WorldWideScience

Sample records for clinical oncology program

  1. Implementing effective and sustainable multidisciplinary clinical thoracic oncology programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osarogiagbon, Raymond U; Freeman, Richard K; Krasna, Mark J

    2015-08-01

    Three models of care are described, including two models of multidisciplinary care for thoracic malignancies. The pros and cons of each model are discussed, the evidence supporting each is reviewed, and the need for more (and better) research into care delivery models is highlighted. Key stakeholders in thoracic oncology care delivery outcomes are identified, and the need to consider stakeholder perspectives in designing, validating and implementing multidisciplinary programs as a vehicle for quality improvement in thoracic oncology is emphasized. The importance of reconciling stakeholder perspectives, and identify meaningful stakeholder-relevant benchmarks is also emphasized. Metrics for measuring program implementation and overall success are proposed.

  2. Why providers participate in clinical trials: considering the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Song, Paula H; Reiter, Kristin L

    2012-11-01

    The translation of research evidence into practice is facilitated by clinical trials such as those sponsored by the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) that help disseminate cancer care innovations to community-based physicians and provider organizations. However, CCOP participation involves unsubsidized costs and organizational challenges that raise concerns about sustained provider participation in clinical trials. This study was designed to improve our understanding of why providers participate in the CCOP in order to inform the decision-making process of administrators, clinicians, organizations, and policy-makers considering CCOP participation. We conducted a multi-site qualitative study of five provider organizations engaged with the CCOP. We interviewed 41 administrative and clinician key informants, asking about what motivated CCOP participation, and what benefits they associated with involvement. We deductively and inductively analyzed verbatim interview transcripts, and explored themes that emerged. Interviewees expressed both "altruistic" and "self-interested" motives for CCOP participation. Altruistic reasons included a desire to increase access to clinical trials and feeling an obligation to patients. Self-interested reasons included the desire to enhance reputation, and a need to integrate disparate cancer care activities. Perceived benefits largely matched expressed motives for CCOP participation, and included internal and external benefits to the organization, and quality of care benefits for both patients and participating physicians. The motives and benefits providers attributed to CCOP participation are consistent with translational research goals, offering evidence that participation can contribute value to providers by expanding access to innovative medical care for patients in need. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. THE NATIONAL ONCOLOGICAL PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION – EXPERIENCE IN THE VLADIMIR REGION (TO THE 70TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE REGIONAL CLINICAL ONCOLOGICAL DISPENSARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Zirin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available By 2010, on the background of the steady increase in the incidence of malignant tumors in the Vladimir area, primary oncological care level worked inefficiently.Condition of material and technical base of the Vladimir Regional Clinical Oncological Dispensary was also unsatisfactory. All these problems required solution in the form of the National Oncology Program realization in the region. The National Oncological Program has begun to work in the Vladimir region since 2011. Target indicators of the oncological program implementation by 2015 were established. They are: Increase of 5-year survival value of patients with malignant tumors after diagnosis date to 51.4%; Increase the number of malignant tumors early detection cases at the I–II stages up to 51%; Decrease the mortality rate of working age population to 99 per 100 000; Decrease of mortality within one year from the first time of cancer diagnosis to 27%. The following main objectives such as radically improved the material and technical base of oncology dispensary; modern methods of prevention, diagnosis and patients treatment improvement and introduction; the system providing population cancer care focused on the cancer early detection and the specialized combined antitumor treatment provision are realized in order to achieve these goals. The implementation of the tasks allowed to achieve positive dynamics of Vladimir region population cancer care indicators. All the main targets of the National Oncology Program for the Vladimir region were achieved successfully. Implementation of the National Oncology Program has had an extremely positive effect on the cancer services development of, as well as for the health of the entire population of the Vladimir region.

  4. Predicting the performance of a strategic alliance: an analysis of the Community Clinical Oncology Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluzny, A D; Lacey, L M; Warnecke, R; Hynes, D M; Morrissey, J; Ford, L; Sondik, E

    1993-06-01

    This study is designed to examine the effects of environment and structure of the Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) on performance as measured by patient accrual to National Cancer Institute (NCI)-approved treatment protocols. Data and analysis are part of a larger evaluation of the NCI Community Clinical Oncology Program during its second funding cycle, June 1987-May 1990. Data, taken from primary and secondary sources, included a survey of selected informants in CCOPs and research bases, CCOP grant applications, CCOP annual progress reports, and site visits to a subsample of CCOPs (N = 20) and research bases (N = 5). Accrual data were obtained from NCI records. Analysis involved three complementary sets of factors: the local health care resources environment available to the CCOP, the larger policy environment as reflected by the relationship of the CCOP to selected research bases and the NCI, and the operational structure of the CCOP itself. A hierarchical model examined the separate and cumulative effects of local and policy environment and structure on performance. Other things equal, the primary predictors of treatment accrual were: (1) the larger policy environment, as measured by the attendance of nurses at research base meetings; and (2) operational structure, as measured by the number and character of components within participating CCOPs and the number of hours per week worked by data managers. These factors explained 73 percent of the total variance in accrual performance. Findings suggest criteria for selecting the types of organizations to participate in the alliance, as well as for establishing guidelines for managing such alliances. A future challenge is to determine the extent to which factors predicting accrual to cancer treatment clinical trials are equally important as predictors of accrual to cancer prevention and control trials.

  5. Pet in Clinical oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunsche, A.; Grossman, G.; Santana, M.; Santana, C.; Halkar, R.; Garcia, E.

    2003-01-01

    The utility of the PET (positron emission tomography in clinical oncology has been recognized for more than two decades, locating it as a sensible technique for the diagnosis and the prognosis stratification of the oncology patients. The sensitivity and specificity of the PET in comparation to other image studies have demonstrated to be greater. For some years, there was a restriction of PET because of the high cost of the equipment and the cyclotrons. Nevertheless, the relation of cost/benefits is considered as a priority as this technique offers important clinical information. In this article the results observed when using it in diverse types of cancer, as well as the effectiveness shown in the pre-operating evaluation, the evaluation of residual disease, diagnosis of recurrences, pursuit and prognosis stratification of the patients with cancer. (The author)

  6. Why Providers Participate in Clinical Trials: Considering the National Cancer Institute’s Community Clinical Oncology Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Song, Paula H.; Reiter, Kristin L.

    2012-01-01

    Background The translation of research evidence into practice is facilitated by clinical trials such as those sponsored by the National Cancer Institute’s Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) that help disseminate cancer care innovations to community-based physicians and provider organizations. However, CCOP participation involves unsubsidized costs and organizational challenges that raise concerns about sustained provider participation in clinical trials. Objectives This study was designed to improve our understanding of why providers participate in the CCOP in order to inform the decision-making process of administrators, clinicians, organizations, and policy-makers considering CCOP participation. Research Methods We conducted a multi-site qualitative study of five provider organizations engaged with the CCOP. We interviewed 41 administrative and clinician key informants, asking about what motivated CCOP participation, and what benefits they associated with involvement. We deductively and inductively analyzed verbatim interview transcripts, and explored themes that emerged. Results Interviewees expressed both “altruistic” and “self-interested” motives for CCOP participation. Altruistic reasons included a desire to increase access to clinical trials and feeling an obligation to patients. Self-interested reasons included the desire to enhance reputation, and a need to integrate disparate cancer care activities. Perceived benefits largely matched expressed motives for CCOP participation, and included internal and external benefits to the organization, and quality of care benefits for both patients and participating physicians. Conclusion The motives and benefits providers attributed to CCOP participation are consistent with translational research goals, offering evidence that participation can contribute value to providers by expanding access to innovative medical care for patients in need. PMID:22925970

  7. Topics in clinical oncology. 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cepcek, P.

    1987-12-01

    The monograph comprising primarily papers on topical subjects of oncology and cancer research, contains also a selection of papers presented at the 2. Congress of the Czechoslovak Society of Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Hygiene. Seven papers were selected on behalf of their subject related to clinical oncology. All of them were iputted in INIS; five of them deal with the scintiscanning of the skeleton of cancer patients, one with radioimmunodetection of tumors, and one with radionuclide lymphography. (A.K.)

  8. Comparing oncology clinical programs by use of innovative designs and expected net present value optimization: Which adaptive approach leads to the best result?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parke, Tom; Marchenko, Olga; Anisimov, Vladimir; Ivanova, Anastasia; Jennison, Christopher; Perevozskaya, Inna; Song, Guochen

    2017-01-01

    Designing an oncology clinical program is more challenging than designing a single study. The standard approaches have been proven to be not very successful during the last decade; the failure rate of Phase 2 and Phase 3 trials in oncology remains high. Improving a development strategy by applying innovative statistical methods is one of the major objectives of a drug development process. The oncology sub-team on Adaptive Program under the Drug Information Association Adaptive Design Scientific Working Group (DIA ADSWG) evaluated hypothetical oncology programs with two competing treatments and published the work in the Therapeutic Innovation and Regulatory Science journal in January 2014. Five oncology development programs based on different Phase 2 designs, including adaptive designs and a standard two parallel arm Phase 3 design were simulated and compared in terms of the probability of clinical program success and expected net present value (eNPV). In this article, we consider eight Phase2/Phase3 development programs based on selected combinations of five Phase 2 study designs and three Phase 3 study designs. We again used the probability of program success and eNPV to compare simulated programs. For the development strategies, we considered that the eNPV showed robust improvement for each successive strategy, with the highest being for a three-arm response adaptive randomization design in Phase 2 and a group sequential design with 5 analyses in Phase 3.

  9. A screening tool to enhance clinical trial participation at a community center involved in a radiation oncology disparities program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Julian W; Martz, Elaine; Schenken, Larry L; Rainville, Rebecca; Marlowe, Ursula

    2011-05-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of a screening tool to enhance clinical trial participation at a community radiation oncology center involved in a National Cancer Institute-funded disparities program but lacking on-site clinical trials personnel. The screening form was pasted to the front of the charts and filled out for all new patients over the 9-month period of the study, during which time five external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) trials and a patient perception study were open for accrual. Patient consent was obtained by assorted personnel at several different sites. Patients potentially eligible for a trial were identified and approached by one of the clinic staff. Patients who were under- or uninsured, age > 80 years, members of an racial/ethnic minority, or recipients of medical assistance were identified as at risk for health care disparities and were offered patient navigator services. Of 196 patients consulted during the study, 144 were treated with EBRT. Of the 24 patients eligible for EBRT trials, 23 were approached (one had an incomplete screening form), and 15 accepted. Of 77 patients eligible for a patient perception trial, 72 were approached (five had incomplete forms), and 45 accepted. The eligibility and acceptance rates for EBRT trials were similar for disparities and nondisparities patients. Screening was completed for 96 patients (67%). When completed, the screening tool ensured clinical trial accrual. The major factor limiting overall accrual was a shortage of available trials.

  10. Radioimmunoimaging in clinical oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kairemo, K.J.A.

    1993-01-01

    In the thesis radiolabeled antibodies were tested for screening of cancer in patients without previous knowledge of tumour histopathology. They were tested as well targeting known cancer, sometimes in unknown clinical stage. Methods for detection enhancement utilizing double-tracer techniques and alternative routes of administration were also investigated. (385 refs., 11 tabs.)

  11. Meeting the challenge of managed care - Part II: Designing a radiation oncology department and setting up a clinical practice program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halman, Marc A.; Szerlag, Chester

    1997-01-01

    Objective: Identify the business practices necessary to develop a successful radiation oncology department in the current health care environment. Course content will be of interest to new practitioners establishing first time programs or joining existing groups as well as experienced radiation oncologists who are challenged with redesigning programs to be competitive. Course Content: During this session, the following topics will be discussed: 1) Space planning and equipment selection 2) Personnel; creating efficiencies while promoting productivity 3) Professional and Technical Billing; establishing proper fee structures and coding procedures 4) Utilizing benchmarking as a tool to improve operations 5) Information technology in radiation oncology 6) Current and Future Trends: a) Oncology networks b) Reimbursement: managed care and capitation c) Downsizing d) Relative Value Units

  12. ENRICH: A promising oncology nurse training program to implement ASCO clinical practice guidelines on fertility for AYA cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadaparampil, Susan T; Gwede, Clement K; Meade, Cathy; Kelvin, Joanne; Reich, Richard R; Reinecke, Joyce; Bowman, Meghan; Sehovic, Ivana; Quinn, Gwendolyn P

    2016-11-01

    We describe the impact of ENRICH (Educating Nurses about Reproductive Issues in Cancer Healthcare), a web-based communication-skill-building curriculum for oncology nurses regarding AYA fertility and other reproductive health issues. Participants completed an 8-week course that incorporated didactic content, case studies, and interactive learning. Each learner completed a pre- and post-test assessing knowledge and a 6-month follow-up survey assessing learner behaviors and institutional changes. Out of 77 participants, the majority (72%) scored higher on the post-test. Fifty-four participants completed the follow-up survey: 41% reviewed current institutional practices, 20% formed a committee, and 37% gathered patient materials or financial resources (22%). Participants also reported new policies (30%), in-service education (37%), new patient education materials (26%), a patient navigator role (28%), and workplace collaborations with reproductive specialists (46%). ENRICH improved nurses' knowledge and involvement in activities addressing fertility needs of oncology patients. Our study provides a readily accessible model to prepare oncology nurses to integrate American Society of Clinical Oncology guidelines and improve Quality Oncology Practice Initiative measures related to fertility. Nurses will be better prepared to discuss important survivorship issues related to fertility and reproductive health, leading to improved quality of life outcomes for AYAs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Introduction to veterinary clinical oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    Veterinary clinical oncology involves a multidisciplinary approach to the recognition and management of spontaneously occurring neoplasms of domestic animals. This requires some knowledge of the causes, incidence, and natural course of malignant disease as it occurs in domestic species. The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with the more common neoplastic problems you will encounter in practice, so that you can offer your clients an informed opinion regarding prognosis and possible therapeutic modalities. A major thrust will be directed toward discussing and encouraging treatment/management of malignant disease. Multimodality therapy will be stressed. 10 refs., 3 tabs.

  14. Program for Critical Technologies in Breast Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-01

    the tissues, and in a ethical manner that respects the patients’ rights . The Program for Critical Technologies in Breast Oncology helps address all of...diagnosis, database 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 148 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS...closer to clinical utility. Page 17 References Adida C. Crotty PL. McGrath J. Berrebi D. Diebold J. Altieri DC. Developmentally regulated

  15. Clinical and Radiation Oncology. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurga, L.; Adam, Z.; Autrata, R.

    2010-01-01

    The work is two-volume set and has 1,658 pages. It is divided into 5 sections: I. Principles Clinical and radiation oncology. II. Hematological Malignant tumors. III. Solid tumors. IV. Treatment options metastatic Disease. V. Clinical practice in oncology. First volume contains following sections a chapters: Section I: Principles of clinical and radiation oncology, it contains following chapters: (1) The history of clinical/experimental and radiation oncology in the Czech Republic; (2) The history of clinical/experimental and radiation oncology in the Slovak Republic - development and development of oncology in Slovakia; (3) Clinical and radiation oncology as part of evidence-based medicine; (4) Molecular biology; (5) Tumor Disease; (6) Epidemiology and prevention of malignant tumors; (7) Diagnosis, staging, stratification and monitoring of patients in oncology; (8) Imaging methods in oncology; (9) Principles of surgical treatment of cancer diseases; (10) Symptomatology and signaling of malignant tumors - systemic, paraneoplastic and paraendocrine manifestations of tumor diseases; (11) Principles of radiation oncology; (12 Modeling radiobiological effects of radiotherapy; (13) Principles of anticancer chemotherapy; (14) Hormonal manipulation in the treatment of tumors; (15) Principles of biological and targeted treatment of solid tumors; (16) Method of multimodal therapy of malignant tumors; (17) Evaluation of treatment response, performance evaluation criteria (RECIST); (18) Adverse effects of cancer chemotherapy and the principles of their prevention and treatment; (19) Biological principles of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation; (20) Design, analysis and ethical aspects of clinical studies in oncology; (21) Fundamentals of biostatistics for oncologists; (22) Information infrastructure for clinical and radiological oncology based on evidence; (23) Pharmacoeconomic aspects in oncology; (24) Respecting patient preferences when deciding on the strategy and

  16. Tumor markers in clinical oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakovic, S.

    2004-01-01

    The subtle differences between normal and tumor cells are exploited in the detection and treatment of cancer. These differences are designated as tumor markers and can be either qualitative or quantitative in their nature. That means that both the structures that are produced by tumor cells as well as the structures that are produced in excessive amounts by host tissues under the influence of tumor cells can function as tumor markers. Speaking in general, the tumor markers are the specific molecules appearing in the blood or tissues and the occurrence of which is associated with cancer. According to their application, tumor markers can be roughly divided as markers in clinical oncology and markers in pathology. In this review, only tumor markers in clinical oncology are going to be discussed. Current tumor markers in clinical oncology include (i) oncofetal antigens, (ii) placental proteins, (iii) hormones, (iv) enzymes, (v) tumor-associated antigens, (vi) special serum proteins, (vii) catecholamine metabolites, and (viii) miscellaneous markers. As to the literature, an ideal tumor marker should fulfil certain criteria - when using it as a test for detection of cancer disease: (1) positive results should occur in the early stages of the disease, (2) positive results should occur only in the patients with a specific type of malignancy, (3) positive results should occur in all patients with the same malignancy, (4) the measured values should correlate with the stage of the disease, (5) the measured values should correlate to the response to treatment, (6) the marker should be easy to measure. Most tumor markers available today meet several, but not all criteria. As a consequence of that, some criteria were chosen for the validation and proper selection of the most appropriate marker in a particular malignancy, and these are: (1) markers' sensitivity, (2) specificity, and (3) predictive values. Sensitivity expresses the mean probability of determining an elevated tumor

  17. E-learning programs in oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degerfält, Jan; Sjöstedt, Staffan; Fransson, Per

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: E-learning is an established concept in oncological education and training. However, there seems to be a scarcity of long-term assessments of E-learning programs in oncology vis-á-vis their structural management and didactic value. This study presents descriptive, nationwide data from...... 2005 to 2014. E-learning oncology programs in chemotherapy, general oncology, pain management, palliative care, psycho-social-oncology, and radiotherapy, were reviewed from our databases. Questionnaires of self-perceived didactic value of the programs were examined 2008-2014. RESULTS: The total number.......6% (MDs: 64.9%; RNs: 66.8%; SHCAs: 77.7%) and as good by 30.6% (MDs: 34.5%; RNs: 32.4%; SHCAs: 21.5%) of the responders. CONCLUSIONS: This descriptive study, performed in a lengthy timeframe, presents high-volume data from multi-professional, oncological E-learning programs. While the E-learning paradigm...

  18. The Business Case for Provider Participation in Clinical Trials Research: An Application to the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Paula H.; Reiter, Kristin L.; Weiner, Bryan J.; Minasian, Lori; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2012-01-01

    Background Provider-based research networks (PBRNs) make clinical trials available in community-based practice settings, where most people receive their care, but provider participation requires both financial and in-kind contributions. Purpose This study explores whether providers believe there is a business case for participating in PBRNs and what factors contribute to the business case. Methodology/Approach We use a multiple case study methodology approach to examine the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program, a longstanding federally funded PBRN. Interviews with 41 key informants across five sites, selected on the basis of organizational maturity, were conducted using a semi-structured interview guide. We analyzed interview transcripts using an iterative, deductive process to identify themes and subthemes in the data. Findings We found that a business case for provider participation in PBRNs may exist if both direct and indirect financial benefits are identified and included in the analysis, and if the time horizon is long enough to allow those benefits to be realized. We identified specific direct and indirect financial benefits that were perceived as important contributors to the business case and the perceived length of time required for a positive return to accrue. Practice Implications As the lack of a business case may result in provider reluctance to participate in PBRNs, knowledge of the benefits we identified may be crucial to encouraging and sustaining participation, thereby preserving patient access to innovative community-based treatments. The results are also relevant to federally-funded PBRNs outside of oncology or to providers considering participation in any clinical trials research. PMID:23044836

  19. The business case for provider participation in clinical trials research: an application to the National Cancer Institute's community clinical oncology program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Paula H; Reiter, Kristin L; Weiner, Bryan J; Minasian, Lori; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2013-01-01

    Provider-based research networks (PBRNs) make clinical trials available in community-based practice settings, where most people receive their care, but provider participation requires both financial and in-kind contributions. The aim of this study was to explore whether providers believe there is a business case for participating in PBRNs and what factors contribute to the business case. We use a multiple case study methodology approach to examine the National Cancer Institute's community clinical oncology program, a long-standing federally funded PBRN. Interviews with 41 key informants across five sites, selected on the basis of organizational maturity, were conducted using a semistructured interview guide. We analyzed interview transcripts using an iterative, deductive process to identify themes and subthemes in the data. We found that a business case for provider participation in PBRNs may exist if both direct and indirect financial benefits are identified and included in the analysis and if the time horizon is long enough to allow those benefits to be realized. We identified specific direct and indirect financial benefits that were perceived as important contributors to the business case and the perceived length of time required for a positive return to accrue. As the lack of a business case may result in provider reluctance to participate in PBRNs, knowledge of the benefits we identified may be crucial to encouraging and sustaining participation, thereby preserving patient access to innovative community-based treatments. The results are also relevant to federally funded PBRNs outside of oncology or to providers considering participation in any clinical trials research.

  20. Clinical quality assurance in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    A quality assurance program in radiation oncology monitors and evaluates any departmental functions which have an impact on patient outcome. The ultimate purpose of the program is to maximize health benefit to the patient without a corresponding increase in risk. The foundation of the program should be the credo: at least do no harm, usually do some good and ideally realize the greatest good. The steep dose response relationships for tumor control and complications require a high degree of accuracy and precision throughout the entire process of radiation therapy. It has been shown that failure to control local disease with radiation may result in decreased survival and may increase the cost of care by a factor of 3. Therefore, a comprehensive quality assurance program which seeks to optimize dose delivery and which encompasses both clinical and physics components, is needed

  1. Geriatric Oncology Program Development and Gero-Oncology Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Mary Pat; DeDonato, Dana Marcone; Kutney-Lee, Ann

    2016-02-01

    To provide a critical analysis of current approaches to the care of older adults with cancer, outline priority areas for geriatric oncology program development, and recommend strategies for improvement. Published articles and reports between 1999 and 2015. Providing an interdisciplinary model that incorporates a holistic geriatric assessment will ensure the delivery of patient-centered care that is responsive to the comprehensive needs of older patients. Nursing administrators and leaders have both an opportunity and responsibility to shape the future of geriatric oncology. Preparations include workforce development and the creation of programs that are designed to meet the complex needs of this population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Towards enhanced PET quantification in clinical oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaidi, Habib; Karakatsanis, Nicolas

    2018-01-01

    is still a matter of debate. Quantitative PET has advanced elegantly during the last two decades and is now reaching the maturity required for clinical exploitation, particularly in oncology where it has the capability to open many avenues for clinical diagnosis, assessment of response to treatment...... and therapy planning. Therefore, the preservation and further enhancement of the quantitative features of PET imaging is crucial to ensure that the full clinical value of PET imaging modality is utilized in clinical oncology. Recent advancements in PET technology and methodology have paved the way for faster...... PET acquisitions of enhanced sensitivity to support the clinical translation of highly quantitative 4D parametric imaging methods in clinical oncology. In this report, we provide an overview of recent advances and future trends in quantitative PET imaging in the context of clinical oncology. The pros...

  3. Program for Critical Technologies in Breast Oncology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Costa, Jose

    1997-01-01

    In Year 3 of The Program for Critical Technologies in Breast Oncology (PCTBO), we have expanded services that were initiated in July 1994 to establish a core technical and tissue procurement resource that: (1...

  4. Pharmacogenetics in the oncological clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, S.

    2004-01-01

    The genetic control of drug metabolism allows new insights into the bioavailability, toxicity, and efficacy of chemotherapy. In addition, molecular expression profiles of tumors offers the potential for targeted therapy to be directed more specifically to the biologic behavior of the cancer. Together these strategies are likely to change the practice of clinical oncology. However, appropriate clinical trials will be required to demonstrate the utility of these approaches before they are broadly implemented the biologic behavior of the cancer. Together these strategies are likely to change the practice of clinical oncology. However, appropriate clinical trials will be required to demonstrate the utility of these approaches before they are broadly implemented

  5. Clinical and Radiation Oncology. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurga, L.; Adam, Z.; Autrata, R.

    2010-01-01

    The work is two-volume set and has 1,658 pages. It is divided into 5 sections: I. Principles Clinical and radiation oncology. II. Hematological Malignant tumors. III. Solid tumors. IV. Treatment options metastatic Disease. V. Clinical practice in oncology. Second volume contains following sections a chapters: Section III: Solid nodes, it contains following chapters: (38) Central nervous system tumors; (39) Tumors of the eye, orbits and adnexas; (40) Head and neck carcinomas; (41) Lung carcinomas and pleural mesothelioma; (42) Mediastinal tumors; (43) Tumors of the esophagus; (44) Gastric carcinomas; (45) Carcinoma of the colon, rectum and anus; (46) Small intestinal cancer; (47) Liver and biliary tract carcinomas; (48) Tumors of the pancreas; (49) Tumors of the kidney and upper urinary tract; (50) Bladder tumors of the bladder, urinary tract and penis; (51) Prostate Carcinoma; (52) Testicular tumors; (53) Malignant neoplasm of the cervix, vulva and vagina; (54) Endometrial carcinoma; (55) Malignant ovarian tumors; (56) Gestational trophoblastic disease; (57) Breast carcinoma - based on a evidence-based approach; (58) Thyroid and parathyroid carcinomas; (59) Dental tumors of endocrine glands; (60) Tumors of the locomotory system; (61) Malignant melanoma; (62) Carcinomas of the skin and skin adnexa; (63) Malignant tumors in immunosuppressed patients; (64) Tumors of unknown primary localization; (65) Children's oncology; (66) Geriatric Oncology; (67) Principles of long-term survival of patients with medically and socially significant types of malignant tumors after treatment. Section IV: Options of metastic disease disease, it contains following chapters: (68) Metastases to the central nervous system; (69) Metastases in the lungs; (70) Metastases in the liver; (71) Metastases into the skeleton. Section V: Clinical practice in oncology, it contains following chapters: (72) Acute conditions in oncology; (73) Prevention and management of radiation and chemical toxicity

  6. SU-D-201-07: A Survey of Radiation Oncology Residents’ Training and Preparedness to Lead Patient Safety Programs in Clinics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spraker, M; Nyflot, M; Ford, E; Kane, G; Zeng, J; Hendrickson, K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Safety and quality has garnered increased attention in radiation oncology, and physicians and physicists are ideal leaders of clinical patient safety programs. However, it is not clear whether residency programs incorporate formal patient safety training and adequately equip residents to assume this leadership role. A national survey was conducted to evaluate medical and physics residents’ exposure to safety topics and their confidence with the skills required to lead clinical safety programs. Methods: Radiation oncology residents were identified in collaboration with ARRO and AAPM. The survey was released in February 2016 via email using REDCap. This included questions about exposure to safety topics, confidence leading safety programs, and interest in training opportunities (i.e. workshops). Residents rated their exposure, skills, and confidence on 4 or 5-point scales. Medical and physics residents responses were compared using chi-square tests. Results: Responses were collected from 56 of 248 (22%) physics and 139 of 690 (20%) medical residents. More than two thirds of all residents had no or only informal exposure to incident learning systems (ILS), root cause analysis (RCA), failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA), and the concept of human factors engineering (HFE). Likewise, 63% of residents had not heard of RO-ILS. Response distributions were similar, however more physics residents had formal exposure to FMEA (p<0.0001) and felt they were adequately trained to lead FMEAs in clinic (p<0.001) than medical residents. Only 36% of residents felt their patient safety training was adequate, and 58% felt more training would benefit their education. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that, despite increasing desire for patient safety training, medical and physics residents’ exposure to relevant concepts is low. Physics residents had more exposure to FMEA than medical residents, and were more confident in leading FMEA. This suggests that increasing

  7. SU-D-201-07: A Survey of Radiation Oncology Residents’ Training and Preparedness to Lead Patient Safety Programs in Clinics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spraker, M; Nyflot, M; Ford, E; Kane, G; Zeng, J; Hendrickson, K [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Safety and quality has garnered increased attention in radiation oncology, and physicians and physicists are ideal leaders of clinical patient safety programs. However, it is not clear whether residency programs incorporate formal patient safety training and adequately equip residents to assume this leadership role. A national survey was conducted to evaluate medical and physics residents’ exposure to safety topics and their confidence with the skills required to lead clinical safety programs. Methods: Radiation oncology residents were identified in collaboration with ARRO and AAPM. The survey was released in February 2016 via email using REDCap. This included questions about exposure to safety topics, confidence leading safety programs, and interest in training opportunities (i.e. workshops). Residents rated their exposure, skills, and confidence on 4 or 5-point scales. Medical and physics residents responses were compared using chi-square tests. Results: Responses were collected from 56 of 248 (22%) physics and 139 of 690 (20%) medical residents. More than two thirds of all residents had no or only informal exposure to incident learning systems (ILS), root cause analysis (RCA), failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA), and the concept of human factors engineering (HFE). Likewise, 63% of residents had not heard of RO-ILS. Response distributions were similar, however more physics residents had formal exposure to FMEA (p<0.0001) and felt they were adequately trained to lead FMEAs in clinic (p<0.001) than medical residents. Only 36% of residents felt their patient safety training was adequate, and 58% felt more training would benefit their education. Conclusion: These results demonstrate that, despite increasing desire for patient safety training, medical and physics residents’ exposure to relevant concepts is low. Physics residents had more exposure to FMEA than medical residents, and were more confident in leading FMEA. This suggests that increasing

  8. Dose-response relationship in clinical oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehan, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    The relationship of dose (and dose rate) to response and toxicity in clinical oncology is reviewed. The concepts expressed by some authors in dose-response studies in animal and human systems are reviewed briefly. Dose rate and tactics of conducting clinical studies are reviewed for both radiotherapy and various types of chemotherapeutic treatment. Examples are given from clinical studies in Hodgkin's disease, acute leukemia, and breast cancer that may prove useful in planning future clinical studies

  9. Clinical PET/MR Imaging in Oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Andreas; Torigian, Drew A.

    2016-01-01

    . The question, therefore, arises regarding what the future clinical applications of PET/MR imaging will be. In this article, the authors discuss ways in which PET/MR imaging may be used in future applications that justify the added cost, predominantly focusing on oncologic applications. The authors suggest...

  10. American Society of Clinical Oncology Strategic Plan for Increasing Racial and Ethnic Diversity in the Oncology Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkfield, Karen M; Flowers, Christopher R; Patel, Jyoti D; Rodriguez, Gladys; Robinson, Patricia; Agarwal, Amit; Pierce, Lori; Brawley, Otis W; Mitchell, Edith P; Head-Smith, Kimberly T; Wollins, Dana S; Hayes, Daniel F

    2017-08-01

    In December 2016, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Board of Directors approved the ASCO Strategic Plan to Increase Racial and Ethnic Diversity in the Oncology Workforce. Developed through a multistakeholder effort led by the ASCO Health Disparities Committee, the purpose of the plan is to guide the formal efforts of ASCO in this area over the next three years (2017 to 2020). There are three primary goals: (1) to establish a longitudinal pathway for increasing workforce diversity, (2) to enhance ASCO leadership diversity, and (3) to integrate a focus on diversity across ASCO programs and policies. Improving quality cancer care in the United States requires the recruitment of oncology professionals from diverse backgrounds. The ASCO Strategic Plan to Increase Racial and Ethnic Diversity in the Oncology Workforce is designed to enhance existing programs and create new opportunities that will move us closer to the vision of achieving an oncology workforce that reflects the demographics of the US population it serves.

  11. Effectiveness of a psycho-oncology training program for oncology nurses: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Yosuke; Okuyama, Toru; Uchida, Megumi; Umezawa, Shino; Nakaguchi, Tomohiro; Sugano, Koji; Ito, Yoshinori; Katsuki, Fujika; Nakano, Yumi; Nishiyama, Takeshi; Katayama, Yoshiko; Akechi, Tatsuo

    2016-06-01

    Oncology nurses are expected to play an important role in psychosocial care for cancer patients. The aim of this study was to examine whether a novel training program aimed at enhancing oncology nurses' ability to assess and manage common psychological problems in cancer patients would improve participants' self-reported confidence, knowledge, and attitudes regarding care of patients with common psychological problems (trial register: UMIN000008559). Oncology nurses were assigned randomly to either the intervention group (N = 50) or the waiting list control group (N = 46). The intervention group received a 16-h program, the content of which focused on four psychological issues: normal reactions, clinically significant distress, suicidal thoughts, and delirium. Each session included a role-play exercise, group work, and didactic lecture regarding assessment and management of each problem. Primary outcomes were changes in self-reported confidence, knowledge, and attitudes toward the common psychological problems between pre-intervention and 3 months post-intervention. Secondary outcomes were job-related stress and burnout. Intervention acceptability to participants was also assessed. In the intervention group, confidence and knowledge but not attitudes were significantly improved relative to the control group. No significant intervention effects were found for job- related stress and burnout. A high percentage (98%) of participants considered the program useful in clinical practice. This psycho-oncology training program improved oncology nurses' confidence and knowledge regarding care for patients with psychological problems. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. A method for analyzing the business case for provider participation in the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program and similar federally funded, provider-based research networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Kristin L; Song, Paula H; Minasian, Lori; Good, Marjorie; Weiner, Bryan J; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2012-09-01

    The Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) plays an essential role in the efforts of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to increase enrollment in clinical trials. Currently, there is little practical guidance in the literature to assist provider organizations in analyzing the return on investment (ROI), or business case, for establishing and operating a provider-based research network (PBRN) such as the CCOP. In this article, the authors present a conceptual model of the business case for PBRN participation, a spreadsheet-based tool and advice for evaluating the business case for provider participation in a CCOP organization. A comparative, case-study approach was used to identify key components of the business case for hospitals attempting to support a CCOP research infrastructure. Semistructured interviews were conducted with providers and administrators. Key themes were identified and used to develop the financial analysis tool. Key components of the business case included CCOP start-up costs, direct revenue from the NCI CCOP grant, direct expenses required to maintain the CCOP research infrastructure, and incidental benefits, most notably downstream revenues from CCOP patients. The authors recognized the value of incidental benefits as an important contributor to the business case for CCOP participation; however, currently, this component is not calculated. The current results indicated that providing a method for documenting the business case for CCOP or other PBRN involvement will contribute to the long-term sustainability and expansion of these programs by improving providers' understanding of the financial implications of participation. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  13. Topics in clinical oncology. 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cepcek, P.

    1987-08-01

    The symposium proceedings contain 39 papers. All papers were inputted in INIS. The subjects of the papers were the use of computers in radiotherapy planning, and clinical dosimetry, equipment and quality assurance, biological radiation effects and radiation protection problems in radiotherapy. (J.P.)

  14. Clinical outcomes research in gynecologic oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melamed, Alexander; Rauh-Hain, J Alejandro; Schorge, John O

    2017-09-01

    Clinical outcomes research seeks to understand the real-world manifestations of clinical care. In particular, outcomes research seeks to reveal the effects of pharmaceutical, procedural, and structural aspects of healthcare on patient outcomes, including mortality, disease control, toxicity, cost, and quality of life. Although outcomes research can utilize interventional study designs, insightful use of observational data is a defining feature of this field. Many questions in gynecologic oncology are not amenable to investigation in randomized clinical trials due to cost, feasibility, or ethical concerns. When a randomized trial is not practical or has not yet been conducted, well-designed observational studies have the potential to provide the best available evidence about the effects of clinical care. Such studies may use surveys, medical records, disease registries, and a variety of administrative data sources. Even when a randomized trial has been conducted, observational studies can be used to estimate the real-world effect of an intervention, which may differ from the results obtained in the controlled setting of a clinical trial. This article reviews the goals, methodologies, data sources, and limitations of clinical outcomes research, with a focus on gynecologic oncology. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Clinical oncology based upon radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    This paper discussed the biological effects of radiation as physical energy, especially those of X-ray as electromagnetic radiation, by associating the position of clinical oncology with classical radiation cell biology as well as recent molecular biology. First, it described the physical and biological effects of radiation, cell death due to radiation and recovery, radiation effects at tissue level, and location information and dosage information in the radiotherapy of cancer. It also described the territories unresolved through radiation biology, such as low-dose high-sensitivity, bystander effects, etc. (A.O.)

  16. A National Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship Survey: Didactic Curricular Components Increase Confidence in Clinical Competency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagadeesan, Vikrant S. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Raleigh, David R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, University of California–San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Golden, Daniel W., E-mail: dgolden@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete 1 or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. Methods and Materials: An anonymous, Internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012-2013 academic year. The survey was composed of 3 main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncology experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. Results: The survey response rate was 37% (70 of 188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. Of the respondents, 27% (19 of 70) completed at least 1 clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent's confidence to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon rank–sum P=.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman ρ P=.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman ρ P=.43). Conclusions: Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation oncology resident. These

  17. A national radiation oncology medical student clerkship survey: didactic curricular components increase confidence in clinical competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadeesan, Vikrant S; Raleigh, David R; Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R; Chmura, Steven J; Golden, Daniel W

    2014-01-01

    Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete 1 or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. An anonymous, Internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012-2013 academic year. The survey was composed of 3 main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncology experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. The survey response rate was 37% (70 of 188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. Of the respondents, 27% (19 of 70) completed at least 1 clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent's confidence to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon rank-sum P=.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman ρ P=.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman ρ P=.43). Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation oncology resident. These results support further development of structured didactic

  18. A National Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship Survey: Didactic Curricular Components Increase Confidence in Clinical Competency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagadeesan, Vikrant S.; Raleigh, David R.; Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J.; Golden, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete 1 or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. Methods and Materials: An anonymous, Internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012-2013 academic year. The survey was composed of 3 main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncology experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. Results: The survey response rate was 37% (70 of 188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. Of the respondents, 27% (19 of 70) completed at least 1 clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent's confidence to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon rank–sum P=.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman ρ P=.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman ρ P=.43). Conclusions: Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation oncology resident. These results

  19. Clinical neuro-oncology formal education opportunities for medical students in the United States and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Karan S; Nicholas, Martin Kelly; Lukas, Rimas V

    2014-12-01

    To develop an understanding of the availability of the formal clinical neuro-oncology educational opportunities for medical students. The curriculum websites of all medical schools accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education were reviewed for the presence of clinical neuro-oncology electives as well as other relevant data. Ten (6.8%) of medical schools accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education offer formal neuro-oncology electives. Half are clustered in the Midwest. Forty percent are at institutions with neuro-oncology fellowships. All are at institutions with neurosurgery and neurology residency programs. Formal clinical neuro-oncology elective opportunities for medical students in the United States and Canada are limited. Additional such opportunities may be of value in the education of medical students. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A clinical intranet model for radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, Ken; Fox, Tim; Davis, Larry

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: A new paradigm in computing is being formulated from advances in client-server technology. This new way of accessing data in a network is referred to variously as Web-based computing, Internet computing, or Intranet computing. The difference between an internet and intranet being that the former is for global access and the later is only for intra-departmental access. Our purpose with this work is to develop a clinically useful radiation oncology intranet for accessing physically disparate data sources. Materials and Methods: We have developed an intranet client-server system using Windows-NT Server 4.0 running Internet Information Server (IIS) on the back-end and client PCs using a typical World Wide Web (WWW) browser. The clients also take advantage of the Microsoft Open Database Connectivity (ODBC) standard for accessing commercial database systems. The various data sources used include: a traditional Radiation Oncology Information (ROIS) System (VARiS 1.3 tm ); a 3-D treatment planning system (CAD Plan tm ); a beam scanning system (Wellhoffer tm ); as well as an electronic portal imaging device (PortalVision tm ) and a CT-Simulator providing digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) (Picker AcQsim tm ). We were able to leverage previously developed Microsoft Visual C++ applications without major re-writing of source code for this. Results: With the data sources and development materials used, we were able to develop a series of WWW-based clinical tool kits. The tool kits were designed to provide profession-specific clinical information. The physician's tool kit provides a treatment schedule for daily patients along with a dose summary from VARiS and the ability to review portal images and prescription images from the EPID and Picker. The physicists tool kit compares dose summaries from VARiS with an independent check against RTP beam data and serves as a quick 'chart-checker'. Finally, an administrator tool kit provides a summary of periodic charging

  1. Effects of an intervention aimed at improving nurse-patient communication in an oncology outpatient clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Mette Trøllund; Jensen, Mette Lund; Andersen, Jørn

    2009-01-01

    skills training program in nursing cancer care. Twenty-four nurses in an oncology outpatient clinic participated and were randomly assigned to the intervention program or a control group. A total of 413 patients treated in the clinic during 2 recruitment periods (before and after the communication skills...

  2. Effects of Age Expectations on Oncology Social Workers' Clinical Judgment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, Annemarie; Choi, Namkee G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the influence of oncology social workers' expectations regarding aging (ERA) and ERA with cancer (ERAC) on their clinical judgment. Methods: Oncology social workers (N = 322) were randomly assigned to one of four vignettes describing a patient with lung cancer. The vignettes were identical except for the patent's age…

  3. The Role of Oncology Nurses in Discussing Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flocke, Susan A; Antognoli, Elizabeth; Daly, Barbara J; Jackson, Brigid; Fulton, Sarah E; Liu, Tasnuva M; Surdam, Jessica; Manne, Sharon; Meropol, Neal J

    2017-09-01

    To describe oncology nurses' experiences discussing clinical trials with their patients, and to assess barriers to these discussions.
. A qualitative study designed to elicit narratives from oncology nurses. 
. Community- and academic-based oncology clinics throughout the United States.
. 33 oncology nurses involved in direct patient care in community-based and large hospital-based settings. The sample was drawn from members of the Oncology Nursing Society. 
. In-depth interviews were conducted and analyzed using a 
immersion/crystallization approach to identify themes and patterns. The analyses highlight specific issues, examples, and contexts that present challenges to clinical trial discussions with patients.
. Oncology nurses view their roles as patient educators and advocates to be inclusive of discussion of clinical trials. Barriers to such discussions include lack of knowledge and strategies for addressing patients' common misconceptions and uncertainty about the timing of discussions.
. These data indicate that enabling nurses to actively engage patients in discussions of clinical trials requires educational interventions to build self-efficacy and close knowledge gaps. 
. Oncology nurses can play a critical role in advancing cancer care by supporting patients in decision making about clinical trial participation. This will require training and education to build their knowledge, reduce barriers, and increase their self-efficacy to fulfill this responsibility in various clinical settings.

  4. Results of the Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs (ADROP) Survey of Radiation Oncology Residency Program Directors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Eleanor; Abdel-Wahab, May; Spangler, Ann E.; Lawton, Colleen A.; Amdur, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To survey the radiation oncology residency program directors on the topics of departmental and institutional support systems, residency program structure, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements, and challenges as program director. Methods: A survey was developed and distributed by the leadership of the Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs to all radiation oncology program directors. Summary statistics, medians, and ranges were collated from responses. Results: Radiation oncology program directors had implemented all current required aspects of the ACGME Outcome Project into their training curriculum. Didactic curricula were similar across programs nationally, but research requirements and resources varied widely. Program directors responded that implementation of the ACGME Outcome Project and the external review process were among their greatest challenges. Protected time was the top priority for program directors. Conclusions: The Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs recommends that all radiation oncology program directors have protected time and an administrative stipend to support their important administrative and educational role. Departments and institutions should provide adequate and equitable resources to the program directors and residents to meet increasingly demanding training program requirements.

  5. Women with breast cancer report substantially more disease- and treatment-related side or late effects than registered by clinical oncologists: a cross-sectional study of a standard follow-up program in an oncological department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellegaard, Mai-Britt Bjørklund; Grau, Cai; Zachariae, Robert; Jensen, Anders Bonde

    2017-08-01

    Follow-up after breast cancer treatment is standard due to the risk of development of new primary cancers and recurrent disease. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a standard follow-up program in an oncological department by assessing: (1) Symptoms or signs of new primary cancer or recurrent disease, (2) Disease- and treatment-related physical and psychosocial side or late effects, and (3) relevant actions by oncology staff. In a cross-sectional study, 194 women who came for follow-up visit after treatment for primary surgery were included. The clinical oncologists registered symptoms and signs of recurrent disease or new primary cancer. Side or late effects were both assessed by patient and the clinical oncologists. Loco-regional or distant signs of recurrent disease were suspected in eight (5%) patients. Further examinations revealed no disease recurrence. Most patients (93%) reported some degree of side or late effects. Statistically significant more side or late effects were reported by the women (average: 6.9) than registered by the clinical oncologists (average: 2.4), p effects were hot flushes (35%), fatigue (32%), and sleep disturbance (31%). None of the scheduled or additional visits resulted in detection of recurrent disease. Furthermore, the majority of patients reported side or late effects. Statistically significant more women reported side or late effects than registered by the clinical oncologists. This suggests the need for rethinking of the follow-up programs with more emphasis upon side or late effects of the treatment.

  6. EFFECTIVENESS OF A PROGRAMED TEXT IN TEACHING GYNECOLOGIC ONCOLOGY TO JUNIOR MEDICAL STUDENTS, A SOURCE BOOK ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF PROGRAMED MATERIALS FOR USE IN A CLINICAL DISCIPLINE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WILDS, PRESTON L.; ZACHERT, VIRGINIA

    THIS REPORT DESCRIBES A STUDY TO DETERMINE WHETHER PROGRAMED INSTRUCTION COULD BE USED TO IMPROVE THE TEACHING OF THE MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH GYNECOLOGIC NEOPLASMS TO JUNIOR MEDICAL STUDENTS. TWO PROGRAMED TEXTS WERE PREPARED--(1) A "CONTENT" TEXT, AN 830-FRAME LINEARLY PROGRAMED TEXT DESIGNED TO REPLACE CONVENTIONAL CLASSROOM…

  7. How to Develop a Cardio-Oncology Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snipelisky, David; Park, Jae Yoon; Lerman, Amir; Mulvagh, Sharon; Lin, Grace; Pereira, Naveen; Rodriguez-Porcel, Martin; Villarraga, Hector R; Herrmann, Joerg

    2017-04-01

    Cardiovascular demands to the care of cancer patients are common and important given the implications for morbidity and mortality. As a consequence, interactions with cardiovascular disease specialists have intensified to the point of the development of a new discipline termed cardio-oncology. As an additional consequence, so-called cardio-oncology clinics have emerged, in most cases staffed by cardiologists with an interest in the field. This article addresses this gap and summarizes key points in the development of a cardio-oncology clinic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Survey of Radiation Oncology Centres in Australia: report of the radiation oncology treatment quality program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klybaba, M.; Kenny, L.; Kron, T.; Harris, J.; O'Brien, P.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: One of the first steps towards the development of a comprehensive quality program for radiation oncology in Australia has been a survey of practice. This paper reports on the results of the survey that should inform the development of standards for radiation oncology in Australia. A questionnaire of 108 questions spanning aspects of treatment services, equipment, staff, infrastructure and available quality systems was mailed to all facilities providing radiation treatment services in Australia (n = 45). Information of 42 sites was received by June 2006 providing data on 113 operational linear accelerators of which approximately 2/3 are equipped with multi-leaf collimators. More than 75% of facilities were participating in a formal quality assurance (QA) system, with 63% following a nationally or internationally recognised system. However, there was considerable variation in the availability of policies and procedures specific to quality aspects, and the review of these. Policies for monitoring patient waiting times for treatment were documented at just 71% of all facilities. Although 85% of all centres do, in fact, monitor machine throughput, the number and types of efficiency measures varied markedly, thereby limiting the comparative use of these results. Centres identified workload as the single most common factor responsible for limiting staff involvement in both QA processes and clinical trial participation. The data collected in this 'snapshot' survey provide a unique and comprehensive baseline for future comparisons and evaluation of changes

  9. Frontiers of biostatistical methods and applications in clinical oncology

    CERN Document Server

    Crowley, John

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the state of the art of biostatistical methods and their applications in clinical oncology. Many methodologies established today in biostatistics have been brought about through its applications to the design and analysis of oncology clinical studies. This field of oncology, now in the midst of evolution owing to rapid advances in biotechnologies and cancer genomics, is becoming one of the most promising disease fields in the shift toward personalized medicine. Modern developments of diagnosis and therapeutics of cancer have also been continuously fueled by recent progress in establishing the infrastructure for conducting more complex, large-scale clinical trials and observational studies. The field of cancer clinical studies therefore will continue to provide many new statistical challenges that warrant further progress in the methodology and practice of biostatistics. This book provides a systematic coverage of various stages of cancer clinical studies. Topics from modern cancer clinical ...

  10. Neuro-Oncology Branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BTTC are experts in their respective fields. Neuro-Oncology Clinical Fellowship This is a joint program with ... can increase survival rates. Learn more... The Neuro-Oncology Branch welcomes Dr. Mark Gilbert as new Branch ...

  11. Back to the Future for Clinical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabner

    1996-01-01

    Dear Colleague: I remember, but just barely, what it was like to practice medicine in the first half of this century. My Dad was a general practitioner in a very small farming community in central Illinois, with a hospital of six beds and a trusting clientele. His patients thought he knew how to do everything: deliver babies, set broken bones and take out an appendix. He was an advocate for his patients, not for an HMO or an insurance company. He derived great satisfaction from his practice and was comfortable in this role, up to a point, but knew that he frequently needed the help of specialists from Decatur, St. Louis, and the Mayo Clinic. As his experience and practice evolved, and as medicine itself changed, referrals became a sign of good practice and not an indication of weakness or inadequacy. Some doctors in our town continued to do more than they should have and resisted the trend, and their patients, many with blind faith in their doctor, suffered for it. Clearly, there were economic as well as emotional factors that contributed to this reluctance to ask for help. Clinical oncology is facing much the same situation today. Scientific and economic forces are revolutionizing medicine, but not always in compatible directions. Practice and research have evolved to the point where old patterns of practice are no longer optimal. Few cancer patients can be managed without the input, advice, and even direct involvement of specialists from sister disciplines. Thus, multimodality management of cancer patients is now the norm rather than the exception. At the same time, strong economic forces are dictating a movement in the opposite direction, undermining the strength of traditional academic centers and limiting choices, streamlining patient evaluation, and creating "pathways" to standardize patient management. Who should be setting the course for the cancer patient? We agree that it should not be a clerk at the other end of the phone at the HMO, a computerized

  12. Puerto Rico NCI Community Oncology Research Program Minority/Underserved | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Puerto Rico NCI Community Oncology Research Program (PRNCORP) will be the principal organization in the island that promotes cancer prevention, control and screening/post-treatment surveillance clinical trials. It will conduct cancer care delivery research and will provide access to treatment and imaging clinical trials conducted under the reorganization of the National

  13. Results of an Oncology Clinical Trial Nurse Role Delineation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdom, Michelle A; Petersen, Sandra; Haas, Barbara K

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the relevance of a five-dimensional model of clinical trial nursing practice in an oncology clinical trial nurse population. 
. Web-based cross-sectional survey.
. Online via Qualtrics.
. 167 oncology nurses throughout the United States, including 41 study coordinators, 35 direct care providers, and 91 dual-role nurses who provide direct patient care and trial coordination.
. Principal components analysis was used to determine the dimensions of oncology clinical trial nursing practice.
. Self-reported frequency of 59 activities.
. The results did not support the original five-dimensional model of nursing care but revealed a more multidimensional model.
. An analysis of frequency data revealed an eight-dimensional model of oncology research nursing, including care, manage study, expert, lead, prepare, data, advance science, and ethics.
. This evidence-based model expands understanding of the multidimensional roles of oncology nurses caring for patients with cancer enrolled in clinical trials.

  14. Methods of Academic Course Planning for Cancer Biology PhD Students to Enhance Knowledge of Clinical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattes, Malcolm D; Swart, Elizabeth; Markwell, Steven M; Wen, Sijin; Vona-Davis, Linda C

    2017-09-15

    Little is known about how clinical oncology concepts are taught to PhD students or the most effective methods of doing so. In this study, electronic surveys were sent to faculty and students at PhD training programs, assessing their institution's methods of clinical oncology education and their perspective on optimal approaches to clinical oncology education. Only 40.0% of students reported any clinical oncology component to their institution's training, and only 26.5% had a clinician on their graduate advisory committee. Forty-three percent of students believed that they had a good understanding for translating basic science research into clinical practice, and 77.2% of all participants believed dual degree MD/PhD students were superior to PhD students in this regard. Lectures on clinical oncology research topics were the most valuable type of experience for all participants and were also the most common type of experience utilized. Working with a clinician to develop a clinical trial with correlative endpoints was also highly valued, but was only utilized by approximately 10% of programs. Faculty rated the value of nearly all types of clinical oncology exposure significantly lower than did students. Inclusion of the approaches identified in this study is likely to enhance PhD training in oncology-related disciplines. Cancer Res; 77(18); 4741-4. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Impact of radiation research on clinical trials in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, P.; Van Ess, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    The authors present an outline review of the history of the formation of the cooperative group called International Clinical Trials in Radiation Oncology (ICTRO), and the following areas are briefly discussed together with some projections for the direction of clinical trials in radiation oncology into the 1990s:- radiosensitizers, radioprotectors, and their combination, drug-radiation interactions, dose/time/fractionation, hyperthermia, biological response modifiers and radiolabelled antibodies, high LET, particularly neutron therapy, large field irradiation and interoperative irradiation, research studies on specific sites. (U.K.)

  16. Evidence-based integrative medicine in clinical veterinary oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raditic, Donna M; Bartges, Joseph W

    2014-09-01

    Integrative medicine is the combined use of complementary and alternative medicine with conventional or traditional Western medicine systems. The demand for integrative veterinary medicine is growing, but evidence-based research on its efficacy is limited. In veterinary clinical oncology, such research could be translated to human medicine, because veterinary patients with spontaneous tumors are valuable translational models for human cancers. An overview of specific herbs, botanics, dietary supplements, and acupuncture evaluated in dogs, in vitro canine cells, and other relevant species both in vivo and in vitro is presented for their potential use as integrative therapies in veterinary clinical oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Monitoring cancer stem cells: insights into clinical oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin SC

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ShuChen Lin,1,* YingChun Xu,2,* ZhiHua Gan,1 Kun Han,1 HaiYan Hu,3 Yang Yao,3 MingZhu Huang,4 DaLiu Min1 1Department of Oncology, Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital East Campus, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 2Department of Oncology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 3Department of Oncology, The Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 4Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs are a small, characteristically distinctive subset of tumor cells responsible for tumor initiation and progression. Several treatment modalities, such as surgery, glycolytic inhibition, driving CSC proliferation, immunotherapy, and hypofractionated radiotherapy, may have the potential to eradicate CSCs. We propose that monitoring CSCs is important in clinical oncology as CSC populations may reflect true treatment response and assist with managing treatment strategies, such as defining optimal chemotherapy cycles, permitting pretreatment cancer surveillance, conducting a comprehensive treatment plan, modifying radiation treatment, and deploying rechallenge chemotherapy. Then, we describe methods for monitoring CSCs. Keywords: cancer stem cells, glycolytic inhibition, watchful waiting, rechallenge, immunotherapy

  18. The Development of On-Line Statistics Program for Radiation Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yoon Jong; Lee, Dong Hoon; Ji, Young Hoon; Lee, Dong Han; Jo, Chul Ku; Kim, Mi Sook; Ru, Sung Rul; Hong, Seung Hong

    2001-01-01

    Purpose : By developing on-line statistics program to record the information of radiation oncology to share the information with internet. It is possible to supply basic reference data for administrative plans to improve radiation oncology. Materials and methods : The information of radiation oncology statistics had been collected by paper forms about 52 hospitals in the past. Now, we can input the data by internet web browsers. The statistics program used windows NT 4.0 operation system, Internet Information Server 4.0 (IIS4.0) as a web server and the Microsoft Access MDB. We used Structured Query Language (SQL), Visual Basic, VBScript and JAVAScript to display the statistics according to years and hospitals. Results : This program shows present conditions about man power, research, therapy machines, technic, brachytherapy, clinic statistics, radiation safety management, institution, quality assurance and radioisotopes in radiation oncology department. The database consists of 38 inputs and 6 outputs windows. Statistical output windows can be increased continuously according to user need. Conclusion : We have developed statistics program to process all of the data in department of radiation oncology for reference information. Users easily could input the data by internet web browsers and share the information

  19. Pilot Feasibility Study of an Oncology Financial Navigation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankaran, Veena; Leahy, Tony; Steelquist, Jordan; Watabayashi, Kate; Linden, Hannah; Ramsey, Scott; Schwartz, Naomi; Kreizenbeck, Karma; Nelson, Judy; Balch, Alan; Singleton, Erin; Gallagher, Kathleen; Overstreet, Karen

    2018-02-01

    Few studies have reported on interventions to alleviate financial toxicity in patients with cancer. We developed a financial navigation program in collaboration with our partners, Consumer Education and Training Services (CENTS) and Patient Advocate Foundation (PAF), to improve patient knowledge about treatment costs, provide financial counseling, and to help manage out-of-pocket expenses. We conducted a pilot study to assess the feasibility and impact of this program. Patients with cancer received a financial education course followed by monthly contact with a CENTS financial counselor and a PAF case manager for 6 months. We measured program adherence, self-reported financial burden and anxiety, program satisfaction, and type of assistance provided. Thirty-four patients (median age, 60.5 years) were consented (85% white and 50% commercially insured). Debt, income declines, and loans were reported by 55%, 55%, and 30% of patients, respectively. CENTS counselors assisted most often with budgeting, retirement planning, and medical bill questions. PAF case managers assisted with applications for appropriate insurance coverage, cost of living issues (eg, housing, transportation), and disability applications. High financial burden and anxiety about costs (4 or 5 on a Likert scale) were reported at baseline by 37% and 47% of patients, respectively. Anxiety about costs decreased over time in 33% of patients, whereas self-reported financial burden did not substantially change. Implementing an oncology financial navigation program is feasible, provides concrete assistance in navigating the cost of care, and mitigates anxiety about costs in a subset of patients. Future work will focus on measuring the program's impact on financial and clinical outcomes.

  20. Minimum requirements on a QA program in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almond, P.R.

    1996-01-01

    In April, 1994, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine published a ''Comprehensive QA for radiation oncology:'' a report of the AAPM Radiation Therapy Committee. This is a comprehensive QA program which is likely to become the standard for such programs in the United States. The program stresses the interdisciplinary nature of QA in radiation oncology involving the radiation oncologists, the radiotherapy technologies (radiographers), dosimetrists, and accelerator engineers, as well as the medical physicists. This paper describes a comprehensive quality assurance program with the main emphasis on the quality assurance in radiation therapy using a linear accelerator. The paper deals with QA for a linear accelerator and simulator and QA for treatment planning computers. Next the treatment planning process and QA for individual patients is described. The main features of this report, which should apply to QA programs in any country, emphasizes the responsibilities of the medical physicist. (author). 7 refs, 9 tabs

  1. Minimum requirements on a QA program in radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almond, P R [Louisville Univ., Louisville, KY (United States). J.G. Brown Cancer Center

    1996-08-01

    In April, 1994, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine published a ``Comprehensive QA for radiation oncology:`` a report of the AAPM Radiation Therapy Committee. This is a comprehensive QA program which is likely to become the standard for such programs in the United States. The program stresses the interdisciplinary nature of QA in radiation oncology involving the radiation oncologists, the radiotherapy technologies (radiographers), dosimetrists, and accelerator engineers, as well as the medical physicists. This paper describes a comprehensive quality assurance program with the main emphasis on the quality assurance in radiation therapy using a linear accelerator. The paper deals with QA for a linear accelerator and simulator and QA for treatment planning computers. Next the treatment planning process and QA for individual patients is described. The main features of this report, which should apply to QA programs in any country, emphasizes the responsibilities of the medical physicist. (author). 7 refs, 9 tabs.

  2. Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This paper collects some scientific research works on nuclear medicine developed in Ecuador. The main topics are: Brain metastases, computed tomography assessment; Therapeutic challenge in brain metastases, chemotherapy, surgery or radiotherapy; Neurocysticercosis and oncogenesis; Neurologic complications of radiation and chemotherapy; Cerebral perfusion gammagraphy in neurology and neurosurgery; Neuro- oncologic surgical patient anesthesic management; Pain management in neuro- oncology; Treatment of metastatic lesions of the spine, surgically decompression vs radiation therapy alone; Neuroimagining in spinal metastases

  3. Clinical Relevance of Steroid Use in Neuro-Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, K Ina; Wen, Patrick Y

    2017-01-01

    Corticosteroids are commonly used in the management of primary central nervous system (CNS) tumors and CNS metastases to treat cancer- and treatment-related cerebral edema and improve neurologic function. However, they are also associated with significant morbidity and mortality, given their wide range of adverse effects. To review the mechanism of action, pharmacology, and toxicity profile of corticosteroids and to critically appraise the evidence that supports their use in neuro-oncologic practice based on the latest scientific and clinical data. Recent data suggest that corticosteroids may negatively impact survival in glioma patients. In addition, corticosteroids should be incorporated as a standard criterion to assess a patient's clinical and radiographic response to treatment. Corticosteroids should be used judiciously in neuro-oncologic patients, given the potential deleterious effects on clinical outcome and patient survival. Anti-angiogenic agents, which lack these adverse effects, may be a reasonable alternative to corticosteroids.

  4. Comprehensive quality management program for radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, J.; Roy, T.; Abrath, F.; Wu, T.; Gu, J.; McDonald, R.; Kim, H.; Haenchen, M.

    1994-01-01

    A quality management program for both external beam irradiation (electron and photon modes) and brachytherapy (high dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR) has been developed. The program follows current USA federal regulations for therapeutic administration of by-product materials. After implementation of the program, 54 HDR patients, 36 LDR brachytherapy patients and 311 external beam patients (including 30 stereotactic radiosurgery cases) were treated. The results of this program are presented

  5. Future vision for the quality assurance of oncology clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eFitzGerald, MD

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The National Cancer Institute clinical cooperative groups have been instrumental over the past 50 years in developing clinical trials and evidence based process improvements for clinical oncology patient care. The cooperative groups are undergoing a transformation process as we further integrate molecular biology into personalized patient care and move to incorporate international partners in clinical trials. To support this vision, data acquisition and data management informatics tools must become both nimble and robust to support transformational research at an enterprise level. Information, including imaging, pathology, molecular biology, radiation oncology, surgery, systemic therapy and patient outcome data needs to be integrated into the clinical trial charter using adaptive clinical trial mechanisms for design of the trial. This information needs to be made available to investigators using digital processes for real time data analysis. Future clinical trials will need to be designed and completed in a timely manner facilitated by nimble informatics processes for data management. This paper discusses both past experience and future vision for clinical trials as we move to develop data management and quality assurance processes to meet the needs of the modern trial.

  6. Clinical Implications of TiGRT Algorithm for External Audit in Radiation Oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Daryoush Shahbazi-Gahrouei; Mohsen Saeb; Shahram Monadi; Iraj Jabbari

    2017-01-01

    Background: Performing audits play an important role in quality assurance program in radiation oncology. Among different algorithms, TiGRT is one of the common application software for dose calculation. This study aimed to clinical implications of TiGRT algorithm to measure dose and compared to calculated dose delivered to the patients for a variety of cases, with and without the presence of inhomogeneities and beam modifiers. Materials and Methods: Nonhomogeneous phantom as quality dose veri...

  7. The Cardio-oncology Program: A Multidisciplinary Approach to the Care of Cancer Patients With Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Sarah; Pituskin, Edith; Paterson, D Ian

    2016-07-01

    Improved cancer survivorship has resulted in a growing number of Canadians affected by cancer and cardiovascular disease. As a consequence, cardio-oncology programs are rapidly emerging to treat cancer patients with de novo and preexisting cardiovascular disease. The primary goal of a cardio-oncology program is to preserve cardiovascular health to allow the timely delivery of cancer therapy and achieve disease-free remission. Multidisciplinary programs in oncology and cardiology have been associated with enhanced patient well-being and improved clinical outcomes. Because of the complex needs of these multisystem patients, a similar model of care is gaining acceptance. The optimal composition of the cardio-oncology team will typically involve support from cardiology, oncology, and nursing. Depending on the clinical scenario, additional consultation from dietetics, pharmacy, and social services might be required. Timely access to consultation and testing is another prerequisite for cardio-oncology programs because delays in treating cardiac complications and nonadherence to prescribed cancer therapy are each associated with poor outcomes. Recommended reasons for referral to cardio-oncology programs include primary prevention for those at high risk for cardiotoxicity and the secondary treatment of new or worsening cardiovascular disease in cancer patients and survivors. Management is multifaceted and can involve lifestyle education, pharmacotherapy, enhanced cardiovascular surveillance, and support services, such as exercise training. The lack of evidence to guide clinical decisions and recommendations in cardio-oncology is a major challenge and opportunity for health care professionals. Large multicentre prospective registries are needed to adequately power risk model calculations and generate hypotheses for novel interventions. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cardiac management of oncology patients clinical handbook for cardio-oncology

    CERN Document Server

    Baron Esquivias, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    This book is designed for clinical cardiologists and other physicians working with cardiac patients, where specific specialized teams of cardio-oncologists are not available and who are called to perform a clinical consultation to evaluate both the cardiac condition and the eligibility for chemotherapy or radiotherapy treatment, and to evaluate if a cancer treatment produces toxic effects on a patient treated with chemo or radiotherapy and if appearance of new symptoms is due to this treatment. In recent years, progress in oncologic therapy has resulted in important developments and the prognostic improvement of patients with malignancy. The cornerstone of chemotherapy are the anthracyclines (and the analogue Mitoxantrone), that are direct cellular toxic agents and that are among the most powerful anti-neoplastic drugs, but their cardiac toxicity is well known. Significant breakthroughs in cancer therapy have also been achieved with the introduction of signalling inhibitors, such as VEGF inhibitors, HERB2 inh...

