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  1. Postgraduate Training in Clinical Oncology. Report on a WHO Working Group (The Hague, The Netherlands, December 6-8, 1978).

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    The 1978 report of the Working Group of Postgraduate Training in Clinical Oncology, convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Europe in collaboration with the government of The Netherlands, is presented. The groups analyzed models of postgraduate training in clinical oncology and evaluated their suitability in relation to…

  2. Informed consent in oncology clinical trials: A Brown University Oncology Research Group prospective cross-sectional pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Andrew; Sikov, William M.; Quesenberry, Matthew I.; Safran, Howard; Khurshid, Humera; Mitchell, Kristen M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Informed consent forms (ICFs) for oncology clinical trials have grown increasingly longer and more complex. We evaluated objective understanding of critical components of informed consent among patients enrolling in contemporary trials of conventional or novel biologic/targeted therapies. Methods We evaluated ICFs for cancer clinical trials for length and readability, and patients registered on those studies were asked to complete a validated 14-question survey assessing their understanding of key characteristics of the trial. Mean scores were compared in groups defined by trial and patient characteristics. Results Fifty patients, of whom half participated in trials of immunotherapy or biologic/targeted agents and half in trials of conventional therapy, completed the survey. On average, ICFs for industry-originated trials (N = 9 trials) were significantly longer (P < .0001) and had lower Flesch ease-of-reading scores (P = .003) than investigator-initiated trials (N = 11). At least 80% of patients incorrectly responded to three key questions which addressed the experimental nature of their trial therapy, its purported efficacy and potential risks relative to alternative treatments. The mean objective understanding score was 76.9±8.8, but it was statistically significantly lower for patients who had not completed high school (P = .011). The scores did not differ significantly by type of cancer therapy (P = .12) or trial sponsor (P = .38). Conclusions Many participants enrolled on cancer trials had poor understanding of essential elements of their trial. In order to ensure true informed consent, innovative approaches, such as expanded in-person counseling adapted to the patient’s education level or cultural characteristics should be evaluated across socio-demographic groups. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01772511 PMID:28235011

  3. Group Therapy with Patients in the Waiting Room of an Oncology Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnowitz, Edward; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes a therapy group for cancer patients, conducted by cotherapists in an oncology waiting room. Group members provided mutual support and shared concerns and coping methods. Medical staff members became more involved and were more able to address the affective needs of the patients and their families. (JAC)

  4. Past and present achievements, and future direction of the Gastrointestinal Oncology Study Group (GIOSG), a Division of Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boku, Narikazu

    2011-12-01

    Initially, Gastrointestinal Study Group in Japan Clinical Oncology Group (GIOSG/JCOG) focused on gastric cancer. In 1980s, fluoropyrimidine, cisplatin and mitomycin C were key drugs. A randomized Phase II trial (JCOG8501) comparing futrafur plus mitomycin C and uracil plus futrafur and mitomycin C showed a higher response rate of uracil plus futrafur and mitomycin C than futrafur plus mitomycin C. From the results of two Phase II trials of etoposide, adriamycin and cisplatin, and cisplatin plus 5-fluorouracil, uracil plus futrafur and mitomycin C and cisplatin plus 5-fluorouracil were adopted for the test arms of the Phase III trial (JCOG9205) comparing with continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil as a control arm. Neither cisplatin plus 5-fluorouracil nor uracil plus futrafur and mitomycin C showed a survival benefit over continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil. In late 1990s, new agents, irinotecan and S-1, were developed for gastric cancer in Japan. GIOSG conducted a Phase III trial (JCOG9912) investigating superiority of irinotecan plus cisplatin and non-inferiority of monotherapy with S-1 compared with continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil, and S-1 succeeded in showing non-inferiority. Then, SPIRITS trial showed a survival benefit of S-1 plus cisplatin over S-1, resulting in the establishment of a standard care for advanced gastric cancer in Japan. GIOSG have merged with Gastric Cancer Study Group as the Stomach Cancer Study Group (SCSG) from 2011. Recent progress in the development of new drugs has been remarkable. From the point of the roles shared with many other study groups for clinical trials, including registration trials of new drugs conducted by pharmaceutical companies, SCSG should recognize its role and conduct clinical trials with high quality for establishing new standard treatment.

  5. American Society of Clinical Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Interest Mobile App Privacy Policy Privacy Policy Social Media Policy Sponsor Policy Terms of Use American Society of Clinical Oncology ASCO Annual Meeting Register and Reserve Your Hotel June 2-6, 2017 | Chicago, Illinois Hotel Reservation & ...

  6. Barriers to a Career Focus in Cancer Prevention: A Report and Initial Recommendations From the American Society of Clinical Oncology Cancer Prevention Workforce Pipeline Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyskens, Frank L.; Bajorin, Dean F.; George, Thomas J.; Jeter, Joanne M.; Khan, Shakila; Tyne, Courtney A.; William, William N.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assist in determining barriers to an oncology career incorporating cancer prevention, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Cancer Prevention Workforce Pipeline Work Group sponsored surveys of training program directors and oncology fellows. Methods Separate surveys with parallel questions were administered to training program directors at their fall 2013 retreat and to oncology fellows as part of their February 2014 in-training examination survey. Forty-seven (67%) of 70 training directors and 1,306 (80%) of 1,634 oncology fellows taking the in-training examination survey answered questions. Results Training directors estimated that ≤ 10% of fellows starting an academic career or entering private practice would have a career focus in cancer prevention. Only 15% of fellows indicated they would likely be interested in cancer prevention as a career focus, although only 12% thought prevention was unimportant relative to treatment. Top fellow-listed barriers to an academic career were difficulty in obtaining funding and lower compensation. Additional barriers to an academic career with a prevention focus included unclear career model, lack of clinical mentors, lack of clinical training opportunities, and concerns about reimbursement. Conclusion Reluctance to incorporate cancer prevention into an oncology career seems to stem from lack of mentors and exposure during training, unclear career path, and uncertainty regarding reimbursement. Suggested approaches to begin to remedy this problem include: 1) more ASCO-led and other prevention educational resources for fellows, training directors, and practicing oncologists; 2) an increase in funded training and clinical research opportunities, including reintroduction of the R25T award; 3) an increase in the prevention content of accrediting examinations for clinical oncologists; and 4) interaction with policymakers to broaden the scope and depth of reimbursement for prevention counseling and

  7. Outcome assessment for clinical trials: how many adjudicators do we need? Canadian Lung Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, S D; Cook, D J; Guyatt, G H; King, D; Troyan, S

    1997-02-01

    Considerable effort is often expended to adjudicate outcomes in clinical trials, but little has been written on the administration of the adjudication process and its possible impact on study results. As a case study, we describe the function and performance of an adjudication committee in a large randomized trial of two diagnostic approaches to potentially operable lung cancer. Up to five independent adjudicators independently determined two primary outcomes: tumor status at death or at final follow-up and the cause of death. Patients for whom there was any disagreement were discussed in committee until a consensus was achieved. We describe the pattern of agreement among the adjudicators and with the final consensus result. Additionally, we model the adjudication process and predict the results if a smaller committee had been used. We found that reducing the number of adjudicators from five to two or three would probably have changed the consensus outcome in less than 10% of cases. Correspondingly, the effect on the final study results (comparing primary outcomes in both randomized arms) would have been altered very little. Even using a single adjudicator would not have affected the results substantially. About 90 minutes of person-time per patient was required for activities directly related to the adjudication process, or approximately 6 months of full time work for the entire study. This level of effort could be substantially reduced by using fewer adjudicators with little impact on the results. Thus, we suggest that when high observer agreement is demonstrated or anticipated, adjudication committees should consist of no more than three members. Further work is needed to evaluate if smaller committees are adequate to detect small but important treatment effects or if they compromise validity when the level of adjudicator agreement is lower.

  8. Raman Spectroscopy for Clinical Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B. Fenn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the leading causes of death throughout the world. Advancements in early and improved diagnosis could help prevent a significant number of these deaths. Raman spectroscopy is a vibrational spectroscopic technique which has received considerable attention recently with regards to applications in clinical oncology. Raman spectroscopy has the potential not only to improve diagnosis of cancer but also to advance the treatment of cancer. A number of studies have investigated Raman spectroscopy for its potential to improve diagnosis and treatment of a wide variety of cancers. In this paper the most recent advances in dispersive Raman spectroscopy, which have demonstrated promising leads to real world application for clinical oncology are reviewed. The application of Raman spectroscopy to breast, brain, skin, cervical, gastrointestinal, oral, and lung cancers is reviewed as well as a special focus on the data analysis techniques, which have been employed in the studies.

  9. About the Community Oncology and Prevention Trials Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Community Oncology and Prevention Trials Research Group supports clinical oncology trials in cancer prevention and control in community settings. The group also supports investigator-initiated research projects in supportive, palliative and end-of-life care, and coordinates clinical oncology research projects with other NCI programs to be done in the community setting. |

  10. Introduction to veterinary clinical oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    Veterinary clinical oncology involves a multidisciplinary approach to the recognition and management of spontaneously occurring neoplasms of domestic animals. This requires some knowledge of the causes, incidence, and natural course of malignant disease as it occurs in domestic species. The purpose of this course is to acquaint you with the more common neoplastic problems you will encounter in practice, so that you can offer your clients an informed opinion regarding prognosis and possible therapeutic modalities. A major thrust will be directed toward discussing and encouraging treatment/management of malignant disease. Multimodality therapy will be stressed. 10 refs., 3 tabs.

  11. Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program for Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilan, Barbara A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences is described, along with student reactions to the program. The summer elective program involves cancer lectures (one week) and clinical exposure (nine weeks) in medical, surgical, and pediatric oncology services, as well as self-directed learning…

  12. Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology working group and European Association for Neuro-Oncology recommendations for the clinical use of PET imaging in gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Nathalie L; Weller, Michael; Suchorska, Bogdana

    2016-01-01

    This guideline provides recommendations for the use of PET imaging in gliomas. The review examines established clinical benefit in glioma patients of PET using glucose ((18)F-FDG) and amino acid tracers ((11)C-MET, (18)F-FET, and (18)F-FDOPA). An increasing number of studies have been published...... on PET imaging in the setting of diagnosis, biopsy, and resection as well radiotherapy planning, treatment monitoring, and response assessment. Recommendations are based on evidence generated from studies which validated PET findings by histology or clinical course. This guideline emphasizes the clinical...

  13. Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology working group and European Association for Neuro-Oncology recommendations for the clinical use of PET imaging in gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Nathalie L; Weller, Michael; Suchorska, Bogdana; Galldiks, Norbert; Soffietti, Riccardo; Kim, Michelle M; la Fougère, Christian; Pope, Whitney; Law, Ian; Arbizu, Javier; Chamberlain, Marc C; Vogelbaum, Michael; Ellingson, Ben M; Tonn, Joerg C

    2016-09-01

    This guideline provides recommendations for the use of PET imaging in gliomas. The review examines established clinical benefit in glioma patients of PET using glucose ((18)F-FDG) and amino acid tracers ((11)C-MET, (18)F-FET, and (18)F-FDOPA). An increasing number of studies have been published on PET imaging in the setting of diagnosis, biopsy, and resection as well radiotherapy planning, treatment monitoring, and response assessment. Recommendations are based on evidence generated from studies which validated PET findings by histology or clinical course. This guideline emphasizes the clinical value of PET imaging with superiority of amino acid PET over glucose PET and provides a framework for the use of PET to assist in the management of patients with gliomas.

  14. Lessons Learned from Radiation Oncology Clinical Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Fei-Fei; Okunieff, Paul; Bernhard, Eric J.; Stone, Helen B.; Yoo, Stephen; Coleman, C. Norman; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Brown, Martin; Buatti, John; Guha, Chandan

    2013-01-01

    A Workshop entitled “Lessons Learned from Radiation Oncology Trials” was held on December 7–8th, 2011 in Bethesda, MD, to present and discuss some of the recently conducted Radiation Oncology clinical trials with a focus on those that failed to refute the null hypothesis. The objectives of this Workshop were to summarize and examine the questions that these trials provoked, to assess the quality and limitations of the pre-clinical data that supported the hypotheses underlying these trials, an...

  15. Clinical Trials and the Role of the Oncology Clinical Trials Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Elizabeth A; Royce, Cheryl

    2017-03-01

    Clinical trials are paramount to improving human health. New trial designs and informed consent issues are emerging as a result of genomic profiling and the development of molecularly targeted agents. Many groups and individuals are responsible for ensuring the protection of research participants and the quality of the data produced. The specialty role of the clinical trials nurse (CTN) is critical to clinical trials. Oncology CTNs have competencies that can help guide their practice; however, not all oncology clinical trials are supervised by a nurse. Using the process of engagement, one organization has restructured oncology CTNs under a nurse-supervised model.

  16. Introduction of online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer through a multicentre clinical trial (Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 10.01: Lessons learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer is a novel radiotherapy technique that was found feasible in a pilot study at a single academic institution. In September 2010 this technique was opened as a multicenter study through the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG 10.01 bladder online adaptive radiotherapy treatment. Twelve centers across Australia and New-Zealand registered interest into the trial. A multidisciplinary team of radiation oncologists, radiation therapists and medical physicists represented the trial credentialing and technical support team. To provide timely activation and proper implementation of the adaptive technique the following key areas were addressed at each site: Staff education/training; Practical image guided radiotherapy assessment; provision of help desk and feedback. The trial credentialing process involved face-to-face training and technical problem solving via full day site visits. A dedicated "help-desk" team was developed to provide support for the clinical trial. 26% of the workload occurred at the credentialing period while the remaining 74% came post-center activation. The workload was made up of the following key areas; protocol clarification (36%, technical problems (46% while staff training was less than 10%. Clinical trial credentialing is important to minimizing trial deviations. It should not only focus on site activation quality assurance but also provide ongoing education and technical support.

  17. American Society of Clinical Oncology Policy Statement on Clinical Pathways in Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zon, Robin T; Frame, James N; Neuss, Michael N; Page, Ray D; Wollins, Dana S; Stranne, Steven; Bosserman, Linda D

    2016-03-01

    The use of clinical pathways in oncology care is increasingly important to patients and oncology providers as a tool for enhancing both quality and value. However, with increasing adoption of pathways into oncology practice, concerns have been raised by ASCO members and other stakeholders. These include the process being used for pathway development, the administrative burdens on oncology practices of reporting on pathway adherence, and understanding the true impact of pathway use on patient health outcomes. To address these concerns, ASCO's Board of Directors established a Task Force on Clinical Pathways, charged with articulating a set of recommendations to improve the development of oncology pathways and processes, allowing the demonstration of pathway concordance in a manner that promotes evidence-based, high-value care respecting input from patients, payers, and providers. These recommendations have been approved and adopted by ASCO's Board of Directors on August 12, 2015, and are presented herein.

  18. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Guidelines for the Delineation of the Clinical Target Volume in the Postoperative Treatment of Pancreatic Head Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, Karyn A., E-mail: goodmank@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Regine, William F. [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ben-Josef, Edgar [University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Haustermans, Karin [University Hospital Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Bosch, Walter R. [Image-Guided Therapy QA Center, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Turian, Julius; Abrams, Ross A. [Rush University Medical College, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To develop contouring guidelines to be used in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0848, a Phase III randomized trial evaluating the benefit of adjuvant chemoradiation in patients with resected head of pancreas cancer. Methods and Materials: A consensus committee of six radiation oncologists with expertise in gastrointestinal radiotherapy developed stepwise contouring guidelines and an atlas for the delineation of the clinical target volume (CTV) in the postoperative treatment of pancreas cancer, based on identifiable regions of interest and margin expansions. Areas at risk for subclinical disease to be included in the CTV were defined, including nodal regions, anastomoses, and the preoperative primary tumor location. Regions of interest that could be reproducibly contoured on postoperative imaging after a pancreaticoduodenectomy were identified. Standardized expansion margins to encompass areas at risk were developed after multiple iterations to determine the optimal margin expansions. Results: New contouring recommendations based on CT anatomy were established. Written guidelines for the delineation of the postoperative CTV and normal tissues, as well as a Web-based atlas, were developed. Conclusions: The postoperative abdomen has been a difficult area for effective radiotherapy. These new guidelines will help physicians create fields that better encompass areas at risk and minimize dose to normal tissues.

  19. Marginal prescription equivalent to the isocenter prescription in lung stereotactic body radiotherapy: preliminary study for Japan Clinical Oncology Group trial (JCOG1408)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Daisuke; Ozawa, Shuichi; Kimura, Tomoki; Saito, Akito; Nishio, Teiji; Nakashima, Takeo; Ohno, Yoshimi; Murakami, Yuji; Nagata, Yasushi

    2017-01-01

    A new randomized Phase III trial, the Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG) 1408, which compares two dose fractionations (JCOG 0403 and JCOG 0702) for medically inoperable Stage IA NSCLC or small lung lesions clinically diagnosed as primary lung cancer, involves the introduction of a prescribed dose to the D95% of the planning target volume (PTV) using a superposition/convolution algorithm. Therefore, we must determine the prescribed dose in the D95% prescribing method to begin JCOG1408. JCOG 0702 uses density correction and the D95% prescribing method. However, JCOG 0403 uses no density correction and isocenter- prescribing method. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prescribed dose to the D95% of the PTV equivalent to a dose of 48 Gy to the isocenter (JCOG 0403) using a superposition algorithm. The peripheral isodose line, which has the highest conformity index, and the D95% of the PTV were analyzed by considering the weighting factor, i.e. the inverse of the difference between the doses obtained using the superposition and Clarkson algorithms. The average dose at the isodose line of the highest conformity index and the D95% of the PTV were 41.5 ± 0.3 and 42.0 ± 0.3 Gy, respectively. The D95% of the PTV had a small correlation with the target volume (r2 = 0.0022) and with the distance between the scatterer and tumor volumes (r2 = 0.19). Thus, the prescribed dose of 48 Gy using the Clarkson algorithm (JCOG0403) was found to be equivalent to the prescribed dose of 42 Gy to the D95% of the PTV using the superposition algorithm. PMID:28115532

  20. Clinical Oncology-A New Era

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Biyun Qian; Dan Su; Herbert Yu

    2007-01-01

    Rapid growth in biomedical research coupled with dramatic advancement in biotechnology has significantly improved our understanding of the molecular basis involving cancer development and progression.This improvement has led to the discovery of new molecular markers for cancer diagnosis and prognosis as well as new molecular targets for cancer treatment and intervention.Continuous emergence of some new developing area in molecular profiling,new therapeutic agents,tissue microenvironment and systems biology have made significant progress in clinical oncology.Clinical research and investigation that focus on these new developments have begun to show exciting results that indicate future promises in improving patient management and survival.

  1. Future of clinical genomics in pediatric oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janeway, Katherine A; Place, Andrew E; Kieran, Mark W; Harris, Marian H

    2013-05-20

    The somatic genomic alterations in pediatric cancers to some extent overlap with those seen in adult cancers, but the exact distribution throughout the genome and the types and frequency of alterations differ. The ultimate goal of genomic research in children, as with adults, is translation to the clinic to achieve more accurate diagnosis, more precise risk stratification, and more effective, less toxic therapy. The genomic features of pediatric malignancies and pediatric-specific issues in clinical investigation may make translating genomic discoveries to the clinic more difficult. However, through large-scale molecular profiling of pediatric tumors, continued coordinated efforts to evaluate novel therapies in the pediatric population, thoughtful phase II and III trial design, and continued drug development, genomically based therapies will become more common in the pediatric oncology clinic in the future.

  2. Future vision for the quality assurance of oncology clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eFitzGerald, MD

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The National Cancer Institute clinical cooperative groups have been instrumental over the past 50 years in developing clinical trials and evidence based process improvements for clinical oncology patient care. The cooperative groups are undergoing a transformation process as we further integrate molecular biology into personalized patient care and move to incorporate international partners in clinical trials. To support this vision, data acquisition and data management informatics tools must become both nimble and robust to support transformational research at an enterprise level. Information, including imaging, pathology, molecular biology, radiation oncology, surgery, systemic therapy and patient outcome data needs to be integrated into the clinical trial charter using adaptive clinical trial mechanisms for design of the trial. This information needs to be made available to investigators using digital processes for real time data analysis. Future clinical trials will need to be designed and completed in a timely manner facilitated by nimble informatics processes for data management. This paper discusses both past experience and future vision for clinical trials as we move to develop data management and quality assurance processes to meet the needs of the modern trial.

  3. Prospective Clinical Study of Precision Oncology in Solid Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohal, Davendra P S; Rini, Brian I; Khorana, Alok A; Dreicer, Robert; Abraham, Jame; Procop, Gary W; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Pennell, Nathan A; Stevenson, James P; Pelley, Robert; Estfan, Bassam; Shepard, Dale; Funchain, Pauline; Elson, Paul; Adelstein, David J; Bolwell, Brian J

    2016-03-01

    Systematic studies evaluating clinical benefit of tumor genomic profiling are lacking. We conducted a prospective study in 250 patients with select solid tumors at the Cleveland Clinic. Eligibility required histopathologic diagnosis, age of 18 years or older, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-2, and written informed consent. Tumors were sequenced using FoundationOne (Cambridge, MA). Results were reviewed at the Cleveland Clinic Genomics Tumor Board. Outcomes included feasibility and clinical impact. Colorectal (25%), breast (18%), lung (13%), and pancreatobiliary (13%) cancers were the most common diagnoses. Median time from consent to result was 25 days (range = 3-140). Of 223 evaluable samples, 49% (n = 109) of patients were recommended a specific therapy, but only 11% (n = 24) received such therapy: 12 on clinical trials, nine off-label, three on-label. Lack of clinical trial access (n = 49) and clinical deterioration (n = 29) were the most common reasons for nonrecommendation/nonreceipt of genomics-driven therapy.

  4. Clinical oncology in Malaysia: 1914 to present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Gcc

    2006-01-01

    A narration of the development of staff, infrastructure and buildings in the various parts of the country is given in this paper. The role of universities and other institutions of learning, public health, palliative care, nuclear medicine and cancer registries is described together with the networking that has been developed between the government, non-governmental organisations and private hospitals. The training of skilled manpower and the commencement of the Master of Clinical Oncology in the University of Malaya is highlighted. Efforts taken to improve the various aspects of cancer control which includes prevention of cancer, early detection, treatment and palliative care are covered. It is vital to ensure that cancer care services must be accessible and affordable throughout the entire health system, from the primary care level up to the centres for tertiary care, throughout the whole country.

  5. American Society of Clinical Oncology/Oncology Nursing Society chemotherapy administration safety standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Joseph O; Polovich, Martha; McNiff, Kristen K; LeFebvre, Kristine B; Cummings, Charmaine; Galioto, Michele; Bonelli, Katherine R; McCorkle, Michele R

    2009-11-01

    Standardization of care can reduce the risk of errors, increase efficiency, and provide a framework for best practice. In 2008, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) invited a broad range of stakeholders to create a set of standards for the administration of chemotherapy to adult patients in the outpatient setting. At the close of a full-day structured workshop, 64 draft standards were proposed. After a formal process of electronic voting and conference calls, 29 draft standards were eliminated, resulting in a final list of 35 draft measures. The proposed set of standards was posted for 6 weeks of open public comment. Three hundred twenty-two comments were reviewed by the Steering Group and used as the basis for final editing to a final set of standards. The final list includes 31 standards encompassing seven domains, which include the following: review of clinical information and selection of a treatment regimen; treatment planning and informed consent; ordering of treatment; drug preparation; assessment of treatment compliance; administration and monitoring; assessment of response and toxicity monitoring. Adherence to ASCO and ONS standards for safe chemotherapy administration should be a goal of all providers of adult cancer care.

  6. Effects of Age Expectations on Oncology Social Workers' Clinical Judgment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, Annemarie; Choi, Namkee G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the influence of oncology social workers' expectations regarding aging (ERA) and ERA with cancer (ERAC) on their clinical judgment. Methods: Oncology social workers (N = 322) were randomly assigned to one of four vignettes describing a patient with lung cancer. The vignettes were identical except for the patent's age…

  7. A phase II clinical trial of endoscopic submucosal dissection for early gastric cancer of undifferentiated type: Japan Clinical Oncology Group study JCOG1009/1010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Kohei; Takashima, Atsuo; Kimura, Aya; Mizusawa, Junki; Hasuike, Noriaki; Ono, Hiroyuki; Terashima, Masanori; Muto, Manabu; Boku, Narikazu; Sasako, Mitsuru; Fukuda, Haruhiko

    2013-01-01

    A Phase II clinical trial has been initiated to evaluate the efficacy and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection for intramucosal (cT1a) gastric cancer of undifferentiated type. Patients with cT1a gastric cancer with undifferentiated-type adenocarcinoma are eligible for the study. The tumor size should be 2 cm or less without ulceration. The study will enroll a total of 325 patients from 51 institutions over a 4-year period. The primary endpoint is proportion of 5-year overall survival (% 5-year overall survival) in patients with undifferentiated dominant type. The secondary endpoints are overall survival, relapse-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, % 5-year overall survival without either recurrence or gastrectomy, % en-bloc resection with endoscopic submucosal dissection, % pathological curative resection with endoscopic submucosal dissection, % 5-year overall survival in patients with differentiated dominant type, % 5-year overall survival in patients with pathologically curative resection with endoscopic submucosal dissection and adverse events.

  8. Healthcare Costs Reduced After Incorporating the Results of the American College of Surgeons Oncology Group Z0011 Trial into Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillion, Michelle M; Glass, Katherine E; Hayek, Joe; Wehr, Allison; Phillips, Gary; Terando, Alicia; Agnese, Doreen M

    2016-11-30

    The purpose of our study was to quantitate the changes in axillary lymph node dissection (ALND), frozen section (FS), and the impact on costs after the publication of the American College of Surgeons Oncology Group (ACOSOG) Z0011 trial. We compared axillary nodal management and cost data in breast cancer patients who met Z0011 criteria and were treated with lumpectomy and sentinel lymph nodes (SLN) biopsy from 2007 to July 2013. Of 800 patients, 67 (13.5%) and 34 (12.5%) patients in the pre- and post-Z0011 era had 1-2 positive SLN. ALND decreased from 78% to 21% (p < 0.001) after publication of Z0011. The mean overall cost of SLN biopsy was $41,059 per patient, while SLN biopsy with completion ALND was $50,999 (p < 0.001). Intraoperative FS use decreased from 95% to 66% (p = 0.015). Omitting the FS decreased mean costs from $4,319 to $2,036. The application of Z0011 resulted in an overall mean cost savings of $571,653 from 2011 to July 2013. ACOSOG Z0011 significantly impacted axillary management resulting in a 20% reduction in the mean overall cost per patient by omitting ALND. In these patients, intraoperative FS analysis had poor sensitivity (56%) and doubled the cost of pathologic examination. Fewer ALND and intraoperative FS were performed after the publication of ACOSOG Z0011. Eliminating FS and ALND in patients who met Z0011 criteria, results in significant cost savings.

  9. How to Develop a Cardio-Oncology Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snipelisky, David; Park, Jae Yoon; Lerman, Amir; Mulvagh, Sharon; Lin, Grace; Pereira, Naveen; Rodriguez-Porcel, Martin; Villarraga, Hector R; Herrmann, Joerg

    2017-04-01

    Cardiovascular demands to the care of cancer patients are common and important given the implications for morbidity and mortality. As a consequence, interactions with cardiovascular disease specialists have intensified to the point of the development of a new discipline termed cardio-oncology. As an additional consequence, so-called cardio-oncology clinics have emerged, in most cases staffed by cardiologists with an interest in the field. This article addresses this gap and summarizes key points in the development of a cardio-oncology clinic.

  10. What, why, and when we image: considerations for diagnostic imaging and clinical research in the Children's Oncology Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reaman, Gregory H. [The George Washington University, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Hematology Oncology, Children' s National Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    2009-02-15

    Success in improving treatment outcomes in childhood cancer has been achieved almost exclusively through multicenter and multidisciplinary clinical and applied research over several decades. While biologically rational as well as empirical approaches have led to combination chemotherapy and multimodality approaches to therapy, which have given rise to evidence-based practice standards, similar scientific rigor has not always been as evidently applied to modalities utilized to assess initial disease burden and, more important, response to investigational approaches to therapy. As the empirical approach to therapeutic advances has likely maximized its benefit, future progress will require translation of biologic discovery most notably from the areas of genomics and proteomics. Hence, attempts to improve efficacy of therapy will require a parallel effort to minimize collateral damage of future therapeutic approaches, and such a parallel approach will mandate the continued dependence on advances in diagnostic imaging for improvements in staging methodologies to best define risk groups for risk-adjusted therapy. In addition, anatomic and functional assessment of response and surveillance for disease recurrence will require improved understanding of the biology as well as natural history of individual diseases, which one hopes will better inform investigators in designing trials. Clinical and research expertise is urgently needed in the selection of specific imaging studies and frequencies that best assess a response as well as to define disease-free intervals. Despite limited resources to develop sufficient infrastructure, emphasis on enabling early assessment of new technology to minimize risks associated with treatment advances and with those critical diagnostic and staging procedures must continue to be a focus of pediatric cancer clinical research. (orig.)

  11. Evidence-based integrative medicine in clinical veterinary oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raditic, Donna M; Bartges, Joseph W

    2014-09-01

    Integrative medicine is the combined use of complementary and alternative medicine with conventional or traditional Western medicine systems. The demand for integrative veterinary medicine is growing, but evidence-based research on its efficacy is limited. In veterinary clinical oncology, such research could be translated to human medicine, because veterinary patients with spontaneous tumors are valuable translational models for human cancers. An overview of specific herbs, botanics, dietary supplements, and acupuncture evaluated in dogs, in vitro canine cells, and other relevant species both in vivo and in vitro is presented for their potential use as integrative therapies in veterinary clinical oncology.

