF19 for moderate and severe periodontitis, and DEF5, DEF13, DEF14, DEF21 and DEF25 for severe periodontitis, which were similar for estimation of periodontitis prevalence compared with the reference, were selected. DEF18 for periodontitis, DEF19 for moderate and severe periodontitis, and DEF5 for severe periodontitis were selected because they showed higher values for the Youden Index, CKC and AUC, and formed a three-level definition. A novel three-level case classification of periodontitis using three parameters of PD, CAL and BOP was proposed. The estimated periodontitis prevalence according to the novel proposed definition is close to the prevalence according to the CDC/AAP definition.

  9. Microbial landscape features in patients with generalized periodontitis at pre-clinical and radiological stage of its development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vatamanyuk N.V.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of a comparative study of microbial landscape features in patients with generalized periodontitis at pre-clinical and radiological stage of its development in 42 patients. The purpose of the study is a comparative study of the composition of microbiocenosis of periodontal tissues in patients with chronic catarrhal gingivitis (CCG and chronic generalized periodontitis (CGP at an early stage of development and development studies of microbiological criteria for early emergence of the destructive process in periodontal structures. We found that the microflora isolated from dento-gingival grooves is of importance in diagnostics to identify the etiology of chronic generalized catarrhal gingivitis (CGCG and chronic generalized periodontitis in the early stages of its development. It was established that the presence of two or more types of fixed parodonto-pathogenic microorganisms in microbial association increases the likelihood of inflammatory and destructive events in periodontal tissues in patients with GCCG and is one of the reasons of is becoming CGP.

  10. Comparative clinical evaluation of glycosylated haemoglobin level in healthy and chronic periodontitis patients: A chairside diagnostic method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T S Srinivasa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective and Background: Glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c level can consequently be interpreted as an average of the blood glucose present over the past 3-4 months. Periodontitis is associated with glycemic control in patients with diabetes. The purpose of this study was to determine the level of HbA1c in healthy and periodontitis patients who were previously not diagnosed with diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 patients were selected for study and divided into two groups. Group 1 included patients with a healthy periodontium, and Group 2 included patients suffering from chronic periodontitis. Finger stick blood was collected by special collection unit (A1CNOW +® Bayer Health Care, Tarrytown New York, USA, for estimating level of HbA1c. Result: Both groups showed similar HbA1c levels clinically with slight increase in levels in the test group, but was statistically significant (test - 5.66 ± 0.35%, control - 5.17 ± 0.3% P = 0.003. Conclusion: Indians are at a high-risk of developing periodontitis and diabetes. These data suggest a possible link between periodontitis and glycemic control in nondiabetic individuals, periodontal disease may be a potential contributor to the development of type 2 diabetes.

  11. Non-invasive detection of periodontal disease using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy: a clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanth, Chandra Sekhar; Betsy, Joseph; Subhash, Narayanan; Jayanthi, Jayaraj L.; Prasanthila, Janam

    2012-03-01

    In clinical diagnostic procedures, gingival inflammation is considered as the initial stage of periodontal breakdown. This is often detected clinically by bleeding on probing as it is an objective measure of inflammation. Since conventional diagnostic procedures have several inherent drawbacks, development of novel non-invasive diagnostic techniques assumes significance. This clinical study was carried out in 15 healthy volunteers and 25 patients to demonstrate the applicability of diffuse reflectance (DR) spectroscopy for quantification and discrimination of various stages of inflammatory conditions in periodontal disease. The DR spectra of diseased lesions recorded using a point monitoring system consisting of a tungsten halogen lamp and a fiber-optic spectrometer showed oxygenated hemoglobin absorption dips at 545 and 575 nm. Mean DR spectra on normalization shows marked differences between healthy and different stages of gingival inflammation. Among the various DR intensity ratios investigated, involving oxy Hb absorption peaks, the R620/R575 ratio was found to be a good parameter of gingival inflammation. In order to screen the entire diseased area and its surroundings instantaneously, DR images were recorded with an EMCCD camera at 620 and 575 nm. We have observed that using the DR image intensity ratio R620/R575 mild inflammatory tissues could be discriminated from healthy with a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 93%, and from moderate with a sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 96%. The sensitivity and specificity obtained between moderate and severe inflammation are 82% and 76% respectively.

  12. A Randomized Clinical Trial Evaluating rh-FGF-2/β-TCP in Periodontal Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, D L; Oh, T-J; Mills, M P; Clem, D S; McClain, P K; Schallhorn, R A; McGuire, M K; Scheyer, E T; Giannobile, W V; Reddy, M S; Abou-Arraj, R V; Vassilopoulos, P J; Genco, R J; Geurs, N C; Takemura, A

    2016-05-01

    Biological mediators have been used to enhance periodontal regeneration. The aim of this prospective randomized controlled study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of 3 doses of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) when combined with a β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) scaffold carrier placed in vertical infrabony periodontal defects in adult patients. In this double-blinded, dose-verification, externally monitored clinical study, 88 patients who required surgical intervention to treat a qualifying infrabony periodontal defect were randomized to 1 of 4 treatment groups-β-TCP alone (control) and 0.1% recombinant human FGF-2 (rh-FGF-2), 0.3% rh-FGF-2, and 0.4% rh-FGF-2 with β-TCP-following scaling and root planing of the tooth prior to a surgical appointment. Flap surgery was performed with EDTA conditioning of the root prior to device implantation. There were no statistically significant differences in patient demographics and baseline characteristics among the 4 treatment groups. When a composite outcome of gain in clinical attachment of 1.5 mm was used with a linear bone growth of 2.5 mm, a dose response pattern detected a plateau in the 0.3% and 0.4% rh-FGF-2/β-TCP groups with significant improvements over control and 0.1% rh-FGF-2/β-TCP groups. The success rate at 6 mo was 71% in the 2 higher-concentration groups, as compared with 45% in the control and lowest treatment groups. Percentage bone fill in the 2 higher-concentration groups was 75% and 71%, compared with 63% and 61% in the control and lowest treatment group. No increases in specific antibody to rh-FGF-2 were detected, and no serious adverse events related to the products were reported. The results from this multicenter trial demonstrated that the treatment of infrabony vertical periodontal defects can be enhanced with the addition of rh-FGF-2/β-TCP (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01728844). © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2016.

  13. Regenerative periodontal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägi, Tobias T; Laugisch, Oliver; Ivanovic, Aleksandar; Sculean, Anton

    2014-03-01

    The goal of regenerative periodontal therapy is to completely restore the tooth's supporting apparatus that has been lost due to inflammatory periodontal disease or injury. It is characterized by formation of new cementum with inserting collagen fibers, new periodontal ligament, and new alveolar bone. Indeed conventional, nonsurgical, and surgical periodontal therapy usually result in clinical improvements evidenced by probing depth reduction and clinical attachment gain, but the healing occurs predominantly through formation of a long junctional epithelium and no or only unpredictable periodontal regeneration. Therefore, there is an ongoing search for new materials and improved surgical techniques, with the aim of predictably promoting periodontal wound healing/regeneration and improving the clinical outcome. This article attempts to provide the clinician with an overview of the most important biologic events involved in periodontal wound healing/ regeneration and on the criteria on how to select the appropriate regenerative material and surgical technique in order to optimize the clinical outcomes.

  14. Effect of rotary electric toothbrush versus manual toothbrush on periodontal status during orthodontic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, R L; Murray, P; Robertson, P B

    1989-10-01

    Adolescents with fixed orthodontic appliances frequently have increased levels of plaque accumulation and gingivitis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a rotary electric toothbrush would be more effective than conventional toothbrushing in maintaining periodontal health in these patients. Forty adolescent patients were divided into equal groups matched for sex and age. Before and during placement of orthodontic appliances, one group was instructed in use of the rotary electric toothbrush and the other in the use of a conventional toothbrush; these instructions were reinforced at monthly visits thereafter. Baseline clinical assessments of Plaque Index, Gingival Index, and bleeding tendency were made on six standard teeth before appliances were placed. assessments were repeated at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 18 months after appliances were placed. Intragroup and intergroup differences were tested by a two-way analysis of variance. At baseline there were no significant differences between the two groups for any study variable. During the 18-month study period, however, plaque accumulation and gingivitis increased significantly over baseline levels in the control group (p less than 0.01) but remained stable in the group using the rotary electric toothbrush. In addition, the control group showed significantly greater plaque (p less than 0.01), gingival inflammation (p less than 0.001), and gingival bleeding on probing (p less than 0.001) than did the treatment group from the 1- to 18-month examinations. These data suggest that the rotary electric toothbrush is more effective than conventional toothbrushes for removing plaque and controlling gingivitis in adolescents during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances.

  15. An ignored cause of inflammation in patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis: periodontal problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocyigit, Ismail; Yucel, Hasan Esat; Cakmak, Omer; Dogruel, Fatma; Durukan, Dürdane Banu; Korkar, Hafsa; Unal, Aydin; Sipahioglu, Murat Hayri; Oymak, Oktay; Gurgan, Cem A; Tokgoz, Bulent

    2014-10-01

    We aimed to assess whether there is a significant relation between periodontal health status and inflammation in uremic patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) and also to reveal the efficiency of periodontal treatment in patients with various degrees of periodontal problems. Overall, 68 patients undergoing CAPD were included in the study. Clinical indices and measurements were obtained at baseline and panoramic radiographies were used for the diagnosis. According to the baseline values, patients were stratified into four groups according to the severity of periodontal problems as follows: healthy/gingivitis, slight-to-moderate, and severe periodontitis. A control examination was performed 3 months after the periodontal treatment for only 43 patients. Clinical and laboratory parameters before and after treatment were compared. The frequency of periodontal disease was found to be high in uremic patients on CAPD. The frequency and severity of periodontitis was also found to be significantly (p periodontitis rate was found to be higher in patients with cardiovascular disease (p diabetes mellitus (p periodontal examination should be a routine part of management of the uremic patients on CAPD because periodontal disease could be one of the hidden sources of unexplained inflammatory status.

  16. [Diabetes mellitus and periodontitis. Bidirectional relationship and clinical implications. A consensus document].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschner, J; Haak, T; Jepsen, S; Kocher, T; Mehnert, H; Meyle, J; Schumm-Draeger, P-M; Tschöpe, D

    2011-04-01

    Diabetes and periodontitis are chronic diseases with an increasing prevalence in the German population. There is a bi-directional relationship between both diseases. Diabetes promotes the occurrence, the progression and the severity of periodontitis. Periodontitis complicates the glycemic control of diabetes, increases the risk of diabetes-associated complications and possibly even of its onset. In view of the existing evidence, that is still not sufficiently communicated within the medical community, an expert panel consisting of four diabetologists and four periodontists has addressed the following questions: What is the effect of diabetes mellitus on periodontitis and on periodontal therapy? What is the effect of periodontitis on diabetes mellitus? What are the practical consequences, that result for interdisciplinary treatment strategies? The treatment of periodontal infections should become an integral part of the management of diabetes, whereas glycemic control is a prerequisite for successful periodontal therapy.

  17. Further evidence for periodontal disease as a risk indicator for adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turton, Mervyn; Africa, Charlene W J

    2017-06-01

    Although there is increasing evidence to suggest an association between periodontal disease and adverse pregnancy outcomes, the issue remains controversial. This study tested the hypothesis that periodontal disease is a risk indicator for preterm delivery of low-birthweight infants. The study sample comprised 443 pregnant women with a mean (± standard deviation) age of 24.13 (±5.30) years. At first visit, maternal oral health status was assessed by the measurement of probing pocket depth and clinical attachment loss, and periodontal status was graded as absent, mild, moderate or severe. An association was sought between pregnancy outcomes and maternal periodontal status. While controlling for other factors, significant associations were found between pregnancy outcomes and maternal periodontal index scores. This study provides further evidence that periodontal disease is a risk indicator for adverse pregnancy outcomes. © 2016 FDI World Dental Federation.

  18. Clinical evaluation of periodontal health during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hănțoiu T.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Fixed orthodontic appliances make daily application of oral hygiene standard procedures more difficult and in time may lead to accumulation of oral biofilms and development of gingivitis and hyperplasia. The aim of the study is to evaluate the periodontal health expressed by clinical indices in patients under orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances, according to different oral hygene maintenance programs. Material and method: We performed a randomized prospective study on 60 patients with fixed orthodontic appliances (17-25 years of age devided in three study groups. The clnical indices recorded were: modified gingival index, plaque index and sulcular bleeding index. Statistical analysis or the results were carried out using Student t test. Results: The patients were randomly divided into three groups: group A-patients were instructed to use electric brush, water flosser and interdental brush, group B- electric brush, interdental brush and fluoride and group C- manual brushing and fluoride. Statistical comparison of the values of the indexes with the Student t test for independent samples showed statistically significant differences in all three groups of patients studied between initial and final values of all recorded clinical parameters. Conclusions: Fixed orthodontics do not induce periodontal disease if basic principles of oral hygiene are followed in compliant patients, which are correctly instructed to deal with real challenge, represented by complete elimination of debris and bacterial accumulation.

  19. Vitamin D Status and Tooth Loss in Postmenopausal Females: The Buffalo Osteoporosis and Periodontal Disease (OsteoPerio) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlesen, Sonja; Mai, Xiaodan; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; LaMonte, Michael J; Hovey, Kathy M; Genco, Robert J; Millen, Amy E

    2016-08-01

    Vitamin D is hypothesized to reduce risk for tooth loss via its influence on bone health, inflammation, and the immune response. The association between plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations and prevalence and 5-year incidence of tooth loss in a cohort of postmenopausal females was examined. Participants underwent oral examinations at study baseline (1997 to 2000) and follow-up (2002 to 2005) to determine the number of missing teeth and 5-year incidence of tooth loss, respectively. At both visits, females self-reported reasons for each missing tooth. At baseline, 152 females reported no history of tooth loss, and 628 were categorized as reporting a history of tooth loss as a result of periodontal disease (n = 70) or caries (n = 558) (total n = 780). At follow-up, 96, 376, 48, and 328 females were categorized into the aforementioned categories related to tooth loss (total n = 472). Logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for tooth loss by category of baseline 25(OH)D (nmol/L) concentrations. Models were adjusted for age, income, smoking status, frequency of dental visits, waist circumference, and recreational physical activity. P value for trend was estimated using continuous concentrations of 25(OH)D. Among females with 25(OH)D ≥50 (adequate vitamin D status) compared to periodontal disease or caries and 1.07 (95% CI = 0.62 to 1.85), P-trend = 0.11 for the incidence of tooth loss resulting from periodontal disease or caries. No statistically significant association was observed between 25(OH)D and the history or incidence of tooth loss caused by periodontal disease. An increased odds of the history of tooth loss attributable to caries was observed with increasing concentrations of 25(OH)D (P-trend = <0.05) but was not confirmed in prospective analyses. In this cohort of postmenopausal females, the data do not support an association between vitamin D status and tooth loss.

  20. Relationship between alexithymia and chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezer, U; Üstün, K; Şenyurt, S Z; Altınbaş, K; Erciyas, K

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential relationship between alexithymia and chronic periodontitis. A case-control study of 222 male and female subjects aged 21-63 years was conducted. The participants were divided into a chronic periodontitis group (n = 114) and a control group (n = 108) with no history of periodontitis. The Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) was used to evaluate alexithymia status of the subjects. Clinical data were collected on parameters such as the plaque index, bleeding on probing, probing depth, and the clinical attachment level (CAL). Socioeconomic data on the patients were also recorded. Chronic periodontitis group showed higher frequency in alexithymic patients as compared to control group. The proportion of high dental anxiety did not differ between the groups. The total TAS-20 score was statistically significantly higher in male subjects than in female subjects (P psychometric measures and the periodontal parameters revealed positive correlations with the severity of periodontal disease/CAL and the total TAS-20 score (P periodontitis. Further research is needed to identify the underlying mechanism.

  1. Chlorhexidine Chip in the Treatment of Chronic Periodontitis – A Clinical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medaiah, Sangeetha; Srinivas, M; Melath, Anil; Girish, Suragimath; Dasari, Ankineedu Babu

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to clinically evaluate the use of biodegradable chlorhexidine chip when used as an adjunct to scaling and root planing (SRP) in the treatment of moderate to severe periodontitis patients. The study also intended to compare the combined therapy (SRP and Chlorhexidine chip) with chlorhexidine chip alone in individuals with periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients with three sites having a probing depth of 5-8mm were considered for the study. Sites were numbered 1, 2, 3 randomly. The clinical parameters assessed were the Plaque Index (PI), gingival index (GI), Bleeding on probing (BOP), Clinical attachment level (CAL) and Probing pocket depth (PPD). Following baseline evaluation, on two sites scaling and root planing (SRP) was performed, no treatment was carried out in the third site. Chlorhexidine chips were placed on one site with SRP and another without SRP. A periodontal pack was placed on the site to prevent dislodgement of the CHX chip. Clinical parameters were recorded at baseline, one month and three months. Duration of the study was for three months. Statistical Analysis: T-test and Analysis of variance (ANOVA) has been carried out in the present study. Results: All three groups presented with an improvement in the clinical parameters compared to baseline. There was no statistically significant difference between the SRP and SRP + CHIP group in all parameters. There was a significant difference when these two groups were compared to the chip alone group. The mean reductions in PPD were 2.8mm (SRP group), 2.6 (SRP+CHIP group), 0.8 (chip alone group) The mean gain in CAL were 2.8mm (SRP group), 2.5 (SRP+CHIP group), 0.7 (chip alone group). Reduction in bleeding on probing were significant for the SRP and SRP +CHIP group but not for the chip alone group. Conclusion: The CHX chip did not provide any clinical benefit beyond that achieved with conventional scaling and rootplaning after a three month period. PMID:25121059

  2. Antibiotics in periodontal surgeries: A prospective randomised cross over clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal Oswal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: (1 To evaluate the need of antibiotics in periodontal surgeries in reducing postsurgical infections and explore if antibiotics have any key role in reducing or eliminating inflammatory complications. (2 To establish the incidence of postoperative infections in relation to type of surgery and determine those factors, which may affect infection rates. Materials and Methods: A prospective randomized double-blind cross over clinical study was carried out for a period of 1-year with predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. All the patients included in the study for any periodontal surgery were randomly divided into three categories: Group A (prophylactic, Group B (therapeutic, and Group C (no antibiotics. Patients were followed up for 1-week after surgery on the day of suture removal and were evaluated for pain, swelling, fever, infection, delayed wound healing and any other significant findings. Appropriate statistical analysis was carried out to evaluate the objectives and P < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: No infection was reported in any of 90 sites. Patients reported less pain and postoperative discomfort when prophylactic antibiotics were given. However, there were no statistical significant differences between the three groups. Summary and Conclusion: There was no postoperative infection reported in all the 90 sites operated in this study. The prevalence of postoperative infections following periodontal surgery is <1% and this low risk does not justify the routine use of systemic antimicrobials just to prevent infections. Use of prophylactic antibiotics may have role in prevention of inflammatory complication, but again not infection.

  3. Correlations between clinical parameters in implant maintenance patients: analysis among healthy and history-of-periodontitis groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Keisuke; Nakabayashi, Shinya; Tanabe, Naoki; Kamimoto, Atsushi; Hagiwara, Yoshiyuki

    2017-10-30

    The pathophysiology and pathology of peri-implantitis remain unclear; however, its similarity to periodontitis has been described. The evaluation of peri-implant tissue and the diagnostic criteria of peri-implant disease are not currently standardized as they are for periodontitis. In this study, we evaluated clinical parameters during the implant maintenance period to determine significant correlations between these parameters. We examined 55 implant patients at the time of maintenance visits between April and September 2016 and classified patients into a healthy group (H) and a history-of-periodontitis group (HP). For each implant, we evaluated the modified plaque index, probing pocket depth, and bleeding on probing as clinical parameters. Statistical analyses were performed with Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. A total of 130 implants were assessed. The mean time since implant placement was 6 years and 6 months. The prevalence of implant-based peri-implantitis was 10.8% of all the implants. All cases of implant-based peri-implantitis came from the HP group, and many were present in patients with a history of severe periodontitis. The probing pocket depth around the implant was significantly greater in the HP group than in the H group. We found weak positive correlations between the probing pocket depth and bleeding on probing (r s  = 0.401, p implant disease during the maintenance period among healthy and history-of-periodontitis groups.

  4. Association between salivary sialic acid and periodontal health status among smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jwan Ibrahim Jawzali

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion: Salivary free sialic acid may be used as a diagnostic oxidative stress biomarker for periodontal diseases among young current smokers. Cumulative destructive effect of long duration of smoking on the periodontum can be controlled by smoking cessation, good oral hygiene and diet habit in early old ages.

  5. Is the periodontal status a risk factor for the development of psoriasis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and Objectives: Psoriasis is a common, chronic, inflammatory, and hyperproliperative skin disease. It has been known that the infectious agents play a role in triggering and exacerbation of the disease. Periodontal diseases are chronic inflammatory gum diseases initiated by microorganisms in dental plaques.