  9. Development of a residency program in radiation oncology physics: an inverse planning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Rao F H; Dunscombe, Peter B

    2016-03-08

    Over the last two decades, there has been a concerted effort in North America to organize medical physicists' clinical training programs along more structured and formal lines. This effort has been prompted by the Commission on Accreditation of Medical Physics Education Programs (CAMPEP) which has now accredited about 90 residency programs. Initially the accreditation focused on standardized and higher quality clinical physics training; the development of rounded professionals who can function at a high level in a multidisciplinary environment was recognized as a priority of a radiation oncology physics residency only lately. In this report, we identify and discuss the implementation of, and the essential components of, a radiation oncology physics residency designed to produce knowledgeable and effective clinical physicists for today's safety-conscious and collaborative work environment. Our approach is that of inverse planning, by now familiar to all radiation oncology physicists, in which objectives and constraints are identified prior to the design of the program. Our inverse planning objectives not only include those associated with traditional residencies (i.e., clinical physics knowledge and critical clinical skills), but also encompass those other attributes essential for success in a modern radiation therapy clinic. These attributes include formal training in management skills and leadership, teaching and communication skills, and knowledge of error management techniques and patient safety. The constraints in our optimization exercise are associated with the limited duration of a residency and the training resources available. Without compromising the knowledge and skills needed for clinical tasks, we have successfully applied the model to the University of Calgary's two-year residency program. The program requires 3840 hours of overall commitment from the trainee, of which 7%-10% is spent in obtaining formal training in nontechnical "soft skills".

  10. Radiation oncology training in the United States: report from the Radiation Oncology Resident Training Working Group organized by the Society of Chairman of Academic Radiation Oncology Programs (SCAROP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: In response to the major changes occurring in healthcare, medical education, and cancer research, SCAROP addressed issues related to post-graduate education that could enhance existing programs and complement the present system. Methods and Materials: SCAROP brought together a Working Group with a broad range of representatives organized in subcommittees to address: training, curriculum, and model building. Results: The Working Group emphasized the importance of training physicians with the necessary clinical, scientific, and analytical skills, and the need to provide expert radiation oncology services to patients throughout the United States. Opportunities currently exist for graduates in academic medicine, although there may be limited time and financial resources available to support academic pursuits. Conclusions: In the face of diminishing resources for training and education and the increased scope of knowledge required, a number of models for resident training are considered that can provide flexibility to complement the present system. This report is intended to initiate dialogue among the organizations responsible for radiation oncology resident education so that resident training can continually evolve to meet the needs of cancer patients and take advantage of opportunities for progress through innovative cancer care and research

  11. The main trends in clinical use of radionuclides in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agranat, V.Z.

    1979-01-01

    The main trends of using radionuclide methods in clinical oncology are shown. Two main aspects of using radionuclide methods are pointed out: radionuclide investigation of the primary tumour as ''local'' manifestation of the cancer disease, radionuclide investigation of the body ''response'' to the tumour process. Each of the aspects of the problem is briefly considered on some examples. Examples of positive scintigraphy of tumours are given. It is shown that tumorotropic properties of some radionuclides make possible using visualization methods realizing the differential diagnosis of some tumours. Considered are direct and indirect signs which allow determining the presence of metastases and testifying to the tumour process spread

  12. Childhood cancer survivorship educational resources in North American pediatric hematology/oncology fellowship training programs: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Paul C; Schiffman, Joshua D; Huang, Sujuan; Landier, Wendy; Bhatia, Smita; Eshelman-Kent, Debra; Wright, Jennifer; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Hudson, Melissa M

    2011-12-15

    Childhood cancer survivors require life-long care by clinicians with an understanding of the specific risks arising from the prior cancer and its therapy. We surveyed North American pediatric hematology/oncology training programs to evaluate their resources and capacity for educating medical trainees about survivorship. An Internet survey was sent to training program directors and long-term follow-up clinic (LTFU) directors at the 56 US and Canadian centers with pediatric hematology/oncology fellowship programs. Perceptions regarding barriers to and optimal methods of delivering survivorship education were compared among training program and LTFU clinic directors. Responses were received from 45/56 institutions of which 37/45 (82%) programs require that pediatric hematology/oncology fellows complete a mandatory rotation focused on survivorship. The rotation is 4 weeks or less in 21 programs. Most (36/45; 80%) offer didactic lectures on survivorship as part of their training curriculum, and these are considered mandatory for pediatric hematology/oncology fellows at 26/36 (72.2%). Only 10 programs (22%) provide training to medical specialty trainees other than pediatric hematology/oncology fellows. Respondents identified lack of time for trainees to spend learning about late effects as the most significant barrier to providing survivorship teaching. LTFU clinic directors were more likely than training program directors to identify lack of interest in survivorship among trainees and survivorship not being a formal or expected part of the fellowship training program as barriers. The results of this survey highlight the need to establish standard training requirements to promote the achievement of basic survivorship competencies by pediatric hematology/oncology fellows. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Burnout in United States Academic Chairs of Radiation Oncology Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusano, Aaron S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Thomas, Charles R., E-mail: thomasch@ohsu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Knight Cancer Institute/Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Bonner, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); DeWeese, Theodore L. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Formenti, Silvia C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University, New York, New York (United States); Hahn, Stephen M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Mittal, Bharat B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Chicago, Ilinois (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to determine the self-reported prevalence of burnout in chairs of academic radiation oncology departments, to identify factors contributing to burnout, and to compare the prevalence of burnout with that seen in other academic chair groups. Methods and Materials: An anonymous online survey was administered to the membership of the Society of Chairs of Academic Radiation Oncology Programs (SCAROP). Burnout was measured with the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS). Results: Questionnaires were returned from 66 of 87 chairs (76% response rate). Seventy-nine percent of respondents reported satisfaction with their current positions. Common major stressors were budget deficits and human resource issues. One-quarter of chairs reported that it was at least moderately likely that they would step down in the next 1 to 2 years; these individuals demonstrated significantly higher emotional exhaustion. Twenty-five percent of respondents met the MBI-HSS criteria for low burnout, 75% for moderate burnout, and none for high burnout. Group MBI-HSS subscale scores demonstrated a pattern of moderate emotional exhaustion, low depersonalization, and moderate personal accomplishment, comparing favorably with other specialties. Conclusions: This is the first study of burnout in radiation oncology chairs with a high response rate and using a validated psychometric tool. Radiation oncology chairs share similar major stressors to other chair groups, but they demonstrate relatively high job satisfaction and lower burnout. Emotional exhaustion may contribute to the anticipated turnover in coming years. Further efforts addressing individual and institutional factors associated with burnout may improve the relationship with work of chairs and other department members.

  14. Burnout in United States Academic Chairs of Radiation Oncology Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusano, Aaron S.; Thomas, Charles R.; Bonner, James A.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Formenti, Silvia C.; Hahn, Stephen M.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Mittal, Bharat B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to determine the self-reported prevalence of burnout in chairs of academic radiation oncology departments, to identify factors contributing to burnout, and to compare the prevalence of burnout with that seen in other academic chair groups. Methods and Materials: An anonymous online survey was administered to the membership of the Society of Chairs of Academic Radiation Oncology Programs (SCAROP). Burnout was measured with the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS). Results: Questionnaires were returned from 66 of 87 chairs (76% response rate). Seventy-nine percent of respondents reported satisfaction with their current positions. Common major stressors were budget deficits and human resource issues. One-quarter of chairs reported that it was at least moderately likely that they would step down in the next 1 to 2 years; these individuals demonstrated significantly higher emotional exhaustion. Twenty-five percent of respondents met the MBI-HSS criteria for low burnout, 75% for moderate burnout, and none for high burnout. Group MBI-HSS subscale scores demonstrated a pattern of moderate emotional exhaustion, low depersonalization, and moderate personal accomplishment, comparing favorably with other specialties. Conclusions: This is the first study of burnout in radiation oncology chairs with a high response rate and using a validated psychometric tool. Radiation oncology chairs share similar major stressors to other chair groups, but they demonstrate relatively high job satisfaction and lower burnout. Emotional exhaustion may contribute to the anticipated turnover in coming years. Further efforts addressing individual and institutional factors associated with burnout may improve the relationship with work of chairs and other department members

  15. [Oncological quality indicators and Colorectal Cancer Program: data from 2009-2010 of University Hospital in Ferrara, Italy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Jacopo; Marzola, Marina; Indelli, Monica; Frassoldati, Antonio

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse the oncological quality indicators on our Colorectal Cancer Program, that are reflective of the scope of care, feasible to implement and supported by evidence. We compared two different populations during the same period: patients referring to our Clinical Oncology Unit coming from Regional Colorectal Cancer Screening Program and the other population that was not in any Colorectal Cancer Program. On the basis of our experience, we concluded for high-quality care for both population. Any critical point should be carefully analysed in order to implement quality of care.

  16. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group clinical trials with misonidazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserman, T.H.; Stetz, J.; Phillips, T.L.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the progressive clinical trials of the hypoxic cell radiosensitizer, misonidazole, in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). Presentation is made of all the schemas of the recently completed and currently active RTOG Phase II and Phase III studies. Detailed information is provided on the clinical toxicity of the Phase II trials, specifically regarding neurotoxicity. With limitations in drug total dose, a variety of dose schedules have proven to be tolerable, with a moderate incidence of nausea and vomiting and mild peripheral neuropathy or central neuropathy. No other organ toxicity has been seen, specifically no liver, renal or bone marrow toxicities. An additional Phase III malignant glioma trial in the Brain Tumor Study Group is described

  17. Prospective Clinical Study of Precision Oncology in Solid Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohal, Davendra P S; Rini, Brian I; Khorana, Alok A; Dreicer, Robert; Abraham, Jame; Procop, Gary W; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Pennell, Nathan A; Stevenson, James P; Pelley, Robert; Estfan, Bassam; Shepard, Dale; Funchain, Pauline; Elson, Paul; Adelstein, David J; Bolwell, Brian J

    2015-11-09

    Systematic studies evaluating clinical benefit of tumor genomic profiling are lacking. We conducted a prospective study in 250 patients with select solid tumors at the Cleveland Clinic. Eligibility required histopathologic diagnosis, age of 18 years or older, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-2, and written informed consent. Tumors were sequenced using FoundationOne (Cambridge, MA). Results were reviewed at the Cleveland Clinic Genomics Tumor Board. Outcomes included feasibility and clinical impact. Colorectal (25%), breast (18%), lung (13%), and pancreatobiliary (13%) cancers were the most common diagnoses. Median time from consent to result was 25 days (range = 3-140). Of 223 evaluable samples, 49% (n = 109) of patients were recommended a specific therapy, but only 11% (n = 24) received such therapy: 12 on clinical trials, nine off-label, three on-label. Lack of clinical trial access (n = 49) and clinical deterioration (n = 29) were the most common reasons for nonrecommendation/nonreceipt of genomics-driven therapy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Palliative care and palliative radiation therapy education in radiation oncology: A survey of US radiation oncology program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Randy L; Colbert, Lauren E; Jones, Joshua; Racsa, Margarita; Kane, Gabrielle; Lutz, Steve; Vapiwala, Neha; Dharmarajan, Kavita V

    The purpose of this study was to assess the state of palliative and supportive care (PSC) and palliative radiation therapy (RT) educational curricula in radiation oncology residency programs in the United States. We surveyed 87 program directors of radiation oncology residency programs in the United States between September 2015 and November 2015. An electronic survey on PSC and palliative RT education during residency was sent to all program directors. The survey consisted of questions on (1) perceived relevance of PSC and palliative RT to radiation oncology training, (2) formal didactic sessions on domains of PSC and palliative RT, (3) effective teaching formats for PSC and palliative RT education, and (4) perceived barriers for integrating PSC and palliative RT into the residency curriculum. A total of 57 responses (63%) was received. Most program directors agreed or strongly agreed that PSC (93%) and palliative radiation therapy (99%) are important competencies for radiation oncology residents and fellows; however, only 67% of residency programs had formal educational activities in principles and practice of PSC. Most programs had 1 or more hours of formal didactics on management of pain (67%), management of neuropathic pain (65%), and management of nausea and vomiting (63%); however, only 35%, 33%, and 30% had dedicated lectures on initial management of fatigue, assessing role of spirituality, and discussing advance care directives, respectively. Last, 85% of programs reported having a formal curriculum on palliative RT. Programs were most likely to have education on palliative radiation to brain, bone, and spine, but less likely on visceral, or skin, metastasis. Residency program directors believe that PSC and palliative RT are important competencies for their trainees and support increasing education in these 2 educational domains. Many residency programs have structured curricula on PSC and palliative radiation education, but room for improvement exists in

  19. Functional imaging in oncology. Clinical applications. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luna, Antonio; Vilanova, Joan C.

    2014-01-01

    Easy-to-read manual on new functional imaging techniques in oncology. Explains current clinical applications and outlines future avenues. Includes numerous high-quality illustrations to highlight the major teaching points. In the new era of functional and molecular imaging, both currently available imaging biomarkers and biomarkers under development are expected to lead to major changes in the management of oncological patients. This two-volume book is a practical manual on the various imaging techniques capable of delivering functional information on cancer, including diffusion MRI, perfusion CT and MRI, dual-energy CT, spectroscopy, dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, PET, and hybrid modalities. This second volume considers the applications and benefits of these techniques in a wide range of tumor types, including their role in diagnosis, prediction of treatment outcome, and early evaluation of treatment response. Each chapter addresses a specific malignancy and is written by one or more acclaimed experts. The lucid text is complemented by numerous high-quality illustrations that highlight key features and major teaching points.

  20. Functional imaging in oncology. Clinical applications. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, Antonio [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiology; MRI Health Time Group, Jaen (Spain); Vilanova, Joan C. [Girona Univ. (Spain). Clinica Girona - Hospital Sta. Caterina; Hygino da Cruz, L. Celso Jr. (ed.) [CDPI and IRM, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Dept. of Radiology; Rossi, Santiago E. [Centro de Diagnostico, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-06-01

    Easy-to-read manual on new functional imaging techniques in oncology. Explains current clinical applications and outlines future avenues. Includes numerous high-quality illustrations to highlight the major teaching points. In the new era of functional and molecular imaging, both currently available imaging biomarkers and biomarkers under development are expected to lead to major changes in the management of oncological patients. This two-volume book is a practical manual on the various imaging techniques capable of delivering functional information on cancer, including diffusion MRI, perfusion CT and MRI, dual-energy CT, spectroscopy, dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, PET, and hybrid modalities. This second volume considers the applications and benefits of these techniques in a wide range of tumor types, including their role in diagnosis, prediction of treatment outcome, and early evaluation of treatment response. Each chapter addresses a specific malignancy and is written by one or more acclaimed experts. The lucid text is complemented by numerous high-quality illustrations that highlight key features and major teaching points.

  1. Toward a science of tumor forecasting for clinical oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankeelov, Thomas E; Quaranta, Vito; Evans, Katherine J; Rericha, Erin C

    2015-03-15

    We propose that the quantitative cancer biology community makes a concerted effort to apply lessons from weather forecasting to develop an analogous methodology for predicting and evaluating tumor growth and treatment response. Currently, the time course of tumor response is not predicted; instead, response is only assessed post hoc by physical examination or imaging methods. This fundamental practice within clinical oncology limits optimization of a treatment regimen for an individual patient, as well as to determine in real time whether the choice was in fact appropriate. This is especially frustrating at a time when a panoply of molecularly targeted therapies is available, and precision genetic or proteomic analyses of tumors are an established reality. By learning from the methods of weather and climate modeling, we submit that the forecasting power of biophysical and biomathematical modeling can be harnessed to hasten the arrival of a field of predictive oncology. With a successful methodology toward tumor forecasting, it should be possible to integrate large tumor-specific datasets of varied types and effectively defeat one cancer patient at a time. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. 2016 Updated American Society of Clinical Oncology/Oncology Nursing Society Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards, Including Standards for Pediatric Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuss, Michael N; Gilmore, Terry R; Belderson, Kristin M; Billett, Amy L; Conti-Kalchik, Tara; Harvey, Brittany E; Hendricks, Carolyn; LeFebvre, Kristine B; Mangu, Pamela B; McNiff, Kristen; Olsen, MiKaela; Schulmeister, Lisa; Von Gehr, Ann; Polovich, Martha

    2016-12-01

    Purpose To update the ASCO/Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards and to highlight standards for pediatric oncology. Methods The ASCO/ONS Chemotherapy Administration Safety Standards were first published in 2009 and updated in 2011 to include inpatient settings. A subsequent 2013 revision expanded the standards to include the safe administration and management of oral chemotherapy. A joint ASCO/ONS workshop with stakeholder participation, including that of the Association of Pediatric Hematology Oncology Nurses and American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, was held on May 12, 2015, to review the 2013 standards. An extensive literature search was subsequently conducted, and public comments on the revised draft standards were solicited. Results The updated 2016 standards presented here include clarification and expansion of existing standards to include pediatric oncology and to introduce new standards: most notably, two-person verification of chemotherapy preparation processes, administration of vinca alkaloids via minibags in facilities in which intrathecal medications are administered, and labeling of medications dispensed from the health care setting to be taken by the patient at home. The standards were reordered and renumbered to align with the sequential processes of chemotherapy prescription, preparation, and administration. Several standards were separated into their respective components for clarity and to facilitate measurement of adherence to a standard. Conclusion As oncology practice has changed, so have chemotherapy administration safety standards. Advances in technology, cancer treatment, and education and training have prompted the need for periodic review and revision of the standards. Additional information is available at http://www.asco.org/chemo-standards .

  3. Development of new on-line statistical program for the Korean Society for Radiation Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Si Yeol; Ahn, Seung Do; Chung, Weon Kuu; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Choi, Eun Kyung; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2015-06-01

    To develop new on-line statistical program for the Korean Society for Radiation Oncology (KOSRO) to collect and extract medical data in radiation oncology more efficiently. The statistical program is a web-based program. The directory was placed in a sub-folder of the homepage of KOSRO and its web address is http://www.kosro.or.kr/asda. The operating systems server is Linux and the webserver is the Apache HTTP server. For database (DB) server, MySQL is adopted and dedicated scripting language is the PHP. Each ID and password are controlled independently and all screen pages for data input or analysis are made to be friendly to users. Scroll-down menu is actively used for the convenience of user and the consistence of data analysis. Year of data is one of top categories and main topics include human resource, equipment, clinical statistics, specialized treatment and research achievement. Each topic or category has several subcategorized topics. Real-time on-line report of analysis is produced immediately after entering each data and the administrator is able to monitor status of data input of each hospital. Backup of data as spread sheets can be accessed by the administrator and be used for academic works by any members of the KOSRO. The new on-line statistical program was developed to collect data from nationwide departments of radiation oncology. Intuitive screen and consistent input structure are expected to promote entering data of member hospitals and annual statistics should be a cornerstone of advance in radiation oncology.

  4. Development of new on line statistical program for the Korean society for radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Si Yeol; Ahn, Seung Do; Choi, Eun Kyung; Chung, Weon Kuu; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2015-01-01

    To develop new on-line statistical program for the Korean Society for Radiation Oncology (KOSRO) to collect and extract medical data in radiation oncology more efficiently. The statistical program is a web-based program. The directory was placed in a sub-folder of the homepage of KOSRO and its web address is http://www.kosro.or.kr/asda. The operating systems server is Linux and the webserver is the Apache HTTP server. For database (DB) server, MySQL is adopted and dedicated scripting language is the PHP. Each ID and password are controlled independently and all screen pages for data input or analysis are made to be friendly to users. Scroll-down menu is actively used for the convenience of user and the consistence of data analysis. Year of data is one of top categories and main topics include human resource, equipment, clinical statistics, specialized treatment and research achievement. Each topic or category has several subcategorized topics. Real-time on-line report of analysis is produced immediately after entering each data and the administrator is able to monitor status of data input of each hospital. Backup of data as spread sheets can be accessed by the administrator and be used for academic works by any members of the KOSRO. The new on-line statistical program was developed to collect data from nationwide departments of radiation oncology. Intuitive screen and consistent input structure are expected to promote entering data of member hospitals and annual statistics should be a cornerstone of advance in radiation oncology

  5. Development of new on line statistical program for the Korean society for radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Si Yeol; Ahn, Seung Do; Choi, Eun Kyung [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Weon Kuu [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Kangdong, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyung Hwan [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kwan Ho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To develop new on-line statistical program for the Korean Society for Radiation Oncology (KOSRO) to collect and extract medical data in radiation oncology more efficiently. The statistical program is a web-based program. The directory was placed in a sub-folder of the homepage of KOSRO and its web address is http://www.kosro.or.kr/asda. The operating systems server is Linux and the webserver is the Apache HTTP server. For database (DB) server, MySQL is adopted and dedicated scripting language is the PHP. Each ID and password are controlled independently and all screen pages for data input or analysis are made to be friendly to users. Scroll-down menu is actively used for the convenience of user and the consistence of data analysis. Year of data is one of top categories and main topics include human resource, equipment, clinical statistics, specialized treatment and research achievement. Each topic or category has several subcategorized topics. Real-time on-line report of analysis is produced immediately after entering each data and the administrator is able to monitor status of data input of each hospital. Backup of data as spread sheets can be accessed by the administrator and be used for academic works by any members of the KOSRO. The new on-line statistical program was developed to collect data from nationwide departments of radiation oncology. Intuitive screen and consistent input structure are expected to promote entering data of member hospitals and annual statistics should be a cornerstone of advance in radiation oncology.

  6. Patient-centered care in cancer treatment programs: the future of integrative oncology through psychoeducation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garchinski, Christina M; DiBiase, Ann-Marie; Wong, Raimond K; Sagar, Stephen M

    2014-12-01

    The reciprocal relationship between the mind and body has been a neglected process for improving the psychosocial care of cancer patients. Emotions form an important link between the mind and body. They play a fundamental role in the cognitive functions of decision-making and symptom control. Recognizing this relationship is important for integrative oncology. We define psychoeducation as the teaching of self-evaluation and self-regulation of the mind-body process. A gap exists between research evidence and implementation into clinical practice. The patients' search for self-empowerment through the pursuit of complementary therapies may be a surrogate for inadequate psychoeducation. Integrative oncology programs should implement psychoeducation that helps patients to improve both emotional and cognitive intelligence, enabling them to better negotiate cancer treatment systems.

  7. The use of biosimilar medicines in oncology - position statement of the Brazilian Society of Clinical Oncology (SBOC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, G S; Sternberg, C; Lopes, G; Chammas, R; Gifoni, M A C; Gil, R A; Araujo, D V

    2018-01-11

    A biosimilar is a biologic product that is similar to a reference biopharmaceutical product, the manufacturing process of which hinders the ability to identically replicate the structure of the original product, and therefore, it cannot be described as an absolute equivalent of the original medication. The currently available technology does not allow for an accurate copy of complex molecules, but it does allow the replication of similar molecules with the same activity. As biosimilars are about to be introduced in oncology practice, these must be evaluated through evidence-based medicine. This manuscript is a position paper, where the Brazilian Society of Clinical Oncology (SBOC) aims to describe pertinent issues regarding the approval and use of biosimilars in oncology. As a working group on behalf of SBOC, we discuss aspects related to definition, labeling/nomenclature, extrapolation, interchangeability, switching, automatic substitution, clinical standards on safety and efficacy, and the potential impact on financial burden in healthcare. We take a stand in favor of the introduction of biosimilars, as they offer a viable, safe, and cost-effective alternative to the biopharmaceutical products currently used in cancer. We hope this document can provide valuable information to support therapeutic decisions that maximize the clinical benefit for the thousands of cancer patients in Brazil and can contribute to expedite the introduction of this new drug class in clinical practice. We expect the conveyed information to serve as a basis for further discussion in Latin America, this being the first position paper issued by a Latin American Oncology Society.

  8. [Economic analysis of multinational clinical trials in oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejeune, Catherine; Lueza, Béranger; Bonastre, Julia

    2018-02-01

    In oncology, as in other fields of medicine, international multicentre clinical trials came into being so as to include a sufficient number of subjects to investigate a clinical situation. The existence of tight budgetary constraints and the desire to make the best use of the resources available have resulted in the development of economic evaluations associated with these trials, which, thanks to their level of evidence and their size, provide particularly relevant material. Nonetheless, economic evaluations alongside international clinical trials raise specific questions of methodology with regard to both the design and the analysis of the results. Indeed, the costs of goods and services consumed, the types and quantities of resources, and medical practices vary from one country to another and within an individual country. Economic data from the different countries involved must be available so as to study and to take into account this variability, and appropriate techniques for cost estimations and analysis must be implemented to aggregate the results from several countries. From a review of the literature, the aim of this work was to provide an overview of the specific methodological features of economic evaluations alongside international clinical trials: analysis of efficacy data from several countries, collection of resources and real costs, methods to establish the monetary value of resources, methods to aggregate results accounting for the trial effect. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Mentorship Programs in Radiation Oncology Residency Training Programs: A Critical Unmet Need

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhami, Gurleen; Gao, Wendy; Gensheimer, Michael F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Trister, Andrew D. [Sage Bionetworks, Seattle, Washington (United States); Kane, Gabrielle [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Zeng, Jing, E-mail: jzeng13@uw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To conduct a nationwide survey to evaluate the current status of resident mentorship in radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: An anonymous electronic questionnaire was sent to all residents and recent graduates at US Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education–accredited radiation oncology residency programs, identified in the member directory of the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology. Factors predictive of having a mentor and satisfaction with the mentorship experience were identified using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: The survey response rate was 25%, with 85% of respondents reporting that mentorship plays a critical role in residency training, whereas only 53% had a current mentor. Larger programs (≥10 faculty, P=.004; and ≥10 residents, P<.001) were more likely to offer a formal mentorship program, which makes it more likely for residents to have an active mentor (88% vs 44%). Residents in a formal mentoring program reported being more satisfied with the overall mentorship experience (univariate odds ratio 8.77, P<.001; multivariate odds ratio 5, P<.001). On multivariate analysis, women were less likely to be satisfied with the mentorship experience. Conclusions: This is the first survey focusing on the status of residency mentorship in radiation oncology. Our survey highlights the unmet need for mentorship in residency programs.

  10. Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Radiation Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The application of radiation in human health, for both diagnosis and treatment of disease, is an important component of the work of the IAEA. The responsibility for the increasing technical aspects of this work is undertaken by the medical physicist. To ensure good practice in this vital area structured clinical training programmes are required to complement academic learning. This publication is intended to be a guide to the practical implementation of such a programme for radiation therapy. There is a general and growing awareness that radiation medicine is increasingly dependant on well trained medical physicists that are based in the clinical setting. However an analysis of the availability of medical physicists indicates a large shortfall of qualified and capable professionals. This is particularly evident in developing countries. While strategies to increase academic educational opportunities are critical to such countries, the need for guidance on structured clinical training was recognised by the members of the Regional Cooperative Agreement (RCA) for research, development and training related to nuclear sciences for Asia and the Pacific. Consequently a technical cooperation regional project (RAS6038) under the RCA programme was formulated to address this need in the Asia Pacific region by developing suitable material and establishing its viability. Development of a clinical training guide for medical physicists specialising in radiation therapy was started in 2005 with the appointment of a core drafting committee of regional and international experts. Since 2005 the IAEA has convened two additional consultant group meetings including additional experts to prepare the present publication. The publication drew heavily, particularly in the initial stages, from the experience and documents of the Clinical Training Programme for Radiation Oncology Medical Physicists as developed by the Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine. Their

  11. ONCOLOGY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cancer is characterized by a later stage of presentation.6 ... may be done as a result of the patient's age or family history on presentation to a ... This may frequently be the first time that the patient has a clinical breast ... and the diagnosis and treatment of their DCIS. ... conservation therapy (either ROLL or WLE), 10 required.

  12. Radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The Radiation Oncology Division has had as its main objectives both to operate an academic training program and to carry out research on radiation therapy of cancer. Since fiscal year 1975, following a directive from ERDA, increased effort has been given to research. The research activities have been complemented by the training program, which has been oriented toward producing radiation oncologists, giving physicians short-term experience in radiation oncology, and teaching medical students about clinical cancer and its radiation therapy. The purpose of the research effort is to improve present modalities of radiation therapy of cancer. As in previous years, the Division has operated as the Radiation Oncology Program of the Department of Radiological Sciences of the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine. It has provided radiation oncology support to patients at the University Hospital and to academic programs of the University of Puerto Rico Medical Sciences Campus. The patients, in turn, have provided the clinical basis for the educational and research projects of the Division. Funding has been primarily from PRNC (approx. 40%) and from National Cancer Institute grants channeled through the School of Medicine (approx. 60%). Special inter-institutional relationships with the San Juan Veterans Administration Hospital and the Metropolitan Hospital in San Juan have permitted inclusion of patients from these institutions in the Division's research projects. Medical physics and radiotherapy consultations have been provided to the Radiotherapy Department of the VA Hospital

  13. Developing emotional intelligence ability in oncology nurses: a clinical rounds approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codier, Estelle; Freitas, Beth; Muneno, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    To explore the feasibility and impact of an emotional intelligence ability development program on staff and patient care. A mixed method, pre/post-test design. A tertiary care hospital in urban Honolulu, HI. Rounds took place on a 24-bed inpatient oncology unit. 33 RNs in an oncology unit. After collection of baseline data, the emotional intelligence rounds were conducted in an inpatient oncology nursing unit on all shifts during a 10-month period. Demographic information, emotional intelligence scores, data from rounds, chart reviews of emotional care documentation, and unit-wide satisfaction and safety data. The ability to identify emotions in self and others was demonstrated less frequently than expected in this population. The low test response rate prevented comparison of scores pre- and postintervention. The staff's 94% participation in rounds, the positive (100%) evaluation of rounds, and poststudy improvements in emotional care documentation and emotional care planning suggest a positive effect from the intervention. Additional research is recommended over a longer period of time to evaluate the impact emotional intelligence specifically has on the staff's identification of emotions. Because the intervention involved minimal time and resources, feasibility for continuation of the intervention poststudy was rated "high" by the research team. Research in other disciplines suggests that improvement in emotional intelligence ability in clinical staff nurses may improve retention, performance, and teamwork in nursing, which would be of particular significance in high-risk clinical practice environments. Few research studies have explored development of emotional intelligence abilities in clinical staff nurses. Evidence from this study suggests that interventions in the clinical environment may be used to develop emotional intelligence ability. Impact from such development may be used in the future to not only improve the quality of nursing care, but also

  14. Development of a Post-Master's Fellowship Program in Oncology Nursing Education. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegele, Dorothy; Henderson, Billie

    A one-year Post-Master's Fellowship in Oncology Nursing Education for nurse educators was developed through the collaboration of San Jose State University (California) and University of Alabama at Birmingham. The project was designed to: develop or update undergraduate/graduate oncology nursing programs; provide continuing education for practicing…

  15. Phase 3 Oncology Clinical Trials in South Africa: Experimentation or Therapeutic Misconception?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malan, Tina; Moodley, Keymanthri

    2016-02-01

    Although clinical research in oncology is vital to improve current understanding of cancer and to validate new treatment options, voluntary informed consent is a critical component. Oncology research participants are a particularly vulnerable population; hence, therapeutic misconception often leads to ethical and legal challenges. We conducted a qualitative study administering semi-structured questionnaires on 29 adult, Phase 3, oncology clinical trial participants at three different private oncology clinical trial sites in South Africa. A descriptive content analysis was performed to identify perceptions of these participants regarding Phase 3 clinical trials. We found that most participants provided consent to be included in the trial for self-benefit. More than half of the participants had a poor understanding of Phase 3 clinical trials, and almost half the participants believed the clinical trial did not pose any significant risk to them. The word "hope" was used frequently by participants, displaying clear optimism with regard to the clinical trial and its outcome. This indicated that therapeutic misconception does occur in the South African oncology research setting and has the potential to lead to underestimation of the risks of a Phase 3 clinical trial. Emphasizing the experimental nature of a clinical trial during the consent process is critical to address therapeutic misconception in oncology research. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Assessing Interpersonal and Communication Skills in Radiation Oncology Residents: A Pilot Standardized Patient Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Melody; Berman, Abigail T.; Hwang, Wei-Ting; LaMarra, Denise; Baffic, Cordelia; Suneja, Gita; Vapiwala, Neha

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: There is a lack of data for the structured development and evaluation of communication skills in radiation oncology residency training programs. Effective communication skills are increasingly emphasized by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and are critical for a successful clinical practice. We present the design of a novel, pilot standardized patient (SP) program and the evaluation of communication skills among radiation oncology residents. Methods and Materials: Two case scenarios were developed to challenge residents in the delivery of “bad news” to patients: one scenario regarding treatment failure and the other regarding change in treatment plan. Eleven radiation oncology residents paired with 6 faculty participated in this pilot program. Each encounter was scored by the SPs, observing faculty, and residents themselves based on the Kalamazoo guidelines. Results: Overall resident performance ratings were “good” to “excellent,” with faculty assigning statistically significant higher scores and residents assigning lower scores. We found inconsistent inter rater agreement among faculty, residents, and SPs. SP feedback was also valuable in identifying areas of improvement, including more collaborative decision making and less use of medical jargon. Conclusions: The program was well received by residents and faculty and regarded as a valuable educational experience that could be used as an annual feedback tool. Poor inter rater agreement suggests a need for residents and faculty physicians to better calibrate their evaluations to true patient perceptions. High scores from faculty members substantiate the concern that resident evaluations are generally positive and nondiscriminating. Faculty should be encouraged to provide honest and critical feedback to hone residents' interpersonal skills

  17. Guide to clinical PET in oncology: Improving clinical management of cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has an approximately 50 year-history. It was developed as a tool of medical science to quantitatively measure metabolic rates of bio-substances in vivo and in particular the number of receptors in neuroscience. Until the late 1990s PET was, in most cases, research oriented activity. In 2001, positron emission tomography/X ray computed tomography (PET/CT) hybrid imaging system became commercially available. An era of clinical PET then emerged, in which PET images were utilized for clinical practice in the treatment and diagnosis of cancer patients. PET imaging could recognize areas of abnormal metabolic behaviour of cancers in vivo, and the addition of CT imaging underlines the site of malignancy. More accurate and precise interpretation of cancer lesions can therefore be performed by PET/CT imaging than PET or CT imaging alone. Clinical PET, in particular with fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG), has already proven itself to have considerable value in oncology. The indications include malignant lymphoma and melanoma, head and neck cancers, oesophageal cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer and colorectal cancer, and it is still being expanded. The roles of clinical PET could be for 1) preoperative staging of cancers, 2) differentiation between residual tumour and scarring, 3) demonstration of suspected recurrences, 4) monitoring response to therapy, 5) prognosis and 6) radiotherapy treatment planning. Clinical PET can be used to illustrate exactly which treatment should be applied for a cancer patient as well as where surgeons should operate and where radiation oncologists should target radiation therapy. An almost exponential rise in the introduction of clinical PET, as well as the installation of PET/CT has been seen throughout the world. Clinical PET is currently viewed as the most powerful diagnostic tool in its field. This IAEA-TECDOC presents an overview of clinical PET for cancer patients and a relevant source of

  18. Recommendations for Obesity Clinical Trials in Cancer Survivors: American Society of Clinical Oncology Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligibel, Jennifer A; Alfano, Catherine M; Hershman, Dawn; Ballard, Rachel M; Bruinooge, Suanna S; Courneya, Kerry S; Daniels, Elvan C; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Frank, Elizabeth S; Goodwin, Pamela J; Irwin, Melinda L; Levit, Laura A; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Minasian, Lori M; O'Rourke, Mark A; Pierce, John P; Stein, Kevin D; Thomson, Cynthia A; Hudis, Clifford A

    2015-11-20

    Observational evidence has established a relationship between obesity and cancer risk and outcomes. Interventional studies have demonstrated the feasibility and benefits of lifestyle change after cancer diagnosis, and guidelines recommend weight management and regular physical activity in cancer survivors; however, lifestyle interventions are not a routine part of cancer care. The ASCO Research Summit on Advancing Obesity Clinical Trials in Cancer Survivors sought to identify the knowledge gaps that clinical trials addressing energy balance factors in cancer survivors have not answered and to develop a roadmap for the design and implementation of studies with the potential to generate data that could lead to the evidence-based incorporation of weight management and physical activity programs into standard oncology practice. Recommendations highlight the need for large-scale trials evaluating the impact of energy balance interventions on cancer outcomes, as well as the concurrent conduct of studies focused on dissemination and implementation of interventions in diverse populations of cancer survivors, including answering critical questions about the degree of benefit in key subgroups of survivors. Other considerations include the importance of incorporating economic metrics into energy balance intervention trials, the need to establish intermediate biomarkers, and the importance of integrating traditional and nontraditional funding sources. Establishing lifestyle change after cancer diagnosis as a routine part of cancer care will require a multipronged effort to overcome barriers related to study development, funding, and stakeholder engagement. Given the prevalence of obesity and inactivity in cancer survivors in the United States and elsewhere, energy balance interventions hold the potential to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality in millions of patients, and it is essential that we move forward in determining their role in cancer care with the same care and

  19. Evaluating the quality, clinical relevance, and resident perception of the radiation oncology in-training examination: A national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun; Bar Ad, Voichita; McAna, John; Dicker, Adam P

    2016-01-01

    The yearly radiation oncology in-training examination (ITE) by the American College of Radiology is a widely used, norm-referenced educational assessment, with high test reliability and psychometric performance. We distributed a national survey to evaluate the academic radiation oncology community's perception of the ITE. In June 2014, a 7-question online survey was distributed via e-mail to current radiation oncology residents, program directors, and attending physicians who had completed residency in the past 5 years or junior attendings. Survey questions were designed on a 5-point Likert scale. Sign test was performed with P ≤ .05 considered statistically different from neutral. Thirty-one program directors (33.3%), 114 junior attendings (35.4%), and 225 residents (41.2%) responded. Junior attendings and program directors reported that the ITE directly contributed to their preparation for the American Board of Radiology written certification (P = .050 and .004, respectively). Residents did not perceive the examination as an accurate assessment of relevant clinical and scientific knowledge (P ITE. Although the current examination allows limited feedback, establishing a venue for individualized feedback may allow continual and timely improvement of the ITE. Adopting a criterion-referenced examination may further increase resident investment in and utilization of this valuable learning tool. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Program director and chief resident perspectives on the educational environment of US radiation oncology programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berriochoa, Camille; Weller, Michael; Berry, Danielle; Reddy, Chandana A; Koyfman, Shlomo; Tendulkar, Rahul

    Our goals were toexamine the educational approachesused at radiation oncology residency programs nationwide andto evaluate program director(PD) and chief resident (CR) perceptions of their educational environment. We distributed a survey regarding curricular structure via email toall identified US radiation oncology residency PDs and CRs. Pearson χ 2 test was used toevaluate whether differences existed between answers provided by the 2 study populations. The survey was disseminated to 200 individuals in 85 US residency programs: 49/85PDs(58%)and 74/115 (64%)CRs responded. More than one-half of PDs and CRs report that attending physicians discussed management, reviewed contours, and conducted mock oral board examinations with the residents. At nearly 50% of programs, the majority of teaching conferences use a lecture-based approach, whereas only 20% reported predominant utilization of the Socratic method. However, both PDs (63%) and CRs (49%) reported that Socratic teaching is more effective than didactic lectures (16% and 20%, respectively), with the remainder responding that they are equally effective. Teaching sessions were reported to be resident-led ≥75% of the time by 50% of CRs versus 18% of PDs (P = .002). Significantly more CRs than PDs felt that faculty-led teaching conferences were more effective than resident-led conferences (62% vs 26%, respectively; P Socratic-based teaching conferences. Increased communication between PDs and CRs can better align perceptions with educational goals. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Detailed prospective peer review in a community radiation oncology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, James D; Chesnut, Thomas J; Eastham, David V; Demandante, Carlo N; Hoopes, David J

    In 2012, we instituted detailed prospective peer review of new cases. We present the outcomes of peer review on patient management and time required for peer review. Peer review rounds were held 3 to 4 days weekly and required 2 physicians to review pertinent information from the electronic medical record and treatment planning system. Eight aspects were reviewed for each case: 1) workup and staging; 2) treatment intent and prescription; 3) position, immobilization, and simulation; 4) motion assessment and management; 5) target contours; 6) normal tissue contours; 7) target dosimetry; and 8) normal tissue dosimetry. Cases were marked as, "Meets standard of care," "Variation," or "Major deviation." Changes in treatment plan were noted. As our process evolved, we recorded the time spent reviewing each case. From 2012 to 2014, we collected peer review data on 442 of 465 (95%) radiation therapy patients treated in our hospital-based clinic. Overall, 91 (20.6%) of the cases were marked as having a variation, and 3 (0.7%) as major deviation. Forty-two (9.5%) of the cases were altered after peer review. An overall peer review score of "Variation" or "Major deviation" was highly associated with a change in treatment plan (P peer review. Indicators on position, immobilization, simulation, target contours, target dosimetry, motion management, normal tissue contours, and normal tissue dosimetry were significantly associated with a change in treatment plan. The mean time spent on each case was 7 minutes. Prospective peer review is feasible in a community radiation oncology practice. Our process led to changes in 9.5% of cases. Peer review should focus on technical factors such as target contours and dosimetry. Peer review required 7 minutes per case. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Measurement of nurses' workload in an oncology outpatient clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Alves de Souza

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The growing demand and the degree of patient care in oncological outpatient services, as well as the complexity of treatment have had an impact on the workload of nurses. This study aimed at measuring the workload and productivity of nurses in an oncological outpatient service. An observational study using a work sampling technique was conducted and included seven nurses working in an oncological outpatient service in the south-eastern region of Brazil. A total of 1,487 intervention or activity samples were obtained. Nurses used 43.2% of their time on indirect care, 33.2% on direct care, 11.6% on associated activities, and 12% on personal activities. Their mean productivity was 88.0%. The findings showed that nurses in this service spend most of their time in indirect care activities. Moreover, the productivity index in this study was above that recommended in the literature.

  3. A Window Into Clinical Next-Generation Sequencing-Based Oncology Testing Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Rakesh; Bartley, Angela N; Bridge, Julia A; Jennings, Lawrence J; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Kim, Annette; Lazar, Alexander J; Lindeman, Neal I; Moncur, Joel; Rai, Alex J; Routbort, Mark J; Vasalos, Patricia; Merker, Jason D

    2017-12-01

    - Detection of acquired variants in cancer is a paradigm of precision medicine, yet little has been reported about clinical laboratory practices across a broad range of laboratories. - To use College of American Pathologists proficiency testing survey results to report on the results from surveys on next-generation sequencing-based oncology testing practices. - College of American Pathologists proficiency testing survey results from more than 250 laboratories currently performing molecular oncology testing were used to determine laboratory trends in next-generation sequencing-based oncology testing. - These presented data provide key information about the number of laboratories that currently offer or are planning to offer next-generation sequencing-based oncology testing. Furthermore, we present data from 60 laboratories performing next-generation sequencing-based oncology testing regarding specimen requirements and assay characteristics. The findings indicate that most laboratories are performing tumor-only targeted sequencing to detect single-nucleotide variants and small insertions and deletions, using desktop sequencers and predesigned commercial kits. Despite these trends, a diversity of approaches to testing exists. - This information should be useful to further inform a variety of topics, including national discussions involving clinical laboratory quality systems, regulation and oversight of next-generation sequencing-based oncology testing, and precision oncology efforts in a data-driven manner.

  4. Oncology education in Canadian undergraduate and postgraduate medical programs: a survey of educators and learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, V.C.; Berry, S.; Hsu, T.; North, S.; Neville, A.; Chan, K.; Verma, S.

    2014-01-01

    Background The oncology education framework currently in use in Canadian medical training programs is unknown, and the needs of learners have not been fully assessed to determine whether they are adequately prepared to manage patients with cancer. Methods To assess the oncology education framework currently in use at Canadian medical schools and residency training programs for family (fm) and internal medicine (im), and to evaluate opinions about the content and utility of standard oncology education objectives, a Web survey was designed and sent to educators and learners. The survey recipients included undergraduate medical education curriculum committee members (umeccms), directors of fm and im programs, oncologists, medical students, and fm and im residents. Results Survey responses were received from 677 educators and learners. Oncology education was felt to be inadequate in their respective programs by 58% of umeccms, 57% of fm program directors, and 50% of im program directors. For learners, oncology education was thought to be inadequate by 67% of medical students, 86% of fm residents, and 63% of im residents. When comparing teaching of medical subspecialty–related diseases, all groups agreed that their trainees were least prepared to manage patients with cancer. A standard set of oncology objectives was thought to be possibly or definitely useful for undergraduate learners by 59% of respondents overall and by 61% of postgraduate learners. Conclusions Oncology education in Canadian undergraduate and postgraduate fm and im training programs are currently thought to be inadequate by a majority of educators and learners. Developing a standard set of oncology objectives might address the needs of learners. PMID:24523624

  5. Project reconversion Service Hospital Radiation Oncology Clinics-Medical School

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quarneti, A.; Levaggi, G.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: The Health Sector operates within the framework of Social Policy and it is therefore one of the ways of distribution of public benefit, like Housing, Education and Social Security. While public spending on health has grown in recent years, its distribution has been uneven and the sector faces funding and management problems. The Service Hospital Radiation Oncology has reduced its health care liavility , lack technological development and unsufficient human resources and training. Aim: developing an inclusive reform bill Service Hospital Radiation Oncology .Material and Methods: This project tends to form a network institutional, introducing concepts of evidence-based medicine, risk models, cost analysis, coding systems, system implementation of quality management (ISO-9000 Standards). Proposes redefining radiotherapy centers and their potential participation in training resource development goals humanos.Promueve scientific research of national interest. Separate strictly administrative function, management and teaching. The project takes into account the characteristics of demand, the need to order it and organize around her, institutional network system and within the Hospital das Clinicas own related services related to Service Hospital Radiation Oncology , Encourages freedom of choice, and confers greater equity in care. The project would managed by the Hospital Clínicas. Conclusions: We believe this proposal identifies problems and opportunities, Service Hospital Radiation Oncology proposes the development of institutional network under one management model

  6. IAEA training course series TCS-37 clinical training of medical physicists specializing in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inamura, Kiyonari

    2015-01-01

    Training program IAEA TCS-37 (Training course series No.37) 'Clinical Training Specializing in Radiation Oncology (2009)' was fixed to practical training syllabus at faculty and graduate course of medical physics of a university. TCS-47 for diagnostic radiology (2010) and TCS-50 for nuclear medicine (2011) were also involved in the syllabus. These training courses had been developed by IAEA RCA RAS6038 project since 2002. In this paper, first, comparison with other training programs in the world was made in terms of (1) Degree of extent of subject or field, (2) Concreteness or specificity, (3) Degree of completion, (4) Method of certification and (5) Practicability. IAEA TCS series got the most points among ten programs such as EMERALD/EMIT, AAPM rpt. No.90 and CAMPEP accredited programs. Second, TCS-37, TCS-47 and TCS-50 were broken down to 6, 5 and 6 subjects of training course respectively. Third, each subject was further broken down to 15 times of training schedule where every time was composed by 3 hours of training. Totally 45 hours of a subject were assigned to one semester for getting one unit of credit. Seventeen units should be credited up to three years in graduate course to finish the whole program. (author)

  7. Training program in radiation protection: implantation in a radiation oncology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chretien, Mario; Morrier, Janelle; Cote, Carl; Lavallee, Marie C.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Purpose: To introduce the radiation protection training program implemented in the radiation oncology department of the Hotel-Dieu de Quebec. This program seeks to provide an adequate training for all the clinic workers and to fulfill Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's (CNSC) legislations. Materials and Methods: The radiation protection training program implemented is based on the use of five different education modalities: 1) Oral presentations, when the objective of the formation is to inform a large number of persons about general topics; 2) Periodic journals are published bimonthly and distributed to members of the department. They aim to answer frequently asked questions on the radiation safety domain. Each journal contains one main subject which is vulgarized and short notices, these later added to inform the readers about the departmental news and developments in radiation safety; 3) Electronic self-training presentations are divided into several units. Topics, durations, complexity and evaluations are adapted for different worker groups; 4) Posters are strategically displayed in the department in order to be read by all the radiation oncology employees, even those who are not specialized in the radiation protection area; 5) Simulations are organized for specialised workers to practice and to develop their skills in radiation protection situations as emergencies. A registration method was developed to record all training performed by each member of the department. Results: The training program implemented follows the CNSC recommendations. It allows about 150 members of the department to receive proper radiation safety training. The oral presentations allow an interaction between the trainer and the workers. The periodic journals are simple to write while ensuring continuous training. They are also easy to read and to understand. The e-learning units and their associated evaluations can be done at any time and everywhere in the department. The

  8. The roots of modern oncology: from discovery of new antitumor anthracyclines to their clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassinelli, Giuseppe

    2016-06-02

    In May 1960, the Farmitalia CEO Dr. Bertini and the director of the Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori of Milan Prof. Bucalossi (talent scout and city's Mayor) signed a research agreement for the discovery and development up to clinical trials of new natural antitumor agents. This agreement can be considered as a pioneering and fruitful example of a translational discovery program with relevant transatlantic connections. Owing to an eclectic Streptomyces, found near Castel del Monte (Apulia), and to the skilled and motivated participants of both institutions, a new natural antitumor drug, daunomycin, was ready for clinical trials within 3 years. Patent interference by the Farmitalia French partner was overcome by the good quality of the Italian drug and by the cooperation between Prof. Di Marco, director of the Istituto Ricerche Farmitalia Research Laboratories for Microbiology and Chemotherapy, and Prof. Karnofsky, head of the Sloan-Kettering Cancer Institute of New York, leading to the first transatlantic clinical trials. The search for daunomycin's sister anthracyclines led to the discovery and development of adriamycin, one of the best drugs born in Milan. This was the second act prologue of the history of Italian antitumor discovery and clinical oncology, which started in July 1969 when Prof. Di Marco sent Prof. Bonadonna the first vials of adriamycin (doxorubicin) to be tested in clinical trials. This article reviews the Milan scene in the 1960s, a city admired and noted for the outstanding scientific achievements of its private and public institutions in drugs and industrial product discovery.

  9. Innovative designs for radiation oncology research in clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, P.; Keys, H.; Salazar, O.

    1987-01-01

    The goals of the research mission are clear: (1) to explore in a logical, systematic, organized, and coordinated fashion those potential therapeutic advances that show promise; (2) to identify, in the laboratory, those models that predict successful combinations of treatment modes; (3) to search for ultimate treatment of programs that improve the therapeutic ratio. The modalities, innovations in treatment, and logic exist; it now rests with meticulous science to show carefully the directions that clinical research should follow in pursuit of the ultimate objective of improving cancer cure rates with less toxicity

  10. Clinical trial or standard treatment? Shared decision making at the department of oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Trine Ammentorp; Birkelund, Regner; Ammentorp, Jette

    2016-01-01

    Title: Clinical trial or standard treatment? Shared decision making at the department of oncology. Authors: Ph.d. student, Trine A. Gregersen. Trine.gregersen@rsyd.dk. Department of Oncology. Health Services Research Unit Lillebaelt Hospital / IRS University of Southern Denmark. Professor, Regner...... are involved in difficult treatment decisions including participation in clinical trials. The literature indicates that the decision is very often based on little knowledge about the treatment and that many patients who have consented to participate in a clinical trial are not always aware...... that they are participating in a trial. This place great demand on the healthcare providers’ ability to involve and advise patients in the decisions. The aim of this study is to investigate the characteristics of the communication when decisions about participation in clinical oncology trial are made and the patients...

  11. American Society of Clinical Oncology Policy Statement Update: Genetic and Genomic Testing for Cancer Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Mark E; Bradbury, Angela R; Arun, Banu; Domchek, Susan M; Ford, James M; Hampel, Heather L; Lipkin, Stephen M; Syngal, Sapna; Wollins, Dana S; Lindor, Noralane M

    2015-11-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has long affirmed that the recognition and management of individuals with an inherited susceptibility to cancer are core elements of oncology care. ASCO released its first statement on genetic testing in 1996 and updated that statement in 2003 and 2010 in response to developments in the field. In 2014, the Cancer Prevention and Ethics Committees of ASCO commissioned another update to reflect the impact of advances in this area on oncology practice. In particular, there was an interest in addressing the opportunities and challenges arising from the application of massively parallel sequencing-also known as next-generation sequencing-to cancer susceptibility testing. This technology introduces a new level of complexity into the practice of cancer risk assessment and management, requiring renewed effort on the part of ASCO to ensure that those providing care to patients with cancer receive the necessary education to use this new technology in the most effective, beneficial manner. The purpose of this statement is to explore the challenges of new and emerging technologies in cancer genetics and provide recommendations to ensure their optimal deployment in oncology practice. Specifically, the statement makes recommendations in the following areas: germline implications of somatic mutation profiling, multigene panel testing for cancer susceptibility, quality assurance in genetic testing, education of oncology professionals, and access to cancer genetic services. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  12. Male Oncology Research and Education program for men at high risk for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorentz, J; Liu, S K; Vesprini, D

    2018-04-01

    Three groups of men are at high risk of developing prostate cancer: men with a strong family history of prostate cancer, men of West African or Caribbean ancestry, and men with a germline pathogenic variant in a prostate cancer-associated gene. Despite the fact that those men constitute a significant portion of the male population in North America, few recommendations for prostate cancer screening specific to them have been developed. For men at general population risk for prostate cancer, screening based on prostate-specific antigen (psa) has remained controversial despite the abundance of literature on the topic. As a result, recommendations made by major screening authorities are inconsistent (ranging from no psa screening to baseline psa screening at age 45), allowing physicians to pick and choose how to screen their patients. The Male Oncology Research and Education (more) program is an observational research program that serves as an academic platform for multiple research foci. For its participants, serum and dna are biobanked, medical information is collected, and contact for relevant research-related opportunities is maintained. This research program is paired with a specialized clinic called the more clinic, where men at high risk are regularly screened for prostate cancer in a standard approach that includes physical examination and serum psa measurement. In this article, we describe the goals, participant accrual to date, and projects specific to this unique program.

  13. Stress and Burnout Among Residency Program Directors in United States Radiation Oncology Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aggarwal, Sonya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Kusano, Aaron S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Carter, Justin Nathaniel; Gable, Laura [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Chang, Daniel T., E-mail: dtchang@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate stressors among radiation oncology residency program directors (PDs) and determine the prevalence and indicators of burnout. Methods and Materials: An anonymous, online, cross-sectional survey was offered to PDs of US radiation oncology programs in the fall of 2014. Survey content examined individual and program demographics, perceptions surrounding the role of PD, and commonly encountered stressors. Burnout was assessed using the validated Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey. Results: In total, 47 of 88 PDs (53%) responded to the survey. Although 78% of respondents reported feeling “satisfied” or “highly satisfied” with their current role, 85% planned to remain as PD for <5 years. The most commonly cited stressors were satisfying Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education/Residency Review Committee requirements (47%), administrative duties (30%) and resident morale (28%). Three-quarters of respondents were satisfied that they became PDs. Overall, 11% of respondents met criteria for low burnout, 83% for moderate burnout, and 6% for high burnout. Not having served as a PD at a prior institution correlated with high depersonalization (OR 6.75, P=.04) and overall burnout (odds ratio [OR], 15.6; P=.04). Having more years on faculty prior to becoming PD correlated with less emotional exhaustion (OR, 0.44, P=.05) and depersonalization (OR, 0.20, P=.04). Finally, having dedicated time for PD duties correlated with less emotional exhaustion (OR, 0.27, P=.04). Conclusions: Moderate levels of burnout are common in U.S. radiation oncology PDs with regulatory stressors being common. Despite this, many PDs are fulfilled with their role. Longitudinal studies assessing dynamic external factors and their influence on PD burnout would be beneficial.

  14. Stress and Burnout Among Residency Program Directors in United States Radiation Oncology Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Sonya; Kusano, Aaron S.; Carter, Justin Nathaniel; Gable, Laura; Thomas, Charles R.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate stressors among radiation oncology residency program directors (PDs) and determine the prevalence and indicators of burnout. Methods and Materials: An anonymous, online, cross-sectional survey was offered to PDs of US radiation oncology programs in the fall of 2014. Survey content examined individual and program demographics, perceptions surrounding the role of PD, and commonly encountered stressors. Burnout was assessed using the validated Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey. Results: In total, 47 of 88 PDs (53%) responded to the survey. Although 78% of respondents reported feeling “satisfied” or “highly satisfied” with their current role, 85% planned to remain as PD for <5 years. The most commonly cited stressors were satisfying Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education/Residency Review Committee requirements (47%), administrative duties (30%) and resident morale (28%). Three-quarters of respondents were satisfied that they became PDs. Overall, 11% of respondents met criteria for low burnout, 83% for moderate burnout, and 6% for high burnout. Not having served as a PD at a prior institution correlated with high depersonalization (OR 6.75, P=.04) and overall burnout (odds ratio [OR], 15.6; P=.04). Having more years on faculty prior to becoming PD correlated with less emotional exhaustion (OR, 0.44, P=.05) and depersonalization (OR, 0.20, P=.04). Finally, having dedicated time for PD duties correlated with less emotional exhaustion (OR, 0.27, P=.04). Conclusions: Moderate levels of burnout are common in U.S. radiation oncology PDs with regulatory stressors being common. Despite this, many PDs are fulfilled with their role. Longitudinal studies assessing dynamic external factors and their influence on PD burnout would be beneficial.

  15. Companion diagnostics and molecular imaging-enhanced approaches for oncology clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Heertum, Ronald L; Scarimbolo, Robert; Ford, Robert; Berdougo, Eli; O'Neal, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the era of personalized medicine, diagnostic approaches are helping pharmaceutical and biotechnology sponsors streamline the clinical trial process. Molecular assays and diagnostic imaging are routinely being used to stratify patients for treatment, monitor disease, and provide reliable early clinical phase assessments. The importance of diagnostic approaches in drug development is highlighted by the rapidly expanding global cancer diagnostics market and the emergent attention of regulatory agencies worldwide, who are beginning to offer more structured platforms and guidance for this area. In this paper, we highlight the key benefits of using companion diagnostics and diagnostic imaging with a focus on oncology clinical trials. Nuclear imaging using widely available radiopharmaceuticals in conjunction with molecular imaging of oncology targets has opened the door to more accurate disease assessment and the modernization of standard criteria for the evaluation, staging, and treatment responses of cancer patients. Furthermore, the introduction and validation of quantitative molecular imaging continues to drive and optimize the field of oncology diagnostics. Given their pivotal role in disease assessment and treatment, the validation and commercialization of diagnostic tools will continue to advance oncology clinical trials, support new oncology drugs, and promote better patient outcomes.

  16. The role of hybrid SPECT-CT in oncology: current and emerging clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, F.U.; Scarsbrook, A.F.

    2008-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography - computed tomography (SPECT-CT) is an emerging dual-modality imaging technique with many established and potential clinical applications in the field of oncology. To date, there has been a considerable emphasis on the benefits of integrated positron emission tomography - computed tomography (PET-CT) in oncology, but relatively little focus on the clinical utility of SPECT-CT. As with PET-CT, accurate co-registration of anatomical and functional data from a combined SPECT-CT camera often provides complementary diagnostic information. Both sensitivity (superior disease localization) and specificity (exclusion of false-positives due to physiological tracer uptake) are improved, and the functional significance of indeterminate lesions detected on cross-sectional imaging can be defined. This article will review the scope of hybrid SPECT-CT in oncology and illustrate both current and emerging clinical applications

  17. Clinical practice guidelines and consensus statements in oncology--an assessment of their methodological quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmel Jacobs

    Full Text Available Consensus statements and clinical practice guidelines are widely available for enhancing the care of cancer patients. Despite subtle differences in their definition and purpose, these terms are often used interchangeably. We systematically assessed the methodological quality of consensus statements and clinical practice guidelines published in three commonly read, geographically diverse, cancer-specific journals. Methods Consensus statements and clinical practice guidelines published between January 2005 and September 2013 in Current Oncology, European Journal of Cancer and Journal of Clinical Oncology were evaluated. Each publication was assessed using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II rigour of development and editorial independence domains. For assessment of transparency of document development, 7 additional items were taken from the Institute of Medicine's standards for practice guidelines and the Journal of Clinical Oncology guidelines for authors of guidance documents.Consensus statements and clinical practice guidelines published between January 2005 and September 2013 in Current Oncology, European Journal of Cancer and Journal of Clinical Oncology were evaluated. Each publication was assessed using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II rigour of development and editorial independence domains. For assessment of transparency of document development, 7 additional items were taken from the Institute of Medicine's standards for practice guidelines and the Journal of Clinical Oncology guidelines for authors of guidance documents.Thirty-four consensus statements and 67 clinical practice guidelines were evaluated. The rigour of development score for consensus statements over the three journals was 32% lower than that of clinical practice guidelines. The editorial independence score was 15% lower for consensus statements than clinical practice guidelines. One journal scored

  18. FDG PET/CT in clinical oncology. Case based approach with teaching points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihailovic, Jasna [Novi Sad Univ. (Serbia). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Goldsmith, Stanley J. [Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States). Div. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imging; Killeen, Ronan P. [St. Vincents Univ. Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)

    2012-07-01

    Organized according to the role of FDG PET/CT in the evaluation and management of oncology patients. 100 informative cases reflecting the issues that clinicians address in their daily practice. Ideal for all newcomers to the field, whether medical students, radiology, nuclear medicine, or oncology fellows, or practicing physicians. FDG PET/CT has rapidly emerged as an invaluable combined imaging modality that can identify tumors on the basis of not only anatomical alterations but also metabolic activity, thus allowing the detection of lesions that would otherwise be too small to distinguish. This book, comprising a collection of images from oncology cases, is organized according to the role of FDG PET/CT in the evaluation and management of oncology patients, and only secondarily by organ or tumor entity. In this way, it reflects the issues that clinicians actually address in their daily practice, namely: identification of an unknown or unsuspected primary; determination of the extent of disease; evaluation of response to therapy; and surveillance after response, i.e., detection of recurrent disease. In total, 100 cases involving different primary tumors are presented to illustrate findings in these different circumstances. FDG PET/CT in Clinical Oncology will be of great value to all newcomers to this field, whether medical students, radiology, nuclear medicine, or oncology fellows, or practicing physicians.

  19. Informatics in clinical research in oncology: current state, challenges, and a future perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahal, Amar P S

    2011-01-01

    The informatics landscape of clinical trials in oncology has changed significantly in the last 10 years. The current state of the infrastructure for clinical trial management, execution, and data management is reviewed. The systems, their functionality, the users, and the standards available to researchers are discussed from the perspective of the oncologist-researcher. Challenges in complexity and in the processing of information are outlined. These challenges include the lack of communication and information-interchange between systems, the lack of simplified standards, and the lack of implementation and adherence to the standards that are available. The clinical toxicology criteria from the National Cancer Institute (CTCAE) are cited as a successful standard in oncology, and HTTP on the Internet is referenced for its simplicity. Differences in the management of information standards between industries are discussed. Possible future advances in oncology clinical research informatics are addressed. These advances include strategic policy review of standards and the implementation of actions to make standards free, ubiquitous, simple, and easily interpretable; the need to change from a local data-capture- or transaction-driven model to a large-scale data-interpretation model that provides higher value to the oncologist and the patient; and the need for information technology investment in a readily available digital educational model for clinical research in oncology that is customizable for individual studies. These new approaches, with changes in information delivery to mobile platforms, will set the stage for the next decade in clinical research informatics.

  20. Women with breast cancer report substantially more disease- and treatment-related side or late effects than registered by clinical oncologists: a cross-sectional study of a standard follow-up program in an oncological department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Mai Britt Bjørklund; Grau, Cai; Zachariae, Robert

    2017-01-01

    effects were hot flushes (35%), fatigue (32%), and sleep disturbance (31%). CONCLUSION: None of the scheduled or additional visits resulted in detection of recurrent disease. Furthermore, the majority of patients reported side or late effects. Statistically significant more women reported side or late...... effects than registered by the clinical oncologists. This suggests the need for rethinking of the follow-up programs with more emphasis upon side or late effects of the treatment....

  1. Survey of Medical Oncology Status in Korea (SOMOS-K): A National Survey of Medical Oncologists in the Korean Association for Clinical Oncology (KACO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Yeun; Lee, Yun Gyoo; Kim, Bong-Seog

    2017-07-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the current role of medical oncologists in cancer care with a focus on increasing the recognition of medical oncology as an independent specialty. Questionnaires modified from the Medical Oncology Status in Europe Survey dealing with oncology structure, resources, research, and patterns of care given by medical oncologists were selected. Several modifications were made to the questionnaire after feedback from the insurance and policy committee of the Korean Association for Clinical Oncology (KACO). The online survey was then sent to KACO members. A total of 214 medical oncologists (45.8% of the total inquiries), including 71 directors of medical oncology institutions, took the survey. Most institutions had various resources, including a medical oncology department (94.1%) and a department of radiation oncology (82.4%). There was an average of four medical oncologists at each institution. Medical oncologists were involved in various treatments from diagnosis to end-of-life care. They were also chemotherapy providers from a wide range of institutions that treated many types of solid cancers. In addition, 86.2% of the institutions conducted research. This is the first national survey in Korea to show that medical oncologists are involved in a wide range of cancer treatments and care. This survey emphasizes the contributions and proper roles of medical oncologists in the evolving health care environment in Korea.