  12. Vesicular monoamine transporter protein expression correlates with clinical features, tumor biology, and MIBG avidity in neuroblastoma: a report from the Children's Oncology Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temple, William; Mendelsohn, Lori; Nekritz, Erin; Gustafson, W.C.; Matthay, Katherine K. [UCSF School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, San Francisco, CA (United States); UCSF Benioff Children' s Hospital, San Francisco, CA (United States); Kim, Grace E. [UCSF School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Lin, Lawrence; Giacomini, Kathy [UCSF School of Pharmacy, Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, San Francisco, CA (United States); Naranjo, Arlene; Van Ryn, Collin [University of Florida, Children' s Oncology Group Statistics and Data Center, Gainesville, FL (United States); Yanik, Gregory A. [University of Michigan, CS Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kreissman, Susan G. [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Hogarty, Michael [University of Pennsylvania, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia and Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); DuBois, Steven G. [UCSF School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, San Francisco, CA (United States); UCSF Benioff Children' s Hospital, San Francisco, CA (United States); UCSF School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Vesicular monoamine transporters 1 and 2 (VMAT1 and VMAT2) are thought to mediate MIBG uptake in adult neuroendocrine tumors. In neuroblastoma, the norepinephrine transporter (NET) has been investigated as the principal MIBG uptake protein, though some tumors without NET expression concentrate MIBG. We investigated VMAT expression in neuroblastoma and correlated expression with MIBG uptake and clinical features. We evaluated VMAT1 and VMAT2 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in neuroblastoma tumors from 76 patients with high-risk metastatic disease treated in a uniform cooperative group trial (COG A3973). All patients had baseline MIBG diagnostic scans centrally reviewed. IHC results were scored as the product of intensity grading (0 - 3+) and percent of tumor cells expressing the protein of interest. The association between VMAT1 and VMAT2 scores and clinical and biological features was tested using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Patient characteristics were typical of high-risk neuroblastoma, though the cohort was intentionally enriched in patients with MIBG-nonavid tumors (n = 20). VMAT1 and VMAT2 were expressed in 62 % and 75 % of neuroblastoma tumors, respectively. VMAT1 and VMAT2 scores were both significantly lower in MYCN amplified tumors and in tumors with high mitotic karyorrhectic index. MIBG-avid tumors had significantly higher VMAT2 scores than MIBG-nonavid tumors (median 216 vs. 45; p = 0.04). VMAT1 expression did not correlate with MIBG avidity. VMAT1 and VMAT2 are expressed in the majority of neuroblastomas. Expression correlates with other biological features. The expression level of VMAT2 but not that of VMAT1 correlates with avidity for MIBG. (orig.)

  13. Medical Oncology Pharmacy: A New Role for the Clinical Pharmacist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Carl R.; Hickman, Mary Johne

    1977-01-01

    The University of Tennessee has established a training program for clinical pharmacists dealing with cancer chemotherapy patients. Health-care settings are described in which these individuals can contribute as unique health-care team members in oncology. (Author/LBH)

  14. [Limitations and pitfalls of clinical studies in oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Nowadays results of clinical studies in oncology are often first found and commented in the news media because of their high relevance to the pharmaceutical market. The limits and pitfalls of clinical studies are manifold and not always appreciated even by specialists as well as journalists and politicians. The planning of a study is a most crucial phase, and most deficits are due to inappropriate design and conduct of a study. Adequate and skilful interpretation of a study is often hampered by many known but mostly overlooked variable pitfalls. Today there is an overrepresentation of pharmaceutically sponsored studies and a painful lack of well-designed academic studies with really meaningful endpoints for patient care. This paper touches several important aspects of today's shortcomings of clinical studies in oncology and highlights the importance of strengthening the academic clinical research. Evidence-based medicine needs to be more clinically relevant, and therefore we need well-designed, and critically interpreted studies in the future.

  15. Monitoring cancer stem cells: insights into clinical oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin SC

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ShuChen Lin,1,* YingChun Xu,2,* ZhiHua Gan,1 Kun Han,1 HaiYan Hu,3 Yang Yao,3 MingZhu Huang,4 DaLiu Min1 1Department of Oncology, Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital East Campus, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 2Department of Oncology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 3Department of Oncology, The Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 4Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs are a small, characteristically distinctive subset of tumor cells responsible for tumor initiation and progression. Several treatment modalities, such as surgery, glycolytic inhibition, driving CSC proliferation, immunotherapy, and hypofractionated radiotherapy, may have the potential to eradicate CSCs. We propose that monitoring CSCs is important in clinical oncology as CSC populations may reflect true treatment response and assist with managing treatment strategies, such as defining optimal chemotherapy cycles, permitting pretreatment cancer surveillance, conducting a comprehensive treatment plan, modifying radiation treatment, and deploying rechallenge chemotherapy. Then, we describe methods for monitoring CSCs. Keywords: cancer stem cells, glycolytic inhibition, watchful waiting, rechallenge, immunotherapy

  16. Minimal Residual Disease and Childhood Leukemia: Standard of Care Recommendations From the Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario MRD Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athale, Uma H; Gibson, Paul J; Bradley, Nicole M; Malkin, David M; Hitzler, Johann

    2016-06-01

    Minimal residual disease (MRD) is an independent predictor of relapse risk in children with leukemia and is widely used for risk-adapted treatment. This article summarizes current evidence supporting the use of MRD, including clinical significance, current international clinical practice, impact statement, and recommended indications. The proposed MRD recommendations have been endorsed by the MRD Working Group of the Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario and provide the foundation for a strategy that aims at equitable access to MRD evaluation for children with leukemia.

  17. Clinical trial or standard treatment? Shared decision making at the department of oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Trine Ammentorp; Birkelund, Regner; Ammentorp, Jette

    2016-01-01

    Title: Clinical trial or standard treatment? Shared decision making at the department of oncology. Authors: Ph.d. student, Trine A. Gregersen. Trine.gregersen@rsyd.dk. Department of Oncology. Health Services Research Unit Lillebaelt Hospital / IRS University of Southern Denmark. Professor, Regner...... was at the trial and the best treatment and not the patient’s life and values. Preliminary implications of research In a prestudy it has been difficult finding enough patients. We are considering expanding the patient group to other cancer patients and not only breast cancer patients. Request for feedback...

  18. Clinical oncology and palliative medicine as a combined specialty--a unique model in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Rebecca; Wong, Kam-Hung; Yuen, Kwok-Keung; Wong, Ka-Yan; Yau, Yvonne; Lo, Sing-Hung; Liu, Rico

    2015-07-01

    The importance of early integration of palliative care (PC) into oncology treatment is increasingly being recognized. However, there is no consensus on what is the optimal way of integration. This article describes a unique model in Hong Kong where clinical oncology and palliative medicine (PM) is integrated through the development of PM as a subspecialty under clinical oncology.

  19. Response evaluation criteria for solid tumours in dogs (v1.0): a Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group (VCOG) consensus document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, S M; Thamm, D H; Vail, D M; London, C A

    2015-09-01

    In veterinary medical oncology, there is currently no standardized protocol for assessing response to therapy in solid tumours. The lack of such a formalized guideline makes it challenging to critically compare outcome measures across various treatment protocols. The Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group (VCOG) membership consensus document presented here is based on the recommendations of a subcommittee of American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) board-certified veterinary oncologists. This consensus paper has used the human response evaluation criteria in solid tumours (RECIST v1.1) as a framework to establish standard procedures for response assessment in canine solid tumours that is meant to be easy to use, repeatable and applicable across a variety of clinical trial structures in veterinary oncology. It is hoped that this new canine RECIST (cRECIST v1.0) will be adopted within the veterinary oncology community and thereby facilitate the comparison of current and future treatment protocols used for companion animals with cancer.

  20. Phase 2 trial design in neuro-oncology revisited: a report from the RANO group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanis, Evanthia; Wu, Wenting; Cloughesy, Timothy; Lamborn, Kathleen; Mann, Bhupinder; Wen, Patrick Y; Reardon, David A; Wick, Wolfgang; Macdonald, David; Armstrong, Terri S; Weller, Michael; Vogelbaum, Michael; Colman, Howard; Sargent, Daniel J; van den Bent, Martin J; Gilbert, Mark; Chang, Susan

    2012-05-01

    Advances in the management of gliomas, including the approval of agents such as temozolomide and bevacizumab, have created an evolving therapeutic landscape in glioma treatment, thus affecting our ability to reliably use historical controls to comparatively assess the activity of new therapies. Furthermore, the increasing availability of novel, targeted agents--which are competing for a small patient population, in view of the low incidence of primary brain tumours--draws attention to the need to improve the efficiency of phase 2 clinical testing in neuro-oncology to expeditiously transition the most promising of these drugs or combinations to potentially practice-changing phase 3 trials. In this report from the Response Assessment in Neurooncology (RANO) group, we review phase 2 trial designs that can address these challenges and capitalise on scientific and clinical advances in brain tumour treatment in neuro-oncology to accelerate and optimise the selection of drugs deserving further testing in phase 3 trials. Although there is still a small role for single-arm and non-comparative phase 2 designs, emphasis is placed on the potential role that comparative randomised phase 2 designs--such as screening designs, selection designs, discontinuation designs, and adaptive designs, including seamless phase 2/3 designs--can have. The rational incorporation of these designs, as determined by the specific clinical setting and the trial's endpoints or goals, has the potential to substantially advance new drug development in neuro-oncology.

  1. Clinical and biochemical function of polymorphic NR0B1 GGAA-microsatellites in Ewing sarcoma: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Monument

    Full Text Available The genetics involved in Ewing sarcoma susceptibility and prognosis are poorly understood. EWS/FLI and related EWS/ETS chimeras upregulate numerous gene targets via promoter-based GGAA-microsatellite response elements. These microsatellites are highly polymorphic in humans, and preliminary evidence suggests EWS/FLI-mediated gene expression is highly dependent on the number of GGAA motifs within the microsatellite.Here we sought to examine the polymorphic spectrum of a GGAA-microsatellite within the NR0B1 promoter (a critical EWS/FLI target in primary Ewing sarcoma tumors, and characterize how this polymorphism influences gene expression and clinical outcomes.A complex, bimodal pattern of EWS/FLI-mediated gene expression was observed across a wide range of GGAA motifs, with maximal expression observed in constructs containing 20-26 GGAA motifs. Relative to white European and African controls, the NR0B1 GGAA-microsatellite in tumor cells demonstrated a strong bias for haplotypes containing 21-25 GGAA motifs suggesting a relationship between microsatellite function and disease susceptibility. This selection bias was not a product of microsatellite instability in tumor samples, nor was there a correlation between NR0B1 GGAA-microsatellite polymorphisms and survival outcomes.These data suggest that GGAA-microsatellite polymorphisms observed in human populations modulate EWS/FLI-mediated gene expression and may influence disease susceptibility in Ewing sarcoma.

  2. Outcomes assessment of a pharmacist-directed seamless care program in an ambulatory oncology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Scott J; Abbott, Rick; Edwards, Jonathan; LeBlanc, Michael; Dranitsaris, George; Donnan, Jennifer; Laing, Kara; Whelan, Maria A; MacKinnon, Neil J

    2014-02-01

    The primary goal of seamless care is improved patient outcomes and improved standards of care for patients with cancer. The pharmacy service of the Newfoundland Cancer Treatment and Research Foundation conducted a randomized control study that measured clinical and humanistic outcomes of a pharmacist-directed seamless care program in an ambulatory oncology clinic. This article focuses on the intervention group, particularly the identification of drug-related problems (DRPs) and utilization of health care services as well the satisfaction of 3 types of health professionals with the services provided by the pharmacist-directed seamless care program. Overall, the seamless care pharmacist (SCP) identified an average of 3.7 DRPs per intervention patient; the most common DRP reported was a patient not receiving or taking a drug therapy for which there is an indication. The SCP identified more DRPs in patients receiving adjuvant treatment compared to those receiving palliative treatment. On average, family physicians, oncology nurses, and hospital pharmacists were satisfied with the SCP intervention indicating that they agreed the information collected and distributed by the SCP was useful to them. Pharmacist-directed seamless care services in an ambulatory oncology clinic have a significant impact on clinical outcomes and processes of patient care. The presence of a SCP can help identify and resolve DRPs experienced by patients in an outpatient oncology clinic, ensuring that patients are receiving the highest standard of care.

  3. [Shared web-based data center for multi-institutional clinical trials: evaluation of UMIN-INDICE (university hospital medical information network-internet data and information center for medical research)in clinical trials of JIVROSG (Japan interventional radiology in oncology study group)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sone, Miyuki; Arai, Yasuaki; Kiuchi, Takahiro; Ishikawa, Hirono; Aoki, Noriaki; Inaba, Yoshitaka; Yoshioka, Tetsuya; Aramaki, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Matsuoka, Toshiyuki; Anai, Hiroshi; Tanigawa, Noboru; Osuga, Keigo; Takeuchi, Yoshito; Okusaka, Takushi; Kanazawa, Susumu; Matsui, Osamu; Endo, Keigo

    2012-04-01

    A patient registration system is mandatory for establishing the scientific credibility of the multi-center clinical trials. The Japan Interventional Radiology in Oncology Study Group (JIVROSG) was organized in 2002 to establish evidence supporting the procedures used in interventional radiology. The Internet Data and Information Center for Medical Research (INDICE), provided by the University Hospital Medical Information Network(UMIN), has been utilized for patient registration in the clinical trials of JIVROSG. In this study, the safety and efficacy of UMIN-INDICE were evaluated. From 2002 to 2010, 18 clinical trials, including one international trial, were conducted. A total of 736 patients were enrolled from 51 institutions. No significant trouble was encountered during this period. A questionnaire survey demonstrated that 90% of participating researchers could use this system without difficulties. UMIN-INDICE may contribute to promoting clinical trials as an infrastructure of multicenter studies.

  4. Integration of Palliative Care Into Standard Oncology Care: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, Betty R; Temel, Jennifer S; Temin, Sarah; Alesi, Erin R; Balboni, Tracy A; Basch, Ethan M; Firn, Janice I; Paice, Judith A; Peppercorn, Jeffrey M; Phillips, Tanyanika; Stovall, Ellen L; Zimmermann, Camilla; Smith, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To provide evidence-based recommendations to oncology clinicians, patients, family and friend caregivers, and palliative care specialists to update the 2012 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) provisional clinical opinion (PCO) on the integration of palliative care into standard oncology care for all patients diagnosed with cancer. Methods ASCO convened an Expert Panel of members of the ASCO Ad Hoc Palliative Care Expert Panel to develop an update. The 2012 PCO was based on a review of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) by the National Cancer Institute Physicians Data Query and additional trials. The panel conducted an updated systematic review seeking randomized clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses, as well as secondary analyses of RCTs in the 2012 PCO, published from March 2010 to January 2016. Results The guideline update reflects changes in evidence since the previous guideline. Nine RCTs, one quasiexperimental trial, and five secondary analyses from RCTs in the 2012 PCO on providing palliative care services to patients with cancer and/or their caregivers, including family caregivers, were found to inform the update. Recommendations Inpatients and outpatients with advanced cancer should receive dedicated palliative care services, early in the disease course, concurrent with active treatment. Referral of patients to interdisciplinary palliative care teams is optimal, and services may complement existing programs. Providers may refer family and friend caregivers of patients with early or advanced cancer to palliative care services.

  5. Realization of results of innovational research in clinical oncological

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Kaprin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a brief overview of major innovative scientific research conducted at the research oncological Institute n. a. P. A. Herzen over the last decade, and the results of their the introduction into clinical practice. On the basis of 36 patents of the for the invention in Russian Federation we developed new medical technologies for diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of cancer patients, permission for clinical use in the territory of the Russian Federation issued by the Federal service on surveillance in healthcare and social development.

  6. Merging Children's Oncology Group Data with an External Administrative Database Using Indirect Patient Identifiers: A Report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yimei Li

    Full Text Available Clinical trials data from National Cancer Institute (NCI-funded cooperative oncology group trials could be enhanced by merging with external data sources. Merging without direct patient identifiers would provide additional patient privacy protections. We sought to develop and validate a matching algorithm that uses only indirect patient identifiers.We merged the data from two Phase III Children's Oncology Group (COG trials for de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML with the Pediatric Health Information Systems (PHIS. We developed a stepwise matching algorithm that used indirect identifiers including treatment site, gender, birth year, birth month, enrollment year and enrollment month. Results from the stepwise algorithm were compared against the direct merge method that used date of birth, treatment site, and gender. The indirect merge algorithm was developed on AAML0531 and validated on AAML1031.Of 415 patients enrolled on the AAML0531 trial at PHIS centers, we successfully matched 378 (91.1% patients using the indirect stepwise algorithm. Comparison to the direct merge result suggested that 362 (95.7% matches identified by the indirect merge algorithm were concordant with the direct merge result. When validating the indirect stepwise algorithm using the AAML1031 trial, we successfully matched 157 out of 165 patients (95.2% and 150 (95.5% of the indirectly merged matches were concordant with the directly merged matches.These data demonstrate that patients enrolled on COG clinical trials can be successfully merged with PHIS administrative data using a stepwise algorithm based on indirect patient identifiers. The merged data sets can be used as a platform for comparative effectiveness and cost effectiveness studies.

  7. A strategy for young members within national radiation oncology societies: the Italian experience (AIRO Giovani group)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Alongi, Filippo; Ciammella, Patrizia; De Bari, Berardino; Franco, Pierfrancesco; Livi, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    Aim To briefly review history, structure, past events and future projects of AIRO (Associazione Italiana Radioterapia Oncologica) young group (AIRO Giovani), focusing on its specific commitment to multidisciplnary networking among junior clinical oncologists at a national and international level. Background AIRO Giovani is a part of AIRO composed by members under 40 years old. Its main activities are scientific and educational meetings dedicated to young Italian radiation oncologists and collaborative research projects. Materials and Methods AIRO Giovani structure, events organized and supported by AIRO giovani as well as scientific activities are here reported from its creation in 2007 up to current days. Results AIRO Giovani group was able to create a consolidated network between Italian junior radiation oncologists, while opening the possibility to collaborate with junior groups of other national scientific societies in the field of oncology and with ESTRO young members. Scientific projects carried out by the group have been successful and will be further implemented in next years. Conclusions AIRO Giovani is still in its infancy, but its early positive experience supports the creation and development of young groups within national radiation oncology societies. PMID:24669305

  8. The use of combinations of monoclonal antibodies in clinical oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henricks, Linda M; Schellens, Jan H M; Huitema, Alwin D R; Beijnen, Jos H

    2015-12-01

    Treatment with monoclonal antibodies is becoming increasingly important in clinical oncology. These antibodies specifically inhibit signaling pathways in tumor growth and/or induce immunological responses against tumor cells. By combining monoclonal antibodies several pathways may be targeted simultaneously, potentially leading to additive or synergistic effects. Theoretically, antibodies are very suitable for use in combination therapy, because of limited overlapping toxicity and lack of pharmacokinetic interactions. In this article an overview is given of preclinical and clinical data on twenty-five different combinations of antibodies in oncology. Some of these combinations have proven clinical benefit, for example the combination of trastuzumab and pertuzumab in HER2-positive breast cancer, which exemplifies an additive or synergistic effect on antitumor activity in clinical studies and the combination of nivolumab and ipilimumab, which results in significant increases in progression-free and overall survival in patients with advanced melanoma. However, other combinations may lead to unfavorable results, such as bevacizumab with cetuximab or panitumumab in advanced colorectal cancer. These combinations result in shorter progression-free survival and increased toxicity compared to therapy with a single antibody. In summary, the different published studies showed widely varying results, depending on the combination of antibodies, indication and patient population. More preclinical and clinical studies are necessary to unravel the mechanisms behind synergistic or antagonistic effects of combining monoclonal antibodies. Most research on combination therapies is still in an early stage, but it is expected that for several tumor types the use of combination therapy of antibodies will become standard of care in the near future.

  9. Electronic clinical decision support systems attitudes and barriers to use in the oncology setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, I M

    2012-03-02

    BACKGROUND: There is little evidence regarding attitudes to clinical decision support systems (CDSS) in oncology. AIMS: We examined the current usage, awareness, and concerns of Irish medical oncologists and oncology pharmacists in this area. METHODS: A questionnaire was sent to 27 medical oncologists and 34 oncology pharmacists, identified through professional interest groups. Respondents ranked concerns regarding their use of a CDSS on a scale from 1 to 4, with 4 being most important. RESULTS: Overall, 67% (41\\/61) responded, 48% (13\\/27) of oncologists and 82% (28\\/34) of pharmacists surveyed. Concerns included "difficulty defining complex clinical situations with a set of rules" (mean ± SD) (3.2 ± 0.9), "ensuring evidence base is up to date and relevant" (3.2 ± 0.9) and "lack of clinically relevant suggestions" (2.9 ± 0.9). Ninety-three percent reported using a CDSS but 54% were unaware of this. CONCLUSION: While there are benefits to using a CDSS, concerns must be addressed through user education. This may be a starting point for a user-centred design approach to the development of future local systems through a consultative process.

  10. Functional imaging in oncology. Clinical applications. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, Antonio [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiology; MRI Health Time Group, Jaen (Spain); Vilanova, Joan C. [Girona Univ. (Spain). Clinica Girona - Hospital Sta. Caterina; Hygino da Cruz, L. Celso Jr. (ed.) [CDPI and IRM, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Dept. of Radiology; Rossi, Santiago E. [Centro de Diagnostico, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-06-01

    Easy-to-read manual on new functional imaging techniques in oncology. Explains current clinical applications and outlines future avenues. Includes numerous high-quality illustrations to highlight the major teaching points. In the new era of functional and molecular imaging, both currently available imaging biomarkers and biomarkers under development are expected to lead to major changes in the management of oncological patients. This two-volume book is a practical manual on the various imaging techniques capable of delivering functional information on cancer, including diffusion MRI, perfusion CT and MRI, dual-energy CT, spectroscopy, dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, PET, and hybrid modalities. This second volume considers the applications and benefits of these techniques in a wide range of tumor types, including their role in diagnosis, prediction of treatment outcome, and early evaluation of treatment response. Each chapter addresses a specific malignancy and is written by one or more acclaimed experts. The lucid text is complemented by numerous high-quality illustrations that highlight key features and major teaching points.

  11. Phase 0 clinical trials in oncology new drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Chandra Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Research focus of pharmaceutical industry has expanded to a larger extent in last few decades putting many more new molecules, particularly targeted agents, for the clinical development. On the other hand, researchers are facing serious challenges due to high failure rates of new molecules in clinical studies. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA in combination with academia and industry experts identified many factors responsible for failures of new molecules, and with a vision of taking traditional drug development model toward an innovative paradigm shift, issued regulatory guidance on conduct of exploratory investigational new drug (exploratory IND studies, often called as phase 0 clinical trials, requiring reduced preclinical testing, which has special relevance to life-threatening diseases such as cancer. Phase 0 trials, utilizing much lower drug doses, provide an opportunity to explore the clinical behavior of new molecules very early in the drug development pathway, helping to identify the promising candidates and eliminating non-promising molecules, thus improving the efficiency of overall drug development with significant savings of resources. Being non-therapeutic in nature, these studies, however, pose certain ethical challenges requiring careful study designing and informed consent process. This article reviews the insights and perspectives for the feasibility, utility, planning, designing and conduct of phase 0 clinical trials, in addition to ethical issues and industrial perspective focused at oncology new drug development.

  12. Phase 0 clinical trials in oncology new drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Umesh Chandra; Bhatia, Sandeep; Garg, Amit; Sharma, Amit; Choudhary, Vaibhav

    2011-01-01

    Research focus of pharmaceutical industry has expanded to a larger extent in last few decades putting many more new molecules, particularly targeted agents, for the clinical development. On the other hand, researchers are facing serious challenges due to high failure rates of new molecules in clinical studies. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in combination with academia and industry experts identified many factors responsible for failures of new molecules, and with a vision of taking traditional drug development model toward an innovative paradigm shift, issued regulatory guidance on conduct of exploratory investigational new drug (exploratory IND) studies, often called as phase 0 clinical trials, requiring reduced preclinical testing, which has special relevance to life-threatening diseases such as cancer. Phase 0 trials, utilizing much lower drug doses, provide an opportunity to explore the clinical behavior of new molecules very early in the drug development pathway, helping to identify the promising candidates and eliminating non-promising molecules, thus improving the efficiency of overall drug development with significant savings of resources. Being non-therapeutic in nature, these studies, however, pose certain ethical challenges requiring careful study designing and informed consent process. This article reviews the insights and perspectives for the feasibility, utility, planning, designing and conduct of phase 0 clinical trials, in addition to ethical issues and industrial perspective focused at oncology new drug development.

  13. Clinical microdialysis in neuro-oncology: principles and applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Clay Goodman

    2011-01-01

    Clinical microdialysis allows a discrete volume of the brain to be sampled for neurochemical analysis of neurotransmitters, metabolites, biomarkers, and drugs. The technique can be safely used in humans intraoperatively, in the intensive care unit, and in ambulatory settings. Microdialysis probes, micropumps, and analytical equipment are commercially available and have been used extensively for neurochemical monitoring in traumatic brain injury, stroke, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. There has been very limited use of micredialysis in neuro-oncology, but this technique has groat promise in the study of the basic neurochemistry of brain tumors, alterations in neurochemistry in response to therapy, and the pharmacokinetics of chemotherapeutic agents. Microdialysis probes may also be used to deliver drugs while simultaneously permitting monitoring of neurochemical changes induced by this therapy.

  14. A National Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship Survey: Didactic Curricular Components Increase Confidence in Clinical Competency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagadeesan, Vikrant S. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Raleigh, David R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, University of California–San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Golden, Daniel W., E-mail: dgolden@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete 1 or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. Methods and Materials: An anonymous, Internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012-2013 academic year. The survey was composed of 3 main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncology experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. Results: The survey response rate was 37% (70 of 188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. Of the respondents, 27% (19 of 70) completed at least 1 clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent's confidence to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon rank–sum P=.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman ρ P=.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman ρ P=.43). Conclusions: Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation oncology resident. These

  15. A national radiation oncology medical student clerkship survey: Didactic curricular components increase confidence in clinical competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadeesan, Vikrant S.; Raleigh, David R.; Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J.; Golden, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete one or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. Methods and Materials An anonymous, internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012–2013 academic year. The survey was composed of three main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncology experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. Results The survey response rate was 37% (70/188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. 27% of respondents (19/70) completed at least one clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent’s confidence to function as a first- year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon rank-sum p = 0.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman’s rho p = 0.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman’s rho p = 0.43). Conclusions Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation

  16. Effects of Age Expectations on Oncology Social Workers' Clinical Judgment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, Annemarie; Choi, Namkee G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the influence of oncology social workers' expectations regarding aging (ERA) and ERA with cancer (ERAC) on their clinical judgment. Methods: Oncology social workers (N = 322) were randomly assigned to one of four vignettes describing a patient with lung cancer. The vignettes were identical except for the…

  17. Phase 3 Oncology Clinical Trials in South Africa: Experimentation or Therapeutic Misconception?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malan, Tina; Moodley, Keymanthri

    2016-02-01

    Although clinical research in oncology is vital to improve current understanding of cancer and to validate new treatment options, voluntary informed consent is a critical component. Oncology research participants are a particularly vulnerable population; hence, therapeutic misconception often leads to ethical and legal challenges. We conducted a qualitative study administering semi-structured questionnaires on 29 adult, Phase 3, oncology clinical trial participants at three different private oncology clinical trial sites in South Africa. A descriptive content analysis was performed to identify perceptions of these participants regarding Phase 3 clinical trials. We found that most participants provided consent to be included in the trial for self-benefit. More than half of the participants had a poor understanding of Phase 3 clinical trials, and almost half the participants believed the clinical trial did not pose any significant risk to them. The word "hope" was used frequently by participants, displaying clear optimism with regard to the clinical trial and its outcome. This indicated that therapeutic misconception does occur in the South African oncology research setting and has the potential to lead to underestimation of the risks of a Phase 3 clinical trial. Emphasizing the experimental nature of a clinical trial during the consent process is critical to address therapeutic misconception in oncology research.

  18. Tracking the 2015 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium: bridging cancer biology to clinical gastrointestinal oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprile G

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Aprile,1 Francesco Leone,2,3 Riccardo Giampieri,4 Mariaelena Casagrande,1 Donatella Marino,2,3 Luca Faloppi,4 Stefano Cascinu,4 Gianpiero Fasola,1 Mario Scartozzi5,6 1Department of Oncology, University and General Hospital, Udine, Italy; 2Medical Oncology Department, University of Turin, 3Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Candiolo, Turin, Italy; 4Medical Oncology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Ospedali Riuniti, Universita Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; 5Medical Oncology Department, University of Cagliari, 6General Hospital, Cagliari, Italy Abstract: The 2015 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium (San Francisco, CA, USA; January 15–17 is the world-class conference co-sponsored by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the American Society for Radiation Oncology, the American Gastroenterological Association Institute, and the Society of Surgical Oncology, in which the most innovative research results in digestive tract oncology are presented and discussed. In its twelfth edition, the meeting has provided new insights focusing on the underpinning biology and clinical management of gastrointestinal malignancies. More than 3,400 health care professionals gathered from all over the world to share their experiences on how to bridge the recent novelties in cancer biology with everyday medical practice. In this article, the authors report on the most significant advances, didactically moving on three different anatomic tracks: gastroesophageal malignancies, pancreatic and biliary cancers, and colorectal adenocarcinomas. Keywords: colorectal cancer, gastric cancer, ramucirumab, pembrolizumab, target therapy, onartuzumab, AMG 337

  19. Effects of an intervention aimed at improving nurse-patient communication in an oncology outpatient clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Mette Trøllund; Jensen, Mette Lund; Andersen, Jørn

    2009-01-01

    In an ever more burdened healthcare system, there is an urgent need to investigate whether patients benefit from the resources allocated to nurses' communication skills training in terms of improved patient outcomes. This study aimed to evaluate a standardized two 2-day (33 hours) communication...... skills training program in nursing cancer care. Twenty-four nurses in an oncology outpatient clinic participated and were randomly assigned to the intervention program or a control group. A total of 413 patients treated in the clinic during 2 recruitment periods (before and after the communication skills...... training) completed a questionnaire package assessing the nurse-patient relationship, psychological well-being, and cancer-related self-efficacy. Nurse group differences in change scores between time points (baseline, 1 week, and 3 months after the communication skills training) on measures related...

  20. Innovations in American Society of Clinical Oncology Practice Guideline Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerfield, Mark R; Bohlke, Kari; Browman, George P; Denduluri, Neelima; Einhaus, Kaitlin; Hayes, Daniel F; Khorana, Alok A; Miller, Robert S; Mohile, Supriya G; Oliver, Thomas K; Ortiz, Eduardo; Lyman, Gary H

    2016-09-10

    Since the beginning of its guidelines program in 1993, ASCO has continually sought ways to produce a greater number of guidelines while maintaining its commitment to using the rigorous development methods that minimize the biases that threaten the validity of practice recommendations. ASCO is implementing a range of guideline development and implementation innovations. In this article, we describe innovations that are designed to (1) integrate consideration of multiple chronic conditions into practice guidelines; (2) keep more of its guidelines current by applying evolving signals or (more) rapid, for-cause updating approaches; (3) increase the number of high-quality guidelines available to its membership through endorsement and adaptation of other groups' products; (4) improve coverage of its members' guideline needs through a new topic nomination process; and (5) enhance dissemination and promote implementation of ASCO guidelines in the oncology practice community through a network of volunteer ambassadors. We close with a summary of ASCO's plans to facilitate the integration of data from its rapid learning system, CancerLinQ, into ASCO guidelines and to develop tactics through which guideline recommendations can be embedded in clinicians' workflow in digital form. We highlight the challenges inherent in reconciling the need to provide clinicians with more interactive, point-of-care guidance with ASCO's abiding commitment to methodologic rigor in guideline development.