  6. Respuesta al tratamiento periodontal de diabéticos tipo 2 con mal control metabólico y obesos intolerantes a la glucosa, con periodontitis severa Impact of the periodontal therapy in both clinical and metabolic parameters in type 2 diabetic and prediabetic obese patients with severe periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Pavez Correa

    2011-08-01

    chronic complications and possibly, death by diabetes. It is recognized that both diseases are related because the inflammation factors generated by the periodontitis as well as the oral cavity bacteria in the systemic circulation, may act as aggravating factor for insulin resistance and worsen the glycemic control. It is clear that an opportune treatment of PD would improve the quality of life and the metabolic control of diabetic patients. The objectives of the current paper are to evaluate the impact of the periodontal therapy in both clinical and metabolic parameters in type 2 diabetic and prediabetic obese patients and to demonstrate that uncontrolled diabetics can be treated successfully, without increasing their medical risk. Nine DM2 and 7 glucose intolerant obese patients were selected. All of them suffering severe chronic periodontitis. All patients were treated following a protocol designed by us and medical indications were not modified. The DM2 patients showed approximately a 1% decrease in HbA1C after 6 months of the periodontal treatment. No complication was observed and no patient needed major medical assistance. The response to the periodontal treatment was similar in both groups, with a significant improvement in clinical parameters. Although the decrease in HbA1C was not statistically significant, our results are very promising at the clinical setting.

  7. Short-term clinical outcomes of laser supported periodontal treatment concept using Er,Cr:YSGG (2780nm) and diode (940 nm): a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odor, Alin A.; Violant, Deborah; Badea, Victoria; Gutknecht, Norbert

    2016-03-01

    Backgrounds: Er,Cr:YSGG (2780nm) and diode (940 nm) lasers can be used adjacent to the conventional periodontal treatment as minimally invasive non-surgical devices. Aim: To describe the short-term clinical outcomes by combining Er,Cr:YSGG (2780nm) and diode 940 nm lasers in non-surgical periodontal treatment. Materials and methods: A total of 10 patients with periodontal disease (mild, moderate, severe) - 233 teeth and 677 periodontal pockets ranging from 4 mm to 12 mm - were treated with Er,Cr:YSGG (2780nm) and diode (940 nm) lasers in adjunct to manual and piezoelectric scaling and root planning (SRP). Periodontal parameters such as mean probing depth (PD), mean clinical attachment level (CAL) and mean bleeding on probing (BOP) were evaluated at baseline and 6 months after the laser treatment using an electronic periodontal chart. Results: At baseline, the mean PD was 4.06 ± 1.06 mm, mean CAL was 4.56 ± 1.43 mm, and mean BOP was 43.8 ± 23.84 %. At 6 months after the laser supported periodontal treatments the mean PD was 2.6 ± 0.58 mm (p periodontal clinical parameters such as PD, CAL and BOP. Keywords: Laser supported periodontal treatment concept, Er,Cr:YSGG and diode 940nm lasers, Scaling and root planning, Minimally invasive non-surgical device

  8. Predictive power of the severity measure of attachment loss for periodontal care need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Honghu; Marcus, Marvin; Maida, Carl A; Wang, Yan; Shen, Jie; Spolsky, Vladimir W

    2013-10-01

    The prevalence of periodontal diseases is high, and >15% of adults have severe gum disease. Clinical attachment loss (AL) is one of the most important measures for periodontal disease severity. With AL, one could measure the worst scenario, the average, or the cumulative sum of AL among all teeth. The objective of this study is to evaluate which of the 15 measures of periodontal problems (e.g., maximum, mean, and cumulative AL) best predict the need for periodontal treatment. Using detailed periodontal data obtained through clinical examination from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999 to 2002, weighted logistic regression was used to model the periodontal treatment need of 15 different periodontal disease measures. The outcome measure is the clinically determined periodontal need. After adjustment for the covariates of age, sex, ethnicity, education, smoking status, and diabetes, the three most predictive measures were identified as: 1) the sum of the maximum mid-buccal (B) and mesio-buccal (MB) measures, which reflects the worst case of both B and MB measures; 2) the sum of the maximum MB measure or the worst case of the MB measure; and 3) the sum of all B and MB measures, or the cumulative AL measures. Cumulative periodontal morbidity, particularly the worst case of B and MB measures, has the strongest impact on the need for periodontal care. All the demographic variables and covariates follow the classic pattern of association with periodontal disease.

  9. Clinical and biochemical effects of dark chocolate in moderate chronic periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshanak Roodgaryan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Antioxidant agents such as cocoa could have some benefits in treatment of inflammation including periodontitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of cocoa consumption on moderate chronic periodontitis. Materials &Methods: This single-blind randomized clinical trial study was performed on 40 subjects who were randomly divided into two groups. Treatment group received 30 gr dark chocolate (78% cocoa and control group received 22.5 gr white chocolate three times a day for 4 weeks. Saliva samples were collected from patients at baseline and t wenty-eight days after eating chocolate. Probing pocket depth (PPD, Gingival index (GI, Silness and Loe, Modified papillary bleeding index (MPBI, Barnett, Clinical attachment loss (CAL were recorded at baseline and 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th weeks later in ramfjord teeth. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC and lipid peroxidation of saliva were estimated by Ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP and Tiuborbituric acid reactive substances ( TBARS methods. Data of clinical parameters were analyzed using t-test and repeated measures test. Biochemical parameters were analyzed using t-test. Results: Intra-group comparison of clinical parameters demonstrated significant decrease in both groups (p<0.0001 and inter-group comparison showed significant decrease of MPBI in treatment group, (p<0.03. MPBI and GI were significantly decreased in treatment group compared to the control in the weeks of 4th, 6th and 8th, according t-test ( GI4, P=0.008-GI6, P=0.008-GI8, P=0.009, (MPBI4, MPBI6, MPBI8, P<0.0001. Treatment group showed the increase in FRAP, (p<0.00001 and decrease in TBARS, ( P<0.015 which were statically significant in compare with control group. Conclusion: Consuming dark chocolate could increase TAC and decrease lipid peroxidation, gingival bleeding and inflammation.

  10. Clinical and microbiological effects of mechanical instrumentation and local antimicrobials during periodontal supportive therapy in aggressive periodontitis patients: smoker versus non-smoker patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarnelli, Maria Elena; Farina, Roberto; Cucchi, Alessandro; Trombelli, Leonardo

    2010-11-01

    To compare the clinical and microbiological effects of ultrasonic mechanical instrumentation (UMI) associated to home-care use of amine fluoride/stannous fluoride (AmF/SnF(2) )-containing mouthrinse and toothpaste in smoker and non-smoker patients affected by generalized aggressive periodontitis (G-AgP) during a recall session of supportive periodontal therapy (SPT). Thirteen smokers and 25 non-smokers G-AgP patients enrolled in an SPT programme received a single session of UMI associated with home-care use of AmF/SnF(2) -containing mouthrinse and toothpaste. Clinical and microbiological parameters were assessed pre-treatment, at 6 and 12 weeks post-treatment. In both groups, UMI plus AmF/SnF(2) -implemented oral hygiene use determined a significant decrease of total bacterial counts, with non-smokers exhibiting a lower count compared with smokers at 12 weeks. No significant differences were observed between smokers and non-smokers in the counts of total pathogens and red complex species at each observation interval. Clinically, a significant reduction of supragingival plaque, gingival inflammation and probing pocket depth was similarly observed in both groups. A combined mechanical/chemical plaque control approach based on UMI and the use of AmF/SnF(2) agents resulted in the reduction of supragingival plaque deposits, gingival inflammation and subgingival periodontal pathogens in G-AgP patients during SPT, with no substantial difference between smokers and non-smokers. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. The clinical and metabolic effects of subgingival application of xanthan-based chlorhexidine gel in Type 2 diabetic patients with chronic periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faramarzi, Masoumeh; Shirmohammadi, Adileh; Chitsazi, Mohammadtaghi; Shamami, Mehrnoosh Sadighi; Ghanitab, Sahand

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is a two-way relationship between periodontal disease and diabetes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and metabolic effects of a xanthan-based chlorhexidine (CHX) gel used as an adjunct to nonsurgical periodontal therapy in Type II diabetic patients with chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Sixty-eight diabetic patients with moderate to advanced periodontitis and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) ≥6% were selected. The test group (n = 34) received scaling and root planning (SRP) plus xanthan-based CHX gel. The control group (n = 34) received single SRP. Fasting blood sugar (FBS) and HbA1c tests were done at the baseline and after 3 and 6 months. Data from the study were analyzed using descriptive statistics (mean ± standard deviation and frequency), ANOVA test by SPSS.15 software (SPSS Inc. Chicago, IL, USA). P periodontal treatment in diabetic patients with periodontitis. PMID:29109743

  12. Serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D are associated with periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laky, Markus; Bertl, Kristina; Haririan, Hady; Andrukhov, Oleh; Seemann, Rudolf; Volf, Ivo; Assinger, Alice; Gruber, Reinhard; Moritz, Andreas; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui

    2017-06-01

    Vitamin D plays an essential role in bone metabolism as well as in immunity. Hence, it might affect the development and extent of periodontal disease. The aim of this study was the assessment of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) status in periodontal disease. Twenty-nine patients with severe periodontal disease and 29 healthy volunteers were recruited in this case-control-study. Serum 25(OH)D levels, Periodontal Probing Depth (PPD), Clinical Attachment Level (CAL), Bleeding on Probing (BOP), Body Mass Index (BMI), and current smoking status and smoking history (packyears) were assessed in all participants. Serum 25(OH)D levels were compared between controls and cases. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine the odds ratio (OR) and 95 % confidence interval (CI) for periodontal disease in 25(OH)D deficient probands. Patients with periodontal disease presented a significantly higher proportion of deficient 25(OH)D levels (i.e., periodontal disease with vitamin D deficiency was 1.5 (95 % CI, 1.13-1.98). No correlation between serum 25(OH)D levels and CAL, PPD, and BOP in the group with periodontal disease was found. In this case-control-study 25(OH)D deficiency is significantly associated with periodontal disease. The assessment of vitamin D levels in patients presenting with periodontal disease seems advisable, as vitamin D deficiency might be involved in the onset and progression of periodontal disease.

  13. A practical approach to the diagnosis and treatment of periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, D E

    2000-04-01

    Both nonsurgical and surgical periodontal therapies are important in the control of most forms of periodontal disease. Sometimes, nonsurgical therapy is adequate to control the disease in mild cases and to slow progression and maintain periodontal stability in more advanced cases. Other times, both therapies may be indicated to obtain satisfactory results. The author presents treatment guidelines and recommendations for periodontal therapy. The author searched the dental literature for information pertaining to periodontal therapy. The author found evidence-based data to support the effectiveness of nonsurgical and surgical periodontal therapy in controlling periodontal disease. Nonsurgical periodontal therapy requires time, effort, and good diagnostic and clinical skills to obtain satisfactory results. The results are determined by evaluating the patient's periodontal disease after active therapy, at which time additional surgical or nonsurgical treatment may be recommended. Evaluation should continue throughout the lifelong supportive phase of periodontal therapy. Clinicians should continue to develop and enhance their diagnostic skills, assess factors that affect diagnosis and prognosis, formulate a comprehensive treatment plan, render appropriate treatment, evaluate the outcome and determine when periodontal care is indicated. Failure to comply with monitoring the patient's periodontal status may lead to uncontrolled disease and eventually premature tooth loss. Premature tooth loss can be prevented through patient education and application of evidence-based nonsurgical and surgical therapy.

  14. Assessment of periodontal health status in postmenopausal women visiting dental hospital from in and around Meerut city: Cross-sectional observational study

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    D Deepa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Puberty, menses, pregnancy, and menopause are the different phases of a woman′s life which have a varied influence on oral health. During the menopause, women go through biological and endocrine changes, particularly in their sex steroid hormone production which affects their health. Because the oral mucosa contains estrogen receptors, variations in hormone levels can be seen directly in the oral cavity leading to a few oral conditions and diseases seen more frequently during postmenopausal years. Objective: The objective of this study is to assess periodontal health status in postmenopausal women in and around Meerut city. Materials and Methods: The study sample comprised ninety postmenopausal women. History of menopause was recorded, and the dental examinations were done by measuring the following parameters of periodontal health: plaque index (PI, gingival index (GI, bleeding on probing (BOP, pocket probing depth, and Russell′s periodontal index. The collected data were subjected to statistical analyses. Results and Conclusion: In the study group, mean age was 55 years, mean missing teeth were 10.3, mean duration of menopause was 9.23. Eleven percent females were completely edentulous, and 5 females had never brushed. Mean PI-s was 1.99, mean GI-s was 1.74, mean BOP was 52.85, and mean Russell′s periodontal index was 4.34. Eleven patients were at the initial stages of destructive periodontal disease, 34 had established destructive periodontal disease while thirty patients had the terminal periodontal disease. These findings suggest that females after menopause are at a risk of developing destructive periodontal disease if proper oral hygiene practices are not followed.

  15. Periodontal condition in patients of the specialist Outpatient Clinics at the Institute of Rural Health in Lublin, Poland

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    Agnieszka Pawłowicz

    2018-03-01

    Patients of specialist clinics of the Institute of Rural Health who formed the analyzed group, had affected periodontium which required comprehensive periodontal treatment. The alarmingly high percentage of people over 55 years of age with advanced periodontopathy may translate into an increased risk of cause-and-effect incidence of systemic diseases.

  16. Factors associated with the clinical response to nonsurgical periodontal therapy in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalowicz, Bryan S; Hyman, Leslie; Hou, Wei; Oates, Thomas W; Reddy, Michael; Paquette, David W; Katancik, James A; Engebretson, Steven P

    2014-12-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a growing health problem worldwide. People with T2DM are at risk of experiencing periodontitis and likely require treatment. Using data from the national multicenter Diabetes and Periodontal Therapy Trial (DPTT), the authors assessed patient-based characteristics associated with the clinical response to nonsurgical therapy. The DPTT investigators randomly assigned adults with T2DM (hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c] ≥ 7 percent and periodontitis to receive immediate or delayed therapy (scaling and root planing, oral hygiene instruction, chlorhexidine rinse). The investigators assessed probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), bleeding on probing (BOP), and medical conditions at baseline, three months and six months. Six-month changes in mean PD, CAL and BOP defined the treatment response. Complete data were available for 473 of 514 DPTT participants. The authors used multiple regression models to evaluate participant-level factors associated with the response. More severe baseline PD, CAL and BOP were associated with greater improvements in these same measurements (P 30 kilograms per square meter) experienced greater reductions in PD and BOP than did participants who were not obese (P diabetes duration, and smoking were not associated with change in any outcome (P > .1). In patients with T2DM, baseline disease severity was associated with the clinical response to nonsurgical periodontal therapy. Body mass index and Hispanic ethnicity-but not glycemic control, diabetes duration or smoking-also may be useful in predicting clinical changes in this population.

  17. Severe periodontitis and higher cirrhosis mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladegaard Grønkjær, Lea; Holmstrup, Palle; Schou, Søren

    2018-01-01

    Background Periodontitis and edentulism are prevalent in patients with cirrhosis, but their clinical significance is largely unknown. Objective The objective of this article is to determine the association of severe periodontitis and edentulism with mortality in patients with cirrhosis. Methods...... A total of 184 cirrhosis patients underwent an oral examination. All-cause and cirrhosis-related mortality was recorded. The associations of periodontitis and edentulism with mortality were explored by Kaplan–Meier survival plots and Cox proportional hazards regression adjusted for age, gender, cirrhosis...... etiology, Child–Pugh score, Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score, smoker status, present alcohol use, comorbidity, and nutritional risk score. Results The total follow-up time was 74,197 days (203.14 years). At entry, 44% of the patients had severe periodontitis and 18% were edentulous. Forty...

  18. Impact of periodontal disease on the quality of life of diabetics based on different clinical diagnostic criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pinho, Aline Mendes Silva; Borges, Carolina Marques; de Abreu, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães; E Ferreira, Efigênia Ferreira; Vargas, Andréa Maria Duarte

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of periodontal disease on the quality of life of individuals with diabetes according to different clinical criteria (I-AAP, II-Beck, III-Machtei, IV-Lopez, V-Albandar, VI-Tonetti, and VII-CPI). This cross-sectional study sampled 300 individuals in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. The Oral Health Impact Profile was used to measure the impact of periodontal disease on quality of life. Prevalence of periodontal disease was 35.3%, 30.7%, 35.0%, 9.7%, 92.3%, 25.3%, and 75.3% using criteria I, II, III, IV, V, VI, and VII, respectively. The III-Machtei (P = 0.043) and IV-Lopez (P diabetics' quality of life.

  19. Clinical evaluation of an ionic tooth brush on oral hygiene status, gingival status, and microbial parameter

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    Deshmukh J

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available It has long been recognised that the presence of dental plaque leads to gingivitis and periodontal disease, as well as dental caries. Today tooth brushing is the most widely accepted method of removing plaque. Hence this present clinical study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of an ionic toothbrush on oral hygiene status. For this study, 20 dental students in the age group of 18-20 years were included. All the subjects after undergoing dental prophylaxis were then provided with ionic toothbrushes, either active (equipped with lithium battery or inactive (without lithium battery. Plaque index and gingival bleeding index were examined at 7th, 14th, and 21st day. Microbial assessment was done for detection of colony forming units (CFU from the plaque samples which were collected on 0 day and 21st day, both before brushing and after brushing. Results shown a significant reduction in all the parameters and the reduction was more significant in active and inactive ionic toothbrush users. It was concluded that both active and inactive ionic toothbrushes reduced the plaque index and gingival bleeding index scores significantly and active ionic tooth brushes were more effective as compared to inactive ionic toothbrushes. There was no soft tissue trauma following the use of both type of toothbrushes, which showed that ionic toothbrushes were equally safe for regular long-term use.

  20. Periodontal Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that number would be much lower. The fundamental role of the immune system in causing periodontal diseases was largely overlooked just a generation ago. Research has established that periodontal diseases arise ... role in causing periodontitis. Periodontal diseases are no longer ...

  1. Impact of mandibular third molar extraction in the second molar periodontal status: A prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo Eduardo Melo Stella; Saulo Gabriel Moreira Falci; Lorrayne Estéfane Oliveira de Medeiros; Dhelfeson Willya Douglas-de-Oliveira; Patricia Furtado Gonçalves; Olga Dumont Flecha; Cássio Roberto Rocha Dos Santos

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to assess the periodontal condition and sensitivity of second mandibular molars after the extraction of the adjacent third molar, while also assessing the quality of life of the patients. Materials and Methods: Twenty-three healthy patients were assessed in terms of probing depth, gingival height, gingival thickness, dental sensitivity, plaque index and bleeding on probing (adjacent second mandibular molar), before the surgical procedure, as well as 60 an...

  2. Assessing the effectiveness of systemic tinidazole as an adjunct to nonsurgical periodontal therapy in the treatment of chronic periodontitis in smokers: A randomized double-masked, placebo-controlled clinical trial

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    Farin Kiany

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this clinical trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of systemic tinidazole as an adjunct to nonsurgical periodontal therapy in the treatment of chronic periodontitis in smokers. Materials and Methods: Sixty smoker participants with history of moderate to severe generalized chronic periodontitis were selected. Gingival index (GI Leo and Silness, plaque index (PI O'Leary, bleeding index (BI Lenox, pocket depth (PD, recession, and clinical attachment level (CAL were measured at the baseline and 6 weeks after initial periodontal treatment. Thirty participants were randomly assigned to full-mouth scaling and root planning (SRP + placebo (control group and 30 participants were assigned to full-mouth SRP + tinidazole (test group. Results: Both test and control groups showed significant improvement in clinical parameters. Comparison of reduction in PI, GI, BI, PD, and CAL, between two groups, was statistically significant 6 weeks after baseline visit (P < 0.001. The improvements in clinical periodontal parameters were significantly more in test group. Conclusion: Smokers with chronic periodontitis benefited from adjunctive therapy, consisted of systemic tinidazole and SRP.

  3. Impact of mandibular third molar extraction in the second molar periodontal status: A prospective study

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    Paulo Eduardo Melo Stella

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the present study was to assess the periodontal condition and sensitivity of second mandibular molars after the extraction of the adjacent third molar, while also assessing the quality of life of the patients. Materials and Methods: Twenty-three healthy patients were assessed in terms of probing depth, gingival height, gingival thickness, dental sensitivity, plaque index and bleeding on probing (adjacent second mandibular molar, before the surgical procedure, as well as 60 and 180 days after the surgery. The following data were also recorded and measured: the position and size of the impacted teeth; the size of the alveoli after surgery and the quality of life of the patient. Results: Significant differences were found for probing depth and gingival height before and after 180 days. The plaque index increased significantly after surgery (P = 0.004, as did bleeding on probing. No significant difference was found for the quality of life. The size of the third molar extracted was correlated with bleeding on probing 180 days after the surgery. Conclusion: An improvement was noted in the periodontal condition of the second mandibular molars after the extraction, based on the assessments of probing depth and gingival height. The position of the third molar affected the periodontal condition of the second mandibular molar. No alterations were recorded for dental sensitivity or the quality of life after the extraction.