  2. Clinical Pathways and the Patient Perspective in the Pursuit of Value-Based Oncology Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersek, Jennifer L; Nadler, Eric; Freeman-Daily, Janet; Mazharuddin, Samir; Kim, Edward S

    2017-01-01

    The art of practicing oncology has evolved substantially in the past 5 years. As more and more diagnostic tests, biomarker-directed therapies, and immunotherapies make their way to the oncology marketplace, oncologists will find it increasingly difficult to keep up with the many therapeutic options. Additionally, the cost of cancer care seems to be increasing. Clinical pathways are a systematic way to organize and display detailed, evidence-based treatment options and assist the practitioner with best practice. When selecting which treatment regimens to include on a clinical pathway, considerations must include the efficacy and safety, as well as costs, of the therapy. Pathway treatment regimens must be continually assessed and modified to ensure that the most up-to-date, high-quality options are incorporated. Value-based models, such as the ASCO Value Framework, can assist providers in presenting economic evaluations of clinical pathway treatment options to patients, thus allowing the patient to decide the overall value of each treatment regimen. Although oncologists and pathway developers can decide which treatment regimens to include on a clinical pathway based on the efficacy of the treatment, assessment of the value of that treatment regimen ultimately lies with the patient. Patient definitions of value will be an important component to enhancing current value-based oncology care models and incorporating new, high-quality, value-based therapeutics into oncology clinical pathways.

  3. Postgraduate Training in Clinical Oncology. Report on a WHO Working Group (The Hague, The Netherlands, December 6-8, 1978).

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    The 1978 report of the Working Group of Postgraduate Training in Clinical Oncology, convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Europe in collaboration with the government of The Netherlands, is presented. The groups analyzed models of postgraduate training in clinical oncology and evaluated their suitability in relation to…

  4. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  5. Cultural Competency Training to Increase Minority Enrollment into Radiation Therapy Clinical Trials-an NRG Oncology RTOG Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jessica S; Pugh, Stephanie; Boparai, Karan; Rearden, Jessica; Yeager, Katherine A; Bruner, Deborah W

    2017-12-01

    Despite initiatives to increase the enrollment of racial and ethnic minorities into cancer clinical trials in the National Cancer Institute National Cancer Clinical Trials Network (NCCTN), participation by Latino and African American populations remain low. The primary aims of this pilot study are (1) to develop a Cultural Competency and Recruitment Training Program (CCRTP) for physician investigators and clinical research associates (CRAs), (2) to determine if the CCRTP increases cultural competency scores among physician investigators and CRAs, and (3) to determine the impact of the CCRTP on minority patient recruitment into NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trials. Sixty-seven CRAs and physicians participated in an in-person or online 4-h CRRTP training. Five knowledge and attitude items showed significant improvements from pre- to post-training. A comparison between enrolling sites that did and did not participate in the CCRTP demonstrated a pre to 1-year post-incremental increase in minority accrual to clinical trials of 1.2 % among participating sites. While not statistically significant, this increase translated into an additional 300 minority patients accrued to NCCTN clinical trials in the year following the training from those sites who participated in the training.

  6. Factors Predicting Oncology Care Providers' Behavioral Intention to Adopt Clinical Decision Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfenden, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlation study was to examine the predictors of user behavioral intention on the decision of oncology care providers to adopt or reject the clinical decision support system. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) formed the foundation of the research model and survey instrument. The…

  7. Quantitative assessment of workload and stressors in clinical radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Lukasz M; Mosaly, Prithima R; Jackson, Marianne; Chang, Sha X; Burkhardt, Katharin Deschesne; Adams, Robert D; Jones, Ellen L; Hoyle, Lesley; Xu, Jing; Rockwell, John; Marks, Lawrence B

    2012-08-01

    Workload level and sources of stressors have been implicated as sources of error in multiple settings. We assessed workload levels and sources of stressors among radiation oncology professionals. Furthermore, we explored the potential association between workload and the frequency of reported radiotherapy incidents by the World Health Organization (WHO). Data collection was aimed at various tasks performed by 21 study participants from different radiation oncology professional subgroups (simulation therapists, radiation therapists, physicists, dosimetrists, and physicians). Workload was assessed using National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task-Load Index (NASA TLX). Sources of stressors were quantified using observational methods and segregated using a standard taxonomy. Comparisons between professional subgroups and tasks were made using analysis of variance ANOVA, multivariate ANOVA, and Duncan test. An association between workload levels (NASA TLX) and the frequency of radiotherapy incidents (WHO incidents) was explored (Pearson correlation test). A total of 173 workload assessments were obtained. Overall, simulation therapists had relatively low workloads (NASA TLX range, 30-36), and physicists had relatively high workloads (NASA TLX range, 51-63). NASA TLX scores for physicians, radiation therapists, and dosimetrists ranged from 40-52. There was marked intertask/professional subgroup variation (P<.0001). Mental demand (P<.001), physical demand (P=.001), and effort (P=.006) significantly differed among professional subgroups. Typically, there were 3-5 stressors per cycle of analyzed tasks with the following distribution: interruptions (41.4%), time factors (17%), technical factors (13.6%), teamwork issues (11.6%), patient factors (9.0%), and environmental factors (7.4%). A positive association between workload and frequency of reported radiotherapy incidents by the WHO was found (r = 0.87, P value=.045). Workload level and sources of stressors vary

  8. Quantitative Assessment of Workload and Stressors in Clinical Radiation Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazur, Lukasz M.; Mosaly, Prithima R.; Jackson, Marianne; Chang, Sha X.; Burkhardt, Katharin Deschesne; Adams, Robert D.; Jones, Ellen L.; Hoyle, Lesley; Xu, Jing; Rockwell, John; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Workload level and sources of stressors have been implicated as sources of error in multiple settings. We assessed workload levels and sources of stressors among radiation oncology professionals. Furthermore, we explored the potential association between workload and the frequency of reported radiotherapy incidents by the World Health Organization (WHO). Methods and Materials: Data collection was aimed at various tasks performed by 21 study participants from different radiation oncology professional subgroups (simulation therapists, radiation therapists, physicists, dosimetrists, and physicians). Workload was assessed using National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task-Load Index (NASA TLX). Sources of stressors were quantified using observational methods and segregated using a standard taxonomy. Comparisons between professional subgroups and tasks were made using analysis of variance ANOVA, multivariate ANOVA, and Duncan test. An association between workload levels (NASA TLX) and the frequency of radiotherapy incidents (WHO incidents) was explored (Pearson correlation test). Results: A total of 173 workload assessments were obtained. Overall, simulation therapists had relatively low workloads (NASA TLX range, 30-36), and physicists had relatively high workloads (NASA TLX range, 51-63). NASA TLX scores for physicians, radiation therapists, and dosimetrists ranged from 40-52. There was marked intertask/professional subgroup variation (P<.0001). Mental demand (P<.001), physical demand (P=.001), and effort (P=.006) significantly differed among professional subgroups. Typically, there were 3-5 stressors per cycle of analyzed tasks with the following distribution: interruptions (41.4%), time factors (17%), technical factors (13.6%), teamwork issues (11.6%), patient factors (9.0%), and environmental factors (7.4%). A positive association between workload and frequency of reported radiotherapy incidents by the WHO was found (r = 0.87, P value=.045

  9. Quantitative Assessment of Workload and Stressors in Clinical Radiation Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazur, Lukasz M., E-mail: lukasz_mazur@ncsu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Industrial Extension Service, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States); Biomedical Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States); Mosaly, Prithima R. [Industrial Extension Service, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States); Jackson, Marianne; Chang, Sha X.; Burkhardt, Katharin Deschesne; Adams, Robert D.; Jones, Ellen L.; Hoyle, Lesley [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Xu, Jing [Industrial Extension Service, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States); Rockwell, John; Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Workload level and sources of stressors have been implicated as sources of error in multiple settings. We assessed workload levels and sources of stressors among radiation oncology professionals. Furthermore, we explored the potential association between workload and the frequency of reported radiotherapy incidents by the World Health Organization (WHO). Methods and Materials: Data collection was aimed at various tasks performed by 21 study participants from different radiation oncology professional subgroups (simulation therapists, radiation therapists, physicists, dosimetrists, and physicians). Workload was assessed using National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task-Load Index (NASA TLX). Sources of stressors were quantified using observational methods and segregated using a standard taxonomy. Comparisons between professional subgroups and tasks were made using analysis of variance ANOVA, multivariate ANOVA, and Duncan test. An association between workload levels (NASA TLX) and the frequency of radiotherapy incidents (WHO incidents) was explored (Pearson correlation test). Results: A total of 173 workload assessments were obtained. Overall, simulation therapists had relatively low workloads (NASA TLX range, 30-36), and physicists had relatively high workloads (NASA TLX range, 51-63). NASA TLX scores for physicians, radiation therapists, and dosimetrists ranged from 40-52. There was marked intertask/professional subgroup variation (P<.0001). Mental demand (P<.001), physical demand (P=.001), and effort (P=.006) significantly differed among professional subgroups. Typically, there were 3-5 stressors per cycle of analyzed tasks with the following distribution: interruptions (41.4%), time factors (17%), technical factors (13.6%), teamwork issues (11.6%), patient factors (9.0%), and environmental factors (7.4%). A positive association between workload and frequency of reported radiotherapy incidents by the WHO was found (r = 0.87, P value=.045

  10. Making the right software choice for clinically used equipment in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorwerk, Hilke; Zink, Klemens; Wagner, Daniela Michaela; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita

    2014-01-01

    The customer of a new system for clinical use in radiation oncology must consider many options in order to find the optimal combination of software tools. Many commercial systems are available and each system has a large number of technical features. However an appraisal of the technical capabilities, especially the options for clinical implementations, is hardly assessable at first view. The intention of this article was to generate an assessment of the necessary functionalities for high precision radiotherapy and their integration in ROKIS (Radiation oncology clinic information system) for future customers, especially with regard to clinical applicability. Therefore we analysed the clinically required software functionalities and divided them into three categories: minimal, enhanced and optimal requirements for high conformal radiation treatment

  11. Tracking the workforce: the American Society of Clinical Oncology workforce information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, M Kelsey; Kosty, Michael P; Bajorin, Dean F; Bruinooge, Suanna S; Goldstein, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    In anticipation of oncologist workforce shortages projected as part of a 2007 study, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) worked with a contractor to create a workforce information system (WIS) to assemble the latest available data on oncologist supply and cancer incidence and prevalence. ASCO plans to publish findings annually, reporting on new data and tracking trends over time. THE WIS REPORT IS COMPOSED OF THREE SECTIONS: supply, new entrants, and cancer incidence and prevalence. Tabulations of the number of oncologists in the United States are derived mainly from the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile. Information on fellows and residents in the oncology workforce pipeline come from published sources such as Journal of the American Medical Association. Incidence and prevalence estimates are published by the American Cancer Society and National Cancer Institute. The WIS reports a total of 13,084 oncologists working in the United States in 2011. Oncologists are defined as those physicians who designate hematology, hematology/oncology, or medical oncology as their specialty. The WIS compares the characteristics of these oncologists with those of all physicians and tracks emerging trends in the physician training pipeline. Observing characteristics of the oncologist workforce over time allows ASCO to identify, prioritize, and evaluate its workforce initiatives. Accessible figures and reports generated by the WIS can be used by ASCO and others in the oncology community to advocate for needed health care system and policy changes to help offset future workforce shortages.

  12. Tracking the Workforce: The American Society of Clinical Oncology Workforce Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, M. Kelsey; Kosty, Michael P.; Bajorin, Dean F.; Bruinooge, Suanna S.; Goldstein, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In anticipation of oncologist workforce shortages projected as part of a 2007 study, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) worked with a contractor to create a workforce information system (WIS) to assemble the latest available data on oncologist supply and cancer incidence and prevalence. ASCO plans to publish findings annually, reporting on new data and tracking trends over time. Methods: The WIS report is composed of three sections: supply, new entrants, and cancer incidence and prevalence. Tabulations of the number of oncologists in the United States are derived mainly from the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile. Information on fellows and residents in the oncology workforce pipeline come from published sources such as Journal of the American Medical Association. Incidence and prevalence estimates are published by the American Cancer Society and National Cancer Institute. Results: The WIS reports a total of 13,084 oncologists working in the United States in 2011. Oncologists are defined as those physicians who designate hematology, hematology/oncology, or medical oncology as their specialty. The WIS compares the characteristics of these oncologists with those of all physicians and tracks emerging trends in the physician training pipeline. Conclusion: Observing characteristics of the oncologist workforce over time allows ASCO to identify, prioritize, and evaluate its workforce initiatives. Accessible figures and reports generated by the WIS can be used by ASCO and others in the oncology community to advocate for needed health care system and policy changes to help offset future workforce shortages. PMID:23633965

  13. Assessing the Value of an Optional Radiation Oncology Clinical Rotation During the Core Clerkships in Medical School

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaorsky, Nicholas G.; Malatesta, Theresa M.; Den, Robert B.; Wuthrick, Evan; Ahn, Peter H.; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Shi, Wenyin; Dicker, Adam P.; Anne, P. Rani; Bar-Ad, Voichita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Showalter, Timothy N., E-mail: timothy.showalter@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Few medical students are given proper clinical training in oncology, much less radiation oncology. We attempted to assess the value of adding a radiation oncology clinical rotation to the medical school curriculum. Methods and Materials: In July 2010, Jefferson Medical College began to offer a 3-week radiation oncology rotation as an elective course for third-year medical students during the core surgical clerkship. During 2010 to 2012, 52 medical students chose to enroll in this rotation. The rotation included outpatient clinics, inpatient consults, didactic sessions, and case-based presentations by the students. Tests of students' knowledge of radiation oncology were administered anonymously before and after the rotation to evaluate the educational effectiveness of the rotation. Students and radiation oncology faculty were given surveys to assess feedback about the rotation. Results: The students' prerotation test scores had an average of 64% (95% confidence interval [CI], 61-66%). The postrotation test scores improved to an average of 82% (95% CI, 80-83%; 18% absolute improvement). In examination question analysis, scores improved in clinical oncology from 63% to 79%, in radiobiology from 70% to 77%, and in medical physics from 62% to 88%. Improvements in all sections but radiobiology were statistically significant. Students rated the usefulness of the rotation as 8.1 (scale 1-9; 95% CI, 7.3-9.0), their understanding of radiation oncology as a result of the rotation as 8.8 (95% CI, 8.5-9.1), and their recommendation of the rotation to a classmate as 8.2 (95% CI, 7.6-9.0). Conclusions: Integrating a radiation oncology clinical rotation into the medical school curriculum improves student knowledge of radiation oncology, including aspects of clinical oncology, radiobiology, and medical physics. The rotation is appreciated by both students and faculty.

  14. Assessing the Value of an Optional Radiation Oncology Clinical Rotation During the Core Clerkships in Medical School

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaorsky, Nicholas G.; Malatesta, Theresa M.; Den, Robert B.; Wuthrick, Evan; Ahn, Peter H.; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Shi, Wenyin; Dicker, Adam P.; Anne, P. Rani; Bar-Ad, Voichita; Showalter, Timothy N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Few medical students are given proper clinical training in oncology, much less radiation oncology. We attempted to assess the value of adding a radiation oncology clinical rotation to the medical school curriculum. Methods and Materials: In July 2010, Jefferson Medical College began to offer a 3-week radiation oncology rotation as an elective course for third-year medical students during the core surgical clerkship. During 2010 to 2012, 52 medical students chose to enroll in this rotation. The rotation included outpatient clinics, inpatient consults, didactic sessions, and case-based presentations by the students. Tests of students’ knowledge of radiation oncology were administered anonymously before and after the rotation to evaluate the educational effectiveness of the rotation. Students and radiation oncology faculty were given surveys to assess feedback about the rotation. Results: The students’ prerotation test scores had an average of 64% (95% confidence interval [CI], 61–66%). The postrotation test scores improved to an average of 82% (95% CI, 80–83%; 18% absolute improvement). In examination question analysis, scores improved in clinical oncology from 63% to 79%, in radiobiology from 70% to 77%, and in medical physics from 62% to 88%. Improvements in all sections but radiobiology were statistically significant. Students rated the usefulness of the rotation as 8.1 (scale 1–9; 95% CI, 7.3–9.0), their understanding of radiation oncology as a result of the rotation as 8.8 (95% CI, 8.5–9.1), and their recommendation of the rotation to a classmate as 8.2 (95% CI, 7.6–9.0). Conclusions: Integrating a radiation oncology clinical rotation into the medical school curriculum improves student knowledge of radiation oncology, including aspects of clinical oncology, radiobiology, and medical physics. The rotation is appreciated by both students and faculty.

  15. What Medical Oncologist Residents Think about the Italian Speciality Schools: A Survey of the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM on Educational, Clinical and Research Activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Moretti

    Full Text Available Relevant heterogeneity exists among Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology, also within the same country. In order to provide a comprehensive overview of the landscape of Italian Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology, the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM undertook an online survey, inviting all the residents to describe their daily activities and to express their overall satisfaction about their programs.A team composed of five residents and three consultants in medical oncology prepared a 38 items questionnaire that was published online in a reserved section, accessible through a link sent by e-mail. Residents were invited to anonymously fill in the questionnaire that included the following sub-sections: quality of teaching, clinical and research activity, overall satisfaction.Three-hundred and eleven (57% out of 547 invited residents filled in the questionnaire. Two-hundred and twenty-three (72% participants declared that attending lessons was frequently difficult and 153 (49% declared they did not gain substantial improvement in their knowledge from them. Fifty-five percent stated that they did not receive lessons on palliative care. Their overall judgment about didactic activity was low in 63% of the interviewed. The satisfaction for clinical activity was in 86% of cases good: 84% recognized that, during the training period, they acquired a progressive independence on patients' management. About research activity, the majority (79% of participants in the survey was actively engaged in managing patients included in clinical trials but the satisfaction level for the involvement in research activities was quite low (54%. Overall, 246 residents (79% gave a positive global judgment of their Medical Oncology Schools.The landscape of Italian Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology is quite heterogeneous across the country. Some improvements in the organization of teaching and in the access to research opportunity are needed; the

  16. Radiotherapy procedures quality control program: Guidelines established by the Spanish Society of Radiotherapy and Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, A.; Pardo, J.; Valls, A.; Petschen, I.; Castell, A.; Villar, A.; Pedro Olive, B.A.; Munoz, V.; Fernandez, J.; Rodriguez, R.; Oton, C.

    2001-01-01

    The main purpose of the Royal Decree 1566/1998 of July 17 th , is to establish the quality criteria in radiation therapy in order to assure the optimisation of both radiation oncology treatments and radiation protection of the patients. According to this decree, the implementation of a quality control program in the radiation oncology departments is imperative. This program must be in writing and always available for supervision of health authorities. When necessary, modifications to improve non-optimal procedures or equipment will be made. The Spanish Society of Radiotherapy and Oncology, in order to co-operate and facilitate to all its members, set up a task force focussing on elaborating a set of guidelines that every single Radiation Oncology Department could use to develop its own quality control program. No agreements regarding equipment quality control were made by the Commission, in spite they are a part of the quality control program in radiotherapy, because it is considered that they correspond to members of other scientific societies. (author)

  17. The Effectiveness of a Participatory Program on Fall Prevention in Oncology Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-Chi; Ma, Wei-Fen; Li, Tsai-Chung; Liang, Yia-Wun; Tsai, Li-Yun; Chang, Fy-Uan

    2015-01-01

    Falls are known to be one of the most common in patient adverse events. A high incidence of falls was reported on patients with cancer. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of a participatory program on patient's knowledge and self-efficacy of fall prevention and fall incidence in an oncology ward. In this quasi-experimental study,…

  18. Defining High-Quality Palliative Care in Oncology Practice: An American Society of Clinical Oncology/American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine Guidance Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, Kathleen E; McNiff, Kristen; Buss, Mary K; Kamal, Arif; Lupu, Dale; Abernethy, Amy P; Broder, Michael S; Shapiro, Charles L; Acheson, Anupama Kurup; Malin, Jennifer; Evans, Tracey; Krzyzanowska, Monika K

    2016-09-01

    Integrated into routine oncology care, palliative care can improve symptom burden, quality of life, and patient and caregiver satisfaction. However, not all oncology practices have access to specialist palliative medicine. This project endeavored to define what constitutes high-quality primary palliative care as delivered by medical oncology practices. An expert steering committee outlined 966 palliative care service items, in nine domains, each describing a candidate element of primary palliative care delivery for patients with advanced cancer or high symptom burden. Using modified Delphi methodology, 31 multidisciplinary panelists rated each service item on three constructs: importance, feasibility, and scope within medical oncology practice. Panelists endorsed the highest proportion of palliative care service items in the domains of End-of-Life Care (81%); Communication and Shared Decision Making (79%); and Advance Care Planning (78%). The lowest proportions were in Spiritual and Cultural Assessment and Management (35%) and Psychosocial Assessment and Management (39%). In the largest domain, Symptom Assessment and Management, there was consensus that all symptoms should be assessed and managed at a basic level, with more comprehensive management for common symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dyspnea, and pain. Within the Appropriate Palliative Care and Hospice Referral domain, there was consensus that oncology practices should be able to describe the difference between palliative care and hospice to patients and refer patients appropriately. This statement describes the elements comprising high-quality primary palliative care for patients with advanced cancer or high symptom burden, as delivered by oncology practices. Oncology providers wishing to enhance palliative care delivery may find this information useful to inform operational changes and quality improvement efforts. Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  19. E-learning programs in oncology: a nationwide experience from 2005 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degerfält, Jan; Sjöstedt, Staffan; Fransson, Per; Kjellén, Elisabeth; Werner, Mads U

    2017-01-13

    E-learning is an established concept in oncological education and training. However, there seems to be a scarcity of long-term assessments of E-learning programs in oncology vis-á-vis their structural management and didactic value. This study presents descriptive, nationwide data from 2005 to 2014. E-learning oncology programs in chemotherapy, general oncology, pain management, palliative care, psycho-social-oncology, and radiotherapy, were reviewed from our databases. Questionnaires of self-perceived didactic value of the programs were examined 2008-2014. The total number of trainees were 4693, allocated to 3889 individuals. The trainees included medical doctors (MDs; n = 759), registered nurses (RNs; n = 2359), radiation therapy technologists (n = 642), and, social and health care assistants (SHCAs; n = 933). The E-learning covered 29 different program classifications, comprising 731 recorded presentations, and covering 438 themes. A total of 490 programs were completed by the trainees. The European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS; 1 ECTS point equals 0.60 US College Credit Hours) points varied across the educational programs from 0.7 to 30.0, corresponding to a duration of full-time studies ranging between 15 to 900 h (0.4-24 weeks) per program. The total number of ECTS points for the trainee cohort, was 20,000 corresponding to 530,000 full-time academic hours or 324.0 standard academic working years. The overall drop-out rate, across professions and programs, was 10.6% (499/4693). The lowest drop-out rate was seen for RNs (4.3%; P < 0.0001). Self-reported evaluation questionnaires (2008-2014) were completed by 72.1% (2642/3666) of the trainees. The programs were overall rated, on a 5-categorical scale (5 = excellent; 1 = very inferior), as excellent by 68.6% (MDs: 64.9%; RNs: 66.8%; SHCAs: 77.7%) and as good by 30.6% (MDs: 34.5%; RNs: 32.4%; SHCAs: 21.5%) of the responders. This descriptive study, performed in a lengthy timeframe

  20. A critical appraisal of the clinical utility of proton therapy in oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Dongxu

    2015-01-01

    Dongxu WangDepartment of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA, USAAbstract: Proton therapy is an emerging technology for providing radiation therapy to cancer patients. The depth dose distribution of a proton beam makes it a preferable radiation modality as it reduces radiation to the healthy tissue outside the tumor, compared with conventional photon therapy. While theoretically beneficial, its clinical values are still being demonstrated from the incre...

  1. Recent advances in gastrointestinal oncology - updates and insights from the 2009 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh Chung-Tsen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have reviewed the pivotal presentations related to gastrointestinal malignancies from 2009 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology with the theme of "personalizing cancer care". We have discussed the scientific findings and the impact on practice guidelines and ongoing clinical trials. Adding trastuzumab to chemotherapy improved the survival of patients with advanced gastric cancer overexpressing human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Gemcitabine plus cisplatin has become a new standard for first-line treatment of advanced biliary cancer. Octreotide LAR significantly lengthened median time to tumor progression compared with placebo in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumors of the midgut. Addition of oxaliplatin to fluoropyrimidines for preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with stage II or III rectal cancer did not improve local tumor response but increased toxicities. Bevacizumab did not provide additional benefit to chemotherapy in adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II or III colon cancer. In patients with resected stage II colon cancer, recurrence score estimated by multigene RT-PCR assay has been shown to provide additional risk stratification. In stage IV colorectal cancer, data have supported the routine use of prophylactic skin treatment in patients receiving antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor, and the use of upfront chemotherapy as initial management in patients with synchronous metastasis without obstruction or bleeding from the primary site.

  2. Radiolabeled amino acids : Basic aspects and clinical applications in oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, PL; Vaalburg, W; Pruim, J; de Vries, EGE; Langen, KJ; Piers, DA

    As the applications of metabolic imaging are expanding, radiolabeled amino acids may gain increased clinical interest, This review first describes the basic aspects of amino acid metabolism, then continues with basic aspects of radiolabeled amino acids, and finally describes clinical applications,

  3. A national study of the provision of oncology sperm banking services among Canadian fertility clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, S; Buckett, W; Campbell, S; Yanofsky, R A; Barr, R D

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey the current state of oncology sperm banking services provided by fertility clinics across Canada. A total of 78 Canadian fertility facilities were invited to complete a questionnaire related to the availability, accessibility, affordability and utilisation of sperm banking services for cancer patients. The total response rate was 59%, with 20 (69%) in vitro fertilisation clinics and 26 (53%) other fertility centres returning the survey. A total of 24 responding facilities accepted oncology sperm banking referrals. The time frame to book the first banking appointment for 19 (79%) facilities was within 2 days. Inconsistent practice was found regarding the consent process for cancer patients who are of minority age. Eight (33%) facilities did not provide any subsidy and charged a standard banking fee regardless of patients' financial situations. Overall, the utilisation of oncology sperm banking services was low despite its availability and established efficacy, suggesting that Canadian cancer patients are notably underserved. The study has highlighted some important issues for further consideration in improving access to sperm banking services for cancer patients, especially for adolescents. Better collaboration between oncology and reproductive medicine to target healthcare providers would help to improve sperm banking rates. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. An exploration of the experience of compassion fatigue in clinical oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Beth; Toffner, Greg; Merrick, Trish; Dalton, Janice

    2011-01-01

    Compassion fatigue (CF) is "debilitating weariness brought about by repetitive, empathic responses to the pain and suffering of others" (LaRowe, 2005, p. 21). The work performed by oncology nurses, and the experiences of the people they care for, place oncology nurses at high risk for CF (Pierce et al., 2007; Ferrell & Coyle, 2008). Thus oncology nurses were chosen as the study focus. This paper details a descriptive exploratory qualitative research study that investigated the experience of CF in Canadian clinical oncology registered nurses (RNs). A conceptual stress process model by Aneshensel, Pearlin, Mullan, Zarit, and Whitlatch (1995) that considers caregivers' stress in four domains provided the study framework (see Figure 1). Nineteen study participants were recruited through an advertisement in the Canadian Oncology Nursing Journal (CONJ). The advertisement directed potential participants to a university-based online website developed for this study. Participants completed a questionnaire and wrote a narrative describing an experience with CF and submitted these through the secure research website. Data were analyzed thematically. Five themes include: defining CF, causes of CF, factors that worsen CF, factors that lessen CF, and outcomes of CF. Participants had limited knowledge about CF, about lack of external support, and that insufficient time to provide high quality, care may precipitate CF. The gap between quality of care nurses wanted to provide and what they were able to do, compounded by coexisting physical and emotional stress, worsened CF. CF was lessened by colleague support, work-life balance, connecting with others, acknowledgement, and maturity and experience. Outcomes of CF included profound fatigue of mind and body, negative effects on personal relationships, and considering leaving the specialty. Recommendations that may enhance oncology nurse well-being are provided.

  5. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Survey of Radiation Biology Educators in U.S. and Canadian Radiation Oncology Residency Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenstein, Barry S.; Held, Kathryn D.; Rockwell, Sara; Williams, Jacqueline P.; Zeman, Elaine M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain, in a survey-based study, detailed information on the faculty currently responsible for teaching radiation biology courses to radiation oncology residents in the United States and Canada. Methods and Materials: In March-December 2007 a survey questionnaire was sent to faculty having primary responsibility for teaching radiation biology to residents in 93 radiation oncology residency programs in the United States and Canada. Results: The responses to this survey document the aging of the faculty who have primary responsibility for teaching radiation biology to radiation oncology residents. The survey found a dramatic decline with time in the percentage of educators whose graduate training was in radiation biology. A significant number of the educators responsible for teaching radiation biology were not fully acquainted with the radiation sciences, either through training or practical application. In addition, many were unfamiliar with some of the organizations setting policies and requirements for resident education. Freely available tools, such as the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Radiation and Cancer Biology Practice Examination and Study Guides, were widely used by residents and educators. Consolidation of resident courses or use of a national radiation biology review course was viewed as unlikely by most programs. Conclusions: A high priority should be given to the development of comprehensive teaching tools to assist those individuals who have responsibility for teaching radiation biology courses but who do not have an extensive background in critical areas of radiobiology related to radiation oncology. These findings also suggest a need for new graduate programs in radiobiology.

  6. Real-world Data for Clinical Evidence Generation in Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khozin, Sean; Blumenthal, Gideon M; Pazdur, Richard

    2017-11-01

    Conventional cancer clinical trials can be slow and costly, often produce results with limited external validity, and are difficult for patients to participate in. Recent technological advances and a dynamic policy landscape in the United States have created a fertile ground for the use of real-world data (RWD) to improve current methods of clinical evidence generation. Sources of RWD include electronic health records, insurance claims, patient registries, and digital health solutions outside of conventional clinical trials. A definition focused on the original intent of data collected at the point of care can distinguish RWD from conventional clinical trial data. When the intent of data collection at the point of care is research, RWD can be generated using experimental designs similar to those employed in conventional clinical trials, but with several advantages that include gains in efficient execution of studies with an appropriate balance between internal and external validity. RWD can support active pharmacovigilance, insights into the natural history of disease, and the development of external control arms. Prospective collection of RWD can enable evidence generation based on pragmatic clinical trials (PCTs) that support randomized study designs and expand clinical research to the point of care. PCTs may help address the growing demands for access to experimental therapies while increasing patient participation in cancer clinical trials. Conducting valid real-world studies requires data quality assurance through auditable data abstraction methods and new incentives to drive electronic capture of clinically relevant data at the point of care. Published by Oxford University Press 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  7. Optimizing oncology therapeutics through quantitative translational and clinical pharmacology: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatakrishnan, K; Friberg, L E; Ouellet, D; Mettetal, J T; Stein, A; Trocóniz, I F; Bruno, R; Mehrotra, N; Gobburu, J; Mould, D R

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in biomedical research that have deepened our understanding of cancer hallmarks, resulting in the discovery and development of targeted therapies, the success rates of oncology drug development remain low. Opportunities remain for objective dose selection informed by exposure-response understanding to optimize the benefit-risk balance of novel therapies for cancer patients. This review article discusses the principles and applications of modeling and simulation approaches across the lifecycle of development of oncology therapeutics. Illustrative examples are used to convey the value gained from integration of quantitative clinical pharmacology strategies from the preclinical-translational phase through confirmatory clinical evaluation of efficacy and safety. © 2014 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  8. Processes for Quality Improvements in Radiation Oncology Clinical Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FitzGerald, T.J.; Urie, Marcia; Ulin, Kenneth; Laurie, Fran; Yorty, Jeffrey C.; Hanusik, Richard; Kessel, Sandy; Jodoin, Maryann Bishop; Osagie, Gani; Cicchetti, M. Giulia; Pieters, Richard; McCarten, Kathleen; Rosen, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    Quality assurance in radiotherapy (RT) has been an integral aspect of cooperative group clinical trials since 1970. In early clinical trials, data acquisition was nonuniform and inconsistent and computational models for radiation dose calculation varied significantly. Process improvements developed for data acquisition, credentialing, and data management have provided the necessary infrastructure for uniform data. With continued improvement in the technology and delivery of RT, evaluation processes for target definition, RT planning, and execution undergo constant review. As we move to multimodality image-based definitions of target volumes for protocols, future clinical trials will require near real-time image analysis and feedback to field investigators. The ability of quality assurance centers to meet these real-time challenges with robust electronic interaction platforms for imaging acquisition, review, archiving, and quantitative review of volumetric RT plans will be the primary challenge for future successful clinical trials

  9. Survey of Implementation of Antiemetic Prescription Standards in Indian Oncology Practices and Its Adherence to the American Society of Clinical Oncology Antiemetic Clinical Guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Patil

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Adherence to international antiemetic prophylaxis guidelines like those of ASCO can result in better control of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting; however, the extent of implementation of such guidelines in India is unknown. Therefore, this survey was planned. Methods: This study was an anonymized cross-sectional survey approved by the ethics committee. Survey items were generated from the clinical questions given in the ASCO guidelines. The survey was disseminated through personal contacts at an oncology conference and via e-mail to various community oncology centers across India. The B1, B2, and B3 domains included questions regarding the optimal antiemetic prophylaxis for high, moderate, and low-minimal emetogenic regimens. Results: Sixty-six (62.9% of 105 responded and 65 centers (98.5% were aware of the published guidelines. The partial, full, and no implementation scores were 92.5%, 4.5%, and 3.0%, respectively. Full implementation was better for the low-minimal emetogenic regimens (34.8% than the highly emetogenic regimens (6.1%. The three most frequent reasons for hampered implementation of ASCO guidelines in routine chemotherapy practice cited by centers were a lack of sensitization (26 centers; 39.4%, lack of national guidelines (12 centers; 18.2%, and lack of administrative support (10 centers; 15.2%. Conclusion: Awareness regarding ASCO antiemetic guidelines is satisfactory in Indian oncology practices; however, there is a need for sensitization of oncologists toward complete implementation of these guidelines in their clinical practice.

  10. Assessing the Eventual Publication of Clinical Trial Abstracts Submitted to a Large Annual Oncology Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Paul R; Wang, Ruibin; Prasad, Vinay; Bates, Susan E; Fojo, Tito

    2016-03-01

    Despite the ethical imperative to publish clinical trials when human subjects are involved, such data frequently remain unpublished. The objectives were to tabulate the rate and ascertain factors associated with eventual publication of clinical trial results reported as abstracts in the Proceedings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (American Society of Clinical Oncology). Abstracts describing clinical trials for patients with breast, lung, colorectal, ovarian, and prostate cancer from 2009 to 2011 were identified by using a comprehensive online database (http://meetinglibrary.asco.org/abstracts). Abstracts included reported results of a treatment or intervention assessed in a discrete, prospective clinical trial. Publication status at 4-6 years was determined by using a standardized search of PubMed. Primary outcomes were the rate of publication for abstracts of randomized and nonrandomized clinical trials. Secondary outcomes included factors influencing the publication of results. A total of 1,075 abstracts describing 378 randomized and 697 nonrandomized clinical trials were evaluated. Across all years, 75% of randomized and 54% of nonrandomized trials were published, with an overall publication rate of 61%. Sample size was a statistically significant predictor of publication for both randomized and nonrandomized trials (odds ratio [OR] per increase of 100 participants = 1.23 [1.11-1.36], p publication (OR 2.37, p = .013; and 2.21, p = .01, respectively). Among nonrandomized studies, phase II trials were more likely to be published than phase I (p publication in randomized (OR 0.76 [0.38-1.52]; p = .441) or nonrandomized trials (OR 0.89 [0.61-1.29]; p = .532). This is the largest reported study examining why oncology trials are not published. The data show that 4-6 years after appearing as abstracts, 39% of oncology clinical trials remain unpublished. Larger sample size and advanced trial phase were associated with eventual publication; among randomized

  11. Clinical and Outcome Research in oncology The need for integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apolone Giovanni

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer is one of the main healthcare problems in Europe. Although significant progress has recently been made, long-term survival is still disappointing for most common solid tumours. The explosion of information has strengthened the need to create and sustain coordinated interaction between technology, biology, clinical research, clinical practice and health policy. A simple process based on automatic and passive translation from bench to clinical research and eventually to the bed side is usually assumed but cannot be taken for granted. A critical role might be played by Outcome Research (OR, defined as the discipline that describes, interprets, and predicts the impact of various influences, especially interventions, on final endpoints (from survival to satisfaction with care that matter to decision makers (from patients to society at large, with special emphasis on the use of patient-reported outcomes (PRO. Recently, under pressure from several parts of society, the FDA, recognizing the need for faster drug approval, has modified existing regulations and created new rules to allow anti-cancer drugs to be approved more quickly and, in certain but quite common circumstances, single arm trials and surrogate endpoints to be used as measures of clinical benefit. In this context, the faster approval process may lead to drugs being marketed without there being a complete picture of how effective or safe they are. The FDA move to speed up drug approval, together with the use of not fully validated surrogate endpoints, give OR the unique opportunity to help understand the value of drugs that have received accelerated approval. Despite this opportunity, OR has yet to demonstrate its role in this specific setting and provide proof of the validity, reliability and added value of its primary endpoint measures when evaluated in a broader context. The implementation of lines of OR in the development and evaluation of anti-cancer drugs hinges upon

  12. Radiation doses to personnel in clinics for gynecologic oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, B.; Spanne, P.

    1985-01-01

    Radium or Cesium is used for radiotherapy of gynecologic cancer at six clinics in Sweden. This report gives a survey of the radiation doses the personnel is exposed to. The measurement were performed using TL-dosimeters. The dose equivalents for different parts of the body at specific working moments was deduced as well as the effective dose equivalent and the collective dose equivalent. 1983 the total collective dose equivalent for the six clinics was 1.3 manSv, which corresponds to 3.9 manmSv/g equivalent mass of Radium used at the treatments. (With 11 tables and 10 figures) (L.E.)

  13. Potential use of recombinant human interleukin-6 in clinical oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, GJ; Willemse, PHB; Mulder, NH; Limburg, PC; deVries, EGE

    Recombinant human IL-6 (rhIL-6) is a pleiotropic cytokine with stimulatory actions on the hematopoietic system, the immune system and hepatocytes. Clinical interest in the use of this cytokine was raised because of its thrombopoietic properties and also because of its anti-tumor activity, which was

  14. Genetic consultation embedded in a gynecologic oncology clinic improves compliance with guideline-based care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senter, Leigha; O'Malley, David M; Backes, Floor J; Copeland, Larry J; Fowler, Jeffery M; Salani, Ritu; Cohn, David E

    2017-10-01

    Analyze the impact of embedding genetic counseling services in gynecologic oncology on clinician referral and patient uptake of cancer genetics services. Data were reviewed for a total of 737 newly diagnosed epithelial ovarian cancer patients seen in gynecologic oncology at a large academic medical center including 401 from 11/2011-7/2014 (a time when cancer genetics services were provided as an off-site consultation). These data were compared to data from 8/2014-9/2016 (n=336), when the model changed to the genetics embedded model (GEM), incorporating a cancer genetic counselor on-site in the gynecologic oncology clinic. A statistically significant difference in proportion of patients referred pre- and post-GEM was observed (21% vs. 44%, pgenetics consultation and post-GEM 82% were scheduled (pgenetics was also statistically significant (3.92months pre-GEM vs. 0.79months post-GEM, pgenetics consultation (2.52months pre-GEM vs. 1.67months post-GEM, pgenetic counselor on the same day as the referral. Providing cancer genetics services on-site in gynecologic oncology and modifying the process by which patients are referred and scheduled significantly increases referral to cancer genetics and timely completion of genetics consultation, improving compliance with guideline-based care. Practice changes are critical given the impact of genetic test results on treatment and familial cancer risks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Omics AnalySIs System for PRecision Oncology (OASISPRO): A Web-based Omics Analysis Tool for Clinical Phenotype Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kun-Hsing; Fitzpatrick, Michael R; Pappas, Luke; Chan, Warren; Kung, Jessica; Snyder, Michael

    2017-09-12

    Precision oncology is an approach that accounts for individual differences to guide cancer management. Omics signatures have been shown to predict clinical traits for cancer patients. However, the vast amount of omics information poses an informatics challenge in systematically identifying patterns associated with health outcomes, and no general-purpose data-mining tool exists for physicians, medical researchers, and citizen scientists without significant training in programming and bioinformatics. To bridge this gap, we built the Omics AnalySIs System for PRecision Oncology (OASISPRO), a web-based system to mine the quantitative omics information from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). This system effectively visualizes patients' clinical profiles, executes machine-learning algorithms of choice on the omics data, and evaluates the prediction performance using held-out test sets. With this tool, we successfully identified genes strongly associated with tumor stage, and accurately predicted patients' survival outcomes in many cancer types, including mesothelioma and adrenocortical carcinoma. By identifying the links between omics and clinical phenotypes, this system will facilitate omics studies on precision cancer medicine and contribute to establishing personalized cancer treatment plans. This web-based tool is available at http://tinyurl.com/oasispro ;source codes are available at http://tinyurl.com/oasisproSourceCode . © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. The situation of radiation oncology training programs and their graduates in 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crewson, Philip E.; Sunshine, Jonathan H.; Schepps, Barbara

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: In light of concerns about the job market, the American College of Radiology (ACR) studied the employment situation of 1997 radiation oncology graduates, and the status and plans of radiation oncology training programs. Methods and Materials: In April-May 1997, and in a December follow-up, the ACR surveyed all radiation oncology residency directors about the employment situation of their 1997 residency and fellowship graduates and about their programs. Ninety-four percent of those surveyed responded. We compared findings with surveys from 1995 and 1996. Differences were assessed with p ≤ 0.05 as the test of statistical significance. Results: By six months after graduation, 98% of residency graduates and all fellowship graduates were employed. Program directors reported approximately 95% of graduates had positions that reasonably matched their training and personal employment goals. Programs have reduced beginning residency slots by 22% over the past three years, and further reductions are planned. Many observers were disappointed with fill rates in the 1997 National Match, but by the December follow-up, 96% of beginning-year residency slots were filled. Conclusion: Unemployment continues to be low, and one 'softer' indicator, the job market perceptions of residency program directors, showed improvement

  17. Searching for Clinically Relevant Biomarkers in Geriatric Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsila, Theodora; Patrinos, George P; Kardamakis, Dimitrios

    2018-01-01

    Ageing, which is associated with a progressive decline and functional deterioration in multiple organ systems, is highly heterogeneous, both inter- and intraindividually. For this, tailored-made theranostics and optimum patient stratification become fundamental, when decision-making in elderly patients is considered. In particular, when cancer incidence and cancer-related mortality and morbidity are taken into account, elderly patient care is a public health concern. In this review, we focus on oncogeriatrics and highlight current opportunities and challenges with an emphasis on the unmet need of clinically relevant biomarkers in elderly cancer patients. We performed a literature search on PubMed and Scopus databases for articles published in English between 2000 and 2017 coupled to text mining and analysis. Considering the top insights, we derived from our literature analysis that information knowledge needs to turn into knowledge growth in oncogeriatrics towards clinically relevant biomarkers, cost-effective practices, updated educational schemes for health professionals (in particular, geriatricians and oncologists), and awareness of ethical issues. We conclude with an interdisciplinary call to omics, geriatricians, oncologists, informatics, and policy-makers communities that Big Data should be translated into decision-making in the clinic.

  18. Is the clinical use of cannabis by oncology patients advisable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Sela, Gil; Avisar, Adva; Batash, Ron; Schaffer, Moshe

    2014-06-01

    The use of the cannabis plant for various medical indications by cancer patients has been rising significantly in the past few years in several European countries, the US and Israel. The increase in use comes from public demand for the most part, and not due to a scientific basis. Cannabis chemistry is complex, and the isolation and extraction of the active ingredient remain difficult. The active agent in cannabis is unique among psychoactive plant materials, as it contains no nitrogen and, thus, is not an alkaloid. Alongside inconclusive evidence of increased risks of lung and head and neck cancers from prolonged smoking of the plant produce, laboratory evidence of the anti-cancer effects of plant components exists, but with no clinical research in this direction. The beneficial effects of treatment with the plant, or treatment with medicine produced from its components, are related to symptoms of the disease: pain, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite and weight loss. The clinical evidence of the efficacy of cannabis for these indications is only partial. However, recent scientific data from studies with THC and cannabidiol combinations report the first clinical indication of cancer-related pain relief. The difficulties of performing research into products that are not medicinal, such as cannabis, have not allowed a true study of the cannabis plant extract although, from the public point of view, such studies are greatly desirable.

  19. Informed consent in oncology clinical trials: A Brown University Oncology Research Group prospective cross-sectional pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Schumacher

    Full Text Available Informed consent forms (ICFs for oncology clinical trials have grown increasingly longer and more complex. We evaluated objective understanding of critical components of informed consent among patients enrolling in contemporary trials of conventional or novel biologic/targeted therapies.We evaluated ICFs for cancer clinical trials for length and readability, and patients registered on those studies were asked to complete a validated 14-question survey assessing their understanding of key characteristics of the trial. Mean scores were compared in groups defined by trial and patient characteristics.Fifty patients, of whom half participated in trials of immunotherapy or biologic/targeted agents and half in trials of conventional therapy, completed the survey. On average, ICFs for industry-originated trials (N = 9 trials were significantly longer (P < .0001 and had lower Flesch ease-of-reading scores (P = .003 than investigator-initiated trials (N = 11. At least 80% of patients incorrectly responded to three key questions which addressed the experimental nature of their trial therapy, its purported efficacy and potential risks relative to alternative treatments. The mean objective understanding score was 76.9±8.8, but it was statistically significantly lower for patients who had not completed high school (P = .011. The scores did not differ significantly by type of cancer therapy (P = .12 or trial sponsor (P = .38.Many participants enrolled on cancer trials had poor understanding of essential elements of their trial. In order to ensure true informed consent, innovative approaches, such as expanded in-person counseling adapted to the patient's education level or cultural characteristics should be evaluated across socio-demographic groups.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01772511.

  20. Fertility Preservation for Patients With Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loren, Alison W.; Mangu, Pamela B.; Beck, Lindsay Nohr; Brennan, Lawrence; Magdalinski, Anthony J.; Partridge, Ann H.; Quinn, Gwendolyn; Wallace, W. Hamish; Oktay, Kutluk

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To update guidance for health care providers about fertility preservation for adults and children with cancer. Methods A systematic review of the literature published from March 2006 through January 2013 was completed using MEDLINE and the Cochrane Collaboration Library. An Update Panel reviewed the evidence and updated the recommendation language. Results There were 222 new publications that met inclusion criteria. A majority were observational studies, cohort studies, and case series or reports, with few randomized clinical trials. After review of the new evidence, the Update Panel concluded that no major, substantive revisions to the 2006 American Society of Clinical Oncology recommendations were warranted, but clarifications were added. Recommendations As part of education and informed consent before cancer therapy, health care providers (including medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, gynecologic oncologists, urologists, hematologists, pediatric oncologists, and surgeons) should address the possibility of infertility with patients treated during their reproductive years (or with parents or guardians of children) and be prepared to discuss fertility preservation options and/or to refer all potential patients to appropriate reproductive specialists. Although patients may be focused initially on their cancer diagnosis, the Update Panel encourages providers to advise patients regarding potential threats to fertility as early as possible in the treatment process so as to allow for the widest array of options for fertility preservation. The discussion should be documented. Sperm and embryo cryopreservation as well as oocyte cryopreservation are considered standard practice and are widely available. Other fertility preservation methods should be considered investigational and should be performed by providers with the necessary expertise. PMID:23715580

  1. Regulatory barriers to clinical trial enrollment of adolescent and young adult oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felgenhauer, Judy; Hooke, Mary C

    2014-06-01

    Adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with cancer may face unique challenges if they and their families wish to participate in clinical oncology trials. Regulatory guidelines and funding requirements put in place to protect patients may actually raise barriers to enrollment in clinical trials. Hospital age guidelines may need to be readdressed to better suit the needs of AYA patients. Finally, the creation of the National Clinical Trials Network will provide new opportunities for pediatric and medical oncologists to collaborate in the care of AYA patients. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. Identifying Health Information Technology Needs of Oncologists to Facilitate the Adoption of Genomic Medicine: Recommendations From the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology Omics and Precision Oncology Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Kevin S; Ambinder, Edward P; Hess, Gregory P; Yu, Peter Paul; Bernstam, Elmer V; Routbort, Mark J; Clemenceau, Jean Rene; Hamm, John T; Febbo, Phillip G; Domchek, Susan M; Chen, James L; Warner, Jeremy L

    2017-09-20

    At the ASCO Data Standards and Interoperability Summit held in May 2016, it was unanimously decided that four areas of current oncology clinical practice have serious, unmet health information technology needs. The following areas of need were identified: 1) omics and precision oncology, 2) advancing interoperability, 3) patient engagement, and 4) value-based oncology. To begin to address these issues, ASCO convened two complementary workshops: the Omics and Precision Oncology Workshop in October 2016 and the Advancing Interoperability Workshop in December 2016. A common goal was to address the complexity, enormity, and rapidly changing nature of genomic information, which existing electronic health records are ill equipped to manage. The subject matter experts invited to the Omics and Precision Oncology Workgroup were tasked with the responsibility of determining a specific, limited need that could be addressed by a software application (app) in the short-term future, using currently available genomic knowledge bases. Hence, the scope of this workshop was to determine the basic functionality of one app that could serve as a test case for app development. The goal of the second workshop, described separately, was to identify the specifications for such an app. This approach was chosen both to facilitate the development of a useful app and to help ASCO and oncologists better understand the mechanics, difficulties, and gaps in genomic clinical decision support tool development. In this article, we discuss the key challenges and recommendations identified by the workshop participants. Our hope is to narrow the gap between the practicing oncologist and ongoing national efforts to provide precision oncology and value-based care to cancer patients.

  3. Relationships between authorship contributions and authors' industry financial ties among oncology clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Susannah L; Krzyzanowska, Monika K; Joffe, Steven

    2010-03-10

    PURPOSE To test the hypothesis that authors who play key scientific roles in oncology clinical trials, and who therefore have increased influence over the design, analysis, interpretation or reporting of trials, are more likely than those who do not play such roles to have financial ties to industry. METHODS Data were abstracted from all trials (n = 235) of drugs or biologic agents published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology between January 1, 2006 and June 30, 2007. Article-level data included sponsorship, age group (adult v pediatric), phase, single versus multicenter, country (United States v other), and number of authors. Author-level data (n = 2,927) included financial ties (eg, employment, consulting) and performance of key scientific roles (ie, conception/design, analysis/interpretation, or manuscript writing). Associations between performance of key roles and financial ties, adjusting for article-level covariates, were examined using generalized linear mixed models. Results One thousand eight hundred eighty-one authors (64%) reported performing at least one key role, and 842 authors (29%) reported at least one financial tie. Authors who reported performing a key role were more likely than other authors to report financial ties to industry (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 4.3; 99% CI, 3.0 to 6.0; P analysis, and interpretation, or reporting of oncology clinical trials are more likely than authors who do not perform such roles to have financial ties to industry.

  4. Electronic clinical decision support systems attitudes and barriers to use in the oncology setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, I M

    2012-03-02

    BACKGROUND: There is little evidence regarding attitudes to clinical decision support systems (CDSS) in oncology. AIMS: We examined the current usage, awareness, and concerns of Irish medical oncologists and oncology pharmacists in this area. METHODS: A questionnaire was sent to 27 medical oncologists and 34 oncology pharmacists, identified through professional interest groups. Respondents ranked concerns regarding their use of a CDSS on a scale from 1 to 4, with 4 being most important. RESULTS: Overall, 67% (41\\/61) responded, 48% (13\\/27) of oncologists and 82% (28\\/34) of pharmacists surveyed. Concerns included "difficulty defining complex clinical situations with a set of rules" (mean ± SD) (3.2 ± 0.9), "ensuring evidence base is up to date and relevant" (3.2 ± 0.9) and "lack of clinically relevant suggestions" (2.9 ± 0.9). Ninety-three percent reported using a CDSS but 54% were unaware of this. CONCLUSION: While there are benefits to using a CDSS, concerns must be addressed through user education. This may be a starting point for a user-centred design approach to the development of future local systems through a consultative process.

  5. Clinically Meaningful Use of Blood Tumor Markers in Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdenrieder, Stefan; Pagliaro, Lance; Morgenstern, David; Dayyani, Farshid

    2016-01-01

    Before the introduction of modern imaging techniques and the recent developments in molecular diagnosis, tumor markers (TMs) were among the few available diagnostic tools for the management of cancer patients. Easily obtained from serum or plasma samples, TMs are minimally invasive and convenient, and the associated costs are low. Single TMs were traditionally used but these have come under scrutiny due to their low sensitivity and specificity when used, for example, in a screening setting. However, recent research has shown superior performance using a combination of multiple TMs as a panel for assessment, or as part of validated algorithms that also incorporate other clinical factors. In addition, newer TMs have been discovered that have an increased sensitivity and specificity profile for defined malignancies. The aim of this review is to provide a concise overview of the appropriate uses of both traditional and newer TMs and their roles in diagnosis, prognosis, and the monitoring of patients in current clinical practice. We also look at the future direction of TMs and their integration with other diagnostic modalities and other emerging serum based biomarkers, such as circulating nucleic acids, to ultimately advance diagnostic performance and improve patient management.

  6. Clinically Meaningful Use of Blood Tumor Markers in Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Holdenrieder

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Before the introduction of modern imaging techniques and the recent developments in molecular diagnosis, tumor markers (TMs were among the few available diagnostic tools for the management of cancer patients. Easily obtained from serum or plasma samples, TMs are minimally invasive and convenient, and the associated costs are low. Single TMs were traditionally used but these have come under scrutiny due to their low sensitivity and specificity when used, for example, in a screening setting. However, recent research has shown superior performance using a combination of multiple TMs as a panel for assessment, or as part of validated algorithms that also incorporate other clinical factors. In addition, newer TMs have been discovered that have an increased sensitivity and specificity profile for defined malignancies. The aim of this review is to provide a concise overview of the appropriate uses of both traditional and newer TMs and their roles in diagnosis, prognosis, and the monitoring of patients in current clinical practice. We also look at the future direction of TMs and their integration with other diagnostic modalities and other emerging serum based biomarkers, such as circulating nucleic acids, to ultimately advance diagnostic performance and improve patient management.

  7. Evaluation of quality of life in oncology clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarema, A.; Marzecki, Z.

    1994-01-01

    In 18 patients with various malignancies the quality of life was evaluated with the use of the SF-36 questionnaire before and after radiotherapy. The quality of life was better among patients whose physical condition was better both before and after radiotherapy. The quality of life deteriorated after radiotherapy in patients whose physical status before treatment was evaluated as more serious. After the treatment the correlation was found between the global evaluation of quality of life and the intensity of pain and physical disability. However, both before and after radiotherapy the correlation was found between global quality of life and the severity of depression. The subjective estimation of quality of life by cancer patients did not correlate with the clinical evaluation of the severity of their state in doctor's opinion. (author)

  8. Clinical perspectives of cancer stem cell research in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bütof, Rebecca; Baumann, Michael; Dubrovska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy has a proven potential to eradicate cancer stem cells which is reflected by its curative potential in many cancer types. Considerable progress has been made in identification and biological characterisation of cancer stem cells during the past years. Recent biological findings indicate significant inter- and intratumoural and functional heterogeneity of cancer stem cells and lead to more complex models which have potential implications for radiobiology and radiotherapy. Clinical evidence is emerging that biomarkers of cancer stem cells may be prognostic for the outcome of radiotherapy in some tumour entities. Perspectives of cancer stem cell based research for radiotherapy reviewed here include their radioresistance compared to the mass of non-cancer stem cells which form the bulk of all tumour cells, implications for image- and non-image based predictive bio-assays of the outcome of radiotherapy and a combination of novel systemic treatments with radiotherapy

  9. Organizing and implementing a multidisciplinary fast track oncology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basta, Y L; Tytgat, K M A J; Greuter, H H; Klinkenbijl, J H G; Fockens, P; Strikwerda, J

    2017-11-01

    Patients with gastrointestinal malignancies often need multiple appointments with different medical specialists, causing waiting times to accrue. In our hospital, care is organized in a sequential manner, causing long waiting times. To reduce this, a fast track outpatient clinic (FTC) was implemented. The FTC was organized within the hospital's existing structure. Patient centered care was achieved by ensuring that the medical specialists visit the patient, implementing nurse coordinators and considering patient wishes and co-morbidities when formulating a treatment plan. A mandate from the board (Top-down), ensured cooperation between different medical departments and a change in resource allocation (i.e. medical staff); a horizontal clinic across a vertical departmental structure. Brainstorm sessions between the departments led by two physicians who were going to work at the FTC (Bottom-up), assured a swift implementation of the FTC. Since implementation in 2009, patient influx has tripled. Waiting time for an appointment and start of treatment was reduced from 2-4 weeks to 6 working days and from 12-14 weeks to 17 working days, respectively. This was achieved by re-allocating recourses, but without increasing existing resources. The combination of a top-down and bottom-up strategy ensured participation from all involved departments, a strong foundation and a shared vision on patient centered care. The FTC facilitates sharing information between different medical specialists through both proximity and a shared electronic patient record. The implementation of the FTC comprises a change in organization, but not a change in structure. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  10. The effect of a psychological empowerment program based on psychodrama on empowerment perception and burnout levels in oncology nurses: Psychological empowerment in oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özbaş, Azize Atli; Tel, Havva

    2016-08-01

    Oncology nursing is stressful by its nature, and nurses in the field experience a high amount of stress and burnout. In order to cope with occupational stress, nurses need to employ flexible adjustment mechanisms that allow them the power to process their experiences. Failure of efficient stress management causes burnout, and burnout is closely related to powerlessness. It is therefore believed that the occurrence of burnout can be reduced by means of psychological empowerment of nurses. Our study was conducted to determine the effect of a "psychodrama-based psychological empowerment program" on (1) the perception of empowerment and (2) the levels of burnout in oncology nurses. The sample was made up of 82 oncology nurses (38 nurses in the study group and 44 in the control/comparison group). Study data were collected using the Psychological Empowerment Scale, the Nurse Work Empowerment Scale, and Maslach's Burnout Inventory. The study group attended a "psychodrama-based psychological empowerment program" (2 hours, 1 day a week, for 10 weeks). For data assessment, we employed an independent t test and one-way analysis of variance. The psychological empowerment and workplace empowerment scores of nurses in the study group increased and their burnout scores decreased following attendance in the psychodrama-based psychological empowerment program. We found that the psychodrama-based psychological empowerment program increased psychological empowerment and enhanced perception of workplace empowerment while decreasing levels of burnout in oncology nurses. The program is recommended and should allow oncology nurses to benefit from their personal experiences and thus increase self-empowerment, to enhance their perception of empowerment, and to prevent burnout.

  11. Media Reporting of Practice-Changing Clinical Trials in Oncology: A North American Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Peter; Vickers, Michael M; O'Connor, Stephen; Valdes, Mario; Tang, Patricia A

    2016-03-01

    Media reporting of clinical trials impacts patient-oncologist interactions. We sought to characterize the accuracy of media and Internet reporting of practice-changing clinical trials in oncology. The first media articles referencing 17 practice-changing clinical trials were collected from 4 media outlets: newspapers, cable news, cancer websites, and industry websites. Measured outcomes were media reporting score, social media score, and academic citation score. The media reporting score was a measure of completeness of information detailed in media articles as scored by a 15-point scoring instrument. The social media score represented the ubiquity of social media presence referencing 17 practice-changing clinical trials in cancer as determined by the American Society of Clinical Oncology in its annual report, entitled Clinical Cancer Advances 2012; social media score was calculated from Twitter, Facebook, and Google searches. The academic citation score comprised total citations from Google Scholar plus the Scopus database, which represented the academic impact per clinical cancer advance. From 170 media articles, 107 (63%) had sufficient data for analysis. Cohen's κ coefficient demonstrated reliability of the media reporting score instrument with a coefficient of determination of 94%. Per the media reporting score, information was most complete from industry, followed by cancer websites, newspapers, and cable news. The most commonly omitted items, in descending order, were study limitations, exclusion criteria, conflict of interest, and other. The social media score was weakly correlated with academic citation score. Media outlets appear to have set a low bar for coverage of many practice-changing advances in oncology, with reports of scientific breakthroughs often omitting basic study facts and cautions, which may mislead the public. The media should be encouraged to use a standardized reporting template and provide accessible references to original source

  12. A web-based 'patterns of care study' system for clinical radiation oncology in Korea: development, launching, and characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, II Han; Chie, Eui Kyu; Oh, Do Hoon

    2003-01-01

    We report upon a web-based system for Patterns of Care Study (PCS) devised for Korean radiation oncology, This PCS was designed to establish standard tools for clinical quality assurance, to determine basic parameters for radiation oncology processes, to offer a solid system for cooperative clinical studies and a useful standard database for comparisons with other national databases. The system consisted of a main server with two back-ups in other locations. The program uses a Linux operating system and a MySQL database. Cancers with high frequencies in radiotherapy departments in Korea from 1998 to 1999 were chosen to have a developmental priority. The web-based clinical PCS system for radiotherapy in www.pcs.re.kr was developed in early 2003 for cancers of the breast, rectum, esophagus, larynx and lung, and for brain metastasis. The total number of PCS study items exceeded one thousand. Our PCS system features user-friendliness, double entry checking, data security, encryption, hard disc mirroring, double back-up, and statistical analysis. Alphanumeric data can be input as well as image data. In addition, programs were constructed for IRB submission, random sampling of data, and departmental structure. For the first time in the field of PCS, we have developed a web-based system and associated working programs. With this system, we can gather sample data in a short period and thus save, cost, effort and time. Data should be performed to validate input data. We propose that this system should be considered as a standard method for PCS or similar types of data collection systems

  13. Recent trends for drug lag in clinical development of oncology drugs in Japan: does the oncology drug lag still exist in Japan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Hideki; Kurokawa, Tatsuo

    2015-12-01

    This study exhaustively and historically investigated the status of drug lag for oncology drugs approved in Japan. We comprehensively investigated oncology drugs approved in Japan between April 2001 and July 2014, using publicly available information. We also examined changes in the status of drug lag between Japan and the United States, as well as factors influencing drug lag. This study included 120 applications for approval of oncology drugs in Japan. The median difference over a 13-year period in the approval date between the United States and Japan was 875 days (29.2 months). This figure peaked in 2002, and showed a tendency to decline gradually each year thereafter. In 2014, the median approval lag was 281 days (9.4 months). Multiple regression analysis identified the following potential factors that reduce drug lag: "Japan's participation in global clinical trials"; "bridging strategies"; "designation of priority review in Japan"; and "molecularly targeted drugs". From 2001 to 2014, molecularly targeted drugs emerged as the predominant oncology drug, and the method of development has changed from full development in Japan or bridging strategy to global simultaneous development by Japan's taking part in global clinical trials. In line with these changes, the drug lag between the United States and Japan has significantly reduced to less than 1 year.

  14. American Society of Clinical Oncology position statement on obesity and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligibel, Jennifer A; Alfano, Catherine M; Courneya, Kerry S; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Burger, Robert A; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Fabian, Carol J; Gucalp, Ayca; Hershman, Dawn L; Hudson, Melissa M; Jones, Lee W; Kakarala, Madhuri; Ness, Kirsten K; Merrill, Janette K; Wollins, Dana S; Hudis, Clifford A

    2014-11-01

    Rates of obesity have increased significantly over the last three decades in the United States and globally. In addition to contributing to heart disease and diabetes, obesity is a major unrecognized risk factor for cancer. Obesity is associated with worsened prognosis after cancer diagnosis and also negatively affects the delivery of systemic therapy, contributes to morbidity of cancer treatment, and may raise the risk of second malignancies and comorbidities. Research shows that the time after a cancer diagnosis can serve as a teachable moment to motivate individuals to adopt risk-reducing behaviors. For this reason, the oncology care team--the providers with whom a patient has the closest relationships in the critical period after a cancer diagnosis--is in a unique position to help patients lose weight and make other healthy lifestyle changes. The American Society of Clinical Oncology is committed to reducing the impact of obesity on cancer and has established a multipronged initiative to accomplish this goal by 1) increasing education and awareness of the evidence linking obesity and cancer; 2) providing tools and resources to help oncology providers address obesity with their patients; 3) building and fostering a robust research agenda to better understand the pathophysiology of energy balance alterations, evaluate the impact of behavior change on cancer outcomes, and determine the best methods to help cancer survivors make effective and useful changes in lifestyle behaviors; and 4) advocating for policy and systems change to address societal factors contributing to obesity and improve access to weight management services for patients with cancer. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  15. A workplace modified duty program for employees in an oncology center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soteriades, Elpidoforos S

    2017-01-01

    Workplace modified duty programs may provide reasonable accommodations to employees who have partial temporary job disability and could work on duty accommodations until they fully recover. However, little is known about the implementation barriers and effectiveness of such programs. This study is aimed at evaluating the implementation of a modified duty program for employees in an oncology center. A modified duty program for employees working at the Bank of Cyprus Oncology Center, a non profit organization with 200 employees located in the Republic of Cyprus was evaluated based on the health records of the occupational medicine department. Employees' participation in the program was 3%. A total of 12 employees participated (6 each year). The participants were all women and the mean participation period was 21.6 days (range 10 - 65 days). The two most frequent reasons for a modified duty assignment were pregnancy and back pain. Employees were assigned either on limited duties or on a combination of limited duties and reduced work hours. Employees reported being very satisfied with their participation based on a follow-up narrative oral assessment. The small participation rate does not allow for advanced statistical analyses. Further studies from larger organizations are urgently needed to evaluate the effectiveness of modified duty programs. The development of a legal framework for such modified duty programs in Cyprus as well as internationally may promote their implementation in order to facilitate the effective management of temporary partial job disability for the benefit of both employees and businesses.