  1. The effect of short term neo-adjuvant androgen deprivation on erectile function in patients treated with external beam radiotherapy for localised prostate cancer: an analysis of the 4- versus 8-month randomised trial (Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group 97-01).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Daly, Patricia E

    2012-07-01

    Erectile dysfunction is a common consequence of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer. The addition of neo-adjuvant androgen deprivation (NAD) has an indeterminate additive effect. We examined the long-term effect on erectile function (EF) of two durations (4 months: arm 1 and 8 months: arm 2) of NAD prior to radiation (RT) for patients with localised prostate cancer from the Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group (ICORG 97-01) 4- versus 8-month trial. In this study we aimed to (1) analyse the overall effect on EF of NAD in an EBRT population, (2) compare the probability of retained EF over time in an EBRT population treated with either 4 or 8 months of NAD and (3) identify any variables such as risk group and age which may have an additive detrimental effect. This analysis provides unique long term follow up data.

  2. Conducting Nursing Intervention Research in a Cooperative Group Setting – A Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Heidi S.; Nolte, Susan; Edwards, Robert P.; Wenzel, Lari

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To provide a history on nursing science within the Gynecology Oncology Group (GOG); to discuss challenges and facilitators of nursing science in the cooperative group (CG) using a current nurse-led protocol (GOG-0259) as an exemplar; and to propose recommendations aimed at advancing nursing science in the CG setting. Data Source GOG reports and protocol databases, online databases of indexed citations, and experiences from the development and implementation of GOG-0259. Conclusions Benefits of CG research include opportunities for inter-disciplinary collaboration and ability to rapidly accrue large national samples. Challenges include limited financial resources to support non-treatment trials, a cumbersome protocol approval process, and lack of experience with nursing/quality of life intervention studies. Formal structures within GOG need to be created to encourage nurse scientists to become active members; promote collaboration between experienced GOG advanced practice nurses and new nurse scientists to identify nursing research priorities; and consider innovative funding structures to support pilot intervention studies. Implications for Nursing Practice Understanding the CG research process is critical for nurse scientists. A multi-disciplinary team of CG leaders can help investigators navigate a complex research environment and can increase awareness of the value of nursing research. PMID:24559780

  3. Measurement of nurses' workload in an oncology outpatient clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Alves de Souza

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The growing demand and the degree of patient care in oncological outpatient services, as well as the complexity of treatment have had an impact on the workload of nurses. This study aimed at measuring the workload and productivity of nurses in an oncological outpatient service. An observational study using a work sampling technique was conducted and included seven nurses working in an oncological outpatient service in the south-eastern region of Brazil. A total of 1,487 intervention or activity samples were obtained. Nurses used 43.2% of their time on indirect care, 33.2% on direct care, 11.6% on associated activities, and 12% on personal activities. Their mean productivity was 88.0%. The findings showed that nurses in this service spend most of their time in indirect care activities. Moreover, the productivity index in this study was above that recommended in the literature.

  4. An introduction to molecular imaging in radiation oncology: a report by the AAPM Working Group on Molecular Imaging in Radiation Oncology (WGMIR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munley, Michael T; Kagadis, George C; McGee, Kiaran P; Kirov, Assen S; Jang, Sunyoung; Mutic, Sasa; Jeraj, Robert; Xing, Lei; Bourland, J Daniel

    2013-10-01

    Molecular imaging is the direct or indirect noninvasive monitoring and recording of the spatial and temporal distribution of in vivo molecular, genetic, and/or cellular processes for biochemical, biological, diagnostic, or therapeutic applications. Molecular images that indicate the presence of malignancy can be acquired using optical, ultrasonic, radiologic, radionuclide, and magnetic resonance techniques. For the radiation oncology physicist in particular, these methods and their roles in molecular imaging of oncologic processes are reviewed with respect to their physical bases and imaging characteristics, including signal intensity, spatial scale, and spatial resolution. Relevant molecular terminology is defined as an educational assist. Current and future clinical applications in oncologic diagnosis and treatment are discussed. National initiatives for the development of basic science and clinical molecular imaging techniques and expertise are reviewed, illustrating research opportunities in as well as the importance of this growing field.

  5. Report on the use of non-clinical studies in the regulatory evaluation of oncology drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Kawada, Manabu; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro; Saya, Hideyuki; Seimiya, Hiroyuki; Yao, Ryoji; Hayashi, Masahiro; Kai, Chieko; Matsuda, Akira; Naoe, Tomoki; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Okazaki, Taku; Saji, Hideo; Sata, Masataka; Sugimura, Haruhiko; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Toi, Masakazu; Irimura, Tatsuro

    2016-02-01

    Non-clinical studies are necessary at each stage of the development of oncology drugs. Many experimental cancer models have been developed to investigate carcinogenesis, cancer progression, metastasis, and other aspects in cancer biology and these models turned out to be useful in the efficacy evaluation and the safety prediction of oncology drugs. While the diversity and the degree of engagement in genetic changes in the initiation of cancer cell growth and progression are widely accepted, it has become increasingly clear that the roles of host cells, tissue microenvironment, and the immune system also play important roles in cancer. Therefore, the methods used to develop oncology drugs should continuously be revised based on the advances in our understanding of cancer. In this review, we extensively summarize the effective use of those models, their advantages and disadvantages, ranges to be evaluated and limitations of the models currently used for the development and for the evaluation of oncology drugs.

  6. Neuro-Oncology Branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tumors of the brain and spinal cord. Neuro-Oncology Clinical Fellowship This is a joint program with ... NCINeuroOncology@mail.nih.gov . Our News The Neuro-Oncology Branch Welcomes Dr. Mark Gilbert as New Branch ...

  7. Patient satisfaction with inpatient care provided by the Sydney Gynecological Oncology Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Arora

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Vivek Arora, Shannon Philp, Kathryn Nattress, Selvan Pather, Christopher Dalrymple, Kenneth Atkinson, Sofia Smirnova, Stephen Cotterell, Jonathan CarterSydney Gynecological Oncology Group, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, University of Sydney, Sydney, AustraliaPurpose: Patient satisfaction with the provision of hospital oncology services can have a significant impact on their overall treatment experience.Aims: To assess patient satisfaction with the inpatient hospital services in the gynecological oncology setting using the IN-PATSAT32 questionnaire developed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC.Methods: A modified version of the IN-PATSAT32 questionnaire with additional 16 items was administered to 52 adult surgical inpatients admitted with the Sydney Gynecological Oncology Group. All participants were provided with an information leaflet regarding the survey and written consent obtained.Results: A high response rate (100% from patients with varied social, ethnic, and educational backgrounds confirmed the acceptability of the survey. Standard of medical care provided, frequency of doctors’ visits, exchange of information with doctors, friendliness of the staff, and state of the room ranked highly (>95% on the patient satisfaction scales. Problems were identified with ease of access to and within the hospital, quality of food, and exchange of information with other hospital staff.Conclusions: Overall the satisfaction with inpatient care was rated very highly in most areas. Deficiencies in certain elements of provision of medical care to the patients were identified and steps have been taken to improve upon these shortcomings.Keywords: patient satisfaction, EORTC, IN-PATSAT32, gynecological oncology, survey

  8. Design, development of water tank-type lung phantom and dosimetric verification in institutions participating in a phase I study of stereotactic body radiation therapy in patients with T2N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer: Japan Clinical Oncology Group trial (JCOG0702).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Teiji; Shirato, Hiroki; Ishikawa, Masayori; Miyabe, Yuki; Kito, Satoshi; Narita, Yuichirou; Onimaru, Rikiya; Ishikura, Satoshi; Ito, Yoshinori; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2014-05-01

    A domestic multicenter phase I study of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for T2N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer in inoperable patients or elderly patients who refused surgery was initiated as the Japan Clinical Oncology Group trial (JCOG0702) in Japan. Prior to the clinical study, the accuracy of dose calculation in radiation treatment-planning systems was surveyed in participating institutions, and differences in the irradiating dose between the institutions were investigated. We developed a water tank-type lung phantom appropriate for verification of the exposure dose in lung SBRT. Using this water tank-type lung phantom, the dose calculated in the radiation treatment-planning system and the measured dose using a free air ionization chamber and dosimetric film were compared in a visiting survey of the seven institutions participating in the clinical study. In all participating institutions, differences between the calculated and the measured dose in the irradiation plan were as follows: the accuracy of the absolute dose in the center of the simulated tumor measured using a free air ionization chamber was within 2%, the mean gamma value was ≤ 0.47 on gamma analysis following the local dose criteria, and the pass rate was >87% for 3%/3 mm from measurement of dose distribution with dosimetric film. These findings confirmed the accuracy of delivery doses in the institutions participating in the clinical study, so that a study with integration of the institutions could be initiated.

  9. Companion diagnostics and molecular imaging-enhanced approaches for oncology clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Heertum, Ronald L; Scarimbolo, Robert; Ford, Robert; Berdougo, Eli; O'Neal, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the era of personalized medicine, diagnostic approaches are helping pharmaceutical and biotechnology sponsors streamline the clinical trial process. Molecular assays and diagnostic imaging are routinely being used to stratify patients for treatment, monitor disease, and provide reliable early clinical phase assessments. The importance of diagnostic approaches in drug development is highlighted by the rapidly expanding global cancer diagnostics market and the emergent attention of regulatory agencies worldwide, who are beginning to offer more structured platforms and guidance for this area. In this paper, we highlight the key benefits of using companion diagnostics and diagnostic imaging with a focus on oncology clinical trials. Nuclear imaging using widely available radiopharmaceuticals in conjunction with molecular imaging of oncology targets has opened the door to more accurate disease assessment and the modernization of standard criteria for the evaluation, staging, and treatment responses of cancer patients. Furthermore, the introduction and validation of quantitative molecular imaging continues to drive and optimize the field of oncology diagnostics. Given their pivotal role in disease assessment and treatment, the validation and commercialization of diagnostic tools will continue to advance oncology clinical trials, support new oncology drugs, and promote better patient outcomes.

  10. Pelvic Normal Tissue Contouring Guidelines for Radiation Therapy: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Atlas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gay, Hiram A., E-mail: hgay@radonc.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Barthold, H. Joseph [Commonwealth Hematology and Oncology, Weymouth, MA (United States); Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); O' Meara, Elizabeth [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Al-Lozi, Rawan [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Zietman, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Myerson, Robert [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Willett, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Ryu, Janice [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); and others

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To define a male and female pelvic normal tissue contouring atlas for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Methods and Materials: One male pelvis computed tomography (CT) data set and one female pelvis CT data set were shared via the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center. A total of 16 radiation oncologists participated. The following organs at risk were contoured in both CT sets: anus, anorectum, rectum (gastrointestinal and genitourinary definitions), bowel NOS (not otherwise specified), small bowel, large bowel, and proximal femurs. The following were contoured in the male set only: bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, and penile bulb. The following were contoured in the female set only: uterus, cervix, and ovaries. A computer program used the binomial distribution to generate 95% group consensus contours. These contours and definitions were then reviewed by the group and modified. Results: The panel achieved consensus definitions for pelvic normal tissue contouring in RTOG trials with these standardized names: Rectum, AnoRectum, SmallBowel, Colon, BowelBag, Bladder, UteroCervix, Adnexa{sub R}, Adnexa{sub L}, Prostate, SeminalVesc, PenileBulb, Femur{sub R}, and Femur{sub L}. Two additional normal structures whose purpose is to serve as targets in anal and rectal cancer were defined: AnoRectumSig and Mesorectum. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusions: Consensus guidelines for pelvic normal tissue contouring were reached and are available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG Web site. This will allow uniformity in defining normal tissues for clinical trials delivering pelvic radiation and will facilitate future normal tissue complication research.

  11. Contribution Invitation of The Chinese-German Journal of Clinical Oncology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ The Chinese-German Journal of Clinical Oncology is an international professional academic periodical on oncology, being co-edited by China and Germany. The Journal, with the authors from around world, especially from China, is dominated in introducing the clinical experience of diagnosis and treatment as well as leading scientific research achievement in the tumor domain, in addition to report basic theory researches which help instruct the clinical practice of oncology and closely connect with the discipline. All the manuscripts are published in English, quarterly issued both internal and external, 64 -80pages, big 16 opens domains, art paper in offset printing, with lay-out by international customs, unified issuing number: ISSN 1610-1979 (Paper) 1613-9089 (Online)/CN 42-1654/R.

  12. Response of chronic myelogenous leukemia patients to COAP-splenectomy. A Southwest Oncology Group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, J P; Waddell, C C; Coltman, C A; Morrison, F S; Stephens, R L; Balcerzak, S P; Baker, L H; Chen, T T

    1984-11-01

    Eighty-seven patients from 18 institutions with a confirmed diagnosis of chronic myelogenous leukemia were registered on a Southwest Oncology Group protocol for multiagent induction and single-agent maintenance chemotherapy, with randomization to an immunotherapy arm. Elective surgical splenectomy was performed for 42 patients at the completion of 3 months of induction therapy. Final analysis of the study revealed statistically significant survival advantages were correlated with age, splenectomy, the absence of hepatic leukemic infiltrate at the time of splenectomy, and race.

  13. FDG PET/CT in clinical oncology. Case based approach with teaching points

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihailovic, Jasna [Novi Sad Univ. (Serbia). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Goldsmith, Stanley J. [Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States). Div. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imging; Killeen, Ronan P. [St. Vincents Univ. Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)

    2012-07-01

    Organized according to the role of FDG PET/CT in the evaluation and management of oncology patients. 100 informative cases reflecting the issues that clinicians address in their daily practice. Ideal for all newcomers to the field, whether medical students, radiology, nuclear medicine, or oncology fellows, or practicing physicians. FDG PET/CT has rapidly emerged as an invaluable combined imaging modality that can identify tumors on the basis of not only anatomical alterations but also metabolic activity, thus allowing the detection of lesions that would otherwise be too small to distinguish. This book, comprising a collection of images from oncology cases, is organized according to the role of FDG PET/CT in the evaluation and management of oncology patients, and only secondarily by organ or tumor entity. In this way, it reflects the issues that clinicians actually address in their daily practice, namely: identification of an unknown or unsuspected primary; determination of the extent of disease; evaluation of response to therapy; and surveillance after response, i.e., detection of recurrent disease. In total, 100 cases involving different primary tumors are presented to illustrate findings in these different circumstances. FDG PET/CT in Clinical Oncology will be of great value to all newcomers to this field, whether medical students, radiology, nuclear medicine, or oncology fellows, or practicing physicians.

  14. Clinical practice guidelines and consensus statements in oncology--an assessment of their methodological quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmel Jacobs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Consensus statements and clinical practice guidelines are widely available for enhancing the care of cancer patients. Despite subtle differences in their definition and purpose, these terms are often used interchangeably. We systematically assessed the methodological quality of consensus statements and clinical practice guidelines published in three commonly read, geographically diverse, cancer-specific journals. Methods Consensus statements and clinical practice guidelines published between January 2005 and September 2013 in Current Oncology, European Journal of Cancer and Journal of Clinical Oncology were evaluated. Each publication was assessed using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II rigour of development and editorial independence domains. For assessment of transparency of document development, 7 additional items were taken from the Institute of Medicine's standards for practice guidelines and the Journal of Clinical Oncology guidelines for authors of guidance documents. METHODS: Consensus statements and clinical practice guidelines published between January 2005 and September 2013 in Current Oncology, European Journal of Cancer and Journal of Clinical Oncology were evaluated. Each publication was assessed using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II rigour of development and editorial independence domains. For assessment of transparency of document development, 7 additional items were taken from the Institute of Medicine's standards for practice guidelines and the Journal of Clinical Oncology guidelines for authors of guidance documents. FINDINGS: Thirty-four consensus statements and 67 clinical practice guidelines were evaluated. The rigour of development score for consensus statements over the three journals was 32% lower than that of clinical practice guidelines. The editorial independence score was 15% lower for consensus statements than clinical practice

  15. Optimizing oncology therapeutics through quantitative translational and clinical pharmacology: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatakrishnan, K; Friberg, L E; Ouellet, D; Mettetal, J T; Stein, A; Trocóniz, I F; Bruno, R; Mehrotra, N; Gobburu, J; Mould, D R

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in biomedical research that have deepened our understanding of cancer hallmarks, resulting in the discovery and development of targeted therapies, the success rates of oncology drug development remain low. Opportunities remain for objective dose selection informed by exposure-response understanding to optimize the benefit-risk balance of novel therapies for cancer patients. This review article discusses the principles and applications of modeling and simulation approaches across the lifecycle of development of oncology therapeutics. Illustrative examples are used to convey the value gained from integration of quantitative clinical pharmacology strategies from the preclinical-translational phase through confirmatory clinical evaluation of efficacy and safety.

  16. Reiki as a clinical intervention in oncology nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossi, Larraine M; Ott, Mary Jane; DeCristofaro, Susan

    2008-06-01

    Oncology nurses and their patients are frequently on the cutting edge of new therapies and interventions that support coping, health, and healing. Reiki is a practice that is requested with increasing frequency, is easy to learn, does not require expensive equipment, and in preliminary research, elicits a relaxation response and helps patients to feel more peaceful and experience less pain. Those who practice Reiki report that it supports them in self-care and a healthy lifestyle. This article will describe the process of Reiki, review current literature, present vignettes of patient responses to the intervention, and make recommendations for future study.

  17. Young patients', parents', and survivors' communication preferences in paediatric oncology: Results of online focus groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamps Willem A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guidelines in paediatric oncology encourage health care providers to share relevant information with young patients and parents to enable their active participation in decision making. It is not clear to what extent this mirrors patients' and parents' preferences. This study investigated communication preferences of childhood cancer patients, parents, and survivors of childhood cancer. Methods Communication preferences were examined by means of online focus groups. Seven patients (aged 8–17, 11 parents, and 18 survivors (aged 8–17 at diagnosis participated. Recruitment took place by consecutive inclusion in two Dutch university oncological wards. Questions concerned preferences regarding interpersonal relationships, information exchange and participation in decision making. Results Participants expressed detailed and multi-faceted views regarding their needs and preferences in communication in paediatric oncology. They agreed on the importance of several interpersonal and informational aspects of communication, such as honesty, support, and the need to be fully informed. Participants generally preferred a collaborative role in medical decision making. Differences in views were found regarding the desirability of the patient's presence during consultations. Patients differed in their satisfaction with their parents' role as managers of the communication. Conclusion Young patients' preferences mainly concur with current guidelines of providing them with medical information and enabling their participation in medical decision making. Still, some variation in preferences was found, which faces health care providers with the task of balancing between the sometimes conflicting preferences of young cancer patients and their parents.

  18. Impact of cytogenetics on the outcome of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia: results of Southwest Oncology Group 9400 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullarkat, Vinod; Slovak, Marilyn L; Kopecky, Kenneth J; Forman, Stephen J; Appelbaum, Frederick R

    2008-03-01

    We examined the prognostic impact of cytogenetics on the outcome of 200 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients 15 to 65 years of age enrolled in Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG)-9400 study. Evaluable cytogenetics or fluorescence in situ hybridization studies were available in 140 (70%) patients. Four karyotype categories (normal [n = 31, 22%], t(9;22)/BCR/ABL1 [n = 36, 26%], other unfavorable [-7, +8, or 11q23 rearrangement, n = 19, 13%], and miscellaneous [n = 54, 39%]) and the biologically and clinically relevant ALL ploidy subgroups were prospectively defined. Overall survival (OS) decreased significantly with increasing age (P = .009) and varied with karyotype category (P cytogenetics as the most important prognostic factor in adult ALL. This trial was registered at www.ClinicalTrials.gov as #NCT00002665.

  19. Scenario drafting for early technology assessment of next generation sequencing in clinical oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, S.E.P.; Retel, V.P.; Coupé, V.M.H.; Heuvel, van den M.M.; Harten, van W.H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) is expected to lift molecular diagnostics in clinical oncology to the next level. It enables simultaneous identification of mutations in a patient tumor, after which targeted therapy may be assigned. This approach could improve patient survival and/or assi

  20. Factors Predicting Oncology Care Providers' Behavioral Intention to Adopt Clinical Decision Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfenden, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlation study was to examine the predictors of user behavioral intention on the decision of oncology care providers to adopt or reject the clinical decision support system. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) formed the foundation of the research model and survey instrument. The…

  1. Music therapy services in pediatric oncology: a national clinical practice review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucquet, Belinda; Leung, Maggie

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of a national clinical practice review conducted in Australia of music therapy services in pediatric oncology hospitals. Literature specifically related to music therapy and symptom management in pediatric oncology is reviewed. The results from a national benchmarking survey distributed to all music therapists working with children with cancer in Australian pediatric hospitals are discussed. Patient and family feedback provided from a quality improvement activity conducted at a major pediatric tertiary hospital is summarized, and considerations for future growth as a profession and further research is proposed.

  2. Assessing the Value of an Optional Radiation Oncology Clinical Rotation During the Core Clerkships in Medical School

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaorsky, Nicholas G.; Malatesta, Theresa M.; Den, Robert B.; Wuthrick, Evan; Ahn, Peter H.; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Shi, Wenyin; Dicker, Adam P.; Anne, P. Rani; Bar-Ad, Voichita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Showalter, Timothy N., E-mail: timothy.showalter@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Few medical students are given proper clinical training in oncology, much less radiation oncology. We attempted to assess the value of adding a radiation oncology clinical rotation to the medical school curriculum. Methods and Materials: In July 2010, Jefferson Medical College began to offer a 3-week radiation oncology rotation as an elective course for third-year medical students during the core surgical clerkship. During 2010 to 2012, 52 medical students chose to enroll in this rotation. The rotation included outpatient clinics, inpatient consults, didactic sessions, and case-based presentations by the students. Tests of students' knowledge of radiation oncology were administered anonymously before and after the rotation to evaluate the educational effectiveness of the rotation. Students and radiation oncology faculty were given surveys to assess feedback about the rotation. Results: The students' prerotation test scores had an average of 64% (95% confidence interval [CI], 61-66%). The postrotation test scores improved to an average of 82% (95% CI, 80-83%; 18% absolute improvement). In examination question analysis, scores improved in clinical oncology from 63% to 79%, in radiobiology from 70% to 77%, and in medical physics from 62% to 88%. Improvements in all sections but radiobiology were statistically significant. Students rated the usefulness of the rotation as 8.1 (scale 1-9; 95% CI, 7.3-9.0), their understanding of radiation oncology as a result of the rotation as 8.8 (95% CI, 8.5-9.1), and their recommendation of the rotation to a classmate as 8.2 (95% CI, 7.6-9.0). Conclusions: Integrating a radiation oncology clinical rotation into the medical school curriculum improves student knowledge of radiation oncology, including aspects of clinical oncology, radiobiology, and medical physics. The rotation is appreciated by both students and faculty.

  3. Attitudes of Oncologists, Oncology Nurses, and Patients from a Women's Clinic Regarding Medical Decision Making for Older and Younger Breast Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisecker, Analee E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Administered Beisecker Locus of Authority in Decision Making: Breast Cancer survey to 67 oncologists, 94 oncology nurses, and 288 patients from women's clinic. All groups believed that physicians should have dominant role in decision making. Nurses felt that patients should have more input than patients or physicians felt they should. Physicians…

  4. American Society of Clinical Oncology Policy Statement Update: Genetic and Genomic Testing for Cancer Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Mark E; Bradbury, Angela R; Arun, Banu; Domchek, Susan M; Ford, James M; Hampel, Heather L; Lipkin, Stephen M; Syngal, Sapna; Wollins, Dana S; Lindor, Noralane M

    2015-11-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has long affirmed that the recognition and management of individuals with an inherited susceptibility to cancer are core elements of oncology care. ASCO released its first statement on genetic testing in 1996 and updated that statement in 2003 and 2010 in response to developments in the field. In 2014, the Cancer Prevention and Ethics Committees of ASCO commissioned another update to reflect the impact of advances in this area on oncology practice. In particular, there was an interest in addressing the opportunities and challenges arising from the application of massively parallel sequencing-also known as next-generation sequencing-to cancer susceptibility testing. This technology introduces a new level of complexity into the practice of cancer risk assessment and management, requiring renewed effort on the part of ASCO to ensure that those providing care to patients with cancer receive the necessary education to use this new technology in the most effective, beneficial manner. The purpose of this statement is to explore the challenges of new and emerging technologies in cancer genetics and provide recommendations to ensure their optimal deployment in oncology practice. Specifically, the statement makes recommendations in the following areas: germline implications of somatic mutation profiling, multigene panel testing for cancer susceptibility, quality assurance in genetic testing, education of oncology professionals, and access to cancer genetic services.

  5. Innovations for phase I dose-finding designs in pediatric oncology clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doussau, Adelaide; Geoerger, Birgit; Jiménez, Irene; Paoletti, Xavier

    2016-03-01

    Phase I oncology clinical trials are designed to identify the optimal dose that will be recommended for phase II trials. In pediatric oncology, the conduct of those trials raises specific challenges, as the disease is rare with limited therapeutic options. In addition, the tolerance profile is known from adult trials. This paper provides a review of the major recent developments in the design of these trials, inspired by the need to cope with the specific challenges of dose finding in cancer pediatric oncology. We reviewed simulation studies comparing designs dedicated to address these challenges. We also reviewed the design used in published dose-finding trials in pediatric oncology over the period 2009-2014. Three main fields of innovation were identified. First, designs that were developed in order to relax the rules for more flexible inclusions. Second, methods to incorporate data emerging from adult studies. Third, designs accounting for toxicity evaluation at repeated cycles in pediatric oncology. In addition to this overview, we propose some further directions for designing pediatric dose-finding trials.

  6. Clinical PET/MR Imaging in Dementia and Neuro-Oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølby Henriksen, Otto; Marner, Lisbeth; Law, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of hybrid PET/MRI systems allows simultaneous multimodality image acquisition of high technical quality. This technique is well suited for the brain, and particularly in dementia and neuro-oncology. In routine use combinations of well-established MRI sequences and PET tracers....../MRI using [18F]-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine (FET) also abide to the expectations of the adaptive and versatile diagnostic tool necessary in neuro-oncology covering both simple 20 min protocols for routine treatment surveillance and complicated 90 min brain and spinal cord protocols in pediatric neuro......-oncology under general anesthesia. The clinical value of adding advanced MRI sequences in multiparametric imaging setting, however, is still undocumented....

  7. Cultural Competency Training to Increase Minority Enrollment into Radiation Therapy Clinical Trials-an NRG Oncology RTOG Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jessica S; Pugh, Stephanie; Boparai, Karan; Rearden, Jessica; Yeager, Katherine A; Bruner, Deborah W

    2016-05-21

    Despite initiatives to increase the enrollment of racial and ethnic minorities into cancer clinical trials in the National Cancer Institute National Cancer Clinical Trials Network (NCCTN), participation by Latino and African American populations remain low. The primary aims of this pilot study are (1) to develop a Cultural Competency and Recruitment Training Program (CCRTP) for physician investigators and clinical research associates (CRAs), (2) to determine if the CCRTP increases cultural competency scores among physician investigators and CRAs, and (3) to determine the impact of the CCRTP on minority patient recruitment into NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trials. Sixty-seven CRAs and physicians participated in an in-person or online 4-h CRRTP training. Five knowledge and attitude items showed significant improvements from pre- to post-training. A comparison between enrolling sites that did and did not participate in the CCRTP demonstrated a pre to 1-year post-incremental increase in minority accrual to clinical trials of 1.2 % among participating sites. While not statistically significant, this increase translated into an additional 300 minority patients accrued to NCCTN clinical trials in the year following the training from those sites who participated in the training.

  8. Comparing oncology clinical programs by use of innovative designs and expected net present value optimization: Which adaptive approach leads to the best result?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parke, Tom; Marchenko, Olga; Anisimov, Vladimir; Ivanova, Anastasia; Jennison, Christopher; Perevozskaya, Inna; Song, Guochen

    2017-01-01

    Designing an oncology clinical program is more challenging than designing a single study. The standard approaches have been proven to be not very successful during the last decade; the failure rate of Phase 2 and Phase 3 trials in oncology remains high. Improving a development strategy by applying innovative statistical methods is one of the major objectives of a drug development process. The oncology sub-team on Adaptive Program under the Drug Information Association Adaptive Design Scientific Working Group (DIA ADSWG) evaluated hypothetical oncology programs with two competing treatments and published the work in the Therapeutic Innovation and Regulatory Science journal in January 2014. Five oncology development programs based on different Phase 2 designs, including adaptive designs and a standard two parallel arm Phase 3 design were simulated and compared in terms of the probability of clinical program success and expected net present value (eNPV). In this article, we consider eight Phase2/Phase3 development programs based on selected combinations of five Phase 2 study designs and three Phase 3 study designs. We again used the probability of program success and eNPV to compare simulated programs. For the development strategies, we considered that the eNPV showed robust improvement for each successive strategy, with the highest being for a three-arm response adaptive randomization design in Phase 2 and a group sequential design with 5 analyses in Phase 3.

  9. Recent advances in gastrointestinal oncology - updates and insights from the 2009 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh Chung-Tsen

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have reviewed the pivotal presentations related to gastrointestinal malignancies from 2009 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology with the theme of "personalizing cancer care". We have discussed the scientific findings and the impact on practice guidelines and ongoing clinical trials. Adding trastuzumab to chemotherapy improved the survival of patients with advanced gastric cancer overexpressing human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. Gemcitabine plus cisplatin has become a new standard for first-line treatment of advanced biliary cancer. Octreotide LAR significantly lengthened median time to tumor progression compared with placebo in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumors of the midgut. Addition of oxaliplatin to fluoropyrimidines for preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with stage II or III rectal cancer did not improve local tumor response but increased toxicities. Bevacizumab did not provide additional benefit to chemotherapy in adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II or III colon cancer. In patients with resected stage II colon cancer, recurrence score estimated by multigene RT-PCR assay has been shown to provide additional risk stratification. In stage IV colorectal cancer, data have supported the routine use of prophylactic skin treatment in patients receiving antibody against epidermal growth factor receptor, and the use of upfront chemotherapy as initial management in patients with synchronous metastasis without obstruction or bleeding from the primary site.

  10. Current practices and guidelines for clinical next-generation sequencing oncology testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Samuel P. Strom

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has been rapidly integrated into molecular pathology, dramatically increasing the breadth genomic of information available to oncologists and their patients. This review will explore the ways in which this new technology is currently applied to bolster care for patients with solid tumors and hematological malignancies, focusing on practices and guidelines for assessing the technical validity and clinical utility of DNA variants identified during clinical NGS oncology testing.