  4. Impact of mandibular third molar extraction in the second molar periodontal status: A prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Paulo Eduardo Melo; Falci, Saulo Gabriel Moreira; Oliveira de Medeiros, Lorrayne Estéfane; Douglas-de-Oliveira, Dhelfeson Willya; Gonçalves, Patricia Furtado; Flecha, Olga Dumont; Dos Santos, Cássio Roberto Rocha

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to assess the periodontal condition and sensitivity of second mandibular molars after the extraction of the adjacent third molar, while also assessing the quality of life of the patients. Materials and Methods: Twenty-three healthy patients were assessed in terms of probing depth, gingival height, gingival thickness, dental sensitivity, plaque index and bleeding on probing (adjacent second mandibular molar), before the surgical procedure, as well as 60 and 180 days after the surgery. The following data were also recorded and measured: the position and size of the impacted teeth; the size of the alveoli after surgery and the quality of life of the patient. Results: Significant differences were found for probing depth and gingival height before and after 180 days. The plaque index increased significantly after surgery (P = 0.004), as did bleeding on probing. No significant difference was found for the quality of life. The size of the third molar extracted was correlated with bleeding on probing 180 days after the surgery. Conclusion: An improvement was noted in the periodontal condition of the second mandibular molars after the extraction, based on the assessments of probing depth and gingival height. The position of the third molar affected the periodontal condition of the second mandibular molar. No alterations were recorded for dental sensitivity or the quality of life after the extraction. PMID:29456302

  5. Treatment of periodontal abcess with Class II furcation involvement

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    Nur Rahmah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of periodontal abscess with furcation involvement has its own challenges in achieving the success of periodontal treatment. Teeth with periodontal abscesses often indicate the presence of furcation involvement. Most periodontal abscess occurs in approximately 92.5% molar. Furcation involvement on tooth abscesses had a greater challenge to the success of periodontal therapy. A male patient aged 36 years came to the clinic with active periodontal disease. On examination, the teeth are sensitive to percussion and 2o mobility. There is 13 mm deep pockets around the roots of teeth. On radiographic examination, appears severe bone destruction in the root area and furcation. Oral hygiene status was fair. Patients had a history of systemic disease type II diabetes mellitus. The periodontal abscess with furcation involvement with systemic disease type II diabetes mellitus can be treated with open flap and debridement so it can achieve a better prognosis. Systemic disease do not become a hindrance in periodontal treatment as long as the disease is controlled. Prognosis of teeth with abscess depend on the nature and extent of bone loss. Chronic periodontal abscess has a slow progressive bone destruction.

  6. Assessment of the periodontal health status in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances and Invisalign system: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haili; Tang, Haifang; Zhou, Tian; Kang, Na

    2018-03-01

    At present, many scholars have studied the periodontal health status of patients undergoing orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances and invisalign. However, those results are inconsistent. Therefore, we conducted this meta-analysis, and then provide reference for clinical treatment. Most databases, such as the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, PubMed, Medline, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, CNKI, and Wan Fang Data were retrieved for related articles from the establishment of the database to October 2017. Meanwhile, we also searched the references of the related literatures manually, in order to increase the included literatures. Two researchers screened the related literatures according to the inclusion criteria and exclusion criteria. Stata 12.0 software was used for data analysis, and results are estimated by odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Finally, 7 articles, including 368 patients, were included into our meta-analysis. Meta-analysis results showed that there was no statistically significant difference of gingival index (GI) and sulcus probing depth (SPD) status between the invisalign group and the control group, including at 1, 3, and 6 months (all P > .05). When compared with the control group, the invisalign group presented a lower plaque index (PLI) and sulcus bleeding index (SBI) status at 1 month (OR = -0.53, 95% CI: -0.89 to -0.18; OR = -0.44, 95% CI: -0.70 to -0.19, respectively), 3 months (OR = -0.69, 95% CI: -1.12 to -0.27; OR = -0.49, 95% CI: -0.93 to -0.05, respectively), and 6 months (OR = -0.91, 95% CI: -1.47 to -0.35; OR = -0.40, 95% CI: -0.63 to -0.07, respectively). Subgroup analysis showed that the SPD status was lower in the invisalign group at 6 months when measured the teeth using Ramfjord index (OR = -0.74, 95% CI: -1.35 to -0.12). However, there was no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups when using other measure methods (OR = 0.12, 95% CI: -0.26 to 0.17). Our

  7. Gingival crevicular fluid interleukin-8 and lipoxin A4 levels of smokers and nonsmokers with different periodontal status: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lütfioğlu, M; Aydoğdu, A; Sakallioğlu, E E; Alaçam, H; Pamuk, F

    2016-08-01

    Smoking is an important risk factor for periodontal disease and effects the pathogenesis of the disease. This study evaluated the impact of smoking on gingival crevicular fluid interleukin-8 (IL-8) and lipoxin A4 (LxA4 ) levels in patients with and without periodontal disease. A total of 122 participants were grouped as follows: smokers with generalized aggressive periodontitis (S-GAgP, n = 15); smokers with chronic periodontitis (S-CP, n = 17); smokers with gingivitis (SG, n = 15); smokers classified as periodontally healthy (SH, n = 15); nonsmokers with generalized aggressive periodontitis (N-GAgP, n = 15); nonsmokers with chronic periodontitis (N-CP, n = 15); nonsmokers with gingivitis (NG, n = 15); and nonsmokers classified as periodontally healthy (NH, n = 15). Gingival index, plaque index, probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level were recorded. Gingival crevicular fluid IL-8 and LxA4 levels were analyzed by ELISA. Gingival crevicular fluid IL-8 levels varied among groups, as follows: S-GAgP>S-CP>SG>SH and N-GAgP>N-CP>NG>NH. The gingival crevicular fluid IL-8 levels were significantly higher in the S-GAgP group compared with the N-GAgP group and in the S-CP group compared with the N-CP group (p 0.05). Gingival crevicular fluid LxA4 levels also varied among groups, but in an inverse direction when compared with the IL-8 levels, as follows: S-GAgP 0.05). The study findings suggest that the observed increases in gingival crevicular fluid IL-8 levels and decreases in gingival crevicular fluid LxA4 levels reflect changes in immune and inflammatory responses that occur as a result of smoking. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Immediate implants and immediate loading in periodontally compromised patients-a 3-year prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Celia Coutinho; Correia, Andre Ricardo; Neves, Manuel

    2010-10-01

    To avoid the necessity of a removable provisional prosthesis, and therefore preserve the patient's functional outcome, esthetics, and quality of life, a clinical protocol was developed to approach periodontally compromised patients presenting a full-arch irreversibly lost dentition: full-arch extraction and immediate replacement with a provisional acrylic resin implant-supported fixed partial denture (FPD). A total of 23 periodontally compromised patients (11 women, 12 men; 4 smokers, 4 controlled diabetics) were included in this study. Pretreatment casts were taken and vertical dimension of occlusion was determined. In most patients, 6 Straumann implants were distributed along the arch according to the surgical guide or bone availability, with the most distal ones in the maxilla slightly tilted so they could emerge more distally. A total of 168 implants (146 Straumann, 10 Nobel Biocare, 8 Biomet 3i, and 4 Lifecore) were placed (83 in the maxilla, 85 in the mandible). Of those in the maxilla, 74 were loaded immediately (implant stability quotient mentor [ISQm] > 70) and 9 placed with delayed loading (ISQm =/ 70). If an FPD had not been fabricated already, impressions were taken during surgery to do so. The prosthesis was then adapted (cemented or screwed) to the 6 implants within the first 48 hours postsurgery. After 2 months, definitive impressions were taken, and a definitive porcelain-fused-to-metal implant-supported 12-element FPD was fabricated and cemented or screwed to all 6 implants. Of the 168 implants, 108 were immediate implants and 159 immediately loaded. Only 2 implants (1 in the mandible, 1 in the maxilla) did not osseointegrate. This yields a 3-year cumulative survival rate of 98.74% (98.65% in the maxilla, 98.82% in the mandible). From a total of 26 immediately loaded prostheses (12 in the maxilla, 14 in the mandible), 6 were cemented and 20 screw-retained. The 3-year cumulative survival rate was 100%. Immediate loading in mandibular and maxillary

  9. The effects of non-surgical periodontal treatment on glycemic control, oxidative stress balance and quality of life in patients with type 2 diabetes: A randomized clinical trial.

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    Hirofumi Mizuno

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of non-surgical periodontal treatment on hemoglobinA1c (HbA1c levels, oxidative stress balance and quality of life (QOL in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM compared to no periodontal treatment (simple oral hygiene instructions only.The design was a 6-month, single-masked, single center, randomized clinical trial. Patients had both T2DM and chronic periodontitis. Forty participants were enrolled between April 2014 and March 2016 at the Nephrology, Diabetology and Endocrinology Department of Okayama University Hospital. The periodontal treatment group (n = 20 received non-surgical periodontal therapy, including scaling and root planing plus oral hygiene instructions, and consecutive supportive periodontal therapy at 3 and 6 months. The control group (n = 17 received only oral hygiene instructions without treatment during the experimental period. The primary study outcome was the change in HbA1c levels from baseline to 3 months. Secondary outcomes included changes in oxidative stress balance (Oxidative-INDEX, the Diabetes Therapy-Related QOL and clinical periodontal parameters from baseline to 3 months and baseline to 6 months.Changes in HbA1c in the periodontal treatment group were not significantly different with those in the control group at 3 and 6 months. Systemic oxidative stress balance and QOL significantly improved in the periodontal treatment group compared to the control group at 3 months. In the subgroup analysis (moderately poor control of diabetes, the decrease in HbA1c levels in the periodontal treatment group was greater than that in the control group at 3 months but not significant.In T2DM patients, non-surgical periodontal treatment improved systemic oxidative stress balance and QOL, but did not decrease HbA1c levels at 3 months follow-up.Current Controlled Trials UMIN-ICDR UMIN 000013278 (Registered April 1, 2014.

  10. Periodontal diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinane, D F

    2000-10-01

    Periodontitis affects a subset of the population and our current thinking is that progression of periodontal disease may be either continuous or cyclical (burst hypothesis). These features make screening and diagnostic tools desirable in the management of this disease. Although many potential markers exist, several difficulties hamper our ability to declare them diagnostic tests with proven utility. The 'gold standard' for active periodontal disease is not available and inflammation due to gingivally confined lesions (gingivitis) and periodontal inflammation which results in attachment loss is a potential confounder of any test based on assessing the host response elements of the disease. The current absence of proof for the progression of periodontal disease i.e., whether or not the burst hypothesis is correct, is a further problem. Although much is written about the need for markers of current or future disease which will prevent us from overtreating pockets, the time, effort and cost involved in testing these sites has to be balanced against the relative ease and speed of routine therapy such as root planing. In addition, we are still some way from the development and validation of reliable host or microbial testing methods. In terms of screening tests for diseases such as the early-onset forms of periodontitis, the research and development on diagnostic tools involving genetic polymorphisms, specific genes, systemic antibodies or leucocyte cell surface markers of the patients, may become a clinical reality in time. One could envisage chairside tests using blood from thumb pricks being capable of determining a young individual's risk of developing disease at a later age, and thus the need for a timely prevention programme. Before applying any test we should reconsider what treatment planning effects a positive or negative result will have, and any test which does not influence the treatment plan is redundant. Whether periodontal diagnostic tests will be

  11. Randomized, controlled clinical study to evaluate efficacy of novel indigenously designed controlled release flurbiprofen gel system for management of periodontal diseases

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    Neeraj C Deshpande

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This randomized, controlled clinical study was planned to evaluate the use of anti-inflammatory drug flurbiprofen in the form of locally delivered controlled release gel in the treatment of periodontal disease. Materials and Methods: The flurbiprofen gel was indigenously prepared in the concentration of 0.3%. The 30 patients with localized periodontal pockets measuring ≥5 mm were randomly divided into three groups. The groups received flurbiprofen gel, flurbiprofen gel after prophylaxis, and placebo gel after oral prophylaxis, respectively. The clinical parameters for plaque and gingival inflammation were evaluated at baseline, 7 th day, and 14 th day. Results: The results of the study suggested the statistically significant ( P < 0.05 improvement in the gingival status of the patients with the use of flurbiprofen gel as an adjunct to scaling and root planing as compared to oral prophylaxis or gel alone. Conclusion: The data demonstrated that the additional use of local drug delivery of flurbiprofen through gel media enhances the positive effects of scaling and root planing and helps in faster resolution of the inflammation.

  12. Bone Density and Clinical Periodontal Attachment in Postmenopausal Women: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penoni, D C; Fidalgo, T K S; Torres, S R; Varela, V M; Masterson, D; Leão, A T T; Maia, L C

    2017-03-01

    Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disease characterized by low bone mineral density (BMD) and has been considered a risk factor for periodontal disease. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to verify the scientific evidence for the association of periodontal attachment loss with low BMD in postmenopausal women. A systematic search of the literature was performed in databases until August 2016, in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines. Eligibility criteria included studies that compared clinical attachment loss (CAL) between postmenopausal women with low and normal BMD. Studies using similar methodology, with lower and higher risk of bias, were pooled into 3 different meta-analyses to compare CAL among women with normal BMD, osteoporosis, and osteopenia. In the first meta-analysis, mean CAL was compared among groups. In the other 2 meta-analyses, the mean percentages of sites with CAL ≥4 mm and ≥6 mm were respectively compared among groups. From 792 unique citations, 26 articles were selected for the qualitative synthesis. Eleven of the studies were appraised as presenting low risk of bias, and the association between low BMD and CAL was observed in 10 of these studies. Thirteen cross-sectional articles were included in the meta-analysis for osteoporosis and 9 in the osteopenia analysis. Women with low BMD presented greater mean CAL than those with normal BMD (osteoporosis = 0.34 mm [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.20-0.49], P osteoporosis = 3.04 [95% CI, 1.23-4.85], P = 0.001; osteopenia = 1.74 [95% CI, 0.36-3.12], P = 0.01) and CAL ≥6 mm (osteoporosis = 5.07 [95% CI, 2.74-7.40], P osteoporosis or osteopenia may exhibit greater CAL compared with women with normal BMD.

  13. [State of the art diagnostic criteria of severe periodontitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, X Y

    2017-02-09

    Periodontitis could be categorized as mild, moderate, and severe according to the severity of the disease. This categorizing system could also be used together with other classification systems. The present article introduced the status about the case definition of severe periodontitis, including the standard of case definitions for surveillance of periodontitis reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in partnership with the American Academy of Periodontology (AAP) and the consensus report on the definition of periodontitis case for use in risk factor research by Europe workshop. A consensus on the state of the art definition of severe periodontitis for use in clinical work was gained base on the expertise of Chinese Society of Periodontology, Chinese Association of Stomatology. The background of this consensus and the significance of the criteria for the case definition were discussed.

  14. A six-month clinical comparison of the efficacy of the Sonicare and the Braun Oral-B electric toothbrushes on improving periodontal health in adult periodontitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, P J; Maddalozzo, D; Breslin, S

    1997-01-01

    A sonic electric toothbrush (Sonicare) and an oscillating/rotating electric brush (Braun Oral-B) were compared for efficacy in removing supragingival plaque, reducing gingival inflammation, reducing probing pocket depth (Pd) and improving probing attachment levels (PAL) in a 6-month, single-blind clinical trial. Sixty-six adults with early-moderate periodontitis (5-7 mm Pd in at least two quadrants) entered the study, and 54 completed the entire study. The Sonicare and Braun groups were equally matched for plaque scores, and balanced for age, race and gender. Plaque was scored using the Turesky, Gilmore and Glickman Index. Gingival inflammation was determined by the Papillary Bleeding Score (PBS) of Loesche. Probing depths and attachment levels were determined using a manual North Carolina probe. All measurements were recorded at baseline, 2, 4 and 6 months. The mean overall plaque scores improved in both the Sonicare and the Braun groups at each of the follow-up visits. Interproximal plaque scores also improved in both groups with time, and the mean differential Sonicare post-brushing score was significantly better than the Braun at the 6-month visit (t-test; p = 0.039). Gingival inflammation also decreased in both groups over the 6-month period, but the Sonicare group showed significantly superior PBS scores at 4 months (t-test; p = 0.002) and 6 months (p = 0.005). The percentage reduction in inflammation from baseline at 6 months was 31.9% for Sonicare and 18.1% for Braun. Probing depth scores followed a similar pattern, with the Sonicare showing a mean reduction of 0.84 mm (15.8%) from baseline at 6 months, and Braun showing a 0.39 mm (7.2%) reduction (p = 0.002). In the Sonicare group probing attachment levels improved by 8.6% (MANOVA; p = 0.01), but no PAL improvement was seen in the Braun group. Overall, this study demonstrates that long-term use of these two electric toothbrushes improves periodontal health in adult periodontitis patients, and that the

  15. Evaluation of periodontal parameters in postmenopausal women

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    "Sarlati F.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: It has been suggested that osteoporosis may be a predisposing factor for periodontitis and tissue destruction, thus periodontitis and mandibular bone density might be related. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the clinical signs of periodontal tissue destruction in postmenopausal women. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 60 postmenopausal women (51 to 78 years of age underwent radiographic examination of the right mandibular premolar. Mandibular bone density (MBD was measured using optical densitometry. Periodontal status variables examined included: probing pocket depth (PPD, clinical attachment level (CAL, bleeding on probing (BOP and plaque index (PLI. Data were analyzed by statistical tests using P<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: This study found no statistically significant association between the four indicators of periodontal disease and mandibular bone density, but there was statistically significant association between mandibular bone density and the number of remaining teeth. There was also statistically significant association between PPD and the number of remaining teeth. Conclusion: These findings suggest that individuals with high MBD seem to retain teeth with deep periodontal pockets more easily than those with lower MBD.

  16. Clinical implications of age and sex in the prevalence of periodontitis in Korean adults with diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyungdo; Park, Jun-Beom

    2018-01-01

    The present study was performed to assess the risk factors for periodontitis in Korean adults with diabetes. Data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey of the Korean population, conducted between January 2012 and December 2014 were used in the investigation. The presence of periodontitis in participants with diabetes in association with demographic variables and the anthropometric characteristics of the participants was investigated. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to assess the associations between periodontitis and age, sex, diabetic control and duration of diabetes, following adjustment for confounding factors. The odds ratio of periodontitis was higher in individuals ≥65 years old compared with individuals periodontitis was significantly higher in males compared with females (1.774). The number of patients with moderate and severe periodontitis differed significantly between different age groups. The present study revealed that age, sex and oral health behavior are risk indicators for periodontitis in patients with diabetes. The present study suggests that that an increased age, being male and engaging in poor oral health behavior increases the risk of periodontitis in participants with diabetes. PMID:29556264

  17. CLINICAL CONSIDERATIONS ON THE EVALUATION OF PERIODONTAL THERAPY IN CHILDREN AND YOUNG ADULTS

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    Anca Mihaela Stupu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the periodontal pathology of the pediatric pacient, the therapeutical management depends on an early, as precise as possible diagnosis, as well as on a correct evaluation of the causes and risk factors involved in such processes. The aim of the study: The paper discusses a clinicostatistical study devoted to the evaluation and comparison of the periodontal health condition of a group of children and teenagers subjected to a local etiological treatment. Materials and method: The experimental study was formed of 70 patients selected from the total number of patients having addressed a dentist. Over the whole period of the therapy, oral hygiene, the aspect of marginal gingiva, and the vitality of the teeth under treatment were carefully monitored. Comparisons between the initial and the final moment were based on: periodontal diagnosis, condition of marginal gingiva, number and depth of periodontal pockets, hygiene and dental mobility. Results: Improvement of the periodontal condition or its maintaining at the initial level was observed in patients with good or satisfactory oral hygiene, which was not the case of those with a scarce hygiene, in whom the periodontal problems evolved. Conclusions: Periodontal management should observe the basic principles of the initial causal, corrective and maintainance therapy. The main elements to be here considered are: age, the extent of patient’s involvement, his / her cooperation and motivation, and the support expressed by the family, all of them reflecting the periodontal diagnosis.

  18. Periodontitis in established rheumatoid arthritis patients : A cross-sectional clinical, microbiological and serological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Menke de; Westra, Johanna; Vissink, Arjan; Doornbos-van der Meer, Berber; Brouwer, Elisabeth; van Winkelhoff, Arie Jan

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis is suggested to be linked to the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. Colonization of P. gingivalis in the oral cavity of RA patients has been scarcely considered. To further explore whether the association

  19. Association between Periodontopathogens and CRP Levels in Patients with Periodontitis in Serbia

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    Ana Pejcic

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Recent epidemiological studies have shown that individuals with periodontitis have a significantly higher risk of developing coronary heart disease, which might be attributed to the complex microbiota in the dental plaque. Periodontopathogens have been reported as risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This study evaluated association of chronic periodontitis and periodontopathogens with CRP in systemically healthy Serbian adults. Materials and methods. Serum C-reactive protein levels were measured in 24 patients with moderate periodontitis, 26 patients with severe periodontitis, and 25 periodontally healthy subjects. Periodontal health indicators included gingival bleeding on probing and periodontal disease status. Patients with moderate periodontitis had low attachment loss and pocket depths of 5 mm. The control group with healthy gingiva had gingival sulcus of 5 mol/L was greater in the higher clinical AL group compared to the group with less attachment loss. Presence of periodontopathogens was also associated with elevated CRP levels and poor periodontal status. Conclusions. PD and subgingival periodontopathogens are associated with increased CRP levels. These findings suggest that periodontal infection may contribute to systemic inflammatory burden in otherwise healthy individuals.