  16. Clinical Implications of TiGRT Algorithm for External Audit in Radiation Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Saeb, Mohsen; Monadi, Shahram; Jabbari, Iraj

    2017-01-01

    Performing audits play an important role in quality assurance program in radiation oncology. Among different algorithms, TiGRT is one of the common application software for dose calculation. This study aimed to clinical implications of TiGRT algorithm to measure dose and compared to calculated dose delivered to the patients for a variety of cases, with and without the presence of inhomogeneities and beam modifiers. Nonhomogeneous phantom as quality dose verification phantom, Farmer ionization chambers, and PC-electrometer (Sun Nuclear, USA) as a reference class electrometer was employed throughout the audit in linear accelerators 6 and 18 MV energies (Siemens ONCOR Impression Plus, Germany). Seven test cases were performed using semi CIRS phantom. In homogeneous regions and simple plans for both energies, there was a good agreement between measured and treatment planning system calculated dose. Their relative error was found to be between 0.8% and 3% which is acceptable for audit, but in nonhomogeneous organs, such as lung, a few errors were observed. In complex treatment plans, when wedge or shield in the way of energy is used, the error was in the accepted criteria. In complex beam plans, the difference between measured and calculated dose was found to be 2%-3%. All differences were obtained between 0.4% and 1%. A good consistency was observed for the same type of energy in the homogeneous and nonhomogeneous phantom for the three-dimensional conformal field with a wedge, shield, asymmetric using the TiGRT treatment planning software in studied center. The results revealed that the national status of TPS calculations and dose delivery for 3D conformal radiotherapy was globally within acceptable standards with no major causes for concern.

  17. Clinical Implications of TiGRT Algorithm for External Audit in Radiation Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryoush Shahbazi-Gahrouei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Performing audits play an important role in quality assurance program in radiation oncology. Among different algorithms, TiGRT is one of the common application software for dose calculation. This study aimed to clinical implications of TiGRT algorithm to measure dose and compared to calculated dose delivered to the patients for a variety of cases, with and without the presence of inhomogeneities and beam modifiers. Materials and Methods: Nonhomogeneous phantom as quality dose verification phantom, Farmer ionization chambers, and PC-electrometer (Sun Nuclear, USA as a reference class electrometer was employed throughout the audit in linear accelerators 6 and 18 MV energies (Siemens ONCOR Impression Plus, Germany. Seven test cases were performed using semi CIRS phantom. Results: In homogeneous regions and simple plans for both energies, there was a good agreement between measured and treatment planning system calculated dose. Their relative error was found to be between 0.8% and 3% which is acceptable for audit, but in nonhomogeneous organs, such as lung, a few errors were observed. In complex treatment plans, when wedge or shield in the way of energy is used, the error was in the accepted criteria. In complex beam plans, the difference between measured and calculated dose was found to be 2%–3%. All differences were obtained between 0.4% and 1%. Conclusions: A good consistency was observed for the same type of energy in the homogeneous and nonhomogeneous phantom for the three-dimensional conformal field with a wedge, shield, asymmetric using the TiGRT treatment planning software in studied center. The results revealed that the national status of TPS calculations and dose delivery for 3D conformal radiotherapy was globally within acceptable standards with no major causes for concern.

  18. Development and implementation of an online program to improve how patients communicate emotional concerns to their oncology providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Laura S; Pollak, Kathryn I; Farrell, David; Cooper, Meredith; Arnold, Robert M; Jeffreys, Amy S; Tulsky, James A

    2015-10-01

    Patients often struggle to express their emotional concerns to their oncology providers and may therefore experience unmet needs. This paper describes the development and implementation of an online program that teaches patients how to communicate their emotions to their oncology providers. The intervention was developed by a multidisciplinary team consisting of palliative care physicians, psychologists, and an intervention software developer and included input from patients. It incorporated elements of Social Cognitive Theory and validated cognitive behavioral strategies for communication skills training. Strategies to increase intervention adherence were implemented midway through the study. The intervention consists of four interactive, online modules to teach patients strategies for expressing emotional concerns to their providers and asking for support. In addition to skill-building, the intervention was designed to raise patients' expectations that expressing emotional concerns to providers would be helpful, to enhance their self-efficacy for doing so, and to help them overcome barriers to having these conversations. After implementing strategies to improve adherence, usage rates increased from 47 to 64 %. This intervention addresses an unmet educational need for patients with advanced cancer. Strategies to increase adherence led to improvements in usage rates in this population of older patients. We are currently evaluating the intervention in a randomized clinical trial to determine its efficacy in increasing patient expression of emotional concerns and requests for support. If successful, this intervention could serve as a model for future online patient education programs.

  19. Japanese Society of Medical Oncology Clinical Guidelines: Molecular Testing for Colorectal Cancer Treatment, Third Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Kentaro; Taniguchi, Hiroya; Yoshino, Takayuki; Akagi, Kiwamu; Ishida, Hideyuki; Ebi, Hiromichi; Nakatani, Kaname; Muro, Kei; Yatabe, Yasushi; Yamaguchi, Kensei; Tsuchihara, Katsuya

    2018-06-01

    The Japanese Society of Medical Oncology (JSMO) previously published 2 editions of the clinical guidelines: "Japanese guidelines for testing of KRAS gene mutation in colorectal cancer" in 2008 and "Japanese Society of Medical Oncology Clinical Guidelines: RAS (KRAS/NRAS) mutation testing in colorectal cancer patients" in 2014. These guidelines have contributed to the proper use of KRAS and RAS mutation testing, respectively. Recently, clinical utility, particularly for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with BRAF V600E mutation or DNA mismatch-repair (MMR) deficiency, has been established. Therefore, the guideline members decided these genetic alterations should also be involved. The aim of this revision is to properly carry out testing for BRAF V600E mutation and MMR deficiency in addition to RAS mutation. The revised guidelines include the basic requirements for testing for these genetic alterations based on recent scientific evidence. Furthermore, because clinical utility of comprehensive genetic testing using next-generation sequencing and somatic gene testing of analyzing circulating tumor DNA has increasingly evolved with recent advancements in testing technology, we noted the current situation and prospects for these testing technologies and their clinical implementation in the revised guidelines. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  20. The situation of radiation oncology practice training programs and their graduates in 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushee, Gerald R.; Sunshine, Jonathan H.; Schepps, Barbara

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To keep the profession apprised of current trends in the job market, the American College of Radiology (ACR) studied the employment situation of 1998 radiation oncology graduates and the status and plans of radiation oncology training programs in the United States. Methods and Materials: In April-May 1998, and again in a December 1998-January 1999 follow-up, the ACR surveyed all radiation oncology residency directors in the U.S. about the employment situation of their 1998 residency and fellowship graduates as well as changes in their programs. Eighty-five percent (71/84) of those surveyed responded. We compare current findings with similar 1997 and earlier surveys and report statistically significant differences (p ≤ 0.05). Results: By 6 months after graduation, there were no graduating residents or fellows who had not secured a position, although the status of two was unknown. At that time, about 93% of all graduates had secured positions that directors said reasonably matched graduates' training and personal goals. Program directors reported that accomplished and planned changes in their programs will reduce the annual number of residency graduates by about one-fifth since 1993. However, the number of beginning residency positions offered in 1998 was 149, up from 116 in 1997 and only a few percent below the 1993 level. By the December 1998-January 1999 follow-up, fill rates for offered training positions were 94% for residencies and 80% for fellowships, figures that are similar to those reported for past years. Directors' perceptions of the job market are much more positive. For example, only 11% of residency directors viewed the market as more difficult this year than typical of recent years, as against 48% in 1997 and 82% in 1996. Conclusion: Unemployment continues to be low, and another, 'softer' indicator, the job market perceptions of residency program directors, continues to improve. Possibly as a result, plans for program reductions are

  1. Integrity of the National Resident Matching Program for Radiation Oncology: National Survey of Applicant Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holliday, Emma B. [Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Thomas, Charles R., E-mail: thomasch@ohsu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Kusano, Aaron S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the experiences of radiation oncology applicants and to evaluate the prevalence of behaviors that may be in conflict with established ethical standards. Methods and Materials: An anonymous survey was sent to all 2013 applicants to a single domestic radiation oncology residency program through the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP). Questions included demographics, survey of observed behaviors, and opinions regarding the interview and matching process. Descriptive statistics were presented. Characteristics and experiences of respondents who matched were compared with those who did not match. Results: Questionnaires were returned by 87 of 171 applicants for a 51% response rate. Eighty-two questionnaires were complete and included for analysis. Seventy-eight respondents (95.1%) reported being asked at least 1 question in conflict with the NRMP code of conduct. When asked where else they were interviewing, 64% stated that this query made them uncomfortable. Forty-five respondents (54.9%) reported unsolicited post-interview contact by programs, and 31 (37.8%) felt pressured to give assurances. Fifteen respondents (18.3%) reported being told their rank position or that they were “ranked to match” prior to Match day, with 27% of those individuals indicating this information influenced how they ranked programs. Half of respondents felt applicants often made dishonest or misleading assurances, one-third reported that they believed their desired match outcome could be improved by deliberately misleading programs, and more than two-thirds felt their rank position could be improved by having faculty from their home institutions directly contact programs on their behalf. Conclusions: Radiation oncology applicants report a high prevalence of behaviors in conflict with written NRMP policies. Post-interview communication should be discouraged in order to enhance fairness and support the professional development of future

  2. Integrity of the National Resident Matching Program for Radiation Oncology: National Survey of Applicant Experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holliday, Emma B.; Thomas, Charles R.; Kusano, Aaron S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the experiences of radiation oncology applicants and to evaluate the prevalence of behaviors that may be in conflict with established ethical standards. Methods and Materials: An anonymous survey was sent to all 2013 applicants to a single domestic radiation oncology residency program through the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP). Questions included demographics, survey of observed behaviors, and opinions regarding the interview and matching process. Descriptive statistics were presented. Characteristics and experiences of respondents who matched were compared with those who did not match. Results: Questionnaires were returned by 87 of 171 applicants for a 51% response rate. Eighty-two questionnaires were complete and included for analysis. Seventy-eight respondents (95.1%) reported being asked at least 1 question in conflict with the NRMP code of conduct. When asked where else they were interviewing, 64% stated that this query made them uncomfortable. Forty-five respondents (54.9%) reported unsolicited post-interview contact by programs, and 31 (37.8%) felt pressured to give assurances. Fifteen respondents (18.3%) reported being told their rank position or that they were “ranked to match” prior to Match day, with 27% of those individuals indicating this information influenced how they ranked programs. Half of respondents felt applicants often made dishonest or misleading assurances, one-third reported that they believed their desired match outcome could be improved by deliberately misleading programs, and more than two-thirds felt their rank position could be improved by having faculty from their home institutions directly contact programs on their behalf. Conclusions: Radiation oncology applicants report a high prevalence of behaviors in conflict with written NRMP policies. Post-interview communication should be discouraged in order to enhance fairness and support the professional development of future

  3. The American Society of Clinical Oncology's Efforts to Support Global Cancer Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Saghir, Nagi S.; Cufer, Tanja; Cazap, Eduardo; de Guzman, Roselle; Othieno-Abinya, Nicholas Anthony; Sanchez, Jose Angel; Pyle, Doug

    2016-01-01

    Despite much progress in the management of malignant diseases, the number of new cases and cancer-related deaths continues to rise around the world. More than half of new cases occur in economically developing countries, where more than two thirds of cancer deaths are expected. However, implementation of all necessary steps to accomplish the dissemination of state-of-the-art prevention, diagnosis, and management will require increased allocation of resources, and, more importantly, harmonization of the efforts of hundreds of national and international public health agencies, policy-setting bodies, governments, pharmaceutical companies, and philanthropic organizations. More than 30% of the members of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) reside and practice outside US borders, and more than half of attendees at all of the scientific congresses and symposia organized by ASCO are international. As cancer has become an increasingly global disease, ASCO has evolved as a global organization. The ASCO Board of Directors currently includes members from France, Brazil, and Canada. In 2013, the ASCO Board of Directors identified a number of strategic priorities for the future. Recognizing the importance of non-US members to the society, their first strategic priority was improving the society's service to non-US members and defining these members' identity in the international oncology community. This article reviews current ASCO activities in the international arena and its future plans in global oncology. PMID:26578614

  4. Complementary and Alternative Medicine: A Clinical Study in 1,016 Hematology/Oncology Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hierl, Marina; Pfirstinger, Jochen; Andreesen, Reinhard; Holler, Ernst; Mayer, Stephanie; Wolff, Daniel; Vogelhuber, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Surveys state a widespread use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in patients with malignant diseases. CAM methods might potentially interfere with the metabolization of tumor-specific therapy. However, there is little communication about CAM use in hematology/oncology patients between patients, CAM providers, and oncologists. A self-administered questionnaire was handed out to all patients attending to the hematology/oncology outpatient clinic of Regensburg University Hospital. Subsequently, a chart review of all CAM users was performed. Questionnaires of 1,016 patients were analyzed. Of these patients, 30% used CAM, preferably vitamins and micronutrients. Main information sources for CAM methods were physicians/nonmedical practitioners and friends/relatives. CAM therapies were provided mainly by licensed physicians (29%), followed by nonmedical practitioners (14%) and the patients themselves (13%). Although 62% of the CAM users agreed that the oncologist may know about their CAM therapy, a chart entry about CAM use was found only in 41%. CAM is frequently used by hematology/oncology patients. Systematic communication about CAM is essential to avoid possible drug interactions. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. [Rethinking clinical research in surgical oncology. From comic opera to quality control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evrard, Serge

    2016-01-01

    The evidence base for the effectiveness of surgical interventions is relatively poor and data from large, randomized prospective studies are rare with often a poor quality. Many efforts have been made to increase the number of high quality randomized trials in surgery and theoretical proposals have been put forward to improve the situation, but practical implementation of these proposals is seriously lacking. The consequences of this policy are not trivial; with very few patients included in surgical oncology trials, this represents wasted opportunity for advances in cancer treatment. In this review, we cover the difficulties inherent to clinical research in surgical oncology, such as quality control, equipoise, accrual, and funding and promote alternative designs to the randomized controlled trial. Although the classic randomized controlled trial has a valid but limited place in surgical oncology, other prospective designs need to be promoted as a new deal. This new deal not only implicates surgeons but also journal editors, tender jury, as well as regulatory bodies to cover legal gaps currently surrounding surgical innovation. Copyright © 2015 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinic Health Awareness Program Subsystem -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Clinic Health Awareness Program Subystem (CHAPS) is a comprehensive system for recording, reporting, and analyzing a patient’s medical information and managing an...

  7. Professional practice assessment. Pertinence of positron emission tomography clinical indications in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Stanc, E.; Tainturier, C.; Swaenepoel, J.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction As part of the health care quality and safety policy in France, Professional Practice Assessment (P.P.A.) are mandatory in the health services 'certification' process. We present our study regarding the pertinence of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) indications in oncology. Materials and methods A multidisciplinary task group used the Quick Audit method with two rounds of 100 request forms each. The assessment list of criteria comprised four items of decreasing relevance grading the PET scans clinical indications, which were derived from the three French published guidelines (S.O.R. [F.N.C.L.C.C]., 'Guide du bon usage des examens d'imagerie medicale' [S.F.R.-S.F.M.N.], 'Guide pour la redaction de protocoles pour la TEP au F.D.G. en cancerologie' [S.F.M.N.]) and five additional items: clinical information, patient's body weight, previous treatments dates, diabetes, claustrophobia. Results The first round showed that 68% of the requested scans corresponded to the two most relevant groups of indications (S.O.R. Standards and Options). The request forms were correctly filled in regarding the clinical information, but this was not the case for the other items we tested. Several actions were conducted: dedicated PET request form, availability of the S.O.R. on the hospital intranet, boost of the referring physicians awareness during the multidisciplinary oncology meetings (Reunions de Concertation Pluridisciplinaires RCP). The second round showed a better pertinence of the PET scans indications (75% versus 68%); the patient's body weight was more frequently mentioned on the request form. Discussion This study is an example of P.P.A. in our discipline. It led to an improvement of the oncologic PET scans clinical indications in our hospital. This work is pursued in everyday discussion with the referring clinicians, especially during the RCP. (authors)

  8. The feasibility, perceived satisfaction, and value of using synchronous webinars to educate clinical research professionals on reporting adverse events in clinical trials: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgerson, Dawn; Dino, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Clinical research professionals are faced with decreased funding and increased workloads; innovative methods of professional development programs are necessary to accommodate these factors. This study evaluated the feasibility, perceived satisfaction, and value of using webinars to educate clinical research professionals on reporting adverse events commonly experienced in pediatric oncology clinical trials. The setting incorporated synchronous web-based educational technology. Constructivist learning provides the theoretical framework for this study. Participants evaluated the professional development program at 2 time points: (a) at the conclusion and (b) 4 to 6 weeks afterward, using survey method. Synchronous webinars were both economical and effective in educating clinical research professionals across institutional sites. Participants reported exceptionally high levels of satisfaction with the accessibility, scope, quality, and interactivity of the professional development program. The vast majority of participants reported that the education would assist with reporting adverse events in pediatric oncology clinical trials and this perception persisted into clinical practice. Although the results of this study were intended to guide future educational efforts of the Children's Oncology Group, they may also apply to other cooperative groups.

  9. Results of the 2005-2008 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology Survey of Chief Residents in the United States: Clinical Training and Resident Working Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondi, Vinai; Bernard, Johnny Ray; Jabbari, Siavash; Keam, Jennifer; Amorim Bernstein, Karen L. de; Dad, Luqman K.; Li, Linna; Poppe, Matthew M.; Strauss, Jonathan B.; Chollet, Casey T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To document clinical training and resident working conditions reported by chief residents during their residency. Methods and Materials: During the academic years 2005 to 2006, 2006 to 2007, and 2007 to 2008, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology conducted a nationwide survey of all radiation oncology chief residents in the United States. Chi-square statistics were used to assess changes in clinical training and resident working conditions over time. Results: Surveys were completed by representatives from 55 programs (response rate, 71.4%) in 2005 to 2006, 60 programs (75.9%) in 2006 to 2007, and 74 programs (93.7%) in 2007 to 2008. Nearly all chief residents reported receiving adequate clinical experience in commonly treated disease sites, such as breast and genitourinary malignancies; and commonly performed procedures, such as three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Clinical experience in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy increased over time (p < 0.001), whereas clinical experience in endovascular brachytherapy (p <0.001) decreased over time. The distribution of gynecologic and prostate brachytherapy cases remained stable, while clinical case load in breast brachytherapy increased (p = 0.006). A small but significant percentage of residents reported receiving inadequate clinical experience in pediatrics, seeing 10 or fewer pediatric cases during the course of residency. Procedures involving higher capital costs, such as particle beam therapy and intraoperative radiotherapy, and infrequent clinical use, such as head and neck brachytherapy, were limited to a minority of institutions. Most residency programs associated with at least one satellite facility have incorporated resident rotations into their clinical training, and the majority of residents at these programs find them valuable experiences. The majority of residents reported working 60 or fewer hours per week on required clinical duties

  10. Clinical PET/CT Atlas: A Casebook of Imaging in Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Integrated positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has evolved since its introduction into the commercial market more than a decade ago. It is now a key procedure, particularly in oncological imaging. Over the last years in routine clinical service, PET/CT has had a significant impact on diagnosis, treatment planning, staging, therapy, and monitoring of treatment response and has therefore played an important role in the care of cancer patients. The high sensitivity from the PET component and the specificity of the CT component give this hybrid imaging modality the unique characteristics that make PET/CT, even after over 10 years of clinical use, one of the fastest growing imaging modalities worldwide. This publication combines over 90 comprehensive cases covering all major indications of fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG)-PET/CT as well as some cases of clinically relevant special tracers. The cases provide an overview of what the specific disease can look like in PET/CT, the typical pattern of the disease’s spread as well as likely pitfalls and teaching points. This PET/CT Atlas will allow professionals interested in PET/CT imaging to embrace the variety of oncological imaging by providing clinically relevant teaching files on the effectiveness and diagnostic quality of FDG-PET/CT imaging in routine applications

  11. Assessing clinical significance in measuring oncology patient quality of life: Introduction to the symposium, content overview, and definition of terms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloan, Jeff A.; Cella, David; Frost, Marlene; Guyatt, Gordon H.; Sprangers, Mirjam; Symonds, Tara

    2002-01-01

    The Clinical Significance Consensus Meeting Group of the Symposium on the Clinical Significance of Quality-of-Life Measures in Cancer Patients produced 6 articles regarding the clinical significance of quality of life (QOL) assessments in oncology. The 6 articles deal with the methods used to date:

  12. Knowledge bases, clinical decision support systems, and rapid learning in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peter Paul

    2015-03-01

    One of the most important benefits of health information technology is to assist the cognitive process of the human mind in the face of vast amounts of health data, limited time for decision making, and the complexity of the patient with cancer. Clinical decision support tools are frequently cited as a technologic solution to this problem, but to date useful clinical decision support systems (CDSS) have been limited in utility and implementation. This article describes three unique sources of health data that underlie fundamentally different types of knowledge bases which feed into CDSS. CDSS themselves comprise a variety of models which are discussed. The relationship of knowledge bases and CDSS to rapid learning health systems design is critical as CDSS are essential drivers of rapid learning in clinical care. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  13. Colorectal cancer clinical epidemiological characteristics in patients attended at Oncology service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Area Abreu, Daniel; Borrego Pino, Luis; Borrego Diaz, Luis; Abreu Rivera, Pedro; Tillan Garrote; Aurora

    2009-01-01

    A study of series of cases from January 2006 to December 2007 was carried out in 195 patients with colorectal cancer. They were attended at Oncology Service at Lenin Hospital, and were diagnosed at different health areas of the province. 63% and 37% of them had tumors in rectum and colon respectively. The age group between 40 and 69 years old was the most affected one (81.0%) and 56.9% of them were males. The main risk factors were the family history of the illness, chronic constipation, bleeding polyps and vesicular lithiasis. The most frequent clinical manifestations were rectal hemorrhage and anemia. (author)

  14. Treatment of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, Hedy L; Ismaila, Nofisat; Armato, Samuel G; Bueno, Raphael; Hesdorffer, Mary; Jahan, Thierry; Jones, Clyde Michael; Miettinen, Markku; Pass, Harvey; Rimner, Andreas; Rusch, Valerie; Sterman, Daniel; Thomas, Anish; Hassan, Raffit

    2018-05-01

    Purpose To provide evidence-based recommendations to practicing physicians and others on the management of malignant pleural mesothelioma. Methods ASCO convened an Expert Panel of medical oncology, thoracic surgery, radiation oncology, pulmonary, pathology, imaging, and advocacy experts to conduct a literature search, which included systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials, and prospective and retrospective comparative observational studies published from 1990 through 2017. Outcomes of interest included survival, disease-free or recurrence-free survival, and quality of life. Expert Panel members used available evidence and informal consensus to develop evidence-based guideline recommendations. Results The literature search identified 222 relevant studies to inform the evidence base for this guideline. Recommendations Evidence-based recommendations were developed for diagnosis, staging, chemotherapy, surgical cytoreduction, radiation therapy, and multimodality therapy in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/thoracic-cancer-guidelines and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki .

  15. Robotic surgery for rectal cancer: current immediate clinical and oncological outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Sergio Eduardo Alonso; Seid, Victor Edmond; Klajner, Sidney

    2014-10-21

    Laparoscopic rectal surgery continues to be a challenging operation associated to a steep learning curve. Robotic surgical systems have dramatically changed minimally invasive surgery. Three-dimensional, magnified and stable view, articulated instruments, and reduction of physiologic tremors leading to superior dexterity and ergonomics. Therefore, robotic platforms could potentially address limitations of laparoscopic rectal surgery. It was aimed at reviewing current literature on short-term clinical and oncological (pathological) outcomes after robotic rectal cancer surgery in comparison with laparoscopic surgery. A systematic review was performed for the period 2002 to 2014. A total of 1776 patients with rectal cancer underwent minimally invasive robotic treatment in 32 studies. After robotic and laparoscopic approach to oncologic rectal surgery, respectively, mean operating time varied from 192-385 min, and from 158-297 min; mean estimated blood loss was between 33 and 283 mL, and between 127 and 300 mL; mean length of stay varied from 4-10 d; and from 6-15 d. Conversion after robotic rectal surgery varied from 0% to 9.4%, and from 0 to 22% after laparoscopy. There was no difference between robotic (0%-41.3%) and laparoscopic (5.5%-29.3%) surgery regarding morbidity and anastomotic complications (respectively, 0%-13.5%, and 0%-11.1%). Regarding immediate oncologic outcomes, respectively among robotic and laparoscopic cases, positive circumferential margins varied from 0% to 7.5%, and from 0% to 8.8%; the mean number of retrieved lymph nodes was between 10 and 20, and between 11 and 21; and the mean distal resection margin was from 0.8 to 4.7 cm, and from 1.9 to 4.5 cm. Robotic rectal cancer surgery is being undertaken by experienced surgeons. However, the quality of the assembled evidence does not support definite conclusions about most studies variables. Robotic rectal cancer surgery is associated to increased costs and operating time. It also seems to be

  16. The implementation and evaluation of a communication skills training program for oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Smita C; Manna, Ruth; Coyle, Nessa; Penn, Stacey; Gallegos, Tess E; Zaider, Talia; Krueger, Carol A; Bialer, Philip A; Bylund, Carma L; Parker, Patricia A

    2017-09-01

    Many nurses express difficulty in communicating with their patients, especially in oncology settings where there are numerous challenges and high-stake decisions during the course of diagnosis and treatment. Providing specific training in communication skills is one way to enhance the communication between nurses and their patients. We developed and implemented a communication skills training program for nurses, consisting of three teaching modules: responding empathically to patients; discussing death, dying, and end-of-life goals of care; and responding to challenging interactions with families. Training included didactic and experiential small group role plays. This paper presents results on program evaluation, self-efficacy, and behavioral demonstration of learned communication skills. Three hundred forty-two inpatient oncology nurses participated in a 1-day communication skills training program and completed course evaluations, self-reports, and pre- and post-standardized patient assessments. Participants rated the training favorably, and they reported significant gains in self-efficacy in their ability to communicate with patients in various contexts. Participants also demonstrated significant improvement in several empathic skills, as well as in clarifying skill. Our work demonstrates that implementation of a nurse communication skills training program at a major cancer center is feasible and acceptable and has a significant impact on participants' self-efficacy and uptake of communication skills.

  17. R-IDEAL: A Framework for Systematic Clinical Evaluation of Technical Innovations in Radiation Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkooijen, Helena M; Kerkmeijer, Linda G W; Fuller, Clifton D; Huddart, Robbert; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Verheij, Marcel; Mook, Stella; Sahgal, Arjun; Hall, Emma; Schultz, Chris

    2017-01-01

    The pace of innovation in radiation oncology is high and the window of opportunity for evaluation narrow. Financial incentives, industry pressure, and patients' demand for high-tech treatments have led to widespread implementation of innovations before, or even without, robust evidence of improved outcomes has been generated. The standard phase I-IV framework for drug evaluation is not the most efficient and desirable framework for assessment of technological innovations. In order to provide a standard assessment methodology for clinical evaluation of innovations in radiotherapy, we adapted the surgical IDEAL framework to fit the radiation oncology setting. Like surgery, clinical evaluation of innovations in radiation oncology is complicated by continuous technical development, team and operator dependence, and differences in quality control. Contrary to surgery, radiotherapy innovations may be used in various ways, e.g., at different tumor sites and with different aims, such as radiation volume reduction and dose escalation. Also, the effect of radiation treatment can be modeled, allowing better prediction of potential benefits and improved patient selection. Key distinctive features of R-IDEAL include the important role of predicate and modeling studies (Stage 0), randomization at an early stage in the development of the technology, and long-term follow-up for late toxicity. We implemented R-IDEAL for clinical evaluation of a recent innovation in radiation oncology, the MRI-guided linear accelerator (MR-Linac). MR-Linac combines a radiotherapy linear accelerator with a 1.5-T MRI, aiming for improved targeting, dose escalation, and margin reduction, and is expected to increase the use of hypofractionation, improve tumor control, leading to higher cure rates and less toxicity. An international consortium, with participants from seven large cancer institutes from Europe and North America, has adopted the R-IDEAL framework to work toward coordinated, evidence

  18. Clinical evaluation of radiation oncology greater area database (ROGAD). From 1992 to 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harauchi, Hajime; Inamura, Kiyonari; Umeda, Tokuo

    2001-01-01

    Radiotherapy clinical records of 8,950 cases were collected from 251 hospitals in the period from 1992 to 1998 by the activity of Radiation Oncology Greater Area Database ROGAD under the Japanese Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology JASTRO, and their data were analyzed. Outlines of analysis are presented in this paper and other 5 papers in series. Also follow-up data of 814 cases by the 4th follow-up survey study carried out in 1998 were retrieved and examined. Case distribution survey according to ICD-O code for primary tumor region were worked out. Chronological change of case distribution during these seven years were examined and briefly stated in this paper. Case analyses in terms of 5 portions of topographical region were also done, and 5 papers together with this paper describe the results of the analyses. Data analysis comparison between ROGAD and the regular census revealed that the resulted analyses of collected clinical data by ROGAD from 1992 to 1998 indicated the real world of radiation therapy situation in Japan. One of the reason to state this is that ROGAD covers 34.7% of number of facilities and 36.1% of number of cases treated in Japan. The another reason is that we could reduce the rate of mis-registration and items of blanked registration by means of improvement of registration software with logical check. We made sure from our effort of this ROGAD activity for these 7 years experiences that continuation of the run of this database ROGAD would bring us much more accurate information on the radiation oncology situation in Japan. (author)

  19. Vision 20/20: Automation and advanced computing in clinical radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Kevin L.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Kagadis, George C.; McNutt, Todd R.; Mutic, Sasa

    2014-01-01

    This Vision 20/20 paper considers what computational advances are likely to be implemented in clinical radiation oncology in the coming years and how the adoption of these changes might alter the practice of radiotherapy. Four main areas of likely advancement are explored: cloud computing, aggregate data analyses, parallel computation, and automation. As these developments promise both new opportunities and new risks to clinicians and patients alike, the potential benefits are weighed against the hazards associated with each advance, with special considerations regarding patient safety under new computational platforms and methodologies. While the concerns of patient safety are legitimate, the authors contend that progress toward next-generation clinical informatics systems will bring about extremely valuable developments in quality improvement initiatives, clinical efficiency, outcomes analyses, data sharing, and adaptive radiotherapy

  20. Vision 20/20: Automation and advanced computing in clinical radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Kevin L., E-mail: kevinmoore@ucsd.edu; Moiseenko, Vitali [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Kagadis, George C. [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Rion, GR 26504 (Greece); McNutt, Todd R. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Science, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    This Vision 20/20 paper considers what computational advances are likely to be implemented in clinical radiation oncology in the coming years and how the adoption of these changes might alter the practice of radiotherapy. Four main areas of likely advancement are explored: cloud computing, aggregate data analyses, parallel computation, and automation. As these developments promise both new opportunities and new risks to clinicians and patients alike, the potential benefits are weighed against the hazards associated with each advance, with special considerations regarding patient safety under new computational platforms and methodologies. While the concerns of patient safety are legitimate, the authors contend that progress toward next-generation clinical informatics systems will bring about extremely valuable developments in quality improvement initiatives, clinical efficiency, outcomes analyses, data sharing, and adaptive radiotherapy.

  1. Vision 20/20: Automation and advanced computing in clinical radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kevin L; Kagadis, George C; McNutt, Todd R; Moiseenko, Vitali; Mutic, Sasa

    2014-01-01

    This Vision 20/20 paper considers what computational advances are likely to be implemented in clinical radiation oncology in the coming years and how the adoption of these changes might alter the practice of radiotherapy. Four main areas of likely advancement are explored: cloud computing, aggregate data analyses, parallel computation, and automation. As these developments promise both new opportunities and new risks to clinicians and patients alike, the potential benefits are weighed against the hazards associated with each advance, with special considerations regarding patient safety under new computational platforms and methodologies. While the concerns of patient safety are legitimate, the authors contend that progress toward next-generation clinical informatics systems will bring about extremely valuable developments in quality improvement initiatives, clinical efficiency, outcomes analyses, data sharing, and adaptive radiotherapy.

  2. Subspeciality training in hematology and oncology, 2003: results of a survey of training program directors conducted by the American Society of Hematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Robert F; Gitlin, Scott D; Burns, Linda J

    2004-06-15

    A survey of directors of adult and pediatric hematology/oncology subspecialty training programs in the United States and Canada was conducted to assess the environment in which recruitment and training is conducted in these medical disciplines. A total of 107 program directors responded to the survey, representing 66% of internal medicine and 47% of pediatric subspecialty programs in hematology or hematology/oncology. Specific areas covered in the web-based questionnaire included the type and demographics of the training program, profile of the training program director, characteristics of the applicant pool and existing trainee recruits, characteristics of the training program environment and curricula, research productivity of trainees, and the career pathways taken by recent training program graduates (including dominant areas of clinical interest). The results of this survey show considerable heterogeneity in the recruiting practices and the environment in which subspecialty training occurs, leading the authors to recommend improvements in or a heightened attention to issues, including recruitment of minority trainees, flexibility to recruit international medical school graduates, timing of trainee acceptance, maintaining the financial support of Medicare graduation medical education (GME), training of physician scientists, organization of the continuity clinic experience, visibility of nonmalignant hematology as a career path, and level of training program director support.

  3. Successful use of nitrous oxide during lumbar punctures: A call for nitrous oxide in pediatric oncology clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Mylynda; Lawell, Miranda; McAllister, Nancy

    2017-11-01

    Numerous reports describe the successful use of nitrous oxide for analgesia in children undergoing painful procedures. Although shown to be safe, effective, and economical, nitrous oxide use is not yet common in pediatric oncology clinics and few reports detail its effectiveness for children undergoing repeated lumbar punctures. We developed a nitrous oxide clinic, and undertook a review of pediatric oncology lumbar puncture records for those patients receiving nitrous oxide in 2011. No major complications were noted. Minor complications were noted in 2% of the procedures. We offer guidelines for establishing such a clinic. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Validation of a next-generation sequencing assay for clinical molecular oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Catherine E; Al-Kateb, Hussam; Bredemeyer, Andrew J; Duncavage, Eric J; Spencer, David H; Abel, Haley J; Lockwood, Christina M; Hagemann, Ian S; O'Guin, Stephanie M; Burcea, Lauren C; Sawyer, Christopher S; Oschwald, Dayna M; Stratman, Jennifer L; Sher, Dorie A; Johnson, Mark R; Brown, Justin T; Cliften, Paul F; George, Bijoy; McIntosh, Leslie D; Shrivastava, Savita; Nguyen, Tudung T; Payton, Jacqueline E; Watson, Mark A; Crosby, Seth D; Head, Richard D; Mitra, Robi D; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Seibert, Karen; Virgin, Herbert W; Milbrandt, Jeffrey; Pfeifer, John D

    2014-01-01

    Currently, oncology testing includes molecular studies and cytogenetic analysis to detect genetic aberrations of clinical significance. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) allows rapid analysis of multiple genes for clinically actionable somatic variants. The WUCaMP assay uses targeted capture for NGS analysis of 25 cancer-associated genes to detect mutations at actionable loci. We present clinical validation of the assay and a detailed framework for design and validation of similar clinical assays. Deep sequencing of 78 tumor specimens (≥ 1000× average unique coverage across the capture region) achieved high sensitivity for detecting somatic variants at low allele fraction (AF). Validation revealed sensitivities and specificities of 100% for detection of single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) within coding regions, compared with SNP array sequence data (95% CI = 83.4-100.0 for sensitivity and 94.2-100.0 for specificity) or whole-genome sequencing (95% CI = 89.1-100.0 for sensitivity and 99.9-100.0 for specificity) of HapMap samples. Sensitivity for detecting variants at an observed 10% AF was 100% (95% CI = 93.2-100.0) in HapMap mixes. Analysis of 15 masked specimens harboring clinically reported variants yielded concordant calls for 13/13 variants at AF of ≥ 15%. The WUCaMP assay is a robust and sensitive method to detect somatic variants of clinical significance in molecular oncology laboratories, with reduced time and cost of genetic analysis allowing for strategic patient management. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Modeling the economic outcomes of immuno-oncology drugs: alternative model frameworks to capture clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, E J; Begum, N; Koblbauer, I; Dranitsaris, G; Liew, D; McEwan, P; Tahami Monfared, A A; Yuan, Y; Juarez-Garcia, A; Tyas, D; Lees, M

    2018-01-01

    Economic models in oncology are commonly based on the three-state partitioned survival model (PSM) distinguishing between progression-free and progressive states. However, the heterogeneity of responses observed in immuno-oncology (I-O) suggests that new approaches may be appropriate to reflect disease dynamics meaningfully. This study explored the impact of incorporating immune-specific health states into economic models of I-O therapy. Two variants of the PSM and a Markov model were populated with data from one clinical trial in metastatic melanoma patients. Short-term modeled outcomes were benchmarked to the clinical trial data and a lifetime model horizon provided estimates of life years and quality adjusted life years (QALYs). The PSM-based models produced short-term outcomes closely matching the trial outcomes. Adding health states generated increased QALYs while providing a more granular representation of outcomes for decision making. The Markov model gave the greatest level of detail on outcomes but gave short-term results which diverged from those of the trial (overstating year 1 progression-free survival by around 60%). Increased sophistication in the representation of disease dynamics in economic models is desirable when attempting to model treatment response in I-O. However, the assumptions underlying different model structures and the availability of data for health state mapping may be important limiting factors.

  6. Everolimus: a proliferation signal inhibitor with clinical applications in organ transplantation, oncology, and cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabardi, Steven; Baroletti, Steven A

    2010-10-01

    Everolimus, a proliferation signal inhibitor in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) drug class, has many clinical applications, including in organ transplantation, oncology, and cardiology. It currently has United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for prophylaxis against rejection in de novo renal transplant recipients, treatment of renal cell carcinoma, and use as a drug-eluting stent. To review the pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety of everolimus, we performed a search of the MEDLINE database (January 1997-April 2010) for all English-language articles of in vitro and in vivo studies that evaluated everolimus, as well as abstracts from recent scientific meetings and the manufacturer. In transplantation, everolimus demonstrates immunosuppressive properties and has been used to prevent acute rejection in cardiac, liver, lung, and renal transplant recipients. It appears that this agent may be potent enough to allow for the minimization or removal of calcineurin inhibitors in the long-term management of renal transplant recipients. In oncology, everolimus has been proven effective for the management of treatment-resistant renal cell carcinoma. In cardiology, everolimus is available as a drug-coated stent and is used in percutaneous coronary interventions for prevention of restenosis. In transplant recipients and patients with renal cell carcinoma, everolimus appears to have an extensive adverse-event profile. The pharmacologic properties of everolimus differentiate this agent from other drugs used in these clinical areas, and its pharmacokinetic properties differentiate it from sirolimus.

  7. Imaging Opportunities in Radiation Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balter, James M.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Dunnick, N. Reed; Siegel, Eliot L.

    2011-01-01

    Interdisciplinary efforts may significantly affect the way that clinical knowledge and scientific research related to imaging impact the field of Radiation Oncology. This report summarizes the findings of an intersociety workshop held in October 2008, with the express purpose of exploring 'Imaging Opportunities in Radiation Oncology.' Participants from the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), American Association of physicists in Medicine (AAPM), American Board of Radiology (ABR), Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG), European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO), and Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) discussed areas of education, clinical practice, and research that bridge disciplines and potentially would lead to improved clinical practice. Findings from this workshop include recommendations for cross-training opportunities within the allowed structured of Radiology and Radiation Oncology residency programs, expanded representation of ASTRO in imaging related multidisciplinary groups (and reciprocal representation within ASTRO committees), increased attention to imaging validation and credentialing for clinical trials (e.g., through the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN)), and building ties through collaborative research as well as smaller joint workshops and symposia.

  8. Influence of a sampling review process for radiation oncology quality assurance in cooperative group clinical trials -- results of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Linda A.; Krall, John M.; Curran, Walter J.; Leibel, Steven A.; Cox, James D.

    1995-01-01

    The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) designed a random sampling process and observed its influence upon radiotherapy review mechanisms in cooperative group clinical trials. The method of sampling cases for review was modeled from sampling techniques commonly used in pharmaceutical quality assurance programs, and applied to the initial (on-study) review of protocol cases. 'In control' (IC) status is defined for a given facility as the ability to meet minimum compliance standards. Upon achieving IC status, activation of the sampling process was linked to the rate of continued patient accrual for each participating institution in a given protocol. The sampling design specified that ≥ 30% cases not in compliance would be detected with 80% power. A total of 458 cases was analyzed for initial review findings in four RTOG Phase III protocols. Initial review findings were compared with retrospective (final) review results. Of the 458 cases analyzed, 370 underwent initial review at on-study, while 88 did not require review as they were enrolled from institutions that had demonstrated protocol compliance. In the group that had both initial and final review, (345(370)) (93%) were found to have followed the protocol or had a minor variation. Of the exempted cases, (79(88)) (90%) were found to be per protocol or a minor variant. The sampling process proved itself to be cost-effective and resulted in a noticeable reduction in the workload, thus providing an improved approach to resource allocation for the group. Continued evaluation of the sampling mechanism is appropriate as study designs and participants vary over time, and as more data become available to study. Further investigation of individual protocol compliance is appropriate to identify problems specific to new trial investigations

  9. Improving Patient Satisfaction in a Midsize Pediatric Hematology-Oncology Outpatient Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fustino, Nicholas J; Kochanski, Justin J

    2015-09-01

    The study of patient satisfaction is a rapidly emerging area of importance within health care. High levels of patient satisfaction are associated with exceptional physician-patient communication, superior patient compliance, reduced risk of medical malpractice, and economic benefit in the value-based purchasing era. To our knowledge, no previous reports have evaluated methods to improve the patient experience within the pediatric hematology-oncology (PHO) outpatient clinic. Patient satisfaction was measured using returned Press-Ganey surveys at Blank Children's Hospital PHO outpatient clinic (UnityPoint Health). The aim of this study was to raise the overall patient satisfaction score to the 75th percentile and raise the care provider score (CP) to the 90th percentile nationally. After analyzing data from 2013, interventions were implemented in January 2014, including weekly review of returned surveys, review of goals and progress at monthly staff meetings, distribution of written materials addressing deficiencies, score transparency among providers, provider use of Web-based patient satisfaction training modules, devotion of additional efforts to address less satisfied demographics (new patient consultations), and more liberal use of service recovery techniques. In the PHO outpatient clinic, overall patient satisfaction improved from the 56th to 97th percentile. Care provider scores improved from the 70th to 99 th percentile. For new patients, overall satisfaction improved from the 27th to 92 nd percentile, and care provider scores improved from the 29th to 98 th percentile. Patient satisfaction was improved in a midsize PHO clinic by implementing provider- and staff-driven initiatives. A combination of minor behavioral changes among care providers and staff in conjunction with systems-related modifications drove improvement. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  10. Who Enrolls Onto Clinical Oncology Trials? A Radiation Patterns of Care Study Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Movsas, Benjamin; Moughan, Jennifer; Owen, Jean; Coia, Lawrence R.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Hanks, Gerald; Wilson, J. Frank

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To identify factors significantly influencing accrual to clinical protocols by analyzing radiation Patterns of Care Study (PCS) surveys of 3,047 randomly selected radiotherapy (RT) patients. Methods and Materials: Patterns of Care Study surveys from disease sites studied for the periods 1992-1994 and 1996-1999 (breast cancer, n = 1,080; prostate cancer, n = 1,149; esophageal cancer, n = 818) were analyzed. The PCS is a National Cancer Institute-funded national survey of randomly selected RT institutions in the United States. Patients with nonmetastatic disease who received RT as definitive or adjuvant therapy were randomly selected from eligible patients at each institution. To determine national estimates, individual patient records were weighted by the relative contribution of each institution and patients within each institution. Data regarding participation in clinical trials were recorded. The factors age, gender, race, type of insurance, and practice type of treating institution (academic or not) were studied by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: Overall, only 2.7% of all patients were accrued to clinical protocols. Of these, 57% were enrolled on institutional review board-approved institutional trials, and 43% on National Cancer Institute collaborative group studies. On multivariate analysis, patients treated at academic facilities (p = 0.0001) and white patients (vs. African Americans, p = 0.0002) were significantly more likely to participate in clinical oncology trials. Age, gender, type of cancer, and type of insurance were not predictive. Conclusions: Practice type and race significantly influence enrollment onto clinical oncology trials. This suggests that increased communication and education regarding protocols, particularly focusing on physicians in nonacademic settings and minority patients, will be essential to enhance accrual

  11. Application of organ tolerance dose-constraints in clinical studies in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerr, Wolfgang; Herrmann, Thomas; Baumann, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In modern radiation oncology, tolerance dose-constraints for organs at risk (OAR) must be considered for treatment planning, but particularly in order to design clinical studies. Tolerance dose tables, however, only address one aspect of the therapeutic ratio of any clinical study, i.e., the limitation of adverse events, but not the desired potential improvement in the tumor effect of a novel treatment strategy. A sensible application of ''tolerance doses'' in a clinical situation requires consideration of various critical aspects addressed here: definition of tolerance dose, specification of an endpoint/symptom, consideration of radiation quality and irradiation protocol, exposed volume and dose distribution, and patient-related factors of radiosensitivity. The currently most comprehensive estimates of OAR radiation tolerance are in the QUANTEC compilations (2010). However, these tolerance dose values must only be regarded as a rough orientation and cannot answer the relevant question for the patients, i.e., if the study can achieve a therapeutic advantage; this can obviously be answered only by the final scientific analysis of the study results. Despite all limitations, the design of clinical studies should currently refer to the QUANTEC values for appreciation of the risk of complications, if needed supplemented by one's own data or further information from the literature. The implementation of a consensus on the safety interests of the patients and on an application and approval process committed to progress in medicine, with transparent quality-assuring requirements with regard to the structural safeguarding of the study activities, plays a central role in clinical research in radiation oncology. (orig.) [de

  12. Journey Toward High Reliability: A Comprehensive Safety Program to Improve Quality of Care and Safety Culture in a Large, Multisite Radiation Oncology Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Kristina Demas; Volz, Edna; Maity, Amit; Gabriel, Peter E; Solberg, Timothy D; Bergendahl, Howard W; Hahn, Stephen M

    2016-05-01

    High-reliability organizations (HROs) focus on continuous identification and improvement of safety issues. We sought to advance a large, multisite radiation oncology department toward high reliability through the implementation of a comprehensive safety culture (SC) program at the University of Pennsylvania Department of Radiation Oncology. In 2011, with guidance from safety literature and experts in HROs, we designed an SC framework to reduce radiation errors. All state-reported medical events (SRMEs) from 2009 to 2016 were retrospectively reviewed and plotted on a control chart. Changes in SC grade were assessed using the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Hospital Survey. Outcomes measured included the number of radiation treatment fractions and days between SRMEs, as well as SC grade. Multifaceted safety initiatives were implemented at our main academic center and across all network sites. Postintervention results demonstrate increased staff fundamental safety knowledge, enhanced peer review with an electronic system, and special cause variation of SRMEs on control chart analysis. From 2009 to 2016, the number of days and fractions between SRMEs significantly increased, from a mean of 174 to 541 days (P safety framework. Our multifaceted initiatives, focusing on culture and system changes, can be successfully implemented in a large academic radiation oncology department to yield measurable improvements in SC and outcomes. Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  13. Clinical value of positron emission tomography (PET) in oncology: Results of an interdisciplinary consensus conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reske, S.N.; Bares, R.; Buell, U.; Guhlmann, A.; Moser, E.; Wannenmacher, M.F.

    1996-01-01

    Clinical value of PET in oncology was evaluated by a panel of recognized experts in the framework of an interdisciplinary consensus conference. On the basis of PET studies, well documented in the international literature, the value of PET for solving clinical questions was classified according to the following categories 'appropriate' (1a), 'mostly acceptable' (1b), 'helpful' (2a), 'value as yet unknown' (2b), 'useless' (3). 2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) acts as the radiopharmaceutical of choice for PET in clinical oncology. PET is indicated (1a) for diagnosing relapse in high grade glioma (FDG) or low grade glioma (C-11 methionine or F-18 fluorotyrosine), differential diagnosis of solitary peripheral pulponary nodules in high risk patients and for diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma. PET may be clinically used (1b): In 'low-grade' glioma, search for unknown primary in head and neck tumors, suspicion of relapse in nonsmall cell bronchial carcinoma (NSCBC) and colorectal carcinoma, lymphnode staging in NSCBC, pancreatic carcinoma, muscle invasive bladder carcinoma and testicular cancer. Staging of Hodgkin's disease (HD, stage I/II vs III), early therapy control in patients with a residual mass or suspicion of relapse in HD and in high grade NHL, lymph node staging and search for distant metastases in malignant melanoma (Breslow>1,5 mm), search for lymph node or distant metastases in differentiated thyroid cancer with elevated hTG and a negative radioiodide whole body scan. Many further indications are emerging, but are not yet sufficiently well documented in the literature. For most indications beside scientific studies, an individual cost benefit utility evaluation by the responsible physician is recommended. (orig./MG) [de

  14. A Communication Training Program to Encourage Speaking-Up Behavior in Surgical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, Thomas A; Bialer, Philip A; Walters, Chasity B; Killen, Aileen R; Sigurdsson, Hrafn O; Parker, Patricia A

    2017-10-01

    Patient safety in the OR depends on effective communication. We developed and tested a communication training program for surgical oncology staff members to increase communication about patient safety concerns. In phase one, 34 staff members participated in focus groups to identify and rank factors that affect speaking-up behavior. We compiled ranked items into thematic categories that included role relations and hierarchy, staff rapport, perceived competence, perceived efficacy of speaking up, staff personality, fear of retaliation, institutional regulations, and time pressure. We then developed a communication training program that 42 participants completed during phase two. Participants offered favorable ratings of the usefulness and perceived effect of the training. Participants reported significant improvement in communicating patient safety concerns (t 40  = -2.76, P = .009, d = 0.48). Findings offer insight into communication challenges experienced by surgical oncology staff members and suggest that our training demonstrates the potential to improve team communication. Copyright © 2017 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A novel design for randomized immuno-oncology clinical trials with potentially delayed treatment effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei He

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The semi-parametric proportional hazards model is widely adopted in randomized clinical trials with time-to-event outcomes, and the log-rank test is frequently used to detect a potential treatment effect. Immuno-oncology therapies pose unique challenges to the design of a trial as the treatment effect may be delayed, which violates the proportional hazards assumption, and the log-rank test has been shown to markedly lose power under the non-proportional hazards setting. A novel design and analysis approach for immuno-oncology trials is proposed through a piecewise treatment effect function, which is capable of detecting a potentially delayed treatment effect. The number of events required for the trial will be determined to ensure sufficient power for both the overall log-rank test without a delayed effect and the test beyond the delayed period when such a delay exists. The existence of a treatment delay is determined by a likelihood ratio test with resampling. Numerical results show that the proposed design adequately controls the Type I error rate, has a minimal loss in power under the proportional hazards setting and is markedly more powerful than the log-rank test with a delayed treatment effect.

  16. Bioluminescent imaging: a critical tool in pre-clinical oncology research.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, Karen

    2010-02-01

    Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) is a non-invasive imaging modality widely used in the field of pre-clinical oncology research. Imaging of small animal tumour models using BLI involves the generation of light by luciferase-expressing cells in the animal following administration of substrate. This light may be imaged using an external detector. The technique allows a variety of tumour-associated properties to be visualized dynamically in living models. The increasing use of BLI as a small-animal imaging modality has led to advances in the development of xenogeneic, orthotopic, and genetically engineered animal models expressing luciferase genes. This review aims to provide insight into the principles of BLI and its applications in cancer research. Many studies to assess tumour growth and development, as well as efficacy of candidate therapeutics, have been performed using BLI. More recently, advances have also been made using bioluminescent imaging in studies of protein-protein interactions, genetic screening, cell-cycle regulators, and spontaneous cancer development. Such novel studies highlight the versatility and potential of bioluminescent imaging in future oncological research.

  17. A Profile of Academic Training Program Directors and Chairs in Radiation Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Lynn D.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To identify objective characteristics and benchmarks for program leadership in academic radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: A study of the 87 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education radiation oncology training program directors (PD) and their chairs was performed. Variables included age, gender, original training department, highest degree, rank, endowed chair assignment, National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding, and Hirsch index (H-index). Data were gathered from online sources such as departmental websites, NIH RePORTER, and Scopus. Results: There were a total of 87 PD. The median age was 48, and 14 (16%) were MD/PhD. A total of 21 (24%) were female, and rank was relatively equally distributed above instructor. Of the 26 professors, at least 7 (27%) were female. At least 24 (28%) were working at the institution from which they had received their training. A total of 6 individuals held endowed chairs. Only 2 PD had active NIH funding in 2012. The median H-index was 12 (range, 0-51) but the index dropped to 9 (range, 0-38) when those who served as both PD and chair were removed from the group. A total of 76 chairs were identified at the time of the study. The median age was 55, and 9 (12%) were MD/PhD. A total of 7 (9%) of the chairs were female, and rank was professor for all with the exception of 1 who was listed as “Head” and was an associate professor. Of the 76 chairs, at least 10 (13%) were working at the institution from which they received their training. There were a total of 21 individuals with endowed chairs. A total of 13 (17%) had NIH funding in 2012. The median H-index was 29 (range, 3-60). Conclusions: These data provide benchmarks for individuals and departments evaluating leadership positions in the field of academic radiation oncology. Such data are useful for evaluating leadership trends over time and comparing academic radiation oncology with other specialties

  18. A Profile of Academic Training Program Directors and Chairs in Radiation Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Lynn D., E-mail: Lynn.wilson@yale.edu [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, Smilow Cancer Hospital, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, UMDNJ-RWJMS, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To identify objective characteristics and benchmarks for program leadership in academic radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: A study of the 87 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education radiation oncology training program directors (PD) and their chairs was performed. Variables included age, gender, original training department, highest degree, rank, endowed chair assignment, National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding, and Hirsch index (H-index). Data were gathered from online sources such as departmental websites, NIH RePORTER, and Scopus. Results: There were a total of 87 PD. The median age was 48, and 14 (16%) were MD/PhD. A total of 21 (24%) were female, and rank was relatively equally distributed above instructor. Of the 26 professors, at least 7 (27%) were female. At least 24 (28%) were working at the institution from which they had received their training. A total of 6 individuals held endowed chairs. Only 2 PD had active NIH funding in 2012. The median H-index was 12 (range, 0-51) but the index dropped to 9 (range, 0-38) when those who served as both PD and chair were removed from the group. A total of 76 chairs were identified at the time of the study. The median age was 55, and 9 (12%) were MD/PhD. A total of 7 (9%) of the chairs were female, and rank was professor for all with the exception of 1 who was listed as “Head” and was an associate professor. Of the 76 chairs, at least 10 (13%) were working at the institution from which they received their training. There were a total of 21 individuals with endowed chairs. A total of 13 (17%) had NIH funding in 2012. The median H-index was 29 (range, 3-60). Conclusions: These data provide benchmarks for individuals and departments evaluating leadership positions in the field of academic radiation oncology. Such data are useful for evaluating leadership trends over time and comparing academic radiation oncology with other specialties.

  19. Precision Oncology Medicine: The Clinical Relevance of Patient-Specific Biomarkers Used to Optimize Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Keith T; Chau, Cindy H; Price, Douglas K; Figg, William D

    2016-12-01

    Precision medicine in oncology is the result of an increasing awareness of patient-specific clinical features coupled with the development of genomic-based diagnostics and targeted therapeutics. Companion diagnostics designed for specific drug-target pairs were the first to widely utilize clinically applicable tumor biomarkers (eg, HER2, EGFR), directing treatment for patients whose tumors exhibit a mutation susceptible to an FDA-approved targeted therapy (eg, trastuzumab, erlotinib). Clinically relevant germline mutations in drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters (eg, TPMT, DPYD) have been shown to impact drug response, providing a rationale for individualized dosing to optimize treatment. The use of multigene expression-based assays to analyze an array of prognostic biomarkers has been shown to help direct treatment decisions, especially in breast cancer (eg, Oncotype DX). More recently, the use of next-generation sequencing to detect many potential "actionable" cancer molecular alterations is further shifting the 1 gene-1 drug paradigm toward a more comprehensive, multigene approach. Currently, many clinical trials (eg, NCI-MATCH, NCI-MPACT) are assessing novel diagnostic tools with a combination of different targeted therapeutics while also examining tumor biomarkers that were previously unexplored in a variety of cancer histologies. Results from ongoing trials such as the NCI-MATCH will help determine the clinical utility and future development of the precision-medicine approach. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  20. [Early clinical trials in paediatric oncology in Spain: a nationwide perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Francisco; Gallego, Soledad; Cañete, Adela; Mora, Jaume; Díaz de Heredia, Cristina; Cruz, Ofelia; Fernández, José María; Rives, Susana; Berlanga, Pablo; Hladun, Raquel; Juan Ribelles, Antonio; Madero, Luis; Ramírez, Manuel; Fernández Delgado, Rafael; Pérez-Martínez, Antonio; Mata, Cristina; Llort, Anna; Martín Broto, Javier; Cela, María Elena; Ramírez, Gema; Sábado, Constantino; Acha, Tomás; Astigarraga, Itziar; Sastre, Ana; Muñoz, Ascensión; Guibelalde, Mercedes; Moreno, Lucas

    2017-09-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of death between the first year of life and adolescence, and some types of diseases are still a major challenge in terms of cure. There is, therefore, a major need for new drugs. Recent findings in cancer biology open the door to the development of targeted therapies against individual molecular changes, as well as immunotherapy. Promising results in adult anti-cancer drug development have not yet been translated into paediatric clinical practice. A report is presented on the activity in early paediatric oncology trials (phase I-II) in Spain. All members of the Spanish Society of Paediatric Haematology Oncology (SEHOP) were contacted in order to identify early clinical trials in paediatric cancer opened between 2005 and 2015. A total of 30 trials had been opened in this period: 21 (70%) in solid tumours, and 9 (30%) in malignant haemopathies. A total of 212 patients have been enrolled. The majority was industry sponsored (53%). Since 2010, four centres have joined the international consortium of Innovative Therapies for Children with Cancer (ITCC), which has as its aim to develop novel therapies for paediatric tumours. A significant number of new studies have opened since 2010, improving the treatment opportunities for our children. Results of recently closed trials show the contribution of Spanish investigators, the introduction of molecularly targeted agents, and their benefits. The activity in clinical trials has increased in the years analysed. The SEHOP is committed to develop and participate in collaborative academic trials, in order to help in the advancement and optimisation of existing therapies in paediatric cancer. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. A call for new standard of care in perioperative gynecologic oncology practice: Impact of enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralpeix, Ester; Nick, Alpa M; Meyer, Larissa A; Cata, Juan; Lasala, Javier; Mena, Gabriel E; Gottumukkala, Vijaya; Iniesta-Donate, Maria; Salvo, Gloria; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2016-05-01

    Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) programs aim to hasten functional recovery and improve postoperative outcomes. However, there is a paucity of data on ERAS programs in gynecologic surgery. We reviewed the published literature on ERAS programs in colorectal surgery, general gynecologic surgery, and gynecologic oncology surgery to evaluate the impact of such programs on outcomes, and to identify key elements in establishing a successful ERAS program. ERAS programs are associated with shorter length of hospital stay, a reduction in overall health care costs, and improvements in patient satisfaction. We suggest an ERAS program for gynecologic oncology practice involving preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative strategies including; preadmission counseling, avoidance of preoperative bowel preparation, use of opioid-sparing multimodal perioperative analgesia (including loco-regional analgesia), intraoperative goal-directed fluid therapy (GDT), and use of minimally invasive surgical techniques with avoidance of routine use of nasogastric tube, drains and/or catheters. Postoperatively, it is important to encourage early feeding, early mobilization, timely removal of tubes and drains, if present, and function oriented multimodal analgesia regimens. Successful implementation of an ERAS program requires a multidisciplinary team effort and active participation of the patient in their goal-oriented functional recovery program. However, future outcome studies should evaluate the efficacy of an intervention within the pathway, include objective measures of symptom burden and control, study measures of functional recovery, and quantify outcomes of the program in relation to the rates of adherence to the key elements of care in gynecologic oncology such as oncologic outcomes and return to intended oncologic therapy (RIOT). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of the clinical support nurse role on work-related stress for nurses on an inpatient pediatric oncology unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ann; Kicis, Jennifer; Sangha, Gurjit

    2007-01-01

    High patient acuity, heavy workload, and patient deaths can all contribute to work-related stress for pediatric oncology nurses. A new leadership role, the clinical support nurse (CSN), was recently initiated on the oncology unit of a large Canadian pediatric hospital to support frontline staff and reduce some of the stresses related to clinical activity. The CSN assists nurses with complex patient care procedures, provides hands-on education at the bedside, and supports staff in managing challenging family situations. This study explores the effect of the CSN role on the nurses' work-related stress using the Stressor Scale for Pediatric Oncology Nurses. A total of 58 nurses participated in this study for a response rate of 86%. The results show that the intensity of work-related stress experienced by nurses in this study is significantly less (P < .001) on shifts staffed with a CSN compared with shifts without a CSN.

  3. Building trust and diversity in patient-centered oncology clinical trials: An integrated model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Thelma C; Kaplan, Charles D; Cook, Elise D; Chilton, Janice A; Lytton, Jay S; Hawk, Ernest T; Jones, Lovell A

    2017-04-01

    Trust is the cornerstone of clinical trial recruitment and retention. Efforts to decrease barriers and increase clinical trial participation among diverse populations have yielded modest results. There is an urgent need to better understand the complex interactions between trust and clinical trial participation. The process of trust-building has been a focus of intense research in the business community. Yet, little has been published about trust in oncology clinical trials or the process of building trust in clinical trials. Both clinical trials and business share common dimensions. Business strategies for building trust may be transferable to the clinical trial setting. This study was conducted to understand and utilize contemporary thinking about building trust to develop an Integrated Model of Trust that incorporates both clinical and business perspectives. A key word-directed literature search of the PubMed, Medline, Cochrane, and Google Search databases for entries dated between 1 January 1985 and 1 September 2015 was conducted to obtain information from which to develop an Integrated Model of Trust. Successful trial participation requires both participants and clinical trial team members to build distinctly different types of interpersonal trust to effect recruitment and retention. They are built under conditions of significant emotional stress and time constraints among people who do not know each other and have never worked together before. Swift Trust and Traditional Trust are sequentially built during the clinical trial process. Swift trust operates during the recruitment and very early active treatment phases of the clinical trial process. Traditional trust is built over time and operates during the active treatment and surveillance stages of clinical trials. The Psychological Contract frames the participants' and clinical trial team members' interpersonal trust relationship. The "terms" of interpersonal trust are negotiated through the psychological

  4. Correlative Studies in Clinical Trials: A Position Statement From the International Thyroid Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Keith C; Cote, Gilbert J; Demeure, Michael J; Elisei, Rossella; Jhiang, Sissy; Ringel, Matthew D

    2015-12-01

    Patients with progressive thyroid cancer in distant metastatic sites represent a population with a need for new therapeutic options. Aspiring to improve the treatment of such patients, the objective of this position statement from the International Thyroid Oncology Group (ITOG) is to clarify the importance of incorporating high-quality correlative studies into clinical trials. ITOG was formed to develop and support high-quality multicenter and multidisciplinary clinical trials for patients with aggressive forms of thyroid cancer. The Correlative Sciences Committee of the ITOG focuses on the quality and types of correlative studies included in ITOG-associated clinical trials. This document represents expert consensus from ITOG regarding this issue based on extensive collective experience in clinical and translational trials informed by basic science. The Correlative Studies Committee identified an international writing group representative of diverse specialties, including basic sciences. Drafts were reviewed by all members of the writing group, the larger committee, and the ITOG board. After consideration of all comments by the writing group and modification of the document, the final document was then approved by the authors and the ITOG board. High-quality correlative studies, which include variety in the types of correlates, should be intrinsic to the design of thyroid cancer clinical trials to offer the best opportunity for each study to advance treatment for patients with advanced and progressive thyroid cancer.

  5. Missing data and censoring in the analysis of progression-free survival in oncology clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denne, J S; Stone, A M; Bailey-Iacona, R; Chen, T-T

    2013-01-01

    Progression-free survival (PFS) is increasingly used as a primary endpoint in oncology clinical trials. However, trial conduct is often such that PFS data on some patients may be partially missing either due to incomplete follow-up for progression, or due to data that may be collected but confounded by patients stopping randomized therapy or starting alternative therapy prior to progression. Regulatory guidance on how to handle these patients in the analysis and whether to censor these patients differs between agencies. We present results of a reanalysis of 28 Phase III trials from 12 companies or institutions performed by the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers Association-sponsored PFS Expert Team. We show that analyses not adhering to the intention-to-treat principle tend to give hazard ratio estimates further from unity and describe several factors associated with this shift. We present illustrative simulations to support these findings and provide recommendations for the analysis of PFS.