  11. Modern Radiation Therapy for Extranodal Lymphomas: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahalom, Joachim, E-mail: yahalomj@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Illidge, Tim [Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, The Christie National Health Service Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Specht, Lena [Department of Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Hoppe, Richard T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California (United States); Li, Ye-Xiong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Tsang, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Wirth, Andrew [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, St. Andrews Place, East Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-05-01

    Extranodal lymphomas (ENLs) comprise about a third of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently used as either primary therapy (particularly for indolent ENL), consolidation after systemic therapy, salvage treatment, or palliation. The wide range of presentations of ENL, involving any organ in the body and the spectrum of histological sub-types, poses a challenge both for routine clinical care and for the conduct of prospective and retrospective studies. This has led to uncertainty and lack of consistency in RT approaches between centers and clinicians. Thus far there is a lack of guidelines for the use of RT in the management of ENL. This report presents an effort by the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) to harmonize and standardize the principles of treatment of ENL, and to address the technical challenges of simulation, volume definition and treatment planning for the most frequently involved organs. Specifically, detailed recommendations for RT volumes are provided. We have applied the same modern principles of involved site radiation therapy as previously developed and published as guidelines for Hodgkin lymphoma and nodal NHL. We have adopted RT volume definitions based on the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), as has been widely adopted by the field of radiation oncology for solid tumors. Organ-specific recommendations take into account histological subtype, anatomy, the treatment intent, and other treatment modalities that may be have been used before RT.

  12. Invited review: study design considerations for clinical research in veterinary radiology and radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrivani, Peter V; Erb, Hollis N

    2013-01-01

    High quality clinical research is essential for advancing knowledge in the areas of veterinary radiology and radiation oncology. Types of clinical research studies may include experimental studies, method-comparison studies, and patient-based studies. Experimental studies explore issues relative to pathophysiology, patient safety, and treatment efficacy. Method-comparison studies evaluate agreement between techniques or between observers. Patient-based studies investigate naturally acquired disease and focus on questions asked in clinical practice that relate to individuals or populations (e.g., risk, accuracy, or prognosis). Careful preplanning and study design are essential in order to achieve valid results. A key point to planning studies is ensuring that the design is tailored to the study objectives. Good design includes a comprehensive literature review, asking suitable questions, selecting the proper sample population, collecting the appropriate data, performing the correct statistical analyses, and drawing conclusions supported by the available evidence. Most study designs are classified by whether they are experimental or observational, longitudinal or cross-sectional, and prospective or retrospective. Additional features (e.g., controlled, randomized, or blinded) may be described that address bias. Two related challenging aspects of study design are defining an important research question and selecting an appropriate sample population. The sample population should represent the target population as much as possible. Furthermore, when comparing groups, it is important that the groups are as alike to each other as possible except for the variables of interest. Medical images are well suited for clinical research because imaging signs are categorical or numerical variables that might be predictors or outcomes of diseases or treatments.

  13. Multi-scale Modeling in Clinical Oncology: Opportunities and Barriers to Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankeelov, Thomas E; An, Gary; Saut, Oliver; Luebeck, E Georg; Popel, Aleksander S; Ribba, Benjamin; Vicini, Paolo; Zhou, Xiaobo; Weis, Jared A; Ye, Kaiming; Genin, Guy M

    2016-09-01

    Hierarchical processes spanning several orders of magnitude of both space and time underlie nearly all cancers. Multi-scale statistical, mathematical, and computational modeling methods are central to designing, implementing and assessing treatment strategies that account for these hierarchies. The basic science underlying these modeling efforts is maturing into a new discipline that is close to influencing and facilitating clinical successes. The purpose of this review is to capture the state-of-the-art as well as the key barriers to success for multi-scale modeling in clinical oncology. We begin with a summary of the long-envisioned promise of multi-scale modeling in clinical oncology, including the synthesis of disparate data types into models that reveal underlying mechanisms and allow for experimental testing of hypotheses. We then evaluate the mathematical techniques employed most widely and present several examples illustrating their application as well as the current gap between pre-clinical and clinical applications. We conclude with a discussion of what we view to be the key challenges and opportunities for multi-scale modeling in clinical oncology.

  14. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  15. Optimising translational oncology in clinical practice: strategies to accelerate progress in drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahel, R; Bogaerts, J; Ciardiello, F; de Ruysscher, D; Dubsky, P; Ducreux, M; Finn, S; Laurent-Puig, P; Peters, S; Piccart, M; Smit, E; Sotiriou, C; Tejpar, S; Van Cutsem, E; Tabernero, J

    2015-02-01

    Despite intense efforts, the socioeconomic burden of cancer remains unacceptably high and treatment advances for many common cancers have been limited, suggesting a need for a new approach to drug development. One issue central to this lack of progress is the heterogeneity and genetic complexity of many tumours. This results in considerable variability in therapeutic response and requires knowledge of the molecular profile of the tumour to guide appropriate treatment selection for individual patients. While recent advances in the molecular characterisation of different cancer types have the potential to transform cancer treatment through precision medicine, such an approach presents a major economic challenge for drug development, since novel targeted agents may only be suitable for a small cohort of patients. Identifying the patients who would benefit from individual therapies and recruiting sufficient numbers of patients with particular cancer subtypes into clinical trials is challenging, and will require collaborative efforts from research groups and industry in order to accelerate progress. A number of molecular screening platforms have already been initiated across Europe, and it is hoped that these networks, along with future collaborations, will benefit not only patients but also society through cost reductions as a result of more efficient use of resources. This review discusses how current developments in translational oncology may be applied in clinical practice in the future, assesses current programmes for the molecular characterisation of cancer and describes possible collaborative approaches designed to maximise the benefits of translational science for patients with cancer.

  16. Oncology medications prescription in a cancer service: appropriateness to clinical practice guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Palchik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess prescription of oncology medications in municipal public health network of Rosario for its appropriateness to clinical practice guidelines. Methods: Descriptive pharmacoepidemiological study in adult patients in an Oncology Service between January and June 2012. Compliance requirements with clinical practice guidelines were evaluated. Results: 51.8% of diagnoses had at least one prescription medication that did not match recommendation by at least one of the guides considered. Prescriptions of doxorrubicine and ifosfamide did not agree with the recommendation of any reference guides. 5.4% of prescriptions weren´t considered by local guides, nor 7.7% by national on es. Regarding comparison with international guidelines: 4.2% of prescriptions weren ´t considered by the European Society for Medical Oncology guidelines, 2.3% not considered by the American Cancer Society and only 1.9% were not considered by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network ones. Conclusions: Prescription of oncology treatments is closer to international reference guides. One reason could be that there is still no standard definition in the management of tumor diseases by the National State.

  17. Inside the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary Cancers Symposium: part 1 - kidney cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buti, Sebastiano; Ciccarese, Chiara; Iacovelli, Roberto; Bersanelli, Melissa; Scarpelli, Marina; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Massari, Francesco

    2016-09-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, Moscone West Building, San Francisco, CA, USA, 7-9 January 2016 The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, held in San Francisco (CA, USA), from 7 to 9 January 2016, focused on 'patient-centric care: translating research to results'. Every year, this meeting is a must for anyone studying genitourinary tumors to keep abreast of the most recent innovations in this field, exchange views on behaviors customarily adopted in daily clinical practice, and discuss future topics of scientific research. This two-part report highlights the key themes presented at the 2016 ASCO Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, with part 1 reporting the main novelties of kidney cancer and part 2 discussing the most relevant issues which have emerged for bladder and prostate tumors.

  18. Differences in demographic, clinical, and symptom characteristics and quality of life outcomes among oncology patients with different types of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posternak, Victoria; Dunn, Laura B; Dhruva, Anand; Paul, Steven M; Luce, Judith; Mastick, Judy; Levine, Jon D; Aouizerat, Bradley E; Hammer, Marylin; Wright, Fay; Miaskowski, Christine

    2016-04-01

    The purposes of this study, in oncology outpatients receiving chemotherapy (n = 926), were to: describe the occurrence of different types of pain (ie, no pain, only noncancer pain [NCP], only cancer pain [CP], or both CP and NCP) and evaluate for differences in demographic, clinical, and symptom characteristics, and quality of life (QOL) among the 4 groups. Patients completed self-report questionnaires on demographic and symptom characteristics and QOL. Patients who had pain were asked to indicate if it was or was not related to their cancer or its treatment. Medical records were reviewed for information on cancer and its treatments. In this study, 72.5% of the patients reported pain. Of the 671 who reported pain, 21.5% reported only NCP, 37.0% only CP, and 41.5% both CP and NCP. Across the 3 pain groups, worst pain scores were in the moderate to severe range. Compared with the no pain group, patients with both CP and NCP were significantly younger, more likely to be female, have a higher level of comorbidity, and a poorer functional status. In addition, these patients reported: higher levels of depression, anxiety, fatigue, and sleep disturbance; lower levels of energy and attentional function; and poorer QOL. Patients with only NCP were significantly older than the other 3 groups. The most common comorbidities in the NCP group were back pain, hypertension, osteoarthritis, and depression. Unrelieved CP and NCP continue to be significant problems. Oncology outpatients need to be assessed for both CP and NCP conditions.

  19. Photoacoustic Imaging in Oncology: Translational Preclinical and Early Clinical Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valluru, Keerthi S; Wilson, Katheryne E; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2016-08-01

    Photoacoustic imaging has evolved into a clinically translatable platform with the potential to complement existing imaging techniques for the management of cancer, including detection, characterization, prognosis, and treatment monitoring. In photoacoustic imaging, tissue is optically excited to produce ultrasonographic images that represent a spatial map of optical absorption of endogenous constituents such as hemoglobin, fat, melanin, and water or exogenous contrast agents such as dyes and nanoparticles. It can therefore provide functional and molecular information that allows noninvasive soft-tissue characterization. Photoacoustic imaging has matured over the years and is currently being translated into the clinic with various clinical studies underway. In this review, the current state of photoacoustic imaging is presented, including techniques and instrumentation, followed by a discussion of potential clinical applications of this technique for the detection and management of cancer. (©) RSNA, 2016.

  20. Phase 0 clinical trials in oncology new drug development

    OpenAIRE

    Umesh Chandra Gupta; Sandeep Bhatia; Amit Garg; Amit Sharma; Vaibhav Choudhary

    2011-01-01

    Research focus of pharmaceutical industry has expanded to a larger extent in last few decades putting many more new molecules, particularly targeted agents, for the clinical development. On the other hand, researchers are facing serious challenges due to high failure rates of new molecules in clinical studies. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in combination with academia and industry experts identified many factors responsible for failures of new molecules, and with a visi...

  1. POLYNEOPLASMS IN OPHTHALMIC ONCOLOGY: CLINICAL AND EPIDEMIOLOGICAL ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Ye. Panova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the clinical and epidemiological aspects of polyneoplasms of the organ of vision, shows the incidence rate of this abnormality in the pattern of neoplasms of the eye, and determines the specific features of the age-sex composition of patients and the clinical course characterized by a predominance of the metachronic type of a tumor process and by the most common concurrence with malignant skin tumors or breast cancer.

  2. [An art education programme for groups in the psycho-oncological after-care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geue, Kristina; Buttstädt, Marianne; Richter, Robert; Böhler, Ursula; Singer, Susanne

    2011-03-01

    In this paper the formal and contentual structure of the outpatient art education programme for oncological patients is presented. The group intervention was comprised of 22 separate sessions. The course consisted of 3 phases. The first unit helped to foster mutual understanding and to learn various experimental drawing techniques using a given topic. The second unit merged into the shaping of personal thoughts and feelings with the aim of encouraging self-perception and reflection. The aim in the third phase is to create a personal book. The effects of the intervention for the participants were examined in studies. The art therapist as well as the supervisor sees development of better coping strategies, contact with other patients and enhancement of scope of action through the regular activities as main effects. Participants reported the enlargement of means of expression, emotional stabilization, coping with illness, personal growth and contacts with other patients as meanings. This art education course enlarges the field of psycho-oncological interventions in outpatient care with a low-treshhold and resource-oriented creative programme.

  3. Research Biopsies in the Context of Early Phase Oncology Studies: Clinical and Ethical Considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Matilde Saggese; Divyanshu Dua; Emily Simmons; Charlotte Lemech; Hendrik-Tobias Arkenau

    2013-01-01

    The Personalized Medicine approach in oncology is a direct result of an improved understanding of complex tumor biology and advances in diagnostic technologies. In recent years, there has been an increased demand for archival and fresh tumor analysis in early clinical trials to foster proof-of-concept biomarker development, to understand resistance mechanisms, and ultimately to assess biological response. Although phase I studies are aimed at defining drug safety, pharmacokinetics, and to rec...

  4. Mass spectrometry strategies for clinical metabolomics and lipidomics in psychiatry, neurology, and neuro-oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Paul L

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomics research has the potential to provide biomarkers for the detection of disease, for subtyping complex disease populations, for monitoring disease progression and therapy, and for defining new molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. These potentials are far from being realized because of a number of technical, conceptual, financial, and bioinformatics issues. Mass spectrometry provides analytical platforms that address the technical barriers to success in metabolomics research; however, the limited commercial availability of analytical and stable isotope standards has created a bottleneck for the absolute quantitation of a number of metabolites. Conceptual and financial factors contribute to the generation of statistically under-powered clinical studies, whereas bioinformatics issues result in the publication of a large number of unidentified metabolites. The path forward in this field involves targeted metabolomics analyses of large control and patient populations to define both the normal range of a defined metabolite and the potential heterogeneity (eg, bimodal) in complex patient populations. This approach requires that metabolomics research groups, in addition to developing a number of analytical platforms, build sufficient chemistry resources to supply the analytical standards required for absolute metabolite quantitation. Examples of metabolomics evaluations of sulfur amino-acid metabolism in psychiatry, neurology, and neuro-oncology and of lipidomics in neurology will be reviewed.

  5. Online focus groups as a tool to collect data in hard-to-include populations : examples from paediatric oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tates, Kiek; Zwaanswijk, Marieke; Otten, Roel; van Dulmen, Sandra; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M.; Kamps, Willem A.; Bensing, Jozien M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this article is to describe and evaluate the methodology of online focus group discussions within the setting of paediatric oncology. Methods: Qualitative study consisting of separate moderated asynchronous online discussion groups with 7 paediatric cancer patients (aged 8

  6. Clinical cancer advances 2011: Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Benowitz, Steven I; Adams, Sylvia; Aghajanian, Carol; Chang, Susan Marina; Dreyer, Zoann Eckert; Janne, Pasi A; Ko, Andrew H; Masters, Greg A; Odenike, Olatoyosi; Patel, Jyoti D; Roth, Bruce J; Samlowski, Wolfram E; Seidman, Andrew D; Tap, William D; Temel, Jennifer S; Von Roenn, Jamie H; Kris, Mark G

    2012-01-01

    -time information that can inform the care of every patient with cancer as well as connect patients with their entire medical teams. The rapid learning system will form a continuous cycle of learning: securely capturing data from every patient at the point of care, drawing on evidence-based guidelines, and evaluating quality of care against those standards and the outcomes of other patients. Clinical trials are another area in which collaboration is critical. Increasing clinical trial participation will require commitment across the cancer community from physicians, patients, insurers, hospitals, and industry. A 2010 report by the Institute of Medicine described challenges to participation in trials by both physicians and patients and provided recommendations for revitalizing clinical trials conducted through the National Cancer Institute's Cooperative Group Program. ASCO has pledged its support for the full implementation of these recommendations. More broadly, ASCO recently outlined a bold vision for translational and clinical cancer research for the next decade and made recommendations to achieve that vision. Accelerating Progress Against Cancer: ASCO's Blueprint for Transforming Clinical and Translational Research, released in November, calls for a research system that takes full advantage of today's scientific and technologic opportunities and sets a high-level agenda for policy makers, regulators, and advocates. Cancer research has transformed cancer care in the past forty years, and this year's Clinical Cancer Advances illustrates how far we have come in the past year alone. We now have a tremendous opportunity to use today's knowledge and collaborate across all facets of cancer care to conquer this deadly disease. Michael P. Link, MD President American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  7. American Society of Clinical Oncology guidance statement: the cost of cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meropol, Neal J; Schrag, Deborah; Smith, Thomas J; Mulvey, Therese M; Langdon, Robert M; Blum, Diane; Ubel, Peter A; Schnipper, Lowell E

    2009-08-10

    Advances in early detection, prevention, and treatment have resulted in consistently falling cancer death rates in the United States. In parallel with these advances have come significant increases in the cost of cancer care. It is well established that the cost of health care (including cancer care) in the United States is growing more rapidly than the overall economy. In part, this is a result of the prices and rapid uptake of new agents and other technologies, including advances in imaging and therapeutic radiology. Conventional understanding suggests that high prices may reflect the costs and risks associated with the development, production, and marketing of new drugs and technologies, many of which are valued highly by physicians, patients, and payers. The increasing cost of cancer care impacts many stakeholders who play a role in a complex health care system. Our patients are the most vulnerable because they often experience uneven insurance coverage, leading to financial strain or even ruin. Other key groups include pharmaceutical manufacturers that pass along research, development, and marketing costs to the consumer; providers of cancer care who dispense increasingly expensive drugs and technologies; and the insurance industry, which ultimately passes costs to consumers. Increasingly, the economic burden of health care in general, and high-quality cancer care in particular, will be less and less affordable for an increasing number of Americans unless steps are taken to curb current trends. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is committed to improving cancer prevention, diagnosis, and treatment and eliminating disparities in cancer care through support of evidence-based and cost-effective practices. To address this goal, ASCO established a Cost of Care Task Force, which has developed this Guidance Statement on the Cost of Cancer Care. This Guidance Statement provides a concise overview of the economic issues facing stakeholders in the cancer

  8. Adolescents with Cancer in Italy: Improving Access to National Cooperative Pediatric Oncology Group (AIEOP) Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Andrea; Rondelli, Roberto; Pession, Andrea; Mascarin, Maurizio; Buzzoni, Carlotta; Mosso, Maria Luisa; Maule, Milena; Barisone, Elena; Bertolotti, Marina; Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Jankovic, Momcilo; Fagioli, Franca; Biondi, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    This analysis compared the numbers of patients treated at Italian pediatric oncology group (Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica [AIEOP]) centers with the numbers of cases predicted according to the population-based registry. It considered 32,431 patients registered in the AIEOP database (1989-2012). The ratio of observed (O) to expected (E) cases was 0.79 for children (0-14 years old) and 0.15 for adolescents (15-19 years old). The proportion of adolescents increased significantly over the years, however, from 0.05 in the earliest period to 0.10, 0.18, and then 0.28 in the latest period of observation, suggesting a greater efficacy of local/national programs dedicated to adolescents.

  9. Diffusion-weighted MRI in abdominal oncology:Clinical applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reiji; Sugita; Kei; Ito; Naotaka; Fujita; Shoki; Takahashi

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging(DWI) provides image contrast that is different from that obtained by conventional magnetic resonance techniques.Although previously,DWI has been used to evaluate various diseases of the central nervous system,several technical advances have expanded the clinical applications of DWI beyond the central nervous system.As a result,many reports have been published on the use of DWI in abdominal diseases.Particularly,abdominal DWI has now being focused on evaluation o...

  10. Role of American Society of Clinical Oncology in low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jyoti D; Galsky, Matthew D; Chagpar, Anees B; Pyle, Doug; Loehrer, Patrick J

    2011-08-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) is a global community of health care professionals whose stated purpose is to "make a world of difference" by improving cancer care around the world. Unfortunately, cancer survival rates vary significantly among countries with differing financial and infrastructural resources. Because ASCO is a professional oncology society committed to conquering cancer through research, education, prevention, and delivery of high-quality patient care, it is ideally suited to address this issue. ASCO could bring together oncology professionals and other necessary stakeholders from around the world to improve cancer care and lessen suffering for patients worldwide. As part of the ongoing commitment of ASCO to the future of cancer care, the Leadership Development Program was created to foster the leadership skills of early and midcareer oncologists and provide these participants with a working knowledge of the depth and breadth of the organization. As participants in the inaugural class of the ASCO Leadership Development Program, we were charged with investigating how ASCO might favorably affect cancer prevention and treatment in resource-poor countries in a cost-effective, scalable, and sustainable fashion. ASCO can significantly influence cancer care in low- and middle-income countries through a comprehensive approach that promotes cancer awareness and education, improves clinical practice by identifying and removing barriers to delivery of quality cancer care, and fosters innovation to initiate novel solutions to complex problems.

  11. Pharmacogenomics in Pediatric Oncology: Review of Gene—Drug Associations for Clinical Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vid Mlakar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available During the 3rd congress of the European Society of Pharmacogenomics and Personalised Therapy (ESPT in Budapest in 2015, a preliminary meeting was held aimed at establishing a pediatric individualized treatment in oncology and hematology committees. The main purpose was to facilitate the transfer and harmonization of pharmacogenetic testing from research into clinics, to bring together basic and translational research and to educate health professionals throughout Europe. The objective of this review was to provide the attendees of the meeting as well as the larger scientific community an insight into the compiled evidence regarding current pharmacogenomics knowledge in pediatric oncology. This preliminary evaluation will help steer the committee’s work and should give the reader an idea at which stage researchers and clinicians are, in terms of personalizing medicine for children with cancer. From the evidence presented here, future recommendations to achieve this goal will also be suggested.

  12. Pharmacogenomics in Pediatric Oncology: Review of Gene—Drug Associations for Clinical Use †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlakar, Vid; Huezo-Diaz Curtis, Patricia; Satyanarayana Uppugunduri, Chakradhara Rao; Krajinovic, Maja; Ansari, Marc

    2016-01-01

    During the 3rd congress of the European Society of Pharmacogenomics and Personalised Therapy (ESPT) in Budapest in 2015, a preliminary meeting was held aimed at establishing a pediatric individualized treatment in oncology and hematology committees. The main purpose was to facilitate the transfer and harmonization of pharmacogenetic testing from research into clinics, to bring together basic and translational research and to educate health professionals throughout Europe. The objective of this review was to provide the attendees of the meeting as well as the larger scientific community an insight into the compiled evidence regarding current pharmacogenomics knowledge in pediatric oncology. This preliminary evaluation will help steer the committee’s work and should give the reader an idea at which stage researchers and clinicians are, in terms of personalizing medicine for children with cancer. From the evidence presented here, future recommendations to achieve this goal will also be suggested. PMID:27618021

  13. Pharmacogenomics in Pediatric Oncology: Review of Gene-Drug Associations for Clinical Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlakar, Vid; Huezo-Diaz Curtis, Patricia; Satyanarayana Uppugunduri, Chakradhara Rao; Krajinovic, Maja; Ansari, Marc

    2016-01-01

    During the 3rd congress of the European Society of Pharmacogenomics and Personalised Therapy (ESPT) in Budapest in 2015, a preliminary meeting was held aimed at establishing a pediatric individualized treatment in oncology and hematology committees. The main purpose was to facilitate the transfer and harmonization of pharmacogenetic testing from research into clinics, to bring together basic and translational research and to educate health professionals throughout Europe. The objective of this review was to provide the attendees of the meeting as well as the larger scientific community an insight into the compiled evidence regarding current pharmacogenomics knowledge in pediatric oncology. This preliminary evaluation will help steer the committee's work and should give the reader an idea at which stage researchers and clinicians are, in terms of personalizing medicine for children with cancer. From the evidence presented here, future recommendations to achieve this goal will also be suggested.

  14. Statins in oncological research: from experimental studies to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubatka, Peter; Kruzliak, Peter; Rotrekl, Vladimir; Jelinkova, Sarka; Mladosievicova, Beata

    2014-12-01

    Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors are commonly used drugs in the treatment of dyslipidemias, primarily raised cholesterol. Recently, many epidemiological and preclinical studies pointed to anti-tumor properties of statins, including anti-proliferative activities, apoptosis, decreased angiogenesis and metastasis. These processes play an important role in carcinogenesis and, therefore, the role of statins in cancer disease is being seriously discussed among oncologists. Anti-neoplastic properties of statins combined with an acceptable toxicity profile in the majority of individuals support their further development as anti-tumor drugs. The mechanism of action, current preclinical studies and clinical efficacy of statins are reviewed in this paper. Moreover, promising results have been reported regarding the statins' efficacy in some cancer types, especially in esophageal and colorectal cancers, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Statins' hepatotoxicity has traditionally represented an obstacle to the prescription of this class of drugs and this issue is also discussed in this review.

  15. A systems approach to clinical oncology: Focus on breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyland-Jones Brian

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During the past decade, genomic microarrays have been applied with some success to the molecular profiling of breast tumours, which has resulted in a much more detailed classification scheme as well as in the identification of potential gene signature sets. These gene sets have been applied to both the prognosis and prediction of outcome to treatment and have performed better than the current clinical criteria. One of the main limitations of microarray analysis, however, is that frozen tumour samples are required for the assay. This imposes severe limitations on access to samples and precludes large scale validation studies from being conducted. Quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, on the other hand, can be used with degraded RNAs derived from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tumour samples, the most important and abundant source of clinical material available. More recently, the novel DASL (cDNA-mediated Annealing, Selection, extension and Ligation assay has been developed as a high throughput gene expression profiling system specifically designed for use with FFPE tumour tissue samples. However, we do not believe that genomics is adequate as a sole prognostic and predictive platform in breast cancer. The key proteins driving oncogenesis, for example, can undergo post-translational modifications; moreover, if we are ever to move individualization of therapy into the practical world of blood-based assays, serum proteomics becomes critical. Proteomic platforms, including tissue micro-arrays (TMA and protein chip arrays, in conjunction with surface-enhanced laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF/MS, have been the technologies most widely applied to the characterization of tumours and serum from breast cancer patients, with still limited but encouraging results. This review will focus on these genomic and proteomic platforms, with an emphasis placed on the utilization

  16. Mucosal malignant melanoma - a clinical, oncological, pathological and genetic survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Lauge H; Larsen, Ann-Cathrine; von Buchwald, Christian; Drzewiecki, Krzysztof T; Prause, Jan U; Heegaard, Steffen

    2016-06-01

    Mucosal melanomas constitute 1.3% of all melanomas and they may develop in any mucosal membrane. Conjunctival melanomas (0.5/million/year) and melanomas in the sinonasal cavity (0.5/million/year) are the most common, followed by anorectal melanomas (0.4/million/year) and melanomas in the oral cavity (0.2/million/year). Anorectal melanoma occurs slightly more often in females, whereas oral melanoma has a male predilection. Mucosal melanoma most commonly develops in a patient's sixth or seventh decade of life, and no differences between races have been found except for sinonasal melanoma and conjunctival melanoma, which are very rare in Black people. The symptoms are not tumour-specific and are related to the organ system affected, and the disease is most often diagnosed at an advanced clinical stage. The diagnosis of a primary tumour is difficult, and metastatic cutaneous melanoma and choroidal melanoma must be excluded. Mutations in KIT are frequently found, while BRAF and NRAS mutations are rarely found - except in conjunctival melanomas that carry BRAF mutations. Mutations in the TERT promotor region are also found in mucosal melanomas. Complete surgical resection with free margins is the treatment of choice. The prognosis is poor, with the 5-year survival rate ranging from 0% (gastric melanoma) to 80% (conjunctival melanoma).

  17. The American Society of Clinical Oncology's Efforts to Support Global Cancer Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; El-Saghir, Nagi S; Cufer, Tanja; Cazap, Eduardo; de Guzman, Roselle; Othieno-Abinya, Nicholas Anthony; Sanchez, Jose Angel; Pyle, Doug

    2016-01-01

    Despite much progress in the management of malignant diseases, the number of new cases and cancer-related deaths continues to rise around the world. More than half of new cases occur in economically developing countries, where more than two thirds of cancer deaths are expected. However, implementation of all necessary steps to accomplish the dissemination of state-of-the-art prevention, diagnosis, and management will require increased allocation of resources, and, more importantly, harmonization of the efforts of hundreds of national and international public health agencies, policy-setting bodies, governments, pharmaceutical companies, and philanthropic organizations. More than 30% of the members of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) reside and practice outside US borders, and more than half of attendees at all of the scientific congresses and symposia organized by ASCO are international. As cancer has become an increasingly global disease, ASCO has evolved as a global organization. The ASCO Board of Directors currently includes members from France, Brazil, and Canada. In 2013, the ASCO Board of Directors identified a number of strategic priorities for the future. Recognizing the importance of non-US members to the society, their first strategic priority was improving the society's service to non-US members and defining these members' identity in the international oncology community. This article reviews current ASCO activities in the international arena and its future plans in global oncology.

  18. [Rethinking clinical research in surgical oncology. From comic opera to quality control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evrard, Serge

    2016-01-01

    The evidence base for the effectiveness of surgical interventions is relatively poor and data from large, randomized prospective studies are rare with often a poor quality. Many efforts have been made to increase the number of high quality randomized trials in surgery and theoretical proposals have been put forward to improve the situation, but practical implementation of these proposals is seriously lacking. The consequences of this policy are not trivial; with very few patients included in surgical oncology trials, this represents wasted opportunity for advances in cancer treatment. In this review, we cover the difficulties inherent to clinical research in surgical oncology, such as quality control, equipoise, accrual, and funding and promote alternative designs to the randomized controlled trial. Although the classic randomized controlled trial has a valid but limited place in surgical oncology, other prospective designs need to be promoted as a new deal. This new deal not only implicates surgeons but also journal editors, tender jury, as well as regulatory bodies to cover legal gaps currently surrounding surgical innovation.

  19. Gene expression profiles predictive of outcome and age in infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A Children's Oncology Group study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Kang; C.S. Wilson (Carla); R. Harvey (R.); I.-M. Chen (I.-Ming); M.H. Murphy (Maurice); S.R. Atlas (Susan); E.J. Bedrick (Edward); M. Devidas (Meenakshi); A.J. Carroll; B.W. Robinson (Blaine); R.W. Stam (Ronald); M.G. Valsecchi (Maria Grazia); R. Pieters (Rob); N.A. Heerema (Nyla); J.M. Hilden (Joanne); C.A. Felix (Carolyn); G.H. Reaman (Gregory); B. Camitta (Bruce); N.J. Winick (Naomi); W.L. Carroll (William); S.D. Dreyer; S.P. Hunger (Stephen); S.F. Willman (Sami )

    2012-01-01

    textabstractGene expression profiling was performed on 97 cases of infant ALL from Children's Oncology Group Trial P9407. Statistical modeling of an outcome predictor revealed 3 genes highly predictive of event-free survival (EFS), beyond age and MLL status: FLT3, IRX2, and TACC2. Low FLT3 expressio

  20. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.