  20. ASSOCIATION OF THE BONE LOSS WITH MAIN CLINICAL AND MICROBIOLOGICAL PARAMETERS IN CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS

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    Velitchka Dosseva-Panova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Literature data have reported that certain Gram-negative anaerobe bacteria from the subgingival environment are important etiological agents of chronic periodontal disease. Based on published criteria identifying periodontal pathogens, major evidences has been shown for: Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia; moderate evidences for: Prevotella intermedia, Peptostreptococcus /Micromonas/ micros, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Eubacterium nodatum, Campylobacter rectus, and spirochetes (Treponema denticola. Microbiological data has been suggested by several studies as a useful indicator of disease progression, selection of an adjunctive antimicrobial administration, healing assessment and disease recurrence. The results of this study demonstrate statistically significant correlation between periodontal attachment loss and the prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Peptostreptococcus (Micromonas micros in deep periodontal pockets of severe chronic periodontitis patients.

  1. Clinical Case Report on Treatment of Generalized Aggressive Periodontitis: 5-Year Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kai-Fang; Ho, Ya-Ping; Ho, Kun-Yen; Wu, Yi-Min; Wang, Wen-Chen; Chou, Yu-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    Generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP) is a distinct type of periodontal disease associated with considerably more rapid periodontal tissue destruction than chronic periodontitis. This study presents the 5-year follow-up of a patient with GAgP. A 29-year-old man reported experiencing increasing gingival recession. He was treated using cause-related therapy, provisional splints, and flap surgery combined with allograft grafting and was followed up for 5 years. This case study shows that elimination of infectious microorganisms and meticulous long-term maintenance provide an effective treatment modality for aggressive periodontitis cases. This treatment modality can restore the masticatory function and provide the GAgP patient with improved quality of life.

  2. Signature of Microbial Dysbiosis in Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuric, Vincent; Le Gall-David, Sandrine; Boyer, Emile; Acuña-Amador, Luis; Martin, Bénédicte; Fong, Shao Bing; Barloy-Hubler, Frederique; Bonnaure-Mallet, Martine

    2017-07-15

    Periodontitis is driven by disproportionate host inflammatory immune responses induced by an imbalance in the composition of oral bacteria; this instigates microbial dysbiosis, along with failed resolution of the chronic destructive inflammation. The objectives of this study were to identify microbial signatures for health and chronic periodontitis at the genus level and to propose a model of dysbiosis, including the calculation of bacterial ratios. Published sequencing data obtained from several different studies (196 subgingival samples from patients with chronic periodontitis and 422 subgingival samples from healthy subjects) were pooled and subjected to a new microbiota analysis using the same Visualization and Analysis of Microbial Population Structures (VAMPS) pipeline, to identify microbiota specific to health and disease. Microbiota were visualized using CoNet and Cytoscape. Dysbiosis ratios, defined as the percentage of genera associated with disease relative to the percentage of genera associated with health, were calculated to distinguish disease from health. Correlations between the proposed dysbiosis ratio and the periodontal pocket depth were tested with a different set of data obtained from a recent study, to confirm the relevance of the ratio as a potential indicator of dysbiosis. Beta diversity showed significant clustering of periodontitis-associated microbiota, at the genus level, according to the clinical status and independent of the methods used. Specific genera ( Veillonella , Neisseria , Rothia , Corynebacterium , and Actinomyces ) were highly prevalent (>95%) in health, while other genera ( Eubacterium , Campylobacter , Treponema , and Tannerella ) were associated with chronic periodontitis. The calculation of dysbiosis ratios based on the relative abundance of the genera found in health versus periodontitis was tested. Nonperiodontitis samples were significantly identifiable by low ratios, compared to chronic periodontitis samples. When

  3. Impact of cigarette smoking on clinical outcomes of periodontal flap surgical procedures: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsakis, Georgios A; Javed, Fawad; Hinrichs, James E; Karoussis, Ioannis K; Romanos, Georgios E

    2015-02-01

    Periodontal flap surgery is frequently used to remove subgingival deposits, yielding consequential reductions in gingival inflammation and probing depth (PD) with a gain in clinical attachment level (CAL) to treat advanced periodontal disease. However, clinical studies have reported diminished periodontal healing in smokers compared with non-smokers. The aim of the present systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess the impact of cigarette smoking on clinical outcomes following periodontal flap surgical procedures. A systematic electronic review of articles relevant to periodontal flap surgical procedures in smokers was conducted from 1977 to March 2014 inclusive, using predefined, optimized search strategies. Meta-analyses were done separately for changes in the two primary outcomes of PD and CAL. The initial search yielded 390 titles and abstracts. After screening, eight controlled clinical studies were finally selected. Three studies were assessed as having a low risk of bias, two as having moderate risk of bias, and three as having a high risk of bias. Qualitative assessment of the articles consistently showed an improved treatment effect among non-smokers versus smokers. The reduction in PD in smokers and non-smokers ranged from 0.76 to 2.05 mm and 1.27 to 2.40 mm, respectively. For CAL, the gain in non-smokers versus smokers ranged from 0.29 to 1.6 mm and 0.09 to 1.2 mm, respectively. Meta-analysis on eight studies reporting on 363 study participants demonstrated an increased reduction in mean (95% confidence interval) PD of 0.39 (0.33 to 0.45) mm. Similar results were found for mean gain in CAL (0.35 [0.30 to 0.40] mm, n = 4 studies). Considering the relatively homogenous information available, the authors conclude that active smokers could be candidates for periodontal flap surgical procedures. However, the magnitude of the therapeutic effect is compromised in smokers compared with non-smokers. Therefore, cigarette smokers should be: 1) encouraged to

  4. The main aspects of the clinic picture, treatment and prevention of caries and periodontal tissues of children patients with epidermolysis bullosa

    OpenAIRE

    Vakoliuk, Olena; Budaev, Iurij; Kosteniuk, Snizhana

    2015-01-01

    Using the references listed below and the results of personal clinic observations, the plan of prevention and treatment of dental caries and periodontal tissues among the children patients with epidermolysis bullosa is suggested in this article.

  5. Impact of gingivitis treatment for diabetic patients on quality of life related to periodontal objective parameters: A randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortelli, Sheila C; Costa, Fernando O; Gargioni-Filho, Antonio; Aquino, Davi R; Cota, Luis O M; Scherma, Alexandre P; Miranda, Taís B; Cortelli, Jose R

    2018-02-01

    Patients with diabetes have a poor oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). It is not clear if this situation could be changed with effective periodontal treatment. This study examined both patients with diabetes and systemically healthy individuals to discover the impact of a gingivitis treatment protocol on OHRQoL and its relation to objective periodontal parameters. After ultrasonic debridement, patients were randomly assigned to an essential-oils (EO) or placebo mouthwash group. At baseline and 3 months, OHRQoL was assessed with the Oral Health and Quality of Life-United Kingdom questionnaire (OHQoL-UK) along with clinical, halitometric, microbiological and inflammatory objective parameters. The primary outcome was a change in OHQoL-UK scores. A factor analysis was performed and the impact of the extracted quality of life factor (QLF) and its interactions with diabetes, treatment, and time on the objective parameters, were tested by multiple linear regression models (p oral health status on quality of life increased in EO groups but not in placebo groups. Question I (self-confidence) showed the greatest factorial weight, while Question A (food intake) showed the lowest factorial weight. All patients who showed OHRQoL improvements and used the EO rinse showed the lowest plaque and gingival indices and lower levels of bacteria and volatile sulfur compounds. OHRQoL positively changed overtime. Most effective treatment protocols would provide better improvements in OHRQoL which is related to periodontal objective measures. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Periodontal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovski, S

    2009-09-01

    The ultimate goal of periodontal therapy is the regeneration of the tissues destroyed as a result of periodontal disease. Currently, two clinical techniques, based on the principles of "guided tissue regeneration" (GTR) or utilization of the biologically active agent "enamel matrix derivative" (EMD), can be used for the regeneration of intrabony and Class II mandibular furcation periodontal defects. In cases where additional support and space-making requirements are necessary, both of these procedures can be combined with a bone replacement graft. There is no evidence that the combined use of GTR and EMD results in superior clinical results compared to the use of each material in isolation. Great variability in clinical outcomes has been reported in relation to the use of both EMD and GTR, and these procedures can be generally considered to be unpredictable. Careful case selection and treatment planning, including consideration of patient, tooth, site and surgical factors, is required in order to optimize the outcomes of treatment. There are limited data available for the clinical effectiveness of other biologically active molecules, such as growth factors and platelet concentrates, and although promising results have been reported, further clinical trials are required in order to confirm their effectiveness. Current active areas of research are centred on tissue engineering and gene therapy strategies which may result in more predictable regenerative outcomes in the future.

  7. Clinical classification of post anoxic myoclonic status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaeil-Demo, Yara; Gavvala, Jay R; Bellinski, Irena I; Macken, Micheal P; Narechania, Aditi; Templer, Jessica W; VanHaerents, Stephen; Schuele, Stephan U; Gerard, Elizabeth E

    2017-10-01

    Despite decades of research into the prognostic significance of post anoxic myoclonic status (MS), no consistent definition has been used to describe its clinical appearance. We set out to characterize the clinical features of MS and hypothesized that there are distinct clinical subtypes that may have prognostic implications. Video EEG reports from 2008 to 2016 were searched to identify adult patients with post anoxic MS defined as persistent myoclonus for >30min beginning within 3days of cardiac arrest in a comatose patient. Forty-three patients met inclusion and exclusion criteria. To generate definitions of the clinical features of MS, we reviewed videos of 23 cases and characterized 3 distinct clinical semiologies. An additional 20 cases were independently reviewed and categorized by 3 raters to evaluate inter-rater agreement (IRA). All 43 patients were assigned to a group based on consensus review for the first 23 patients and majority agreement for IRA patients. We also examined the relationship between semiology and outcome. Three distinct clinical semiologies of MS were identified: Type 1: distal, asynchronous, variable; type 2: axial or axial and distal, asynchronous, variable; and type 3: axial, synchronous, stereotyped. For IRA, Gwet's kappa was 0.64 indicating substantial agreement. Two of 3 type 1 patients (66.6%) and 7.4% of type 2 followed commands whereas none of type 3 followed commands (p=0.03). We defined and validated a classification system of post anoxic MS based on clinical semiology. This classification may be a useful bedside prognostication tool. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. [Implants in partially edentulous patients with history of periodontal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, A; Porzio, M; Ramaglia, L; Sbordone, L

    2000-03-01

    Microbiota associated with periodontal diseases were also associated with periimplant diseases. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical status and composition of subgingival microbiota of implants and natural teeth in a group of partially edentulous patients with history of periodontal disease. 38 partially edentulous patients with history of periodontal disease, treated with dental implants, were selected for this study. Patients selected for the study were in good health condition and did not take any antibiotics in the last six months. One year after second stage surgery a total of 72 implants and 38 teeth underwent clinical and microbiological examination. Clinical parameters were PD, PAL, PI and GI. Subgingival plaque samples were analyzed by dark-field microscopy and cultural analysis. Clinical parameters didn't show any significant differences between periodontal and periimplant tissues. Dark-field microscopic examination showed higher prevalence of rods and spirochetes around implants than around teeth. There were no differences detected by cultural examination in the subgingival microbiota at peri-implant and periodontal sites. Findings from this study showed no differences between implants and teeth in partially edentulous patients with history of periodontal disease one year after second stage surgery. Implants were colonized by microbiota similar to that observed around teeth and were well-maintained in patients with a history of periodontitis.

  9. Prevention of periodontal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentino, Andrew R; Kassab, Moawia M; Renner, Erica J

    2005-07-01

    The ultimate goal of periodontal disease prevention is to maintain the dentition over a lifetime in a state of health, comfort, and function in an aesthetically pleasing presentation. This article focuses on primary and secondary periodontal disease prevention as they relate to gingivitis and periodontitis. Risk assessment, mechanical plaque control, chemical plaque control, current clinical recommendations for optimal prevention, and future preventive strategies are discussed.

  10. Self-reported periodontal conditions among Dutch women during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelmakh, V; Slot, D E; van der Weijden, G A

    2017-11-01

    Women can experience symptoms of gingival inflammation during pregnancy. However, whether clinical signs of gingival inflammation were present already before pregnancy and whether women perceive an alteration in their periodontal health status during pregnancy compared to their periodontal health status before pregnancy remain unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the self-reported periodontal conditions in pregnant Dutch women as perceived before and during pregnancy. This cross-sectional survey was performed by asking women visiting two midwifery practices to complete a structured questionnaire. The data, which considered the women's oral hygiene habits, perceived periodontal health status before and during pregnancy and dental visits, were gathered and analysed. Parametric and nonparametric tests were used when appropriate. Most of the respondents (mean age: 29.6 years) brushed their teeth twice a day (72.2%), and 62.0% used interdental cleaning devices. Significant differences in periodontal health before and during pregnancy were perceived. No differences with respect to periodontal disease symptoms between the three trimesters during pregnancy were found. The symptom with the greatest increase was bleeding gums. This was followed by symptoms of painful and swollen gums. Of the 61.5% women who disclosed their plans to become pregnant to their dental care practitioner, 53.9% received information regarding the possibility of alterations in oral health status during pregnancy. Because of the perceived alterations in oral health status during pregnancy, approximately 11% of the women scheduled an additional appointment with their dental care professional for advice. During the pregnancy period, perceived alterations in periodontal health status were reported as compared to the oral health situation before pregnancy. Furthermore, approximately 50% of the women who visited a dental professional and disclosed their (plans) of pregnancy did not receive

  11. Quantitative detection of Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in human oral epithelial cells from subjects with periodontitis and periodontal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Andrea V; Barbosa, Graziela M; Higashi, Daniela; di Micheli, Giorgio; Rodrigues, Paulo H; Simionato, Maria Regina L

    2013-10-01

    Epithelial cells in oral cavities can be considered reservoirs for a variety of bacterial species. A polymicrobial intracellular flora associated with periodontal disease has been demonstrated in buccal cells. Important aetiological agents of systemic and nosocomial infections have been detected in the microbiota of subgingival biofilm, especially in individuals with periodontal disease. However, non-oral pathogens internalized in oral epithelial cells and their relationship with periodontal status are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to detect opportunistic species within buccal and gingival crevice epithelial cells collected from subjects with periodontitis or individuals with good periodontal health, and to associate their prevalence with periodontal clinical status. Quantitative detection of total bacteria and Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecalis in oral epithelial cells was determined by quantitative real-time PCR using universal and species-specific primer sets. Intracellular bacteria were visualized by confocal microscopy and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Overall, 33% of cell samples from patients with periodontitis contained at least one opportunistic species, compared with 15% of samples from healthy individuals. E. faecalis was the most prevalent species found in oral epithelial cells (detected in 20.6% of patients with periodontitis, P = 0.03 versus healthy individuals) and was detected only in cells from patients with periodontitis. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that high levels of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were present in both the periodontitis and healthy groups. However, the proportion of these species was significantly higher in epithelial cells of subjects with periodontitis compared with healthy individuals (P = 0.016 for P. aeruginosa and P = 0.047 for S. aureus). Although E. faecalis and P. aeruginosa were detected in 57% and 50% of patients, respectively, with probing depth and

  12. Interrelationship between chronic periodontitis and anemia: A 6-month follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha Dhananjay Patel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In India, anemia is a common and serious health disorder among both sexes and all age groups, with anemia of chronic disease (ACD being the second most prevalent anemia. Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of the supporting tissues of the tooth caused by specific microorganisms. An immune response to bacteria and their products induces a major vascular response, offering explanatory mechanisms for the interactions between periodontal infection and a variety of systemic disorders. Therefore, periodontitis results in low-grade systemic inflammation, which may cause lower number of erythrocytes and, consequently, lower hemoglobin concentration. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 systemically healthy male patients visiting the outpatient department participated in the study. Of these, 50 patients had healthy periodontium and 50 patients had chronic periodontitis. Clinical parameters and red blood cell parameters of all the patients were assessed at baseline and 6 months after non-surgical periodontal therapy. Statistical analysis using Student′s t-test was performed. Results: Data analysis revealed that patients with chronic periodontitis showed an improvement in both clinical and red blood cell parameters from baseline to 6 months after non-surgical periodontal therapy. Conclusion: From the present study, it can be concluded that like any other chronic condition, chronic periodontitis can lead to ACD. It also provides evidence that non-surgical periodontal therapy can improve the anemic status of patients with chronic periodontitis.

  13. PhD Thesis (Final Document): " Association between periodontitis and endothelial dysfunction: Clinical significance and physiopathological mechanisms "

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez, Jorge H.

    2014-01-01

    Thesis Dissertation (Final Document) Mentor: Adolfo Contreras --- Related publications Ramirez, Jorge H; R, Arce; Parra, Beatriz; Bravo, Luis E.; Gutierrez, Sonia Jackeline; Jaramillo, Adriana; Vivas, Juliana; Gonzalez, Viviana; JE, Soto; Otalvaro A; J, Consuegra; A, Contreras (2014): Periodontal therapy does not improve cardiovascular disease biomarkers: results of a randomized clinical trial. figshare. http://dx.doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.1098548 Ramirez JH, Arce RM, Contrer...

  14. Systemic Antibody Response of Clinically Characterized Patients with Antigens of Eubacterium brachy Initially and Following Periodontal Therapy,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-11-21

    id topical application of chlorhexidine on the developing dental plaque and gingi- vitis In man. J Periodont Res 11:135, 1970. 7. Loe, H., Theilade, E...TASK AREA A WORK UNIT NUMBERSUS Army Institute of Dental Research Walter R-ed Army Medical Center 30 Washington, DC 20307-5300 I I. CONTROLLING OFFICE... dental plaque by rigorous oral hygiene5 or anti- 6septic agents would prevent or reverse clinical gingivitis in humans is particularly convincing

  15. Managing a fractured one-piece zirconia abutment with a modified plastic periodontal probe: A clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saponaro, Paola C; Lee, Damian J; McGlumphy, Edwin A

    2017-05-01

    This clinical report describes the management of a fractured 1-piece zirconia stock abutment from an implant with an internal connection using a modified plastic periodontal probe. This minimally invasive approach allows for the retrieval of fractured prosthetic components without causing irreversible damage to the implant's platform or its internal threads and does not require special equipment or costly instruments. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis of the relationship between periodontal disease and atherosclerosis within a local clinical system: a cross-sectional observational pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Chieko; Shin, Wee Soo; Minabe, Masato; Harai, Kazuo; Kato, Kai; Seino, Hiroaki; Goke, Eiji; Sasaki, Nobuhiro; Fujino, Takemasa; Kuribayashi, Nobuichi; Pearce, Youko Onuki; Taira, Masato; Maeda, Hiroshi; Takashiba, Shogo

    2015-09-01

    It has been revealed that atherosclerosis and periodontal disease may have a common mechanism of "chronic inflammation". Several reports have indicated that periodontal infection is related to atherosclerosis, but none have yet reported such an investigation through the cooperation of local clinics. This study was performed in local Japanese clinics to examine the relationship between periodontal disease and atherosclerosis under collaborative medical and dental care. A pilot multicenter cross-sectional study was conducted on 37 medical patients with lifestyle-related diseases under consultation in participating medical clinics, and 79 periodontal patients not undergoing medical treatment but who were seen by participating dental clinics. Systemic examination and periodontal examination were performed at baseline, and the relationships between periodontal and atherosclerosis-related clinical markers were analyzed. There was a positive correlation between LDL-C level and plasma IgG antibody titer to Porphyromonas gingivalis. According to the analysis under adjusted age, at a cut-off value of 5.04 for plasma IgG titer to Porphyromonas gingivalis, the IgG titer was significantly correlated with the level of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). This study suggested that infection with periodontal bacteria (Porphyromonas gingivalis) is associated with the progression of atherosclerosis. Plasma IgG titer to Porphyromonas gingivalis may be useful as the clinical risk marker for atherosclerosis related to periodontal disease. Moreover, the application of the blood examination as a medical check may lead to the development of collaborative medical and dental care within the local medical clinical system for the purpose of preventing the lifestyle-related disease.