  6. Primary Prevention of Cervical Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Resource-Stratified Guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvina Arrossi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To provide resource-stratified (four tiers, evidence-based recommendations on the primary prevention of cervical cancer globally. Methods: The American Society of Clinical Oncology convened a multidisciplinary, multinational panel of oncology, obstetrics/gynecology, public health, cancer control, epidemiology/biostatistics, health economics, behavioral/implementation science, and patient advocacy experts. The Expert Panel reviewed existing guidelines and conducted a modified ADAPTE process and a formal consensus-based process with additional experts (consensus ratings group for one round of formal ratings. Results: Existing sets of guidelines from five guideline developers were identified and reviewed; adapted recommendations formed the evidence base. Five systematic reviews, along with cost-effectiveness analyses, provided evidence to inform the formal consensus process, which resulted in agreement of ≥ 75%. Recommendations: In all resource settings, two doses of human papillomavirus vaccine are recommended for girls age 9 to 14 years, with an interval of at least 6 months and possibly up to 12 to 15 months. Individuals with HIV positivity should receive three doses. Maximal and enhanced settings: if girls are age ≥ 15 years and received their first dose before age 15 years, they may complete the series; if no doses were received before age 15 years, three doses should be administered; in both scenarios, vaccination may be through age 26 years. Limited and basic settings: if sufficient resources remain after vaccinating girls age 9 to 14 years, girls who received one dose may receive additional doses between age 15 and 26 years. Maximal, enhanced, and limited settings: if ≥ 50% coverage in the priority female target population, sufficient resources, and cost effectiveness, boys may be vaccinated to prevent other noncervical human papillomavirus–related cancers and diseases. Basic settings: vaccinating boys is not recommended

  7. Primary Prevention of Cervical Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Resource-Stratified Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrossi, Silvina; Temin, Sarah; Garland, Suzanne; Eckert, Linda O'Neal; Bhatla, Neerja; Castellsagué, Xavier; Alkaff, Sharifa Ezat; Felder, Tamika; Hammouda, Doudja; Konno, Ryo; Lopes, Gilberto; Mugisha, Emmanuel; Murillo, Rául; Scarinci, Isabel C; Stanley, Margaret; Tsu, Vivien; Wheeler, Cosette M; Adewole, Isaac Folorunso; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2017-10-01

    To provide resource-stratified (four tiers), evidence-based recommendations on the primary prevention of cervical cancer globally. The American Society of Clinical Oncology convened a multidisciplinary, multinational panel of oncology, obstetrics/gynecology, public health, cancer control, epidemiology/biostatistics, health economics, behavioral/implementation science, and patient advocacy experts. The Expert Panel reviewed existing guidelines and conducted a modified ADAPTE process and a formal consensus-based process with additional experts (consensus ratings group) for one round of formal ratings. Existing sets of guidelines from five guideline developers were identified and reviewed; adapted recommendations formed the evidence base. Five systematic reviews, along with cost-effectiveness analyses, provided evidence to inform the formal consensus process, which resulted in agreement of ≥ 75%. In all resource settings, two doses of human papillomavirus vaccine are recommended for girls age 9 to 14 years, with an interval of at least 6 months and possibly up to 12 to 15 months. Individuals with HIV positivity should receive three doses. Maximal and enhanced settings: if girls are age ≥ 15 years and received their first dose before age 15 years, they may complete the series; if no doses were received before age 15 years, three doses should be administered; in both scenarios, vaccination may be through age 26 years. Limited and basic settings: if sufficient resources remain after vaccinating girls age 9 to 14 years, girls who received one dose may receive additional doses between age 15 and 26 years. Maximal, enhanced, and limited settings: if ≥ 50% coverage in the priority female target population, sufficient resources, and cost effectiveness, boys may be vaccinated to prevent other noncervical human papillomavirus-related cancers and diseases. Basic settings: vaccinating boys is not recommended. It is the view of the American Society of Clinical Oncology that

  8. External review systems for radiation oncology facilities - clinical audit versus other review systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogusz-Czerniewicz, M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Between 1996 and 1999 project team of ExPeRT, catalogued four external review systems of health care facilities in the European Union and countries associated with EU. Aim: The aim of this paper is a/ to identify and compare currently existing external review systems for radiation oncology facilities and b/ to distinguish main differences between clinical audit and other external evaluation models and c/ to identify where those models are currently used in European Union member states. Materials and Methods: Based on the literature review and the survey conducted between January and April 2007 among representatives of 67 national societies (for diagnostic radiology, radiotherapy and nuclear medicine) in European Union member states, the analysis of existing external review systems in radiation oncology was performed. Relevant information about purpose, scope and methodology of evaluation process for those systems were surveyed. Results: The response to the questionnaire was 72%. Only a few countries did not supply any reply in spite of repeated enquiries to several recipients. Six main categories of systems aiming at measuring the quality of service management and delivery were identified: professional peer review -based schemes, hospital accreditation, accreditation in terms of ISO standards, award seeking, certification by International Standards Organization, and clinical audit. Conclusions: Though the methodology and terminology of the five main external review systems differ, a constant movement towards collaboration and convergence of those models has been observed. Due to the social, political, and economical aspects of each European country, the different audit systems have been implemented either on voluntary or mandatory basis. (author)

  9. Psycho-oncology in Australia: a descriptive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butow, P; Dhillon, H; Shaw, J; Price, M

    2017-01-01

    Australia has a thriving Psycho-Oncology research and clinical community. In this article, the Australian health system in which Psycho-Oncology is embedded is described. Clinical Psycho-Oncology services are outlined, in terms of their composition, processes and reach. The development of the internationally ground-breaking Australian Psychosocial guidelines for the care of adults with cancer is described. Two large Psycho-Oncology organisations which are strongly linked to mainstream Oncology organisations are discussed: the Australian Psycho-Oncology Society (OzPos, a primarily clinician-led and focused organisation) and the Psycho-Oncology Co-operative Research Group (PoCoG, a national cancer clinical trial group). OzPos is a special interest group within the Clinical Oncology Society of Australia, while PoCoG is one of 14 cancer clinical trial groups funded by the national government. It is these strong connections with major multidisciplinary cancer organisations, and a culture of collaboration and co-operation, that have made Psycho-Oncology grow and thrive in Australia. Examples of large collaborative programs of Psycho-Oncology research are provided, as well as the mechanisms used to achieve these outcomes.

  10. Principles of cobalt-60 teletherapy including an introduction to the compendium. Guidelines in clinical radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.S.; Hlasivec, Z.

    1984-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the clinical radiotherapeutic oncologist must be a well educated doctor, with wide knowledge and experience, able to deal with the many difficult problems that can arise in connection with radiotherapy, curative, palliative or prophylactic. The management, treatment and care of the individual patient with malignant disease is a major task of medicine, requiring up-to-date knowledge in a number of rapidly advancing fields. To be efficient, it is essential for the clinical radiation oncologist to continue his education throughout his life, by reading the literature, attending lectures, conferences and advanced 'refresher' courses, and by visiting other centres. The clinical radiation oncologist will discover that it is wise, where at all possible, to spend a proportion of his time working with other specialists on clinical trials and research, with formal publication of the results. The disciplines of such work will deepen his understanding, not only of his own speciality, but of the whole field of oncology, and will further co-operation between the many different specialists on whose combined efforts the cure of each individual patient and the advances in the treatment of cancer must ultimately depend

  11. Current technological clinical practice in breast radiotherapy; results of a survey in EORTC-Radiation Oncology Group affiliated institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, Hans Paul; Hurkmans, Coen W; Kuten, Abraham; Westenberg, Helen A

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the current technological clinical practice of radiation therapy of the breast in institutions participating in the EORTC-Radiation Oncology Group (EORTC-ROG). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A survey was conducted between August 2008 and January 2009 on behalf of the Breast Working

  12. Data-driven management using quantitative metric and automatic auditing program (QMAP) improves consistency of radiation oncology processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Naichang; Xia, Ping; Mastroianni, Anthony; Kolar, Matthew D; Chao, Samuel T; Greskovich, John F; Suh, John H

    Process consistency in planning and delivery of radiation therapy is essential to maintain patient safety and treatment quality and efficiency. Ensuring the timely completion of each critical clinical task is one aspect of process consistency. The purpose of this work is to report our experience in implementing a quantitative metric and automatic auditing program (QMAP) with a goal of improving the timely completion of critical clinical tasks. Based on our clinical electronic medical records system, we developed a software program to automatically capture the completion timestamp of each critical clinical task while providing frequent alerts of potential delinquency. These alerts were directed to designated triage teams within a time window that would offer an opportunity to mitigate the potential for late completion. Since July 2011, 18 metrics were introduced in our clinical workflow. We compared the delinquency rates for 4 selected metrics before the implementation of the metric with the delinquency rate of 2016. One-tailed Student t test was used for statistical analysis RESULTS: With an average of 150 daily patients on treatment at our main campus, the late treatment plan completion rate and late weekly physics check were reduced from 18.2% and 8.9% in 2011 to 4.2% and 0.1% in 2016, respectively (P < .01). The late weekly on-treatment physician visit rate was reduced from 7.2% in 2012 to <1.6% in 2016. The yearly late cone beam computed tomography review rate was reduced from 1.6% in 2011 to <0.1% in 2016. QMAP is effective in reducing late completions of critical tasks, which can positively impact treatment quality and patient safety by reducing the potential for errors resulting from distractions, interruptions, and rush in completion of critical tasks. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ovarian cancer clinical trial endpoints: Society of Gynecologic Oncology white paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Thomas J.; Armstrong, Deborah K.; Brady, Mark F.; Coleman, Robert L.; Einstein, Mark H.; Monk, Bradley J.; Mannel, Robert S.; Thigpen, J. Tate; Umpierre, Sharee A.; Villella, Jeannine A.; Alvarez, Ronald D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the value of multiple clinical endpoints in the unique setting of ovarian cancer. Methods A clinical trial workgroup was established by the Society of Gynecologic Oncology to develop a consensus statement via multiple conference calls, meetings and white paper drafts. Results Clinical trial endpoints have profound effects on late phase clinical trial design, result interpretation, drug development, and regulatory approval of therapeutics. Selection of the optimal clinical trial endpoint is particularly provocative in ovarian cancer where long overall survival (OS) is observed. The lack of new regulatory approvals and the lack of harmony between regulatory bodies globally for ovarian cancer therapeutics are of concern. The advantages and disadvantages of the numerous endpoints available are herein discussed within the unique context of ovarian cancer where both crossover and post-progression therapies potentially uncouple surrogacy between progression-free survival (PFS) and OS, the two most widely supported and utilized endpoints. The roles of patient reported outcomes (PRO) and health related quality of life (HRQoL) are discussed, but even these widely supported parameters are affected by the unique characteristics of ovarian cancer where a significant percentage of patients may be asymptomatic. Original data regarding the endpoint preferences of ovarian cancer advocates is presented. Conclusions Endpoint selection in ovarian cancer clinical trials should reflect the impact on disease burden and unique characteristics of the treatment cohort while reflecting true patient benefit. Both OS and PFS have led to regulatory approvals and are clinically important. OS remains the most objective and accepted endpoint because it is least vulnerable to bias; however, the feasibility of OS in ovarian cancer is compromised by the requirement for large trial size, prolonged time-line for final analysis, and potential for unintended loss of treatment effect

  14. Ovarian cancer clinical trial endpoints: Society of Gynecologic Oncology white paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Thomas J; Armstrong, Deborah K; Brady, Mark F; Coleman, Robert L; Einstein, Mark H; Monk, Bradley J; Mannel, Robert S; Thigpen, J Tate; Umpierre, Sharee A; Villella, Jeannine A; Alvarez, Ronald D

    2014-01-01

    To explore the value of multiple clinical endpoints in the unique setting of ovarian cancer. A clinical trial workgroup was established by the Society of Gynecologic Oncology to develop a consensus statement via multiple conference calls, meetings and white paper drafts. Clinical trial endpoints have profound effects on late phase clinical trial design, result interpretation, drug development, and regulatory approval of therapeutics. Selection of the optimal clinical trial endpoint is particularly provocative in ovarian cancer where long overall survival (OS) is observed. The lack of new regulatory approvals and the lack of harmony between regulatory bodies globally for ovarian cancer therapeutics are of concern. The advantages and disadvantages of the numerous endpoints available are herein discussed within the unique context of ovarian cancer where both crossover and post-progression therapies potentially uncouple surrogacy between progression-free survival (PFS) and OS, the two most widely supported and utilized endpoints. The roles of patient reported outcomes (PRO) and health related quality of life (HRQoL) are discussed, but even these widely supported parameters are affected by the unique characteristics of ovarian cancer where a significant percentage of patients may be asymptomatic. Original data regarding the endpoint preferences of ovarian cancer advocates is presented. Endpoint selection in ovarian cancer clinical trials should reflect the impact on disease burden and unique characteristics of the treatment cohort while reflecting true patient benefit. Both OS and PFS have led to regulatory approvals and are clinically important. OS remains the most objective and accepted endpoint because it is least vulnerable to bias; however, the feasibility of OS in ovarian cancer is compromised by the requirement for large trial size, prolonged time-line for final analysis, and potential for unintended loss of treatment effect from active post-progression therapies

  15. Using PET for therapy monitoring in oncological clinical trials: challenges ahead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deroose, C.M.; Stroobants, S.; Liu, Y.; Shankar, L.K.; Bourguet, P.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular imaging with PET has emerged as a powerful imaging tool in the clinical care of oncological patients. Assessing therapy response is a prime application of PET and so the integration of PET into multicentre trials can offer valuable scientific insights and shape future clinical practice. However, there are a number of logistic and methodological challenges that have to be dealt with. These range from availability and regulatory compliance of the PET radiopharmaceutical to availability of scan time for research purposes. Standardization of imaging and reconstruction protocols, quality control, image processing and analysis are of paramount importance. Strategies for harmonization of the final image and the quantification result are available and can be implemented within the scope of multicentre accreditation programmes. Data analysis can be performed either locally or by centralized review. Response assessment can be done visually or using more quantitative approaches, depending on the research question. Large-scale real-time centralized review can be achieved using web-based solutions. Specific challenges for the future are inclusion of PET/MRI scanners in multicentre trials and the incorporation of radiomic analyses. Inclusion of PET in multicentre trials is a necessity to guarantee the further development of PET for routine clinical care and may yield very valuable scientific insights. (orig.)

  16. The role of radiation therapy in pediatric oncology as assessed by cooperative clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Angio, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    Major advances have been made in pediatric oncology, and many are due to the advent of the cooperative clinical trial. This important research tool was originally developed for the testing of various therapeutic strategies for the management of children with acute leukemia. Such trials were eminently successful, as the consistently better long-term survival rates for children with this hitherto uniformly lethal disease can attest. The method soon found favor for the investigation of patients with so-called solid tumors. These trails were originally concerned with the elucidation of the value of various chemotherapeutic agents. Radiation therapists soon became involved, however, and this discipline became more heavily represented in study design and data analyses. Much radiation therapy information has been gained, some through prospective, randomized clinical investigations and some through retrospective reviews of roentgen therapy as it was employed in protocols accenting other aspects of care. Voluminous, important radiation therapy data have been deduced through the latter retrospective kinds of analyses, but this review will be confined largely to the published results of prospective, randomized cooperative clinical trials where radiation therapy was a governing variable. Certain investigations of historical interest will also be cited together with other results that established important principles even though not so rigorous in design

  17. Using PET for therapy monitoring in oncological clinical trials: challenges ahead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deroose, C.M. [UZ Leuven, Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Leuven (Belgium); European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Imaging Group, Leuven (Belgium); Stroobants, S. [European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Imaging Group, Leuven (Belgium); University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Antwerp, Edegem (Belgium); Liu, Y. [European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Imaging Group, Leuven (Belgium); EORTC Headquarters, Brussels (Belgium); Shankar, L.K. [National Cancer Institute, Diagnostic Imaging Branch, Cancer Imaging Program, Bethesda, MD (United States); Bourguet, P. [European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Imaging Group, Leuven (Belgium); University of Rennes 1, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rennes (France)

    2017-08-15

    Molecular imaging with PET has emerged as a powerful imaging tool in the clinical care of oncological patients. Assessing therapy response is a prime application of PET and so the integration of PET into multicentre trials can offer valuable scientific insights and shape future clinical practice. However, there are a number of logistic and methodological challenges that have to be dealt with. These range from availability and regulatory compliance of the PET radiopharmaceutical to availability of scan time for research purposes. Standardization of imaging and reconstruction protocols, quality control, image processing and analysis are of paramount importance. Strategies for harmonization of the final image and the quantification result are available and can be implemented within the scope of multicentre accreditation programmes. Data analysis can be performed either locally or by centralized review. Response assessment can be done visually or using more quantitative approaches, depending on the research question. Large-scale real-time centralized review can be achieved using web-based solutions. Specific challenges for the future are inclusion of PET/MRI scanners in multicentre trials and the incorporation of radiomic analyses. Inclusion of PET in multicentre trials is a necessity to guarantee the further development of PET for routine clinical care and may yield very valuable scientific insights. (orig.)

  18. Strategies to facilitate shared decision-making about pediatric oncology clinical trial enrollment: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Eden G; Wakefield, Claire E; Signorelli, Christina; Cohn, Richard J; Patenaude, Andrea; Foster, Claire; Pettit, Tristan; Fardell, Joanna E

    2018-07-01

    We conducted a systematic review to identify the strategies that have been recommended in the literature to facilitate shared decision-making regarding enrolment in pediatric oncology clinical trials. We searched seven databases for peer-reviewed literature, published 1990-2017. Of 924 articles identified, 17 studies were eligible for the review. We assessed study quality using the 'Mixed-Methods Appraisal Tool'. We coded the results and discussions of papers line-by-line using nVivo software. We categorized strategies thematically. Five main themes emerged: 1) decision-making as a process, 2) individuality of the process; 3) information provision, 4) the role of communication, or 5) decision and psychosocial support. Families should have adequate time to make a decision. HCPs should elicit parents' and patients' preferences for level of information and decision involvement. Information should be clear and provided in multiple modalities. Articles also recommended providing training for healthcare professionals and access to psychosocial support for families. High quality, individually-tailored information, open communication and psychosocial support appear vital in supporting decision-making regarding enrollment in clinical trials. These data will usefully inform future decision-making interventions/tools to support families making clinical trial decisions. A solid evidence-base for effective strategies which facilitate shared decision-making is needed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Landscape of Clinical Trials Evaluating the Theranostic Role of PET Imaging in Oncology: Insights from an Analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Pei; Lv, Jia-Wei; Liu, Xu; Zhang, Yuan; Guo, Ying; Lin, Ai-Hua; Sun, Ying; Mao, Yan-Ping; Ma, Jun

    2017-01-01

    In the war on cancer marked by personalized medicine, positron emission tomography (PET)-based theranostic strategy is playing an increasingly important role. Well-designed clinical trials are of great significance for validating the PET applications and ensuring evidence-based cancer care. This study aimed to provide a comprehensive landscape of the characteristics of PET clinical trials using the substantial resource of ClinicalTrials.gov database. We identified 25,599 oncology trials registered with ClinicalTrials.gov in the last ten-year period (October 2005-September 2015). They were systematically reviewed to validate classification into 519 PET trials and 25,080 other oncology trials used for comparison. We found that PET trials were predominantly phase 1-2 studies (86.2%) and were more likely to be single-arm (78.9% vs. 57.9%, P oncology trials. Furthermore, PET trials were small in scale, generally enrolling fewer than 100 participants (20.3% vs. 25.7% for other oncology trials, P = 0.014), which might be too small to detect a significant theranostic effect. The funding support from industry or National Institutes of Health shrunk over time (both decreased by about 5%), and PET trials were more likely to be conducted in only one region lacking international collaboration (97.0% vs. 89.3% for other oncology trials, P oncology are not receiving the attention or efforts necessary to generate high-quality evidence. Advancing the clinical application of PET imaging will require a concerted effort to improve the quality of trials. PMID:28042342

  20. A Clinical Librarian-Nursing Partnership to Bridge Clinical Practice and Research in an Oncology Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginex, Pamela K; Hernandez, Marisol; Vrabel, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Nurses in clinical settings in which evidence-based, individualized care is expected are often the best resource to identify important clinical questions and gaps in practice. These nurses are frequently challenged by a lack of resources to fully develop their questions and identify the most appropriate methods to answer them. A strategic and ongoing partnership between medical library services and nursing can support nurses as they embark on the process of answering these questions and, ultimately, improving patient care and clinical outcomes

  1. Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Radiation Oncology (French Ed.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The application of radiation in human health, for both diagnosis and treatment of disease, is an important component of the work of the IAEA. The responsibility for the increasing technical aspects of this work is undertaken by the medical physicist. To ensure good practice in this vital area structured clinical training programmes are required to complement academic learning. This publication is intended to be a guide to the practical implementation of such a programme for radiation therapy. There is a general and growing awareness that radiation medicine is increasingly dependant on well trained medical physicists that are based in the clinical setting. However an analysis of the availability of medical physicists indicates a large shortfall of qualified and capable professionals. This is particularly evident in developing countries. While strategies to increase academic educational opportunities are critical to such countries, the need for guidance on structured clinical training was recognised by the members of the Regional Cooperative Agreement (RCA) for research, development and training related to nuclear sciences for Asia and the Pacific. Consequently a technical cooperation regional project (RAS6038) under the RCA programme was formulated to address this need in the Asia Pacific region by developing suitable material and establishing its viability. Development of a clinical training guide for medical physicists specialising in radiation therapy was started in 2005 with the appointment of a core drafting committee of regional and international experts. Since 2005 the IAEA has convened two additional consultant group meetings including additional experts to prepare the present publication. The publication drew heavily, particularly in the initial stages, from the experience and documents of the Clinical Training Programme for Radiation Oncology Medical Physicists as developed by the Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine. Their

  2. Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Radiation Oncology (Spanish Ed.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The application of radiation in human health, for both diagnosis and treatment of disease, is an important component of the work of the IAEA. The responsibility for the increasing technical aspects of this work is undertaken by the medical physicist. To ensure good practice in this vital area structured clinical training programmes are required to complement academic learning. This publication is intended to be a guide to the practical implementation of such a programme for radiation therapy. There is a general and growing awareness that radiation medicine is increasingly dependant on well trained medical physicists that are based in the clinical setting. However an analysis of the availability of medical physicists indicates a large shortfall of qualified and capable professionals. This is particularly evident in developing countries. While strategies to increase academic educational opportunities are critical to such countries, the need for guidance on structured clinical training was recognised by the members of the Regional Cooperative Agreement (RCA) for research, development and training related to nuclear sciences for Asia and the Pacific. Consequently a technical cooperation regional project (RAS6038) under the RCA programme was formulated to address this need in the Asia Pacific region by developing suitable material and establishing its viability. Development of a clinical training guide for medical physicists specialising in radiation therapy was started in 2005 with the appointment of a core drafting committee of regional and international experts. Since 2005 the IAEA has convened two additional consultant group meetings including additional experts to prepare the present publication. The publication drew heavily, particularly in the initial stages, from the experience and documents of the Clinical Training Programme for Radiation Oncology Medical Physicists as developed by the Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine. Their

  3. Psychosocial Issues in Pediatric Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Psychosocial oncology, a relatively new discipline, is a multidisciplinary application of the behavioral and social sciences, and pediatric psychosocial oncology is an emerging subspecialty within the domain of psychosocial oncology. This review presents a brief overview of some of the major clinical issues surrounding pediatric psychosocial oncology. PMID:23049457

  4. Do Case Rates Affect Physicians' Clinical Practice in Radiation Oncology?: An Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loy, Bryan A.; Shkedy, Clive I.; Powell, Adam C.; Happe, Laura E.; Royalty, Julie A.; Miao, Michael T.; Smith, Gary L.; Long, James W.; Gupta, Amit K.

    2016-01-01

    Case rate payments combined with utilization monitoring may have the potential to improve the quality of care by reducing over and under-treatment. Thus, a national managed care organization introduced case rate payments at one multi-site radiation oncology provider while maintaining only fee-for-service payments at others. This study examined whether the introduction of the payment method had an effect on radiation fractions administered when compared to clinical guidelines. The number of fractions of radiation therapy delivered to patients with bone metastases, breast, lung, prostate, and skin cancer was assessed for concordance with clinical guidelines. The proportion of guideline-based care ascertained from the payer's claims database was compared before (2011) and after (2013) the payment method introduction using relative risks (RR). After the introduction of case rates, there were no significant changes in guideline-based care in breast, lung, and skin cancer; however, patients with bone metastases and prostate cancer were significantly more likely to have received guideline-based care (RR = 2.0 and 1.1, respectively, ppayment model and assess implications in other populations. PMID:26870963

  5. A marketing clinical doctorate programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Isaac D; Kimball, Olive M

    2007-01-01

    Over the past decade, clinical doctorate programs in health disciplines have proliferated amid both support and controversy among educators, professional organizations, practitioners, administrators, and third-party payers. Supporters argue that the explosion of new knowledge and increasing sophistication of technology have created a need for advanced practice models to enhance patient care and safety and to reduce costs. Critics argue that necessary technological advances can be incorporated into existing programs and believe that clinical doctorates will increase health care costs, not reduce them. Despite the controversy, many health disciplines have advanced the clinical doctorate (the most recent is the doctor of nursing practice in 2004), with some professions mandating the doctorate as the entry-level degree (i.e., psychology, pharmacy, audiology, and so on). One aspect of the introduction of clinical doctoral degrees has been largely overlooked, and that is the marketing aspect. Because of marketing considerations, some clinical doctorates have been more successfully implemented and accepted than others. Marketing is composed of variables commonly known as "the four P's of marketing": product, price, promotion, and place. This report explores these four P's within the context of clinical doctorates in the health disciplines.

  6. The employment status of 1995 graduates from radiation oncology training programs in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, Daniel F.; Kresl, John J.; Sheldon, John M.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the employment status of 1995 graduates of radiation oncology training programs in the United States. Methods and Materials: All senior residents (149) and fellows (36) who completed training in 1995 were mailed an employment survey questionnaire by the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO). Telephone follow-up of nonrespondents achieved a 100% response rate. Twenty graduates who chose to continue training and five who returned to their home countries were removed from the study. Of the 160 who attempted to enter the U.S. workforce, 106 were men and 54 were women. Initial job status and job status at 6-8 months following graduation were determined. Results: Unemployment was 6.9% at graduation and 4.4% at 6-8 months. Underemployment (part-time employment) was 10.6% at graduation and 11.9% at 6-8 months postgraduation. Of those working part-time 6-8 months after graduation, 63% (12 of 19) did so involuntarily after unsuccessfully seeking full-time employment. For the 20 graduates who chose to continue training with fellowships, seven (35%) did so solely to avoid unemployment, four (20%) were partially influenced by the job market, and nine (45%) were not influenced by the job market. Adverse employment search outcome was defined as being either unemployed as a radiation oncologist or involuntarily working part-time. Excluding those who chose to work part-time, a total of 19 (11.9%) graduates at 6-8 months following graduation, compared to 22 (13.8%) at graduation, were either unemployed or involuntarily working part-time. In terms of gender, this represented 18.5% (10 of 54) of females and 8.6% (9 of 105) of males. In terms of geographic restrictions in the job search, 56% of males and 70% of females with an adverse employment outcome limited their job search to certain parts of the country. This compares to 62% of all graduates in this study with geographic restrictions in their job search. In terms of perceptions of the

  7. The employment status of 1995 graduates from radiation oncology training programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, D F; Kresl, J J; Sheldon, J M

    1999-03-15

    To quantify the employment status of 1995 graduates of radiation oncology training programs in the United States. All senior residents (149) and fellows (36) who completed training in 1995 were mailed an employment survey questionnaire by the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO). Telephone follow-up of nonrespondents achieved a 100% response rate. Twenty graduates who chose to continue training and five who returned to their home countries were removed from the study. Of the 160 who attempted to enter the U.S. workforce, 106 were men and 54 were women. Initial job status and job status at 6-8 months following graduation were determined. Unemployment was 6.9% at graduation and 4.4% at 6-8 months. Underemployment (part-time employment) was 10.6% at graduation and 11.9% at 6-8 months postgraduation. Of those working part-time 6-8 months after graduation, 63% (12 of 19) did so involuntarily after unsuccessfully seeking full-time employment. For the 20 graduates who chose to continue training with fellowships, seven (35%) did so solely to avoid unemployment, four (20%) were partially influenced by the job market, and nine (45%) were not influenced by the job market. Adverse employment search outcome was defined as being either unemployed as a radiation oncologist or involuntarily working part-time. Excluding those who chose to work part-time, a total of 19 (11.9%) graduates at 6-8 months following graduation, compared to 22 (13.8%) at graduation, were either unemployed or involuntarily working part-time. In terms of gender, this represented 18.5% (10 of 54) of females and 8.6% (9 of 105) of males. In terms of geographic restrictions in the job search, 56% of males and 70% of females with an adverse employment outcome limited their job search to certain parts of the country. This compares to 62% of all graduates in this study with geographic restrictions in their job search. In terms of perceptions of the workforce and employment opportunities, 95% of

  8. Integrating Collaborative Learning and Competition in a Hematology/Oncology Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhoul, Issam; Motwani, Pooja; Schafer, Liudmila; Arnaoutakis, Konstantinos; Mahmoud, Fade; Safar, Mazin; Graves, Dorothy; Mehta, Paulette; Govindarajan, Rang; Hutchins, Laura; Thrush, Carol

    2018-02-01

    New educational methods and structures to improve medical education are needed to face the challenge of an exponential increase and complexity of medical knowledge. Collaborative learning has been increasingly used in education, but its use in medical training programs is in its infancy, and its impact is still unknown; the role of competition in education is more controversial. We introduced these pedagogical methods to the hematology/oncology fellowship program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences to improve attendance and performance at didactic activities and different educational outcomes. One year after the adoption of these methods, the fellowship program has reached many of the expected goals from this intervention without the negative consequences of competition observed in younger learners. The most important conclusion of this project is that collaboration and cross-generational team work provide a healthy and effective learning environment and competition may not add further benefit. Analysis, interpretation, and discussion of our experience are provided. This study was approved by the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences IRB as a low risk educational intervention not requiring a consent form.

  9. Initial employment experiences of 1997 graduates of radiation oncology training programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bushee, Gerald R.; Sunshine, Jonathan H.; Simon, Carol; Schepps, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To inform the profession of current trends in the job market, the American College of Radiology (ACR) sought to detail the job-hunting experiences and outcomes of 1997 graduates of radiation oncology training programs. Methods and Materials: In early 1998, questionnaires were mailed to all graduates; 67% responded. Results were compared with similar surveys of 1996 graduates. Results: Similar to past years, immediately after graduation, 13% of residency graduates and 1 of 10 fellowship graduates encountered serious employment difficulties - that is, spent some time working locums, working outside radiation oncology, or unemployed. By 6-12 months after graduation, approximately 2% of all residency graduates were working outside the profession and approximately 3% were not working at all. Eighty-five percent of residency graduates and 7 of 8 fellowship graduates reported that their employment reasonably matched their training and individual goals. On average, graduates' actual salaries approximately corresponded to expected salaries. Eleven percent of all graduates were in nonownership-track jobs, a significant decline since 1996. For residents and fellows combined, 46% had a job with at least one characteristic some observers associate with a weak job market, but fewer than half of those with one of these characteristics actually disliked it. These percentages are similar to 1996. Women graduates were more likely than men to have spouse-related restrictions on job location but less likely to end up in a self-reportedly undesirable location. Conclusion: Unemployment remained low. Some other indicators of the employment market showed improvement, while others did not

  10. Invited review: study design considerations for clinical research in veterinary radiology and radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrivani, Peter V; Erb, Hollis N

    2013-01-01

    High quality clinical research is essential for advancing knowledge in the areas of veterinary radiology and radiation oncology. Types of clinical research studies may include experimental studies, method-comparison studies, and patient-based studies. Experimental studies explore issues relative to pathophysiology, patient safety, and treatment efficacy. Method-comparison studies evaluate agreement between techniques or between observers. Patient-based studies investigate naturally acquired disease and focus on questions asked in clinical practice that relate to individuals or populations (e.g., risk, accuracy, or prognosis). Careful preplanning and study design are essential in order to achieve valid results. A key point to planning studies is ensuring that the design is tailored to the study objectives. Good design includes a comprehensive literature review, asking suitable questions, selecting the proper sample population, collecting the appropriate data, performing the correct statistical analyses, and drawing conclusions supported by the available evidence. Most study designs are classified by whether they are experimental or observational, longitudinal or cross-sectional, and prospective or retrospective. Additional features (e.g., controlled, randomized, or blinded) may be described that address bias. Two related challenging aspects of study design are defining an important research question and selecting an appropriate sample population. The sample population should represent the target population as much as possible. Furthermore, when comparing groups, it is important that the groups are as alike to each other as possible except for the variables of interest. Medical images are well suited for clinical research because imaging signs are categorical or numerical variables that might be predictors or outcomes of diseases or treatments. © 2013 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  11. A review of Raman spectroscopy advances with an emphasis on clinical translation challenges in oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jermyn, Michael; Desroches, Joannie; Aubertin, Kelly; St-Arnaud, Karl; Madore, Wendy-Julie; De Montigny, Etienne; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Trudel, Dominique; Wilson, Brian C.; Petrecca, Kevin; Leblond, Frederic

    2016-12-01

    There is an urgent need for improved techniques for disease detection. Optical spectroscopy and imaging technologies have potential for non- or minimally-invasive use in a wide range of clinical applications. The focus here, in vivo Raman spectroscopy (RS), measures inelastic light scattering based on interaction with the vibrational and rotational modes of common molecular bonds in cells and tissue. The Raman ‘signature’ can be used to assess physiological status and can also be altered by disease. This information can supplement existing diagnostic (e.g. radiological imaging) techniques for disease screening and diagnosis, in interventional guidance for identifying disease margins, and in monitoring treatment responses. Using fiberoptic-based light delivery and collection, RS is most easily performed on accessible tissue surfaces, either on the skin, in hollow organs or intra-operatively. The strength of RS lies in the high biochemical information content of the spectra, that characteristically show an array of very narrow peaks associated with specific chemical bonds. This results in high sensitivity and specificity, for example to distinguish malignant or premalignant from normal tissues. A critical issue is that the Raman signal is often very weak, limiting clinical use to point-by-point measurements. However, non-linear techniques using pulsed-laser sources have been developed to enable in vivo Raman imaging. Changes in Raman spectra with disease are often subtle and spectrally distributed, requiring full spectral scanning, together with the use of tissue classification algorithms that must be trained on large numbers of independent measurements. Recent advances in instrumentation and spectral analysis have substantially improved the clinical feasibility of RS, so that it is now being investigated with increased success in a wide range of cancer types and locations, as well as for non-oncological conditions. This review covers recent advances and

  12. Modeling the economic outcomes of immuno-oncology drugs: alternative model frameworks to capture clinical outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibson EJ

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available EJ Gibson,1 N Begum,1 I Koblbauer,1 G Dranitsaris,2 D Liew,3 P McEwan,4 AA Tahami Monfared,5,6 Y Yuan,7 A Juarez-Garcia,7 D Tyas,8 M Lees9 1Wickenstones Ltd, Didcot, UK; 2Augmentium Pharma Consulting Inc, Toronto, ON, Canada; 3Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Alfred Hospital, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 4Health Economics and Outcomes Research Ltd, Cardiff, UK; 5Bristol-Myers Squibb Canada, Saint-Laurent, QC Canada; 6Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; 7Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ, USA; 8Bristol-Myers Squibb, Uxbridge, UK; 9Bristol-Myers Squibb, Rueil-Malmaison, France Background: Economic models in oncology are commonly based on the three-state partitioned survival model (PSM distinguishing between progression-free and progressive states. However, the heterogeneity of responses observed in immuno-oncology (I-O suggests that new approaches may be appropriate to reflect disease dynamics meaningfully. Materials and methods: This study explored the impact of incorporating immune-specific health states into economic models of I-O therapy. Two variants of the PSM and a Markov model were populated with data from one clinical trial in metastatic melanoma patients. Short-term modeled outcomes were benchmarked to the clinical trial data and a lifetime model horizon provided estimates of life years and quality adjusted life years (QALYs. Results: The PSM-based models produced short-term outcomes closely matching the trial outcomes. Adding health states generated increased QALYs while providing a more granular representation of outcomes for decision making. The Markov model gave the greatest level of detail on outcomes but gave short-term results which diverged from those of the trial (overstating year 1 progression-free survival by around 60%. Conclusion: Increased sophistication in the representation of disease dynamics in economic models

  13. Elective Clinical Target Volumes for Conformal Therapy in Anorectal Cancer: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Contouring Atlas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myerson, Robert J.; Garofalo, Michael C.; El Naqa, Issam; Abrams, Ross A.; Apte, Aditya; Bosch, Walter R.; Das, Prajnan; Gunderson, Leonard L.; Hong, Theodore S.; Kim, J.J. John; Willett, Christopher G.; Kachnic, Lisa A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) atlas of the elective clinical target volume (CTV) definitions to be used for planning pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for anal and rectal cancers. Methods and Materials: The Gastrointestinal Committee of the RTOG established a task group (the nine physician co-authors) to develop this atlas. They responded to a questionnaire concerning three elective CTVs (CTVA: internal iliac, presacral, and perirectal nodal regions for both anal and rectal case planning; CTVB: external iliac nodal region for anal case planning and for selected rectal cases; CTVC: inguinal nodal region for anal case planning and for select rectal cases), and to outline these areas on individual computed tomographic images. The imaging files were shared via the Advanced Technology Consortium. A program developed by one of the co-authors (I.E.N.) used binomial maximum-likelihood estimates to generate a 95% group consensus contour. The computer-estimated consensus contours were then reviewed by the group and modified to provide a final contouring consensus atlas. Results: The panel achieved consensus CTV definitions to be used as guidelines for the adjuvant therapy of rectal cancer and definitive therapy for anal cancer. The most important difference from similar atlases for gynecologic or genitourinary cancer is mesorectal coverage. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusion: This report serves as a template for the definition of the elective CTVs to be used in IMRT planning for anal and rectal cancers, as part of prospective RTOG trials.

  14. Managing a palliative oncology program: the role of a business plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, D; Gombeski, W R; Goldstein, P; Hayes, D; Armour, M

    1994-02-01

    Today's health-care environment demands that palliative-care programs operate in a businesslike manner. This report summarizes the business plan and the process followed to develop the Palliative Care Program at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation (CCF). The benefits generated from this effort and the lessons learned that may be helpful to other program managers are described. By disciplining itself to focus on financial, marketing, and operational issues, the Palliative Care Program is in a better position to advance its clinical services within the organization and in its market area, and can thereby serve its patients more effectively.

  15. Using Baldrige Performance Excellence Program Approaches in the Pursuit of Radiation Oncology Quality Care, Patient Satisfaction, and Workforce Commitment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternick, Edward S., E-mail: esternick@lifespan.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital/Brown Alpert Medical School, Providence, RI (United States)

    2011-06-20

    The Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Improvement Act was signed into law in 1987 to advance US business competitiveness and economic growth. Administered by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Act created the Baldrige National Quality Program, recently renamed the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program. The comprehensive analytical approaches referred to as the Baldrige Healthcare Criteria, are very well-suited for the evaluation and sustainable improvement of radiation oncology management and operations. A multidisciplinary self-assessment approach is used for radiotherapy program evaluation and development in order to generate a fact-based, knowledge-driven system for improving quality of care, increasing patient satisfaction, enhancing leadership effectiveness, building employee engagement, and boosting organizational innovation. This methodology also provides a valuable framework for benchmarking an individual radiation oncology practice's operations and results against guidelines defined by accreditation and professional organizations and regulatory agencies.

  16. Using Baldrige Performance Excellence Program Approaches in the Pursuit of Radiation Oncology Quality Care, Patient Satisfaction, and Workforce Commitment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sternick, Edward S.

    2011-01-01

    The Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Improvement Act was signed into law in 1987 to advance US business competitiveness and economic growth. Administered by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Act created the Baldrige National Quality Program, recently renamed the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program. The comprehensive analytical approaches referred to as the Baldrige Healthcare Criteria, are very well-suited for the evaluation and sustainable improvement of radiation oncology management and operations. A multidisciplinary self-assessment approach is used for radiotherapy program evaluation and development in order to generate a fact-based, knowledge-driven system for improving quality of care, increasing patient satisfaction, enhancing leadership effectiveness, building employee engagement, and boosting organizational innovation. This methodology also provides a valuable framework for benchmarking an individual radiation oncology practice's operations and results against guidelines defined by accreditation and professional organizations and regulatory agencies.

  17. Using baldrige performance excellence program approaches in the pursuit of radiation oncology quality care, patient satisfaction, and workforce commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternick, Edward S

    2011-01-01

    The Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Improvement Act was signed into law in 1987 to advance US business competitiveness and economic growth. Administered by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Act created the Baldrige National Quality Program, recently renamed the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program. The comprehensive analytical approaches referred to as the Baldrige Healthcare Criteria, are very well-suited for the evaluation and sustainable improvement of radiation oncology management and operations. A multidisciplinary self-assessment approach is used for radiotherapy program evaluation and development in order to generate a fact-based, knowledge-driven system for improving quality of care, increasing patient satisfaction, enhancing leadership effectiveness, building employee engagement, and boosting organizational innovation. This methodology also provides a valuable framework for benchmarking an individual radiation oncology practice's operations and results against guidelines defined by accreditation and professional organizations and regulatory agencies.

  18. Using Baldrige Performance Excellence Program Approaches in the Pursuit of Radiation Oncology Quality Care, Patient Satisfaction and Workforce Commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward eSternick

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Improvement Act was signed into law in 1987 to advance U.S. business competitiveness and economic growth. Administered by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, the Act created the Baldrige National Quality Program, recently renamed the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program. The comprehensive analytical approaches referred to as the Baldrige Healthcare Criteria, are very well-suited for the evaluation and sustainable improvement of radiation oncology management and operations. A multidisciplinary self-assessment approach is used for radiotherapy program evaluation and development in order to generate a fact-based, knowledge-driven system for improving quality of care, increasing patient satisfaction, enhancing leadership effectiveness, building employee engagement and boosting organizational innovation. This methodology also provides a valuable framework for benchmarking an individual radiation oncology practice’s operations and results against guidelines defined by accreditation and professional organizations and regulatory agencies.

  19. Mass Spectrometry Strategies for Clinical Metabolomics and Lipidomics in Psychiatry, Neurology, and Neuro-Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Paul L

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomics research has the potential to provide biomarkers for the detection of disease, for subtyping complex disease populations, for monitoring disease progression and therapy, and for defining new molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. These potentials are far from being realized because of a number of technical, conceptual, financial, and bioinformatics issues. Mass spectrometry provides analytical platforms that address the technical barriers to success in metabolomics research; however, the limited commercial availability of analytical and stable isotope standards has created a bottleneck for the absolute quantitation of a number of metabolites. Conceptual and financial factors contribute to the generation of statistically under-powered clinical studies, whereas bioinformatics issues result in the publication of a large number of unidentified metabolites. The path forward in this field involves targeted metabolomics analyses of large control and patient populations to define both the normal range of a defined metabolite and the potential heterogeneity (eg, bimodal) in complex patient populations. This approach requires that metabolomics research groups, in addition to developing a number of analytical platforms, build sufficient chemistry resources to supply the analytical standards required for absolute metabolite quantitation. Examples of metabolomics evaluations of sulfur amino-acid metabolism in psychiatry, neurology, and neuro-oncology and of lipidomics in neurology will be reviewed. PMID:23842599

  20. Monitoring of patients in the Oncology department of the Clinical Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Quiroz, J.

    2010-01-01

    An important number of patients that visit the Oncology department o the Clinicas Hospital lost sight at some stage of their evolution. Our objective was to quantify the proportion of patients who are lost and describe the time spent in the service and its relationship with variables such as age, sex, origin of the patient and progress of the disease, for which we performed a descriptive observational study with an analytical component of 435 stories clinics patients with confirmed diagnosis of cancer, treated from January 2001 to December 2004, in order to have a minimum of 5 years of follow-up potential. Data were processed with Excel 2003. Patients had between 15-85 years old with a mean and median of 52 ± 14 years DS. Two hundred Seventy women and 165 were men, 232 were from the metropolitan area. The time of length of service was 0-114 months with a median of 8 and an average DS 21 months ± 27 months. As of December 2009 31 117 patients had died 36 remained in control and 282 were lost from sight. We found no relationship between age (p = 0.1) nor the state of progress of the disease at diagnosis (p = 0.21) If there were significant differences with greater probability of loss tracking men (p = 0.009) and from sites outside the metropolitan area (p = 0.04). The number of patients who are lost is very large and we must develop strategies more effective monitoring

  1. Mass spectrometry strategies for clinical metabolomics and lipidomics in psychiatry, neurology, and neuro-oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Paul L

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomics research has the potential to provide biomarkers for the detection of disease, for subtyping complex disease populations, for monitoring disease progression and therapy, and for defining new molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. These potentials are far from being realized because of a number of technical, conceptual, financial, and bioinformatics issues. Mass spectrometry provides analytical platforms that address the technical barriers to success in metabolomics research; however, the limited commercial availability of analytical and stable isotope standards has created a bottleneck for the absolute quantitation of a number of metabolites. Conceptual and financial factors contribute to the generation of statistically under-powered clinical studies, whereas bioinformatics issues result in the publication of a large number of unidentified metabolites. The path forward in this field involves targeted metabolomics analyses of large control and patient populations to define both the normal range of a defined metabolite and the potential heterogeneity (eg, bimodal) in complex patient populations. This approach requires that metabolomics research groups, in addition to developing a number of analytical platforms, build sufficient chemistry resources to supply the analytical standards required for absolute metabolite quantitation. Examples of metabolomics evaluations of sulfur amino-acid metabolism in psychiatry, neurology, and neuro-oncology and of lipidomics in neurology will be reviewed.

  2. Clinical Predictors of Survival for Patients with Stage IV Cancer Referred to Radiation Oncology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny Kao

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need for a robust, clinically useful predictive model for survival in a heterogeneous group of patients with metastatic cancer referred to radiation oncology.From May 2012 to August 2013, 143 consecutive patients with stage IV cancer were prospectively evaluated by a single radiation oncologist. We retrospectively analyzed the effect of 29 patient, laboratory and tumor-related prognostic factors on overall survival using univariate analysis. Variables that were statistically significant on univariate analysis were entered into a multivariable Cox regression to identify independent predictors of overall survival.The median overall survival was 5.5 months. Four prognostic factors significantly predicted survival on multivariable analysis including ECOG performance status (0-1 vs. 2 vs. 3-4, number of active tumors (1 to 5 vs. ≥ 6, albumin levels (≥ 3.4 vs. 2.4 to 3.3 vs. 31.4 months for very low risk patients compared to 14.5 months for low risk, 4.1 months for intermediate risk and 1.2 months for high risk (p < 0.001.These data suggest that a model that considers performance status, extent of disease, primary tumor site and serum albumin represents a simple model to accurately predict survival for patients with stage IV cancer who are potential candidates for radiation therapy.

  3. The script concordance test in radiation oncology: validation study of a new tool to assess clinical reasoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, Carole; Gagnon, Robert; Nguyen, David; Charlin, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    The Script Concordance test (SCT) is a reliable and valid tool to evaluate clinical reasoning in complex situations where experts' opinions may be divided. Scores reflect the degree of concordance between the performance of examinees and that of a reference panel of experienced physicians. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate SCT's usefulness in radiation oncology. A 90 items radiation oncology SCT was administered to 155 participants. Three levels of experience were tested: medical students (n = 70), radiation oncology residents (n = 38) and radiation oncologists (n = 47). Statistical tests were performed to assess reliability and to document validity. After item optimization, the test comprised 30 cases and 70 questions. Cronbach alpha was 0.90. Mean scores were 51.62 (± 8.19) for students, 71.20 (± 9.45) for residents and 76.67 (± 6.14) for radiation oncologists. The difference between the three groups was statistically significant when compared by the Kruskall-Wallis test (p < 0.001). The SCT is reliable and useful to discriminate among participants according to their level of experience in radiation oncology. It appears as a useful tool to document the progression of reasoning during residency training

  4. Application of organ tolerance dose-constraints in clinical studies in radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerr, Wolfgang [Medical University/AKH Vienna, Dept. of Radiation Oncology/Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria); Technical University Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); Task Group ' ' Tolerance Doses' ' of the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO), Berlin (Germany); Herrmann, Thomas [Task Group ' ' Tolerance Doses' ' of the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO), Berlin (Germany); Baumann, Michael [Technical University Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); Task Group ' ' Tolerance Doses' ' of the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO), Berlin (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    In modern radiation oncology, tolerance dose-constraints for organs at risk (OAR) must be considered for treatment planning, but particularly in order to design clinical studies. Tolerance dose tables, however, only address one aspect of the therapeutic ratio of any clinical study, i.e., the limitation of adverse events, but not the desired potential improvement in the tumor effect of a novel treatment strategy. A sensible application of ''tolerance doses'' in a clinical situation requires consideration of various critical aspects addressed here: definition of tolerance dose, specification of an endpoint/symptom, consideration of radiation quality and irradiation protocol, exposed volume and dose distribution, and patient-related factors of radiosensitivity. The currently most comprehensive estimates of OAR radiation tolerance are in the QUANTEC compilations (2010). However, these tolerance dose values must only be regarded as a rough orientation and cannot answer the relevant question for the patients, i.e., if the study can achieve a therapeutic advantage; this can obviously be answered only by the final scientific analysis of the study results. Despite all limitations, the design of clinical studies should currently refer to the QUANTEC values for appreciation of the risk of complications, if needed supplemented by one's own data or further information from the literature. The implementation of a consensus on the safety interests of the patients and on an application and approval process committed to progress in medicine, with transparent quality-assuring requirements with regard to the structural safeguarding of the study activities, plays a central role in clinical research in radiation oncology. (orig.) [German] In der modernen Radioonkologie muessen Toleranzdosisgrenzen fuer die Risikoorgane (''organs at risk'', OAR) zur Behandlungsplanung, besonders aber zur Gestaltung klinischer Studien, herangezogen werden

  5. Tobacco control: reducing cancer incidence and saving lives. American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) supports the elimination of tobacco products. Toward that goal, ASCO urges the adoption of national policy that strengthens regulation of the sale, promotion, and distribution of such products. To reduce cancer mortality, our regulatory policies must recognize that the nicotine within tobacco is an addictive substance, the use of which leads to 30% of all cancer deaths and a total of 419,000 deaths each year. Tobacco-related advertising and promotion should be banned. At a minimum, national policies should: ban billboards; limit advertising to black and white text only; prohibit the sale or giveaway of products that contain tobacco brand names or logos; prohibit brand name sponsorship of sporting or entertainment events; and require stronger and more prominent warning labels on all tobacco products. Despite existing state laws prohibiting sale of tobacco products to minors, children are able to buy such products easily. National regulation of the sale and distribution of tobacco products is necessary to eliminate children's access to tobacco. Where sales are permitted, they should be limited to face-to-face purchases by individuals 18 and older. Vending machines and other means of distributing tobacco without a face-to-face purchase should be outlawed. To the extent tobacco sales are allowed to continue, the federal government should mandate that the tobacco industry contribute substantial funds for a national public education campaign to prevent young people from smoking and other tobacco use. ASCO has long advocated a substantial increase (in the range of $2) in the federal excise tax on cigarettes and other tobacco products- a measure known to decrease consumption, particularly among children. Revenue from a tax on tobacco products should be used to support retraining for tobacco farmers, biomedical research, health care delivery, and antitobacco education. United State trade policies should discourage the export

  6. American Society of Clinical Oncology guidance statement: the cost of cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meropol, Neal J; Schrag, Deborah; Smith, Thomas J; Mulvey, Therese M; Langdon, Robert M; Blum, Diane; Ubel, Peter A; Schnipper, Lowell E

    2009-08-10

    Advances in early detection, prevention, and treatment have resulted in consistently falling cancer death rates in the United States. In parallel with these advances have come significant increases in the cost of cancer care. It is well established that the cost of health care (including cancer care) in the United States is growing more rapidly than the overall economy. In part, this is a result of the prices and rapid uptake of new agents and other technologies, including advances in imaging and therapeutic radiology. Conventional understanding suggests that high prices may reflect the costs and risks associated with the development, production, and marketing of new drugs and technologies, many of which are valued highly by physicians, patients, and payers. The increasing cost of cancer care impacts many stakeholders who play a role in a complex health care system. Our patients are the most vulnerable because they often experience uneven insurance coverage, leading to financial strain or even ruin. Other key groups include pharmaceutical manufacturers that pass along research, development, and marketing costs to the consumer; providers of cancer care who dispense increasingly expensive drugs and technologies; and the insurance industry, which ultimately passes costs to consumers. Increasingly, the economic burden of health care in general, and high-quality cancer care in particular, will be less and less affordable for an increasing number of Americans unless steps are taken to curb current trends. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is committed to improving cancer prevention, diagnosis, and treatment and eliminating disparities in cancer care through support of evidence-based and cost-effective practices. To address this goal, ASCO established a Cost of Care Task Force, which has developed this Guidance Statement on the Cost of Cancer Care. This Guidance Statement provides a concise overview of the economic issues facing stakeholders in the cancer

  7. Training oncology and palliative care clinical nurse specialists in psychological skills: evaluation of a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jane E; Aitken, Susan; Watson, Nina; McVey, Joanne; Helbert, Jan; Wraith, Anita; Taylor, Vanessa; Catesby, Sarah

    2015-06-01

    National guidelines in the United Kingdom recommend training Clinical Nurse Specialists in psychological skills to improve the assessment and intervention with psychological problems experienced by people with a cancer diagnosis (National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, 2004). This pilot study evaluated a three-day training program combined with supervision sessions from Clinical Psychologists that focused on developing skills in psychological assessment and intervention for common problems experienced by people with cancer. Questionnaires were developed to measure participants' levels of confidence in 15 competencies of psychological skills. Participants completed these prior to the program and on completion of the program. Summative evaluation was undertaken and results were compared. In addition, a focus group interview provided qualitative data of participants' experiences of the structure, process, and outcomes of the program. Following the program, participants rated their confidence in psychological assessment and skills associated with providing psychological support as having increased in all areas. This included improved knowledge of psychological theories, skills in assessment and intervention and accessing and using supervision appropriately. The largest increase was in providing psycho-education to support the coping strategies of patients and carers. Thematic analysis of interview data identified two main themes including learning experiences and program enhancements. The significance of the clinical supervision sessions as key learning opportunities, achieved through the development of a community of practice, emerged. Although this pilot study has limitations, the results suggest that a combined teaching and supervision program is effective in improving Clinical Nurse Specialists' confidence level in specific psychological skills. Participants' experiences highlighted suggestions for refinement and development of the program

  8. An interprofessional palliative care oncology rehabilitation program: effects on function and predictors of program completion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasen, M R; Feldstain, A; Gravelle, D; Macdonald, N; Pereira, J

    2013-12-01

    After treatment, patients with active cancer face a considerable burden from the effects of both the disease and its treatment. The Palliative Rehabilitation Program (prp) is designed to ameliorate disease effects and to improve the patient's functioning. The present study evaluated predictors of program completion and changes in functioning, symptoms, and well-being after the program. The program received referrals for 173 patients who had finished anticancer therapy. Of those 173 patients, 116 with advanced cancer were eligible and enrolled in the 8-week interprofessional prp; 67 completed it. Measures of physical, nutritional, social, and psychological functioning were evaluated at entry to the program and at completion. Participants experienced significant improvements in physical performance (p program not challenging enough), death, and personal or unknown reasons. A normal level of C-reactive protein (program completion. Patients living with advanced cancers who underwent the interprofessional prp experienced significant improvement in functioning across several domains. Program completion can be predicted by a normal level of C-reactive protein.

  9. Recommendations on disease management for patients with advanced human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive breast cancer and brain metastases: American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishna, Naren; Temin, Sarah; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; Crews, Jennie R; Davidson, Nancy E; Esteva, Francisco J; Giordano, Sharon H; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M; Kirshner, Jeffrey J; Krop, Ian; Levinson, Jennifer; Modi, Shanu; Patt, Debra A; Perez, Edith A; Perlmutter, Jane; Winer, Eric P; Lin, Nancy U

    2014-07-01

    To provide formal expert consensus-based recommendations to practicing oncologists and others on the management of brain metastases for patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) -positive advanced breast cancer. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) convened a panel of medical oncology, radiation oncology, guideline implementation, and advocacy experts and conducted a systematic review of the literature. When that failed to yield sufficiently strong quality evidence, the Expert Panel undertook a formal expert consensus-based process to produce these recommendations. ASCO used a modified Delphi process. The panel members drafted recommendations, and a group of other experts joined them for two rounds of formal ratings of the recommendations. No studies or existing guidelines met the systematic review criteria; therefore, ASCO conducted a formal expert consensus-based process. Patients with brain metastases should receive appropriate local therapy and systemic therapy, if indicated. Local therapies include surgery, whole-brain radiotherapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery. Treatments depend on factors such as patient prognosis, presence of symptoms, resectability, number and size of metastases, prior therapy, and whether metastases are diffuse. Other options include systemic therapy, best supportive care, enrollment onto a clinical trial, and/or palliative care. Clinicians should not perform routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to screen for brain metastases, but rather should have a low threshold for MRI of the brain because of the high incidence of brain metastases among patients with HER2-positive advanced breast cancer. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  10. Bioinformatics for Precision Medicine in Oncology: principles and application to the SHIVA clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eServant

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Precision medicine (PM requires the delivery of individually adapted medical care based on the genetic characteristics of each patient and his/her tumor. The last decade witnessed the development of high-throughput technologies such as microarrays and next-generation sequencing which paved the way to PM in the field of oncology. While the cost of these technologies decreases, we are facing an exponential increase in the amount of data produced. Our ability to use this information in daily practice relies strongly on the availability of an efficient bioinformatics system that assists in the translation of knowledge from the bench towards molecular targeting and diagnosis. Clinical trials and routine diagnoses constitute different approaches, both requiring a strong bioinformatics environment capable of i warranting the integration and the traceability of data, ii ensuring the correct processing and analyses of genomic data and iii applying well-defined and reproducible procedures for workflow management and decision-making. To address the issues, a seamless information system was developed at Institut Curie which facilitates the data integration and tracks in real-time the processing of individual samples. Moreover, computational pipelines were developed to identify reliably genomic alterations and mutations from the molecular profiles of each patient. After a rigorous quality control, a meaningful report is delivered to the clinicians and biologists for the therapeutic decision. The complete bioinformatics environment and the key points of its implementation are presented in the context of the SHIVA clinical trial, a multicentric randomized phase II trial comparing targeted therapy based on tumor molecular profiling versus conventional therapy in patients with refractory cancer. The numerous challenges faced in practice during the setting up and the conduct of this trial are discussed as an illustration of PM application.

  11. Do Case Rates Affect Physicians' Clinical Practice in Radiation Oncology?: An Observational Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan A Loy

    Full Text Available Case rate payments combined with utilization monitoring may have the potential to improve the quality of care by reducing over and under-treatment. Thus, a national managed care organization introduced case rate payments at one multi-site radiation oncology provider while maintaining only fee-for-service payments at others. This study examined whether the introduction of the payment method had an effect on radiation fractions administered when compared to clinical guidelines. The number of fractions of radiation therapy delivered to patients with bone metastases, breast, lung, prostate, and skin cancer was assessed for concordance with clinical guidelines. The proportion of guideline-based care ascertained from the payer's claims database was compared before (2011 and after (2013 the payment method introduction using relative risks (RR. After the introduction of case rates, there were no significant changes in guideline-based care in breast, lung, and skin cancer; however, patients with bone metastases and prostate cancer were significantly more likely to have received guideline-based care (RR = 2.0 and 1.1, respectively, p<0.05. For the aggregate of all cancers, the under-treatment rate significantly declined (p = 0.008 from 4% to 0% after the introduction of case rate payments, while the over-treatment rate remained steady at 9%, with no significant change (p = 0.20. These findings suggest that the introduction of case rate payments did not adversely affect the rate of guideline-based care at the provider examined. Additional research is needed to isolate the effect of the payment model and assess implications in other populations.

  12. Do Case Rates Affect Physicians' Clinical Practice in Radiation Oncology?: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loy, Bryan A; Shkedy, Clive I; Powell, Adam C; Happe, Laura E; Royalty, Julie A; Miao, Michael T; Smith, Gary L; Long, James W; Gupta, Amit K

    2016-01-01

    Case rate payments combined with utilization monitoring may have the potential to improve the quality of care by reducing over and under-treatment. Thus, a national managed care organization introduced case rate payments at one multi-site radiation oncology provider while maintaining only fee-for-service payments at others. This study examined whether the introduction of the payment method had an effect on radiation fractions administered when compared to clinical guidelines. The number of fractions of radiation therapy delivered to patients with bone metastases, breast, lung, prostate, and skin cancer was assessed for concordance with clinical guidelines. The proportion of guideline-based care ascertained from the payer's claims database was compared before (2011) and after (2013) the payment method introduction using relative risks (RR). After the introduction of case rates, there were no significant changes in guideline-based care in breast, lung, and skin cancer; however, patients with bone metastases and prostate cancer were significantly more likely to have received guideline-based care (RR = 2.0 and 1.1, respectively, p<0.05). For the aggregate of all cancers, the under-treatment rate significantly declined (p = 0.008) from 4% to 0% after the introduction of case rate payments, while the over-treatment rate remained steady at 9%, with no significant change (p = 0.20). These findings suggest that the introduction of case rate payments did not adversely affect the rate of guideline-based care at the provider examined. Additional research is needed to isolate the effect of the payment model and assess implications in other populations.

  13. Optimising translational oncology in clinical practice: strategies to accelerate progress in drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahel, R; Bogaerts, J; Ciardiello, F; de Ruysscher, D; Dubsky, P; Ducreux, M; Finn, S; Laurent-Puig, P; Peters, S; Piccart, M; Smit, E; Sotiriou, C; Tejpar, S; Van Cutsem, E; Tabernero, J

    2015-02-01

    Despite intense efforts, the socioeconomic burden of cancer remains unacceptably high and treatment advances for many common cancers have been limited, suggesting a need for a new approach to drug development. One issue central to this lack of progress is the heterogeneity and genetic complexity of many tumours. This results in considerable variability in therapeutic response and requires knowledge of the molecular profile of the tumour to guide appropriate treatment selection for individual patients. While recent advances in the molecular characterisation of different cancer types have the potential to transform cancer treatment through precision medicine, such an approach presents a major economic challenge for drug development, since novel targeted agents may only be suitable for a small cohort of patients. Identifying the patients who would benefit from individual therapies and recruiting sufficient numbers of patients with particular cancer subtypes into clinical trials is challenging, and will require collaborative efforts from research groups and industry in order to accelerate progress. A number of molecular screening platforms have already been initiated across Europe, and it is hoped that these networks, along with future collaborations, will benefit not only patients but also society through cost reductions as a result of more efficient use of resources. This review discusses how current developments in translational oncology may be applied in clinical practice in the future, assesses current programmes for the molecular characterisation of cancer and describes possible collaborative approaches designed to maximise the benefits of translational science for patients with cancer. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical applications of single photon emission tomography in neuromedicine. Part 1. Neuro-oncology, epilepsy, movement disorders, cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartenstein, P.; Gruenwald, F.; Kuwert, T.; Tatsch, K.; Sabri, O.; Benkert, O.; Fahlbusch, R.; Gruender, G.; Herzholz, K.; Weiller, C.

    2000-01-01

    Single photon emission tomography is, because of its availability and the relatively low costs, the functional imaging modality currently most widely used for clinical applications in the brain. Beside the application of radiopharmaceuticals for the assessment of regional cerebral blood flow there is an increasing clinical use of more selective SPECT-radiopharmaceuticals, like amino acid analogs or receptor ligands. This article gives in its first part a critical review of the clinical applications of SPECT in neuro-oncology, epilepsy, basal ganglia disorders and cerebrovascular disease. (orig.) [de

  15. Nanotechnology in Radiation Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Andrew Z.; Tepper, Joel E.

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology, the manipulation of matter on atomic and molecular scales, is a relatively new branch of science. It has already made a significant impact on clinical medicine, especially in oncology. Nanomaterial has several characteristics that are ideal for oncology applications, including preferential accumulation in tumors, low distribution in normal tissues, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and clearance, that differ from those of small molecules. Because these properties are also well suited for applications in radiation oncology, nanomaterials have been used in many different areas of radiation oncology for imaging and treatment planning, as well as for radiosensitization to improve the therapeutic ratio. In this article, we review the unique properties of nanomaterials that are favorable for oncology applications and examine the various applications of nanotechnology in radiation oncology. We also discuss the future directions of nanotechnology within the context of radiation oncology. PMID:25113769

  16. Roadmap to a Comprehensive Clinical Data Warehouse for Precision Medicine Applications in Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foran, David J; Chen, Wenjin; Chu, Huiqi; Sadimin, Evita; Loh, Doreen; Riedlinger, Gregory; Goodell, Lauri A; Ganesan, Shridar; Hirshfield, Kim; Rodriguez, Lorna; DiPaola, Robert S

    2017-01-01

    Leading institutions throughout the country have established Precision Medicine programs to support personalized treatment of patients. A cornerstone for these programs is the establishment of enterprise-wide Clinical Data Warehouses. Working shoulder-to-shoulder, a team of physicians, systems biologists, engineers, and scientists at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey have designed, developed, and implemented the Warehouse with information originating from data sources, including Electronic Medical Records, Clinical Trial Management Systems, Tumor Registries, Biospecimen Repositories, Radiology and Pathology archives, and Next Generation Sequencing services. Innovative solutions were implemented to detect and extract unstructured clinical information that was embedded in paper/text documents, including synoptic pathology reports. Supporting important precision medicine use cases, the growing Warehouse enables physicians to systematically mine and review the molecular, genomic, image-based, and correlated clinical information of patient tumors individually or as part of large cohorts to identify changes and patterns that may influence treatment decisions and potential outcomes.

  17. Preparation in the business and practice of medicine: perspectives from recent gynecologic oncology graduates and program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlumbrecht, Matthew; Siemon, John; Morales, Guillermo; Huang, Marilyn; Slomovitz, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Preparation in the business of medicine is reported to be poor across a number of specialties. No data exist about such preparation in gynecologic oncology training programs. Our objectives were to evaluate current time dedicated to these initiatives, report recent graduate perceptions about personal preparedness, and assess areas where improvements in training can occur. Two separate surveys were created and distributed, one to 183 Society of Gynecologic Oncology candidate members and the other to 48 gynecologic oncology fellowship program directors. Candidate member surveys included questions about perceived preparedness for independent research, teaching, job-hunting, insurance, and billing. Program director surveys assessed current and desired time dedicated to the topics asked concurrently on the candidate survey. Statistical analysis was performed using Chi-squared (or Fisher's exact test if appropriate) and logistic regression. Survey response rates of candidate members and program directors were 28% and 40%, respectively. Candidate members wanted increased training in all measures except retrospective protocol writing. Female candidates wanted more training on writing letters of intent (LOI) ( p  = 0.01) and billing ( p  communication between the two may serve to achieve the educational goals of each.