  1. PET-Based Personalized Management in Clinical Oncology: An Unavoidable Path for the Foreseeable Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sandip; Alavi, Abass

    2016-07-01

    It is imperative that the thrust of clinical practice in the ensuing years would be to develop personalized management model for various disorders. PET-computed tomography (PET-CT) based molecular functional imaging has been increasingly utilized for assessment of tumor and other nonmalignant disorders and has the ability to explore disease phenotype on an individual basis and address critical clinical decision making questions related to practice of personalized medicine. Hence, it is essential to make a concerted systematic effort to explore and define the appropriate place of PET-CT in personalized clinical practice in each of malignancies, which would strengthen the concept further. The potential advantages of PET based disease management can be classified into broad categories: (1) Traditional: which includes assessment of disease extent such as initial disease staging and restaging, treatment response evaluation particularly early in the course and thus PET-CT response adaptive decision for continuing the same regimen or switching to salvage schedules; there has been continuous addition of newer application of PET based disease restaging in oncological parlance (eg, Richter transformation); (2) Recent and emerging developments: this includes exploring tumor biology with FDG and non-FDG PET tracers. The potential of multitracer PET imaging (particularly new and novel tracers, eg, 68Ga-DOTA-TOC/NOC/TATE in NET, 68Ga-PSMA and 18F-fluorocholine in prostate carcinoma, 18F-fluoroestradiol in breast carcinoma) has provided a scientific basis to stratify and select appropriate targeted therapies (both radionuclide and nonradionuclide treatment), a major boost for individualized disease management in clinical oncology. Integrating the molecular level information obtained from PET with structural imaging further individualizing treatment plan in radiation oncology, precision of interventions and biopsies of a particular lesion and forecasting disease prognosis.

  2. New evidence-based adaptive clinical trial methods for optimally integrating predictive biomarkers into oncology clinical development programs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert A.Beckman; Cong Chen

    2013-01-01

    Predictive biomarkers are important to the future of oncology; they can be used to identify patient populations who will benefit from therapy,increase the value of cancer medicines,and decrease the size and cost of clinical trials while increasing their chance of success.But predictive biomarkers do not always work.When unsuccessful,they add cost,complexity,and time to drug development.This perspective describes phases 2 and 3 development methods that efficiently and adaptively check the ability of a biomarker to predict clinical outcomes.In the end,the biomarker is emphasized to the extent that it can actually predict.

  3. Robotic surgery for rectal cancer: current immediate clinical and oncological outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Sergio Eduardo Alonso; Seid, Victor Edmond; Klajner, Sidney

    2014-10-21

    Laparoscopic rectal surgery continues to be a challenging operation associated to a steep learning curve. Robotic surgical systems have dramatically changed minimally invasive surgery. Three-dimensional, magnified and stable view, articulated instruments, and reduction of physiologic tremors leading to superior dexterity and ergonomics. Therefore, robotic platforms could potentially address limitations of laparoscopic rectal surgery. It was aimed at reviewing current literature on short-term clinical and oncological (pathological) outcomes after robotic rectal cancer surgery in comparison with laparoscopic surgery. A systematic review was performed for the period 2002 to 2014. A total of 1776 patients with rectal cancer underwent minimally invasive robotic treatment in 32 studies. After robotic and laparoscopic approach to oncologic rectal surgery, respectively, mean operating time varied from 192-385 min, and from 158-297 min; mean estimated blood loss was between 33 and 283 mL, and between 127 and 300 mL; mean length of stay varied from 4-10 d; and from 6-15 d. Conversion after robotic rectal surgery varied from 0% to 9.4%, and from 0 to 22% after laparoscopy. There was no difference between robotic (0%-41.3%) and laparoscopic (5.5%-29.3%) surgery regarding morbidity and anastomotic complications (respectively, 0%-13.5%, and 0%-11.1%). Regarding immediate oncologic outcomes, respectively among robotic and laparoscopic cases, positive circumferential margins varied from 0% to 7.5%, and from 0% to 8.8%; the mean number of retrieved lymph nodes was between 10 and 20, and between 11 and 21; and the mean distal resection margin was from 0.8 to 4.7 cm, and from 1.9 to 4.5 cm. Robotic rectal cancer surgery is being undertaken by experienced surgeons. However, the quality of the assembled evidence does not support definite conclusions about most studies variables. Robotic rectal cancer surgery is associated to increased costs and operating time. It also seems to be

  4. Vision 20/20: Automation and advanced computing in clinical radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Kevin L., E-mail: kevinmoore@ucsd.edu; Moiseenko, Vitali [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Kagadis, George C. [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras, Rion, GR 26504 (Greece); McNutt, Todd R. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Science, School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    This Vision 20/20 paper considers what computational advances are likely to be implemented in clinical radiation oncology in the coming years and how the adoption of these changes might alter the practice of radiotherapy. Four main areas of likely advancement are explored: cloud computing, aggregate data analyses, parallel computation, and automation. As these developments promise both new opportunities and new risks to clinicians and patients alike, the potential benefits are weighed against the hazards associated with each advance, with special considerations regarding patient safety under new computational platforms and methodologies. While the concerns of patient safety are legitimate, the authors contend that progress toward next-generation clinical informatics systems will bring about extremely valuable developments in quality improvement initiatives, clinical efficiency, outcomes analyses, data sharing, and adaptive radiotherapy.

  5. Modern Radiation Therapy for Primary Cutaneous Lymphomas: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Specht, Lena, E-mail: lena.specht@regionh.dk [Departments of Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Dabaja, Bouthaina [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Illidge, Tim [Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, The Christie National Health Service Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Wilson, Lynn D. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Hoppe, Richard T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of diseases. They often remain localized, and they generally have a more indolent course and a better prognosis than lymphomas in other locations. They are highly radiosensitive, and radiation therapy is an important part of the treatment, either as the sole treatment or as part of a multimodality approach. Radiation therapy of primary cutaneous lymphomas requires the use of special techniques that form the focus of these guidelines. The International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group has developed these guidelines after multinational meetings and analysis of available evidence. The guidelines represent an agreed consensus view of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group steering committee on the use of radiation therapy in primary cutaneous lymphomas in the modern era.

  6. Application of next-generation sequencing in clinical oncology to advance personalized treatment of cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Fang Guan; Gai-Rui Li; Rong-Jiao Wang; Yu-Ting Yi; Ling Yang; Dan Jiang; Xiao-Ping Zhang; Yin Peng

    2012-01-01

    With the development and improvement of new sequencing technology,next-generation sequencing (NGS) has been applied increasingly in cancer genomics research over the past decade.More recently,NGS has been adopted in clinical oncology to advance personalized treatment of cancer.NGS is used to identify novel and rare cancer mutations,detect familial cancer mutation carriers,and provide molecular rationale for appropriate targeted therapy.Compared to traditional sequencing,NGS holds many advantages,such as the ability to fully sequence all types of mutations for a large number of genes (hundreds to thousands) in a single test at a relatively low cost.However,significant challenges,particularly with respect to the requirement for simpler assays,more flexible throughput,shorter turnaround time,and most importantly,easier data analysis and interpretation,will have to be overcome to translate NGS to the bedside of cancer patients.Overall,continuous dedication to apply NGS in clinical oncology practice will enable us to be one step closer to personalized medicine.

  7. Standard of Care for Neuropsychological Monitoring in Pediatric Neuro-Oncology: Lessons From the Children's Oncology Group (COG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Karin S; Noll, Robert B; Annett, Robert D; Patel, Sunita K; Patenaude, Andrea F; Embry, Leanne

    2016-02-01

    As the mortality of pediatric cancers has decreased, focus on neuropsychological morbidities of treatment sequelae have increased. Neuropsychological evaluations are essential diagnostic tools that assess cognitive functioning and neurobiological integrity. These tests provide vital information to support ongoing medical care, documenting cognitive morbidity and response to interventions. We frame standards for neuropsychological monitoring of pediatric patients with CNS malignancy or who received cancer-directed therapies involving the CNS and discuss billing for these services in the United States in the context of clinical research. We describe a cost-effective, efficient model of neuropsychological monitoring that may increases access to neuropsychological care.

  8. Nonclinical Evaluations of Small-Molecule Oncology Drugs: Integration into Clinical Dose Optimization and Toxicity Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambach, Donna M; Simpson, Natalie E; Jones, Thomas W; Brennan, Richard J; Pazdur, Richard; Palmby, Todd R

    2016-06-01

    Multidisciplinary approaches that incorporate nonclinical pharmacologic and toxicologic characterization of small-molecule oncology drugs into clinical development programs may facilitate improved benefit-risk profiles and clinical toxicity management in patients. The performance of the current nonclinical safety-testing scheme was discussed, highlighting current strengths and areas for improvement. While current nonclinical testing appears to predict the clinical outcome where the prevalence of specific adverse effects are high, nonclinical testing becomes less reliable for predicting clinical adverse effects that occur infrequently, as with some kinase inhibitors. Although adverse effects associated with kinase inhibitors can often be predicted on the basis of target biology, drugs can be promiscuous and inhibit targets with poorly defined function and associated risks. Improvements in adverse effect databases and better characterization of the biologic activities of drug targets may enable better use of computational modeling approaches in predicting adverse effects with kinase inhibitors. Assessing safety of a lead candidate in parallel with other drug properties enables incorporation of a molecule's best features during chemical design, eliminates the worst molecules early, and permits timely investigation/characterization of toxicity mechanisms for identified liabilities. A safety lead optimization and candidate identification strategy that reduces intrinsic toxicity and metabolic risk and enhances selectivity can deliver selective kinase inhibitors that demonstrate on-target adverse effects identified nonclinically. Integrating clinical and nonclinical data during drug development can facilitate better identification and management of oncology drugs. Follow-up nonclinical studies may be used to better understand the risks in a given patient population and minimize or manage these risks more appropriately. Clin Cancer Res; 22(11); 2618-22. ©2016 AACR SEE ALL

  9. Acuity-based nurse assignment and patient scheduling in oncology clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bohui; Turkcan, Ayten

    2016-09-01

    The oncology clinics use different nursing care delivery models to provide chemotherapy treatment to cancer patients. Functional and primary care delivery models are the most commonly used methods in the clinics. In functional care delivery model, patients are scheduled for a chemotherapy appointment without considering availabilities of individual nurses, and nurses are assigned to patients according to patient acuities, nursing skill, and patient mix on a given day after the appointment schedule is determined. Patients might be treated by different nurses on different days of their treatment. In primary care delivery model, each patient is assigned to a primary nurse, and the patients are scheduled to be seen by the same nurse every time they come to the clinic for treatment. However, these clinics might experience high variability in daily nurse workload due to treatment protocols that should be followed strictly. In that case, part-time nurses can be utilized to share the excess workload of the primary nurses. The aim of this study is to develop optimization methods to reduce the time spent for nurse assignment and patient scheduling in oncology clinics that use different nursing care delivery models. For the functional delivery model, a multiobjective optimization model with the objectives of minimizing patient waiting times and nurse overtime is proposed to solve the nurse assignment problem. For the primary care delivery model, another multiobjective optimization model with the objectives of minimizing total overtime and total excess workload is proposed to solve the patient scheduling problem. Spreadsheet-based optimization tools are developed for easy implementation. Computational results show that the proposed models provide multiple nondominated solutions, which can be used to determine the optimal staffing levels.

  10. The use, publication and future directions of immunocytochemistry in veterinary medicine: a consensus of the Oncology-Pathology Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, H L; Hume, K R; Killick, D; Kozicki, A; Rizzo, V L; Seelig, D; Snyder, L A; Springer, N L; Wright, Z M; Robat, C

    2016-03-22

    One of the primary objectives of the Oncology Pathology Working Group (OPWG), a joint initiative of the Veterinary Cancer Society and the American College of Veterinary Pathologists, is for oncologists and pathologists to collaboratively generate consensus documents to standardize aspects of and provide guidelines for oncologic pathology. Consensus is established through review of relevant peer-reviewed literature relative to a subgroup's particular focus. In this document, the authors provide descriptions of the literature reviewed, the review process, and a summary of the information gathered on immunocytochemistry. The intent of this publication is to help educate practitioners and pathologists on the process of immunocytochemistry and to provide a guide for the use of this technique in veterinary medicine. This document represents the opinions of the working group and the authors and does not constitute a formal endorsement by the American College of Veterinary Pathologists or the Veterinary Cancer Society.

  11. "Green Oncology": the Italian medical oncologists' challenge to reduce the ecological impact of their clinical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretti, Sergio; Porcile, Gianfranco; Romizi, Roberto; Palazzo, Salvatore; Oliani, Cristina; Crispino, Sergio; Labianca, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    For decades Western medicine has followed a biomedical model based on linear thinking and an individualized, disease-oriented doctor-patient relationship. Today this framework must be replaced by a biopsychosocial model based on complexity theory and a person-oriented medical team-patient relationship, taking into account the psychological and social determinants of health and disease. However, the new model is already proving no longer adequate or appropriate, and current events are urging us to develop an ecological model in which the medical team takes into account both individual illness and population health as a whole, since we are all part of the biosphere. In recent years, the rising costs of cancer treatment have raised a serious issue of economic sustainability. As the population of our planet, we now need to rapidly address this issue, and everyone of us must try to reduce their ecological footprint, measured as CO2 production. Medical oncologists need to reduce the ecological footprint of their professional activity by lowering the consumption of economic resources and avoiding environmental damage as much as possible. This new paradigm is endorsed by the Italian College of Hospital Medical Oncology Directors (CIPOMO). A working group of this organization has drafted the "Green Oncology Position Paper": a proposal of Italian medical oncology (in accordance with international guidelines) that oncologists, while aiming for the same end results, make a commitment toward the more appropriate management of health care and the careful use of resources in order to protect the environment and the ecosphere during the daily exercise of their professional activities.

  12. Maternal Dietary Patterns During Early Pregnancy and the Odds of Childhood Germ Cell Tumors: A Children's Oncology Group Study

    OpenAIRE

    Musselman, Jessica R.B.; Anne M Jurek; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Linabery, Amy M.; Robison, Leslie L.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Ross, Julie A

    2010-01-01

    Maternal diet during pregnancy may be associated with cancer in offspring. Intake of individual foods, as well as dietary patterns, can be used when examining these relations. Here, the authors examined associations between maternal dietary intake patterns and pediatric germ cell tumors (GCTs) using principal components analysis and logistic regression. Mothers of 222 GCT cases aged less than 15 years who were diagnosed at a Children's Oncology Group institution between 1993 and 2001 and thos...

  13. Bioluminescent imaging: a critical tool in pre-clinical oncology research.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, Karen

    2010-02-01

    Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) is a non-invasive imaging modality widely used in the field of pre-clinical oncology research. Imaging of small animal tumour models using BLI involves the generation of light by luciferase-expressing cells in the animal following administration of substrate. This light may be imaged using an external detector. The technique allows a variety of tumour-associated properties to be visualized dynamically in living models. The increasing use of BLI as a small-animal imaging modality has led to advances in the development of xenogeneic, orthotopic, and genetically engineered animal models expressing luciferase genes. This review aims to provide insight into the principles of BLI and its applications in cancer research. Many studies to assess tumour growth and development, as well as efficacy of candidate therapeutics, have been performed using BLI. More recently, advances have also been made using bioluminescent imaging in studies of protein-protein interactions, genetic screening, cell-cycle regulators, and spontaneous cancer development. Such novel studies highlight the versatility and potential of bioluminescent imaging in future oncological research.

  14. Psychosocial Issues in Pediatric Oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Marcus, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Psychosocial oncology, a relatively new discipline, is a multidisciplinary application of the behavioral and social sciences, and pediatric psychosocial oncology is an emerging subspecialty within the domain of psychosocial oncology. This review presents a brief overview of some of the major clinical issues surrounding pediatric psychosocial oncology.

  15. Reliability and accuracy assessment of radiation therapy oncology group-endorsed guidelines for brachial plexus contouring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velde, Joris van de [Ghent University, Department of Anatomy, Ghent (Belgium); Ghent University, Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent (Belgium); Vercauteren, Tom; Gersem, Werner de; Vandecasteele, Katrien; Vuye, Philippe; Vanpachtenbeke, Frank; Neve, Wilfried de [Ghent University, Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent (Belgium); Wouters, Johan; Herde, Katharina d' ; Kerckaert, Ingrid; Hoof, Tom van [Ghent University, Department of Anatomy, Ghent (Belgium)

    2014-07-15

    The goal of this work was to validate the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)-endorsed guidelines for brachial plexus (BP) contouring by determining the intra- and interobserver agreement. Accuracy of the delineation process was determined using anatomically validated imaging datasets as a gold standard. Five observers delineated the right BP on three cadaver computed tomography (CT) datasets. To assess intraobserver variation, every observer repeated each delineation three times with a time interval of 2 weeks. The BP contours were divided into four regions for detailed analysis. Inter- and intraobserver variation was verified using the Computerized Environment for Radiation Research (CERR) software. Accuracy was measured using anatomically validated fused CT-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets by measuring the BP inclusion of the delineations. The overall kappa (κ) values were rather low (mean interobserver overall κ: 0.29, mean intraobserver overall κ: 0.45), indicating poor inter- and intraobserver reliability. In general, the κ coefficient decreased gradually from the medial to lateral BP regions. The total agreement volume (TAV) was much smaller than the union volume (UV) for all delineations, resulting in a low Jaccard index (JI; interobserver agreement 0-0.124; intraobserver agreement 0.004-0.636). The overall accuracy was poor, with an average total BP inclusion of 38 %. Inclusions were insufficient for the most lateral regions (region 3: 21.5 %; region 4: 12.6 %). The inter- and intraobserver reliability of the RTOG-endorsed BP contouring guidelines was poor. BP inclusion worsened from the medial to lateral regions. Accuracy assessment of the contours showed an average BP inclusion of 38 %. For the first time, this was assessed using the original anatomically validated BP volume. The RTOG-endorsed BP guidelines have insufficient accuracy and reliability, especially for the lateral head-and-neck regions. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Studie war

  16. Late Effects Surveillance Recommendations among Survivors of Childhood Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: A Children's Oncology Group Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Eric J; Anderson, Lynnette; Baker, K Scott; Bhatia, Smita; Guilcher, Gregory M T; Huang, Jennifer T; Pelletier, Wendy; Perkins, Joanna L; Rivard, Linda S; Schechter, Tal; Shah, Ami J; Wilson, Karla D; Wong, Kenneth; Grewal, Satkiran S; Armenian, Saro H; Meacham, Lillian R; Mulrooney, Daniel A; Castellino, Sharon M

    2016-05-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is an important curative treatment for children with high-risk hematologic malignancies, solid tumors, and, increasingly, nonmalignant diseases. Given improvements in care, there are a growing number of long-term survivors of pediatric HCT. Compared with childhood cancer survivors who did not undergo transplantation, HCT survivors have a substantially increased burden of serious chronic conditions and impairments involving virtually every organ system and overall quality of life. This likely reflects the joint contributions of pretransplantation treatment exposures and organ dysfunction, the transplantation conditioning regimen, and any post-transplantation graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). In response, the Children's Oncology Group (COG) has created long-term follow-up guidelines (www.survivorshipguidelines.org) for survivors of childhood, adolescent, and young adult cancer, including those who were treated with HCT. Guideline task forces, consisting of HCT specialists, other pediatric oncologists, radiation oncologists, organ-specific subspecialists, nurses, social workers, other health care professionals, and patient advocates systematically reviewed the literature with regards to late effects after childhood cancer and HCT since 2002, with the most recent review completed in 2013. For the most recent review cycle, over 800 articles from the medical literature relevant to childhood cancer and HCT survivorship were reviewed, including 586 original research articles. Provided herein is an organ system-based overview that emphasizes the most relevant COG recommendations (with accompanying evidence grade) for the long-term follow-up care of childhood HCT survivors (regardless of current age) based on a rigorous review of the available evidence. These recommendations cover both autologous and allogeneic HCT survivors, those who underwent transplantation for nonmalignant diseases, and those with a history of chronic GVHD.

  17. Radiation Therapy Planning for Early-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma: Experience of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maraldo, Maja V., E-mail: dra.maraldo@gmail.com [Departments of Clinical Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Dabaja, Bouthaina S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Texas (United States); Filippi, Andrea R. [Department of Oncology, University of Torino School of Medicine, Torino (Italy); Illidge, Tim [Department of Oncology, Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Tsang, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ricardi, Umberto [Department of Oncology, University of Torino School of Medicine, Torino (Italy); Petersen, Peter M.; Schut, Deborah A. [Departments of Clinical Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Garcia, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Texas (United States); Headley, Jayne [Department of Oncology, Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Parent, Amy; Guibord, Benoit [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ragona, Riccardo [Department of Oncology, University of Torino School of Medicine, Torino (Italy); Specht, Lena [Departments of Clinical Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a rare disease, and the location of lymphoma varies considerably between patients. Here, we evaluate the variability of radiation therapy (RT) plans among 5 International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) centers with regard to beam arrangements, planning parameters, and estimated doses to the critical organs at risk (OARs). Methods: Ten patients with stage I-II classic HL with masses of different sizes and locations were selected. On the basis of the clinical information, 5 ILROG centers were asked to create RT plans to a prescribed dose of 30.6 Gy. A postchemotherapy computed tomography scan with precontoured clinical target volume (CTV) and OARs was provided for each patient. The treatment technique and planning methods were chosen according to each center's best practice in 2013. Results: Seven patients had mediastinal disease, 2 had axillary disease, and 1 had disease in the neck only. The median age at diagnosis was 34 years (range, 21-74 years), and 5 patients were male. Of the resulting 50 treatment plans, 15 were planned with volumetric modulated arc therapy (1-4 arcs), 16 with intensity modulated RT (3-9 fields), and 19 with 3-dimensional conformal RT (2-4 fields). The variations in CTV-to-planning target volume margins (5-15 mm), maximum tolerated dose (31.4-40 Gy), and plan conformity (conformity index 0-3.6) were significant. However, estimated doses to OARs were comparable between centers for each patient. Conclusions: RT planning for HL is challenging because of the heterogeneity in size and location of disease and, additionally, to the variation in choice of treatment techniques and field arrangements. Adopting ILROG guidelines and implementing universal dose objectives could further standardize treatment techniques and contribute to lowering the dose to the surrounding OARs.

  18. The Danish Neuro-Oncology Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steinbjørn

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Neuro-Oncology Registry (DNOR) was established by the Danish Neuro-Oncology Group as a national clinical database. It was established for the purpose of supporting research and development in adult patients with primary brain tumors in Denmark. STUDY POPULATION: DNOR has...... advantage of reporting indicators is the related multidisciplinary discussions giving a better understanding of what actually is going on, thereby facilitating the work on adjusting the national guidelines in the Danish Neuro-Oncology Group. CONCLUSION: The establishment of DNOR has optimized the quality...

  19. Young patients', parents', and survivors' communication preferences in paediatric oncology: using online focus groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaanswijk, M.; Tates, K.; Dulmen, S. van; Hoogerbrugge, M.; Kamps, W.A.; Bensing, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guidelines in paediatric oncology encourage health care providers to share relevant information with young patients and parents to enable their active participation in decision making. It is not clear to what extent this mirrors patients' and parents' preferences. This study investigated

  20. The roots of modern oncology: from discovery of new antitumor anthracyclines to their clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassinelli, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    In May 1960, the Farmitalia CEO Dr. Bertini and the director of the Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori of Milan Prof. Bucalossi (talent scout and city's Mayor) signed a research agreement for the discovery and development up to clinical trials of new natural antitumor agents. This agreement can be considered as a pioneering and fruitful example of a translational discovery program with relevant transatlantic connections. Owing to an eclectic Streptomyces, found near Castel del Monte (Apulia), and to the skilled and motivated participants of both institutions, a new natural antitumor drug, daunomycin, was ready for clinical trials within 3 years. Patent interference by the Farmitalia French partner was overcome by the good quality of the Italian drug and by the cooperation between Prof. Di Marco, director of the Istituto Ricerche Farmitalia Research Laboratories for Microbiology and Chemotherapy, and Prof. Karnofsky, head of the Sloan-Kettering Cancer Institute of New York, leading to the first transatlantic clinical trials. The search for daunomycin's sister anthracyclines led to the discovery and development of adriamycin, one of the best drugs born in Milan. This was the second act prologue of the history of Italian antitumor discovery and clinical oncology, which started in July 1969 when Prof. Di Marco sent Prof. Bonadonna the first vials of adriamycin (doxorubicin) to be tested in clinical trials. This article reviews the Milan scene in the 1960s, a city admired and noted for the outstanding scientific achievements of its private and public institutions in drugs and industrial product discovery.

  1. Electronic nicotine delivery systems: a policy statement from the American Association for Cancer Research and the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Thomas H; Goniewicz, Maciej L; Hanna, Nasser H; Hatsukami, Dorothy K; Herbst, Roy S; Hobin, Jennifer A; Ostroff, Jamie S; Shields, Peter G; Toll, Benjamin A; Tyne, Courtney A; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Warren, Graham W

    2015-03-10

    Combustible tobacco use remains the number-one preventable cause of disease, disability, and death in the United States. Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), which include electronic cigarettes, are devices capable of delivering nicotine in an aerosolized form. ENDS use by both adults and youth has increased rapidly, and some have advocated these products could serve as harm-reduction devices and smoking cessation aids. ENDS may be beneficial if they reduce smoking rates or prevent or reduce the known adverse health effects of smoking. However, ENDS may also be harmful, particularly to youth, if they increase the likelihood that nonsmokers or former smokers will use combustible tobacco products or if they discourage smokers from quitting. The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) recognize the potential ENDS have to alter patterns of tobacco use and affect the health of the public; however, definitive data are lacking. The AACR and ASCO recommend additional research on these devices, including assessing the health impacts of ENDS, understanding patterns of ENDS use, and determining what role ENDS have in cessation. Key policy recommendations include supporting federal, state, and local regulation of ENDS; requiring manufacturers to register with the US Food and Drug Administration and report all product ingredients, requiring childproof caps on ENDS liquids, and including warning labels on products and their advertisements; prohibiting youth-oriented marketing and sales; prohibiting child-friendly ENDS flavors; and prohibiting ENDS use in places where cigarette smoking is prohibited. This policy statement was developed by a joint writing group composed of members from the Tobacco and Cancer Subcommittee of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Science Policy and Government Affairs (SPGA) Committee and American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Tobacco Cessation and Control

  2. Improving the Evidence Base for Treating Older Adults With Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurria, Arti; Levit, Laura A; Dale, William; Mohile, Supriya G; Muss, Hyman B; Fehrenbacher, Louis; Magnuson, Allison; Lichtman, Stuart M; Bruinooge, Suanna S; Soto-Perez-de-Celis, Enrique; Tew, William P; Postow, Michael A; Cohen, Harvey J

    2015-11-10

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) convened a subcommittee to develop recommendations on improving the evidence base for treating older adults with cancer in response to a critical need identified by the Institute of Medicine. Older adults experience the majority of cancer diagnoses and deaths and make up the majority of cancer survivors. Older adults are also the fastest growing segment of the US population. However, the evidence base for treating this population is sparse, because older adults are underrepresented in clinical trials, and trials designed specifically for older adults are rare. The result is that clinicians have less evidence on how to treat older adults, who represent the majority of patients with cancer. Clinicians and patients are forced to extrapolate from trials conducted in younger, healthier populations when developing treatment plans. This has created a dearth of knowledge regarding the risk of toxicity in the average older patient and about key end points of importance to older adults. ASCO makes five recommendations to improve evidence generation in this population: (1) Use clinical trials to improve the evidence base for treating older adults with cancer, (2) leverage research designs and infrastructure for generating evidence on older adults with cancer, (3) increase US Food and Drug Administration authority to incentivize and require research involving older adults with cancer, (4) increase clinicians' recruitment of older adults with cancer to clinical trials, and (5) use journal policies to improve researchers' reporting on the age distribution and health risk profiles of research participants.

  3. A comparison of calorie and protein intake in hospitalized pediatric oncology patients dining with a caregiver versus patients dining alone: a randomized, prospective clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ruth; Hinds, Pamela S; Ke, Weiming; Hu, X Joan

    2004-01-01

    Hospitalization and cancer therapy can contribute to decreased food intake in children and adolescents with cancer, making it a challenge to meet their nutritional needs. The affect of hospitalization and the eating environment for pediatric oncology patients has not been studied very well, and the effect of altering the social aspect of mealtime for hospitalized pediatric oncology patients has not been studied at all. The authors conducted a randomized, prospective clinical trial to determine if hospitalized pediatric oncology patients consume more protein and calories when eating with a family member or when eating alone in their room at mealtime. All food and beverage intake was recorded for 3 consecutive days, and a food service satisfaction survey was completed on Day 3. Food records were analyzed for calorie and protein intake, and surveys were analyzed for patient/parent satisfaction. The study was completed by 200 hospitalized patients and their parent/caregiver. Overall, neither calorie nor protein intake differed significantly between the two groups, but patient/parent satisfaction was significantly higher in the group of patients who dined with their caregiver. By using analysis of variance, the authors found that ideal body weight and years of sickness were significantly associated with calorie and protein intake.

  4. Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urology Association combined clinical management guidelines for testicular germ cell tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Alotaibi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an update to the previously published Saudi guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of patients diagnosed with testicular germ cell tumors. It is categorized according to the stage of the disease using the tumor-node-metastasis staging system 7th edition. The guidelines are presented with supporting evidence level, they are based on comprehensive literature review, several internationally recognized guidelines, and the collective expertise of the guidelines committee members (authors who were selected by the Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urological Association. Considerations to the local availability of drugs, technology and expertise have been regarded. These guidelines should serve as a roadmap for the urologists, oncologists, general physicians, support groups, and health care policy makers in the management of patients diagnosed with testicular germ cell tumors.

  5. Nanotechnology in radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Andrew Z; Tepper, Joel E

    2014-09-10

    Nanotechnology, the manipulation of matter on atomic and molecular scales, is a relatively new branch of science. It has already made a significant impact on clinical medicine, especially in oncology. Nanomaterial has several characteristics that are ideal for oncology applications, including preferential accumulation in tumors, low distribution in normal tissues, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and clearance, that differ from those of small molecules. Because these properties are also well suited for applications in radiation oncology, nanomaterials have been used in many different areas of radiation oncology for imaging and treatment planning, as well as for radiosensitization to improve the therapeutic ratio. In this article, we review the unique properties of nanomaterials that are favorable for oncology applications and examine the various applications of nanotechnology in radiation oncology. We also discuss the future directions of nanotechnology within the context of radiation oncology.