  17. Alzheimer's disease and periodontitis - an elusive link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit N. Gurav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is the preeminent cause and commonest form of dementia. It is clinically characterized by a progressive descent in the cognitive function, which commences with deterioration in memory. The exact etiology and pathophysiologic mechanism of Alzheimer's disease is still not fully understood. However it is hypothesized that, neuroinflammation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's disease is marked by salient inflammatory features, characterized by microglial activation and escalation in the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the affected regions. Studies have suggested a probable role of systemic infection conducing to inflammatory status of the central nervous system. Periodontitis is common oral infection affiliated with gram negative, anaerobic bacteria, capable of orchestrating localized and systemic infections in the subject. Periodontitis is known to elicit a "low grade systemic inflammation" by release of pro-inflammatory cytokines into systemic circulation. This review elucidates the possible role of periodontitis in exacerbating Alzheimer's disease. Periodontitis may bear the potential to affect the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease. Periodontitis shares the two important features of Alzheimer's disease namely oxidative damage and inflammation, which are exhibited in the brain pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Periodontitis can be treated and hence it is a modifiable risk factor for Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Assessment of dental caries and periodontal status in institutionalized hearing impaired children in Khordha District of Odisha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jnaneswar, Avinash; Subramaniya, Goutham Bala; Pathi, Jayashree; Jha, Kunal; Suresan, Vinay; Kumar, Gunjan

    2017-01-01

    Over 5% of the world's population has disabling hearing loss. The oral health of the disabled may be disused for the reason of the disabling condition, a challenging disease or the limited access to oral health care. The objectives of the study were to assess the prevalence of dental caries and periodontal status of institutionalized hearing impaired (HI) children in Khordha district of Odisha. A descriptive cross-sectional study on the HI children was conducted in Khordha district, Odisha. Type III examination procedure was conducted to assess the oral health status of the children. Statistical analysis was performed by Chi-square test and Student's t-test, and the significance level was fixed at P children out of which 262 (48.5%) were male and 278 (51.5%) were female, 285 (52.8%) children had severe hearing loss and 227 (42.0%) had profound hearing loss. Bleeding on probing was found in 72 (13.3%) female children as compared to 57 (10.6%) male children. While 131 (24.3%) female children had calculus, 124 (23.0%) male children had the same condition. Total caries prevalence was 19.3%. Statistically highly significant difference was found for mean decayed teeth (DT), missing teeth decayed, missing filled teeth (FT) (P children.

  19. Periodontitis and gestational diabetes mellitus in non-smoking females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokwiriyachit, Anyarat; Dasanayake, Ananda P; Suwannarong, Waraporn; Hormdee, Doosasee; Sumanonta, Gunniga; Prasertchareonsuk, Witoon; Wara-Aswapati, Nawarat; Combellick, Joan; Pitiphat, Waranuch

    2013-07-01

    Chronic inflammation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Periodontal disease is associated with increased levels of inflammatory mediators and may be a risk factor for GDM. The authors aimed to examine the association between periodontitis and GDM among non-smoking pregnant females. This case-control study included 50 females who were diagnosed with GDM and 50 age- and hospital-matched females without diabetes in Khon Kaen, Thailand. Full-mouth periodontal examinations were performed during pregnancy by two calibrated dentists who were unaware of the case-control status. Periodontitis was defined as ≥1 site with probing depth (PD) ≥5 mm and clinical attachment level (CAL) ≥2 mm at the same site. Serum samples were collected to measure C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6 levels. Analyses were performed using conditional logistic regression. Fifty percent of the case females had periodontitis compared to 26% of the controls. Females with GDM had significantly higher mean PD and CAL, more sites with bleeding on probing, and increased levels of CRP compared to the controls. Periodontitis was significantly associated with GDM (odds ratio = 3.00, 95% confidence interval = 1.19 to 7.56). The association remained significant with additional adjustment for family history of diabetes, prepregnancy body mass index, and weight gain during pregnancy. The results suggest that periodontitis is associated with GDM. Therefore, clinicians should assess periodontal conditions of pregnant females.

  20. The periodontal pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donos, Nikolaos

    2018-02-01

    Periodontal disease is synonymous with the presence of periodontal pockets, and very often the clinical success of periodontal therapy is based on periodontal pocket depth reduction. Therefore, in the fields of periodontology and implant dentistry, significant research effort has been placed on the etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of periodontal/peri-implant disease and as a consequence on pocket pathology. In this volume of Periodontology 2000, the in-depth reviews include topics ranging from preclinical models, anatomy and structure of tissues, and molecular and bacterial components, to treatments of pockets around teeth and implants. These reviews aim to provide the readers with current and future perspectives on the different areas of research into the periodontal pocket. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Type 1 diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease: relationship to different clinical variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Francisco-J; Miralles, Lucía; Llambes, Fernando; Bautista, Daniel; Solá-Izquierdo, Eva; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio

    2009-04-01

    This study is designed to evaluate the frequency of periodontal disease in a group of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and how this relates with diabetes metabolic control, duration of diabetes, and presence of diabetic complications. A comparison was made of periodontal parameters (plaque index, bleeding index, pocket depth and attachment loss) in a group of diabetic patients (n=90) versus a group of non-diabetics (n=90). Logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate relationship between periodontal parameters and degree of metabolic control, the duration of the disease, and the appearance of complications. Diabetics had greater bleeding index (pperiodontal pockets (pperiodontal attachment loss (pdiabetics. Deficient metabolic control and presence of diabetic complication were associated with higher bleeding index and pocket depth (pdiabetes appear to show increased periodontal disease susceptibility, particularly those with poorer metabolic control or with diabetic complications.

  2. Antibiotic Susceptibility of Periodontal Streptococcus Constellatus and Streptococcus Intermedius Clinical Isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rams, Thomas E; Feik, Diane; Mortensen, Joel E; Degener, John E; van Winkelhoff, Arie J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Streptococcus constellatus and Streptococcus intermedius in subgingival dental plaque biofilms may contribute to forms of periodontitis that resist treatment with conventional mechanical root debridement/surgical procedures and may additionally participate in some extraoral infections.

  3. PRELIMINARY CLINICAL OBSERVATIONS ON THE GINGIVAL-PERIODONTAL MANIFESTATIONS IN IN VITRO FERTILIZED FEMALE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana GIURA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Scope of the study – determination of the types and intensity of the gingival-periodontal manifestations in in vitro fertilized pregnant women, and establishment of the role played by the hormonal treatment in the initiation and maintenance of such manifestations. Materials and method. The study was performed on patients fertilized in vitro between the years 2010-2012, in the Section of Assisted Human Reproduction of the “Panait Sârbu” Clinical Hospital of Obstretics and Ginecology – Bucuresti. All patients received the same amount and concentration of progesteronic compounds for maintaining their state of pregnancy, being examined in the first gestation weeks, immediately after confirmation of pregnancy through the β-hCG blood test. Results anddiscussion: In the last decades, the effects of estrogen and progesterone have drawn special attention from the part of the researchers. During pregnancy, the gingiva represents the maintissular target for the action of steroid hormones. Pregnancy-induced gingivitis is directly correlated with the presence of the microbial flora, known as the determining factor of the disease, being still exacerbated by the action of the sexual hormones, especially during the second and third quarter of pregnancy. Conclusions: The influence of gestational hormones upon the immune system of the organism may further contribute to the initiation and worsening of pregnancy-induced gingivitis, by reducing the immune response vs. the bacterial plaque.

  4. The association of aggressive and chronic periodontitis with systemic manifestations and dental anomalies in a jordanian population: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karasneh Jumana A

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between dental anomalies and periodontitis has not been documented by earlier studies. Although psychological factors have been implicated in the etiopathogenesis of periodontitis, very little information has so far been published about the association of anxiety and depression with aggressive periodontitis. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of chronic periodontitis and aggressive periodontitis with certain systemic manifestations and dental anomalies. Methods A total of 262 patients (100 chronic periodontitis, 81 aggressive periodontitis and 81 controls, attending the Periodontology clinics at Jordan University of Science and Technology, Dental Teaching Centre were included. All subjects had a full periodontal and radiographic examination to assess the periodontal condition and to check for the presence of any of the following dental anomalies: dens invaginatus, dens evaginatus, congenitally missing lateral incisors or peg-shaped lateral incisors. Participants were interrogated regarding the following: depressive mood, fatigue, weight loss, or loss of appetite; and their anxiety and depression status was assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD scale. Results Patients with aggressive periodontitis reported more systemic symptoms (51% than the chronic periodontitis (36% and control (30% patients (p p Conclusion In this group of Jordanians, systemic symptoms were strongly associated with aggressive periodontitis, and dental anomalies were positively associated with both aggressive and chronic periodontitis.

  5. The effect of osteoporosis on periodontal status, alveolar bone and orthodontic tooth movement. A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidiropoulou-Chatzigiannis, Sossani; Kourtidou, Maria; Tsalikis, Lazaros

    2007-07-01

    Osteoporosis, an age-related condition, is defined as a systemic skeletal disease characterized by low bone mass and micro-architectural deterioration with a consequent increase in bone fragility and susceptibility to fracture. It is considered the most common bone metabolic disease and it constitutes a major public health problem. Several studies indicate that osteoporosis may be related to decreased oral bone density and alveolar bone loss. In osteoporotic patients, uncoupling of bone resorption and bone formation has taken place. Both bone resorption and bone formation are accelerated, and excessive bone resorption usually leads to loss of attachment. Osteoporosis could also affect the rate of tooth movement through the involvement of alveolar bone. In healthy individuals, bone is constantly being remodeled in the coupled sequence of bone resorption and formation. When a force is applied to a tooth, alveolar bone formation and resorption occur predominantly on the tension and pressure sides of the root, respectively, and the tooth moves with increased alveolar bone remodeling. Experimental studies suggest that systemic-osteoporotic hormone imbalance increases bone turnover and accelerates tooth movement while under orthodontic treatment. Based on these observations it can be concluded that deviations in bone turnover and consequent periodontal problems influence the response to orthodontic forces, and this should be taken into consideration when planning orthodontic treatment in adult patients with metabolic bone disease, especially postmenopausal females or those on chronic medication affecting bone metabolism.

  6. Clinical analysis of heat gutta-percha vertical condensation in the treatment of pulpitis and periapical periodontitis

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    Li Fan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the clinical effect of heat gutta-percha vertical condensation in the treatment of pulpitis and periapical periodontitis. Methods: A total of 120 patients with pulpitis and periapical periodontitis who were admitted in our hospital from February, 2015 to February, 2016 were included in the study and randomized into the observation group and the control group. The patients in the observation group were given heat gutta-percha vertical condensation for root canal filling, while the patients in the control group were given cold gutta-percha lateral condensation root canal filling. The root canal filling was evaluated. The changes of GI, SBI, and PD before and after treatment were observed. Results: The correct filling, shorting filling, and extra filling in the observation group were significantly superior to those in the control group. After treatment, GI, SBI, and PD were significantly reduced, and the reduced degree in the observation group was significantly superior to that in the control group. Conclusions: Heat gutta-percha vertical condensation in the treatment of pulpitis and periapical periodontitis can significantly enhance the therapeutic effect, and improve GI, SBI, and PD, with a significant clinical effect; therefore, it deserves to be widely recommended.

  7. Clinical and laboratory substantiation of Mexidol use in complex treatment of periodontitis in patients with peptic ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostrovskaya L.U.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available To determine the clinical pathogenetic efficacy of Mexidol in the combined therapy of parodontitis in patients with peptic ulcers medical examination and treatment of 296 patients were carried out. Endoscopic, histological and im-munohistochemical studies were performed in all examined patients. Investigation of interleukin -6, -10, -18 in oral cavity by immunofermental analysis was conducted. It was established that Mexidol use in the combined treatment of patients with periodontitis and peptic ulcer allowed to decrease evidence of local inflammation, to normalize processes of neurohumoral and cytokine regulation, that provided acceleration of recovery processes, decrease in periodontitis recurrences. The statistical programs Exsel и Statistica 6.0 were used in the study. The subsequent analysis of the received data was carried out

  8. PDT in non-surgical treatment of periodontitis in kidney transplanted patients: a split-mouth, randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, Kelly C. T.; Giovani, Elcio M.

    2016-03-01

    This study was to evaluate clinical and microbiological effectiveness of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of periodontal disease in kidney-transplanted patients. Eight kidney transplanted patients treated at Paulista University were arranged in two groups: SRP performed scaling and root planning by ultrasound; SRP+PDT- in the same patient, which was held to PDT in the opposite quadrant, with 0.01% methylene blue and red laser gallium aluminum arsenide, wavelength 660 nm, power 100 mW. There was reduction in probing pocket depth after 45 days and 3 months regardless the group examined; plaque and bleeding index showed improvement over time, regardless the technique used, and bleeding index in the SRP+PDT group was lower when compared with the baseline the other times. There was no difference in the frequency of pathogens. Photodynamic therapy may be an option for treatment of periodontal disease in renal-transplanted patients and its effectiveness is similar to conventional therapy.

  9. Dental Caries and Periodontal Disease Status in Patients with Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Screening Study in Urban and Semiurban Population of Karnataka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, T V; Revanna, G M; Hallikeri, Umesh; Kuriakose, Moni Abraham

    2014-12-01

    To test the validity of numerous anecdotal claims of poor oral hygiene status being a contributory or etiology for Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) and to isolate the microorganisms associated with oral cancer, to elucidate their role if any, in oral cancer. A total of 242 OSCC patients and 254 controls were screened. Questionnaires were used to inquire about the past condition of the oral health. Dental caries, oral hygiene status and periodontal disease status were assessed using indices. Microorganisms were identified by bacterial culture methods. Majority of cases (Group-1) (57.85 %) never visited the dentist compared to controls (Group-2) (46.06 %). Group-1 brushed once in a day (93.4 %) and less often twice a day (6.6 %) compared to Group-2 (81.1 % and 18.9 %). There was no significant difference in caries experience in both groups. Teeth missing due to periodontal reasons were more in Group-1 (40 %) than Group-2 (26 %) (p periodontal disease experience is directly proportional to OSCC. Increased pathogenic flora may produce carcinogenic metabolites or post-operative infections.

  10. Impact of Periodontal Disease on the Quality of Life of Diabetics Based on Different Clinical Diagnostic Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Mendes Silva de Pinho

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the impact of periodontal disease on the quality of life of individuals with diabetes according to different clinical criteria (I-AAP, II-Beck, III-Machtei, IV-Lopez, V-Albandar, VI-Tonetti, and VII-CPI. This cross-sectional study sampled 300 individuals in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. The Oral Health Impact Profile was used to measure the impact of periodontal disease on quality of life. Prevalence of periodontal disease was 35.3%, 30.7%, 35.0%, 9.7%, 92.3%, 25.3%, and 75.3% using criteria I, II, III, IV, V, VI, and VII, respectively. The III-Machtei (P=0.043 and IV-Lopez (P<0.001 criteria were associated with OHIP-14; functional limitation was associated with IV-Lopez (P=0.006 and V-Albandar (P=0.018 criteria. Pain was only associated with V-Albandar criteria (P<0.001. Psychological discomfort was associated with the IV-Lopez (P=0.018 criteria. Physical disability was associated with the IV-Lopez (P=0.047 and V-Tonetti (P=0.046 criteria. Being handicapped was associated with the I-AAP (P=0.025 and II-Beck (P=0.041 criteria. Concepts of health and disease determined by clinical diagnostic criteria may influence the assessment of the impact of periodontal disease on diabetics' quality of life.

  11. Derivation and Validation of the Periodontal and Tooth Profile Classification System for Patient Stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Thiago; Moss, Kevin L; Beck, James; Preisser, John S; Wu, Di; Divaris, Kimon; Offenbacher, Steven

    2017-02-01

    The goal of this study is to use bioinformatics tools to explore identification and definition of distinct periodontal and tooth profile classes (PPCs/TPCs) among a cohort of individuals by using detailed clinical measures at the tooth level, including both periodontal measurements and tooth loss. Full-mouth clinical periodontal measurements (seven clinical parameters) from 6,793 individuals from the Dental Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (DARIC) were used to identify PPC. A custom latent class analysis (LCA) procedure was developed to identify clinically distinct PPCs and TPCs. Three validation cohorts were used: NHANES (2009 to 2010 and 2011 to 2012) and the Piedmont Study population (7,785 individuals). The LCA method identified seven distinct periodontal profile classes (PPCs A to G) and seven distinct tooth profile classes (TPCs A to G) ranging from health to severe periodontal disease status. The method enabled identification of classes with common clinical manifestations that are hidden under the current periodontal classification schemas. Class assignment was robust with small misclassification error in the presence of missing data. The PPC algorithm was applied and confirmed in three distinct cohorts. The findings suggest PPC and TPC using LCA can provide robust periodontal clinical definitions that reflect disease patterns in the population at an individual and tooth level. These classifications can potentially be used for patient stratification and thus provide tools for integrating multiple datasets to assess risk for periodontitis progression and tooth loss in dental patients.

  12. Comorbidity of periodontal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Palle; Damgaard, Christian; Olsen, Ingar

    2017-01-01

    inflammatory pathways are likely to contribute to this association, but distinct causal mechanisms remain to be defined. Some of these comorbid conditions may improve by periodontal treatment, and a bidirectional relationship may exist, where, for example, treatment of diabetes can improve periodontal status......Increasing evidence has suggested an independent association between periodontitis and a range of comorbidities, for example cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, psoriasis, and respiratory infections. Shared....... The present article presents an overview of the evidence linking periodontitis with selected systemic diseases and calls for increased cooperation between dentists and medical doctors to provide optimal screening, treatment, and prevention of both periodontitis and its comorbidities....

  13. EVALUATION OF THE PREVALENCE OF THE PERIODONTAL DISEASE VERSUS SYSTEMIC AND LOCAL RISK FACTORS

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    Silvia MÂRŢU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The periodontal disease represents a malady characterized by an extremely high incidence. The manifestations and evolution of the periodontal diseases vary for each form in part, being influenced by systemic and local risk factors. Scope of the study: To evaluate the periodontal status on a group of patients, versus the syste‐ mic and local factors. Materials and method: The study was performed on a group of 170 patients, whose odonto‐periodontal status was evaluated by strict clinical and paraclinical examinations, on establishing the inflammation indices and the periodontal diagnosis. Results: The main cause of the analysis was gingival ble‐ eding; an increased number of smokers was registered among the patients. Out of the local factors, especially important were edentations and malocclusions. Also, a higher number of aggressive generalized periodontites has been noticed. Discussion: The forms of the periodontal diseases are obviously influenced by the systemic context, while the forms of localized chronic periodontitis associa‐ ted with generalized chronic gingivitis reflect the role pla‐ yed by the local risk factors. Conclusions: Stress and smoking represent significant risk factors in the installation of periodontal pathology, with a really alarming preva‐ lence. The aggressive forms of periodontitis showed a higher frequency than that recorded in literature.

  14. Clinical and microbiological efficacy of systemic roxithromycin as an adjunct to non-surgical periodontal therapy in treatment of chronic periodontitis. A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martande, Santosh S; Pradeep, Avani R; Kumari, Minal; Priyanka, Ningappa; Singh, Sonender P; Naik, Savitha B; Patel, Swati Pradeep; Bagchi, Paulami

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this randomized clinical trial was to evaluate the clinical and microbiological effects of systemic administration of roxithromycin (RXM) as an adjunct to non-surgical periodontal therapy (NSPT) in the treatment of individuals with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis (CP). 70 individuals (38 males and 32 females, aged 25 to 60 years) with moderate to severe CP were randomly allocated into two groups. 35 individuals were allocated to full mouth SRP+RXM while 35 individuals were allocated to SRP+ Placebo group. The clinical parameters evaluated were probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), gingival index (GI), plaque index (PI) and % bleeding on probing sites (%BOP) at baseline (B/L), 1-, 3- and 6-month intervals while microbiologic parameters included percentage of sites positive for periodontopathic bacteria A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis and T. forsythia at B/L, 3 and 6 months using polymerase chain reaction. RESULTs: Both groups showed improved clinical and microbiologic parameters over 6 months. RXM group showed a statistically significant reduction in mean PD and CAL gain as compared to the placebo group (P bacteria over the duration of the study in both groups and a statistically significant reduction in the number of sites positive for A. actinomycetemcomitans in RXM group (P < 0.001).

  15. Level of Salivary Uric Acid in Gingivitis and Periodontitis Patients

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    Muhammad Ihsan Rizal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periodontal disease is common chronic adult condition. Antioxidants are present in the body fluid as protection against free radical. Uric acid is one of antioxidants that can be found in saliva. Moreover, the relationship among the antioxidant enzymes activities and clinical periodontal status were investigated. Objectives: The aim of the study was to observe uric acid level activities in the saliva of gingivitis and periodontitis patients. Methods: Six patients with gingivitis and six patients with periodontitis in Dental Hospital Trisakti University were included in the study. Clinical condition of each subject, the plaque index, and probing depth were determined. The salivary uric acid level was measured using the Folin-Wu method. Result: Salivary uric acid levels in the periodontitis patients with a mean ± SD  7.40 ± 0.31  (p = 0.004 were found to be higher compared to the gingivitis patients (mean ± SD = 6.84 ± 0.19. In addition, there were no significant differences in salivary uric acid levels between gender (p = 0.641. Conclusion: Uric acid levels in periodontitis patients were found to be higher than in gingivitis patients. Moreover, uric acid has more role on periodontitis than in gingivitis as an antioxidant agent.