  18. Sociodemographic analysis of patients in radiation therapy oncology group clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, Robert M.; Winter, Kathryn A.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Porter, Arthur T.; Roach, M.; Streeter, Oscar; Cox, James D.; Bondy, Melissa L.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the degree to which the sociodemographic characteristics of patients enrolled in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trails are representative of the general population. Methods and Materials: Sociodemographic data were collected on 4016 patients entered in 33 open RTOG studies between July 1991 and June 1994. The data analyzed included educational attainment, age, gender, and race. For comparison, we obtained similar data from the U.S. Department of Census. We also compared our RTOG data with Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data for patients who received radiation therapy, to determine how RTOG patients compared with cancer patients in general, and with patients with cancers at sites typically treated with radiotherapy. Results: Overall, the sociodemographic characteristics of patients entered in RTOG trials were similar to those of the Census data. We found that, in every age group of African-American men and at nearly every level of educational attainment, the proportion of RTOG trial participants mirrored the proportion in the census data. Significant differences were noted only in the youngest category of African-American men, where the RTOG accrues more in the lower educational categories and fewer with college experience. For African-American women, we found a similar pattern in every age group and at each level of educational attainment. As with men, RTOG trials accrued a considerably larger proportion of younger, less educated African-American women than the census reported. Using SEER for comparison, the RTOG enrolled proportionately more African-American men to trials all cancer sites combined, and for prostate and head and neck cancer. In head and neck trials, the RTOG enrolled nearly twice as many African-American men than would be predicted by SEER data. In lung cancer trials, RTOG underrepresented African-American men significantly; however, there was no difference for brain cancer trials. There were

  19. Research Areas - Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about NCI programs and initiatives that sponsor, conduct, develop, or support clinical trials, including NCI’s Clinical Trial Network (NCTN) and NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) initiatives.

  20. American Society of Clinical Oncology Obesity Initiative: Rationale, Progress, and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligibel, Jennifer A; Wollins, Dana

    2016-12-10

    Obesity is increasingly being linked to the risk of developing and dying from cancer. In recognition of the growing contribution of obesity to cancer risk and outcomes, ASCO made obesity and cancer one of its core initiatives in 2014. The goals of this initiative included raising awareness of the relationship between obesity and cancer, providing tools and resources to oncology providers and patients to help encourage conversations regarding weight management in cancer survivors, fostering a robust research agenda, and advocating for access to evidence-based weight management programs for cancer survivors. Efforts to date have included developing patient and provider toolkits focused on weight management and physical activity, publishing a policy statement outlining ASCO's initiatives in this area, and hosting a summit focused on obesity research in cancer populations. As ASCO has defined its priorities in the area of obesity and cancer, it has become increasingly clear that obesity is a problem that extends far beyond its impact on cancer risk and outcomes. Many groups, including those focused on heart disease, diabetes, and endocrinology, have been developing, testing, and implementing obesity prevention and treatment strategies for years. As ASCO moves forward with its obesity initiative, the next steps will focus on forging collaboration with groups working on obesity-related initiatives both within and outside of the field of cancer to learn from their efforts and to partner with them on efforts to increase the education of medical professionals; raising awareness in lay populations regarding the negative health consequences of obesity and effective strategies to foster weight loss; developing collaborative research initiatives; and working together to advocate for the societal changes that will be needed to combat the obesity epidemic in the United States and beyond.

  1. Microarray analysis in clinical oncology: pre-clinical optimization using needle core biopsies from xenograft tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goley, Elizabeth M; Anderson, Soni J; Ménard, Cynthia; Chuang, Eric; Lü, Xing; Tofilon, Philip J; Camphausen, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    DNA microarray profiling performed on clinical tissue specimens can potentially provide significant information regarding human cancer biology. Biopsy cores, the typical source of human tumor tissue, however, generally provide very small amounts of RNA (0.3–15 μg). RNA amplification is a common method used to increase the amount of material available for hybridization experiments. Using human xenograft tissue, we sought to address the following three questions: 1) is amplified RNA representative of the original RNA profile? 2) what is the minimum amount of total RNA required to perform a representative amplification? 3) are the direct and indirect methods of labeling the hybridization probe equivalent? Total RNA was extracted from human xenograft tissue and amplified using a linear amplification process. RNA was labeled and hybridized, and the resulting images yielded data that was extracted into two categories using the mAdb system: 'all genes' and 'outliers'. Scatter plots were generated for each slide and Pearson Coefficients of correlation were obtained. Results show that the amplification of 5 μg of total RNA yields a Pearson Correlation Coefficient of 0.752 (N = 6,987 genes) between the amplified and total RNA samples. We subsequently determined that amplification of 0.5 μg of total RNA generated a similar Pearson Correlation Coefficient as compared to the corresponding original RNA sample. Similarly, sixty-nine percent of total RNA outliers were detected with 5 μg of amplified starting RNA, and 55% of outliers were detected with 0.5 μg of starting RNA. However, amplification of 0.05 μg of starting RNA resulted in a loss of fidelity (Pearson Coefficient 0.669 between amplified and original samples, 44% outlier concordance). In these studies the direct or indirect methods of probe labeling yielded similar results. Finally, we examined whether RNA obtained from needle core biopsies of human tumor xenografts, amplified and indirectly

  2. Toward a Tiered Model to Share Clinical Trial Data and Samples in Precision Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broes, Stefanie; Lacombe, Denis; Verlinden, Michiel; Huys, Isabelle

    2018-01-01

    The recent revolution in science and technology applied to medical research has left in its wake a trial of biomedical data and human samples; however, its opportunities remain largely unfulfilled due to a number of legal, ethical, financial, strategic, and technical barriers. Precision oncology has been at the vanguard to leverage this potential of "Big data" and samples into meaningful solutions for patients, considering the need for new drug development approaches in this area (due to high costs, late-stage failures, and the molecular diversity of cancer). To harness the potential of the vast quantities of data and samples currently fragmented across databases and biobanks, it is critical to engage all stakeholders and share data and samples across research institutes. Here, we identified two general types of sharing strategies. First, open access models, characterized by the absence of any review panel or decision maker, and second controlled access model where some form of control is exercised by either the donor (i.e., patient), the data provider (i.e., initial organization), or an independent party. Further, we theoretically describe and provide examples of nine different strategies focused on greater sharing of patient data and material. These models provide varying levels of control, access to various data and/or samples, and different types of relationship between the donor, data provider, and data requester. We propose a tiered model to share clinical data and samples that takes into account privacy issues and respects sponsors' legitimate interests. Its implementation would contribute to maximize the value of existing datasets, enabling unraveling the complexity of tumor biology, identify novel biomarkers, and re-direct treatment strategies better, ultimately to help patients with cancer.

  3. Toward a Tiered Model to Share Clinical Trial Data and Samples in Precision Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Broes

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent revolution in science and technology applied to medical research has left in its wake a trial of biomedical data and human samples; however, its opportunities remain largely unfulfilled due to a number of legal, ethical, financial, strategic, and technical barriers. Precision oncology has been at the vanguard to leverage this potential of “Big data” and samples into meaningful solutions for patients, considering the need for new drug development approaches in this area (due to high costs, late-stage failures, and the molecular diversity of cancer. To harness the potential of the vast quantities of data and samples currently fragmented across databases and biobanks, it is critical to engage all stakeholders and share data and samples across research institutes. Here, we identified two general types of sharing strategies. First, open access models, characterized by the absence of any review panel or decision maker, and second controlled access model where some form of control is exercised by either the donor (i.e., patient, the data provider (i.e., initial organization, or an independent party. Further, we theoretically describe and provide examples of nine different strategies focused on greater sharing of patient data and material. These models provide varying levels of control, access to various data and/or samples, and different types of relationship between the donor, data provider, and data requester. We propose a tiered model to share clinical data and samples that takes into account privacy issues and respects sponsors’ legitimate interests. Its implementation would contribute to maximize the value of existing datasets, enabling unraveling the complexity of tumor biology, identify novel biomarkers, and re-direct treatment strategies better, ultimately to help patients with cancer.

  4. External audit of clinical practice and medical decision making in a new Asian oncology center: Results and implications for both developing and developed nations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakespeare, Thomas P.; Back, Michael F.; Lu, Jiade J.; Lee, Khai Mun; Mukherjee, Rahul K.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The external audit of oncologist clinical practice is increasingly important because of the incorporation of audits into national maintenance of certification (MOC) programs. However, there are few reports of external audits of oncology practice or decision making. Our institution (The Cancer Institute, Singapore) was asked to externally audit an oncology department in a developing Asian nation, providing a unique opportunity to explore the feasibility of such a process. Methods and Materials: We audited 100 randomly selected patients simulated for radiotherapy in 2003, using a previously reported audit instrument assessing clinical documentation/quality assurance and medical decision making. Results: Clinical documentation/quality assurance, decision making, and overall performance criteria were adequate 74.4%, 88.3%, and 80.2% of the time, respectively. Overall 52.0% of cases received suboptimal management. Multivariate analysis revealed palliative intent was associated with improved documentation/clinical quality assurance (p = 0.07), decision making (p 0.007), overall performance (p = 0.003), and optimal treatment rates (p 0.07); non-small-cell lung cancer or central nervous system primary sites were associated with better decision making (p = 0.001), overall performance (p = 0.03), and optimal treatment rates (p = 0.002). Conclusions: Despite the poor results, the external audit had several benefits. It identified learning needs for future targeting, and the auditor provided facilitating feedback to address systematic errors identified. Our experience was also helpful in refining our national revalidation audit instrument. The feasibility of the external audit supports the consideration of including audit in national MOC programs

  5. [Implementation of quality assurance program ISO 9001 in a department of paediatric oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanold, J; Halle, P; Paillard, C; Merlin, E; David, A; Levallois, S; Roudeix, D; Dugué, F; Lacaze, C; Morisset, C; Souquiere, V; Deméocq, F

    2008-02-01

    Our objective was to improve the organization and management of care facilities for children suffering from cancer or leukaemia and to be aligned with the legislation in force in France. Our report is on the successive steps for the implementation of a quality assurance system, methods used, motivations, cost, difficulties encountered as well as the advantages obtained. In the Regional Centre for Paediatric Oncology (CRCP) at the CHU in Clermont-Ferrand, we launched a quality programme based on ISO9001/2000 standards. The implementation of the quality assurance system was conducted as a research project and an established medical project with the support of the Management Team. The mission was divided into several "processes", an approach consisting of considering the clinical service in terms of flow and successions of transformations (reception, care, support, accompaniment, etc.) which produce added-value (services and products adapted to the needs of the "customers": children, families, correspondents). We singled out ten physical processes or "job specializations" such as "diagnosis", "care" or "project for the child". The cartography which is the systematic representation of the processes and the interactions between them made it possible to draw up a global vision of the CRCP "care" activity. The ISO9001/2000 standard is a tool designed to help organization and management. The benefit obtained in implementing it in a clinic was perceived in organisational terms and lead to a true team spirit, a standardization of the professional practices and the enhancement of the role of each person. The advantages appear at three levels: the child and his/her family, the medical and paramedical teams, and the administrative supervisory bodies.

  6. Clinical utility of 18-FDG-PET with a modified SPECT-camera using molecular coincidence detection in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, M. F.

    1998-09-01

    Malignant diseases are belonging to one of the most frequent reasons for mortality and morbidity of people in industrialized countries. In order to avoid inadequate therapy such as unnecessary operations etc. accurate diagnostic techniques are needed to assess malignancy of proven lesions, for staging of cancer or to assess success of therapy. Many studies have reported the value of PET in such cases. Because of limited financial resources we started PET with a Dual-head-SPECT-camera modified with a MCD-module in February 1997 in order to obtain quick access to clinical 18-FDG studies. The aim of this work was to compare the results of our system with reports of the so called 'state of the art'-PET and with other diagnostic techniques used in clinical oncology. So far 124 studies were performed with the MCD-mode using a standardized investigation protocol between February 1997 and May 1998. The applied dose of 18-FDG for oncological studies was about 185 MBq. The tracer was supplied from the radio-pharmaceutical unit of the Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen. The obtained results were carefully compared with CT, MRI and conventional radiology. In addition, the final diagnosis (based on histology, surgical reports, autopsy and follow up) was also considered. Oncological studies were done either to assess malignancy in certain lesions (n = 25), for staging cancer (n = 77), or to assess success of therapy (n = 22). Sensitivity and specificity for all oncological cases were 99 % and 89 % respectively. One false negative scan was a pretreated CNS-lymphoma, where false positive studies were due to inflammation. (author)

  7. TU-G-BRD-02: Automated Systematic Quality Assurance Program for Radiation Oncology Information System Upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, B; Yi, B; Eley, J; Mutaf, Y; Rahman, S; D’Souza, W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To: (1) describe an independent, automated, systematic software-based protocol for verifying clinical data accuracy/integrity for mitigation of data corruption/loss risks following radiation oncology information system (ROIS) upgrades; and (2) report on application of this approach in an academic/community practice environment. Methods: We propose a robust approach to perform quality assurance on the ROIS after an upgrade, targeting four data sources: (1) ROIS relational database; (2) ROIS DICOM interface; (3) ROIS treatment machine data configuration; and (4) ROIS-generated clinical reports. We investigated the database schema for differences between pre-/post-upgrade states. Paired DICOM data streams for the same object (such as RT-Plan/Treatment Record) were compared between pre-/post-upgrade states for data corruption. We examined machine configuration and related commissioning data files for changes and corruption. ROIS-generated treatment appointment and treatment parameter reports were compared to ensure patient encounter and treatment plan accuracy. This protocol was supplemented by an end-to-end clinical workflow test to verify essential ROI functionality and integrity of components interfaced during patient care chain of activities. We describe the implementation of this protocol during a Varian ARIA system upgrade at our clinic. Results: We verified 1,638 data tables with 2.4 billion data records. For 222 under-treatment patients, 605 DICOM RT plans and 13,480 DICOM treatment records retrieved from the ROIS DICOM interface were compared, with no differences in fractions, doses delivered, or treatment parameters. We identified 82 new data tables and 78 amended/deleted tables consistent with the upgrade. Reports for 5,073 patient encounters over a 2-week horizon were compared and were identical to those before the upgrade. Content in 12,237 xml machine files was compared, with no differences identified. Conclusion: An independent QA

  8. TU-G-BRD-02: Automated Systematic Quality Assurance Program for Radiation Oncology Information System Upgrades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, B; Yi, B; Eley, J; Mutaf, Y; Rahman, S; D’Souza, W [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To: (1) describe an independent, automated, systematic software-based protocol for verifying clinical data accuracy/integrity for mitigation of data corruption/loss risks following radiation oncology information system (ROIS) upgrades; and (2) report on application of this approach in an academic/community practice environment. Methods: We propose a robust approach to perform quality assurance on the ROIS after an upgrade, targeting four data sources: (1) ROIS relational database; (2) ROIS DICOM interface; (3) ROIS treatment machine data configuration; and (4) ROIS-generated clinical reports. We investigated the database schema for differences between pre-/post-upgrade states. Paired DICOM data streams for the same object (such as RT-Plan/Treatment Record) were compared between pre-/post-upgrade states for data corruption. We examined machine configuration and related commissioning data files for changes and corruption. ROIS-generated treatment appointment and treatment parameter reports were compared to ensure patient encounter and treatment plan accuracy. This protocol was supplemented by an end-to-end clinical workflow test to verify essential ROI functionality and integrity of components interfaced during patient care chain of activities. We describe the implementation of this protocol during a Varian ARIA system upgrade at our clinic. Results: We verified 1,638 data tables with 2.4 billion data records. For 222 under-treatment patients, 605 DICOM RT plans and 13,480 DICOM treatment records retrieved from the ROIS DICOM interface were compared, with no differences in fractions, doses delivered, or treatment parameters. We identified 82 new data tables and 78 amended/deleted tables consistent with the upgrade. Reports for 5,073 patient encounters over a 2-week horizon were compared and were identical to those before the upgrade. Content in 12,237 xml machine files was compared, with no differences identified. Conclusion: An independent QA

  9. Clinical PET/MR Imaging in Dementia and Neuro-Oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Otto M.; Marner, Lisbeth; Law, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of hybrid PET/MRI systems allows simultaneous multimodality image acquisition of high technical quality. This technique is well suited for the brain, and particularly in dementia and neuro-oncology. In routine use combinations of well-established MRI sequences and PET tracers....../MRI using [18F]-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine (FET) also abide to the expectations of the adaptive and versatile diagnostic tool necessary in neuro-oncology covering both simple 20 min protocols for routine treatment surveillance and complicated 90 min brain and spinal cord protocols in pediatric neuro...

  10. Can I look at my list? An evaluation of a 'prompt sheet' within an oncology outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynne-Jones, R; Ostler, P; Lumley-Graybow, S; Chait, I; Hughes, R; Grainger, J; Leverton, T J

    2006-06-01

    We introduced a patient 'prompt sheet' into our clinic between January 2004 and January 2005. The aim was to determine whether it would facilitate communication and help patients in obtaining their desired level of information about their illness, and assist with decision making. We conducted an audit survey to investigate the way follow-up takes place in our oncology clinic, to determine what works and what does not work in the clinic, and to examine how patients access the most useful information and to assess the utility of, and patient satisfaction with, a locally developed pilot prompt sheet. A single questionnaire was designed to elicit information on patients' information needs, overall satisfaction with the oncology clinic, and uptake and perceived usefulness of the prompt sheet. We carried out an audit survey in the form of a Likert-scale questionnaire (33 questions), followed immediately afterwards by a semi-structured interview. A specialist nurse asked a range of open questions about what was good and bad about the clinic and the prompt sheets. Despite efforts to ensure that all patients received the prompt-sheet leaflets, only 254 out of 300 (85%) received them. Of these, 195 (65%) felt that they were 'very helpful', and 30 (10%) found them 'fairly helpful'. However, 15 (5%) had no strong feelings and only three found them either fairly or completely unhelpful. One-third of the patients were able to ask more questions about their disease as a result of the prompt sheet, although they felt the doctor was busy and did not want to take up too much of their time. Men with prostate cancer found the prompt sheet particularly helpful to ask questions. This satisfaction audit suggests that our pilot prompt sheet is helpful to patients attending oncology outpatient appointments, particularly for men with prostate cancer. We aim to adapt the present prompt sheet on the basis of the replies obtained, and re-audit in the future.

  11. Quality Research in Radiation Oncology Analysis of Clinical Performance Measures in the Management of Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, Karyn A.; Khalid, Najma; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Minsky, Bruce D.; Crozier, Cheryl; Owen, Jean B.; Devlin, Phillip M.; Thomas, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    -based planning with use of DVH to evaluate normal tissue doses. Most patients completed adjuvant RT in the prescribed time frame. IMRT and IGRT were not routinely incorporated into clinical practice during the 2005-2007 period. These data will be a benchmark for future Quality Research in Radiation Oncology GC surveys.

  12. Quality Research in Radiation Oncology Analysis of Clinical Performance Measures in the Management of Gastric Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, Karyn A., E-mail: goodmank@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Khalid, Najma [Quality Research in Radiation Oncology, American College of Radiology Clinical Research Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Minsky, Bruce D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD, Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Crozier, Cheryl; Owen, Jean B. [Quality Research in Radiation Oncology, American College of Radiology Clinical Research Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Devlin, Phillip M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Knight Cancer Institute at the Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States)

    2013-02-01

    -based planning with use of DVH to evaluate normal tissue doses. Most patients completed adjuvant RT in the prescribed time frame. IMRT and IGRT were not routinely incorporated into clinical practice during the 2005-2007 period. These data will be a benchmark for future Quality Research in Radiation Oncology GC surveys.

  13. Strategic Plans to Promote Head and Neck Cancer Translational Research Within the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group: A Report From the Translational Research Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Christine H.; Wong, Stuart; Ang, K. Kian; Hammond, Elizabeth H.; Dicker, Adam P.; Harari, Paul M.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2007-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is the fifth most common cancer in the United States, with an overall survival rate of approximately 40-50%. In an effort to improve patient outcomes, research efforts designed to maximize benefit and reduce toxicities of therapy are in progress. Basic research in cancer biology has accelerated this endeavor and provided preclinical data and technology to support clinically relevant advances in early detection, prognostic and predictive biomarkers. Recent completion of the Human Genome Project has promoted the rapid development of novel 'omics' technologies that allow more broad based study from a systems biology perspective. However, clinically relevant application of resultant gene signatures to clinical trials within cooperative groups has advanced slowly. In light of the large numbers of variables intrinsic to biomarker studies, validation of preliminary data for clinical implementation presents a significant challenge and may only be realized with large trials that involve significant patient numbers. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Head and Neck Cancer Translational Research Program recognizes this problem and brings together three unique features to facilitate this research: (1) availability of large numbers of clinical specimens from homogeneously treated patients through multi-institutional clinical trials; (2) a team of physicians, scientists, and staff focused on patient-oriented head-and-neck cancer research with the common goal of improving cancer care; and (3) a funding mechanism through the RTOG Seed Grant Program. In this position paper we outline strategic plans to further promote translational research within the framework of the RTOG

  14. Quality of cancer family history and referral for genetic counseling and testing among oncology practices: a pilot test of quality measures as part of the American Society of Clinical Oncology Quality Oncology Practice Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Marie E; Kadlubek, Pamela; Pham, Trang H; Wollins, Dana S; Lu, Karen H; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Neuss, Michael N; Hughes, Kevin S

    2014-03-10

    Family history of cancer (CFH) is important for identifying individuals to receive genetic counseling/testing (GC/GT). Prior studies have demonstrated low rates of family history documentation and referral for GC/GT. CFH quality and GC/GT practices for patients with breast (BC) or colon cancer (CRC) were assessed in 271 practices participating in the American Society of Clinical Oncology Quality Oncology Practice Initiative in fall 2011. A total of 212 practices completed measures regarding CFH and GC/GT practices for 10,466 patients; 77.4% of all medical records reviewed documented presence or absence of CFH in first-degree relatives, and 61.5% of medical records documented presence or absence of CFH in second-degree relatives, with significantly higher documentation for patients with BC compared with CRC. Age at diagnosis was documented for all relatives with cancer in 30.7% of medical records (BC, 45.2%; CRC, 35.4%; P ≤ .001). Referall for GC/GT occurred in 22.1% of all patients with BC or CRC. Of patients with increased risk for hereditary cancer, 52.2% of patients with BC and 26.4% of those with CRC were referred for GC/GT. When genetic testing was performed, consent was documented 77.7% of the time, and discussion of results was documented 78.8% of the time. We identified low rates of complete CFH documentation and low rates of referral for those with BC or CRC meeting guidelines for referral among US oncologists. Documentation and referral were greater for patients with BC compared with CRC. Education and support regarding the importance of accurate CFH and the benefits of proactive high-risk patient management are clearly needed.

  15. How sociodemographics, presence of oncology specialists, and hospital cancer programs affect accrual to cancer treatment trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sateren, Warren B; Trimble, Edward L; Abrams, Jeffrey; Brawley, Otis; Breen, Nancy; Ford, Leslie; McCabe, Mary; Kaplan, Richard; Smith, Malcolm; Ungerleider, Richard; Christian, Michaele C

    2002-04-15

    We chose to examine the impact of socioeconomic factors on accrual to National Cancer Institute (NCI)-sponsored cancer treatment trials. We estimated the geographic and demographic cancer burden in the United States and then identified 24,332 patients accrued to NCI-sponsored cancer treatment trials during a 12-month period. Next, we examined accrual by age, sex, geographic residence, health insurance status, health maintenance organization market penetration, several proxy measures of socioeconomic status, the availability of an oncologist, and the presence of a hospital with an approved multidisciplinary cancer program. Pediatric patients were accrued to clinical trials at high levels, whereas after adolescence, only a small percentage of cancer patients were enrolled onto clinical trials. There were few differences by sex. Black males as well as Asian-American and Hispanic adults were accrued to clinical trials at lower rates than white cancer patients of the same age. Overall, the highest observed accrual was in suburban counties. Compared with the United States population, patients enrolled onto clinical trials were significantly less likely to be uninsured and more like to have Medicare health insurance. Geographic areas with higher socioeconomic levels had higher levels of clinical trial accruals. The number of oncologists and the presence of approved cancer programs both were significantly associated with increased accrual to clinical trials. We must work to increase the number of adults who enroll onto trials, especially among the elderly. Ongoing partnership with professional societies may be an effective approach to strengthen accrual to clinical trials.

  16. Engaging Future Clinical Oncology Researchers: An Initiative to Integrate Teaching of Biostatistics and Research Methodology into Specialty Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, S; Sundaresan, P; Mann, K; Pryor, D; Gebski, V; Shaw, T

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the learner's perspectives on a novel workshop programme designed to improve skills in biostatistics, research methodology and critical appraisal in oncology. Trainees were surveyed anonymously at the completion of each annual workshop from 2012 to 2015. In total, 103 trainees in years 2-4 of training in radiation oncology responded, giving a 94% survey response rate. A 1 day workshop, designed by biostatisticians and radiation oncologist facilitators, is the central component of a programme teaching skills in biostatistics, research methods and critical appraisal. This links short didactic lectures about statistical concepts to interactive trainee discussions around discipline-related publications. The workshop was run in conjunction with the major radiation oncology clinical trials group meeting with alternating programmes (A and B). Most of the participants (44-47/47 for A and 48-55/56 for B), reported that their understanding of one or more individual topics improved as a result of teaching. Refinement of the workshop over time led to a more favourable perception of the 'optimal' balance between didactic/interactive teaching: nine of 27 (33%) 'optimal' responses seen in 2013 compared with 23 of 29 (79%) in 2015 (P research to illuminate key statistical concepts. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. R-IDEAL : A Framework for Systematic Clinical Evaluation of Technical Innovations in Radiation Oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkooijen, Helena M; Kerkmeijer, LGW; Fuller, Clifton D; Huddart, Robbert; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Verheij, Marcel; Mook, Stella; Sahgal, Arjun; Hall, Emma; Schultz, Chris

    2017-01-01

    The pace of innovation in radiation oncology is high and the window of opportunity for evaluation narrow. Financial incentives, industry pressure, and patients' demand for high-tech treatments have led to widespread implementation of innovations before, or even without, robust evidence of improved

  18. Evolution of modern nuclear medicine tumor-imaging diagnostics in clinical oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piperkova, E.

    2000-01-01

    The evolution of current nuclear medicine diagnostic is closely related to the technical progress in imaging equipment development, and application of radiopharmaceuticals (Rphs) with a different tumor-uptake mechanism. It is the aim of the study to present groups of tumor-imaging Rphs differing by tumor uptake mechanisms, used in clinical oncology. The obtained results are described, and compared with the ones reported by other researchers. Sensitivity and specificity of Rphs for cardio-scintigraphy with 99m Tc - MIBI and 201 Tl are relatively high, amounting to 93.7% and 60% respectively, in the various tumors. These indicators depend on the stage, location, histopathology, level of malignancy and biological activity of the neoplasm. 99m Tc - MIBI scintigraphy is endowed with considerable diagnostic potential for assaying multiple drug resistance (MDR), and is also a good criterion for its elimination following anti-MDR therapy. The obtained results show that radioimmunoscintigraphy (RIS) using different radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) have high sensitivity and specificity respectively: 86% and 80% in ovarian carcinoma with B72.3 antiTAG; 68.6% and 92.5% in colorectal carcinoma with B73.2 antiTAG, antiCEA, antiCA 19-9; 92% and 83% in breast cancer with antiCEA, 86.8% and 67-69% in malignant melanoma with 225.28s. Receptor scintigraphy may reach up to 86% sensitivity and 100% specificity in tumors saturated with somatostatin receptors. Positron emission tomography (PET) with 18F-FDG enhances the metabolic activity of tumor cells, and attains tumor-detecting rate amounting to 97%. Tumor imaging evolution characterized by the introduction and practical implementation of different Rphs, visualizing the functional and biochemical activity of tumor cells in the primary neoplasm, sentinel lymph nodes and distant metastases. radiolabelling of a variety of new biochemical substances, including DNA and RNA, drugs and lysosomes contributes to a successful imaging

  19. Radiation Oncology Training Program Curriculum developments in Australia and New Zealand: Design, implementation and evaluation--What next?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Sandra; Seel, Matthew; Berry, Martin

    2015-12-01

    The Australian and New Zealand Radiation Oncology Training Program has undergone major changes to align with pedagogical principles and best-evidence practice. The curriculum was designed around the Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists framework and involved structural programme changes and new in-training assessment. This paper summarises the work of programme design and implementation and presents key findings from an evaluation of the revised programme. An independent team conducted the evaluation during the last year of the first 5-year curriculum cycle. Opinions were sought from trainees, supervisors and directors of training (DoTs) through online surveys, focused interviews and group consultations. One hundred nineteen participated in surveys; 211 participated in consultations. All training networks were represented. The new curriculum was viewed favourably by most participants with over 90% responding that it 'provided direction in attaining competencies'. Most (87/107; 81%) said it 'promotes regular, productive interaction between trainees and supervisors'. Adequacy of feedback to trainees was rated as only 'average' by trainees/trainers in one-third of cases. Consultations revealed this was more common where trainers were less familiar with curriculum tools. Half of DoTs/supervisors felt better supported. Nearly two-third of all responders (58/92; 63%) stated that clinical service requirements could be met during training; 17/92 (18.5%) felt otherwise. When asked about 'work-readiness', 59/90 (66%) respondents, including trainees, felt this was improved. Findings suggest that the 'new' curriculum has achieved many of its aims, and implementation has largely been successful. Outcomes focus future work on better supporting trainers in using curriculum tools and providing useful feedback to trainees. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  20. Radiation Oncology Training Program Curriculum developments in Australia and New Zealand: Design, implementation and evaluation - what next?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, Sandra; Seel, Matthew; Berry, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The Australian and New Zealand Radiation Oncology Training Program has undergone major changes to align with pedagogical principles and best-evidence practice. The curriculum was designed around the Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists framework and involved structural programme changes and new in-training assessment. This paper summarises the work of programme design and implementation and presents key findings from an evaluation of the revised programme. An independent team conducted the evaluation during the last year of the first 5-year curriculum cycle. Opinions were sought from trainees, supervisors and directors of training (DoTs) through online surveys, focused interviews and group consultations. One hundred nineteen participated in surveys; 211 participated in consultations. All training networks were represented. The new curriculum was viewed favourably by most participants with over 90% responding that it ‘provided direction in attaining competencies’. Most (87/107; 81%) said it ‘promotes regular, productive interaction between trainees and supervisors’. Adequacy of feedback to trainees was rated as only ‘average’ by trainees/trainers in one-third of cases. Consultations revealed this was more common where trainers were less familiar with curriculum tools. Half of DoTs/supervisors felt better supported. Nearly two-third of all responders (58/92; 63%) stated that clinical service requirements could be met during training; 17/92 (18.5%) felt otherwise. When asked about ‘work-readiness’, 59/90 (66%) respondents, including trainees, felt this was improved. Findings suggest that the ‘new’ curriculum has achieved many of its aims, and implementation has largely been successful. Outcomes focus future work on better supporting trainers in using curriculum tools and providing useful feedback to trainees.

  1. SU-F-P-13: NRG Oncology Medical Physics Manpower Survey Quantifying Support Demands for Multi Institutional Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monroe, J [St. Anthony’s Cancer Center, St. Louis, MO (United States); Case Western Reserve University (United States); Boparai, K [ACR, Reston, VA (United States); Xiao, Y [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Galvin, J [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Newtown, PA (United States); Sohn, J [Case Western University, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A survey was taken by NRG Oncology to assess Full Time Equivalent (FTE) contributions to multi institutional clinical trials by medical physicists.No current quantification of physicists’ efforts in FTE units associated with clinical trials is available. The complexity of multi-institutional trials increases with new technologies and techniques. Proper staffing may directly impact the quality of trial data and outcomes. The demands on physics time supporting clinical trials needs to be assessed. Methods: The NRG Oncology Medical Physicist Subcommittee created a sixteen question survey to obtain this FTE data. IROC Houston distributed the survey to their list of 1802 contact physicists. Results: After three weeks, 363 responded (20.1% response). 187 (51.5%) institutions reporting external beam participation were processed. There was a wide range in number of protocols active and supported at each institution. Of the 187 clinics, 134 (71.7%) participate in 0 to 10 trials, 28 (15%) in 11 to 20 trials, 10 (5.3%) in 21 to 30 trials, 9 (4.8%) had 40 to 75 trials. On average, physicist spent 2.7 hours (SD: 6.0) per week supervising or interacting with clinical trial staff. 1.25 hours (SD: 3.37), 1.83 hours (SD: 4.13), and 0.64 hours(SD: 1.13) per week were spent on patient simulation, reviewing treatment plans, and maintaining a DICOM server, respectively. For all protocol credentialing activities, physicist spent an average of 37.05 hours (SD: 96.94) yearly. To support dosimetrists, clinicians, and therapists, physicist spend on average 2.07 hours (SD: 3.52) per week just reading protocols. Physicist attended clinical trial meetings for on average 1.13 hours (SD: 1.85) per month. Conclusion: Responding physicists spend a nontrivial amount of time: 8.8 hours per week (0.22 FTE) supporting, on average, 9 active multi-institutional clinical trials.

  2. Basic radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyzadeoglu, M. M.; Ebruli, C.

    2008-01-01

    Basic Radiation Oncology is an all-in-one book. It is an up-to-date bedside oriented book integrating the radiation physics, radiobiology and clinical radiation oncology. It includes the essentials of all aspects of radiation oncology with more than 300 practical illustrations, black and white and color figures. The layout and presentation is very practical and enriched with many pearl boxes. Key studies particularly randomized ones are also included at the end of each clinical chapter. Basic knowledge of all high-tech radiation teletherapy units such as tomotherapy, cyberknife, and proton therapy are also given. The first 2 sections review concepts that are crucial in radiation physics and radiobiology. The remaining 11 chapters describe treatment regimens for main cancer sites and tumor types. Basic Radiation Oncology will greatly help meeting the needs for a practical and bedside oriented oncology book for residents, fellows, and clinicians of Radiation, Medical and Surgical Oncology as well as medical students, physicians and medical physicists interested in Clinical Oncology. English Edition of the book Temel Radyasyon Onkolojisi is being published by Springer Heidelberg this year with updated 2009 AJCC Staging as Basic Radiation Oncology

  3. Following patient pathways to psycho-oncological treatment: Identification of treatment needs by clinical staff and electronic screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, Fanny L; Meraner, Verena; Holzner, Bernhard; Singer, Susanne; Virgolini, Irene; Gamper, Eva M

    2018-04-01

    In this retrospective investigation of patient pathways to psycho-oncological treatment (POT), we compared the number of POT referrals before and after implementation of electronic screening for POT needs and investigated psychosocial predictors for POT wish at a nuclear medicine department. We extracted medical chart information about number of referrals and extent of follow-up contacts. During standard referral (November 2014 to October 2015), POT needs were identified by clinical staff only. In the screening-assisted referral period (November 2015 to October 2016), identification was supported by electronic screening for POT needs. Psychosocial predictors for POT wish were examined using logistic regression. We analysed data from 487 patients during standard referral (mean age 56.4 years; 60.2% female, 88.7% thyroid carcinoma or neuroendocrine tumours) of which 28 patients (5.7%) were referred for POT. Of 502 patients in the screening-assisted referral period (mean age 57.0 years; 55.8% female, 86.6% thyroid carcinoma or neuroendocrine tumours), 69 (13.7%) were referred for POT. Of these, 36 were identified by psycho-oncological (PO) screening and 33 by clinical staff. After PO-screening implementation, referrals increased by a factor of 2.4. The strongest predictor of POT wish was depressive mood (P patients visited the PO outpatient unit additionally to inpatient PO consultations. Our results provide evidence from a real-life setting that PO screening can foster POT referrals, reduce barriers to express the POT wish, and hence help to meet psychosocial needs of this specific patient group. Differences between patients' needs, wish, and POT uptake should be further investigated. © 2018 The Authors. Psycho-Oncology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Cancer Stem Cell Hypothesis for Therapeutic Innovation in Clinical Oncology? Taking the Root Out, Not Chopping the Leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzobo, Kevin; Senthebane, Dimakatso Alice; Rowe, Arielle; Thomford, Nicholas Ekow; Mwapagha, Lamech M; Al-Awwad, Nasir; Dandara, Collet; Parker, M Iqbal

    2016-12-01

    Clinical oncology is in need of therapeutic innovation. New hypotheses and concepts for translation of basic research to novel diagnostics and therapeutics are called for. In this context, the cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis rests on the premise that tumors comprise tumor cells and a subset of tumor-initiating cells, CSCs, in a quiescent state characterized by slow cell cycling and expression of specific stem cell surface markers with the capability to maintain a tumor in vivo. The CSCs have unlimited self-renewal abilities and propagate tumors through division into asymmetric daughter cells. This differentiation is induced by both genetic and environmental factors. Another characteristic of CSCs is their therapeutic resistance, which is due to their quiescent state and slow dividing. Notably, the CSC phenotype differs greatly between patients and different cancer types. The CSCs may differ genetically and phenotypically and may include primary CSCs and metastatic stem cells circulating within the blood system. Targeting CSCs will require the knowledge of distinct stem cells within the tumor. CSCs can differentiate into nontumorigenic cells and this has been touted as the source of heterogeneity observed in many solid tumors. The latter cannot be fully explained by epigenetic regulation or by the clonal evolution theory. This heterogeneity markedly influences how tumors respond to therapy and prognosis. The present expert review offers an analysis and synthesis of the latest research and concepts on CSCs, with a view to truly disruptive innovation for future diagnostics and therapeutics in clinical oncology.

  5. Establishing a Global Radiation Oncology Collaboration in Education (GRaCE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turner, Sandra; Eriksen, Jesper G; Trotter, Theresa

    2015-01-01

    Representatives from countries and regions world-wide who have implemented modern competency-based radiation- or clinical oncology curricula for training medical specialists, met to determine the feasibility and value of an ongoing international collaboration. In this forum, educational leaders...... with similar goals, would provide a valuable vehicle to ensure training program currency, through sharing of resources and expertise, and enhance high quality radiation oncology education. Potential projects for the Global Radiation Oncology Collaboration in Education (GRaCE) were agreed upon...

  6. Biophysical models in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, L.

    1984-01-01

    The paper examines and describes dose-time relationships in clinical radiation oncology. Realistic models and parameters for specific tissues, organs, and tumor types are discussed in order to solve difficult problems which arise in radiation oncology. The computer programs presented were written to: derive parameters from experimental and clinical data; plot normal- and tumor-cell survival curves; generate iso-effect tables of tumor-curative doses; identify alternative, equally effective procedures for fraction numbers and treatment times; determine whether a proposed course of treatment is safe and adequate, and what adjustments are needed should results suggest that the procedure is unsafe or inadequate; combine the physical isodose distribution with computed cellular surviving fractions for the tumor and all normal tissues traversed by the beam, estimating the risks of recurrence or complications at various points in the irradiated volume, and adjusting the treatment plan and fractionation scheme to minimize these risks

  7. SU-F-T-237: The Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC) Cooperatives Activities Supporting the NCI’s National Clinical Trial Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Galvin, J [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Newtown, PA (United States); Michalski, J [Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO (United States); Rosen, M [University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); FitzGerald, T [University of Massachusetts Medical School, Lincoln, RI (United States); Knopp, M [The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC) Cooperative has been active for the past two years supporting the National Clinical Trial Network and the details of that support are reported. Methods: There are six QA centers (Houston, Ohio, Philadelphia-RT, Philadelphia-DI, Rhode Island, St. Louis) providing an integrated RT and DI quality control program in support of the NCI’s clinical trials. The QA Center’s efforts are focused on assuring high quality data for clinical trials designed to improve the clinical outcomes for cancer patients worldwide. This program is administered through five core services: site qualification, trial design support, credentialing, data management, and case review. Results: IROC currently provides core support for 172 NCTN trials with RT, DI and RT/DI components. Many of these trials were legacy trial from the previous cooperative group program. IROC monitors nearly 1800 RT photon and 20 proton institutions. Over 28,000 beams outputs were monitored with 8% of the sites requiring repeat audits due to beam out of criteria. As part of credentialing, 950 QA phantoms have been irradiated, 515 imaging modalities evaluated and almost 4000 credentialing letters have been issued. In just year 2, 5290 RT and 4934 DI patient datasets were received (many using TRIAD) by IROC QA Centers to be prepared for review. During the past 2 years, a total of 6300 RT cases and 19,000 DI image sets were reviewed by IROC technical staff. To date, IROC has published 36 manuscripts. Conclusion: The QA services provided by IROC are numerous and are continually being evaluated for effectiveness, harmonized across all NCTN Groups and administered in an efficient and timely manner to enhance accurate and per protocol trial data submission. These efforts increase each NCTN Group’s ability to derive meaningful outcomes from their clinical trials. This work was supported by DHHS NIH grant 5U24CA180803.

  8. Adoption of an integrated radiology reading room within a urologic oncology clinic: initial experience in facilitating clinician consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Lepor, Herbert; Taneja, Samir S; Recht, Michael P

    2014-05-01

    The authors describe their initial experience in implementing an integrated radiology reading room within a urologic oncology clinic, including the frequency and nature of clinician consultations and the perceived impact on patient management by clinicians. A radiology reading room was established within an office-based urologic oncology clinic in proximity to the surgeon's work area. A radiologist was present in this reading room for a 3-hour shift each day. The frequency and nature of consultations during these shifts were recorded. Also, the clinic's staff completed a survey assessing perceptions of the impact of the integrated reading room on patient management. One hundred two consultations occurred during 57 included dates (average, 1.8 consultations per shift): 52% for review of external cases brought in by patients on discs, 43% for review of internal cases, and 5% for direct review by the radiologist of imaging with patients. The maximum number of consultations during a single shift was 8. All of the clinic's urologists indicated that >90% of consultations benefited patient care. The clinicians indicated tendencies to view consultations as affecting management in the majority of cases, to be more likely to seek consultation for outside imaging when the radiologist was on site, and to be less likely to repeat outside imaging when the radiologist was on site. The integrated reading room within the clinic has potential to improve the quality of care, for instance by facilitating increased review of outside imaging studies and thereby potentially reducing duplicate ordering and by enabling occasional direct image review with patients by radiologists. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Are routine visits to oncology clinics the most appropriate way to follow-up breast cancer patients?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkbride, Peter; Vallis, Katherine

    1997-01-01

    Purpose The routine follow-up at oncology clinics, of patients treated for breast cancer is believed to serve two purposes: to facilitate early detection of loco-regional recurrences and new primary tumors, and to provide psychological support for patients. Since it does not translate into improved survival, early detection of distant metastatic disease is not a priority. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of routine clinic review in detecting loco-regional relapse following treatment for breast cancer. Materials and Methods The charts of all 579 patients with stage I, II and III breast cancer seen for the first time at our institution in 1982 were reviewed. Treatment consisted of mastectomy (367 cases), lumpectomy alone (53), or lumpectomy plus radiotherapy (159). Follow-up policy stipulated that patients were seen every 3 months for the first 2 years after primary treatment, every 6 months for the next 3 years and annually thereafter. Annual mammograms were performed. Results Thirteen patients were lost to follow-up during the 14 year study period. Loco-regional recurrence was diagnosed in 184 patients. Recurrent disease were detected by the patient (79 cases, 45%), at routine mammography (13 cases, 7%), at visits to physicians other than oncologists(40 cases, 22%). In 18 cases, the method of detection was unknown and only 34 (18%) loco-regional recurrences were detected at routine visits to oncology clinics. It is calculated that this group of patients attended approximately 11,000 follow-up clinic appointments over the period in question. Even if we assume that the 18 cases in which the method of detection was unknown were in fact detected at a visit to an oncology clinic, then the rate of detection is only 1 local recurrence per 212 visits. Conclusion Given the apparent limitations of routine follow-up, other methods of surveillance such as open access to a Breast Cancer Resource Centre merit investigation. It is imperative that non

  10. Evaluation of the quality of the reporting of phase II clinical trials in oncology: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivoirard, Romain; Langrand-Escure, Julien; Oriol, Mathieu; Tinquaut, Fabien; Chauvin, Franck; Rancoule, Chloé; Magné, Nicolas; Bourmaud, Aurélie

    2018-05-01

    To describe the current state of knowledge concerning the quality of reporting in phase II clinical trials in oncology and to describe the various methods published allowing this quality evaluation. databases including MEDLINE and COCHRANE were searched. Reviews and meta-analyses analyzing the quality of the reporting of phase II trials in oncology were included. Descriptive analysis of the results was performed. Thirteen publications were retained. Only 2 publications adopted a systematic approach of evaluation of the quality of reporting by overall scores. The Key Methodological Score (KMS), proposed by Grellety et al., gathering 3 items, seemed adapted for such an evaluation. A score of 3/3 was found in 16.1% of the 156 phase II trials analysed by this score. The other reviews used a qualitative analysis to evaluate the reporting, via an analysis of a single criterion, generally the statistical plan of the study. This item was considered as having been correctly reported in less than 50% of the analysed articles. The quality of reporting in phase II trials in oncology is a field that has been investigated very little (13 publications). When it is studied, the estimated level of quality is not satisfactory, whatever the method employed. The use of an overall score of evaluation is a path which should be pursued, in order to get reliable results. It also seems necessary to propose strong recommendations, which would create a consensus for the methodology and the reporting of these studies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Helping the helpers: mindfulness training for burnout in pediatric oncology--a pilot program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Karen; Kramer, Deborah; Santizo, Ruth O; Magro, Laurence; Wyshogrod, Diane; Ambrosio, John; Castillo, Catalina; Lieberman, Rhonda; Stein, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Burnout, a syndrome of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and diminished feelings of accomplishment, is common among pediatric oncology staff. This study explores a mindfulness-based course (MBC) to decrease burnout in a multidisciplinary group of pediatric oncology staff members in the United States and Israel. Forty-eight participants, mostly nurses, were randomized to either the MBC intervention or a control group. MBC participants received eight weekly sessions of mindfulness education. The primary outcome studied was burnout. Secondary outcomes studied included depression and perceived stress. Nearly 100% of the subjects exhibited signs of burnout at baseline and MBC did not result in any significant improvement in scores on burnout, perceived stress or depression scales. Qualitative analysis of diaries kept by subjects revealed reduced stress, improved inner peace, compassion and joy, better focus and self-awareness and less somatic symptoms in the intervention arm. Burnout is a major problem in pediatric oncology staff. Mindfulness practices can be taught in the workplace and may be a useful component of a multidimensional strategy to reduce burnout in this population.

  12. Factors influencing patients seeking oral health care in the oncology dental support clinic at an urban university dental school setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Dale M; Walker, Mary P; Liu, Ying; Mitchell, Tanya Villalpando

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify predictors and/or factors associated with medically compromised patients seeking dental care in the oncology dental support clinic (ODSC) at the University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC) School of Dentistry. An 18-item survey was mailed to 2,541 patients who were new patients to the clinic from 2006 to 2011. The response rate was approximately 18% (n = 450). Analyses included descriptive statistics of percentages/frequencies as well as predictors based on correlations. Fifty percent of participants, 100 females and 119 males, identified their primary medical diagnosis as cancer. Total household income (p dental care (p dental health. Perceived overall health (p Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Use of partnership strategies to build radiation oncology disparities research programs in five Western Pennsylvania communities: an organizational case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenlander, Keith H; Heron, Dwight E; Schenken, Larry L

    2009-01-01

    Many cancer treatment and prevention trials as well as surveillance programs suffer from a disproportionately low rate of accrual and a high rate of noncompliance or dropouts of racial minorities and the poor. One suggested strategy to help remediate this trend is to directly involve those targeted populations within the development, implementation, and evaluation of these services. The Radiation Oncology Community Outreach Group (ROCOG) and Neighborhood Cancer Care Cooperative (NCCC) are designed based upon this type of highly collaborative organizational structure, consistent with the general principles of community-based participatory research. Funded by the National Cancer Institute Cancer Disparities Research Partnership program, ROCOG/NCCC provide oncology-focused, community hospital-based initiatives intended to help close the cancer disparities gap. This article presents a descriptive case study of the organizational and political process that preceded our grant proposal submission, the potential benefits and difficulties associated with our extensive collaborative model, and an example of how highly competitive health care organizations can become partners in narrowly focused initiatives aimed at a greater social good.

  14. Clinical impact of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) on oncological patients and their potentially application context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, O.

    2006-01-01

    (PET) Positron Emission Tomography is a technique of nuclear medicine that has ability of detecting cancer through mechanisms based on molecular alterations of neoplastic processes. This review describes the PET Oncology applications and discusses the potential application of this technology in the sanitary and national academic framework . The most widely used in Oncology plotter is an analogue of laglucosa labelled with fluo: 18F-2-fluoro-2-Deoxy-D-glucose (FDG). In this way, the PET detects tumour retention of FDG, due to the highest glycolytic of cancer cells. In addition, the PET allow the study of the entire body at the same exploratory and some teams are coupled to systems of axial tomography (PET-CT). By ET-FDG, it is possible to diagnose, staging and restaged the majority of cancers, with diagnostic accuracy close to 90 per cent higher than the values provided by the conventional imaging techniques such. It is also possible to know early response to cancer treatments and obtain relevant medical prognosis information. (author) [es

  15. American Society of Clinical Oncology Summit on Addressing Obesity Through Multidisciplinary Provider Collaboration: Key Findings and Recommendations for Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligibel, Jennifer A; Alfano, Catherine M; Hershman, Dawn L; Merrill, Janette K; Basen-Engquist, Karen; Bloomgarden, Zachary T; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Dixon, Suzanne; Hassink, Sandra G; Jakicic, John M; Morton, John Magaña; Okwuosa, Tochi M; Powell-Wiley, Tiffany M; Rothberg, Amy E; Stephens, Mark; Streett, Sarah E; Wild, Robert A; Westman, Eric A; Williams, Ronald J; Wollins, Dana S; Hudis, Clifford A

    2017-11-01

    Given the increasing evidence that obesity increases the risk of developing and dying from malignancy, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) launched an Obesity Initiative in 2013 that was designed to increase awareness among oncology providers and the general public of the relationship between obesity and cancer and to promote research in this area. Recognizing that the type of societal change required to impact the obesity epidemic will require a broad-based effort, ASCO hosted the "Summit on Addressing Obesity through Multidisciplinary Collaboration" in 2016. This meeting was held to review current challenges in addressing obesity within the respective health care provider communities and to identify priorities that would most benefit from a collective and cross-disciplinary approach. Efforts focused on four key areas: provider education and training; public education and activation; research; and policy and advocacy. Summit attendees discussed current challenges in addressing obesity within their provider communities and identified priorities that would most benefit from multidisciplinary collaboration. A synopsis of recommendations to facilitate future collaboration, as well as examples of ongoing cooperative efforts, provides a blueprint for multidisciplinary provider collaboration focused on obesity prevention and treatment. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  16. Oncologic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bragg, D.G.; Rubin, P.; Youker, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on nuclear medicine. Topics considered include the classification of cancers, oncologic diagnosis, brain and spinal cord neoplasms, lymph node metastases, the larynx and hypopharynx, thyroid cancer, breast cancer, esophageal cancer, bladder cancer, tumors of the skeletal system, pediatric oncology, computed tomography and radiation therapy treatment planning, and the impact of future technology on oncologic diagnosis

  17. Examining the sustainability of Screening for Distress, the sixth vital sign, in two outpatient oncology clinics: A mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groff, Shannon; Holroyd-Leduc, Jayna; White, Deborah; Bultz, Barry D

    2018-01-01

    Research indicates that cancer patients experience significant multifactorial distress during their journey. To address this, cancer centers are implementing Screening for Distress programs; however, little is known about the sustainability of these programs. This study sought to examine the sustainability of a Screening for Distress program in 2 cancer clinics 6 months post implementation. A mixed-methods cross-sectional design was utilized. To determine if screening rates, screening conversations and appropriate interventions occurred and the charts of 184 consecutive patients attending the head and neck or neuro-oncology clinics over a 3 week period were reviewed. To examine the barriers and facilitators of sustainability, 16 semi-structured interviews with administrators, physicians, and nurses were conducted. Of the 184 charts reviewed, 163 (88.6%) had completed screening tools. Of these 163, 130 (79.8%) indicated that a conversation occurred with the patient about the identified distress as reported on the screening tool. Of the 89 (54.6%) charts where the need for an intervention was indicated, 68 (76.4%) had an intervention documented. Six oncologists, 7 nurses, and 3 administrators were interviewed, and 5 themes which influenced the sustainability of the program emerged: (1) attitudes, knowledge, and beliefs about the program; (2) implementation approach; (3) outcome expectancy of providers; (4) integration with existing practices; and (5) external factors. This study suggests that Screening for Distress was largely sustained, possibly due to positive attitudes and outcome expectancy. However, sustainability may be enhanced by formally integrating screening with existing practices, addressing potential knowledge gaps, and ensuring engagement with all stakeholder groups. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Comparison of Onsite Versus Online Chart Reviews as Part of the American College of Radiation Oncology Accreditation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T; Heron, Dwight E; Mundt, Arno J; Yashar, Catheryn; Feigenberg, Steven; Koltis, Gordon; Regine, William F; Prasad, Dheerendra; Patel, Shilpen; Sharma, Navesh; Hebert, Mary; Wallis, Norman; Kuettel, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Accreditation based on peer review of professional standards of care is essential in ensuring quality and safety in administration of radiation therapy. Traditionally, medical chart reviews have been performed by a physical onsite visit. The American College of Radiation Oncology Accreditation Program has remodeled its process whereby electronic charts are reviewed remotely. Twenty-eight radiation oncology practices undergoing accreditation had three charts per practice undergo both onsite and online review. Onsite review was performed by a single reviewer for each practice. Online review consisted of one or more disease site-specific reviewers for each practice. Onsite and online reviews were blinded and scored on a 100-point scale on the basis of 20 categories. A score of less than 75 was failing, and a score of 75 to 79 was marginal. Any failed charts underwent rereview by a disease site team leader. Eighty-four charts underwent both onsite and online review. The mean scores were 86.0 and 86.9 points for charts reviewed onsite and online, respectively. Comparison of onsite and online reviews revealed no statistical difference in chart scores ( P = .43). Of charts reviewed, 21% had a marginal (n = 8) or failing (n = 10) score. There was no difference in failing charts ( P = .48) or combined marginal and failing charts ( P = .13) comparing onsite and online reviews. The American College of Radiation Oncology accreditation process of online chart review results in comparable review scores and rate of failing scores compared with traditional on-site review. However, the modern online process holds less potential for bias by using multiple reviewers per practice and allows for greater oversight via disease site team leader rereview.

  19. A peer review process as part of the implementation of clinical pathways in radiation oncology: Does it improve compliance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhardt, Brian J; Heron, Dwight E; Beriwal, Sushil

    Clinical pathways are patient management plans that standardize evidence-based practices to ensure high-quality and cost-effective medical care. Implementation of a pathway is a collaborative process in our network, requiring the active involvement of physicians. This approach promotes acceptance of pathway recommendations, although a peer review process is necessary to ensure compliance and to capture and approve off-pathway selections. We investigated the peer review process and factors associated with time to completion of peer review. Our cancer center implemented radiation oncology pathways for every disease site throughout a large, integrated network. Recommendations are written based upon national guidelines, published literature, and institutional experience with evidence evaluated hierarchically in order of efficacy, toxicity, and then cost. Physicians enter decisions into an online, menu-driven decision support tool that integrates with medical records. Data were collected from the support tool and included the rate of on- and off-pathway selections, peer review decisions performed by disease site directors, and time to complete peer review. A total of 6965 treatment decisions were entered in 2015, and 605 (8.7%) were made off-pathway and were subject to peer review. The median time to peer review decision was 2 days (interquartile range, 0.2-6.8). Factors associated with time to peer review decision >48 hours on univariate analysis include disease site (P peer review (P 48 hours. Clinical pathways are an integral tool for standardizing evidence-based care throughout our large, integrated network, with 91.3% of all treatment decisions being made as per pathway. The peer review process was feasible, with peer review of treatment decisions encourages compliance with clinical pathway recommendations. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Investigation of the Microsoft Kinect v2 Sensor as a Multi-Purpose Device for a Radiation Oncology Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Evan Asher

    For a radiation oncology clinic, the number of devices available to assist in the workflow for radiotherapy treatments are quite numerous. Processes such as patient verification, motion management, or respiratory motion tracking can all be improved upon by devices currently on the market. These three specific processes can directly impact patient safety and treatment efficacy and, as such, are important to track and quantify. Most products available will only provide a solution for one of these processes and may be outside the reach of a typical radiation oncology clinic due to difficult implementation and incorporation with already existing hardware. This manuscript investigates the use of the Microsoft Kinect v2 sensor to provide solutions for all three processes all while maintaining a relatively simple and easy to use implementation. To assist with patient verification, the Kinect system was programmed to create a facial recognition and recall process. The basis of the facial recognition algorithm was created by utilizing a facial mapping library distributed by Microsoft within the Software Developers Toolkit (SDK). Here, the system extracts 31 fiducial points representing various facial landmarks. 3D vectors are created between each of the 31 points and the magnitude of each vector is calculated by the system. This allows for a face to be defined as a collection of 465 specific vector magnitudes. The 465 vector magnitudes defining a face are then used in both the creation of a facial reference data set and subsequent evaluations of real-time sensor data in the matching algorithm. To test the algorithm, a database of 39 faces was created, each with 465 vectors derived from the fiducial points, and a one-to-one matching procedure was performed to obtain sensitivity and specificity data of the facial identification system. In total, 5299 trials were performed and threshold parameters were created for match determination. Optimization of said parameters in the

  1. Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urology Association combined clinical management guidelines for prostate cancer 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljubran, Ali; Abusamra, Ashraf; Alkhateeb, Sultan; Alotaibi, Mohammed; Rabah, Danny; Bazarbashi, Shouki; Alkushi, Hussain; Al-Mansour, Mubarak; Alharbi, Hulayel; Eltijani, Amin; Alghamdi, Abdullah; Alsharm, Abdullah; Ahmad, Imran; Murshid, Esam

    2018-01-01

    This is an update to the previously published Saudi guidelines for the evaluation and medical and surgical management of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is categorized according to the stage of the disease using the tumor node metastasis staging system 7 th edition. The guidelines are presented with supporting evidence levels based on a comprehensive literature review, several internationally recognized guidelines, and the collective expertise of the guidelines committee members (authors) who were selected by the Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urological Association. Local factors, such as availability, logistic feasibility, and familiarity of various treatment modalities, have been taken into consideration. These guidelines should serve as a roadmap for the urologists, oncologists, general physicians, support groups, and health-care policymakers in the management of patients diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the prostate.

  2. Clinical use of organic near-infrared fluorescent contrast agents in image-guided oncologic procedures and its potential in veterinary oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favril, Sophie; Abma, Eline; Blasi, Francesco; Stock, Emmelie; Devriendt, Nausikaa; Vanderperren, Katrien; de Rooster, Hilde

    2018-04-28

    One of the major challenges in surgical oncology is the intraoperative discrimination of tumoural versus healthy tissue. Until today, surgeons rely on visual inspection and palpation to define the tumoural margins during surgery and, unfortunately, for various cancer types, the local recurrence rate thus remains unacceptably high. Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging is an optical imaging technique that can provide real-time preoperative and intraoperative information after administration of a fluorescent probe that emits NIR light once exposed to a NIR light source. This technique is safe, cost-effective and technically easy. Several NIR fluorescent probes are currently studied for their ability to highlight neoplastic cells. In addition, NIR fluorescence imaging holds great promise for sentinel lymph node mapping. The aim of this manuscript is to provide a literature review of the current organic NIR fluorescent probes tested in the light of human oncology and to introduce fluorescence imaging as a valuable asset in veterinary oncology. © British Veterinary Association (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. The role of radiation therapy in childhood acute leukemia. A review from the viewpoint of basic and clinical radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Miwako

    2003-01-01

    Radiation therapy has been playing important roles in the treatment of childhood acute leukemia since the 1970s. The first is the preventive cranial irradiation for central nervous system therapy in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The second is the total body irradiation as conditioning before bone marrow transplantation for children with acute myeloid leukemia in first remission and with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in second remission. Although some late effects have been reported, a part of them could be overcome by technical improvement in radiation and salvage therapy. Radiation therapy for children might have a successful outcome on a delicate balance between efficiencies and potential late toxicities. The role of radiation therapy for childhood acute leukemia was reviewed from the standpoint of basic and clinical radiation oncology in this paper. (author)

  4. Routine administration of standardized questionnaires that assess aspects of patients quality of life in medical oncology clinics: A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsaleh, Kh.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Increasing interest in the Quality of Life outcomes in cancer patients led to increase implementation of their use in routine clinical practice. The aim of this systemic review is to review the scientific evidence behind recommending the use of quality of life (QoL) scales routinely in outpatient evaluation. Methods: Systematic review for all published randomized controlled trials in English language between January 1, 1990 till December 31, 2012. Out of 487 articles (476 identified by electronic search + 11 articles identified by manual search), six trials satisfied the eligibility criteria: (1) the study was a randomized controlled trial (RCT) with randomization of patients or health care providers; (2) the findings of the administered questionnaire or scale (the intervention) were given to health care provider, and compared to standard care with no questionnaire administered (the control); (3) study was conducted in outpatient oncology clinics; and (4) an outcome was measured that related to (i) QoL improvement, (ii) reduction in morbidity, (iii) reduction in stress for the patients, (iv) improvement in communication between patients and health care provider, or (v) improved patient satisfaction. Assessment for the quality of the study was done using the GRADE methodology. Results: Serious methodological issues were affecting most of the trials. Overall the evaluation of the quality of the evidence from these identified trials suggests that there is a weak recommendation to use QoL scales in routine oncology practice to improve communication between physicians and patients. Conclusion: The routine use of such tools in the outpatient settings at improving the patient outcome or satisfaction cannot be recommended based on the available evidence. The potential harm with the excess use of resources needed to implement, collect, store, analyse, and present such data to health care providers should be also considered. Further research and better designed

  5. Developing a mentoring program in clinical nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martindale, Robert G; McClave, Stephen; Heyland, Daren; August, David

    2010-01-01

    Mentoring programs in nutrition are essential to the survival of clinical nutrition as we know it today. The best method known to maintain an influx of talent to a discipline is by developing an active mentoring program. This paper describes 1 concept for development of a viable mentor program. Mentoring should be flexible and based on mentees' training background. Realistic goals should be set, with written and verbal feedback, to sustain a successful program. Programs should incorporate the Socratic Method whenever possible. Factors that leave doubt about the survival of nutrition as a viable area of focus for physicians include the inability to generate adequate funds to support oneself and limited numbers of mentors available with dedicated time to be a mentor. A healthy, sustainable mentoring program in clinical nutrition will ensure survival of physician-based nutrition programs.

  6. Ethical issues at the interface of clinical care and research practice in pediatric oncology: a narrative review of parents' and physicians' experiences.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, M.C. de; Houtlosser, M.; Wit, J.M.; Engberts, D.P.; Bresters, D.; Kaspers, G.J.L.; Leeuwen, E. van

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pediatric oncology has a strong research culture. Most pediatric oncologists are investigators, involved in clinical care as well as research. As a result, a remarkable proportion of children with cancer enrolls in a trial during treatment. This paper discusses the ethical consequences

  7. American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists guideline recommendations for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 testing in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolff, Antonio C.; Hammond, M. Elizabeth H.; Schwartz, Jared N.; Hagerty, Karen L.; Allred, D. Craig; Cote, Richard J.; Dowsett, Mitchell; Fitzgibbons, Patrick L.; Hanna, Wedad M.; Langer, Amy; McShane, Lisa M.; Paik, Soonmyung; Pegram, Mark D.; Perez, Edith A.; Press, Michael F.; Rhodes, Anthony; Sturgeon, Catharine; Taube, Sheila E.; Tubbs, Raymond; Vance, Gail H.; van de Vijver, Marc; Wheeler, Thomas M.; Hayes, Daniel F.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop a guideline to improve the accuracy of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) testing in invasive breast cancer and its utility as a predictive marker. METHODS: The American Society of Clinical Oncology and the College of American Pathologists convened an expert panel,

  8. American Society of Clinical Oncology/College Of American Pathologists guideline recommendations for immunohistochemical testing of estrogen and progesterone receptors in breast cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammond, M.E.; Hayes, D.F.; Dowsett, M.; Allred, D.C.; Hagerty, K.L.; Badve, S.; Fitzgibbons, P.L.; Francis, G.; Goldstein, N.S.; Hayes, M.; Hicks, D.G.; Lester, S.; Love, R.; Mangu, P.B.; McShane, L.; Miller, K.; Osborne, C.K.; Paik, S.; Perlmutter, J.; Rhodes, A.; Sasano, H.; Schwartz, J.N.; Sweep, F.C.; Taube, S.; Torlakovic, E.E.; Valenstein, P.; Viale, G.; Visscher, D.; Wheeler, T.; Williams, R.B.; Wittliff, J.L.; Wolff, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop a guideline to improve the accuracy of immunohistochemical (IHC) estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PgR) testing in breast cancer and the utility of these receptors as predictive markers. METHODS: The American Society of Clinical Oncology and the College of

  9. American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists guideline recommendations for immunohistochemical testing of estrogen and progesterone receptors in breast cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammond, M.E.; Hayes, D.F.; Dowsett, M.; Allred, D.C.; Hagerty, K.L.; Badve, S.; Fitzgibbons, P.L.; Francis, G.; Goldstein, N.S.; Hayes, M.; Hicks, D.G.; Lester, S.; Love, R.; Mangu, P.B.; McShane, L.; Miller, K.; Osborne, C.K.; Paik, S.; Perlmutter, J.; Rhodes, A.; Sasano, H.; Schwartz, J.N.; Sweep, F.C.; Taube, S.; Torlakovic, E.E.; Valenstein, P.; Viale, G.; Visscher, D.; Wheeler, T.; Williams, R.B.; Wittliff, J.L.; Wolff, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop a guideline to improve the accuracy of immunohistochemical (IHC) estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PgR) testing in breast cancer and the utility of these receptors as predictive markers. METHODS: The American Society of Clinical Oncology and the College of

  10. American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists guideline recommendations for immunohistochemical testing of estrogen and progesterone receptors in breast cancer (unabridged version).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammond, M.E.; Hayes, D.F.; Dowsett, M.; Allred, D.C.; Hagerty, K.L.; Badve, S.; Fitzgibbons, P.L.; Francis, G.; Goldstein, N.S.; Hayes, M.; Hicks, D.G.; Lester, S.; Love, R.; Mangu, P.B.; McShane, L.; Miller, K.; Osborne, C.K.; Paik, S.; Perlmutter, J.; Rhodes, A.; Sasano, H.; Schwartz, J.N.; Sweep, F.C.; Taube, S.; Torlakovic, E.E.; Valenstein, P.; Viale, G.; Visscher, D.; Wheeler, T.; Williams, R.B.; Wittliff, J.L.; Wolff, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop a guideline to improve the accuracy of immunohistochemical (IHC) estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PgR) testing in breast cancer and the utility of these receptors as predictive markers. METHODS: The American Society of Clinical Oncology and the College of

  11. Correction for Partial Volume Effect Is a Must, Not a Luxury, to Fully Exploit the Potential of Quantitative PET Imaging in Clinical Oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alavi, Abass; Werner, Thomas J; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2018-01-01

    The partial volume effect (PVE) is considered as one of the major degrading factors impacting image quality and hampering the accuracy of quantitative PET imaging in clinical oncology. This effect is the consequence of the limited spatial resolution of whole-body PET scanners, which results in bl...