  6. A phase II study of amifostine in children with myelodysplastic syndrome: a report from the Children's Oncology Group study (AAML0121).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Prasad; Gerbing, Robert; Alonzo, Todd A; Wallas, Tanya; Gong, Jerald Z; Jasty, Rama; Jorstad, Dean T; Raimondi, Susana C; Chavez, Cathy M; Eisenberg, Nancy L; Hirsch, Betsy; Gamis, Alan; Smith, Franklin O; Arceci, Robert J

    2011-12-15

    Based on its potential role in adult myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), the Children's Oncology Group (COG) embarked on a phase II study using amifostine in pediatric MDS (WHO 2001 criteria) patients. Responses were evaluated after two cycles. Ten patients were enrolled; five were deemed ineligible, and four withdrew after the first course. Only one patient completed two courses, and was found to be in complete remission. The study was closed after being open for 2 years due to slow accrual. Studying a rare disease like MDS may pose insurmountable obstacles even in a large clinical trials group such as COG, in part because of the changing definitions of MDS and the rarity of adult type MDS in children. The role of amifostine in pediatric MDS was not known at the time of study.

  7. Outbreak of Pantoea agglomerans Bloodstream Infections at an Oncology Clinic-Illinois, 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yablon, Brian R; Dantes, Raymund; Tsai, Victoria; Lim, Rachel; Moulton-Meissner, Heather; Arduino, Matthew; Jensen, Bette; Patel, Megan Toth; Vernon, Michael O; Grant-Greene, Yoran; Christiansen, Demian; Conover, Craig; Kallen, Alexander; Guh, Alice Y

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the source of a healthcare-associated outbreak of Pantoea agglomerans bloodstream infections. DESIGN Epidemiologic investigation of the outbreak. SETTING Oncology clinic (clinic A). METHODS Cases were defined as Pantoea isolation from blood or catheter tip cultures of clinic A patients during July 2012-May 2013. Clinic A medical charts and laboratory records were reviewed; infection prevention practices and the facility's water system were evaluated. Environmental samples were collected for culture. Clinical and environmental P. agglomerans isolates were compared using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. RESULTS Twelve cases were identified; median (range) age was 65 (41-78) years. All patients had malignant tumors and had received infusions at clinic A. Deficiencies in parenteral medication preparation and handling were identified (eg, placing infusates near sinks with potential for splash-back contamination). Facility inspection revealed substantial dead-end water piping and inadequate chlorine residual in tap water from multiple sinks, including the pharmacy clean room sink. P. agglomerans was isolated from composite surface swabs of 7 sinks and an ice machine; the pharmacy clean room sink isolate was indistinguishable by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis from 7 of 9 available patient isolates. CONCLUSIONS Exposure of locally prepared infusates to a contaminated pharmacy sink caused the outbreak. Improvements in parenteral medication preparation, including moving chemotherapy preparation offsite, along with terminal sink cleaning and water system remediation ended the outbreak. Greater awareness of recommended medication preparation and handling practices as well as further efforts to better define the contribution of contaminated sinks and plumbing deficiencies to healthcare-associated infections are needed. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:314-319.

  8. Professional practice assessment. Pertinence of positron emission tomography clinical indications in oncology; Evaluation des pratiques professionnelles. Pertinence des indications de la tomographie a emission de positons en cancerologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Stanc, E.; Tainturier, C. [Hopital Foch, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 92 - Suresnes (France); Swaenepoel, J. [Hopital Foch, Cellule Qualite, 92 - Suresnes (France)

    2009-09-15

    Introduction As part of the health care quality and safety policy in France, Professional Practice Assessment (P.P.A.) are mandatory in the health services 'certification' process. We present our study regarding the pertinence of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) indications in oncology. Materials and methods A multidisciplinary task group used the Quick Audit method with two rounds of 100 request forms each. The assessment list of criteria comprised four items of decreasing relevance grading the PET scans clinical indications, which were derived from the three French published guidelines (S.O.R. [F.N.C.L.C.C]., 'Guide du bon usage des examens d'imagerie medicale' [S.F.R.-S.F.M.N.], 'Guide pour la redaction de protocoles pour la TEP au F.D.G. en cancerologie' [S.F.M.N.]) and five additional items: clinical information, patient's body weight, previous treatments dates, diabetes, claustrophobia. Results The first round showed that 68% of the requested scans corresponded to the two most relevant groups of indications (S.O.R. Standards and Options). The request forms were correctly filled in regarding the clinical information, but this was not the case for the other items we tested. Several actions were conducted: dedicated PET request form, availability of the S.O.R. on the hospital intranet, boost of the referring physicians awareness during the multidisciplinary oncology meetings (Reunions de Concertation Pluridisciplinaires RCP). The second round showed a better pertinence of the PET scans indications (75% versus 68%); the patient's body weight was more frequently mentioned on the request form. Discussion This study is an example of P.P.A. in our discipline. It led to an improvement of the oncologic PET scans clinical indications in our hospital. This work is pursued in everyday discussion with the referring clinicians, especially during the RCP. (authors)

  9. Hepato-biliary late effects in survivors of childhood and adolescent cancer: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellino, Sharon; Muir, Andrew; Shah, Ami; Shope, Sheila; McMullen, Kevin; Ruble, Kathy; Barber, Ashley; Davidoff, Andrew; Hudson, Melissa M

    2010-05-01

    Curative therapy for childhood and adolescent cancer translates to 1 in 640 young adults being a survivor of cancer. Although acute hepato-biliary toxicity occurs commonly during pediatric cancer therapy, the impact of antineoplastic therapy on long-term liver health in childhood/adolescent cancer survivors is unknown. This article reviews the medical literature on late liver dysfunction following treatment for childhood/adolescent cancer. We also outline the Children's Oncology Group (COG) guidelines for screening and follow-up of hepato-biliary sequelae. As the population of survivors grow and age, vigilance for risks to hepatic health needs to continue based on specific exposures during curative cancer therapy.

  10. Inside the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary Cancers Symposium: part 2 - prostate and bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buti, Sebastiano; Ciccarese, Chiara; Iacovelli, Roberto; Bersanelli, Melissa; Scarpelli, Marina; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Massari, Francesco

    2016-09-01

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, Moscone West Building, San Francisco, CA, USA, 7-9 January 2016 The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, held in San Francisco (CA, USA), from 7 to 9 January 2016, focused on 'patient-centric care: translating research to results'. Every year, this meeting is a must for anyone studying genitourinary tumors to keep abreast of the most recent innovations in this field, exchange views on behaviors customarily adopted in daily clinical practice and discuss future topics of scientific research. This two-part report highlights the key themes presented at the 2016 ASCO Genitourinary Cancers Symposium, with part 1 reporting the main novelties of kidney cancer and part 2 discussing the most relevant issues which have emerged for bladder and prostate tumors.

  11. Immunodynamics: a cancer immunotherapy trials network review of immune monitoring in immuno-oncology clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohrt, Holbrook E; Tumeh, Paul C; Benson, Don; Bhardwaj, Nina; Brody, Joshua; Formenti, Silvia; Fox, Bernard A; Galon, Jerome; June, Carl H; Kalos, Michael; Kirsch, Ilan; Kleen, Thomas; Kroemer, Guido; Lanier, Lewis; Levy, Ron; Lyerly, H Kim; Maecker, Holden; Marabelle, Aurelien; Melenhorst, Jos; Miller, Jeffrey; Melero, Ignacio; Odunsi, Kunle; Palucka, Karolina; Peoples, George; Ribas, Antoni; Robins, Harlan; Robinson, William; Serafini, Tito; Sondel, Paul; Vivier, Eric; Weber, Jeff; Wolchok, Jedd; Zitvogel, Laurence; Disis, Mary L; Cheever, Martin A

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of PD-1/PD-L1 targeted therapies in addition to anti-CTLA-4 solidifies immunotherapy as a modality to add to the anticancer arsenal. Despite raising the bar of clinical efficacy, immunologically targeted agents raise new challenges to conventional drug development paradigms by highlighting the limited relevance of assessing standard pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD). Specifically, systemic and intratumoral immune effects have not consistently correlated with standard relationships between systemic dose, toxicity, and efficacy for cytotoxic therapies. Hence, PK and PD paradigms remain inadequate to guide the selection of doses and schedules, both starting and recommended Phase 2 for immunotherapies. The promise of harnessing the immune response against cancer must also be considered in light of unique and potentially serious toxicities. Refining immune endpoints to better inform clinical trial design represents a high priority challenge. The Cancer Immunotherapy Trials Network investigators review the immunodynamic effects of specific classes of immunotherapeutic agents to focus immune assessment modalities and sites, both systemic and importantly intratumoral, which are critical to the success of the rapidly growing field of immuno-oncology.

  12. Cancer stem cells in basic science and in translational oncology: can we translate into clinical application?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulenburg, Axel; Blatt, Katharina; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Sadovnik, Irina; Herrmann, Harald; Marian, Brigitte; Grunt, Thomas W; Zielinski, Christoph C; Valent, Peter

    2015-02-25

    Since their description and identification in leukemias and solid tumors, cancer stem cells (CSC) have been the subject of intensive research in translational oncology. Indeed, recent advances have led to the identification of CSC markers, CSC targets, and the preclinical and clinical evaluation of the CSC-eradicating (curative) potential of various drugs. However, although diverse CSC markers and targets have been identified, several questions remain, such as the origin and evolution of CSC, mechanisms underlying resistance of CSC against various targeted drugs, and the biochemical basis and function of stroma cell-CSC interactions in the so-called 'stem cell niche.' Additional aspects that have to be taken into account when considering CSC elimination as primary treatment-goal are the genomic plasticity and extensive subclone formation of CSC. Notably, various cell fractions with different combinations of molecular aberrations and varying proliferative potential may display CSC function in a given neoplasm, and the related molecular complexity of the genome in CSC subsets is considered to contribute essentially to disease evolution and acquired drug resistance. In the current article, we discuss new developments in the field of CSC research and whether these new concepts can be exploited in clinical practice in the future.

  13. Physician recruitment of patients to non-therapeutic oncology clinical trials: ethics revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee eBlack

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Tailoring medical treatment to individual patients requires a strong foundation in research to provide the data necessary to understand the relationship between the disease, the patient, and the type of treatment advocated for. Non-therapeutic oncology clinical trials studying therapeutic resistance require the participation of patients, yet only a small percentage enroll. Treating physicians are often relied on to recruit patients, but they have a number of ethical obligations that might be perceived as barriers to recruiting. Concepts such as voluntariness of consent and conflicts of interest can have an impact on whether physicians will discuss clinical trials with their patients and how patients perceive the information. However, these ethical obligations should not be prohibitive to physician recruitment of patients—precautions can be taken to ensure that patients’ consent to research participation is fully voluntary and devoid of conflict, such as the use of other members of the research team than the treating physician to discuss the trial and obtain consent, and better communication between researchers, clinicians and patients. These can ensure that research benefits are maximized for the good of patients and society.

  14. Do Case Rates Affect Physicians' Clinical Practice in Radiation Oncology?: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loy, Bryan A; Shkedy, Clive I; Powell, Adam C; Happe, Laura E; Royalty, Julie A; Miao, Michael T; Smith, Gary L; Long, James W; Gupta, Amit K

    2016-01-01

    Case rate payments combined with utilization monitoring may have the potential to improve the quality of care by reducing over and under-treatment. Thus, a national managed care organization introduced case rate payments at one multi-site radiation oncology provider while maintaining only fee-for-service payments at others. This study examined whether the introduction of the payment method had an effect on radiation fractions administered when compared to clinical guidelines. The number of fractions of radiation therapy delivered to patients with bone metastases, breast, lung, prostate, and skin cancer was assessed for concordance with clinical guidelines. The proportion of guideline-based care ascertained from the payer's claims database was compared before (2011) and after (2013) the payment method introduction using relative risks (RR). After the introduction of case rates, there were no significant changes in guideline-based care in breast, lung, and skin cancer; however, patients with bone metastases and prostate cancer were significantly more likely to have received guideline-based care (RR = 2.0 and 1.1, respectively, pcase rate payments, while the over-treatment rate remained steady at 9%, with no significant change (p = 0.20). These findings suggest that the introduction of case rate payments did not adversely affect the rate of guideline-based care at the provider examined. Additional research is needed to isolate the effect of the payment model and assess implications in other populations.

  15. Monitoring of the Environment at the Transplant Unit—Hemato-Oncology Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoušková, Ivanka; Holy, Ondřej

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Aim of this study was to monitor the environment at the Transplant Unit—Hemato-Oncology Clinic, University Hospital Olomouc (Olomouc, Czech Republic) and identify risks for the patients. Methods and Results: Microorganisms were cultivated under standard aerobic conditions. Strains were biochemically identified using the BD Phoenix™ PID Panel (USA). Legionella pneumophila was identified by DNA sequencing. From the air, the most frequently isolated strains were coagulase-negative staphylococci (94.3%), Micrococcus spp. and Bacillus spp. No Gram-negative strains were isolated from the air. From the surfaces, the most frequently isolated Gram-positive strains were coagulase-negative staphylococci (67.4%), Bacillus spp., enterococci (5.5%), Staphylococcus aureus (2.3%) and Micrococcus spp. (1.7%). From the surfaces, the most frequently isolated Gram-negative strains were from genera Pseudomonas (28%), Enterobacter (28%), E. coli (6%), and Klebsiella spp. (5%). From the personnel, the most frequently isolated Gram-positive strains were coagulase-negative staphylococci (59.6%), Bacillus spp. (24.1%) and Staphylococcus aureus (9.8%). From the personnel, the most frequently isolated Gram-negative strains were Enterobacter spp. (61%), Klebsiella oxytoca (18%), and E. coli (11%). Microscopic filamentous fungi were isolated in 13 cases (2.71%). Isolated strains were Aspergillus spp. (4), Trichoderma spp. (2), Penicillium spp. (2), one case of the strains Paecilomyces spp., Eurotium spp., Monilia spp. Conclusions: The study found no significant deviations in the microbial contamination of the cleanroom air. The personnel entrance of the Transplant Unit represent a high risk area, an extreme value (7270 CFU/m3) was recorded. Regime measures are fully effective, no other deficiencies were found. Significance and Impact of the Study: This epidemiological study, which was held for the duration of one year at the Transplant Unit—Hemato-Oncology Clinic, University

  16. Monitoring of the Environment at the Transplant Unit—Hemato-Oncology Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanka Matoušková

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Aim of this study was to monitor the environment at the Transplant Unit—Hemato-Oncology Clinic, University Hospital Olomouc (Olomouc, Czech Republic and identify risks for the patients. Methods and Results: Microorganisms were cultivated under standard aerobic conditions. Strains were biochemically identified using the BD Phoenix™ PID Panel (USA. Legionella pneumophila was identified by DNA sequencing. From the air, the most frequently isolated strains were coagulase-negative staphylococci (94.3%, Micrococcus spp. and Bacillus spp. No Gram-negative strains were isolated from the air. From the surfaces, the most frequently isolated Gram-positive strains were coagulase-negative staphylococci (67.4%, Bacillus spp., enterococci (5.5%, Staphylococcus aureus (2.3% and Micrococcus spp. (1.7%. From the surfaces, the most frequently isolated Gram-negative strains were from genera Pseudomonas (28%, Enterobacter (28%, E. coli (6%, and Klebsiella spp. (5%. From the personnel, the most frequently isolated Gram-positive strains were coagulase-negative staphylococci (59.6%, Bacillus spp. (24.1% and Staphylococcus aureus (9.8%. From the personnel, the most frequently isolated Gram-negative strains were Enterobacter spp. (61%, Klebsiella oxytoca (18%, and E. coli (11%. Microscopic filamentous fungi were isolated in 13 cases (2.71%. Isolated strains were Aspergillus spp. (4, Trichoderma spp. (2, Penicillium spp. (2, one case of the strains Paecilomyces spp., Eurotium spp., Monilia spp. Conclusions: The study found no significant deviations in the microbial contamination of the cleanroom air. The personnel entrance of the Transplant Unit represent a high risk area, an extreme value (7270 CFU/m3 was recorded. Regime measures are fully effective, no other deficiencies were found. Significance and Impact of the Study: This epidemiological study, which was held for the duration of one year at the Transplant Unit—Hemato-Oncology Clinic, University Hospital

  17. A review of Raman spectroscopy advances with an emphasis on clinical translation challenges in oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jermyn, Michael; Desroches, Joannie; Aubertin, Kelly; St-Arnaud, Karl; Madore, Wendy-Julie; De Montigny, Etienne; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Trudel, Dominique; Wilson, Brian C.; Petrecca, Kevin; Leblond, Frederic

    2016-12-01

    There is an urgent need for improved techniques for disease detection. Optical spectroscopy and imaging technologies have potential for non- or minimally-invasive use in a wide range of clinical applications. The focus here, in vivo Raman spectroscopy (RS), measures inelastic light scattering based on interaction with the vibrational and rotational modes of common molecular bonds in cells and tissue. The Raman ‘signature’ can be used to assess physiological status and can also be altered by disease. This information can supplement existing diagnostic (e.g. radiological imaging) techniques for disease screening and diagnosis, in interventional guidance for identifying disease margins, and in monitoring treatment responses. Using fiberoptic-based light delivery and collection, RS is most easily performed on accessible tissue surfaces, either on the skin, in hollow organs or intra-operatively. The strength of RS lies in the high biochemical information content of the spectra, that characteristically show an array of very narrow peaks associated with specific chemical bonds. This results in high sensitivity and specificity, for example to distinguish malignant or premalignant from normal tissues. A critical issue is that the Raman signal is often very weak, limiting clinical use to point-by-point measurements. However, non-linear techniques using pulsed-laser sources have been developed to enable in vivo Raman imaging. Changes in Raman spectra with disease are often subtle and spectrally distributed, requiring full spectral scanning, together with the use of tissue classification algorithms that must be trained on large numbers of independent measurements. Recent advances in instrumentation and spectral analysis have substantially improved the clinical feasibility of RS, so that it is now being investigated with increased success in a wide range of cancer types and locations, as well as for non-oncological conditions. This review covers recent advances and

  18. Modern Radiation Therapy for Nodal Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma—Target Definition and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illidge, Tim; Specht, Lena; Yahalom, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is the most effective single modality for local control of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and is an important component of therapy for many patients. Many of the historic concepts of dose and volume have recently been challenged by the advent of modern imaging and RT planning...... tools. The International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) has developed these guidelines after multinational meetings and analysis of available evidence. The guidelines represent an agreed consensus view of the ILROG steering committee on the use of RT in NHL in the modern era. The roles...... techniques that targeted nodal regions have now been replaced by limiting the RT to smaller volumes based solely on detectable nodal involvement at presentation. A new concept, involved-site RT, defines the clinical target volume. For indolent NHL, often treated with RT alone, larger fields should...

  19. Application of organ tolerance dose-constraints in clinical studies in radiation oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerr, Wolfgang [Medical University/AKH Vienna, Dept. of Radiation Oncology/Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria); Technical University Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); Task Group ' ' Tolerance Doses' ' of the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO), Berlin (Germany); Herrmann, Thomas [Task Group ' ' Tolerance Doses' ' of the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO), Berlin (Germany); Baumann, Michael [Technical University Dresden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, OncoRay-National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); Task Group ' ' Tolerance Doses' ' of the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO), Berlin (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    In modern radiation oncology, tolerance dose-constraints for organs at risk (OAR) must be considered for treatment planning, but particularly in order to design clinical studies. Tolerance dose tables, however, only address one aspect of the therapeutic ratio of any clinical study, i.e., the limitation of adverse events, but not the desired potential improvement in the tumor effect of a novel treatment strategy. A sensible application of ''tolerance doses'' in a clinical situation requires consideration of various critical aspects addressed here: definition of tolerance dose, specification of an endpoint/symptom, consideration of radiation quality and irradiation protocol, exposed volume and dose distribution, and patient-related factors of radiosensitivity. The currently most comprehensive estimates of OAR radiation tolerance are in the QUANTEC compilations (2010). However, these tolerance dose values must only be regarded as a rough orientation and cannot answer the relevant question for the patients, i.e., if the study can achieve a therapeutic advantage; this can obviously be answered only by the final scientific analysis of the study results. Despite all limitations, the design of clinical studies should currently refer to the QUANTEC values for appreciation of the risk of complications, if needed supplemented by one's own data or further information from the literature. The implementation of a consensus on the safety interests of the patients and on an application and approval process committed to progress in medicine, with transparent quality-assuring requirements with regard to the structural safeguarding of the study activities, plays a central role in clinical research in radiation oncology. (orig.) [German] In der modernen Radioonkologie muessen Toleranzdosisgrenzen fuer die Risikoorgane (''organs at risk'', OAR) zur Behandlungsplanung, besonders aber zur Gestaltung klinischer Studien, herangezogen werden

  20. The usage of three-dimensional nanostructurized biomaterials in experimental and clinical oncology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ The usage of biotransplants for substitution of tissue defects (in particular in reconstructive surgery in oncology) require both he suitable cell cultures and different biomaterials with definite and regulate properties.

  1. The usage of three-dimensional nanostructurized biomaterials in experimental and clinical oncology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sergeeva; N.; S.; Reshetov; I.; V.; Sviridova; I.; K.; Kirsanova; V.; A.; Achmedova; S.; A.; Barinov; S.; M.; Komlev; V.; S.; Samoylovich; M.; I.; Belyanin; A.; F.; Kleshcheva; S.; M.; Elinson; V.; M.

    2005-01-01

    The usage of biotransplants for substitution of tissue defects (in particular in reconstructive surgery in oncology) require both he suitable cell cultures and different biomaterials with definite and regulate properties.……

  2. Modern Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Specht, Lena, E-mail: lena.specht@regionh.dk [Department of Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Yahalom, Joachim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Illidge, Tim [Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Berthelsen, Anne Kiil [Department of Radiation Oncology and PET Centre, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Constine, Louis S. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Pediatrics, James P. Wilmot Cancer Center, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Eich, Hans Theodor [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Münster (Germany); Girinsky, Theodore [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France); Hoppe, Richard T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Mauch, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mikhaeel, N. George [Department of Clinical Oncology and Radiotherapy, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Ng, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-07-15

    use of ISRT has not yet been validated in a formal study, it is more conservative than INRT, accounting for suboptimal information and appropriately designed for safe local disease control. The goal of modern smaller field radiation therapy is to reduce both treatment volume and treatment dose while maintaining efficacy and minimizing acute and late sequelae. This review is a consensus of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) Steering Committee regarding the modern approach to RT in the treatment of HL, outlining a new concept of ISRT in which reduced treatment volumes are planned for the effective control of involved sites of HL. Nodal and extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) are covered separately by ILROG guidelines.

  3. Coping style and performance status in a group of oncological inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Chau Pérez-Aranibar

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The associations between coping styles, measured by COPE Test, dispositional version (Carver,Scheier and Weintraub, 1989, and Health Status inferred through a performance status, measured by Karnofsky's Index of Behavioral Performance are examined. The study focuses upon 28 oncological in patients. Positive moderate Pearson's correlations were found between these two variables in this correlational-descriptive study. These were interpreted in the following sense: the larger use of the style, the less health status among the scales suppression of competent activities, procrastination of coping, instrumental social support, focusing and releasing of emotions and behavioral disengagement. The active coping scale presented a negative correlationwith regard to Performance Status as a health measure.

  4. Bioinformatics for precision medicine in oncology: principles and application to the SHIVA clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servant, Nicolas; Roméjon, Julien; Gestraud, Pierre; La Rosa, Philippe; Lucotte, Georges; Lair, Séverine; Bernard, Virginie; Zeitouni, Bruno; Coffin, Fanny; Jules-Clément, Gérôme; Yvon, Florent; Lermine, Alban; Poullet, Patrick; Liva, Stéphane; Pook, Stuart; Popova, Tatiana; Barette, Camille; Prud'homme, François; Dick, Jean-Gabriel; Kamal, Maud; Le Tourneau, Christophe; Barillot, Emmanuel; Hupé, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Precision medicine (PM) requires the delivery of individually adapted medical care based on the genetic characteristics of each patient and his/her tumor. The last decade witnessed the development of high-throughput technologies such as microarrays and next-generation sequencing which paved the way to PM in the field of oncology. While the cost of these technologies decreases, we are facing an exponential increase in the amount of data produced. Our ability to use this information in daily practice relies strongly on the availability of an efficient bioinformatics system that assists in the translation of knowledge from the bench towards molecular targeting and diagnosis. Clinical trials and routine diagnoses constitute different approaches, both requiring a strong bioinformatics environment capable of (i) warranting the integration and the traceability of data, (ii) ensuring the correct processing and analyses of genomic data, and (iii) applying well-defined and reproducible procedures for workflow management and decision-making. To address the issues, a seamless information system was developed at Institut Curie which facilitates the data integration and tracks in real-time the processing of individual samples. Moreover, computational pipelines were developed to identify reliably genomic alterations and mutations from the molecular profiles of each patient. After a rigorous quality control, a meaningful report is delivered to the clinicians and biologists for the therapeutic decision. The complete bioinformatics environment and the key points of its implementation are presented in the context of the SHIVA clinical trial, a multicentric randomized phase II trial comparing targeted therapy based on tumor molecular profiling versus conventional therapy in patients with refractory cancer. The numerous challenges faced in practice during the setting up and the conduct of this trial are discussed as an illustration of PM application.

  5. Do Case Rates Affect Physicians' Clinical Practice in Radiation Oncology?: An Observational Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan A Loy

    Full Text Available Case rate payments combined with utilization monitoring may have the potential to improve the quality of care by reducing over and under-treatment. Thus, a national managed care organization introduced case rate payments at one multi-site radiation oncology provider while maintaining only fee-for-service payments at others. This study examined whether the introduction of the payment method had an effect on radiation fractions administered when compared to clinical guidelines. The number of fractions of radiation therapy delivered to patients with bone metastases, breast, lung, prostate, and skin cancer was assessed for concordance with clinical guidelines. The proportion of guideline-based care ascertained from the payer's claims database was compared before (2011 and after (2013 the payment method introduction using relative risks (RR. After the introduction of case rates, there were no significant changes in guideline-based care in breast, lung, and skin cancer; however, patients with bone metastases and prostate cancer were significantly more likely to have received guideline-based care (RR = 2.0 and 1.1, respectively, p<0.05. For the aggregate of all cancers, the under-treatment rate significantly declined (p = 0.008 from 4% to 0% after the introduction of case rate payments, while the over-treatment rate remained steady at 9%, with no significant change (p = 0.20. These findings suggest that the introduction of case rate payments did not adversely affect the rate of guideline-based care at the provider examined. Additional research is needed to isolate the effect of the payment model and assess implications in other populations.

  6. American Society of Clinical Oncology Obesity Initiative: Rationale, Progress, and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligibel, Jennifer A; Wollins, Dana

    2016-12-10

    Obesity is increasingly being linked to the risk of developing and dying from cancer. In recognition of the growing contribution of obesity to cancer risk and outcomes, ASCO made obesity and cancer one of its core initiatives in 2014. The goals of this initiative included raising awareness of the relationship between obesity and cancer, providing tools and resources to oncology providers and patients to help encourage conversations regarding weight management in cancer survivors, fostering a robust research agenda, and advocating for access to evidence-based weight management programs for cancer survivors. Efforts to date have included developing patient and provider toolkits focused on weight management and physical activity, publishing a policy statement outlining ASCO's initiatives in this area, and hosting a summit focused on obesity research in cancer populations. As ASCO has defined its priorities in the area of obesity and cancer, it has become increasingly clear that obesity is a problem that extends far beyond its impact on cancer risk and outcomes. Many groups, including those focused on heart disease, diabetes, and endocrinology, have been developing, testing, and implementing obesity prevention and treatment strategies for years. As ASCO moves forward with its obesity initiative, the next steps will focus on forging collaboration with groups working on obesity-related initiatives both within and outside of the field of cancer to learn from their efforts and to partner with them on efforts to increase the education of medical professionals; raising awareness in lay populations regarding the negative health consequences of obesity and effective strategies to foster weight loss; developing collaborative research initiatives; and working together to advocate for the societal changes that will be needed to combat the obesity epidemic in the United States and beyond.

  7. The role of Internet resources in clinical oncology: promises and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Bradford W; Greenberg, Alexandra J; Rutten, Lila J Finney

    2016-12-01

    The Internet is a valuable tool that continues to revolutionize many aspects of our lives; however, the ability to disseminate diverse data across populations and nations presents both opportunities and challenges. Online resources are increasingly used in health care, providing wider access to information for patients, researchers, and clinicians. At the turn of the millennium, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) predicted that Internet-based technologies would create a revolution in communication for oncology professionals and patients with cancer. Herein, findings from the NCI's Health Information National Trends Survey are reviewed to give insight into how Internet trends related to oncology patients are evolving. Future trends are discussed, including examples of 'connected health' in oncology; the spread of mobile and ubiquitous access points to Internet-hosted information; the diffusion of devices, sensors, and apps; the spread of personal data sharing; and an evolution in how networks can support person-centred and family-centred care.

  8. Pediatric Oncology Clinic Care Model: Achieving Better Continuity of Care for Patients in a Medium-sized Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Donna L; Halton, Jacqueline; Bassal, Mylène; Klaassen, Robert J; Mandel, Karen; Ramphal, Raveena; Simpson, Ewurabena; Peckan, Li

    2016-10-25

    Providing the best care in both the inpatient and outpatient settings to pediatric oncology patients is all programs goal. Using continuous improvement methodologies, we changed from a solely team-based physician care model to a hybrid model. All patients were assigned a dedicated oncologist. There would then be 2 types of weeks of outpatient clinical service. A "Doc of the Day" week where each oncologist would have a specific day in clinic when their assigned patients would be scheduled, and then a "Doc of the Week" week where one physician would cover clinic for the week. Patient satisfaction surveys done before and 14 months after changing the model of care showed that patients were very satisfied with the care they received in both models. A questionnaire to staff 14 months after changing showed that the biggest effect was increased continuity of care, followed by more efficient clinic workflow and increased consistency of care. Staff felt it provided better planning and delivery of care. A hybrid model of care with a primary physician for each patient and assigned clinic days, alternating with weeks of single physician coverage is a feasible model of care for a medium-sized pediatric oncology program.

  9. Impact of cancer support groups on childhood cancer treatment and abandonment in a private pediatric oncology centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arathi Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To analyze the impact of two cancer support groups in the treatment and abandonment of childhood cancer. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective review of children with cancer funded and non-funded who were treated at Kanchi Kamakoti CHILDS Trust Hospital from 2010 to 2013. A total of 100 patients were funded, 57 by Ray of Light Foundation and 43 by Pediatric Lymphoma Project and 70 non-funded. Results: The total current survival of 80%, including those who have completed treatment and those currently undergoing treatment, is comparable in both the groups. Abandonment of treatment after initiating therapy was not seen in the financially supported group whereas abandonment of treatment after initiation was seen in one child in the non-funded group. Conclusions: Besides intensive treatment with good supportive care, financial support also has an important impact on compliance and abandonment in all socioeconomic strata of society. Financial support from private cancer support groups also has its impact beyond the patient and family, in reducing the burden on government institutions by non-governmental funding in private sector. Improvement in the delivery of pediatric oncology care in developing countries could be done by financial support from the private sector.