  16. The prospective study of autotransplanted severely impacted developing premolars: periodontal status and the long-term outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakwicz, Paweł; Czochrowska, Ewa Monika

    2014-05-01

    To determine the periodontal status and long-term outcomes of the surgical treatment of severely impacted developing premolars. Nine impacted and adversely angulated second premolars (four maxillary and five mandibular) were autotransplanted from their initial position to the ideal position within the arches (trans-alveolar autotransplantation). The mean age of patients at the time of the surgery was 13 years and 9 months (from 11 years and 5 months to 17 years) and the mean observation period was 5 years (from 2 to 8 years and 6 months). Naturally erupted, contralateral premolars in the same patients were used for comparison. The survival and success were 100%. Autotransplanted premolars did not differ statistically from their controls, except for having a wider zone of keratinized gingiva (mean difference 0.625 mm), increased probing depths (from 0.04 to 0.49 mm depending on the probing location), pulp canal obliteration and a slightly higher crown-to-root ratio (C/R = 0.71 for transplanted teeth and C/R = 0.6 for control teeth respectively). Trans-alveolar transplantation of severely impacted and adversely angulated developing premolars is a viable treatment option and an attractive alternative to other treatment modalities. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Clinical and metabolic evaluation of one-stage, full-mouth, ultrasonic debridement as a therapeutic approach for uncontrolled type 2 diabetic patients with periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirano, Fabiano Ribeiro; Pera, Claudia; Ueda, Paulo; Casarin, Renato Correa Viana; Ribeiro, Fernanda Vieira; Pimentel, Suzana Peres; Casati, Marcio Zaffalon

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the therapeutic potential of one-stage, full-mouth, ultrasonic debridement (FMUD) as a treatment for type 2 diabetic patients with generalized severe chronic periodontitis. Sixteen patients diagnosed with generalized severe chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus were allocated to the diabetic group; another 15 subjects with periodontitis but without metabolic disorders were placed in the nondiabetic group. Both groups were treated using the FMUD protocol, a unique 45-minute session of ultrasonic debridement of all sites presenting periodontal disease. Patients were analyzed for the following parameters: plaque and bleeding indices, gingival recession, probing depth, and clinical attachment level. Further, diabetic subjects were assessed using fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) tests. Patients were evaluated at 3 and 6 months for all parameters. ANOVA and the Tukey test were used for data analysis (P periodontal health after treatment. There were no significant differences between the groups for any of the parameters assessed (P > .05). Diabetic subjects treated with FMUD had a clinical response similar to that of nondiabetic subjects at all pocket depths. No adverse effects or medical disturbances were observed in either group during treatment. FPG and HbA1c levels remained unaltered after treatment. Within the limitations of this study, FMUD promoted clinical improvements in patients with type 2 uncontrolled diabetes and generalized severe chronic periodontitis.

  18. Periodontal health knowledge and smoking are associated with periodontal treatment need according to tooth brushing levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirer, S; Gũrsoy, U K; Ozdemir, H; Erdemir, E O; Uitto, V J

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether periodontal health knowledge is associated with frequency of tooth brushing and periodontal treatment need. Four hundred and two subjects participated in the study. Data on sociodemographic variables (age, gender, marital status, income, and education), general health, smoking behaviour tooth cleaning habits and knowledge on periodontal health/disease were collected with a questionnaire. Periodontal treatment need was examined using the Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs (CPITN). According to the CPITN scores, the treatment needs were grouped as minimum (CPITN = 0), low-level (CPITN = 1-2), or high-level (CPITN = 3-4). Statistical differences were found between the frequency of tooth brushing and smoking status, marital status, periodontal health knowledge and periodontal treatment needs. Gender (females), place of residence (urban areas), education and periodontal health knowledge had positive relationship with tooth brushing frequency, while smoking and periodontal treatment need had negative relationship. When multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied, age, marriage and poor periodontal knowledge were associated with increased low-level periodontal treatment needs, and age, marriage and smoking were associated with increased high-level periodontal treatment need. In the limits of this study, we suggest that gender, smoking habits, marital status, place of residence, education and periodontal health knowledge are determining factors related to tooth brushing frequency. Periodontal knowledge and smoking are associated with periodontal treatment needs.

  19. Use of Dietary Supplements in Patients Seeking Treatment at a Periodontal Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy E. Ward

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Dietary supplement use may modify the risk of periodontal disease but effects on wound healing after periodontal procedures are less clear. This study characterized dietary supplement use by male and female patients (n = 376 attending a periodontal clinic—information that is essential for evidence-based intervention studies that may improve patient outcomes after periodontal procedures. Calcium, vitamin D, multivitamin and vitamin C were most commonly used. A greater (p ≤ 0.05 number of males took no supplements compared to females, and more (p ≤ 0.05 females than males took ≥ four supplements. Females took more (p ≤ 0.05 calcium, vitamin D, fish oil, green tea, magnesium, omega 3,6,9 and B vitamin complex. Younger patients (31–50 years had the highest (p ≤ 0.05 frequency of no supplement use compared to older age groups. Patients over age 50 had a higher (p ≤ 0.05 frequency of using ≥ four supplements including calcium and vitamin D. Supplement use was lower (p ≤ 0.05 in smokers, particularly for calcium, fish oil, green tea and vitamin D. In conclusion, females, older individuals and non-smokers have higher supplement use. Future dietary intervention studies can focus on supplements with known biological activities—anti-inflammatory, antioxidant or osteogenic activity—that may enhance wound healing after reconstructive periodontal procedures.

  20. Biomarkers of Periodontal Tissue Remodeling during Orthodontic Tooth Movement in Mice and Men: Overview and Clinical Relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizia d'Apuzzo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biologically active substances are expressed by cells within the periodontium in response to mechanical stimuli from orthodontic appliances. Several possible biomarkers representing biological modifications during specific phenomena as simile-inflammatory process, bone resorption and formation, periodontal ligament changes, and vascular and neural responses are proposed. Citations to potentially published trials were conducted by searching PubMed, Cochrane databases, and scientific textbooks. Additionally, hand searching and contact with experts in the area were undertaken to identify potentially relevant published and unpublished studies. Selection criteria were as follows: animal models involving only mice and rats undergoing orthodontic treatment; collection of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF as a noninvasively procedure for humans; no other simultaneous treatment that could affect experimental orthodontic movement. The data suggest that knowledge of the remodeling process occurring in periodontal tissues during orthodontic and orthopedic therapies may be a clinical usefulness procedure leading to proper choice of mechanical stress to improve and to shorten the period of treatment, avoiding adverse consequences. The relevance for clinicians of evaluating the rate of some substances as valid biomarkers of periodontal effects during orthodontic movement, by means of two models of study, mice and men, is underlined.

  1. Assessment of dental caries and periodontal status in institutionalized hearing impaired children in Khordha District of Odisha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Jnaneswar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Over 5% of the world's population has disabling hearing loss. The oral health of the disabled may be disused for the reason of the disabling condition, a challenging disease or the limited access to oral health care. Objectives: The objectives of the study were to assess the prevalence of dental caries and periodontal status of institutionalized hearing impaired (HI children in Khordha district of Odisha. Materials and Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study on the HI children was conducted in Khordha district, Odisha. Type III examination procedure was conducted to assess the oral health status of the children. Statistical analysis was performed by Chi-square test and Student's t-test, and the significance level was fixed at P < 0.05. Results: The final population consisted of 540 HI children out of which 262 (48.5% were male and 278 (51.5% were female, 285 (52.8% children had severe hearing loss and 227 (42.0% had profound hearing loss. Bleeding on probing was found in 72 (13.3% female children as compared to 57 (10.6% male children. While 131 (24.3% female children had calculus, 124 (23.0% male children had the same condition. Total caries prevalence was 19.3%. Statistically highly significant difference was found for mean decayed teeth (DT, missing teeth decayed, missing filled teeth (FT (P < 0.001, while for mean FT there was no statistically significant difference according to age groups. Statistically highly significant difference was found for mean DT, extracted teeth and decayed, extracted, filled teeth (P < 0.001. Conclusion: An improved accessibility to dental services as well as dental health education is necessary to ensure the optimum dental health within the reach of these less fortunate children.

  2. Validity of the "Community Periodontal Index of Treatment Needs" (CPITN) for population periodontitis screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassani, Diego Garcia; da Silva, Carina Maciel; Oppermann, Rui Vicente

    2006-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to validate two versions of CPITN for periodontitis diagnosis. A sample of 400 individuals underwent full mouth periodontal examination including Clinical Attachment Loss, Periodontal Pocket Depth, and Sub-gingival Calculus. Full and partial CPITN versions were derived from this exam (gold standard). Contingency tables were constructed and operational characteristics obtained, as well as ROC curves. The results show 58% sensitivity for full CPITN and 80.6% specificity. Positive and negative predictive values were 87% and 46.3%, respectively. According to the test, estimated periodontitis prevalence was 46%, while the figure obtained with the gold standard was 69%. The partial version of the CPITN showed 50% sensitivity and 87.1% specificity. Positive and negative predictive values were 89.6% and 43.9%, respectively. Estimated periodontitis prevalence, through partial CPITN, was 30.5%. Adjusted global agreement (kappa) for partial and full CPITN was 0.32 and 0.29, respectively. Both CPITN versions disagreed significantly with gold standard results (chi-square p periodontal status of the sample.

  3. Diagnosis and Management of Chronic and Aggressive Periodontitis Part 2: Periodontal Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzistavrianou, Despoina; Blair, Fiona

    2017-05-01

    The first paper of this three-part series discussed periodontal disease pathogenesis and highlighted elements in the clinical assessment which will help the clinician to establish the diagnosis of chronic and aggressive periodontitis. This second paper will focus on the management of chronic and aggressive periodontitis. Finally, the diagnosis and management of chronic and aggressive periodontitis will be reviewed in the third part of the series using two clinical examples. Clinical relevance: This paper aims to provide the general dental practitioner with an understanding of the aim of periodontal treatment, the management of chronic and aggressive periodontitis and the prognosis of periodontally involved teeth.

  4. [Impact of periodontal disease on quality of life for dentate diabetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drumond-Santana, Trícia; Costa, Fernando Oliveira; Zenóbio, Elton Gonçalves; Soares, Rodrigo Villamarim; Santana, Taciana Drumond

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential impact of periodontal disease on quality of life in diabetics. A total of 159 dentate diabetic individuals registered at the Municipal Hospital in Itaúna, Minas Gerais, Brazil, were examined and interviewed. The clinical periodontal parameters recorded were: gingival bleeding, probing depth, and clinical attachment level. The OHIP-14 form was used to evaluate the impact of periodontal disease on quality of life. In relation to periodontal status, 15.7% of individuals were healthy, 35.2% presented gingivitis, and 49.1% periodontitis (27.7% in the mild-to-moderate and 21.4% in the advanced stages). Association between diagnosis of periodontal disease and impact on quality of life was significant in individuals with periodontitis (p 4mm were associated with intensely negative impact on quality of life (p = 0.013, p Diabetics with mild-to-moderate and advanced periodontitis had more negative impact on quality of life than those who were periodontally healthy or with gingivitis.

  5. Periodontitis and myocardial hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Jun-Ichi; Sato, Hiroki; Kaneko, Makoto; Yoshida, Asuka; Aoyama, Norio; Akimoto, Shouta; Wakayama, Kouji; Kumagai, Hidetoshi; Ikeda, Yuichi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Izumi, Yuichi; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Komuro, Issei

    2017-04-01

    There is a deep relationship between cardiovascular disease and periodontitis. It has been reported that myocardial hypertrophy may be affected by periodontitis in clinical settings. Although these clinical observations had some study limitations, they strongly suggest a direct association between severity of periodontitis and left ventricular hypertrophy. However, the detailed mechanisms between myocardial hypertrophy and periodontitis have not yet been elucidated. Recently, we demonstrated that periodontal bacteria infection is closely related to myocardial hypertrophy. In murine transverse aortic constriction models, a periodontal pathogen, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans markedly enhanced cardiac hypertrophy with matrix metalloproteinase-2 activation, while another pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.) did not accelerate these pathological changes. In the isoproterenol-induced myocardial hypertrophy model, P.g. induced myocardial hypertrophy through Toll-like receptor-2 signaling. From our results and other reports, regulation of chronic inflammation induced by periodontitis may have a key role in the treatment of myocardial hypertrophy. In this article, we review the pathophysiological mechanism between myocardial hypertrophy and periodontitis.

  6. Smoking as a permissive factor of periodontal disease in psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antal, Márk; Braunitzer, Gábor; Mattheos, Nikos; Gyulai, Rolland; Nagy, Katalin

    2014-01-01

    Population-based studies have identified smoking as a pathogenetic factor in chronic periodontitis. At the same time, chronic periodontal disease has also been found to occur more often in persons suffering from psoriasis than in controls with no psoriasis. It is known that smoking aggravates both periodontal disease and psoriasis, but so far it has not been investigated how smoking influences the occurrence and severity of periodontal disease in psoriasis. A hospital-based study was conducted to investigate this question. The study population consisted of 82 psoriasis patients and 89 controls. All patients received a full-mouth periodontal examination, and a published classification based on bleeding on probing, clinical attachment level and probing depth was utilized for staging. Both patients and controls were divided into smoker and non-smoker groups, and the resulting groups were compared in terms of periodontal status. Beyond the descriptive statistics, odds ratios were computed. Psoriasis in itself increased the likelihood of severe periodontal disease to 4.373 (OR, as compared to non-smoker controls, psmoking increased it to 24.278 (OR, as compared to non-smoker controls, pperiodontal disease in psoriasis turned out to be six times higher in smokers than in non-smokers. The results of this study corroborate those of other studies regarding the link between psoriasis and periodontal disease, but they also seem to reveal a powerful detrimental effect of smoking on the periodontal health of psoriasis patients, whereby the authors propose that smoking may have a permissive effect on the development of severe periodontal disease in psoriasis.

  7. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN INFLAMMATORY PERI-IMPLANT DISEASE AND THE ACTIVITY OF PERIODONTAL DISEASE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George S. Manev

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Clinical application of knowledge about risk factors and indicators associated with the loss of implants or peri-implantitis requires additional studies to demonstrate the risk of peri-implant diseases. Identification of risk factors for peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis will provide the clinician tools for determining the prognosis of the individual and the implant and better selection of patients for placement of implants. Progress in understanding the risk of peri-implantitis at the individual level with a careful assessment of the risk level of an implant would be useful in the planning of implant treatment.The similarity in the etiology and pathogenesis of periodontal diseases and peri-implant infections requires an assessment of periodontal status and assessing the risk of progression of periodontitis in patients with a history of periodontal disease and implants. In the literature are few and conflicting data on the relationship of periodontal status of the patient and peri-implant diseases. It is likely that the presence of periodontal pockets, showing clinical signs of an infection and activity to be associated with inflammatory peri-implant diseases.The study is focused on the discovery of a relationship between peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis and activity (bleeding on probing - BoP of patient’s periodontal disease. Statistically significant relationship was established between occurrence of active periodontal sites and inflammatory peri-implant diseases.

  8. [Effects of periodontal health and related factors on the oral health-related quality of life in type 2 diabetic patients with chronic periodontitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Zhu, Ling; Sha, Yueqin

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQOL) in type 2 diabetic patients with chronic periodontitis. A total of 80 type 2 diabetic patients with chronic periodontitis who had at least 16 teeth and never accept any periodontal therapy in latest one year were recruited. The clinical periodontal index such as probing depth, attachment loss (AL), modified bleeding index, plaque index were obtained with a Williams type periodontal probe. All accepted structured questionnaire interview including the evaluation of OHRQOL. The geriatric oral health assessment index (GOHAI) results demonstrated good content validity, construct validity and responsibility. The periodontal index had positive correlation with the GOHAI scores. Individuals with self-unsatisfied of oral health status, using hypoglycemic drugs, accompanied with serious gingival inflammation and higher AL had relatively poor OHRQOL. The OHRQOL of type 2 diabetes with chronic periodontitis and the negative experiences of items listed in GOHAI questionnaire were affected by self-conscious of oral health and periodontal inflammation status.

  9. Distribution of macrophages and plasma cells in apical periodontitis and their relationship with clinical and image data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeredo, Stéphane V; Brasil, Sabrina C; Antunes, Henrique; Marques, Fábio V; Pires, Fábio R; Armada, Luciana

    2017-09-01

    Macrophages and plasma cells play a key role in the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of these cells in apical periodontitis and their distribution comparing with clinical and image data. Thirty-three lesions were selected and divided in two groups (17 periapical cysts and 16 periapical granulomas). Immunoreactions using anti-CD68 and anti-CD138 antibodies were carried out; image analysis was performed with an optical microscope and 5 high-power fields from each slide were evaluated leading to an average score of immunoexpression. This mean score was compared between the two groups and correlated with the clinical and image data. There was no statistically significant difference ( p >0.05) for the mean average score of CD68+ macrophages and CD138+ plasma cells when comparing the two groups (cysts x granulomas) and the specimens included in each specific group. No statistically significant differences ( p >0.05) were also observed when comparing the average scores with clinical and image data. The presence of CD68+ macrophages and CD138+ plasma cells was similar in periapical cysts and granulomas and the presence of these cells did not correlate with clinical and image data from both groups. Key words: Macrophages, plasma cells, apical periodontitis, periapical granuloma, periapical cyst.

  10. Correlation of Salivary pH, Incidence of Dental Caries and Periodontal Status in Diabetes Mellitus Patients: A Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seethalakshmi, C; Reddy, R C Jagat; Asifa, Nisha; Prabhu, S

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease affecting many parts of the body. A number of oral diseases have been associated with diabetes mellitus with an increased risk of dental caries and periodontal disease. The aim of the study was to evaluate the salivary pH and incidence of dental caries and periodontal status in diabetes mellitus compared to that of the normal subjects. The study population consisted of 40 patients divided into 2 groups with group I comprising of 20 known diabetes mellitus patients and group II comprising of 20 non diabetic subjects as control group. The pH of the saliva was determined using a digital pH meter. Dental caries and periodontal status were assessed by DMFT and PDI indices respectively. There was a decrease in the mean salivary pH of 6.51 in the study group, compared to the normal mean salivary pH of 7.88 in the control group. The mean DMFT index was higher in the study group (8.10) when compared to that of control group (1.15). The mean PDI score was also higher in the study group (4.0) as compared to that of the control group (0.45). The results of the present study concluded that there was a significant relationship between the diabetes mellitus and increased incidence of dental caries and periodontitis and there was also a significant reduction in the salivary pH in diabetes mellitus patients, compared to that of non diabetic subjects.

  11. Adult stem cell therapy for periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su-Hwan; Seo, Byoung-Moo; Choung, Pill-Hoon; Lee, Yong-Moo

    2010-05-01

    Periodontal disease is a major cause of tooth loss and characterized by inflammation of tooth-supporting structures. Recently, the association between periodontal disease and other health problems has been reported, the importance of treating periodontal disease for general health is more emphasized. The ultimate goal of periodontal therapy is regeneration of damaged periodontal tissues. The development of adult stem cell research enables to improve the cell-based tissue engineering for periodontal regeneration. In this review, we present the results of experimental pre-clinical studies and a brief overview of the current state of stem cells therapy for periodontal diseases.

  12. An evaluation of recruitment methods utilized for a clinical trial with periodontal and diabetes enrollment criteria: the Diabetes and Periodontal Therapy Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Elinor R; Hyman, Leslie; Simpson, Leslie Long; Michalowicz, Bryan; Reddy, Michael; Gelato, Marie; Hou, Wei; Engebretson, Steven P; Hytner, Catherine; Lenton, Pat

    2014-12-01

    Diabetes and its complications are a major United States public health concern. The Diabetes and Periodontal Therapy Trial (DPTT) evaluated whether non-surgical treatment of periodontal disease influenced diabetes management among persons with Type 2 diabetes and periodontitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate DPTT's many recruitment strategies in terms of enrollment success. Targeted recruitment strategies were more effective in identifying individuals who met periodontal and diabetes eligibility criteria. Individuals eligible for a baseline visit/enrollment were more often male, had a younger age at diabetes diagnosis, a longer diabetes duration, more often Hispanic and less often African-American. Tracking and evaluating recruitment sources during study enrollment optimized recruitment methods to enroll a diverse participant population based upon gender, race and ethnicity.

  13. Periowave demonstrates bactericidal activity against periopathogens and leads to improved clinical outcomes in the treatment of adult periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Cale N.; Andersen, Roger; Loebel, Nicolas G.

    2009-02-01

    Periodontitis affects half of the U.S. population over 50, and is the leading cause of tooth loss after 35. It is believed to be caused by growth of complex bacterial biofilms on the tooth surface below the gumline. Photodynamic therapy, a technology used commonly in antitumor applications, has more recently been shown to exhibit antimicrobial efficacy. We have demonstrated eradication of the periopathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in vitro using PeriowaveTM; a commercial photodisinfection system. In addition, several clinical studies have now demonstrated the efficacy of this treatment. A pilot study in the U.S. showed that 68% of patients treated with PeriowaveTM adjunctively to scaling and root planing (SRP) showed clinical attachment level increase of >1 mm, as opposed to 30% with SRP alone. In a subsequent larger study, a second PeriowaveTM treatment 6 weeks after initial treatment led to pocket depth improvements of >1.5 mm in 89% of patients. Finally, in the most recent multicenter, randomized, examiner-blinded study conducted on 121 subjects in Canada, PeriowaveTM treatment produced highly significant gains in attachment level (0.88 mm vs. 0.57 mm; p=0.003) and pocket depth (0.87 mm vs. 0.63 mm; p=0.01) as compared to SRP alone. In summary, PeriowaveTM demonstrated strong bactericidal activity against known periopathogens, and treatment of periodontitis using this system produced significantly better clinical outcomes than SRP alone. This, along with the absence of any adverse events in patients treated to date demonstrates that PDT is a safe and effective treatment for adult chronic periodontitis.