  12. Attitudes of Oncologists, Oncology Nurses, and Patients from a Women's Clinic Regarding Medical Decision Making for Older and Younger Breast Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisecker, Analee E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Administered Beisecker Locus of Authority in Decision Making: Breast Cancer survey to 67 oncologists, 94 oncology nurses, and 288 patients from women's clinic. All groups believed that physicians should have dominant role in decision making. Nurses felt that patients should have more input than patients or physicians felt they should. Physicians…

  13. Smoking cessation results in a clinical lung cancer screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borondy Kitts, Andrea K; McKee, Andrea B; Regis, Shawn M; Wald, Christoph; Flacke, Sebastian; McKee, Brady J

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer screening may provide a "teachable moment" for promoting smoking cessation. This study assessed smoking cessation and relapse rates among individuals undergoing follow-up low-dose chest computed tomography (CT) in a clinical CT lung screening program and assessed the influence of initial screening results on smoking behavior. Self-reported smoking status for individuals enrolled in a clinical CT lung screening program undergoing a follow-up CT lung screening exam between 1st February, 2014 and 31st March, 2015 was retrospectively reviewed and compared to self-reported smoking status using a standardized questionnaire at program entry. Point prevalence smoking cessation and relapse rates were calculated across the entire population and compared with exam results. All individuals undergoing screening fulfilled the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology: Lung Cancer Screening v1.2012(®) high-risk criteria and had an order for CT lung screening. A total of 1,483 individuals underwent a follow-up CT lung screening exam during the study interval. Smoking status at time of follow-up exam was available for 1,461/1,483 (98.5%). A total of 46% (678/1,461) were active smokers at program entry. The overall point prevalence smoking cessation and relapse rates were 20.8% and 9.3%, respectively. Prior positive screening exam results were not predictive of smoking cessation (OR 1.092; 95% CI, 0.715-1.693) but were predictive of reduced relapse among former smokers who had stopped smoking for 2 years or less (OR 0.330; 95% CI, 0.143-0.710). Duration of program enrollment was predictive of smoking cessation (OR 0.647; 95% CI, 0.477-0.877). Smoking cessation and relapse rates in a clinical CT lung screening program rates are more favorable than those observed in the general population. Duration of participation in the screening program correlated with increased smoking cessation rates. A positive exam result correlated with reduced

  14. Relationship between physicians' perceived stigma toward depression and physician referral to psycho-oncology services on an oncology/hematology ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won-Hyoung; Bae, Jae-Nam; Lim, Joohan; Lee, Moon-Hee; Hahm, Bong-Jin; Yi, Hyeon Gyu

    2018-03-01

    This study was performed to identify relationships between physicians' perceived stigma toward depression and psycho-oncology service utilization on an oncology/hematology ward. The study participants were 235 patients in an oncology/hematology ward and 14 physicians undergoing an internal medicine residency training program in Inha University Hospital (Incheon, South Korea). Patients completed the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), and residents completed the Perceived Devaluation-Discrimination scale that evaluates perceived stigma toward depression. A total PHQ-9 score of ≥5 was defined as clinically significant depression. Physicians decided on referral on the basis of their opinions and those of their patients. The correlates of physicians' recommendation for referral to psycho-oncology services and real referrals psycho-oncology services were examined. Of the 235 patients, 143 had PHQ-9 determined depression, and of these 143 patients, 61 received psycho-oncology services. Physicians recommended that 87 patients consult psycho-oncology services. Multivariate analyses showed that lower physicians' perceived stigma regarding depression was significantly associated with physicians' recommendation for referral, and that real referral to psycho-oncology services was significantly associated with presence of a hematologic malignancy and lower physicians' perceived stigma toward depression. Physicians' perceived stigma toward depression was found to be associated with real referral to psycho-oncology services and with physician recommendation for referral to psycho-oncology services. Further investigations will be needed to examine how to reduce physicians' perceived stigma toward depression. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF MUCOSITIS AT AN ONCOLOGY OUTPATIENT CLINIC: A COLLECTIVE CONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Dantas Lopes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo fue elaborar un protocolo asistencial de enfermería para prevención y tratamiento de la mucositis inducida por quimioterapia en un ambulatorio de un Centro de Alta Complejidad en Oncología. Investigación cualitativa del tipo Convergente- Asistencial. La construcción del protocolo fue orientada por los criterios de la Práctica Basada en Evidencias. La recopilación de datos fue realizada en el periodo de enero a junio de 2013 en dos etapas. Inicialmente, recopilamos datos en los historiales médicos de los clientes, con el fin de conocer datos sociodemográficos y terapéuticos e intervenciones de enfermería para prevención, detección y tratamiento de la mucositis. Después de esta primera etapa, se procedió a la realización de talleres con las enfermeras, con miras a la validación de los recursos materiales y humanos disponibles, además de los cuidados razonables para componer el protocolo. Han surgido cuidados relacionados con la higiene oral, enjuague bucal, crioterapia, terapia láser y intervenciones relacionadas con el ámbito nutricional. La implementación de este protocolo de cuidados estandarizó las estrategias de cuidado.

  16. Managing brain metastases patients with and without radiotherapy: initial lessonsfrom a team-based consult service through a multidisciplinary integrated palliative oncology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hellen; Sinnarajah, Aynharan; Enns, Bert; Voroney, Jon-Paul; Murray, Alison; Pelletier, Guy; Wu, Jackson Sai-Yiu

    2013-12-01

    A new ambulatory consultative clinic with integrated assessments by palliative care, radiation oncology, and allied health professionals was introduced to (1) assess patients with brain metastases at a regional comprehensive cancer center and (2) inform and guide patients on management strategies, including palliative radiotherapy, symptom control, and end-of-life care issues. We conducted a quality assurance study to inform clinical program development. Between January 2011 and May 2012, 100 consecutive brain metastases patients referred and assessed through a multidisciplinary clinic were evaluated for baseline characteristics, radiotherapy use, and supportive care decisions. Overall survival was examined by known prognostic groups. Proportion of patients receiving end-of-life radiotherapy (death within 30 and 14 days of brain radiotherapy) was used as a quality metric. The median age was 65 years, with non-small cell lung cancer (n = 38) and breast cancer (n = 23) being the most common primary cancers. At least 57 patients were engaged in advance care planning discussions at first consult visit. In total, 75 patients eventually underwent brain radiotherapy, whereas 25 did not. The most common reasons for nonradiotherapy management were patient preference and rapid clinical deterioration. Overall survival for prognostic subgroups was consistent with literature reports. End-of-life brain radiotherapy was observed in 9 % (death within 30 days) and 1 % (within 14 days) of treated patients. By integrating palliative care expertise to address the complex needs of patients with newly diagnosed brain metastases, end-of-life radiotherapy use appears acceptable and improved over historical rates at our institution. An appreciable proportion of patients are not suitable for palliative brain radiotherapy or opt against this treatment option, but the team approach involving nurses, palliative care experts, allied health, and clinical oncologists facilitates

  17. Neuro-Oncology Branch Appointment - what happens at the clinical center | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Happens When I Get To The Clinical Center at NIH? 1. Visit the Admissions Department Registering is the first step to being evaluated by the Brain Tumor Clinic. Visit Admissions to get registered as a patient. They will ask you for your contact information and provide you with a patient identification number. 2. Proceed to the NOB Clinic Proceed to the Brain Tumor Clinic on the 13th floor.

  18. Instruction in medical ethics during clinical training for medical students. Report on experience in radio-oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, C.; Lenk, C.; Koelbl, O.

    2006-01-01

    The article gives a review of the current state of education in medical ethics in Germany. The issue is considered from the viewpoint of radio-oncology. Both the pertinent literature and our own experience in teaching medical ethics are presented. In October 2003, medical ethics was integrated into the curriculum of medicine. The aim was to train competence in the field of personal attitudes and to intensify skills of moral reasoning. Our own experiences are positive, which is in accordance with the reports of other working groups. Most of the students were interested in education in medical ethics and looked upon ethical training as being an important part of their studies. Medical students are interested in ethical education during the clinical period of their studies, which has been taken into account since the actual change of the curriculum. Radio-oncologists as specialists in other clinical fields can offer important contributions when they discuss clinical cases from the viewpoint of medical ethics. The long-term effect of such an education will become the subject of future research. (orig.) [de

  19. MIBG avidity correlates with clinical features, tumor biology, and outcomes in neuroblastoma: A report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, Steven G; Mody, Rajen; Naranjo, Arlene; Van Ryn, Collin; Russ, Douglas; Oldridge, Derek; Kreissman, Susan; Baker, David L; Parisi, Marguerite; Shulkin, Barry L; Bai, Harrison; Diskin, Sharon J; Batra, Vandana; Maris, John M; Park, Julie R; Matthay, Katherine K; Yanik, Gregory

    2017-11-01

    Prior studies suggest that neuroblastomas that do not accumulate metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) on diagnostic imaging (MIBG non-avid) may have more favorable features compared with MIBG avid tumors. We compared clinical features, biologic features, and clinical outcomes between patients with MIBG nonavid and MIBG avid neuroblastoma. Patients had metastatic high- or intermediate-risk neuroblastoma and were treated on Children's Oncology Group protocols A3973 or A3961. Comparisons of clinical and biologic features according to MIBG avidity were made with chi-squared or Fisher exact tests. Event-free (EFS) and overall (OS) survival compared using log-rank tests and modeled using Cox models. Thirty of 343 patients (8.7%) had MIBG nonavid disease. Patients with nonavid tumors were less likely to have adrenal primary tumors (34.5 vs. 57.2%; P = 0.019), bone metastases (36.7 vs. 61.7%; P = 0.008), or positive urine catecholamines (66.7 vs. 91.0%; P neuroblastoma have lower rates of adrenal primary tumors, bone metastasis, and catecholamine secretion. Despite being more likely to have MYCN-amplified tumors, these patients have superior outcomes compared with patients with MIBG avid disease. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Systemic therapy in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer:American Society of Clinical Oncology and Cancer Care Ontario clinical practice guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Ethan; Loblaw, D Andrew; Oliver, Thomas K; Carducci, Michael; Chen, Ronald C; Frame, James N; Garrels, Kristina; Hotte, Sebastien; Kattan, Michael W; Raghavan, Derek; Saad, Fred; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Walker-Dilks, Cindy; Williams, James; Winquist, Eric; Bennett, Charles L; Wootton, Ted; Rumble, R Bryan; Dusetzina, Stacie B; Virgo, Katherine S

    2014-10-20

    To provide treatment recommendations for men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The American Society of Clinical Oncology and Cancer Care Ontario convened an expert panel to develop evidence-based recommendations informed by a systematic review of the literature. When added to androgen deprivation, therapies demonstrating improved survival, improved quality of life (QOL), and favorable benefit-harm balance include abiraterone acetate/prednisone, enzalutamide, and radium-223 ((223)Ra; for men with predominantly bone metastases). Improved survival and QOL with moderate toxicity risk are associated with docetaxel/prednisone. For asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic men, improved survival with unclear QOL impact and low toxicity are associated with sipuleucel-T. For men who previously received docetaxel, improved survival, unclear QOL impact, and moderate to high toxicity risk are associated with cabazitaxel/prednisone. Modest QOL benefit (without survival benefit) and high toxicity risk are associated with mitoxantrone/prednisone after docetaxel. No benefit and excess toxicity are observed with bevacizumab, estramustine, and sunitinib. Continue androgen deprivation (pharmaceutical or surgical) indefinitely. Abiraterone acetate/prednisone, enzalutamide, or (223)Ra should be offered; docetaxel/prednisone should also be offered, accompanied by discussion of toxicity risk. Sipuleucel-T may be offered to asymptomatic/minimally symptomatic men. For men who have experienced progression with docetaxel, cabazitaxel may be offered, accompanied by discussion of toxicity risk. Mitoxantrone may be offered, accompanied by discussion of limited clinical benefit and toxicity risk. Ketoconazole or antiandrogens (eg, bicalutamide, flutamide, nilutamide) may be offered, accompanied by discussion of limited known clinical benefit. Bevacizumab, estramustine, and sunitinib should not be offered. There is insufficient evidence to evaluate optimal sequences or

  1. Anesthesia Practice in Pediatric Radiation Oncology: Mayo Clinic Arizona's Experience 2014-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurmi, Narjeet; Patel, Perene; Koushik, Sarang; Daniels, Thomas; Kraus, Molly

    2018-02-01

    Understanding the goals of targeted radiation therapy in pediatrics is critical to developing high quality and safe anesthetic plans in this patient population. An ideal anesthetic plan includes allaying anxiety and achieving optimal immobilization, while ensuring rapid and efficient recovery. We conducted a retrospective chart review of children receiving anesthesia for radiation oncology procedures from 1/1/2014 to 7/31/2016. No anesthetics were excluded from the analysis. The electronic anesthesia records were analyzed for perianesthetic complications along with efficiency data. To compare our results to past and current data, we identified relevant medical literature covering a period from 1984-2017. A total of 997 anesthetic procedures were delivered in 58 unique patients. The vast majority of anesthetics were single-agent anesthesia with propofol. The average duration of radiation treatment was 13.24 min. The average duration of anesthesia was 37.81 min, and the average duration to meet discharge criteria in the recovery room was 29.50 min. There were seven instances of perianesthetic complications (0.7%) and no complications noted for the 80 CT simulations. Two of the seven complications occurred in patients receiving total body irradiation. The 5-year survival rate for pediatric cancers has improved greatly in part due to more effective and targeted radiation therapy. Providing an anesthetic with minimal complications is critical for successful daily radiation treatment. The results of our data analysis corroborate other contemporary studies showing minimal risk to patients undergoing radiation therapy under general anesthesia with propofol. Our data reveal that single-agent anesthesia with propofol administered by a dedicated anesthesia team is safe and efficient and should be considered for patients requiring multiple radiation treatments under anesthesia.

  2. Increasing Minority Enrollment Onto Clinical Trials: Practical Strategies and Challenges Emerge From the NRG Oncology Accrual Workshop

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Sandra E.; Muller, Carolyn Y.; Robinson, William; Walker, Eleanor M.; Yeager, Kate; Cook, Elise D.; Friedman, Sue; Somkin, Carol P.; Brown, Carol Leslie; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta

    2015-01-01

    US clinical research programs must generate and embrace new ideas and pilot test novel recruitment strategies if they are to maintain their historic role as world leaders in cancer care innovation and delivery.

  3. The effects of a multimodal training program on burnout syndrome in gynecologic oncology nurses and on the multidisciplinary psychosocial care of gynecologic cancer patients: an Italian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, F N; Arnaboldi, Paola; Santoro, L; D'Anna, E; Beltrami, C; Mazzoleni, E M; Veronesi, P; Maggioni, A; Didier, F

    2013-06-01

    In cancer care, the burden of psycho-emotional elements involved on the patient-healthcare provider relationship cannot be ignored. The aim of this work is to have an impact on the level of burnout experienced by European Institute of Oncology (IEO) gynecologic oncology nurses (N = 14) and on quality of multidisciplinary team work. We designed a 12 session multimodal training program consisting of a 1.5 hour theoretical lesson on a specific issue related to gynecologic cancer patient care, 20 minute projection of a short film, and 1.75 hours of role-playing exercises and experiential exchanges. The Link Burnout Questionnaire (Santinello, 2007) was administered before and after the completion of the intervention. We also monitored the number of patients referred to the Psycho-oncology Service as an indicator of the efficacy of the multidisciplinary approach. After the completion of the program, the general level of burnout significantly diminished (p = 0.02); in particular, a significant decrease was observed in the "personal inefficacy" subscale (p = 0.01). The number of patients referred to the Psycho-oncology Service increased by 50%. Nurses are in the first line of those seeing patients through the entire course of the disease. For this reason, they are at a particularly high risk of developing work-related distress. Structured training programs can be a valid answer to work-related distress, and feeling part of a multidisciplinary team helps in providing patients with better psychosocial care.

  4. The clinical significance of quality of life assessments in oncology: a summary for clinicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloan, Jeff A.; Frost, Marlene H.; Berzon, Rick; Dueck, Amylou; Guyatt, Gordon; Moinpour, Carol; Sprangers, Mirjam; Ferrans, Carol; Cella, David

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A series of six manuscripts with an introduction appeared in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings, based upon the collective effort of 30 individuals with an interest and expertise in assessing the clinical significance of quality of life (QOL) assessments. The series of manuscripts described the

  5. Clinical Oncology Society of Australia position statement on the use of complementary and alternative medicine by cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Lesley; Harris, Jessica; Katris, Paul; Cain, Michael; Dhillon, Haryana; Koczwara, Bogda; Olver, Ian; Robotin, Monica

    2014-12-01

    Health professionals involved in the clinical management of cancer are becoming increasingly aware that their patients use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). As cancer incidence and survival rates increase, use of CAM is also likely to increase. This paper outlines the position of the Clinical Oncology Society of Australia (COSA) on the use of CAM by cancer patients and provides guidance for health professionals involved with the treatment of cancer patients who are using or wish to use CAM. Key definitions and common communication scenarios are presented along with evidence-based recommended steps for health professionals when discussing CAM use. COSA encourages health professionals to focus on open discussion with their patients regarding CAM, to become familiar with reputable resources for CAM information, to discuss with patients the concept of evidence-based medicine, to recognize limitations to their knowledge of CAM and seek further advice when necessary, and to be respectful of the patients' right to autonomy. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Systematic in-vitro evaluation of the NCI/NIH Developmental Therapeutics Program Approved Oncology Drug Set for the identification of a candidate drug repertoire for MLL-rearranged leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoeksema KA

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Kimberley A Hoeksema1, Aarthi Jayanthan1, Todd Cooper2, Lia Gore3, Tanya Trippett4, Jessica Boklan6, Robert J Arceci5, Aru Narendran11Division of Pediatric Oncology, Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, AB, Canada; 2Aflac Cancer Center and Blood Disorders Service, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Children's Hospital, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USA; 4Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA; 5Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA; 6Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, AZ, USAAbstract: Despite significant progress made in the overall cure rate, the prognosis for relapsed and refractory malignancies in children remains extremely poor. Hence, there is an urgent need for studies that enable the timely selection of appropriate agents for Phase I clinical studies. The Pediatric Oncology Experimental Therapeutics Investigators' Consortium (POETIC is systematically evaluating libraries of known and novel compounds for activity against subsets of high-risk pediatric malignancies with defined molecular aberrations for future clinical development. In this report, we describe the in-vitro activity of a diverse panel of approved oncology drugs against MLL-rearranged pediatric leukemia cell lines. Agents in the Approved Oncology Drug Set II (National Cancer Institute/National Institutes of Health Developmental Therapeutics Program were evaluated by in-vitro cytotoxicity assays in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia cell lines with MLL gene rearrangements. Validation studies were carried out with patient leukemia cells in culture. Comparative analysis for toxicity against nonmalignant cells was evaluated in normal bone marrow stromal cells and normal human lymphocytes. Results from this study show that 42 of the 89 agents tested have

  7. Approval procedures for clinical trials in the field of radiation oncology; Genehmigungsverfahren klinischer Studien im Bereich der Radioonkologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Monique; Buettner, Daniel [Deutsches Konsortium fuer Translationale Krebsforschung (DKTK), Dresden (Germany); Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Medizinische Fakultaet und Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie und OncoRay - Nationales Zentrum fuer Strahlenforschung in der Onkologie, Dresden (Germany); Habeck, Matthias; Habeck, Uta; Brix, Gunnar [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz (BfS), Fachbereich Strahlenschutz und Gesundheit, Neuherberg (Germany); Krause, Mechthild; Baumann, Michael [Deutsches Konsortium fuer Translationale Krebsforschung (DKTK), Dresden (Germany); Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Medizinische Fakultaet und Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie und OncoRay - Nationales Zentrum fuer Strahlenforschung in der Onkologie, Dresden (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, Institut fuer Radioonkologie und OncoRay - Nationales Zentrum fuer Strahlenforschung in der Onkologie, Dresden (Germany); Willich, Normann [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie - Radioonkologie, Muenster (Germany); Wenz, Frederik [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim, Universitaet Heidelberg, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Mannheim (Germany); Schmidberger, Heinz [Universitaetsmedizin Mainz, Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Mainz (Germany); Debus, Juergen [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Heidelberg (Germany); Noelling, Torsten

    2015-12-15

    Application of ionizing radiation for the purpose of medical research in Germany needs to be approved by the national authority for radiation protection (Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, BfS). For studies in the field of radiation oncology, differentiation between use of radiation for ''medical care (Heilkunde)'' versus ''medical research'' frequently leads to contradictions. The aim of this article is to provide principle investigators, individuals, and institutions involved in the process, as well as institutional review or ethics committees, with the necessary information for this assessment. Information on the legal frame and the approval procedures are also provided. A workshop was co-organized by the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO), the Working Party for Radiation Oncology (ARO) of the German Cancer Society (DKG), the German Society for Medical Physics (DGMP), and the German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) in October 2013. This paper summarizes the results of the workshop and the follow-up discussions between the organizers and the BfS. Differentiating between ''Heilkunde'' which does not need to be approved by the BfS and ''medical research'' is whether the specific application of radiation (beam quality, dose, schedule, target volume, etc.) is a clinically established and recognized procedure. This must be answered by the qualified physician(s) (''fachkundiger Arzt'' according to German radiation protection law) in charge of the study and the treatments of the patients within the study, taking into consideration of the best available evidence from clinical studies, guidelines and consensus papers. Among the important parameters for assessment are indication, total dose, and fractionation. Radiation treatments applied outside clinical trials do not require approval by the BfS, even if they are applied within a randomized or nonrandomized clinical trial

  8. Summary of presentations from the 46th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology: focus on non-small cell lung cancer (2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Baggstrom, Maria Q; Somaiah, Neeta; Simon, George R; Govindan, Ramaswamy

    2011-01-01

    The promising results of crizotinib in molecularly selected patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumor cells had a novel fusion protein involving anaplastic lymphoma kinase presented at the 2010 American Society of Clinical Oncology reinforce once again the importance of understanding molecular heterogeneity of lung cancer and careful patient selection. Several other important issues were the subject of presentations related to lung cancer at the recently concluded American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting. The articles covered a wide variety of topics including optimal staging techniques to detect mediastinal nodal involvement, the role of platinum-based doublet chemotherapy in the management of elderly patients with advanced NSCLC, use of maintenance therapy with gemcitabine, and the impact of early introduction of organized palliative care in improving the quality of life of patients with advanced NSCLC. This report provides a brief overview of the presentations related to lung cancer that are relevant to clinical practice and future research.

  9. A critical appraisal of the clinical utility of proton therapy in oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongxu

    2015-01-01

    Proton therapy is an emerging technology for providing radiation therapy to cancer patients. The depth dose distribution of a proton beam makes it a preferable radiation modality as it reduces radiation to the healthy tissue outside the tumor, compared with conventional photon therapy. While theoretically beneficial, its clinical values are still being demonstrated from the increasing number of patients treated with proton therapy, from several dozen proton therapy centers around the world. High equipment and facility costs are often the major obstacle for its wider adoption. Because of the high cost and lack of definite clinical evidence of its superiority, proton therapy treatment faces criticism on its cost-effectiveness. Technological development is causing a gradual lowering of costs, and research and clinical studies are providing further evidence on its clinical utility. PMID:26604838

  10. Clinical Pharmacology of Kinase Inhibitors in Oncology : Personalized and Optimzed Dosing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheijen, Remy B.

    2017-01-01

    Kinase inhibitors are an important category of molecularly targeted therapies used for cancer. Verheijen’s doctoral thesis describes several clinical pharmacological studies to optimize and personalize the treatment of cancer with kinase inhibitors, using pharmacokinetics, molecular imaging and

  11. What does physicians' clinical expertise contribute to oncologic decision-making? A qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salloch, Sabine; Otte, Ina; Reinacher-Schick, Anke; Vollmann, Jochen

    2018-02-01

    Physicians' clinical expertise forms an exclusive body of competences, which helps them to find the appropriate diagnostics and treatment for each individual patient. Empirical evidence, however, suggests that there is an inverse relationship between the number of years in practice and the quality of care provided by a physician. Knowledge and adherence to professional standards (such as clinical guidelines) are often used as indicators in previous research. Semistructured interviews and the Q method were used for an explorative study on oncologists' views on the interplay between their own clinical expertise, intuition, and the external evidence incorporated in clinical guidelines. The interviews were audio recorded, transcribed ad verbatim, and analysed using qualitative content analysis. Data analysis shows the complex character of clinical expertise with respect to experience, professional development, and intuition. An irreplaceable role is attributed to personal and bodily experience during the providing of care for a patient. Professional experience becomes important, particularly in those situations that lie out of the focus of "guideline medicine." Intuition is regarded as having a strong emotional component and helps for deciding which therapeutic option the patient can deal with. Using measurable knowledge and adherence to standards as indicators does not account for the complexity of clinical expertise. Other factors, such as the importance of bodily experience and physicians' intuitive knowledge, must be considered, also with respect to the occurrence of treatment biases. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Radiation oncology and medical physicists quality assurance in British Columbia Cancer Agency Provincial Prostate Brachytherapy Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Mira; Morris, William James; Spadinger, Ingrid; Araujo, Cynthia; Cheung, Arthur; Chng, Nick; Crook, Juanita; Halperin, Ross; Lapointe, Vince; Miller, Stacy; Pai, Howard; Pickles, Tom

    2013-01-01

    To describe in detail British Columbia (BC) Cancer Agency (BCCA) Provincial Prostate Brachytherapy (PB) Quality Assurance (QA) Program. The BCCA PB Program was established in 1997. It operates as one system, unified and supported by electronic and information systems, making it a single PB treatment provider for province of BC and Yukon. To date, >4000 patients have received PB (450 implants in 2011), making it the largest program in Canada. The Program maintains a large provincial prospective electronic database with records on all patients, including disease characteristics, risk stratification, pathology, preplan and postimplant dosimetric data, follow-up of prostate-specific antigen, and toxicity outcomes. QA was an integral part of the program since its inception. A formal QA Program was established in 2002, with key components that include: unified eligibility criteria and planning system, comprehensive database, physics and oncologist training and mentorship programs, peer review process, individual performance outcomes and feedback process, structured continuing education and routine assessment of the program's dosimetry, toxicity and prostate-specific antigen outcomes, administration and program leadership that promotes a strong culture of patient safety. The emphasis on creating a robust, broad-based network of skilled providers has been achieved by the program's requirements for training, education, and the QA process. The formal QA process is considered a key factor for the success of cancer control outcomes achieved at BCCA. Although this QA model may not be wholly transferable to all PB programs, some of its key components may be applicable to other programs to ensure quality in PB and patient safety. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Continual reassessment method for dose escalation clinical trials in oncology: a comparison of prior skeleton approaches using AZD3514 data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Gareth D; Symeonides, Stefan N; Marshall, Jayne; Young, Julia; Clack, Glen

    2016-08-31

    The continual reassessment method (CRM) requires an underlying model of the dose-toxicity relationship ("prior skeleton") and there is limited guidance of what this should be when little is known about this association. In this manuscript the impact of applying the CRM with different prior skeleton approaches and the 3 + 3 method are compared in terms of ability to determine the true maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and number of patients allocated to sub-optimal and toxic doses. Post-hoc dose-escalation analyses on real-life clinical trial data on an early oncology compound (AZD3514), using the 3 + 3 method and CRM using six different prior skeleton approaches. All methods correctly identified the true MTD. The 3 + 3 method allocated six patients to both sub-optimal and toxic doses. All CRM approaches allocated four patients to sub-optimal doses. No patients were allocated to toxic doses from sigmoidal, two from conservative and five from other approaches. Prior skeletons for the CRM for phase 1 clinical trials are proposed in this manuscript and applied to a real clinical trial dataset. Highly accurate initial skeleton estimates may not be essential to determine the true MTD, and, as expected, all CRM methods out-performed the 3 + 3 method. There were differences in performance between skeletons. The choice of skeleton should depend on whether minimizing the number of patients allocated to suboptimal or toxic doses is more important. NCT01162395 , Trial date of first registration: July 13, 2010.

  14. 7th annual congress of the Swiss Society of Nuclear Medicine (SGNM/SSMN). Main topic: imaging in oncology. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Program chart and compiled abstracts of the 7th annual congress of the Swiss Society of Nuclear Medicine (SGNM/SSMN). Session headers are: imaging in oncology: PET-CT; oncology: therapy; imaging in oncology: treatment response; oncology: peptides; oncology: basic scinence; imaging in oncology: bone and soft tissue tumors; instrumentation; oncology: imaging. (uke)

  15. Early detection and successful treatment of Wernicke's encephalopathy in outpatients without the complete classic triad of symptoms who attended a psycho-oncology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Hideki; Ishida, Mayumi; Tanahashi, Iori; Takahashi, Takao; Ikebuchi, Kenji; Taji, Yoshitada; Kato, Hisashi; Akechi, Tatsuo

    2018-02-26

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a neuropsychiatric disorder caused by a thiamine deficiency. Although WE has been recognized in cancer patients, it can be overlooked because many patients do not exhibit symptoms that are typical of WE, such as delirium, ataxia, or ocular palsy. Furthermore, outpatients with WE who intermittently present at psycho-oncology clinics have not been described as far as we can ascertain. This report describes two patients who did not exhibit the complete classic triad of symptoms among a series with cancer and WE, and who attended a psycho-oncology outpatient clinic. Result Case 1, a 76-year-old woman with pancreatic cancer and liver metastasis, periodically attended a psycho-oncology outpatient clinic. She presented with delirium and ataxia as well as appetite loss that had persisted for 8 weeks. We suspected WE, which was confirmed by low serum thiamine levels and the disappearance of delirium after thiamine administration. Case 2, a 79-year-old man with advanced stomach cancer, was referred to a psycho-oncology outpatient clinic with depression that had persisted for about 1 month. He also had appetite loss that had persisted for several weeks. He became delirious during the first visit to the outpatient clinic. Our initial suspicion of WE was confirmed by low serum thiamine levels and the disappearance of delirium after thiamine administration. The key indicator of a diagnosis of WE in both patients was appetite loss. Significance of results This report emphasizes awareness of WE in the outpatient setting, even when patients do not exhibit the classical triad of WE. Appetite loss might be the key to a diagnosis of WE in the absence of other causes of delirium.

  16. Fast Neutron Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Final Report of a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Randomized Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laramore, G. E.; Krall, J. M.; Thomas, F. J.; Russell, K. J.; Maor, M. H.; Hendrickson, F. R.; Martz, K. L.; Griffin, T. W.; Davis, L. W.

    1993-01-01

    Between June 1977 and April 1983 the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) sponsored a Phase III randomized trial investigating the use of fast neutron radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced (Stages C and D1) adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland. Patients were randomized to receive either conventional photon radiation or fast neutron radiation used in a mixed-beam (neutron/photon) treatment schedule. A total of 91 analyzable patients were entered into the study, and the two patient groups were balanced with respect to the major prognostic variables. Actuarial curves are presented for local/regional control and "overall" survival. Ten-year results for clinically assessed local control are 70% for the mixed-beam group versus 58% for the photon group (p = 0.03) and for survival are 46% for the mixed-beam group versus 29% for the photon group (p = 0.04). This study suggests that a regional method of treatment can influence both local tumor control and survival in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland.

  17. Clinical training: a simulation program for phlebotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araki Toshitaka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Basic clinical skills training in the Japanese medical education system has traditionally incorporated on-the-job training with patients. Recently, the complementary use of simulation techniques as part of this training has gained popularity. It is not known, however, whether the participants view this new type of education program favorably; nor is the impact of this program known. In this study we developed a new simulation-based training program in phlebotomy for new medical residents and assessed their satisfaction with the program Methods The education program comprised two main components: simulator exercise sessions and the actual drawing of blood from other trainees. At the end of the session, we surveyed participant sentiment regarding the program. Results There were 43 participants in total. In general, they were highly satisfied with the education program, with all survey questions receiving scores of 3 or more on a scale of 1–5 (mean range: 4.3 – 4.8, with 5 indicating the highest level of satisfaction. Additionally, their participation as a 'patient' for their co-trainees was undertaken willingly and was deemed to be a valuable experience. Conclusion We developed and tested an education program using a simulator for blood collection. We demonstrated a high satisfaction level among the participants for this unique educational program and expect that it will improve medical training, patient safety, and quality of care. The development and dissemination of similar educational programs involving simulation for other basic clinical skills will be undertaken in the future.

  18. Slow-release granisetron (APF530) versus palonosetron for chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting: analysis by American Society of Clinical Oncology emetogenicity criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftopoulos, Harry; Boccia, Ralph; Cooper, William; O'Boyle, Erin; Gralla, Richard J

    2015-09-01

    APF530 is a novel sustained-release formulation of granisetron. In a Phase III trial, APF530 500 mg was noninferior to palonosetron 0.25 mg in preventing acute chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) after moderately (MEC) or highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC) and delayed CINV after MEC, but not superior in preventing delayed CINV after HEC. Emetogenicity was classified by Hesketh criteria; this reanalysis uses newer American Society of Clinical Oncology criteria. Complete responses (no emesis or rescue medication) after cycle one were reanalyzed after reclassification of MEC and HEC by American Society of Clinical Oncology criteria. APF530 maintained noninferiority to palonosetron. Single-dose APF530 is a promising alternative to palonosetron for preventing acute and delayed CINV after MEC or HEC. The Clinicaltrials.gov identifier for this study is NCT00343460.

  19. Phase III clinical evaluation of gadoteridol injection: Experience in pediatric neuro-oncologic MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debatin, J.F.; Nadel, S.N.; Gray, L.; Trotter, P.; Friedman, H.S.; Hockenberger, B.; Oakes, W.J.

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-two pediatric patients with known CNS neoplasms underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging before and after intravenous injection of 0.1 mmol/kg gadoteridol injection as part of a Phase IIIB open label multicenter clinical trial. Intravenous adminstration of this neutral, nonionic contrast agent was found to be safe in children. No clinically relevant changes in vital signs or laboratory values were attributed to the administration of gadoteridol injection. There were no systemic complaints. The imaging characteristics of gadoteridol in pediatric CNS disease appeared similar to those of gadopentetate dimeglumine. The very low toxicity, inherent to this nonionic low osmolal paramagnetic contrast formulation may allow administration of increased doses at increased infusion rates for an increased number of indications with improved sensitivity. (orig.)

  20. [Role of multicenter study groups for clinical research in hematology and oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökbuget, N; Hoelzer, D

    2009-04-01

    During the past 25 years a highly effective infrastructure for clinical trials was developed in hematology. Following initial funding by the BMFT (Ministry for Research and Technology) a number of large multicenter study groups for leukemia and lymphoma were developed. Treatment results from these studies often represent the"gold standard". However, since no standard therapy is defined for these diseases, the study groups aim to treat all patients within treatment optimization trials (TOT) to combine research and care. They contribute considerably to quality control in therapy and diagnostics, e.g., by establishing central reference laboratories. The regulatory requirements for clinical trials were extended considerably after the activation of the 12th drug law and TOTs now have to fulfill requirements similar to registration trials in the pharmaceutical industry. Due to the considerable bureaucratic effort and increased costs, only few large multicenter trials could thereafter be initiated and a substantial disadvantage for independent academic research becomes clearly evident.

  1. Next-generation mTOR inhibitors in clinical oncology: how pathway complexity informs therapeutic strategy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wander, Seth A

    2011-04-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a PI3K-related kinase that regulates cell growth, proliferation, and survival via mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTORC2. The mTOR pathway is often aberrantly activated in cancers. While hypoxia, nutrient deprivation, and DNA damage restrain mTORC1 activity, multiple genetic events constitutively activate mTOR in cancers. Here we provide a brief overview of the signaling pathways up- and downstream of mTORC1 and -2, and discuss the insights into therapeutic anticancer targets - both those that have been tried in the clinic with limited success and those currently under clinical development - that knowledge of these pathways gives us.

  2. Using Big Data in oncology to prospectively impact clinical patient care: A proof of concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougoud-Chauvin, Vérène; Lee, Jae Jin; Santos, Edgardo; Williams, Vonetta L; Battisti, Nicolò M L; Ghia, Kavita; Sehovic, Marina; Croft, Cortlin; Kim, Jongphil; Balducci, Lodovico; Kish, Julie A; Extermann, Martine

    2018-04-17

    Big Data is widely seen as a major opportunity for progress in the practice of personalized medicine, attracting the attention from medical societies and presidential teams alike as it offers a unique opportunity to enlarge the base of evidence, especially for older patients underrepresented in clinical trials. This study prospectively assessed the real-time availability of clinical cases in the Health & Research Informatics Total Cancer Care™ (TCC) database matching community patients with cancer, and the impact of such a consultation on treatment. Patients aged 70 and older seen at the Lynn Cancer Institute (LCI) with a documented malignancy were eligible. Geriatric screening information and the oncologist's pre-consultation treatment plan were sent to Moffitt. A search for similar patients was done in TCC and additional information retrieved from Electronic Medical Records. A report summarizing the data was sent and the utility of such a consultation was assessed per email after the treatment decision. Thirty one patients were included. The geriatric screening was positive in 87.1% (27) of them. The oncogeriatric consultation took on average 2.2 working days. It influenced treatment in 38.7% (12), and modified it in 19.4% (6). The consultation was perceived as "somewhat" to "very useful" in 83.9% (26). This study establishes a proof of concept of the feasibility of real time use of Big Data for clinical practice. The geriatric screening and the consultation report influenced treatment in 38.7% of cases and modified it in 19.4%, which compares very well with oncogeriatric literature. Additional steps are needed to render it financially and clinically viable. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Breast-conserving therapy as a model for creating new knowledge in clinical oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Jay R.

    1995-01-01

    New knowledge can be derived from various kinds of studies. Studies of innovative approaches are the basis for progress. Some advances in treatment are so obvious that they do not need formal testing; e.g., penicillin for pneumococcal infection. For comparing interventions with small differences in efficacy or in groups without predictable outcome, prospective randomized trials are the 'gold standard'. However, randomized trials are cumbersome, expensive, and potentially difficult for both patients and physicians. Retrospective studies are less valid scientifically because they are more likely to suffer from bias, misclassification, confounding variables, and the use of multiple comparisons. Retrospective studies can be made more valid by first specifying the study design and analysis, but are generally most useful to generate hypotheses to be tested more formally. Retrospective studies can be particularly useful in improving outcome by identifying 'problems' and their causes. An important issue for radiation oncologists in doing retrospective studies is the difficulty of assessing an effect on local tumor control in diseases in which there are competing risks of local and distant failure. Many of these points will be illustrated in studies from the Joint Center for Radiation Therapy. Studies of innovative approaches, retrospective reviews and prospective randomized clinical trials have all been useful in establishing breast-conserving therapy as a safe and effective treatment for patients with early-stage breast cancer. Several studies of innovative breast-conserving therapy beginning in the 1960's showed favorable results. Based on this experience, a series of randomized clinical trials were initiated, beginning in the early 1970's, formally comparing mastectomy and breast-conserving therapy. These trials firmly established that the two forms of local treatment provide equivalent survival. Additional retrospective studies have also been useful in establishing

  4. ASCO 2007: “Translating Research into Practice”. Report from the 34th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camillo Porta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This year, for the 34th time in its history, the mastodontic machinery of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO once again welcomed thousand of members and participants from all over the world to the Society’s annual meeting, which, this year, took place in the ample and well-appointed, McCormick’s Convention Center in Chicago, Illinois...

  5. Brief Distress Screening in Clinical Practice: Does it Help to Effectively Allocate Psycho-Oncological Support to Female Cancer Inpatients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermelink, Kerstin; Höhn, Henrik; Hasmüller, Stephan; Gallwas, Julia; Härtl, Kristin; Würstlein, Rachel; Köhm, Janna

    2014-05-01

    The usefulness of distress screening in cancer inpatient settings has rarely been investigated. This study evaluated a brief distress screening of inpatients in a breast cancer centre and a gynaecological cancer centre. Hospitalised patients with breast or gynaecological cancers were screened with the Distress Thermometer. Patients who scored above the cut-off, were referred by the medical staff, or self-referred were offered bedside psycho-oncological counselling. Of 125 patients, 68 (54.4%) received an offer of counselling, and 62 patients (49.6%) accepted. Most of the counselling was induced by distress screening. Only 4 (3.2%) patients self-referred to the counselling service. Of the counselled patients, 65.8% stated that they had substantially benefited from psycho-oncological support; only 5.6% of the non-counselled patients indicated that they might have benefited from psycho-oncological support. Almost all patients who will accept and benefit from psycho-oncological counselling can be identified if distress screening is used in conjunction with referrals by physicians and nurses. Distress screening is a worthwhile component in a framework of psycho-oncological support in a cancer inpatient setting. It paves the way to counselling for cancer inpatients who need it and are willing to accept it but hesitate to self-refer to psycho-oncological services.

  6. Clinical usefulness of 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC scintigraphy in oncological diagnostics: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachcinska, Anna; Mikolajczak, Renata; Maecke, Helmut; Mlodkowska, Ewa; Kunert-Radek, Jolanta; Michalski, Andrzej; Rzeszutek, Katarzyna; Kozak, Jozek; Kusmierek, Jacek

    2004-04-01

    The clinical usefulness of a new 99mTc-labeled somatostatin analogue has been studied from the standpoint of oncological diagnostics. The group of patients studied included 40 individuals with diagnosed malignant neoplasms (32 primary and 8 metastatic). Among the primary tumors were 7 pituitary adenomas (5 hormonally active and 2 inactive), 1 liposarcoma, 2 carcinoids, 1 breast carcinoma, and 21 cases of lung cancer (2 small cell and 19 non-small cell) were represented. The metastatic tumors consisted of: 3 malignant melanomas, 1 pheochromocytoma, 1 prostatic cancer, 1 leiomyosarcoma, 1 pancreatic carcinoma ectopically secreting ACTH, and 1 carcinoid of the thymus. The radiopharmaceutical, 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-octreotide, was i.v. administered at the activity of 740-925 MBq. The imaging was comprized of a whole-body scan and single photon emission computed tomography. Positive scintigrams were obtained in 4 of 5 hormonally active pituitary adenomas, in 1 of 2 cases of carcinoid, in liposarcoma, breast cancer, and all cases of small cell (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The neoplastic metastases were visualized in 2 of 3 cases of melanoma and in patients with pheochromocytoma, pancreatic carcinoma secreting ACTH, and thymic carcinoid. Scintigrams were negative in both hormonally inactive pituitary adenomas, in one case of metastatic malignant melanoma, leiomyosarcoma, and in cases of metastasis from the prostatic carcinomas. The results of this pilot study indicated that 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC is a potentially useful radiopharmaceutical for the imaging of a wide range of primary and metastatic tumors. More detailed indications for the clinical usefulness of the new tracer for the imaging of selected tumor types require studies on much larger groups of patients. Special attention should be paid to the successful imaging of all cases of NSCLC.

  7. Predictors of outpatients' request for palliative care service at a medical oncology clinic of a German comprehensive cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewes, Mitra; Rettler, Teresa; Wolf, Nathalie; Hense, Jörg; Schuler, Martin; Teufel, Martin; Beckmann, Mingo

    2018-05-05

    Early integration of palliative care (PC) is recommended. The determination of predictors for patients' request for PC may guide implementation in clinical practice. Toward this end, we analyzed the symptom burden and distress of cancer patients in outpatient care and examined their need and request for PC. Between October 2013 and March 2016, 705 patients receiving outpatient cancer treatment took part in the survey. We used the new MInimal DOcumentation System to detect symptom clusters. Additionally, patients' request for palliative and psychosocial support was assessed. Groups of patients with PC request were compared to patients without PC request regarding their symptom clusters. Logistic regression analysis was applied to discover significant predictors for the requested inclusion of PC. A total of 159 patients (25.5%) requested additional support by PC. Moderate and severe tiredness (40.3%), weakness (37.9%), pain (25.0%), loss of appetite (22.3%), and dyspnea (19.1%) were the most frequent symptoms. The group of patients requesting PC differed significantly in terms of pain, nausea, dyspnea, constipation, weakness, loss of appetite, tiredness, depression, and anxiety from patients without request for PC (p < .01). The perceived need for PC was identified by the significant predictors "depression," "anxiety," and "weakness" with an explained variance of 22%. Combining a standardized screening questionnaire and the assessment of patients' request for PC allows systematic monitoring for patients' need for PC in a large Medical Oncology clinic. Depression, anxiety, and weakness are predictors of requesting PC service by patients receiving outpatient cancer treatment.

  8. American Society of Clinical Oncology Policy Statement: The Role of the Oncologist in Cancer Prevention and Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zon, Robin T.; Goss, Elizabeth; Vogel, Victor G.; Chlebowski, Rowan T.; Jatoi, Ismail; Robson, Mark E.; Wollins, Dana S.; Garber, Judy E.; Brown, Powel; Kramer, Barnett S.

    2009-01-01

    Oncologists have a critical opportunity to utilize risk assessment and cancer prevention strategies to interrupt the initiation or progression of cancer in cancer survivors and individuals at high risk of developing cancer. Expanding knowledge about the natural history and prognosis of cancers positions oncologists to advise patients regarding the risk of second malignancies and treatment-related cancers. In addition, as recognized experts in the full spectrum of cancer care, oncologists are afforded opportunities for involvement in community-based cancer prevention activities. Although oncologists are currently providing many cancer prevention and risk assessment services to their patients, economic barriers exist, including inadequate or lack of insurance, that may compromise uniform patient access to these services. Additionally, insufficient reimbursement for existing and developing interventions may discourage patient access to these services. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the medical society representing cancer specialists involved in patient care and clinical research, is committed to supporting oncologists in their wide-ranging involvement in cancer prevention. This statement on risk assessment and prevention counseling, although not intended to be a comprehensive overview of cancer prevention describes the current role of oncologists in risk assessment and prevention; provides examples of risk assessment and prevention activities that should be offered by oncologists; identifies potential opportunities for coordination between oncologists and primary care physicians in prevention education and coordination of care for cancer survivors; describes ASCO's involvement in education and training of oncologists regarding prevention; and proposes improvement in the payment environment to encourage patient access to these services. PMID:19075281

  9. Implementation of Remote 3-Dimensional Image Guided Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui Yunfeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Galvin, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Parker, William [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC (Canada); Breen, Stephen [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Yin Fangfang; Cai Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Papiez, Lech S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Bednarz, Greg [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Chen Wenzhou [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Xiao Ying, E-mail: ying.xiao@jefferson.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report the process and initial experience of remote credentialing of three-dimensional (3D) image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) as part of the quality assurance (QA) of submitted data for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trials; and to identify major issues resulting from this process and analyze the review results on patient positioning shifts. Methods and Materials: Image guided radiation therapy datasets including in-room positioning CT scans and daily shifts applied were submitted through the Image Guided Therapy QA Center from institutions for the IGRT credentialing process, as required by various RTOG trials. A centralized virtual environment is established at the RTOG Core Laboratory, containing analysis tools and database infrastructure for remote review by the Physics Principal Investigators of each protocol. The appropriateness of IGRT technique and volumetric image registration accuracy were evaluated. Registration accuracy was verified by repeat registration with a third-party registration software system. With the accumulated review results, registration differences between those obtained by the Physics Principal Investigators and from the institutions were analyzed for different imaging sites, shift directions, and imaging modalities. Results: The remote review process was successfully carried out for 87 3D cases (out of 137 total cases, including 2-dimensional and 3D) during 2010. Frequent errors in submitted IGRT data and challenges in the review of image registration for some special cases were identified. Workarounds for these issues were developed. The average differences of registration results between reviewers and institutions ranged between 2 mm and 3 mm. Large discrepancies in the superior-inferior direction were found for megavoltage CT cases, owing to low spatial resolution in this direction for most megavoltage CT cases. Conclusion: This first experience indicated that remote review for 3D IGRT as part of QA

  10. Immunoliposomes in clinical oncology: State of the art and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, María; Zalba, Sara; Garrido, María J

    2018-04-10

    Liposomal formulations entrapping a vast number of molecules have improved cancer therapies overcoming certain pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic limitations, many of which are associated with tumor characteristics. In this context, immunoliposomes represent a new strategy that has been widely investigated in preclinical cancer models with promising results, although few have reached the stage of clinical trials. This contrasts with the emerging clinical application of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). This formulation allows the conjugation of different mAbs or antibody derivatives, such as monovalent variable fragments Fab', to the polymers covering the surface of liposomes. The combination of this targeting strategy together with drug encapsulation in a single formulation may contribute to enhance the efficacy of these associated agents, reducing their toxicities. In this paper we will consider how factors such as particle size, lipid composition and charge, lipid-polymer conjugation, method of production and type of ligand for liposome coupling influence the efficacy of these formulations. Furthermore, the high inter-individual variability in the tumor microenvironment, as well as the poor experimental designs for the PK characterization of liposomes, make the establishment of the relationship between plasma or tumor concentrations and efficacy difficult. Thus, adequate dosing regimens and patient stratification regarding the target expression may contribute to enhance the possibility of incorporating these immunoliposomes into the therapeutic arsenal for cancer treatments. All these issues will be briefly dealt with here, together with a section showing the state of the art of those targeted liposomes that are coming up for testing in clinical trials. Finally, some insights into future developments such as the combination of specificity and controlled release, based on the application of different stimuli, for the manipulation of stability and cargo release

  11. Radiotherapy in cooperative clinical trials: Northern California Oncology Group (NCOG) method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, E.A.; Meurk, M.L.; Ray, G.; Phillips, T.L.; Carter, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    The inclusion of radiation therapy in multimodality clinical research has demonstrated the need for consultion and standardization of terminology and practice between participating centers. A set of guidelines has been developed to ensure that the radiotherapy section of a cooperative study is comprehensive and unambiguous, and that the techniques, fractionation and dosage used are sufficiently uniform to provide a homogeneous group of patients for comparative purposes. An outline is given for the preparation of radiotherapy protocols including the necessary details of physical factors, localization and simulation, portal and treatment volume definition, dosimetry requirements, specification of dose, and treatment documentation

  12. Associations between clinical and sociodemographic data and patterns of communication in pediatric oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Kohlsdorf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pediatric communication directly contributes to treatment adherence, fewer symptoms, better clinical responses, healthier treatment adaptation and management of psychosocial issues. This study aimed to evaluate associations between the clinical and sociodemographic data of caregivers and children and the communicative patterns of pediatricians. Three oncohematology physicians and 44 child-caregiver dyads took part, with audio recording of 146 medical consultations. The physicians interacted more often with older children, offering more guidance, clarifying doubts, and asking for information. The number of questions from children and caregivers was positively correlated with the physician’s communicative behaviors. However, there was no association between the age of the children and the number of doubts of the patients. The diagnosis, treatment time, family income, marital status and caregiver’s level of education were associated with the amount of interaction provided by physicians to the children and caregivers. This study offers subsides relevant to psychosocial interventions that may improve communication in pediatric oncohematology settings.

  13. Profiling the Psychological Training and Support Needs of Oncology Staff, and Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Level 2 Psychological Support Training Program Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffan, Amanda J; Daniels, Jo; Osborn, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The importance of training non-psychology healthcare professionals to offer psychological support to people with cancer is becoming increasingly recognized. This small-scale pilot project sought to identify the training and support needs of oncology staff and to evaluate the effectiveness of a Level 2 Psychological Support Training Program workshop. Semi-structured interviews with five members of multidisciplinary oncology staff identified that training needs were primarily around communication skills, recognizing and dealing with emotions, offering support and empathy, and self-care. Pre and post-training questionnaires developed with these themes in mind revealed that the Level 2 Training Program workshops run in this network of hospitals are effective in increasing participants' levels of perceived knowledge and confidence across each of these domains. Recommendations are made for further enhancing this effectiveness.

  14. Soft Tissue Sarcoma, Version 2.2018, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Mehren, Margaret; Randall, R Lor; Benjamin, Robert S; Boles, Sarah; Bui, Marilyn M; Ganjoo, Kristen N; George, Suzanne; Gonzalez, Ricardo J; Heslin, Martin J; Kane, John M; Keedy, Vicki; Kim, Edward; Koon, Henry; Mayerson, Joel; McCarter, Martin; McGarry, Sean V; Meyer, Christian; Morris, Zachary S; O'Donnell, Richard J; Pappo, Alberto S; Paz, I Benjamin; Petersen, Ivy A; Pfeifer, John D; Riedel, Richard F; Ruo, Bernice; Schuetze, Scott; Tap, William D; Wayne, Jeffrey D; Bergman, Mary Anne; Scavone, Jillian L

    2018-05-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are rare solid tumors of mesenchymal cell origin that display a heterogenous mix of clinical and pathologic characteristics. STS can develop from fat, muscle, nerves, blood vessels, and other connective tissues. The evaluation and treatment of patients with STS requires a multidisciplinary team with demonstrated expertise in the management of these tumors. The complete NCCN Guidelines for STS provide recommendations for the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of extremity/superficial trunk/head and neck STS, as well as intra-abdominal/retroperitoneal STS, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, desmoid tumors, and rhabdomyosarcoma. This portion of the NCCN Guidelines discusses general principles for the diagnosis, staging, and treatment of STS of the extremities, superficial trunk, or head and neck; outlines treatment recommendations by disease stage; and reviews the evidence to support the guidelines recommendations. Copyright © 2018 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  15. Soft Tissue Sarcoma, Version 2.2016, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Mehren, Margaret; Randall, R Lor; Benjamin, Robert S; Boles, Sarah; Bui, Marilyn M; Conrad, Ernest U; Ganjoo, Kristen N; George, Suzanne; Gonzalez, Ricardo J; Heslin, Martin J; Kane, John M; Koon, Henry; Mayerson, Joel; McCarter, Martin; McGarry, Sean V; Meyer, Christian; O'Donnell, Richard J; Pappo, Alberto S; Paz, I Benjamin; Petersen, Ivy A; Pfeifer, John D; Riedel, Richard F; Schuetze, Scott; Schupak, Karen D; Schwartz, Herbert S; Tap, William D; Wayne, Jeffrey D; Bergman, Mary Anne; Scavone, Jillian

    2016-06-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are rare solid tumors of mesenchymal cell origin that display a heterogenous mix of clinical and pathologic characteristics. STS can develop from fat, muscle, nerves, blood vessels, and other connective tissues. The evaluation and treatment of patients with STS requires a multidisciplinary team with demonstrated expertise in the management of these tumors. The complete NCCN Guidelines for Soft Tissue Sarcoma (available at NCCN.org) provide recommendations for the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of extremity/superficial trunk/head and neck STS, as well as intra-abdominal/retroperitoneal STS, gastrointestinal stromal tumor, desmoid tumors, and rhabdomyosarcoma. This manuscript discusses guiding principles for the diagnosis and staging of STS and evidence for treatment modalities that include surgery, radiation, chemoradiation, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy. Copyright © 2016 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  16. Brief Introduction of NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines for Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUANG Xin-en

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is always a main factor threatening human’s health and life, and its incidence and mortality are gradually increasing in recent years. However, some advances have been made with the unremitting efforts and exploration human made and the improvement is mainly made in cancer treatment of young children and older adults, while little in adolescent and young adult (AYA patients, who are generally defined as individuals of 15 to 39 years old at the time of initial cancer diagnosis due to many factors. To highlight the issues of this unique population, National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN absorbs a large amount of information and previous researches and develops a set of clinical practice guidelines. Though the guidelines are more supportive care guidelines than treatment guidelines, they give us the opportunity to learn the latest international developments in AYA treatment and more survival chance for the treatment of AYA patients.

  17. Assessing Clinical Trial-Associated Workload in Community-Based Research Programs Using the ASCO Clinical Trial Workload Assessment Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Marjorie J; Hurley, Patricia; Woo, Kaitlin M; Szczepanek, Connie; Stewart, Teresa; Robert, Nicholas; Lyss, Alan; Gönen, Mithat; Lilenbaum, Rogerio

    2016-05-01

    Clinical research program managers are regularly faced with the quandary of determining how much of a workload research staff members can manage while they balance clinical practice and still achieve clinical trial accrual goals, maintain data quality and protocol compliance, and stay within budget. A tool was developed to measure clinical trial-associated workload, to apply objective metrics toward documentation of work, and to provide clearer insight to better meet clinical research program challenges and aid in balancing staff workloads. A project was conducted to assess the feasibility and utility of using this tool in diverse research settings. Community-based research programs were recruited to collect and enter clinical trial-associated monthly workload data into a web-based tool for 6 consecutive months. Descriptive statistics were computed for self-reported program characteristics and workload data, including staff acuity scores and number of patient encounters. Fifty-one research programs that represented 30 states participated. Median staff acuity scores were highest for staff with patients enrolled in studies and receiving treatment, relative to staff with patients in follow-up status. Treatment trials typically resulted in higher median staff acuity, relative to cancer control, observational/registry, and prevention trials. Industry trials exhibited higher median staff acuity scores than trials sponsored by the National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute, academic institutions, or others. The results from this project demonstrate that trial-specific acuity measurement is a better measure of workload than simply counting the number of patients. The tool was shown to be feasible and useable in diverse community-based research settings. Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  18. Differences in Funding Sources of Phase III Oncology Clinical Trials by Treatment Modality and Cancer Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jairam, Vikram; Yu, James B; Aneja, Sanjay; Wilson, Lynn D; Lloyd, Shane

    2017-06-01

    Given the limited resources available to conduct clinical trials, it is important to understand how trial sponsorship differs among different therapeutic modalities and cancer types and to consider the ramifications of these differences. We searched clinicaltrials.gov for a cross-sectional register of active, phase III, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) studying treatment-related endpoints such as survival and recurrence for the 24 most prevalent malignancies. We classified the RCTs into 7 categories of therapeutic modality: (1) chemotherapy/other cancer-directed drugs, (2) targeted therapy, (3) surgery, (4) radiation therapy (RT), (5) RT with other modalities, (6) multimodality therapy without RT, and (7) other. RCTs were categorized as being funded by one or more of the following groups: (1) government, (2) hospital/university, (3) industry, and (4) other. χ analysis was performed to detect differences in funding source distribution between modalities and cancer types. The percentage of multimodality trials (5%) and radiation RCTs (4%) funded by industry was less than that for chemotherapy (32%, Pfunding than any of the other modalities (Pfunded by industry if they also studied targeted therapy (Pfunded by industry than trials studying multimodality therapy or radiation. The impact of industry funding versus institutional or governmental sources of funding for cancer research is unclear and requires further study.

  19. Funding source, conflict of interest and positive conclusions in neuro-oncology clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Fabio Y; Mendez, Lucas C; Taunk, Neil K; Raman, Srinivas; Suh, John H; Souhami, Luis; Slotman, Ben; Weltman, Eduardo; Spratt, Daniel E; Berlin, Alejandro; Marta, Gustavo N

    2018-02-01

    We aimed to test any association between authors' conclusions and self-reported COI or funding sources in central nervous system (CNS) studies. A review was performed for CNS malignancy clinical trials published in the last 5 years. Two investigators independently classified study conclusions according to authors' endorsement of the experimental therapy. Statistical models were used to test for associations between positive conclusions and trials characteristics. From February 2010 to February 2015, 1256 articles were retrieved; 319 were considered eligible trials. Positive conclusions were reported in 56.8% of trials with industry-only, 55.6% with academia-only, 44.1% with academia and industry, 77.8% with none, and 76.4% with not described funding source (p = 0.011). Positive conclusions were reported in 60.4% of trials with unrelated COI, 60% with related COI, and 60% with no COI reported (p = 0.997). Factors that were significantly associated with the presence of positive conclusion included trials design (phase 1) [OR 11.64 (95 CI 4.66-29.09), p source [OR 2.45 (95 CI 1.22-5.22), p = 0.011]. In a multivariable regression model, all these factors remained significantly associated with trial's positive conclusion. Funding source and self-reported COI did not appear to influence the CNS trials conclusion. Funding source information and COI disclosure were under-reported in 14.1 and 17.2% of the CNS trials. Continued efforts are needed to increase rates of both COI and funding source reporting.

  20. Clinical usefulness of 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC scintigraphy in oncological diagnostics: a preliminary communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płachcińska, Anna; Mikołajczak, Renata; Maecke, Helmut R; Młodkowska, Ewa; Kunert-Radek, Jolanta; Michalski, Andrzej; Rzeszutek, Katarzyna; Kozak, Józef; Kuśmierek, Jacek

    2003-10-01

    This study assessed the clinical usefulness of a new technetium-99m labelled somatostatin analogue from the standpoint of oncological diagnostics. The study group comprised 40 patients in whom malignant neoplasms (32 primary and 8 metastatic) had been diagnosed. Among the primary tumours there were 21 cases of lung cancer (2 small cell and 19 non-small cell), seven pituitary adenomas (five hormonally active and two inactive), one liposarcoma, two carcinoids and one breast carcinoma. The metastatic tumours consisted of three malignant melanomas, one phaeochromocytoma, one prostatic cancer, one leiomyosarcoma, one pancreatic carcinoma ectopically secreting ACTH and one carcinoid of the thymus. The radiopharmaceutical 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr3-octreotide was administered i.v. at an activity of 740-925 MBq. The imaging comprised a whole-body scan and a single-photon emission tomography acquisition. Positive scintigrams were obtained in all cases of small cell and non-small cell lung cancer, four out of five hormonally active pituitary adenomas, one out of two cases of carcinoid, the liposarcoma and the breast cancer. Neoplastic metastases were visualised in two out of three patients with melanoma and in patients with phaeochromocytoma, ACTH-secreting pancreatic carcinoma and thymic carcinoid. Scintigrams were negative in both hormonally inactive pituitary adenomas, in one case of metastatic malignant melanoma, in the leiomyosarcoma and in the case of metastasis from prostatic carcinoma. The results of this pilot study indicate that 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC is a potentially useful radiopharmaceutical for imaging of a wide range of primary and metastatic tumours. Special attention should be paid to the successful imaging of all cases of non-small cell lung cancer.

  1. Clinical usefulness of 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC scintigraphy in oncological diagnostics: a preliminary communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plachcinska, Anna; Mlodkowska, Ewa; Kusmierek, Jacek; Mikolajczak, Renata; Maecke, Helmut R.; Kunert-Radek, Jolanta; Michalski, Andrzej; Rzeszutek, Katarzyna; Kozak, Jozef

    2003-01-01

    This study assessed the clinical usefulness of a new technetium-99m labelled somatostatin analogue from the standpoint of oncological diagnostics. The study group comprised 40 patients in whom malignant neoplasms (32 primary and 8 metastatic) had been diagnosed. Among the primary tumours there were 21 cases of lung cancer (2 small cell and 19 non-small cell), seven pituitary adenomas (five hormonally active and two inactive), one liposarcoma, two carcinoids and one breast carcinoma. The metastatic tumours consisted of three malignant melanomas, one phaeochromocytoma, one prostatic cancer, one leiomyosarcoma, one pancreatic carcinoma ectopically secreting ACTH and one carcinoid of the thymus. The radiopharmaceutical 99m Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-Tyr 3 -octreotide was administered i.v. at an activity of 740-925 MBq. The imaging comprised a whole-body scan and a single-photon emission tomography acquisition. Positive scintigrams were obtained in all cases of small cell and non-small cell lung cancer, four out of five hormonally active pituitary adenomas, one out of two cases of carcinoid, the liposarcoma and the breast cancer. Neoplastic metastases were visualised in two out of three patients with melanoma and in patients with phaeochromocytoma, ACTH-secreting pancreatic carcinoma and thymic carcinoid. Scintigrams were negative in both hormonally inactive pituitary adenomas, in one case of metastatic malignant melanoma, in the leiomyosarcoma and in the case of metastasis from prostatic carcinoma. The results of this pilot study indicate that 99m Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC is a potentially useful radiopharmaceutical for imaging of a wide range of primary and metastatic tumours. Special attention should be paid to the successful imaging of all cases of non-small cell lung cancer. (orig.)