  10. Quality Research in Radiation Oncology Analysis of Clinical Performance Measures in the Management of Gastric Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, Karyn A., E-mail: goodmank@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Khalid, Najma [Quality Research in Radiation Oncology, American College of Radiology Clinical Research Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Minsky, Bruce D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD, Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Crozier, Cheryl; Owen, Jean B. [Quality Research in Radiation Oncology, American College of Radiology Clinical Research Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Devlin, Phillip M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Knight Cancer Institute at the Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States)

    2013-02-01

    -based planning with use of DVH to evaluate normal tissue doses. Most patients completed adjuvant RT in the prescribed time frame. IMRT and IGRT were not routinely incorporated into clinical practice during the 2005-2007 period. These data will be a benchmark for future Quality Research in Radiation Oncology GC surveys.

  11. Canine digital tumors: a veterinary cooperative oncology group retrospective study of 64 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Carolyn J; Brewer, William G; Whitley, Elizabeth M; Tyler, Jeff W; Ogilvie, Gregory K; Norris, Alan; Fox, Leslie E; Morrison, Wallace B; Hammer, Alan; Vail, David M; Berg, John

    2005-01-01

    We compared clinical characteristics and outcomes for dogs with various digital tumors. Medical records and histology specimens of affected dogs from 9 veterinary institutions were reviewed. Risk factors examined included age, weight, sex, tumor site (hindlimb or forelimb), local tumor (T) stage, metastases, tumor type, and treatment modality. The Kaplan-Meier product limit method was used to determine the effect of postulated risk factors on local disease-free interval (LDFI), metastasis-free interval (MFI), and survival time (ST). Outcomes were thought to differ significantly between groups when P dogs were included. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) accounted for 33 (51.6%) of the tumors. Three dogs presented with or developed multiple digital SCC. Other diagnoses included malignant melanoma (MM) (n = 10; 15.6%), osteosarcoma (OSA) (n = 4; 6.3%), hemangiopericytoma (n = 3; 4.7%), benign soft tissue tumors (n = 5; 7.8%), and malignant soft tissue tumors (n = 9; 14%). Fourteen dogs with malignancies had black hair coats, including 5 of the 10 dogs with MM. Surgery was the most common treatment and, regardless of the procedure, had a positive impact on survival. None of the patient variables assessed, including age, sex, tumor type, site, and stage, had a significant impact on ST. Both LDFI and MFI were negatively affected by higher T stage, but not by type of malignancy. Although metastasis at diagnosis correlated with a shorter LDFI, it did not have a significant impact on ST. On the basis of these findings, early surgical intervention is advised for the treatment of dogs with digital tumors, regardless of tumor type or the presence of metastatic disease.

  12. Ethical issues at the interface of clinical care and research practice in pediatric oncology: a narrative review of parents' and physicians' experiences

    OpenAIRE

    de Vries Martine C; Houtlosser Mirjam; Wit Jan M; Engberts Dirk P; Bresters Dorine; Kaspers Gertjan JL; van Leeuwen Evert

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Pediatric oncology has a strong research culture. Most pediatric oncologists are investigators, involved in clinical care as well as research. As a result, a remarkable proportion of children with cancer enrolls in a trial during treatment. This paper discusses the ethical consequences of the unprecedented integration of research and care in pediatric oncology from the perspective of parents and physicians. Methodology An empirical ethical approach, combining (1) a narrati...

  13. Salivary gland carcinoma : Independent prognostic factors for locoregional control, distant metastases, and overall survival: Results of the Dutch Head and Neck Oncology Cooperative Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terhaard, CHJ; Lubsen, H; Van der Tweel, [No Value; Hilgers, FJM; Eijkenboom, WMH; Marres, HAM; Tjho-Heslinga, RE; de Jong, JMA; Roodenburg, JLN

    2004-01-01

    Background. We analyzed the records of patients with malignant salivary gland tumors, as diagnosed in centers of the Dutch Head and Neck Oncology Cooperative Group, in search of independent prognostic factors for locoregional control, distant metastases, and overall survival. Methods. In 565 patient

  14. Psycho-oncology: Searching for practical wisdom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butlin, Helen

    2015-10-01

    The debate is vigorous in psycho-oncology about whether spiritual, existential, and psychosocial are the most comprehensive terms for academic research discourses investigating meaning and purpose. A call-to-action email from the International Society of Psycho-Oncology included the term soul. The current essay highlights the historical and contemporary uses of "soul" to suggest that the re-emergent soul signifies a tacit quest for an "intangible" that seems missing in current constructs of clinical domains reflected in the vigor of the debates. It is suggested that the re-emergence of the pre-Medieval meaning(s) of the notion of soul affirms a growing need for integrative paradigms on "being human" to guide psycho-oncology practitioners and their research. As a paradigmatic example, a clinical support group entitled Soul Medicine is described as employing the term soul to open up the more marginal discourses about experiences of illness arising from philosophical reflection, arts, humanities, and spirituality within a clinical oncology context. A link between soul and wisdom is suggested for further exploration with the view that phronesis ("the virtue of practical wisdom"), an emerging concept in health professional education research, is of ultimate value to the people psycho-oncology seeks to serve. This group holds that garnering wisdom from the expertise of those living with cancer should be a central aim of our field.

  15. Report on the 10th International Conference of the Asian Clinical Oncology Society (ACOS 2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeul Hong; Yang, Han-Kwang; Kim, Tae Won; Lee, Jung Shin; Seong, Jinsil; Lee, Woo Yong; Ahn, Yong Chan; Lim, Ho Yeong; Won, Jong-Ho; Park, Kyong Hwa; Cho, Kyung Sam

    2013-04-01

    The 10th International Conference of the Asian Clinical Oncology Society (ACOS 2012) in conjunction with the 38th Annual Meeting of the Korean Cancer Association, was held on June 13 to 15 (3 days) 2012 at COEX Convention and Exhibition Center in Seoul, Korea. ACOS has a 20-year history starting from the first conference in Osaka, Japan, which was chaired by Prof. Tetsuo Taguchi and the ACOS conferences have since been conducted in Asian countries every 2 years. Under the theme of "Work Together to Make a Difference for Cancer Therapy in Asia", the 10th ACOS was prepared to discuss various subjects through a high-quality academic program, exhibition, and social events. The ACOS 2012 Committee was composed of the ACOS Organizing Committee, Honorary Advisors, Local Advisors, and ACOS 2012 Organizing Committee. The comprehensive academic program had a total of 92 sessions (3 Plenary Lectures, 1 Award Lectures, 1 Memorial Lectures, 9 Special Lectures, 15 Symposia, 1 Debate & Summary Sessions, 1 Case Conferences, 19 Educational Lectures, 1 Research & Development Session, 18 Satellite Symposia, 9 Meet the Professors, 14 Oral Presentations) and a total 292 presentations were delivered throughout the entire program. Amongst Free Papers, 462 research papers (110 oral presentations and 352 poster presentations) were selected to be presented. This conference was the largest of all ACOS conferences in its scale with around 1,500 participants from 30 countries. Furthermore, despite strict new financial policies and requirements governing fundraising alongside global economic stagnation, a total of 14 companies participated as sponsors and an additional 35 companies purchased 76 exhibition booths. Lastly, the conference social events provided attendees with a variety of opportunities to experience and enjoy Korea's rich culture and traditions during the Opening Ceremony, Welcome Reception, Invitee Dinner, Banquet, and Closing Ceremony. Overall, ACOS 2012 reinforced and promoted

  16. Combination goserelin and tamoxifen therapy in premenopausal advanced breast cancer: a multicentre study by the ITMO group. Italian Trials in Medical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzoni, R.; Biganzoli, L.; Bajetta, E.; Celio, L.; Fornasiero, A.; Mariani, L.; Zilembo, N.; Di Bartolomeo, M.; Di Leo, A.; Arcangeli, G.

    1995-01-01

    It has been suggested that tamoxifen may improve the efficacy of medical castration with luteinising hormone-releasing hormone analogues, but very few data have so far been published concerning the clinical and endocrinological activity of this therapeutic modality. In this phase II multicentre trial conducted by the Italian Trials in Medical Oncology group (ITMO), 64 premenopausal patients with hormone receptor-positive or unknown breast cancer were treated with monthly s.c. injections of goserelin 3.6 mg, in association with a tamoxifen daily dose of 20 mg, as first-line therapy for their advanced disease. All of the patients were evaluable for efficacy and there was an overall response rate of 41% (95% confidence interval 28-52%), with 7 of the 26 responders achieving complete remission. The median time to response was 4 months (range 2-17), and the median response duration was 13 months (range 6-37 +). Better responses were observed in soft tissues (51%); the response in visceral and bone metastases was respectively 19% and 37%. Serum concentrations of gonadotrophins and oestradiol were significantly decreased by the treatment, oestrogen levels being constantly suppressed to within the range observed in post-menopausal women. No significant change was detected in serum testosterone levels. In our experience, although it was not associated with any increased clinical efficacy, the concurrent use of goserelin and tamoxifen proved to be a feasible approach in the management of premenopausal advanced breast cancer. PMID:7734310

  17. Control Group Design, Contamination and Drop-Out in Exercise Oncology Trials : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschop, Charlotte N. Steins; Courneya, Kerry S.; Velthuis, Miranda J.; Monninkhof, Evelyn M.; Jones, Lee W.; Friedenreich, Christine; van der Wall, Elsken; Peeters, Petra H. M.; May, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Important considerations for exercise trials in cancer patients are contamination and differential drop-out among the control group members that might jeopardize the internal validity. This systematic review provides an overview of different control groups design characteristics of exercise-

  18. Local Control With Reduced-Dose Radiotherapy for Low-Risk Rhabdomyosarcoma: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group D9602 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breneman, John, E-mail: john.breneman@uchealth.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Cincinnati and Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Meza, Jane [Department of Biostatistics, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Public Health, Omaha, NE (United States); Donaldson, Sarah S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Raney, R. Beverly [Children' s Cancer Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Children' s Ambulatory Blood and Cancer Center, Dell Children' s Medical Center of Central Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Wolden, Suzanne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Michalski, Jeff [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Laurie, Fran [Quality Assurance Review Center, Lincoln, RI (United States); Rodeberg, David A. [Department of Surgery, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Meyer, William [Section of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Walterhouse, David [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children' s Memorial Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Hawkins, Douglas S. [Department of Pediatrics, Seattle Children' s Hospital, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of reduced-dose radiotherapy on local control in children with low-risk rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) treated in the Children's Oncology Group D9602 study. Methods and Materials: Patients with low-risk RMS were nonrandomly assigned to receive radiotherapy doses dependent on the completeness of surgical resection of the primary tumor (clinical group) and the presence of involved regional lymph nodes. After resection, most patients with microscopic residual and uninvolved nodes received 36 Gy, those with involved nodes received 41.4 to 50.4 Gy, and those with orbital primary tumors received 45 Gy. All patients received vincristine and dactinomycin, with cyclophosphamide added for patient subsets with a higher risk of relapse in Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group III and IV studies. Results: Three hundred forty-two patients were eligible for analysis; 172 received radiotherapy as part of their treatment. The cumulative incidence of local/regional failure was 15% in patients with microscopic involved margins when cyclophosphamide was not part of the treatment regimen and 0% when cyclophosphamide was included. The cumulative incidence of local/regional failure was 14% in patients with orbital tumors. Protocol-specified omission of radiotherapy in girls with Group IIA vaginal tumors (n = 5) resulted in three failures for this group. Conclusions: In comparison with Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group III and IV results, reduced-dose radiotherapy does not compromise local control for patients with microscopic tumor after surgical resection or with orbital primary tumors when cyclophosphamide is added to the treatment program. Girls with unresected nonbladder genitourinary tumors require radiotherapy for postsurgical residual tumor for optimal local control to be achieved.

  19. Factors influencing patients seeking oral health care in the oncology dental support clinic at an urban university dental school setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Dale M; Walker, Mary P; Liu, Ying; Mitchell, Tanya Villalpando

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify predictors and/or factors associated with medically compromised patients seeking dental care in the oncology dental support clinic (ODSC) at the University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC) School of Dentistry. An 18-item survey was mailed to 2,541 patients who were new patients to the clinic from 2006 to 2011. The response rate was approximately 18% (n = 450). Analyses included descriptive statistics of percentages/frequencies as well as predictors based on correlations. Fifty percent of participants, 100 females and 119 males, identified their primary medical diagnosis as cancer. Total household income (p dental care (p dental health. Perceived overall health (p < .001) also had a significant association with cancer status and the need for organ transplants. This study provided the ODSC at UMKC and other specialty clinics with vital information that can contribute to future planning efforts.

  20. Identifying oncological emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guddati, Achuta K; Kumar, Nilay; Segon, Ankur; Joy, Parijat S; Marak, Creticus P; Kumar, Gagan

    2013-01-01

    Prompt identification and treatment of life-threatening oncological conditions is of utmost importance and should always be included in the differential diagnosis. Oncological emergencies can have a myriad of presentations ranging from mechanical obstruction due to tumor growth to metabolic conditions due to abnormal secretions from the tumor. Notably, hematologic and infectious conditions may complicate the presentation of oncological emergencies. Advanced testing and imaging is generally required to recognize these serious presentations of common malignancies. Early diagnosis and treatment of these conditions can significantly affect the patient's clinical outcome.

  1. Drug interactions between antineoplastic and antidepressant agents: analysis of patients seen at an oncology clinic at a general hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila de Araújo Reinert

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the prevalence of depressive symptoms among oncology patients and identify simultaneous use of antineoplastic and antidepressant agents.Methods: This was a cross-sectional study that interviewed 56 oncology patients using two data collection instruments: a questionnaire covering clinical and sociodemographic data and the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II, for assessment of depressive symptoms. For data analysis, descriptive statistics were used to determine the prevalence of depressive symptoms and the chi-square test was used to evaluate associations between sociodemographic and clinical variables and depressive symptoms.Results: A 26.7% (15 patients prevalence of depression was detected. Just eight of these 15 patients (53.3% were receiving treatment for depression. In the sample as a whole, 13 of the patients interviewed (23.2% were taking antidepressants and 11 of these 13 patients (19.6% were taking antidepressive and antineoplastic agents simultaneously. A total of five (8.9% of the sample contraindicated drug interactions were detected.Conclusions:Depressive symptoms are more prevalent among cancer patients than in the general population, but they are generally under-diagnosed and under-treated. Simultaneous use of antidepressant and antineoplastic agents is common and so, in order to reduce the number of harmful adverse effects, possible drug interactions must be identified before antidepressants are prescribed to cancer patients.

  2. Cancer Stem Cell Hypothesis for Therapeutic Innovation in Clinical Oncology? Taking the Root Out, Not Chopping the Leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzobo, Kevin; Senthebane, Dimakatso Alice; Rowe, Arielle; Thomford, Nicholas Ekow; Mwapagha, Lamech M; Al-Awwad, Nasir; Dandara, Collet; Parker, M Iqbal

    2016-12-01

    Clinical oncology is in need of therapeutic innovation. New hypotheses and concepts for translation of basic research to novel diagnostics and therapeutics are called for. In this context, the cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis rests on the premise that tumors comprise tumor cells and a subset of tumor-initiating cells, CSCs, in a quiescent state characterized by slow cell cycling and expression of specific stem cell surface markers with the capability to maintain a tumor in vivo. The CSCs have unlimited self-renewal abilities and propagate tumors through division into asymmetric daughter cells. This differentiation is induced by both genetic and environmental factors. Another characteristic of CSCs is their therapeutic resistance, which is due to their quiescent state and slow dividing. Notably, the CSC phenotype differs greatly between patients and different cancer types. The CSCs may differ genetically and phenotypically and may include primary CSCs and metastatic stem cells circulating within the blood system. Targeting CSCs will require the knowledge of distinct stem cells within the tumor. CSCs can differentiate into nontumorigenic cells and this has been touted as the source of heterogeneity observed in many solid tumors. The latter cannot be fully explained by epigenetic regulation or by the clonal evolution theory. This heterogeneity markedly influences how tumors respond to therapy and prognosis. The present expert review offers an analysis and synthesis of the latest research and concepts on CSCs, with a view to truly disruptive innovation for future diagnostics and therapeutics in clinical oncology.

  3. Reconsidering Physical Activity Restrictions for Mononephric Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Maki; Hockenberry, Marilyn J; Koh, Chester J; Meeske, Kathleen A; Rangan, Kasey E; Rodgers, Cheryl; Rosenthal, Yael; Ruccione, Kathleen S; Freyer, David R

    2016-07-01

    Although traditional recommendations for mononephric childhood cancer survivors are to avoid contact sports in order to protect the remaining kidney, review of available evidence suggests that the majority of renal loss is caused by accidents not involving sports. An interdisciplinary team performed a review of the English literature published from 1999 to 2012 within the PubMed, Cochrane, Google Scholar, and National Guidelines Clearinghouse databases. The level of evidence and proposed recommendations were graded according to an established rubric and GRADE criteria. Our review found that kidney loss is most commonly caused by nonsports activities such as motor vehicle accidents and falls, implying that restrictions on sports-related activity in mononephric pediatric survivors are not well supported. This favors encouraging ordinary sports and related activities without restriction in mononephric childhood cancer survivors because the known benefits of exercise outweigh the exceedingly low risk of renal loss. Accordingly, activity recommendations for mononephric patients have been revised in the most current version of the Children's Oncology Group Long-term Follow-Up Guidelines for Survivors of Childhood, Adolescent and Young Adult Cancers. This has important implications for this and similar populations who may now undertake individual and organized sports without undue regard for their mononephric status.

  4. Modern Radiation Therapy for Nodal Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma—Target Definition and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illidge, Tim, E-mail: Tim.Illidge@ics.manchester.ac.uk [Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, The Christie National Health Service Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Specht, Lena [Department of Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Yahalom, Joachim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Aleman, Berthe [Department of Radiotherapy, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Berthelsen, Anne Kiil [Department of Radiation Oncology and PET Centre, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Constine, Louis [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Pediatrics, James P. Wilmot Cancer Center, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Dabaja, Bouthaina [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dharmarajan, Kavita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ng, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ricardi, Umberto [Radiation Oncology Unit, Department of Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Wirth, Andrew [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, St. Andrews Place, East Melbourne (Australia)

    2014-05-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is the most effective single modality for local control of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and is an important component of therapy for many patients. Many of the historic concepts of dose and volume have recently been challenged by the advent of modern imaging and RT planning tools. The International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) has developed these guidelines after multinational meetings and analysis of available evidence. The guidelines represent an agreed consensus view of the ILROG steering committee on the use of RT in NHL in the modern era. The roles of reduced volume and reduced doses are addressed, integrating modern imaging with 3-dimensional planning and advanced techniques of RT delivery. In the modern era, in which combined-modality treatment with systemic therapy is appropriate, the previously applied extended-field and involved-field RT techniques that targeted nodal regions have now been replaced by limiting the RT to smaller volumes based solely on detectable nodal involvement at presentation. A new concept, involved-site RT, defines the clinical target volume. For indolent NHL, often treated with RT alone, larger fields should be considered. Newer treatment techniques, including intensity modulated RT, breath holding, image guided RT, and 4-dimensional imaging, should be implemented, and their use is expected to decrease significantly the risk for normal tissue damage while still achieving the primary goal of local tumor control.

  5. Erwinia asparaginase achieves therapeutic activity after pegaspargase allergy: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, Wanda L; Asselin, Barbara; Supko, Jeffrey G; Devidas, Meenakshi; Kaiser, Nicole A; Plourde, Paul; Winick, Naomi J; Reaman, Gregory H; Raetz, Elizabeth; Carroll, William L; Hunger, Stephen P

    2013-07-25

    AALL07P2 evaluated whether substitution of Erwinia asparaginase 25000 IU/m(2) for 6 doses given intramuscularly Monday/Wednesday/Friday (M/W/F) to children and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and clinical allergy to pegaspargase would provide a 48-hour nadir serum asparaginase activity (NSAA) ≥ 0.10 IU/mL. AALL07P2 enrolled 55 eligible/evaluable patients. NSAA ≥ 0.1 IU/mL was achieved in 38 of 41 patients (92.7%) with acceptable samples 48 hours and in 38 of 43 patients (88.4%) 72 hours after dosing during course 1. Among samples obtained during all courses, 95.8% (252 of 263) of 48-hour samples and 84.5% (125 of 148) of 72-hour samples had NSAA ≥ 0.10-IU/mL. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated by fitting the serum asparaginase activity-time course for all 6 doses given during course 1 to a 1-compartment open model with first order absorption. Erwinia asparaginase administered with this schedule achieved therapeutic NSAA at both 48 and 72 hours and was well tolerated with no reports of hemorrhage, thrombosis, or death, and few cases of grade 2 to 3 allergic reaction (n = 6), grade 1 to 3 hyperglycemia (n = 6), or grade 1 pancreatitis (n = 1). Following allergy to pegaspargase, Erwinia asparaginase 25000 IU/m(2) × 6 intramuscularly M/W/F can be substituted for a single dose of pegaspargase.

  6. Recommendations for the use of long-term central venous catheter (CVC) in children with hemato-oncological disorders: management of CVC-related occlusion and CVC-related thrombosis. On behalf of the coagulation defects working group and the supportive therapy working group of the Italian Association of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology (AIEOP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Paola; Saracco, Paola; Grassi, Massimo; Luciani, Matteo; Banov, Laura; Carraro, Francesca; Crocoli, Alessandro; Cesaro, Simone; Zanazzo, Giulio Andrea; Molinari, Angelo Claudio

    2015-11-01

    Central venous catheters (CVC), used for the management of children with hemato-oncological disorders, are burdened by a significant incidence of mechanical, infective, or thrombotic complications. These complications favor an increasing risk in prolongation of hospitalization, extra costs of care, and sometimes severe life-threatening events. No guidelines for the management of CVC-related occlusion and CVC-related thrombosis are available for children. To this aim, members of the coagulation defects working group and the supportive therapy working group of the Italian Association of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology (AIEOP) reviewed the pediatric and adult literature to propose the first recommendations for the management of CVC-related occlusion and CVC-related thrombosis in children with hemato-oncological disorders.

  7. Long-term results in the treatment of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia: a Pediatric Oncology Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krischer, J P; Steuber, C P; Vietti, T J; Culbert, S J; Ragab, A H; Morgan, S K; Berry, D H; Hvizdala, E; Thomas, P J; Land, V J

    1989-01-01

    Complete remission (CR), 5-year remission duration (RD), and overall 5-year survival rates are 74%, 28% and 25%, respectively, for previously untreated children with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia diagnosed between 1977 and 1981, following induction therapy with vincristine, doxorubicin and prednisone (VAP), consolidation therapy with 6-thioguanine, cytosine arabinoside (TA) and cyclophosphamide/vincristine/cytosine arabinoside/prednisone (COAP), and maintenance therapy of alternating TA and COAP with or without VAP pulses. Approximately 20% are free of their disease for more than 5 years. High white blood cell counts (WBC) at diagnosis and M3 and M6 morphology were associated with lower CR rates, while M5 morphology was associated with higher CR rates. Patients with M1 morphology had shorter remission duration as compared to those with M4 or M5 morphology. Low WBC and age between 2 and 10 years at diagnosis were associated with longer remission durations and survival. Patients with M4 morphology also survived longer. The observed CR rates are comparable to other studies initiated at the same time as this study but survival is less than those reported more recently. Low WBC at diagnosis and M4/M5 morphology may identify relatively favorable prognostic groups.

  8. A Research Agenda for Radiation Oncology: Results of the Radiation Oncology Institute's Comprehensive Research Needs Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagsi, Reshma, E-mail: rjagsi@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bekelman, Justin E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Brawley, Otis W. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Emory University, and American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland, OR (United States); Lawton, Colleen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hahn, Stephen M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To promote the rational use of scarce research funding, scholars have developed methods for the systematic identification and prioritization of health research needs. The Radiation Oncology Institute commissioned an independent, comprehensive assessment of research needs for the advancement of radiation oncology care. Methods and Materials: The research needs assessment used a mixed-method, qualitative and quantitative social scientific approach, including structured interviews with diverse stakeholders, focus groups, surveys of American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) members, and a prioritization exercise using a modified Delphi technique. Results: Six co-equal priorities were identified: (1) Identify and develop communication strategies to help patients and others better understand radiation therapy; (2) Establish a set of quality indicators for major radiation oncology procedures and evaluate their use in radiation oncology delivery; (3) Identify best practices for the management of radiation toxicity and issues in cancer survivorship; (4) Conduct comparative effectiveness studies related to radiation therapy that consider clinical benefit, toxicity (including quality of life), and other outcomes; (5) Assess the value of radiation therapy; and (6) Develop a radiation oncology registry. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this prioritization exercise is the only comprehensive and methodologically rigorous assessment of research needs in the field of radiation oncology. Broad dissemination of these findings is critical to maximally leverage the impact of this work, particularly because grant funding decisions are often made by committees on which highly specialized disciplines such as radiation oncology are not well represented.

  9. Tumor thrombus of inferior vena cava in patients with renal cell carcinoma – clinical and oncological outcome of 50 patients after surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kocot Arkadius

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate oncological and clinical outcome in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC and tumor thrombus involving inferior vena cava (IVC treated with nephrectomy and thrombectomy. Methods We identified 50 patients with a median age of 65 years, who underwent radical surgical treatment for RCC and tumor thrombus of the IVC between 1997 and 2010. The charts were reviewed for pathological and surgical parameters, as well as complications and oncological outcome. Results The median follow-up was 26 months. In 21 patients (42% distant metastases were already present at the time of surgery. All patients underwent radical nephrectomy, thrombectomy and lymph node dissection through a flank (15 patients/30%, thoracoabdominal (14 patients/28% or midline abdominal approach (21 patients/42%, depending upon surgeon preference and upon the characteristics of tumor and associated thrombus. Extracorporal circulation with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB was performed in 10 patients (20% with supradiaphragmal thrombus of IVC. Cancer-specific survival for the whole cohort at 5 years was 33.1%. Survival for the patients without distant metastasis at 5 years was 50.7%, whereas survival rate in the metastatic group at 5 years was 7.4%. Median survival of patients with metastatic disease was 16.4 months. On multivariate analysis lymph node invasion, distant metastasis and grading were independent prognostic factors. There was no statistically significant influence of level of the tumor thrombus on survival rate. Indeed, patients with supradiaphragmal tumor thrombus (n = 10 even had a better outcome (overall survival at 5 years of 58.33% than the entire cohort. Conclusions An aggressive surgical approach is the most effective therapeutic option in patients with RCC and any level of tumor thrombus and offers a reasonable longterm survival. Due to good clinical and oncological outcome we prefer the use of CPB with extracorporal

  10. The role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy of triple-negative breast cancer in St. Petersburg City Clinical Oncological Dispensary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Manikhas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Triple-negative breast cancer (BC is very aggressive form of breast malignancies with high levels of dissemination, frequent ecurrence and poor survival rate, as compared to other breast cancer subtypes.Aim of the study – development and introduction of optimized treatment strategy of patients with triple-negative breast cancer into the clinical practice of City Clinical Oncological Dispensary.Materials and methods. The study included 201 patients (21–90 years, mean age 52 years who were treated in the first departmentof St. Petersburg City Clinical Oncological Dispensary from 2005 to 2011. Stage IА–IIIC invasive breast cancer with triple-negative phenotype according to immunohistochemical study of the tumor material was verified in all the patients before beginning of the treatment. Standard chemotherapy by FAC, CMF and taxane-containing regimen was used as neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The degree of therapeutic pathomorphism was evaluated according to Miller-Payne (2003 classification, which was designed taking into account an overall survival rate of patients, depending on the degree of pathologic tumor regression. Results. We performed evaluation of 3-year relapse-free survival, depending on the degree of pathomorphological regression and histological degree of malignancy. There is a clear dependence of the 3-year relapse-free survival on the degree of histological differentiation of the tumor. We noted an inverse correlation between high degree of histological malignancy with a short relapse-free period. The disease progressed in patients who have a high degree of histological malignancy.Conclusion. The highest efficiency was achieved in patients receiving chemotherapy with the addition of taxanes. It is advantageous to include taxane-containing chemotherapy regimens in the treatment of patients with a high degree of histological malignancy.

  11. Assessing clinical competency: reports from discussion groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnwald, Grant; Stone, Elizabeth; Bristol, David; Fuentealba, Carmen; Hardie, Lizette; Hellyer, Peter; Jaeger, Laurie; Kerwin, Sharon; Kochevar, Deborah; Lissemore, Kerry; Olsen, Christopher; Rogers, Kenita; Sabin, Beth; Swanson, Cliff; Warner, Angeline

    2008-01-01

    This report describes proposed new models for assessment of eight of the nine clinical competencies the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education requires for accreditation. The models were developed by discussion groups at the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges' Clinical Competency Symposium. Clinical competencies and proposed models (in parentheses) are described. Competency 1: comprehensive patient diagnosis (neurologic examination on a dog, clinical reasoning skills); Competency 2: comprehensive treatment planning (concept mapping, computerized case studies); Competency 3: anesthesia, pain management (student portfolio); Competency 4: surgery skills (objective structured clinical examination, cased-based examination, "super dog" model); Competency 5: medicine skills (clinical reasoning and case management, skills checklist); Competency 6: emergency and intensive care case management (computerized case study or scenario); Competency 7: health promotion, disease prevention/biosecurity (360 degrees evaluation, case-based computer simulation); Competency 8: client communications and ethical conduct (Web-based evaluation forms, client survey, communicating with stakeholders, telephone conversation, written scenario-based cases). The report also describes faculty recognition for participating in clinical competency assessments.

  12. Male reproductive health after childhood, adolescent, and young adult cancers: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Lisa B; Cohen, Laurie E; Shnorhavorian, Margarett; Metzger, Monika L; Lockart, Barbara; Hijiya, Nobuko; Duffey-Lind, Eileen; Constine, Louis; Green, Daniel; Meacham, Lillian

    2012-09-20

    The majority of children, adolescents, and young adults diagnosed with cancer will become long-term survivors. Although cancer therapy is associated with many adverse effects, one of the primary concerns of young male cancer survivors is reproductive health. Future fertility is often the focus of concern; however, it must be recognized that all aspects of male health, including pubertal development, testosterone production, and sexual function, can be impaired by cancer therapy. Although pretreatment strategies to preserve reproductive health have been beneficial to some male patients, many survivors remain at risk for long-term reproductive complications. Understanding risk factors and monitoring the reproductive health of young male survivors are important aspects of follow-up care. The Children's Oncology Group Long-Term Follow-Up Guidelines for Survivors of Childhood, Adolescent, and Young Adult Cancer (COG-LTFU Guidelines) were created by the COG to provide recommendations for follow-up care of survivors at risk for long-term complications. The male health task force of the COG-LTFU Guidelines, composed of pediatric oncologists, endocrinologists, nurse practitioners, a urologist, and a radiation oncologist, is responsible for updating the COG-LTFU Guidelines every 2 years based on literature review and expert consensus. This review summarizes current task force recommendations for the assessment and management of male reproductive complications after treatment for childhood, adolescent, and young adult cancers. Issues related to male health that are being investigated, but currently not included in the COG-LTFU Guidelines, are also discussed. Ongoing investigation will inform future COG-LTFU Guideline recommendations for follow-up care to improve health and quality of life for male survivors.