  14. Oral Candida spp carriage and periodontal diseases in HIV-infected patients in Ribeirão Preto, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Alan Grupioni; Ribeiro, Ana Elisa Rodrigues Alves; Nakao, Cristiano; Motta, Ana Carolina Fragoso; Antonio, Luana Grupioni Lourenço; Machado, Alcyone Artioli; Komesu, Marilena Chinali

    2017-06-01

    The majority of HIV-infected patients develop Candida spp-associated clinical oral lesions. Studies have shown that asymptomatic oral colonization of Candida spp may lead to oral lesions or become a source of disseminated infections. The aim of this study was to verify the effects of periodontal conditions on Candida spp prevalence and Candida spp carriage in the oral cavity of HIV-infected patients compared to non-infected patients. Twenty-five patients not infected with HIV and 48 HIV-infected patients were classified according to periodontal conditions as being periodontal healthy or with periodontal disease. Candida spp carriage and classification were performed in oral rinse samples. Viral load and CD4+ T lymphocyte (CD4+L) counts were performed in blood samples from HIV-infected patients. No differences in Candida spp prevalence related to HIV status or periodontal condition were detected. However, Candida spp carriage was increased in periodontally affected HIV-infected patients when compared to periodontally healthy HIV-infected patients (p= 0.04). Periodontally healthy HIV-infected patients presented Candida spp carriage in similar levels as healthy or periodontally affected non-HIV-infected patients. Candida spp carriage was correlated with CD4+L counting in HIV-infected patients. We concluded that periodontal disease is associated with increased Candida spp carriage in HIV-infected patients and may be a predisposing factor to clinical manifestations of candidiasis.

  15. Effect of Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy on Superoxide Dismutase Levels in Gingival Tissues of Chronic Periodontitis Patients: A Clinical and Spectophotometric Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxmi Sukhtankar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Superoxide dismutase (SOD, an antioxidant acting against superoxide (oxygen radical, O2.-, it is released in inflammatory pathways and causes connective tissue breakdown. Increased SOD activity in inflamed gingiva may indicate increased O2.- radical generation by neutrophils and other inflammatory cells at the diseased site. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of non-surgical periodontal therapy (NSPT on SOD levels in gingival tissues of chronic periodontitis patients.

  16. Prevalence of periodontal disease in dogs and owners' level of awareness - a prospective clinical trial

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    Natalia Alves Fernandes

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease (PD is widely known among veterinarians for its high prevalence and serious consequences to the dogs. The objective of this study was to assess the occurrence of PD in dogs that live in the micro-region of Viçosa, treated at the Veterinary Hospital of the Federal University of Viçosa (HVT - Hospital Veterinário da Universidade Federal de Viçosa, as well as to assess how aware of this disease dog owners are. In order to do so, all dogs treated at the HVT from March 10th, 2009 to November 30th, 2009, on alternate days, had their oral cavities examined. Medical history data, such as age, type of food, main complaint and owner consent, halitosis, presence of dental calculus, inflammation and gingival recession and tooth loss, were collected. A prevalence of 88.67% was found for PD in dogs referred to the HVT, and 2.67% were referred due to this disease. Of all the owners who participated in the study, 43.83% knew about periodontal disease and of these 17.46% made use of some type of prevention or treatment. Therefore, periodontal disease is highly prevalent and the owners are not aware of the disease. Thus, a dog owner clarification program on periodontal disease is needed in the area where HVT-UFV operates.

  17. Clinical Management of Patients With Diabetes and Periodontal Disease: Ideas Whose Time Has Come.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalla, Evanthia

    2017-09-01

    Multiple studies over many decades have demonstrated that diabetes mellitus and periodontitis are closely linked and may amplify one another. This review provides a different look at the complex association between these two common, chronic conditions and discusses decision-making in the management of affected individuals.

  18. Identification of a discriminative metabolomic fingerprint of potential clinical relevance in saliva of patients with periodontitis using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Pierre; Jungo, Sébastien; Botosoa, Eliot; Duchemann, Boris; Le Moyec, Laurence; Bernaudin, Jean-François; Guez, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Periodontitis is characterized by the loss of the supporting tissues of the teeth in an inflammatory-infectious context. The diagnosis relies on clinical and X-ray examination. Unfortunately, clinical signs of tissue destruction occur late in the disease progression. Therefore, it is mandatory to identify reliable biomarkers to facilitate a better and earlier management of this disease. To this end, saliva represents a promising fluid for identification of biomarkers as metabolomic fingerprints. The present study used high-resolution 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy coupled with multivariate statistical analysis to identify the metabolic signature of active periodontitis. The metabolome of stimulated saliva of 26 patients with generalized periodontitis (18 chronic and 8 aggressive) was compared to that of 25 healthy controls. Principal Components Analysis (PCA), performed with clinical variables, indicated that the patient population was homogeneous, demonstrating a strong correlation between the clinical and the radiological variables used to assess the loss of periodontal tissues and criteria of active disease. Orthogonal Projection to Latent Structure (OPLS) analysis showed that patients with periodontitis can be discriminated from controls on the basis of metabolite concentrations in saliva with satisfactory explained variance (R2X = 0.81 and R2Y = 0.61) and predictability (Q2Y = 0.49, CV-AUROC = 0.94). Interestingly, this discrimination was irrespective of the type of generalized periodontitis, i.e. chronic or aggressive. Among the main discriminating metabolites were short chain fatty acids as butyrate, observed in higher concentrations, and lactate, γ-amino-butyrate, methanol, and threonine observed in lower concentrations in periodontitis. The association of lactate, GABA, and butyrate to generate an aggregated variable reached the best positive predictive value for diagnosis of periodontitis. In conclusion, this pilot study showed that 1H

  19. Identification of a discriminative metabolomic fingerprint of potential clinical relevance in saliva of patients with periodontitis using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Rzeznik

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is characterized by the loss of the supporting tissues of the teeth in an inflammatory-infectious context. The diagnosis relies on clinical and X-ray examination. Unfortunately, clinical signs of tissue destruction occur late in the disease progression. Therefore, it is mandatory to identify reliable biomarkers to facilitate a better and earlier management of this disease. To this end, saliva represents a promising fluid for identification of biomarkers as metabolomic fingerprints. The present study used high-resolution 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate statistical analysis to identify the metabolic signature of active periodontitis. The metabolome of stimulated saliva of 26 patients with generalized periodontitis (18 chronic and 8 aggressive was compared to that of 25 healthy controls. Principal Components Analysis (PCA, performed with clinical variables, indicated that the patient population was homogeneous, demonstrating a strong correlation between the clinical and the radiological variables used to assess the loss of periodontal tissues and criteria of active disease. Orthogonal Projection to Latent Structure (OPLS analysis showed that patients with periodontitis can be discriminated from controls on the basis of metabolite concentrations in saliva with satisfactory explained variance (R2X = 0.81 and R2Y = 0.61 and predictability (Q2Y = 0.49, CV-AUROC = 0.94. Interestingly, this discrimination was irrespective of the type of generalized periodontitis, i.e. chronic or aggressive. Among the main discriminating metabolites were short chain fatty acids as butyrate, observed in higher concentrations, and lactate, γ-amino-butyrate, methanol, and threonine observed in lower concentrations in periodontitis. The association of lactate, GABA, and butyrate to generate an aggregated variable reached the best positive predictive value for diagnosis of periodontitis. In conclusion, this pilot study

  20. Clinical Outcomes after Treatment of Periodontal Intrabony Defects with Nanocrystalline Hydroxyapatite (Ostim or Enamel Matrix Derivatives (Emdogain: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elyan Al Machot

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Periodontitis is an inflammatory process in response to dental biofilm and leads to periodontal tissue destruction. The aim of this study was the comparison of outcomes using either an enamel matrix derivative (EMD or a nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (NHA in regenerative periodontal therapy after 6 and 12 months. Methods. Using a parallel group, prospective randomized study design, we enrolled 19 patients in each group. The primary outcome was bone fill after 12 months. Attachment gain, probing pocket depth (PPD reduction, and recession were secondary variables. Additionally, early wound healing and adverse events were assessed. Data analysis included test of noninferiority of NHA group (test compared to EMD group (reference in bone fill. Differences in means of secondary variables were compared by paired t-test, frequency data by exact χ2 test. Results. Both groups showed significant bone fill, reduction of PPD, increase in recession, and gain of attachment after 6 and 12 months. No significant differences between groups were found at any time point. Adverse events were comparable between both groups with a tendency of more complaints in the NHA group. Conclusion. The clinical outcomes were similar in both groups. EMD could have some advantage compared to NHA regarding patients comfort and adverse events. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00757159.

  1. Clinical outcomes after treatment of periodontal intrabony defects with nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (Ostim) or enamel matrix derivatives (Emdogain): a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Machot, Elyan; Hoffmann, Thomas; Lorenz, Katrin; Khalili, Ihssan; Noack, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory process in response to dental biofilm and leads to periodontal tissue destruction. The aim of this study was the comparison of outcomes using either an enamel matrix derivative (EMD) or a nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (NHA) in regenerative periodontal therapy after 6 and 12 months. Using a parallel group, prospective randomized study design, we enrolled 19 patients in each group. The primary outcome was bone fill after 12 months. Attachment gain, probing pocket depth (PPD) reduction, and recession were secondary variables. Additionally, early wound healing and adverse events were assessed. Data analysis included test of noninferiority of NHA group (test) compared to EMD group (reference) in bone fill. Differences in means of secondary variables were compared by paired t-test, frequency data by exact χ(2) test. Both groups showed significant bone fill, reduction of PPD, increase in recession, and gain of attachment after 6 and 12 months. No significant differences between groups were found at any time point. Adverse events were comparable between both groups with a tendency of more complaints in the NHA group. The clinical outcomes were similar in both groups. EMD could have some advantage compared to NHA regarding patients comfort and adverse events. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00757159.

  2. Do patients with osteoporosis have an increased prevalence of periodontal disease? A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic, E J; Southern, H N; Coates, P; Adams, J E; Walsh, T; Horner, K; Devlin, H

    2013-07-01

    The study examined if women with osteoporosis were at increased risk of periodontal disease. Three hundred eighty females aged 45-65 years with recent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans of the spine and proximal femur agreed to a dental examination. No association was established between the presence of severe periodontal disease and osteoporosis. The purpose of this study is to determine whether patients with osteoporosis have an increased severity and extent of periodontal disease, taking full account of confounding factors. Volunteer dentate women (45-65 years), who had undergone recent DXA of the femur and lumbar spine, received a clinical examination of their periodontal tissues by a single trained operator who was blind to the subject's osteoporosis status. Clinical examinations were performed within 6 months of the DXA. Basic Periodontal Examination score, gingival bleeding score, periodontal pocket depth, recession and calculus were the periodontal outcome measures. Potential confounding factors were recorded. Logistic regression was performed for the dichotomous outcome measure of severe periodontal disease (present or absent) with osteoporotic status, adjusting for confounding factors. There were 380 dentate participants for whom DXA data were available. Of these, 98 had osteoporosis. When compared with osteoporotic subjects, those with normal bone mineral density were significantly younger (p = 0.01), had a higher body mass index (p = 0.03) and had more teeth (p = 0.01). The prevalence of severe periodontal disease in the sample was 39 %. The unadjusted odds ratio for the association between osteoporosis and severe periodontal disease was 1.21 (0.76 to 1.93). The adjusted odds ratio analysis including other covariates (age, smoking, hormone replacement therapy, alcohol) was 0.99 (0.61 to 1.61). No association was established between the presence of severe periodontal disease and osteoporosis.

  3. Periodontal and hematological characteristics associated with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Westergaard, Jytte; Stoltze, Kaj

    2006-01-01

    Periodontitis shares several clinical and pathogenic characteristics with chronic arthritis, and there is some degree of coexistence. The aims of this study were to elucidate whether patients with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP), generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP), juvenile idi...... idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) share periodontal and hematological characteristics distinguishing them from individuals free of diseases....

  4. A randomized clinical trial of salivary substitute as an adjunct to scaling and root planing for management of periodontal inflammation in mouth breathing patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Anu; Sharma, Rajinder K; Tewari, Shikha; Narula, Satish C

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the outcome of conventional periodontal treatment in mouth breathing patients with chronic periodontitis, and compared the efficacy of applying salivary substitute to the anterior sextants as an adjunct to conventional treatment in such patients. In this randomized, investigator-blind, clinical study involving parallel groups, 40 mouth breathing patients were divided into two groups: a control group (CG, n = 20) comprising patients who received scaling and root planing (SRP), and a test group (TG, n = 20) who received salivary substitute as an adjunct to SRP for treatment of chronic periodontitis. The patients were followed up at various time intervals, and improvement of the gingival index (GI) was examined as the primary outcome. Student's t-test, repeated-measures ANOVA and Mann-Whitney U test were applied for statistical analysis. Although periodontal parameters were improved in both groups after 8 weeks of follow-up, the test group showed better improvement in terms of GI and percentage bleeding on probing. Within the limits of this study, our results suggest that the use of salivary substitute has a beneficial adjunctive effect for improvement of periodontal parameters in mouth breathing patients with chronic periodontitis.

  5. Treatment of intrabony defects with guided tissue regeneration in aggressive periodontitis: clinical outcomes at 6 and 12 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakmanee, Thanasak; Griffiths, Gareth S; Auplish, Gita; Darbar, Ulpee; Petrie, Aviva; Olsen, Irwin; Donos, Nikolaos

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare clinical outcomes between guided tissue regeneration (GTR) and access flap (AF) surgery in patients with aggressive periodontitis (AgP). Eighteen AgP patients with similar bilateral intrabony defects were treated in this split-mouth, single-blinded, randomised, controlled clinical trial. All patients presented with ≥3 mm intrabony defects and ≥5 mm periodontal pocket depths (PPD). In each patient, one defect was treated with a polyglycolide membrane according to the GTR principle, whereas the contralateral side was treated with AF. For both sides, a simplified papilla preservation flap was used. At baseline, 6 and 12 months post-surgery, the clinical attachment levels (CAL) and PPD were evaluated. At 6 and 12 months, at the GTR sites, the mean [95 % CI] CAL gain was 1.7 mm [1.1, 2.3] and 1.6 mm [0.9, 2.1], respectively, while the mean [95 % CI] PPD reduction was 2.3 mm [1.9, 2.8] and 2.4 mm [1.9, 2.8], respectively. Similar CAL (1.6 mm [1.0, 2.2] and 2.1 mm [1.4, 2.7]) and PPD (2.0 mm [1.5, 2.4] and 2.5 mm [2.0, 3.0]) outcomes were observed at the control sites at 6 and 12 months, respectively. Notably, at the GTR-treated sites, 13 subjects presented with various degrees of membrane exposure. Both therapies were effective in the treatment of intrabony defects in AgP patients, and no statistically significant differences between them could be demonstrated, possibly as a result of the differing degrees of membrane exposure at the GTR sites. Both periodontal regeneration and conventional periodontal surgery are effective treatments for AgP patients.

  6. Effect of the probiotic Lactobacilli reuteri (Prodentis in the management of periodontal disease: a preliminary randomized clinical trial

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    M.R. Vivekananda

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Lactobacilli reuteri (Prodentis alone and in combination with scaling and root planing (SRP in a double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial of volunteers with chronic periodontitis. Methods: Thirty, otherwise systemically healthy, chronic periodontitis patients (19 males and 11 females, aged between 34 and 50 years were included. The study period was 42 days. ‘Split-mouth’ design was used for the SRP, which was performed on day 0; two quadrants (either right or left were treated with SRP whereas the remaining two quadrants were left untreated. The participants received a toothbrush, toothpaste, and brushing instructions. L. reuteri Prodentis lozenges (1×108 CFU DSM17938 + 1×108 CFU ATCC PTA 5289 or the corresponding placebo lozenges were taken twice daily from day 21 to day 42. Statistical analysis was done for comparisons of clinical parameters (Plaque Index (PI, Gingival Index (GI, Gingival Bleeding Index (GBI, probing pocket depth (PPD, clinical attachment level (CAL and microbiological levels of the pathogens Aggregibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa, Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg, and Prevotella intermedia (Pi. All p-values less than 0.05 were considered significant. Assessments were made on day 0 before SRP treatment, on day 21 before administration of the lozenges, and on day 42. Results: At day 42, the PI, GI, and GBI were significantly reduced by all treatment modalities. When ranked, the amount of PI, GI and GBI reduction by the different treatments was SRP + Prodentis > Prodentis > SRP + placebo > placebo; all differences were statistically significant. For PPD and CAL, the best result was obtained with the SRP + Prodentis treatment. PPD was reduced from 5.08±0.75 to 3.78±0.61 mm (p<0.001 and CAL from 3.93±0.93 to 2.85±0.74 mm (p<0.001. Prodentis, either alone or following SRP, reduced Aa, Pi, and Pg by 1 log10 unit

  7. Correlation of ABO Blood Group Phenotype and Rhesus Factor with Periodontal Disease: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Anju; Mittal, Neelam; Singh, T B; Srivastava, Ruchi; Verma, Pushpendra Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The knowledge of the ABO blood group phenotype of the patients and their correlation with the periodontal disease maybe important in the development of early treatment strategies, and it would be helpful to target non-responding areas to periodontal therapy of the susceptible individuals. The present study was conducted to determine whether there was any correlation between periodontal diseases and ABO blood groups and Rh factor. This study was carried out on 537 subjects attending Faculty of Dental Sciences OPD in BHU. Subjects were divided into three groups: group I (healthy subjects), group II (subjects with gingivitis), and group III (subjects with periodontitis) based on periodontal examination (Gingival index, Bleeding Index, Probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level). ABO Blood grouping were done and correlated with the periodontal status of study subjects. Statistical Analysis: Data was analyzed using the statistical software namely Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS, Version 16, IBM Analytics) and Systat 8.0. In this study, there was a greater prevalence of gingivitis in blood group O and periodontitis in blood group B. The blood group AB showed the least prevalence of periodontal diseases. Similarly gingivitis and peridontitis were significantly higher among Rhesus positive groups when compared with Rhesus negative groups. Considering the results of this study, it can be concluded that ABO blood groups and Rh factor could be a risk factor for the development of periodontal disease.

  8. Posmetnaya TV. Peculiarities of clinical and X-ray findings at women during postmenopause with chronic generalized periodontitis determined by mineral bone density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eremina N.V.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim: to study clinical and X-ray specifics of chronic generalized periodontitis of women during a postmenopaus-al period determined by mineral bone density. Material and Methods. 80 women having chronic generalized periodontitis during a postmenopausal period were examined using clinical and X-ray research. Material of bone density was taken into consideration. Results. Decrease of hygienic indices of women at postmenopausal period has been found. It depends on the degree of severity of chronic generalized periodontitis. There was a reverse connection of periodon-tal index and mineral density of bone tissues in the 1-st group: — 0.9 (p<0.05, in the 2-nd group: — 0.5 (p<0.05, in the 3-rd group: — 0.79 (p<0.05. Cone-beam computer tomography made possible to find out the initial signs of edge osteoporosis of interdental partitions at the light degree of chronic generalized periodontitis and signs of spot and homogenous osteoporosis of gum bones, osteoporosis of interdental partitions with osteolysis at mild and severe degrees of severity. Conclusion. The clinical researches with cone-beam computer tomography and densitometry have revealed the exact data on the condition of bone tissues. The results have given an opportunity to plan osteotropic therapy and to control the dynamics of the process correctly.

  9. A report of laser-assisted modified Widman flap for periodontal regeneration: Clinical and radiographic evaluation

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    Sanjeev Kumar Salaria

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is a relatively common disease. Various therapies have been recommended for its treatment which includes nonsurgical, antimicrobial, and surgical therapy. In recent years lasers have been used for all the three above-mentioned purposes. Lasers have been applied for hard and soft tissue debridement, contouring as well as the bacterial load reduction in the pocket. Here we present a case report of chronic periodontitis treated with the help of a new technique, laser-assisted modified Widman flap (LAMWF. The surgical procedure followed with a 980 nm diode laser has been described. The present case report resulted in significant pocket depth reduction, attachment gain, and radiographic evidence of bone fill. The laser-assisted modified Widman flap provided excellent results without complications and high patient as well as clinician satisfaction.