  2. Molecular imaging in oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schober, Otmar; Riemann, Burkhard (eds.) [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2013-02-01

    Considers in detail all aspects of molecular imaging in oncology, ranging from basic research to clinical applications in the era of evidence-based medicine. Examines technological issues and probe design. Discusses preclinical studies in detail, with particular attention to multimodality imaging. Presents current clinical use of PET/CT, SPECT/CT, and optical imagingWritten by acknowledged experts. The impact of molecular imaging on diagnostics, therapy, and follow-up in oncology is increasing significantly. The process of molecular imaging includes key biotarget identification, design of specific molecular imaging probes, and their preclinical evaluation, e.g., in vivo using small animal studies. A multitude of such innovative molecular imaging probes have already entered clinical diagnostics in oncology. There is no doubt that in future the emphasis will be on multimodality imaging in which morphological, functional, and molecular imaging techniques are combined in a single clinical investigation that will optimize diagnostic processes. This handbook addresses all aspects of molecular imaging in oncology, ranging from basic research to clinical applications in the era of evidence-based medicine. The first section is devoted to technology and probe design, and examines a variety of PET and SPECT tracers as well as multimodality probes. Preclinical studies are then discussed in detail, with particular attention to multimodality imaging. In the third section, diverse clinical applications are presented, and the book closes by looking at future challenges. This handbook will be of value to all who are interested in the revolution in diagnostic oncology that is being brought about by molecular imaging.

  3. Molecular imaging in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schober, Otmar; Riemann, Burkhard

    2013-01-01

    Considers in detail all aspects of molecular imaging in oncology, ranging from basic research to clinical applications in the era of evidence-based medicine. Examines technological issues and probe design. Discusses preclinical studies in detail, with particular attention to multimodality imaging. Presents current clinical use of PET/CT, SPECT/CT, and optical imagingWritten by acknowledged experts. The impact of molecular imaging on diagnostics, therapy, and follow-up in oncology is increasing significantly. The process of molecular imaging includes key biotarget identification, design of specific molecular imaging probes, and their preclinical evaluation, e.g., in vivo using small animal studies. A multitude of such innovative molecular imaging probes have already entered clinical diagnostics in oncology. There is no doubt that in future the emphasis will be on multimodality imaging in which morphological, functional, and molecular imaging techniques are combined in a single clinical investigation that will optimize diagnostic processes. This handbook addresses all aspects of molecular imaging in oncology, ranging from basic research to clinical applications in the era of evidence-based medicine. The first section is devoted to technology and probe design, and examines a variety of PET and SPECT tracers as well as multimodality probes. Preclinical studies are then discussed in detail, with particular attention to multimodality imaging. In the third section, diverse clinical applications are presented, and the book closes by looking at future challenges. This handbook will be of value to all who are interested in the revolution in diagnostic oncology that is being brought about by molecular imaging.

  4. Clinical Cancer Advances 2018: Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer From the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymach, John; Krilov, Lada; Alberg, Anthony; Baxter, Nancy; Chang, Susan Marina; Corcoran, Ryan; Dale, William; DeMichele, Angela; Magid Diefenbach, Catherine S; Dreicer, Robert; Epstein, Andrew S; Gillison, Maura L; Graham, David L; Jones, Joshua; Ko, Andrew H; Lopez, Ana Maria; Maki, Robert G; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Schilsky, Richard L; Sznol, Mario; Westin, Shannon Neville; Burstein, Harold

    2018-04-01

    A MESSAGE FROM ASCO'S PRESIDENT I remember when ASCO first conceived of publishing an annual report on the most transformative research occurring in cancer care. Thirteen reports later, the progress we have chronicled is remarkable, and this year is no different. The research featured in ASCO's Clinical Cancer Advances 2018 report underscores the impressive gains in our understanding of cancer and in our ability to tailor treatments to tumors' genetic makeup. The ASCO 2018 Advance of the Year, adoptive cell immunotherapy, allows clinicians to genetically reprogram patients' own immune cells to find and attack cancer cells throughout the body. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy-a type of adoptive cell immunotherapy-has led to remarkable results in young patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and in adults with lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Researchers are also exploring this approach in other types of cancer. This advance would not be possible without robust federal investment in cancer research. The first clinical trial of CAR T-cell therapy in children with ALL was funded, in part, by grants from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and researchers at the NCI Center for Cancer Research were the first to report on possible CAR T-cell therapy for multiple myeloma. These discoveries follow decades of prior research on immunology and cancer biology, much of which was supported by federal dollars. In fact, many advances that are highlighted in the 2018 Clinical Cancer Advances report were made possible thanks to our nation's support for biomedical research. Funding from the US National Institutes of Health and the NCI helps researchers pursue critical patient care questions and addresses vital, unmet needs that private industry has little incentive to take on. Federally supported cancer research generates the biomedical innovations that fuel the development and availability of new and improved treatments for patients. We need sustained federal

  5. NCI-FDA Interagency Oncology Task Force Workshop Provides Guidance for Analytical Validation of Protein-based Multiplex Assays | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI-FDA Interagency Oncology Task Force (IOTF) Molecular Diagnostics Workshop was held on October 30, 2008 in Cambridge, MA, to discuss requirements for analytical validation of protein-based multiplex technologies in the context of its intended use. This workshop developed through NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer initiative and the FDA focused on technology-specific analytical validation processes to be addressed prior to use in clinical settings. In making this workshop unique, a case study approach was used to discuss issues related to

  6. The Future of Gero-Oncology Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Sarah H

    2016-02-01

    To project the future of gero-oncology nursing as a distinct specialty, framed between analysis of current challenges and explication of prospective solutions. Peer-reviewed literature, policy directives, web-based resources, and author expertise. Oncology nursing faces several challenges in meeting the needs of older people living with cancer. Realigning cancer nursing education, practice, and research to match demographic and epidemiological realities mandates redesign. Viewing geriatric oncology as an optional sub-specialty limits oncology nursing, where older people represent the majority of oncology patients and cancer survivors. The future of gero-oncology nursing lies in transforming oncology nursing itself. Specific goals to achieve transformation of oncology nursing into gero-oncology nursing include assuring integrated foundational aging and cancer content across entry-level nursing curricula; assuring a gero-competent oncology nursing workforce with integrated continuing education; developing gero-oncology nurse specialists in advanced practice roles; and cultivating nurse leadership in geriatric oncology program development and administration along with expanding the scope and sophistication of gero-oncology nursing science. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Beyond the Standard Curriculum: A Review of Available Opportunities for Medical Students to Prepare for a Career in Radiation Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Ankit; DeNunzio, Nicholas J.; Ahuja, Divya; Hirsch, Ariel E., E-mail: Ariel.hirsch@bmc.org

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To review currently available opportunities for medical students to supplement their standard medical education to prepare for a career in radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: Google and PubMed were used to identify existing clinical, health policy, and research programs for medical students in radiation oncology. In addition, results publicly available by the National Resident Matching Program were used to explore opportunities that successful radiation oncology applicants pursued during their medical education, including obtaining additional graduate degrees. Results: Medical students can pursue a wide variety of opportunities before entering radiation oncology. Several national specialty societies, such as the American Society for Radiation Oncology and the Radiological Society of North America, offer summer internships for medical students interested in radiation oncology. In 2011, 30% of allopathic senior medical students in the United States who matched into radiation oncology had an additional graduate degree, including PhD, MPH, MBA, and MA degrees. Some medical schools are beginning to further integrate dedicated education in radiation oncology into the standard 4-year medical curriculum. Conclusions: To the authors' knowledge, this is the first comprehensive review of available opportunities for medical students interested in radiation oncology. Early exposure to radiation oncology and additional educational training beyond the standard medical curriculum have the potential to create more successful radiation oncology applicants and practicing radiation oncologists while also promoting the growth of the field. We hope this review can serve as guide to radiation oncology applicants and mentors as well as encourage discussion regarding initiatives in radiation oncology opportunities for medical students.

  8. Beyond the standard curriculum: a review of available opportunities for medical students to prepare for a career in radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ankit; DeNunzio, Nicholas J; Ahuja, Divya; Hirsch, Ariel E

    2014-01-01

    To review currently available opportunities for medical students to supplement their standard medical education to prepare for a career in radiation oncology. Google and PubMed were used to identify existing clinical, health policy, and research programs for medical students in radiation oncology. In addition, results publicly available by the National Resident Matching Program were used to explore opportunities that successful radiation oncology applicants pursued during their medical education, including obtaining additional graduate degrees. Medical students can pursue a wide variety of opportunities before entering radiation oncology. Several national specialty societies, such as the American Society for Radiation Oncology and the Radiological Society of North America, offer summer internships for medical students interested in radiation oncology. In 2011, 30% of allopathic senior medical students in the United States who matched into radiation oncology had an additional graduate degree, including PhD, MPH, MBA, and MA degrees. Some medical schools are beginning to further integrate dedicated education in radiation oncology into the standard 4-year medical curriculum. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first comprehensive review of available opportunities for medical students interested in radiation oncology. Early exposure to radiation oncology and additional educational training beyond the standard medical curriculum have the potential to create more successful radiation oncology applicants and practicing radiation oncologists while also promoting the growth of the field. We hope this review can serve as guide to radiation oncology applicants and mentors as well as encourage discussion regarding initiatives in radiation oncology opportunities for medical students. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Beyond the Standard Curriculum: A Review of Available Opportunities for Medical Students to Prepare for a Career in Radiation Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Ankit; DeNunzio, Nicholas J.; Ahuja, Divya; Hirsch, Ariel E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To review currently available opportunities for medical students to supplement their standard medical education to prepare for a career in radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: Google and PubMed were used to identify existing clinical, health policy, and research programs for medical students in radiation oncology. In addition, results publicly available by the National Resident Matching Program were used to explore opportunities that successful radiation oncology applicants pursued during their medical education, including obtaining additional graduate degrees. Results: Medical students can pursue a wide variety of opportunities before entering radiation oncology. Several national specialty societies, such as the American Society for Radiation Oncology and the Radiological Society of North America, offer summer internships for medical students interested in radiation oncology. In 2011, 30% of allopathic senior medical students in the United States who matched into radiation oncology had an additional graduate degree, including PhD, MPH, MBA, and MA degrees. Some medical schools are beginning to further integrate dedicated education in radiation oncology into the standard 4-year medical curriculum. Conclusions: To the authors' knowledge, this is the first comprehensive review of available opportunities for medical students interested in radiation oncology. Early exposure to radiation oncology and additional educational training beyond the standard medical curriculum have the potential to create more successful radiation oncology applicants and practicing radiation oncologists while also promoting the growth of the field. We hope this review can serve as guide to radiation oncology applicants and mentors as well as encourage discussion regarding initiatives in radiation oncology opportunities for medical students

  10. Follow-up care, surveillance protocol, and secondary prevention measures for survivors of colorectal cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline endorsement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Mangu, Pamela B; Flynn, Patrick J; Korde, Larissa; Loprinzi, Charles L; Minsky, Bruce D; Petrelli, Nicholas J; Ryan, Kim; Schrag, Deborah H; Wong, Sandra L; Benson, Al B

    2013-12-10

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing recent clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations. The Cancer Care Ontario (CCO) Guideline on Follow-up Care, Surveillance Protocol, and Secondary Prevention Measures for Survivors of Colorectal Cancer was reviewed by ASCO for methodologic rigor and considered for endorsement. The ASCO Panel concurred with the CCO recommendations and recommended endorsement, with the addition of several qualifying statements. Surveillance should be guided by presumed risk of recurrence and functional status of the patient (important within the first 2 to 4 years). Medical history, physical examination, and carcinoembryonic antigen testing should be performed every 3 to 6 months for 5 years. Patients at higher risk of recurrence should be considered for testing in the more frequent end of the range. A computed tomography scan (abdominal and chest) is recommended annually for 3 years, in most cases. Positron emission tomography scans should not be used for surveillance outside of a clinical trial. A surveillance colonoscopy should be performed 1 year after the initial surgery and then every 5 years, dictated by the findings of the previous one. If a colonoscopy was not preformed before diagnosis, it should be done after completion of adjuvant therapy (before 1 year). Secondary prevention (maintaining a healthy body weight and active lifestyle) is recommended. If a patient is not a candidate for surgery or systemic therapy because of severe comorbid conditions, surveillance tests should not be performed. A treatment plan from the specialist should have clear directions on appropriate follow-up by a nonspecialist.

  11. A pilot study to assess the pharmacy impact of implementing a chemotherapy-induced nausea or vomiting collaborative disease therapy management in the outpatient oncology clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kasey; Letton, Cathy; Maldonado, Andy; Bodiford, Andrew; Sion, Amy; Hartwell, Rebekah; Graham, Anastasia; Bondarenka, Carolyn; Uber, Lynn

    2018-01-01

    Background Collaborative drug therapy management is a formal partnership between a pharmacist and physician to allow the pharmacist to manage a patient's drug therapy. Literature supports collaborative disease therapy management can improve patient outcomes, improve medication adherence, enhance medication safety, and positively influence healthcare expenditures. Chemotherapy induced nausea or vomiting is considered one of the most distressing and feared adverse events among patients receiving chemotherapy. Chemotherapy induced nausea or vomiting can impact a patient's quality of life and may affect compliance with the treatment plan. Purpose The objective of this pilot study was to determine the pharmacy impact of implementing a chemotherapy induced nausea or vomiting collaborative disease therapy management protocol in the outpatient oncology clinics at a National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated cancer center associated with an academic medical center. The primary endpoint was to determine the number and type of chemotherapy induced nausea or vomiting clinical interventions made by the oncology pharmacists. Secondary endpoints included comparing patient's Multinational Association for Supportive Care in Cancer scores and revenue of pharmacists' services. Methods The credentialed oncology pharmacists were consulted by an oncologist to manage chemotherapy induced nausea or vomiting. Patients were included in the chemotherapy induced nausea or vomiting collaborative disease therapy management if they were seen in an outpatient oncology clinic from October 2016 to January 2017 and had a referral from a qualified provider to help manage chemotherapy induced nausea or vomiting. Patients admitted to the hospital at the time of consult were excluded from the study. The pharmacists interviewed patients and provided recommendations. The pharmacists followed up with the patient via a telephone call or during the next scheduled clinic visit to assess their symptoms

  12. Improving oncology nurses' communication skills for difficult conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Linda; Weinstein, Elizabeth

    2013-06-01

    When oncology nurses have strong communication skills, they play a pivotal role in influencing patient satisfaction, adherence to plans of care, and overall clinical outcomes. However, research studies indicate that nurses tend to keep communication with patients and families at a superficial, nontherapeutic level. Processes for teaching goals-of-care communication skills and for implementing skills into clinical practice are not clearly defined. Nurses at a large comprehensive cancer center recognized the need for help with this skill set and sought out communication experts to assist in providing the needed education. An educational project was developed to improve therapeutic communication skills in oncology nurses during goals-of-care discussions and giving bad news. The program was tailored to nurses and social workers providing care to patients in a busy, urban, academic, outpatient oncology setting. Program topics included exploring the patient's world, eliciting hopes and concerns, and dealing with conflict about goals. Sharing and discussing specific difficult questions and scenarios were encouraged throughout the program. The program was well attended and well received by oncology nurses and social workers. Participants expressed interest in the continuation of communication programs to further enhance skills.

  13. Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology working group and European Association for Neuro-Oncology recommendations for the clinical use of PET imaging in gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Nathalie L.; Weller, Michael; Suchorska, Bogdana

    2016-01-01

    This guideline provides recommendations for the use of PET imaging in gliomas. The review examines established clinical benefit in glioma patients of PET using glucose (18F-FDG) and amino acid tracers (11C-MET, 18F-FET, and 18F-FDOPA). An increasing number of studies have been published on PET im...

  14. Professional practice assessment. Pertinence of positron emission tomography clinical indications in oncology; Evaluation des pratiques professionnelles. Pertinence des indications de la tomographie a emission de positons en cancerologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Stanc, E.; Tainturier, C. [Hopital Foch, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 92 - Suresnes (France); Swaenepoel, J. [Hopital Foch, Cellule Qualite, 92 - Suresnes (France)

    2009-09-15

    Introduction As part of the health care quality and safety policy in France, Professional Practice Assessment (P.P.A.) are mandatory in the health services 'certification' process. We present our study regarding the pertinence of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) indications in oncology. Materials and methods A multidisciplinary task group used the Quick Audit method with two rounds of 100 request forms each. The assessment list of criteria comprised four items of decreasing relevance grading the PET scans clinical indications, which were derived from the three French published guidelines (S.O.R. [F.N.C.L.C.C]., 'Guide du bon usage des examens d'imagerie medicale' [S.F.R.-S.F.M.N.], 'Guide pour la redaction de protocoles pour la TEP au F.D.G. en cancerologie' [S.F.M.N.]) and five additional items: clinical information, patient's body weight, previous treatments dates, diabetes, claustrophobia. Results The first round showed that 68% of the requested scans corresponded to the two most relevant groups of indications (S.O.R. Standards and Options). The request forms were correctly filled in regarding the clinical information, but this was not the case for the other items we tested. Several actions were conducted: dedicated PET request form, availability of the S.O.R. on the hospital intranet, boost of the referring physicians awareness during the multidisciplinary oncology meetings (Reunions de Concertation Pluridisciplinaires RCP). The second round showed a better pertinence of the PET scans indications (75% versus 68%); the patient's body weight was more frequently mentioned on the request form. Discussion This study is an example of P.P.A. in our discipline. It led to an improvement of the oncologic PET scans clinical indications in our hospital. This work is pursued in everyday discussion with the referring clinicians, especially during the RCP. (authors)

  15. Clinical relevance of molecular diagnostics in gastrointestinal (GI) cancer: European Society of Digestive Oncology (ESDO) expert discussion and recommendations from the 17th European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO)/World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer, Barcelona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraniskin, Alexander; Van Laethem, Jean-Luc; Wyrwicz, Lucjan; Guller, Ulrich; Wasan, Harpreet S; Matysiak-Budnik, Tamara; Gruenberger, Thomas; Ducreux, Michel; Carneiro, Fatima; Van Cutsem, Eric; Seufferlein, Thomas; Schmiegel, Wolff

    2017-11-01

    In the epoch of precision medicine and personalised oncology, which aims to deliver the right treatment to the right patient, molecular genetic biomarkers are a topic of growing interest. The aim of this expert discussion and position paper is to review the current status of various molecular tests for gastrointestinal (GI) cancers and especially considering their significance for the clinical routine use. Opinion leaders and experts from diverse nationalities selected on scientific merit were asked to answer to a prepared set of questions about the current status of molecular diagnostics in different GI cancers. All answers were then discussed during a plenary session and reported here in providing a well-balanced reflection of both clinical expertise and updated evidence-based medicine. Preselected molecular genetic biomarkers that are described and disputed in the current medical literature in different GI cancers were debated, and recommendations for clinical routine practice were made whenever possible. Furthermore, the preanalytical variations were commented and proposals for quality controls of biospecimens were made. The current article summarises the recommendations of the expert committee regarding prognostic and predictive molecular genetic biomarkers in different entities of GI cancers. The briefly and comprehensively formulated guidelines should assist clinicians in the process of decision making in daily clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Implementing and Integrating a Clinically-Driven Electronic Medical Record (EMR for Radiation Oncology in a Large Medical Enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Paxton Kirkpatrick

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose/Objective: While our department is heavily invested in computer-based treatment planning, we historically relied on paper-based charts for management of Radiation Oncology patients. In early 2009, we initiated the process of conversion to an electronic medical record (EMR eliminating the need for paper charts. Key goals included the ability to readily access information wherever and whenever needed, without compromising safety, treatment quality, confidentiality or productivity.Methodology: In February, 2009, we formed a multi-disciplinary team of Radiation Oncology physicians, nurses, therapists, administrators, physicists/dosimetrists, and information technology (IT specialists, along with staff from the Duke Health System IT department. The team identified all existing processes and associated information/reports, established the framework for the EMR system and generated, tested and implemented specific EMR processes.Results: Two broad classes of information were identified: information which must be readily accessed by anyone in the health system versus that used solely within the Radiation Oncology department. Examples of the former are consultation reports, weekly treatment check notes and treatment summaries; the latter includes treatment plans, daily therapy records and quality assurance reports. To manage the former, we utilized the enterprise-wide system , which required an intensive effort to design and implement procedures to export information from Radiation Oncology into that system. To manage "Radiation Oncology" data, we used our existing system (ARIA, Varian Medical Systems. The ability to access both systems simultaneously from a single workstation (WS was essential, requiring new WS and modified software. As of January, 2010, all new treatments were managed solely with an EMR. We find that an EMR makes information more widely accessible and does not compromise patient safety, treatment quality or confidentiality

  17. “Sacred Work”: Reflections on the Professional and Personal Impact of an Interdisciplinary Palliative Oncology Clinical Experience by Social Work Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa A. Middleton

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the impact of an oncology palliative care clinical experience with older adults on social work learners. A three-member research team conducted a qualitative content analysis of reflective writings. 27 Master of Science in Social Work students enrolled in an interprofessional palliative oncology curriculum and completed a reflective writing assignment to summarize the clinical scenario, analyze the patient/family care provided, and describe the impact of the experience. Using a constant comparison approach based on grounded theory, the research team analyzed the reflections to come to consensus related to the overall impact of the experience. Two overarching themes (professional and personal impact and 11 subthemes (appreciation of interdisciplinary teams, recognition of clinical skills of other disciplines, insight into clinical skills of the social worker, perception of palliative care, embracing palliative care principles, centrality of communication, importance of social support, family as the unit of care, countertransference, conflict between personal values and patient/family values, and emotional reactions were identified. Experiential learning opportunities for social work learners in interprofessional palliative care build appreciation for and skills in applying palliative care principles including teamwork, symptom control, and advanced care planning along with a commitment to embrace these principles in future practice.

  18. Racial Differences in Information Needs During and After Cancer Treatment: a Nationwide, Longitudinal Survey by the University of Rochester Cancer Center National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asare, Matthew; Peppone, Luke J; Roscoe, Joseph A; Kleckner, Ian R; Mustian, Karen M; Heckler, Charles E; Guido, Joseph J; Sborov, Mark; Bushunow, Peter; Onitilo, Adedayo; Kamen, Charles

    2018-02-01

    Before treatment, cancer patients need information about side effects and prognosis, while after treatment they need information to transition to survivorship. Research documenting these needs is limited, especially among racial and ethnic minorities. This study evaluated cancer patients' needs according to race both before and after treatment. We compared white (n = 904) to black (n = 52) patients receiving treatment at 17 National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) sites on their cancer-related concerns and need for information before and after cancer treatment. Two-sample t test and chi-squared analyses were used to assess group differences. Compared to white patients, black patients reported significantly higher concerns about diet (44.3 vs. 25.4 %,) and exercise (40.4 vs. 19.7 %,) during the course of treatment. Compared to whites, blacks also had significantly higher concern about treatment-related issues (white vs. black mean, 25.52 vs. 31.78), self-image issues (7.03 vs. 8.60), family-related issues (10.44 vs. 12.84), and financial concerns (6.42 vs. 8.90, all p < 0.05). Blacks, compared to whites, also had significantly greater post-treatment information needs regarding follow-up tests (8.17 vs. 9.44), stress management (4.12 vs. 4.89), and handling stigma after cancer treatment (4.21 vs. 4.89) [all p < 0.05]. Pre-treatment concerns and post-treatment information needs differed by race, with black patients reporting greater information needs and concerns. In clinical practice, tailored approaches may work particularly well in addressing the needs and concerns of black patients.

  19. Long-term oncological outcomes of a phase II trial of neoadjuvant chemohormonal therapy followed by radical prostatectomy for patients with clinically localised, high-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Jonathan L; Poon, Stephen A; Sjoberg, Daniel D; Maschino, Alexandra C; Vickers, Andrew J; Bernie, Aaron; Konety, Badrinath R; Kelly, W Kevin; Eastham, James A

    2015-07-01

    To determine long-term oncological outcomes of radical prostatectomy (RP) after neoadjuvant chemohormonal therapy (CHT) for clinically localised, high-risk prostate cancer. In this phase II multicentre trial of patients with high-risk prostate cancer (PSA level >20 ng/mL, Gleason ≥8, or clinical stage ≥T3), androgen-deprivation therapy (goserelin acetate depot) and paclitaxel, carboplatin and estramustine were administered before RP. We report the long-term oncological outcomes of these patients and compared them to a contemporary cohort who met oncological inclusion criteria but received RP only. In all, 34 patients were enrolled and followed for a median of 13.1 years. Within 10 years most patients had biochemical recurrence (BCR-free probability 22%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 10-37%). However, the probability of disease-specific survival at 10 years was 84% (95% CI 66-93%) and overall survival was 78% (95% CI 60-89%). The CHT group had higher-risk features than the comparison group (123 patients), with an almost doubled risk of calculated preoperative 5-year BCR (69% vs 36%, P < 0.01). After adjusting for these imbalances the CHT group had trends toward improvement in BCR (hazard ratio [HR] 0.76, 95% CI 0.43-1.34; P = 0.3) and metastasis-free survival (HR 0.55, 95% CI 0.24-1.29; P = 0.2) although these were not statistically significant. Neoadjuvant CHT followed by RP was associated with lower rates of BCR and metastasis compared with the RP-only group; however, these results were not statistically significant. Because this treatment strategy has known harms and unproven benefit, this strategy should only be instituted in the setting of a clinical trial. © 2014 The Authors BJU International © 2014 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Understanding the role of physician assistants in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Alicia C; Polansky, Maura N; Parker, Patricia A; Palmer, J Lynn

    2010-01-01

    To understand the deployment of physician assistants (PAs) in oncology. A recent analysis of the oncology workforce in the United States commissioned by ASCO predicted a significant shortage of providers by 2020. A descriptive study was undertaken using a Web-based questionnaire survey. Invited participants, including all PAs listed in the national PA database (n = 855) and all PAs at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center (Houston, TX; n = 159), were mailed letters directing them to the Web-based survey. The study produced a 30% response rate. A total of 186 PAs worked in medical oncology (the population of interest). Of the respondents, 80% were women, mean age was 36 years, average time employed as a PA was 9.5 years (6.5 years in oncology), 55% had obtained a master's degree, four had completed a postgraduate oncology program, 91% reported that direct mentorship by a supervising physician was very important in obtaining oncology-based knowledge, and 61% reported that becoming fully competent in the practice of oncology required 1 to 2 years. The majority of PAs (78.5%) worked 33 to 50 hours per week, and 56% of those reported working 41 to 50 hours per week. Three fourths (77%) wrote chemotherapy orders, most requiring physician co-signature, and 69% prescribed schedule III to V controlled substances. Additional data were gathered regarding clinical duties, research, and teaching. Oncology PAs are used in multiple medical settings, and many assume high-level responsibilities. Future research addressing function and factors that limit use of PAs may allow for improved organizational efficiency and enhancement in the delivery of health care.

  1. Colorectal cancer clinical epidemiological characteristics in patients attended at Oncology service; Caracteristicas clinicas epidemiologicas del cancer colorrectal en un grupo de enfermos atendidos en consulta de Oncologia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Area Abreu, Daniel; Borrego Pino, Luis; Borrego Diaz, Luis; Abreu Rivera, Pedro; Garrote, Tillan; Aurora, [Hospital Provincial ' Vladimir Ilich Lenin' , Holguin (Cuba)

    2009-07-01

    A study of series of cases from January 2006 to December 2007 was carried out in 195 patients with colorectal cancer. They were attended at Oncology Service at Lenin Hospital, and were diagnosed at different health areas of the province. 63% and 37% of them had tumors in rectum and colon respectively. The age group between 40 and 69 years old was the most affected one (81.0%) and 56.9% of them were males. The main risk factors were the family history of the illness, chronic constipation, bleeding polyps and vesicular lithiasis. The most frequent clinical manifestations were rectal hemorrhage and anemia. (author)

  2. Laboratory compliance with the American Society of Clinical Oncology/college of American Pathologists guidelines for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 testing: a College of American Pathologists survey of 757 laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhleh, Raouf E; Grimm, Erin E; Idowu, Michael O; Souers, Rhona J; Fitzgibbons, Patrick L

    2010-05-01

    To ensure quality human epidermal growth receptor 2 (HER2) testing in breast cancer, the American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists guidelines were introduced with expected compliance by 2008. To assess the effect these guidelines have had on pathology laboratories and their ability to address key components. In late 2008, a survey was distributed with the HER2 immunohistochemistry (IHC) proficiency testing program. It included questions regarding pathology practice characteristics and assay validation using fluorescence in situ hybridization or another IHC laboratory assay and assessed pathologist HER2 scoring competency. Of the 907 surveys sent, 757 (83.5%) were returned. The median laboratory accessioned 15 000 cases and performed 190 HER2 tests annually. Quantitative computer image analysis was used by 33% of laboratories. In-house fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed in 23% of laboratories, and 60% of laboratories addressed the 6- to 48-hour tissue fixation requirement by embedding tissue on the weekend. HER2 testing was performed on the initial biopsy in 40%, on the resection specimen in 6%, and on either in 56% of laboratories. Testing was validated with only fluorescence in situ hybridization in 47% of laboratories, whereas 10% of laboratories used another IHC assay only; 13% used both assays, and 12% and 15% of laboratories had not validated their assays or chose "not applicable" on the survey question, respectively. The 90% concordance rate with fluorescence in situ hybridization results was achieved by 88% of laboratories for IHC-negative findings and by 81% of laboratories for IHC-positive cases. The 90% concordance rate for laboratories using another IHC assay was achieved by 80% for negative findings and 75% for positive cases. About 91% of laboratories had a pathologist competency assessment program. This survey demonstrates the extent and characteristics of HER2 testing. Although some American Society of

  3. Global Health in Radiation Oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodin, Danielle; Yap, Mei Ling; Grover, Surbhi

    2017-01-01

    programs. However, formalized training and career promotion tracks in global health within radiation oncology have been slow to emerge, thereby limiting the sustained involvement of students and faculty, and restricting opportunities for leadership in this space. We examine here potential structures...... and benefits of formalized global health training in radiation oncology. We explore how defining specific competencies in this area can help trainees and practitioners integrate their activities in global health within their existing roles as clinicians, educators, or scientists. This would also help create...... and funding models might be used to further develop and expand radiation oncology services globally....

  4. Capacity for Cancer Care Delivery Research in National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program Community Practices: Availability of Radiology and Primary Care Research Partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos, Ruth C; Sicks, JoRean D; Chang, George J; Lyss, Alan P; Stewart, Teresa L; Sung, Lillian; Weaver, Kathryn E

    2017-12-01

    Cancer care spans the spectrum from screening and diagnosis through therapy and into survivorship. Delivering appropriate care requires patient transitions across multiple specialties, such as primary care, radiology, and oncology. From the program's inception, the National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) sites were tasked with conducting cancer care delivery research (CCDR) that evaluates structural, organizational, and social factors, including care transitions that determine patient outcomes. The aim of this study is to describe the capacity of the NCORP to conduct multidisciplinary CCDR that includes radiology and primary care practices. The NCORP includes 34 community and 12 minority and underserved community sites. The Landscape Capacity Assessment was conducted in 2015 across these 46 sites, composed of the 401 components and subcomponents designated to conduct CCDR. Each respondent had the opportunity to designate an operational practice group, defined as a group of components and subcomponents with common care practices and resources. The primary outcomes were the proportion of adult oncology practice groups with affiliated radiology and primary care practices. The secondary outcomes were the proportion of those affiliated radiology and primary care groups that participate in research. Eighty-seven percent of components and subcomponents responded to at least some portion of the assessment, representing 230 practice groups. Analyzing the 201 adult oncology practice groups, 85% had affiliated radiologists, 69% of whom participate in research. Seventy-nine percent had affiliated primary care practitioners, 31% of whom participate in research. Institutional size, multidisciplinary group practice, and ownership by large regional or multistate health systems was associated with research participation by affiliated radiology and primary care groups. Research participation by these affiliated specialists was not significantly

  5. Need for global partnership in cancer care: perceptions of cancer care researchers attending the 2010 australia and Asia pacific clinical oncology research development workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyerly, H Kim; Abernethy, Amy P; Stockler, Martin R; Koczwara, Bogda; Aziz, Zeba; Nair, Reena; Seymour, Lesley

    2011-09-01

    To understand the diversity of issues and the breadth of growing clinical care, professional education, and clinical research needs of developing countries, not typically represented in Western or European surveys of cancer care and research. A cross-sectional survey was conducted of the attendees at the 2010 Australia and Asia Pacific Clinical Oncology Research Development workshop (Queensland, Australia) about the most important health care questions facing the participant's home countries, especially concerning cancer. Early-career oncologists and advanced oncology trainees from a region of the world containing significant low- and middle-income countries reported that cancer is an emerging health priority as a result of aging of the population, the impact of diet and lifestyle, and environmental pollution. There was concern about the capacity of health care workers and treatment facilities to provide cancer care and access to the latest cancer therapies and technologies. Although improving health care delivery was seen as a critical local agenda priority, focusing on improved cancer research activities in this select population was seen as the best way that others outside the country could improve outcomes for all. The burden of cancer will increase dramatically over the next 20 years, particularly in countries with developing and middle-income economies. Cancer research globally faces significant barriers, many of which are magnified in the developing country setting. Overcoming these barriers will require partnerships sensitive and responsive to both local and global needs.

  6. Radiolabeled antibodies in cancer. Oncology Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories through the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Radiolabeled antibodies--labeling and imaging techniques; Radiolabeled antibodies--carcinoembryonic antigen; Radiolabeled antibodies--alpha-fetoprotein; Radiolabeled antibodies--human chorionic gonadotropin; Radiolabeled antibodies--ferritin; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of colorectal tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of malignant melanoma; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of urogenital tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of thyroid tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--other clinical studies; Radiolabeled antibodies--selected preclinical studies; Radiolabeled antibodies--reviews

  7. Management of Immune-Related Adverse Events in Patients Treated With Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmer, Julie R; Lacchetti, Christina; Schneider, Bryan J; Atkins, Michael B; Brassil, Kelly J; Caterino, Jeffrey M; Chau, Ian; Ernstoff, Marc S; Gardner, Jennifer M; Ginex, Pamela; Hallmeyer, Sigrun; Holter Chakrabarty, Jennifer; Leighl, Natasha B; Mammen, Jennifer S; McDermott, David F; Naing, Aung; Nastoupil, Loretta J; Phillips, Tanyanika; Porter, Laura D; Puzanov, Igor; Reichner, Cristina A; Santomasso, Bianca D; Seigel, Carole; Spira, Alexander; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E; Wang, Yinghong; Weber, Jeffrey S; Wolchok, Jedd D; Thompson, John A

    2018-02-14

    Purpose To increase awareness, outline strategies, and offer guidance on the recommended management of immune-related adverse events in patients treated with immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICPi) therapy. Methods A multidisciplinary, multi-organizational panel of experts in medical oncology, dermatology, gastroenterology, rheumatology, pulmonology, endocrinology, urology, neurology, hematology, emergency medicine, nursing, trialist, and advocacy was convened to develop the clinical practice guideline. Guideline development involved a systematic review of the literature and an informal consensus process. The systematic review focused on guidelines, systematic reviews and meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials, and case series published from 2000 through 2017. Results The systematic review identified 204 eligible publications. Much of the evidence consisted of systematic reviews of observational data, consensus guidelines, case series, and case reports. Due to the paucity of high-quality evidence on management of immune-related adverse events, recommendations are based on expert consensus. Recommendations Recommendations for specific organ system-based toxicity diagnosis and management are presented. While management varies according to organ system affected, in general, ICPi therapy should be continued with close monitoring for grade 1 toxicities, with the exception of some neurologic, hematologic, and cardiac toxicities. ICPi therapy may be suspended for most grade 2 toxicities, with consideration of resuming when symptoms revert to grade 1 or less. Corticosteroids may be administered. Grade 3 toxicities generally warrant suspension of ICPis and the initiation of high-dose corticosteroids (prednisone 1 to 2 mg/kg/d or methylprednisolone 1 to 2 mg/kg/d). Corticosteroids should be tapered over the course of at least 4 to 6 weeks. Some refractory cases may require infliximab or other immunosuppressive therapy. In general, permanent discontinuation of ICPis is

  8. Improved efficiency in clinical workflow of reporting measured oncology lesions via PACS-integrated lesion tracking tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevenster, Merlijn; Travis, Adam R; Ganesh, Rajiv K; Liu, Peng; Kose, Ursula; Peters, Joost; Chang, Paul J

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. Imaging provides evidence for the response to oncology treatment by the serial measurement of reference lesions. Unfortunately, the identification, comparison, measurement, and documentation of several reference lesions can be an inefficient process. We tested the hypothesis that optimized workflow orchestration and tight integration of a lesion tracking tool into the PACS and speech recognition system can result in improvements in oncologic lesion measurement efficiency. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. A lesion management tool tightly integrated into the PACS workflow was developed. We evaluated the effect of the use of the tool on measurement reporting time by means of a prospective time-motion study on 86 body CT examinations with 241 measureable oncologic lesions with four radiologists. RESULTS. Aggregated measurement reporting time per lesion was 11.64 seconds in standard workflow, 16.67 seconds if readers had to register measurements de novo, and 6.36 seconds for each subsequent follow-up study. Differences were statistically significant (p workflow-integrated lesion management tool, especially for patients with multiple follow-up examinations, reversing the onetime efficiency penalty at baseline registration.

  9. Nanomedicine in veterinary oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Yin; Rodriguez, Carlos O; Li, Yuanpei

    2015-08-01

    Nanomedicine is an interdisciplinary field that combines medicine, engineering, chemistry, biology and material sciences to improve disease management and can be especially valuable in oncology. Nanoparticle-based agents that possess functions such as tumor targeting, imaging and therapy are currently under intensive investigation. This review introduces the basic concept of nanomedicine and the classification of nanoparticles. Because of their favorable pharmacokinetics, tumor targeting properties, and resulting superior efficacy and toxicity profiles, nanoparticle-based agents can overcome several limitations associated with conventional diagnostic and therapeutic protocols in veterinary oncology. The two most important tumor targeting mechanisms (passive and active tumor targeting) and their dominating factors (i.e. shape, charge, size and nanoparticle surface display) are discussed. The review summarizes published clinical and preclinical studies that utilize different nanoformulations in veterinary oncology, as well as the application of nanoparticles for cancer diagnosis and imaging. The toxicology of various nanoformulations is also considered. Given the benefits of nanoformulations demonstrated in human medicine, nanoformulated drugs are likely to gain more traction in veterinary oncology. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Oncology PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inubushi, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    At the beginning of this article, likening medical images to 'Where is Waldo?' I indicate the concept of diagnostic process of PET/CT imaging, so that medical physics specialists could understand the role of each imaging modality and infer our distress for image diagnosis. Then, I state the present situation of PET imaging and the basics (e.g. health insurance coverage, clinical significance, principle, protocol, and pitfall) of oncology FDG-PET imaging which accounts for more than 99% of all clinical PET examinations in Japan. Finally, I would like to give a wishful prospect of oncology PET that will expand to be more cancer-specific in order to assess therapeutic effects of emerging molecular targeted drugs targeting the 'hallmarks of cancer'. (author)

  11. Improving End-of-Life Care: Palliative Care Embedded in an Oncology Clinic Specializing in Targeted and Immune-Based Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, David J; DeSanto-Madeya, Susan; Gregas, Matthew; Lynch, Jessica; McDermott, David F; Buss, Mary K

    2017-09-01

    Patients with advanced cancer benefit from early involvement of palliative care. The ideal method of palliative care integration remains to be determined, as does its effectiveness for patients treated with targeted and immune-based therapies. We studied the impact of an embedded palliative care team that saw patients in an academic oncology clinic specializing in targeted and immune-based therapies. Patients seen on a specific day accessed the embedded model, on the basis of automatic criteria; patients seen other days could be referred to a separate palliative care clinic (usual care). We abstracted data from the medical records of 114 patients who died during the 3 years after this model's implementation. Compared with usual care (n = 88), patients with access to the embedded model (n = 26) encountered palliative care as outpatients more often ( P = .003) and earlier (mean, 231 v 109 days before death; P 7 days before death-a core Quality Oncology Practice Initiative metric-was higher in the embedded model (odds ratio, 5.60; P = .034). Place of death ( P = .505) and end-of-life chemotherapy (odds ratio, 0.361; P = .204) did not differ between the two arms. A model of embedded and automatically triggered palliative care among patients treated exclusively with targeted and immune-based therapies was associated with significant improvements in use and timing of palliative care and hospice, compared with usual practice.

  12. Neurologic complications in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pace

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurologic side effects related to cancer therapy are a common problem in oncology practice. These complications can negatively affect the management of the patient, because they can inhibit treatment and diminish quality of life. Therefore specific skills are required to recognise symptoms and clinical manifestations. This review focuses on the most common neurologic complications to improve physician’s familiarity in determining the aetiology of these symptoms.

  13. Medicinal cannabis in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Frederike K; de Jong, Floris A; Mathijssen, Ron H J; Erkens, Joëlle A; Herings, Ron M; Verweij, Jaap

    2007-12-01

    In The Netherlands, since September 2003, a legal medicinal cannabis product, constituting the whole range of cannabinoids, is available for clinical research, drug development strategies, and on prescription for patients. To date, this policy, initiated by the Dutch Government, has not yet led to the desired outcome; the amount of initiated clinical research is less than expected and only a minority of patients resorts to the legal product. This review aims to discuss the background for the introduction of legal medicinal cannabis in The Netherlands, the past years of Dutch clinical experience in oncology practice, possible reasons underlying the current outcome, and future perspectives.

  14. Mastering Resilience in Oncology: Learn to Thrive in the Face of Burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlubocky, Fay J; Rose, Miko; Epstein, Ronald M

    2017-01-01

    Oncology clinician burnout has become a noteworthy issue in medical oncology directly affecting the quality of patient care, patient satisfaction, and overall organizational success. Due to the increasing demands on clinical time, productivity, and the evolving medical landscape, the oncology clinician is at significant risk for burnout. Long hours in direct care with seriously ill patients/families, limited control over daily responsibilities, and endless electronic documentation, place considerable professional and personal demands on the oncologist. As a result, the oncology clinician's wellness is adversely impacted. Physical/emotional exhaustion, cynicism, and feelings of ineffectiveness evolve as core signs of burnout. Unaddressed burnout may affect cancer clinician relationships with their patients, the quality of care delivered, and the overall physical and emotional health of the clinician. Oncology clinicians should be encouraged to build upon their strengths, thrive in the face of adversity and stress, and learn to positively adapt to the changing cancer care system. Fostering individual resilience is a key protective factor against the development of and managing burnout. Empowering clinicians at both the individual and organizational level with tailored resilience strategies is crucial to ensuring clinician wellness. Resilience interventions may include: burnout education, work-life balance, adjustment of one's relationship to work, mindful practice, and acceptance of the clinical work environment. Health care organizations must act to provide institutional solutions through the implementation of: team-based oncology care, communication skills training, and effective resiliency training programs in order to mitigate the effects of stress and prevent burnout in oncology.

  15. Ethical issues at the interface of clinical care and research practice in pediatric oncology: a narrative review of parents' and physicians' experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Vries Martine C

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pediatric oncology has a strong research culture. Most pediatric oncologists are investigators, involved in clinical care as well as research. As a result, a remarkable proportion of children with cancer enrolls in a trial during treatment. This paper discusses the ethical consequences of the unprecedented integration of research and care in pediatric oncology from the perspective of parents and physicians. Methodology An empirical ethical approach, combining (1 a narrative review of (primarily qualitative studies on parents' and physicians' experiences of the pediatric oncology research practice, and (2 comparison of these experiences with existing theoretical ethical concepts about (pediatric research. The use of empirical evidence enriches these concepts by taking into account the peculiarities that ethical challenges pose in practice. Results Analysis of the 22 studies reviewed revealed that the integration of research and care has consequences for the informed consent process, the promotion of the child's best interests, and the role of the physician (doctor vs. scientist. True consent to research is difficult to achieve due to the complexity of research protocols, emotional stress and parents' dependency on their child's physician. Parents' role is to promote their child's best interests, also when they are asked to consider enrolling their child in a trial. Parents are almost never in equipoise on trial participation, which leaves them with the agonizing situation of wanting to do what is best for their child, while being fearful of making the wrong decision. Furthermore, a therapeutic misconception endangers correct assessment of participation, making parents inaccurately attribute therapeutic intent to research procedures. Physicians prefer the perspective of a therapist over a researcher. Consequently they may truly believe that in the research setting they promote the child's best interests, which maintains the

  16. Quality in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawlicki, Todd; Mundt, Arno J.

    2007-01-01

    A modern approach to quality was developed in the United States at Bell Telephone Laboratories during the first part of the 20th century. Over the years, those quality techniques have been adopted and extended by almost every industry. Medicine in general and radiation oncology in particular have been slow to adopt modern quality techniques. This work contains a brief description of the history of research on quality that led to the development of organization-wide quality programs such as Six Sigma. The aim is to discuss the current approach to quality in radiation oncology as well as where quality should be in the future. A strategy is suggested with the goal to provide a threshold improvement in quality over the next 10 years

  17. Payment Reform: Unprecedented and Evolving Impact on Gynecologic Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apte, Sachin M; Patel, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    With the signing of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act in April 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is now positioned to drive the development and implementation of sweeping changes to how physicians and hospitals are paid for the provision of oncology-related services. These changes will have a long-lasting impact on the sub-specialty of gynecologic oncology, regardless of practice structure, physician employment and compensation model, or local insurance market. Recently, commercial payers have piloted various models of payment reform via oncology-specific clinical pathways, oncology medical homes, episode payment arrangements, and accountable care organizations. Despite the positive results of some pilot programs, adoption remains limited. The goals are to eliminate unnecessary variation in cancer treatment, provide coordinated patient-centered care, while controlling costs. Yet, meaningful payment reform in oncology remains elusive. As the largest payer for oncology services in the United States, CMS has the leverage to make cancer services more value based. Thus far, the focus has been around pricing of physician-administered drugs with recent work in the area of the Oncology Medical Home. Gynecologic oncology is a unique sub-specialty that blends surgical and medical oncology, with treatment that often involves radiation therapy. This forward-thinking, multidisciplinary model works to keep the patient at the center of the care continuum and emphasizes care coordination. Because of the breadth and depth of gynecologic oncology, this sub-specialty has both the potential to be disrupted by payment reform as well as potentially benefit from the aspects of reform that can align incentives appropriately to improve coordination. Although the precise future payment models are unknown at this time, focused engagement of gynecologic oncologists and the full care team is imperative to assure that the practice remains patient centered

  18. Payment Reform: Unprecedented and Evolving Impact on Gynecologic Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apte, Sachin M.; Patel, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    With the signing of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act in April 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is now positioned to drive the development and implementation of sweeping changes to how physicians and hospitals are paid for the provision of oncology-related services. These changes will have a long-lasting impact on the sub-specialty of gynecologic oncology, regardless of practice structure, physician employment and compensation model, or local insurance market. Recently, commercial payers have piloted various models of payment reform via oncology-specific clinical pathways, oncology medical homes, episode payment arrangements, and accountable care organizations. Despite the positive results of some pilot programs, adoption remains limited. The goals are to eliminate unnecessary variation in cancer treatment, provide coordinated patient-centered care, while controlling costs. Yet, meaningful payment reform in oncology remains elusive. As the largest payer for oncology services in the United States, CMS has the leverage to make cancer services more value based. Thus far, the focus has been around pricing of physician-administered drugs with recent work in the area of the Oncology Medical Home. Gynecologic oncology is a unique sub-specialty that blends surgical and medical oncology, with treatment that often involves radiation therapy. This forward-thinking, multidisciplinary model works to keep the patient at the center of the care continuum and emphasizes care coordination. Because of the breadth and depth of gynecologic oncology, this sub-specialty has both the potential to be disrupted by payment reform as well as potentially benefit from the aspects of reform that can align incentives appropriately to improve coordination. Although the precise future payment models are unknown at this time, focused engagement of gynecologic oncologists and the full care team is imperative to assure that the practice remains patient centered

  19. Payment Reform: Unprecedented and Evolving Impact on Gynecologic Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin eApte

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available With the signing of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA in April 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS is now positioned to drive the development and implementation of sweeping changes to how physicians and hospitals are paid for the provision of oncology related services. These changes will have a long-lasting impact on the sub-specialty of gynecologic oncology, regardless of practice structure, physician employment and compensation model, or local insurance market. Recently, commercial payers have piloted various models of payment reform via oncology specific clinical pathways, oncology medical homes, episode payment arrangements, and accountable care organizations. Despite the positive results of some pilot programs, adoption remains limited. The goals are to eliminate unnecessary variation in cancer treatment, provide coordinated patient-centered care, while controlling costs. Yet, meaningful payment reform in oncology remains elusive. As the largest payer for oncology services in the United States, CMS has the leverage to make cancer services more value-based. Thus far, the focus has been around pricing of physician-administered drugs with recent work in the area of the Oncology Medical Home. Gynecologic oncology is a unique sub-specialty which blends surgical and medical oncology, with treatment that often involves radiation therapy. This forward-thinking, multi-disciplinary model works to keep the patient at the center of the care continuum and emphasizes care coordination. Because of the breadth and depth of gynecologic oncology, this sub-specialty has both the potential to be disrupted by payment reform as well as potentially benefit from the aspects of reform which can align incentives appropriately to improve coordination. Although the precise future payment models are unknown at this time, focused engagement of gynecologic oncologists and the full care team is imperative to assure that the

  20. American Society of Clinical Oncology Position Statement: Strategies for Reducing Cancer Health Disparities Among Sexual and Gender Minority Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Jennifer; Maingi, Shail; Blinder, Victoria; Denduluri, Neelima; Khorana, Alok A; Norton, Larry; Francisco, Michael; Wollins, Dana S; Rowland, Julia H

    2017-07-01

    ASCO is committed to addressing the needs of sexual and gender minority (SGM) populations as a diverse group at risk for receiving disparate care and having suboptimal experiences, including discrimination, throughout the cancer care continuum. This position statement outlines five areas of recommendations to address the needs of both SGM populations affected by cancer and members of the oncology workforce who identify as SGM: (1) patient education and support; (2) workforce development and diversity; (3) quality improvement strategies; (4) policy solutions; and (5) research strategies. In making these recommendations, the Society calls for increased outreach and educational support for SGM patients; increased SGM cultural competency training for providers; improvement of quality-of-care metrics that include sexual orientation and gender information variables; and increased data collection to inform future work addressing the needs of SGM communities.

  1. Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urology Association combined clinical management guidelines for urothelial cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulayel Alharbi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an update to the previously published Saudi guidelines for the evaluation and medical/surgical management of patients diagnosed with urothelial cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder. It is categorized according to the stage of the disease using the tumor node metastasis staging system, 7th edition. The guidelines are presented with their accompanying supporting evidence level, which is based on comprehensive literature review, several internationally recognized guidelines, and the collective expertise of the guidelines committee members (authors who were selected by the Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urological Association. Considerations to the local availability of drugs, technology, and expertise have been regarded. These guidelines should serve as a roadmap for the urologists, oncologists, general physicians, support groups, and health-care policymakers in the management of patients diagnosed with urothelial cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder.

  2. Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urology Association combined clinical management guidelines for urothelial cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Hulayel; Alkhateeb, Sultan; Murshid, Esam; Alotaibi, Mohammed; Abusamra, Ashraf; Rabah, Danny; Almansour, Mubarak; Alghamdi, Abdullah; Aljubran, Ali; Eltigani, Amin; Alkushi, Hussein; Ahmed, Imran; Alsharm, Abdullah; Bazarbashi, Shouki

    2018-01-01

    This is an update to the previously published Saudi guidelines for the evaluation and medical/surgical management of patients diagnosed with urothelial cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder. It is categorized according to the stage of the disease using the tumor node metastasis staging system, 7 th edition. The guidelines are presented with their accompanying supporting evidence level, which is based on comprehensive literature review, several internationally recognized guidelines, and the collective expertise of the guidelines committee members (authors) who were selected by the Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urological Association. Considerations to the local availability of drugs, technology, and expertise have been regarded. These guidelines should serve as a roadmap for the urologists, oncologists, general physicians, support groups, and health-care policymakers in the management of patients diagnosed with urothelial cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder.

  3. Redesigning a clinical mentoring program for improved outcomes in the clinical training of clerks

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Chia-Der; Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Lee, Cheng-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Mentorship has been noted as critical to medical students adapting to clinical training in the medical workplace. A lack of infrastructure in a mentoring program might deter relationship building between mentors and mentees. This study assessed the effect of a redesigned clinical mentoring program from the perspective of clerks. The objective was to assess the benefits of the redesigned program and identify potential improvements.Methods: A redesigned clinical mentoring program ...

  4. Whole-body FDG PET-MR oncologic imaging: pitfalls in clinical interpretation related to inaccurate MR-based attenuation correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attenberger, Ulrike; Catana, Ciprian; Chandarana, Hersh; Catalano, Onofrio A; Friedman, Kent; Schonberg, Stefan A; Thrall, James; Salvatore, Marco; Rosen, Bruce R; Guimaraes, Alexander R

    2015-08-01

    Simultaneous data collection for positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MR) is now a reality. While the full benefits of concurrently acquiring PET and MR data and the potential added clinical value are still being evaluated, initial studies have identified several important potential pitfalls in the interpretation of fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/MRI in oncologic whole-body imaging, the majority of which being related to the errors in the attenuation maps created from the MR data. The purpose of this article was to present such pitfalls and artifacts using case examples, describe their etiology, and discuss strategies to overcome them. Using a case-based approach, we will illustrate artifacts related to (1) Inaccurate bone tissue segmentation; (2) Inaccurate air cavities segmentation; (3) Motion-induced misregistration; (4) RF coils in the PET field of view; (5) B0 field inhomogeneity; (6) B1 field inhomogeneity; (7) Metallic implants; (8) MR contrast agents.

  5. Continuing medical education in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauvet, B.; Barillot, I.; Denis, F.; Cailleux, P.E.; Ardiet, J.M.; Mornex, F.

    2012-01-01

    In France, continuing medical education (CME) and professional practice evaluation (PPE) became mandatory by law in July 2009 for all health professionals. Recently published decrees led to the creation of national specialty councils to implement this organizational device. For radiation oncology, this council includes the French Society for Radiation Oncology (SFRO), the National Radiation Oncology Syndicate (SNRO) and the Association for Continuing Medical Education in Radiation Oncology (AFCOR). The Radiation Oncology National Council will propose a set of programs including CME and PPE, professional thesaurus, labels for CME actions consistent with national requirements, and will organize expertise for public instances. AFCOR remains the primary for CME, but each practitioner can freely choose an organisation for CME, provided that it is certified by the independent scientific commission. The National Order for physicians is the control authority. Radiation oncology has already a strong tradition of independent CME that will continue through this major reform. (authors)

  6. Tumor thrombus of inferior vena cava in patients with renal cell carcinoma – clinical and oncological outcome of 50 patients after surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kocot Arkadius

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate oncological and clinical outcome in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC and tumor thrombus involving inferior vena cava (IVC treated with nephrectomy and thrombectomy. Methods We identified 50 patients with a median age of 65 years, who underwent radical surgical treatment for RCC and tumor thrombus of the IVC between 1997 and 2010. The charts were reviewed for pathological and surgical parameters, as well as complications and oncological outcome. Results The median follow-up was 26 months. In 21 patients (42% distant metastases were already present at the time of surgery. All patients underwent radical nephrectomy, thrombectomy and lymph node dissection through a flank (15 patients/30%, thoracoabdominal (14 patients/28% or midline abdominal approach (21 patients/42%, depending upon surgeon preference and upon the characteristics of tumor and associated thrombus. Extracorporal circulation with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB was performed in 10 patients (20% with supradiaphragmal thrombus of IVC. Cancer-specific survival for the whole cohort at 5 years was 33.1%. Survival for the patients without distant metastasis at 5 years was 50.7%, whereas survival rate in the metastatic group at 5 years was 7.4%. Median survival of patients with metastatic disease was 16.4 months. On multivariate analysis lymph node invasion, distant metastasis and grading were independent prognostic factors. There was no statistically significant influence of level of the tumor thrombus on survival rate. Indeed, patients with supradiaphragmal tumor thrombus (n = 10 even had a better outcome (overall survival at 5 years of 58.33% than the entire cohort. Conclusions An aggressive surgical approach is the most effective therapeutic option in patients with RCC and any level of tumor thrombus and offers a reasonable longterm survival. Due to good clinical and oncological outcome we prefer the use of CPB with extracorporal

  7. A Leadership Education and Development Program for Clinical Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Modic, Mary Beth; Van Dyk, Jennifer; Hancock, K Kelly

    2016-11-01

    The Leadership Education and Development (LEAD) Program was designed to transform care at the bedside by empowering clinical nurses as leaders. The heart of LEAD was enhancing communication skills of clinical nurses with clinical colleagues and, most importantly, patients and families. Key concepts of leadership/management were included: personal awareness, personal leadership skills/abilities, leading change, leading others individually and in teams, enhancing the patient/provider experience, and the leadership role in outcomes management. A quantitative, longitudinal, survey design was used with 2 cohorts. The program consisted of six 4-hour sessions for 3 to 6 months. Leadership practices were measured before program implementation, at the end of the program, and 3 months after program completion. There were significant increases in leadership practices sustained 3 months after program completion. A range of other outcome measures was included. There is a need for additional leadership development programs for clinical nurses.

  8. Electronic nicotine delivery systems: a policy statement from the American Association for Cancer Research and the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Thomas H; Goniewicz, Maciej L; Hanna, Nasser H; Hatsukami, Dorothy K; Herbst, Roy S; Hobin, Jennifer A; Ostroff, Jamie S; Shields, Peter G; Toll, Benjamin A; Tyne, Courtney A; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Warren, Graham W

    2015-02-01

    Combustible tobacco use remains the number one preventable cause of disease, disability, and death in the United States. Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), which include e-cigarettes, are devices capable of delivering nicotine in an aerosolized form. ENDS use by both adults and youth has increased rapidly, and some have advocated these products could serve as harm-reduction devices and smoking cessation aids. ENDS may be beneficial if they reduce smoking rates or prevent or reduce the known adverse health effects of smoking. However, ENDS may also be harmful, particularly to youth, if they increase the likelihood that nonsmokers or formers smokers will use combustible tobacco products or if they discourage smokers from quitting. The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) recognize the potential ENDS have to alter patterns of tobacco use and affect the public's health; however, definitive data are lacking. AACR and ASCO recommend additional research on these devices, including assessing the health impacts of ENDS, understanding patterns of ENDS use, and determining what role ENDS have in cessation. Key policy recommendations include supporting federal, state, and local regulation of ENDS; requiring manufacturers to register with the FDA and report all product ingredients, requiring childproof caps on ENDS liquids, and including warning labels on products and their advertisements; prohibiting youth-oriented marketing and sales; prohibiting child-friendly ENDS flavors; and prohibiting ENDS use in places where cigarette smoking is prohibited. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research and American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  9. Encyclopedia of radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, Luther W. [Drexel Univ. College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Yaeger, Theodore E. (eds.) [Wake Forest Univ. School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-02-01

    The simple A to Z format provides easy access to relevant information in the field of radiation oncology. Extensive cross references between keywords and related articles enable efficient searches in a user-friendly manner. Fully searchable and hyperlinked electronic online edition. The aim of this comprehensive encyclopedia is to provide detailed information on radiation oncology. The wide range of entries are written by leading experts. They will provide basic and clinical scientists in academia, practice and industry with valuable information about the field of radiation oncology. Those in related fields, students, teachers, and interested laypeople will also benefit from the important and relevant information on the most recent developments. Please note that this publication is available as print only or online only or print + online set. Save 75% of the online list price when purchasing the bundle. For more information on the online version please type the publication title into the search box above, then click on the eReference version in the results list.

  10. Infectious Disease Clinical Research Program (IDCRP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Our mission is to conduct infectious disease clinical research of importance to the military through a unique, adaptive, and collaborative network, to inform health...

  11. Information technologies for radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, George T.Y.

    1996-01-01

    Electronic exchange of information is profoundly altering the ways in which we share clinical information on patients, our research mission, and the ways we teach. The three panelists each describe their experiences in information exchange. Dr. Michael Vannier is Professor of Radiology at the Mallinkrodt Institute of Radiology, and directs the image processing laboratory. He will provide insights into how radiologists have used the Internet in their specialty. Dr. Joel Goldwein, Associate Professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Pennsylvania, will describe his experiences in using the World Wide Web in the practice of academic radiation oncology and the award winning Oncolink Web Site. Dr. Timothy Fox Assistant, Professor of Radiation Oncology at Emory University will discuss wide area networking of multi-site departments, to coordinate center wide clinical, research and teaching activities

  12. Different Clinical Utility of Oropharyngeal Bacterial Screening prior to Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in Oncological and Neurological Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radek Kroupa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study was to monitor oropharyngeal bacterial colonization in patients indicated for percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy (PEG. Methods. Oropharyngeal swabs were obtained from patients prior to PEG placement. A development of peristomal infection was evaluated. The analysis of oropharyngeal and peristomal site pathogens was done. Results. Consecutive 274 patients referred for PEG due to neurological disorder or cancer completed the study. Oropharyngeal colonization with pathogens was observed in 69% (190/274, dominantly in the neurologic subgroup of patients (P < 0.001. Peristomal infection occurred in 30 (10.9% of patients and in 57% of them the correlation between oropharyngeal and peristomal agents was present. The presence of oropharyngeal pathogens was assessed as an important risk factor for the development of peristomal infection only in oncological patients (OR = 8.33, 95% CI: 1.66–41.76. Despite a high prevalence of pathogens in neurological patients, it did not influence the risk of peristomal infection with the exception for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA carriers (OR 4.5, 95% CI: 1.08–18.76. Conclusion. During oropharyngeal microbial screening prior to the PEG insertion, the detection of pathogens may be a marker of the increased risk of peristomal infection in cancer patients only. In neurological patients the benefit of the screening is limited to the detection of MRSA carriers.

  13. Different clinical utility of oropharyngeal bacterial screening prior to percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in oncological and neurological patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroupa, Radek; Jurankova, Jana; Dastych, Milan; Senkyrik, Michal; Pavlik, Tomas; Prokesova, Jitka; Jecmenova, Marketa; Dolina, Jiri; Hep, Ales

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor oropharyngeal bacterial colonization in patients indicated for percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy (PEG). Oropharyngeal swabs were obtained from patients prior to PEG placement. A development of peristomal infection was evaluated. The analysis of oropharyngeal and peristomal site pathogens was done. Consecutive 274 patients referred for PEG due to neurological disorder or cancer completed the study. Oropharyngeal colonization with pathogens was observed in 69% (190/274), dominantly in the neurologic subgroup of patients (P < 0.001). Peristomal infection occurred in 30 (10.9%) of patients and in 57% of them the correlation between oropharyngeal and peristomal agents was present. The presence of oropharyngeal pathogens was assessed as an important risk factor for the development of peristomal infection only in oncological patients (OR = 8.33, 95% CI: 1.66-41.76). Despite a high prevalence of pathogens in neurological patients, it did not influence the risk of peristomal infection with the exception for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriers (OR 4.5, 95% CI: 1.08-18.76). During oropharyngeal microbial screening prior to the PEG insertion, the detection of pathogens may be a marker of the increased risk of peristomal infection in cancer patients only. In neurological patients the benefit of the screening is limited to the detection of MRSA carriers.

  14. Oncology in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eav, S; Schraub, S; Dufour, P; Taisant, D; Ra, C; Bunda, P

    2012-01-01

    Cambodia, a country of 14 million inhabitants, was devastated during the Khmer Rouge period and thereafter. The resources of treatment are rare: only one radiotherapy department, renovated in 2003, with an old cobalt machine; few surgeons trained to operate on cancer patients; no hematology; no facilities to use intensive chemotherapy; no nuclear medicine department and no palliative care unit. Cervical cancer incidence is one of the highest in the world, while in men liver cancer ranks first (20% of all male cancers). Cancers are seen at stage 3 or 4 for 70% of patients. There is no prevention program - only a vaccination program against hepatitis B for newborns - and no screening program for cervical cancer or breast cancer. In 2010, oncology, recognized as a full specialty, was created to train the future oncologists on site at the University of Phnom Penh. A new National Cancer Center will be built in 2013 with modern facilities for radiotherapy, medical oncology, hematology and nuclear medicine. Cooperation with foreign countries, especially France, and international organizations has been established and is ongoing. Progress is occurring slowly due to the shortage of money for Cambodian institutions and the lay public. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. An Open Letter to the Cancer Community Regarding Community Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is in the process of combining its two community-based research networks to create a single network that builds on the strengths of the Community Clinical Oncology Program/Minority-Based Community Clinical Oncology Prog

  16. Personalized care in neuro-oncology coming of age: why we need MGMT and 1p/19q testing for malignant glioma patients in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Michael; Stupp, Roger; Hegi, Monika E.; van den Bent, Martin; Tonn, Joerg C.; Sanson, Marc; Wick, Wolfgang; Reifenberger, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Histological subtyping and grading by malignancy are the cornerstones of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the central nervous system. They shall provide clinicians with guidance as to the course of disease to be expected and the choices of treatment to be made. Nonetheless, patients with histologically identical tumors may have very different outcomes, notably in patients with astrocytic and oligodendroglial gliomas of WHO grades II and III. In gliomas of adulthood, 3 molecular markers have undergone extensive studies in recent years: 1p/19q chromosomal codeletion, O6-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation, and mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 and 2. However, the assessment of these molecular markers has so far not been implemented in clinical routine because of the lack of therapeutic implications. In fact, these markers were considered to be prognostic irrespective of whether patients were receiving radiotherapy (RT), chemotherapy, or both (1p/19q, IDH1/2), or of limited value because testing is too complex and no chemotherapy alternative to temozolomide was available (MGMT). In 2012, this situation has changed: long-term follow-up of the Rad