  10. Effect of non-surgical periodontal therapy on insulin resistance in patients with type II diabetes mellitus and chronic periodontitis, as assessed by C-peptide and the Homeostasis Assessment Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammen, Jerry; Vadakkekuttical, Rosamma Joseph; George, Joseraj Manaloor; Kaziyarakath, Jaishid Ahadal; Radhakrishnan, Chandni

    2017-08-01

    A bidirectional relationship exists between diabetes and periodontitis. In the present clinical trial, we evaluated the effects of non-surgical periodontal therapy (NSPT) on insulin resistance in patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic periodontitis. Forty chronic periodontitis patients with type II DM were selected and equally allocated to case and control groups. All patients were assessed for periodontal parameters and systemic parameters. The case group received NSPT, and both groups were re-evaluated after 3 months. All periodontal parameters were found to be significantly improved in the case group compared to the control group 3 months after NSPT. The mean differences in systemic parameters, such as fasting serum C-peptide, Homeostasis Assessment (HOMA) Index-insulin resistance, and HOMA-insulin sensitivity, from baseline to 3 months for the case group were 0.544 ± 0.73, 0.54 ± 0.63, and -25.44 ± 36.81, respectively; for the control group, they were significant at -1.66 ± 1.89, -1.48 ± 1.86, and 31.42 ± 38.82 respectively (P periodontal inflammation could affect glycemic control and insulin resistance. Effective periodontal therapy reduced insulin resistance and improved periodontal health status and insulin sensitivity in patients with type II DM and chronic periodontitis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Efficacy and acceptability of 0.074% diclofenac-containing mouthwash after periodontal surgery: A clinical study

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    Agarwal Sangita

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The systemic use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are associated with various side-effects like hepatotoxicity, blood dyscrasias, nephrotoxicity and gastric irritability. Among these, gastric irritability is the most common and the most important one, which should be taken care of. Therefore, it may be preferable to use a local formulation such as a mouthwash to treat the inflammatory conditions of the oral cavity. Aim: To determine the efficacy and acceptability of 0.074% diclofenac mouthwash in relieving pain and inflammation of post-periodontal surgery patients. Materials and Methods: The study was designed as a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Twenty chronic periodontitis patients who were scheduled for full-mouth periodontal flap surgery were randomized to receive either diclofenac mouthwash or placebo to rinse with 15 ml of solution daily for a period of 7 days. Modified gingival index (Lobene 1986 was used to verify gingival inflammation and visual analog scale was used to assess pain. After the baseline measurements for all the parameters were recorded, spontaneous pain and burning were evaluated daily while redness and edema were recorded on the 3 rd and 7 th day from the day of treatment. Results: Data obtained were analyzed statistically using paired " t" test for intragroup comparison and unpaired " t"-test for intergroup comparison. Spontaneous pain was significantly reduced by diclofenac mouthwash. Other parameters, i.e. gingival inflammation and swelling, had not shown significant reduction in scores in either group, although the reduction was higher in the test group. Conclusion: The new 0.074% diclofenac mouthwash is an effective and tolerable medicinal product for post-surgical symptomatic relief.

  12. Longitudinal validation of a risk calculator for periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Roy C; Martin, John; Krall, Elizabeth A; Mancl, Lloyd; Garcia, Raul

    2003-09-01

    Risk assessment and utilization of the results are important components of prevention, diagnosis and treatment of periodontal diseases. Risk assessment is relatively new to dentistry. Currently risk is assessed by subjective evaluation and results vary widely among clinicians. We have developed a computer-based risk assessment tool, the Periodontal Risk Calculator (PRC), for objective, quantitative assessment of risk. The purpose of the study reported here was to evaluate the accuracy and validity of this tool. Clinical records and radiographs of 523 subjects enrolled in the VA Dental Longitudinal Study of Oral Health and Disease, covering a period of 15 years, were used. Information from baseline examinations was entered into the risk calculator and a risk score on a scale of l-5 for periodontal deterioration was calculated for each subject. Actual periodontal status in terms of alveolar bone loss determined using digitized radiographs, and tooth loss determined from the clinical records, was assessed at years 3, 9 and 15. The strength of the association between risk prediction and actual outcome was determined statistically. The risk scores were strong predictors of future periodontal status measured as worsening severity and extent of alveolar bone loss and tooth loss, especially loss of periodontally affected teeth. Over the entire 15-year period, risk scores consistently ranked groups from least to most bone loss and tooth loss. Risk groups differed greatly from one another. By year 3, the incidence rate of bone loss of group 5 was 3.7-fold greater than for group 2, and by year 15, the loss of periodontally affected teeth was 22.7-fold greater than for group 2 (pperiodontally affected teeth compared to 20.2% of subjects in group 2. Risk scores calculated using the PRC and information gathered during a standard periodontal examination predict future periodontal status with a high level of accuracy and validity. Use of the risk assessment tool over time may be

  13. Prevalence and Determinants of Chronic periodontitis in HIV positive patients in Nigeria

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    Kehinde Adesola Umeizudike

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prevalence and determinants of chronic periodontitis in HIV positive patients. Methods: A total of 120 HIV positive patients attending the dedicated HIV outpatient clinic of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria were recruited for the study. Their periodontal status was assessed using the community periodontal index of treatment needs. Their CD4+ cell count was determined using the flow-cytometer method. The risk factors for periodontitis including age, gender, education, smoking, CD4+ cell counts, bleeding on probing (BOP were determined. Results: Prevalence of periodontitis was high (63.3% in the HIV positive patients. In a bivariate analysis, significant associations were observed between severity of periodontitis and age ≥35 years (P=0.021, male gender (P=0.005, smoking (P=0.040 and ≥3 community periodontal index of treatment needs sextants exhibiting BOP (P=0.004. In a binary logistic regression, independent predictors of periodontitis were ≥3 sextants exhibiting BOP (odds ratio 1.738, 95% CI 1.339 to 2.256, P=0.000 and age ≥35 years (odds ratio 1.057, 95% CI 1.005 to 1.111, P=0.030. The CD4+ cell counts were not associated with periodontitis in the HIV positive patients (P=0.988. Conclusions: A high prevalence of periodontitis was found among the HIV positive Nigerian patients in this study. Older age ≥35 years and BOP were the determinants of periodontitis. There is therefore a need for close periodontal monitoring of HIV positive Nigerian patients with emphasis on preventive, professional oral prophylaxis.

  14. Periodontal Disease Awareness and Knowledge among Nigerian Primary School Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azodo, C C; Umoh, A O

    2015-01-01

    Teacher-led oral health education is equally effective in improving the oral health knowledge and oral hygiene status of adolescents as dentist-led and peer-led strategies. The aim was to determine periodontal disease awareness and knowledge among Nigerian primary school teachers. This cross-sectional study was conducted among primary school teachers in Edo State, Nigeria. A self-administered questionnaire which elicited information on demography, awareness of the periodontal disease and source of information, knowledge of etiology, and symptoms of the periodontal disease, was the data collection tool.. The test of association was done using either Chi-square or Fisher's exact statistics. P value was set at 0.05 for significance level. Out of 180 teachers recruited from seven public primary schools in Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria, 151 of them fully participated by filling the study questionnaires giving a 83.9% (151/180) response rate. The majority 74.2% (112/151) of the participants reported having heard of the periodontal disease and the leading source of information was television. A total of 29.8% (45/151) of participants considered periodontal disease as the main cause of tooth loss among adult Nigerian. Only 12.6% (19/151) of the participants knew dental plaque as soft debris on teeth and 29.1% (44/151) attested that plaque can cause periodontal disease. The majority of the participants were not aware of age 81.5% (123/151) and gender 96.7% (146/151) predisposition to periodontal disease. The perceived manifestations of the periodontal disease reported by were mainly gum bleeding 35.1% (53/151) and swollen gum 20.5% (31/151). A total of 70.2% (106/151) of the participants considered periodontal disease as a preventable disease and about half 49.0% (74/151) of the participants considered daily mouth cleaning as the best preventive method. The majority 95.4% (144/151) of the participants expressed interest in learning about the periodontal disease and the

  15. Impact of Yoga on Periodontal Disease and Stress Management.

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    Sudhanshu, Archika; Sharma, Urvi; Vadiraja, H S; Rana, Rakesh Kumar; Singhal, Richa

    2017-01-01

    Yoga is considered to be one of the most important, effective, and valuable tools available for man to overcome various physical and psychological problems. Stress contributes significantly to the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases; hence, it becomes important to reduce the level of stress for prevention and management of diseases. The present study was aimed: (1) To understand and analyze the possibilities of employing yogic practices in the treatment of periodontal disease along with conventional dental therapy, (2) to understand the effect of stress on periodontal treatment outcome, (3) to evaluate the efficacy of yoga in the management of periodontal disease with reference to stress. An outpatient department-based parallel group randomized study was performed with standard treatment for periodontal disease yoga therapy as Group II and only standard treatment as Group I. Periodontal health status was recorded using indices of modified plaque index (PI), bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth, and clinical attachment loss (CAL). The Cohen's perceived stress questionnaire was also used to determine stress severity. The yogic intervention consists of lectures and practical sessions on asanas, pranayama, kriyas, and meditation. Repeated measure analysis of variance revealed a significant difference ( P stress scale score also reduced by 18.76 points in Group II as compared to only 2.58 points in Group I, BOP also shows better improvement in Group II with a reduction of 0.68 as compared to reduction of only 0.08 in Group I. The results obtained ascertained the role of yoga in stress reduction in periodontal disease. Although yoga does not play a direct role in improving periodontal disease, it accelerates the treatment outcomes by combating the stress which is a major factor affecting the treatment of periodontal disease.

  16. Short- and Medium-Term Effects of Low-Level Laser Therapy on Periodontal Status in Lingual Orthodontic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellán, Rosa; Gómez, Clara; Oteo, María Dolores; Scuzzo, Giuseppe; Palma, Juan Carlos

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the short- and medium-term effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) applied in repeated doses in adults with a healthy periodontium treated by lingual orthodontic appliances. Plaque accumulation, in combination with difficulty in removing it in lingual orthodontic patients, can cause gingival inflammation. Twelve orthodontic patients scheduled for fixed lingual orthodontic treatment were selected. Clinical measurements [visible plaque index (VPI), bleeding on probing (BOP), and probing depth (PD), and collection of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF)], which was used to measure the levels of interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), was performed before bonding the lingual device, and at the short-term (1, 2, 3 months) and medium-term (12 months) follow-up appointments. For each patient, quadrant 1 or 2 was randomly chosen for irradiation by a diode laser (λ = 670 nm, 190 mW, 6.05 W/cm(2), 60 sec/ tooth) (Laser Group) and the contralateral quadrant was used as the Control Group. In both studied groups, a slight worsening of the periodontal condition was observed, which was evident at the 3rd month follow-up and which was mainly at the lingual side in the Control Group. The levels of IL-1β in the GCF were significantly increased in the Control Group compared with the Laser Group at the 2nd and 3rd months after bonding. At the 12th month follow-up, an improvement of the inflammation was observed in both groups in the study. LLLT showed short-term effects by preventing a substantial increase in IL-1β levels. At medium-term follow-up, LLLT diminished VPI, BOP, and PD scores.

  17. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy vs. local minocycline in addition to non-surgical therapy of deep periodontal pockets: a controlled randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabenski, Laura; Moder, Daniel; Cieplik, Fabian; Schenke, Frederike; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Schmalz, Gottfried; Christgau, Michael

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the additional influence of either antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT; Helbo® Photodynamic Systems) or local application of minocycline microspheres (MC; Arestin, OraPharma) on clinical and microbiological healing results in deep periodontal pockets (PPD ≥6 mm) following non-surgical periodontal therapy (SRP). Forty-five patients with chronic periodontitis were evaluated: test group aPDT + SRP (n = 15), positive control group MC + SRP (n = 15), and negative control group SRP-alone (n = 15). Clinical and microbiological healing parameters were recorded in every patient for four experimental teeth at baseline, 6 weeks, and 3, 6, and 12 months. Wilcoxon signed-rank test and Mann-Whitney U test were used for statistical analysis (α = 0.05). Significant improvements in clinical and microbiological parameters were found for all groups after 6 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months. Differences between groups were not statistically significant. Changes after 12 months [median (25/75%)] are as follows: reduction in PPD [mm]: aPDT + SRP 2 (1/3), MC + SRP 3 (1/4), SRP-alone 2 (1/3); percentage of residual BOP positive teeth [%]: aPDT + SRP 75 (25/100), MC + SRP 33.3 (0/50), SRP-alone 66.7 (25/75). Within the limitations of this study, neither the applied aPDT system nor MC showed a significant additional influence on clinical and microbiological healing outcomes in deep periodontal pockets compared to SRP alone. In deep periodontal defects, the efficacy of non-surgical periodontal treatment seems not to be improved by adjunctive use of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy or minocycline microspheres.

  18. Ten-year results of a three arms prospective cohort study on implants in periodontally compromised patients. Part 2: clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roccuzzo, Mario; Bonino, Francesca; Aglietta, Marco; Dalmasso, Paola

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare long-term outcomes of implants placed both in patients treated for periodontitis and in periodontally healthy patients (PHP). One hundred and twelve partially edentulous patients were consecutively enrolled in private specialist practice and divided into three groups according to their initial periodontal condition: PHP, moderately periodontally compromised patients (PCP) and severely PCP. Implants were placed to support fixed prostheses, after successful completion of initial periodontal therapy [full-mouth plaque score (FMPS) periodontal treatment (APT), patients were asked to follow an individualized supportive periodontal therapy (SPT) program. Diagnosis and treatment of peri-implant biological complications was performed according to cumulative interceptive supportive therapy. At 10 years, clinical measures were recorded by two calibrated operators, blinded to the initial patient classification, on 101 patients, as 11 were lost to follow-up. The number of sites treated according to therapy modalities C and D (antibiotics and/or surgery) during the 10 years was registered. Eighteen implants were removed for biological complications. Antibiotic and/or surgical therapy was performed in 10.7% of cases in PHP, in 27% of cases in moderate PCP and in 47.2% cases in severe PCP, with a statistically significant differences between PHP and severe PCP (P = 0.002). At the final examination, the percentage of implants, with at least one site which presented a PD ≥6 mm, was respectively 1.7% for PHP, 15.9% for moderate PCP and 27.2% for severe PCP, with a statistically significant difference between PHP and moderate PCP (P = 0.005) and PHP and severe PCP (P = 0.0001). Patients with a history of periodontitis presented a statistically significant higher number of sites which required additional treatment. Therefore, patients with a history of periodontitis should be informed that they are more at risk for peri-implant disease

  19. The localised aggressive periodontitis prevalence in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belhaissi, F E; Cherkaoui, A; Laporte, C; Miquel, J L

    2004-03-01

    This work concerns a retrospective study of prevalence records and the clinical characteristics of localised aggressive periodontitis in the breast of consultants in the periodontitis service in Dental Medicine Faculty of Rabat (Morocco) from 1997 to 1999.

  20. The association of psychosocial factors and smoking with periodontal health in a community population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiou, L-J; Yang, Y-H; Hung, H-C; Tsai, C-C; Shieh, T-Y; Wu, Y-M; Wang, W-C; Hsu, T-C

    2010-02-01

    The association between psychosocial factors and periodontal disease has been widely reported and might be modified by smoking status. This study investigated the association of periodontal status with psychosocial factors and smoking in a community population. A structured questionnaire was administered to a total of 1,764 civilian noninstitutional (general population excluding from nursing homes, sanitariums and hospitals) Taiwanese individuals to assess the presence and severity of psychosocial factors [using the 12-item Chinese health questionnaire (CHQ-12)], smoking habits and other related factors. Periodontal status was established using the community periodontal index and by measuring clinical loss of attachment. Psychological factors and smoking were significantly associated with loss of attachment (odds ratio = 1.69, 95% confidence interval = 1.01-2.77, comparing the CHQ-12 score of >or= 6 with the CHQ-12 score of 0-2 and p = 0.032 for linear trend; odds ratio = 2.21, 95% confidence interval = 1.45-3.37, comparing smokers with nonsmokers) but not with community periodontal index. The association was found to be stronger among smokers than among nonsmokers. Smokers with a CHQ-12 score of >or= 6 had a higher odds ratio of loss of attachment (odds ratio = 2.49, 95% confidence interval = 0.91-6.49) than nonsmokers (odds ratio = 1.43, 95% confidence interval = 0.76-2.58). For periodontal health measured using the community periodontal index, married and divorced/widowed subjects tended to have poorer periodontal health (odds ratio = 3.38, 95% confidence interval = 1.26-10.81 and odds ratio = 3.83, 95% confidence interval = 1.21-13.83, respectively) than single subjects among nonsmokers but not among smokers. Poor mental health had a stronger association with periodontal disease among smokers than among nonsmokers, especially in accumulative attachment loss. Our findings suggest that mental health and smoking might have a synergistic effect on the risk of

  1. Status of Clinical Supervision among School Counselors in Southeast Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Anna Lila; Bailey, Carrie Lynn; Bergin, James J.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have investigated the role of clinical supervision in school counseling practice. This research explored the status and meaning of clinical supervision to school counselors employed in two southeastern Georgia counties. Results indicate that participants value clinical supervision even though their employers did not necessarily…

  2. Interim analysis of validity of periodontitis screening questions in the Australian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Gary D

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide interim results regarding the validity of six periodontal screening questions in predicting the prevalence of clinically assessed periodontitis among Australian adults. The Australian National Survey of Adult Oral Health is a cross-sectional survey of Australians aged 15 years or older. Subjects were selected using a multistage probability sampling design. The interview included six questions to screen for periodontal disease and five demographic/health history questions that represented traditional risk indicators for the disease. Oral examinations were conducted by trained, calibrated dentists who measured periodontal recession and probing depth at mesio-buccal, mid-buccal, and disto-buccal sites on all erupted teeth. A computer algorithm determined three categories of periodontal case status: none/mild, moderate, or severe. Multivariable binary logistic regression models were constructed using six screening questions, five traditional risk indicators, and all 11 variables. This interim analysis used data from 2,999 subjects who resided in the first five states/territories that completed the survey. Based on clinical findings, 4.0% of subjects were classified with "severe" periodontitis and 25.2% were classified with "moderate" periodontitis. Five screening questions had non-response rates of validity in predicting the prevalence of periodontitis.

  3. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of intra-bony defects in localized aggressive periodontitis patients with platelet rich plasma/hydroxyapatite graft: A comparative controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geeti Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aggressive periodontitis is a characterized by rapid attachment loss, bone destruction and familial aggregation. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP has been proposed to promote regeneration of the lost periodontal tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the efficacy of PRP combined with hydroxyapatite (HA graft in the treatment of intra-bony defects in localized aggressive periodontitis (L-AgP patients. Materials and Methods: Ten L-AgP patients having bilateral intra-bony defect ≥2 mm and probing depth (PD ≥6 mm were randomly treated either with the PRP/HA graft or HA graft alone. The clinical (plaque control record, bleeding on probing index, PD, and relative attachment level [RAL], and radiographic parameters (size of the bone defect were recorded pre- and post-operatively at 3, 6, and 12 months. Results: After 12 months, for both maxillary and mandibular arches, the mean PD decrease was significantly more (P < 0.05 for the test group than the control group (3.2 mm vs. 1.9 mm and 3.6 mm vs. 1.9 mm, respectively. Furthermore, the mean RAL decrease in both maxillary and mandibular arches was significantly more (P < 0.05 for the test group than the control group (3.0 mm vs. 1.2 mm and 3.1 mm vs. 1.4 mm, respectively. Radiographically, the test group showed significantly more defect fill as compared with the control group. Conclusion: Both treatments provided significant improvements in clinical and radiographic parameters in a 12-month postoperative period. PRP/HA group presented superior results regarding PD reduction, clinical attachment gain and radiographic bone fill than HA group.

  4. Periodontal disease as a risk for dental implant failure over time: a long-term historical cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Liran; Ofec, Ronen; Grossmann, Yoav; Anner, Rachel

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate the long-term survival rates of dental implants according to the patient's periodontal status, as well as to estimate if the effect of periodontal status regarding implant failure is constant throughout the long-term follow-up. This was a historical prospective cohort study design of all consecutive patients operated from 1996 to 2006 at a periodontal clinic. The cohort consisted of 736 patients, with a total of 2336 dental implants. An extended Cox proportional hazards model, which includes interaction terms between survival time and variables of interest, was used. Patients' mean (SD) age was 51.13 (12.35). The follow-up time was up to 144 months, with a mean (SD) of 54.4 (35.6) months. The overall implant raw survival rate was 95.9%. The Kaplan-Meier estimates for the cumulative survival rate (CSR) at 108 months were 0.96 and 0.95 for implants inserted into healthy and moderate chronic periodontal patients, respectively. The CSR declined to 0.88 at 108 months for the severe periodontitis group. The extended Cox model revealed that severe chronic status turned out to be a significant risk factor for implant failure after 50 months of follow-up [hazard ratio (HR)=8.06; pPeriodontal status and smoking are significant risk factors for late implant failures. The HR for periodontal and smoking status are not constant throughout the follow-up period. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. A need to educate postmenopausal women of their periodontal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo, Leena; Chitguppi, Rajeev; Buencamino, Maria Clarinda; Santos, Dwetta; Thacker, Holly

    2013-03-01

    Postmenopausal women have shown proactive willingness to take responsibility for their changing health care needs. The example of osteoporosis is a model that when educated of their bone health status, this cohort follows through with prevention and treatment regimens. Postmenopausal status is considered to be a risk factor for periodontitis. It is kn