  13. [How to tell a patient the truth?--a case report from a psycho-oncology outpatient clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuki, Akira; Ogasawara, Kazuyoshi; Miyata, Nobuko; Yoshioka, Chinami; Yamagishi, Hiroshi

    2009-09-01

    Depression and anxiety are common psychiatric syndromes in the cancer population, but are not always managed very well due to the barriers to psychiatric consultation in Japan. We have tried to care for cancer patients with depression or anxiety through our psycho-oncology outpatient clinic. We have found that some anxiety in cancer patients derives from miscommunications between patients and physicians in charge because physicians do not tell the conditions of diseases clearly to patients. Needless to say, physicians should learn the communication skills regarding breaking bad news but we would like to emphasize the importance of smooth communication among health care professionals through this case report which makes us reconsider how we should have told the patient the truth (the time for stopping anti-cancer treatment, prognosis and so on) to a patient.

  14. Prevention and Treatment of Cancer-Related Infections, Version 2.2016, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baden, Lindsey Robert; Swaminathan, Sankar; Angarone, Michael; Blouin, Gayle; Camins, Bernard C; Casper, Corey; Cooper, Brenda; Dubberke, Erik R; Engemann, Ashley Morris; Freifeld, Alison G; Greene, John N; Ito, James I; Kaul, Daniel R; Lustberg, Mark E; Montoya, Jose G; Rolston, Ken; Satyanarayana, Gowri; Segal, Brahm; Seo, Susan K; Shoham, Shmuel; Taplitz, Randy; Topal, Jeffrey; Wilson, John W; Hoffmann, Karin G; Smith, Courtney

    2016-07-01

    Infectious diseases are important causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with cancer. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Prevention and Treatment of Cancer-Related Infections characterize the major pathogens to which patients with cancer are susceptible, with a focus on the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of major common and opportunistic infections. This portion of the guidelines highlights the sections on antifungal and antiviral prophylaxis. Antifungal and antiviral prophylaxis recommendations have expanded over the past few years. New agents for the treatment of fungal infections and incorporation of therapeutic drug monitoring are presented. Antiviral prophylaxis for hepatitis B and management considerations for hepatitis C and HIV have been further developed.

  15. Ethical issues at the interface of clinical care and research practice in pediatric oncology: a narrative review of parents' and physicians' experiences.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, M.C. de; Houtlosser, M.; Wit, J.M.; Engberts, D.P.; Bresters, D.; Kaspers, G.J.L.; Leeuwen, E. van

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pediatric oncology has a strong research culture. Most pediatric oncologists are investigators, involved in clinical care as well as research. As a result, a remarkable proportion of children with cancer enrolls in a trial during treatment. This paper discusses the ethical consequences o

  16. Analysis on clinical effect of evidence-based nursing in department of oncology%循证护理在肿瘤内科患者护理中的效果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩红军

    2015-01-01

    目的::对在肿瘤内科实施循证护理的临床效果进行分析研究。方法:将我院肿瘤内科患者随机分为2组,一组接受常规内科护理,一组接受循证护理,比较2组患者的临床护理效果。结果:接受循证护理的患者组,其临床护理满意度明显高于接受常规护理的患者组,其护理差错发生率明显低于接受常规护理的患者组,p<0.05。结论:循证护理能够有效改善肿瘤内科患者的临床治疗效果,提高患者对护理的满意度,减少护理差错的发生,对于提高肿瘤内科护理工作质量具有重要意义。%Objective:To analyze the clinical effect of evidence-based nursing in department of oncology. Methods:The tumor in our hospital department of oncology were randomly divided into two groups, one group received the routine nursing in Department of oncology, one group received evidence-based nursing, compared two groups of patients with clinical nursing effect. Results:Patients undergoing group of evidence-based nursing, clinical nursing satisfaction were significantly higher than that in the group received the routine nursing care, the nursing error incidence was significantly lower than the patients received the routine nursing care, p<0. 05. Conclusion:evi-dence based nursing care could effectively improve the clinical treatment effect of tumor in Department of oncology patients, improve pa-tient satisfaction with nursing care, reduce the occurrence of nursing errors, have very important significance for improving the nursing quality in Department of intemal medicine .

  17. Leptomeningeal metastasis: A Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology critical review of endpoints and response criteria of published randomized clinical trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Chamberlain (Marc C.); R. Soffietti; J. Raizer; R. Rudà (Roberta); D. Brandsma (Dieta); W. Boogerd (Willem); S. Taillibert; M.D. Groves (Morris D.); E. Le Rhun (Emilie); L. Junck (L.); M.J. van den Bent (Martin); P.Y. Wen (Patrick); K. Jaeckle (K.)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractPurpose. To date, response criteria and optimal methods for assessment of outcome have not been standardized in patients with leptomeningeal metastasis (LM). Methods. A Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology working group of experts in LM critically reviewed published literature regarding

  18. Standardizing Naming Conventions in Radiation Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santanam, Lakshmi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Hurkmans, Coen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Brame, Scott; Straube, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Galvin, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Tripuraneni, Prabhakar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Scripps Clinic, LaJolla, CA (United States); Michalski, Jeff [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Bosch, Walter, E-mail: wbosch@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Advanced Technology Consortium, Image-guided Therapy QA Center, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to report on the development of a standardized target and organ-at-risk naming convention for use in radiation therapy and to present the nomenclature for structure naming for interinstitutional data sharing, clinical trial repositories, integrated multi-institutional collaborative databases, and quality control centers. This taxonomy should also enable improved plan benchmarking between clinical institutions and vendors and facilitation of automated treatment plan quality control. Materials and Methods: The Advanced Technology Consortium, Washington University in St. Louis, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Dutch Radiation Oncology Society, and the Clinical Trials RT QA Harmonization Group collaborated in creating this new naming convention. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements guidelines have been used to create standardized nomenclature for target volumes (clinical target volume, internal target volume, planning target volume, etc.), organs at risk, and planning organ-at-risk volumes in radiation therapy. The nomenclature also includes rules for specifying laterality and margins for various structures. The naming rules distinguish tumor and nodal planning target volumes, with correspondence to their respective tumor/nodal clinical target volumes. It also provides rules for basic structure naming, as well as an option for more detailed names. Names of nonstandard structures used mainly for plan optimization or evaluation (rings, islands of dose avoidance, islands where additional dose is needed [dose painting]) are identified separately. Results: In addition to its use in 16 ongoing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group advanced technology clinical trial protocols and several new European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer protocols, a pilot version of this naming convention has been evaluated using patient data sets with varying treatment sites. All structures in these data sets were

  19. The Integrated Oncology Program of the Italian Ministry of Health. Analytical and clinical validation of new biomarkers for early diagnosis: network, resources, methodology, quality control, and data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, Angelo; Mangia, Anita; Orlando, Claudio; Verderio, Paolo; Belfiglio, Maurizio; Marchetti, Antonio; Bertario, Lucio; Chiappetta, Gennaro; Gion, Massimo; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Podo, Franca; Vocaturo, Amina; Silvestrini, Rosella; Romani, Massimo; Belloni, Elena; Cavallo, Delia; Ulivi, Paola; Tommasi, Stefania; Steffan, Agostino; Russo, Antonio; Alessio, Massimo; Calistri, Daniele; Zancan, Matelda; Parrela, Paola; Broggini, Massimo; Giuseppe, Antonio; Buttitta, Fiamma; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Mazzocco, Katia; Veronesi, Giulia; Landuzzi, Lorena; Benevolo, Maria; Mariani, Luciano; De Marco, Federico; Venuti, Aldo; Giannelli, Gianluigi; Quaranta, Michele; Trojano, Vito

    2009-01-01

    In 2007, an Italian cancer research group proposed a specific concerted action aimed at the "analytical and clinica validation of new biomarkers for early diagnosis: Network, resources, methodology, quality control, and data analysis." The proposal united 37 national operative units involved in different biomarker studies and it created a strong coordinative body with the necessary expertise in methodologies, statistical analysis, quality control, and biological resources to perform ad hoc validation studies for new biomarkers of early cancer diagnosis. The action, financed by the Italian Ministry of Health within the Integrated Oncology Program (PIO) coordinated by NCI-Istituto Tumori Bari, started in 2007 and activated 7 projects, each of which focused on disease-specific biomarker studies. Overall, the 37 participating units proposed studies on 50 biomarkers, including analytical and clinical validation procedures. Clusters of units were specifically involved in research of early-detection biomarkers for cancers of the lung, digestive tract, prostate/bladder, and nervous system, as well as female cancers. Furthermore, a cluster involved in biomarkers for bioimaging and infection-related cancers was created. The first investigators' meeting, "Analytical and clinical validation of new biomarkers for early diagnosis," was held on 9 September 2008 in Bari. During this meeting, methodological aspects, scientific programs and preliminary results were presented and discussed.

  20. Approval procedures for clinical trials in the field of radiation oncology; Genehmigungsverfahren klinischer Studien im Bereich der Radioonkologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Monique; Buettner, Daniel [Deutsches Konsortium fuer Translationale Krebsforschung (DKTK), Dresden (Germany); Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Medizinische Fakultaet und Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie und OncoRay - Nationales Zentrum fuer Strahlenforschung in der Onkologie, Dresden (Germany); Habeck, Matthias; Habeck, Uta; Brix, Gunnar [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz (BfS), Fachbereich Strahlenschutz und Gesundheit, Neuherberg (Germany); Krause, Mechthild; Baumann, Michael [Deutsches Konsortium fuer Translationale Krebsforschung (DKTK), Dresden (Germany); Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Medizinische Fakultaet und Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie und OncoRay - Nationales Zentrum fuer Strahlenforschung in der Onkologie, Dresden (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf, Institut fuer Radioonkologie und OncoRay - Nationales Zentrum fuer Strahlenforschung in der Onkologie, Dresden (Germany); Willich, Normann [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie - Radioonkologie, Muenster (Germany); Wenz, Frederik [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim, Universitaet Heidelberg, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Mannheim (Germany); Schmidberger, Heinz [Universitaetsmedizin Mainz, Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Mainz (Germany); Debus, Juergen [Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Heidelberg (Germany); Noelling, Torsten

    2015-12-15

    Application of ionizing radiation for the purpose of medical research in Germany needs to be approved by the national authority for radiation protection (Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, BfS). For studies in the field of radiation oncology, differentiation between use of radiation for ''medical care (Heilkunde)'' versus ''medical research'' frequently leads to contradictions. The aim of this article is to provide principle investigators, individuals, and institutions involved in the process, as well as institutional review or ethics committees, with the necessary information for this assessment. Information on the legal frame and the approval procedures are also provided. A workshop was co-organized by the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO), the Working Party for Radiation Oncology (ARO) of the German Cancer Society (DKG), the German Society for Medical Physics (DGMP), and the German Cancer Consortium (DKTK) in October 2013. This paper summarizes the results of the workshop and the follow-up discussions between the organizers and the BfS. Differentiating between ''Heilkunde'' which does not need to be approved by the BfS and ''medical research'' is whether the specific application of radiation (beam quality, dose, schedule, target volume, etc.) is a clinically established and recognized procedure. This must be answered by the qualified physician(s) (''fachkundiger Arzt'' according to German radiation protection law) in charge of the study and the treatments of the patients within the study, taking into consideration of the best available evidence from clinical studies, guidelines and consensus papers. Among the important parameters for assessment are indication, total dose, and fractionation. Radiation treatments applied outside clinical trials do not require approval by the BfS, even if they are applied within a randomized or nonrandomized clinical trial

  1. Molecular imaging in oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schober, Otmar; Riemann, Burkhard (eds.) [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2013-02-01

    Considers in detail all aspects of molecular imaging in oncology, ranging from basic research to clinical applications in the era of evidence-based medicine. Examines technological issues and probe design. Discusses preclinical studies in detail, with particular attention to multimodality imaging. Presents current clinical use of PET/CT, SPECT/CT, and optical imagingWritten by acknowledged experts. The impact of molecular imaging on diagnostics, therapy, and follow-up in oncology is increasing significantly. The process of molecular imaging includes key biotarget identification, design of specific molecular imaging probes, and their preclinical evaluation, e.g., in vivo using small animal studies. A multitude of such innovative molecular imaging probes have already entered clinical diagnostics in oncology. There is no doubt that in future the emphasis will be on multimodality imaging in which morphological, functional, and molecular imaging techniques are combined in a single clinical investigation that will optimize diagnostic processes. This handbook addresses all aspects of molecular imaging in oncology, ranging from basic research to clinical applications in the era of evidence-based medicine. The first section is devoted to technology and probe design, and examines a variety of PET and SPECT tracers as well as multimodality probes. Preclinical studies are then discussed in detail, with particular attention to multimodality imaging. In the third section, diverse clinical applications are presented, and the book closes by looking at future challenges. This handbook will be of value to all who are interested in the revolution in diagnostic oncology that is being brought about by molecular imaging.

  2. Clinical integration of picture archiving and communication systems with pathology and hospital information system in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Lisa D; Gray, Keith; Lewis, James M; Bell, John L; Bigge, Jeremy; McKinney, J Mark

    2010-09-01

    The complexity of our current healthcare delivery system has become an impediment to communication among caregivers resulting in fragmentation of patient care. To address these issues, many hospitals are implementing processes to facilitate clinical integration in an effort to improve patient care and safety. Clinical informatics, including image storage in a Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS), represents a tool whereby clinical integration can be accomplished. In this study, we obtained intraoperative photographs of 19 cases to document clinical stage, extent of disease, disease recurrence, reconstruction/grafting, intraoperative findings not identified by preoperative imaging, and site verification as part of the Universal Protocol. Photographs from all cases were stored and viewed in PACS. Images from many of the cases were presented at our interdepartmental cancer conferences. The stored images improved communication among caregivers and preserved pertinent intraoperative findings in the patients' electronic medical record. In the future, pathology, gastroenterology, pulmonology, dermatology, and cardiology are just a few other subspecialties which could accomplish image storage in PACS. Multidisciplinary image storage in a PACS epitomizes the concept of clinical integration and its goal of improving patient care.

  3. ASCO 2007: “Translating Research into Practice”. Report from the 34th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camillo Porta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This year, for the 34th time in its history, the mastodontic machinery of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO once again welcomed thousand of members and participants from all over the world to the Society’s annual meeting, which, this year, took place in the ample and well-appointed, McCormick’s Convention Center in Chicago, Illinois...

  4. Importance of dose intensity in neuro-oncology clinical trials: summary report of the Sixth Annual Meeting of the Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Consortium.

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Therapeutic options for the treatment of malignant brain tumors have been limited, in part, because of the presence of the blood-brain barrier. For this reason, the Sixth Annual Meeting of the Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Consortium, the focus of which was the "Importance of Dose Intensity in Neuro-Oncology Clinical Trials," was convened in April 2000, at Government Camp, Mount Hood, Oregon. This meeting, which was supported by the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute of Neurol...

  5. Effect of a Nausea Expectancy Manipulation on Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea: A University of Rochester Cancer Center Community Clinical Oncology Program Study

    OpenAIRE

    Shelke, Abhay R.; Roscoe, Joseph A.; Morrow, Gary R.; Colman, Lauren K; Banerjee, Tarit K.; Kirshner, Jeffrey J.

    2008-01-01

    Several studies have shown that patients’ expectancy for the development of nausea following chemotherapy are robust predictors of that treatment-related side effect and some studies have shown that interventions designed to influence expectancies can affect patients’ reports of symptoms. In this randomized multicenter Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) trial, we investigated the effect of an expectancy manipulation designed to reduce nausea expectancy on chemotherapy-induced nausea i...

  6. A contemporary case study illustrating the integration of health information technologies into the organisation and clinical practice of radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alexis Andrew; Phillips, Aaron K

    2006-01-01

    The development of software in radiation oncology departments has seen the increase in capability from the Record and Verify software focused on patient safety to a fully-fledged Oncology Information System (OIS). This paper reports on the medical aspects of the implementation of a modern Oncology Information System (IMPAC MultiAccess, also known as the Siemens LANTIS) in a New Zealand hospital oncology department. The department was successful in translating paper procedures into electronic procedures, and the report focuses on the changes in approach to organisation and data use that occurred. The difficulties that were faced, which included procedural re-design, management of change, removal of paper, implementation cost, integration with the HIS, quality assurance and datasets, are highlighted along with the local solutions developed to overcome these problems.

  7. [Strategies for improving care of oncologic patients: SHARE Project results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reñones Crego, María de la Concepción; Fernández Pérez, Dolores; Vena Fernández, Carmen; Zamudio Sánchez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Cancer treatment is a major burden for the patient and its family that requires an individualized management by healthcare professionals. Nurses are in charge of coordinating care and are the closest healthcare professionals to patient and family; however, in Spain, there are not standard protocols yet for the management of oncology patients. The Spanish Oncology Nursing Society developed between 2012 and 2014 the SHARE project, with the aim of establishing strategies to improve quality of life and nursing care in oncology patients. It was developed in 3 phases. First, a literature search and review was performed to identify nursing strategies, interventions and tools to improve cancer patients' care. At the second stage, these interventions were agreed within a group of oncology nursing experts; and at the third phase, a different group of experts in oncology care categorized the interventions to identify the ones with highest priority and most feasible to be implemented. As a result, 3 strategic actions were identified to improve nursing care during cancer treatment: To provide a named nurse to carry out the follow up process by attending to the clinic or telephonic consultation, develop therapeutic education with adapted protocols for each tumor type and treatment and ensure specific training for nurses on the management of the cancer patients. Strategic actions proposed in this paper aim to improve cancer patients' healthcare and quality of life through the development of advanced nursing roles based on a higher level of autonomy, situating nurses as care coordinators to assure an holistic care in oncology patients.

  8. ‘In silico' oncology for clinical decision making in the context of nephroblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graf, N.; Hoppe, A.; Georgiadi, E.; Belleman, R.; Desmedt, C.; Dionysiou, D.; Erdt, M.; Jacques, J.; Kolokotroni, E.; Lunzer, A.; Tsiknakis, M.; Stamatakos, G.

    2009-01-01

    The present paper outlines the initial version of the ACGT (Advancing Clinico-Genomic Trials) - an Integrated Project, partly funded by the EC (FP6-2005-IST-026996)I-Oncosimulator as an integrated software system simulating in vivo tumour response to therapeutic modalities within the clinical trials

  9. Next-generation mTOR inhibitors in clinical oncology: how pathway complexity informs therapeutic strategy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wander, Seth A

    2011-04-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a PI3K-related kinase that regulates cell growth, proliferation, and survival via mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTORC2. The mTOR pathway is often aberrantly activated in cancers. While hypoxia, nutrient deprivation, and DNA damage restrain mTORC1 activity, multiple genetic events constitutively activate mTOR in cancers. Here we provide a brief overview of the signaling pathways up- and downstream of mTORC1 and -2, and discuss the insights into therapeutic anticancer targets - both those that have been tried in the clinic with limited success and those currently under clinical development - that knowledge of these pathways gives us.

  10. Cutaneous paraneoplastic disorders in stomach cancer: Collaboration between oncologically active dermatologists and clinical oncologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejna, Michael; Wöll, Ewald; Tschandl, Philipp; Raderer, Markus

    2016-07-01

    To our knowledge this is the first systemic review that provides an overview of the cutaneous paraneoplastic syndromes (CPS) (i.e., clinical manifestations, pathomechanisms, and treatment modalities) occurring in stomach cancer. CPS are caused by substances produced by stomach cancer and may precede, coincide with, or follow the diagnosis of this malignancy. More than 20 possible CPS in association with stomach cancer have been identified. CPS mostly compromises the patient's quality of life by skin impairment plus discomfort and are often associated with a dismal prognosis on survival. Studies of these CPS not only in stomach cancer have partially contributed to the understanding of pathomechanism and since CPS may be the presenting sign of an occult cancer, cognizance of their features and clinical implications are of considerable importance. Patients with these syndromes should have an appropriate work-up for a possibly occult malignancy with consecutive successful early treatment.

  11. Pathology is a necessary and informative tool in oncology clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagtegaal, Iris D; West, Nicholas P; van Krieken, J Han J M; Quirke, Phil

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials are essential for the improvement of cancer care. The complexity of modern cancer care and research require careful design, for which input from all disciplines is necessary. Pathologists should play a key role in the design and execution of modern cancer trials, with special attention to the eligibility, stratification and evaluation of response to therapy. In the current review all these aspects are discussed, with examples from colorectal cancer trials. We describe critical issues in biomarker evaluation and development and emphasize the importance of the role of the pathologist in quality control of cancer treatment.

  12. Republished: Importance of carcinoma-associated fibroblast-derived proteins in clinical oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcz, Gabor; Sipos, Ferenc; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnar, Bela; Yagi, Yukako

    2015-05-01

    Carcinoma-associated fibroblast (CAF) as prominent cell type of the tumour microenvironment has complex interaction with both the cancer cells and other non-neoplastic surrounding cells. The CAF-derived regulators and extracellular matrix proteins can support cancer progression by providing a protective microenvironment for the cancer cells via reduction of chemotherapy sensitivity. On the other hand, these proteins may act as powerful prognostic markers as well as potential targets of anticancer therapy. In this review, we summarise the clinical importance of the major CAF-derived signals influencing tumour behaviour and determining the outcome of chemotherapy.

  13. Importance of carcinoma-associated fibroblast-derived proteins in clinical oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcz, Gabor; Sipos, Ferenc; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnar, Bela; Yagi, Yukako

    2014-12-01

    Carcinoma-associated fibroblast (CAF) as prominent cell type of the tumour microenvironment has complex interaction with both the cancer cells and other non-neoplastic surrounding cells. The CAF-derived regulators and extracellular matrix proteins can support cancer progression by providing a protective microenvironment for the cancer cells via reduction of chemotherapy sensitivity. On the other hand, these proteins may act as powerful prognostic markers as well as potential targets of anticancer therapy. In this review, we summarise the clinical importance of the major CAF-derived signals influencing tumour behaviour and determining the outcome of chemotherapy.

  14. What is the Asian Consensus Statement on NCCN clinical practice guidelines in oncology (NCCN-ACS)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaza, Hideyuki

    2016-04-01

    Cancer treatment guidelines are compiled on the basis of established evidence. Such evidence is obtained from epidemiological, pathological and pharmacological study and, most importantly of all, the information gained from clinical trials. However, very little of the kind of evidence that is required for the compilation of treatment guidelines is actually obtained from Asian countries. When one considers the ethnic differences and disparities in medical care, coupled with the tremendous cultural diversity that characterize the Asian region, it would be difficult to conclude that there is currently sufficient evidence that could form the basis for the formulation of guidelines that would be relevant and applicable to all Asian countries. An urgent issue that needs to be addressed in order to achieve a breakthrough in this difficult situation is to build up a body of evidence at an advanced level that is specific to the Asian region and Asian ethnicities. For the interim, however, it is also necessary to efficiently incorporate evidence that has been obtained in Western countries. Furthermore, an effective method of utilizing guidelines that have already been compiled in Western countries is considered to be not by simply translating them into local languages, but rather to engage in a process of adaptation, whereby the guidelines are adjusted or modified to match the circumstances of a particular country or region. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines-Asian Consensus Statement (NCCN-ACS) documents have been compiled with this intention in mind, utilizing the NCCN guidelines that are widely used internationally.

  15. Associations between clinical and sociodemographic data and patterns of communication in pediatric oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Kohlsdorf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pediatric communication directly contributes to treatment adherence, fewer symptoms, better clinical responses, healthier treatment adaptation and management of psychosocial issues. This study aimed to evaluate associations between the clinical and sociodemographic data of caregivers and children and the communicative patterns of pediatricians. Three oncohematology physicians and 44 child-caregiver dyads took part, with audio recording of 146 medical consultations. The physicians interacted more often with older children, offering more guidance, clarifying doubts, and asking for information. The number of questions from children and caregivers was positively correlated with the physician’s communicative behaviors. However, there was no association between the age of the children and the number of doubts of the patients. The diagnosis, treatment time, family income, marital status and caregiver’s level of education were associated with the amount of interaction provided by physicians to the children and caregivers. This study offers subsides relevant to psychosocial interventions that may improve communication in pediatric oncohematology settings.

  16. Brief Introduction of NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines for Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Xin-en

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is always a main factor threatening human’s health and life, and its incidence and mortality are gradually increasing in recent years. However, some advances have been made with the unremitting efforts and exploration human made and the improvement is mainly made in cancer treatment of young children and older adults, while little in adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients, who are generally defined as individuals of 15 to 39 years old at the time of initial cancer diagnosis due to many factors. To highlight the issues of this unique population, National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) absorbs a large amount of information and previous researches and develops a set of clinical practice guidelines. Though the guidelines are more supportive care guidelines than treatment guidelines, they give us the opportunity to learn the latest international developments in AYA treatment and more survival chance for the treatment of AYA patients.

  17. Brief Introduction of NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines for Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUANG Xin-en

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is always a main factor threatening human’s health and life, and its incidence and mortality are gradually increasing in recent years. However, some advances have been made with the unremitting efforts and exploration human made and the improvement is mainly made in cancer treatment of young children and older adults, while little in adolescent and young adult (AYA patients, who are generally defined as individuals of 15 to 39 years old at the time of initial cancer diagnosis due to many factors. To highlight the issues of this unique population, National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN absorbs a large amount of information and previous researches and develops a set of clinical practice guidelines. Though the guidelines are more supportive care guidelines than treatment guidelines, they give us the opportunity to learn the latest international developments in AYA treatment and more survival chance for the treatment of AYA patients.

  18. The role of prophylactic cranial irradiation in regionally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. A Southwest Oncology Group Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusch, V.W.; Griffin, B.R.; Livingston, R.B. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

    1989-10-01

    Lung cancer is the most common malignant disease in the United States. Only the few tumors detected very early are curable, but there has been some progress in the management of more advanced non-small cell lung cancer, particularly in regionally inoperable disease. Prevention of central nervous system relapse is an important issue in this group of patients because brain metastases ultimately develop in 20% to 25% of them. Seventy-three patients with regionally advanced non-small cell lung cancer were entered into a Phase II trial of neutron chest radiotherapy sandwiched between four cycles of chemotherapy including cisplatin, vinblastine, and mitomycin C. Prophylactic cranial irradiation was administered concurrently with chest radiotherapy (3000 cGy in 10 fractions in 15 patients; 3600 cGy in 18 fractions in the remaining 50 patients). Patients underwent computed tomographic scan of the brain before treatment and every 3 months after treatment. The initial overall response rate was 79%, but 65 of the 73 patients have subsequently died of recurrent disease. Median follow-up is 9 months for all 73 patients and 26 months for eight long-term survivors. No patient who completed the prophylactic cranial irradiation program had clinical or radiologic brain metastases. Toxic reactions to prophylactic cranial irradiation included reversible alopecia in all patients, progressive dementia in one patient, and possible optic neuritis in one patient. Both of these patients received 300 cGy per fraction of irradiation. The use of prophylactic cranial irradiation has been controversial, but its safety and efficacy in this trial supports its application in a group of patients at high risk for central nervous system relapse. Further evaluation of prophylactic cranial irradiation in clinical trials for regionally advanced non-small cell lung cancer is warranted.

  19. Determination of Spatial Distribution of Children Treated in Children Oncology Clinic with the Aid of Geographic Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topan, Aysel; Bayram, Dilek; Özendi, Mustafa; Cam, Ali; Öztürk, Özlem; Ayyıldız, Tülay Kuzlu; Kulakçı, Hülya; Veren, Funda

    2016-10-01

    The main objective of this research is to examine child cancer cases in Zonguldak/Turkey descriptively in epidemiological aspect with the help of GIS. Universe of the study is composed of 60 children between 1 and 19 years old who were treated in Children Oncology Clinic with a diagnosis of cancer. Whole universe was reached without selecting a sample in the study. Data were collected by using a form prepared by obtaining expert advice and they were applied to children and their parents at study dates. Results were expressed as percentages. Chi-Square test was used in intergroup comparisons, results were assessed within 95 % confidence interval and p < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Variables that were used in the study were assessed, recorded in prepared data collection form and distribution maps were produced. When disease diagnosis of the children participated in the study were evaluated, the most observed three types are ALL with 33.3 % (n = 20), Medullablastoma with 13.3 % (n = 8) and Hodgkin-nonHodgkin Lymphoma with 11.7 % (n = 7). Kdz. Eregli with 31.7 % (n = 19), Center with 31.7 % (n = 19), and Caycuma with 18.3 % (n = 11) are the first-three counties where the cases were mostly observed. Statistically significant difference was found (p = 0.016) comparing disease diagnosis with living place, and distribution maps of the number of cancer cases were produced.

  20. Genomics-based early-phase clinical trials in oncology: recommendations from the task force on Methodology for the Development of Innovative Cancer Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Stephen V; Miller, Vincent A; Lobbezoo, Marinus W; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2014-11-01

    The Methodology for the Development of Innovative Cancer Therapies (MDICT) task force discussed incorporation of genomic profiling into early (Phase I and II) clinical trials in oncology. The task force reviewed the challenges of standardising genomics data in a manner conducive to conducting clinical trials. Current barriers to successful and efficient implementation were identified and discussed, as well as the methods of genomic analysis, the proper setting for study and strategies to facilitate timely completion of genomics-based studies. The importance of properly capturing and cataloguing outcomes was also discussed. Several recommendations regarding the use of genomics in these trials are provided.

  1. 跨文化护理理论在临床肿瘤护理的应用%Application of trans cultural nursing theory in clinical oncology nursing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑儒君; 李俊英

    2011-01-01

    综述了文化的定义,跨文化理论的发展,Leininger跨文化护理理论的"日出模式"的提以及在临床肿瘤护理中的临床应用和理论评价.%Objective: It reviewed the definitions of culture, the development of trans cultural theory and successful application of "sunrise mode"of Leininger trans cultural nursing theory in clinical oncology nursing , so as to guide clinical nursing practice better.

  2. Application of Bayesian hierarchical models for phase I/II clinical trials in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yada, Shinjo; Hamada, Chikuma

    2017-03-01

    Treatment during cancer clinical trials sometimes involves the combination of multiple drugs. In addition, in recent years there has been a trend toward phase I/II trials in which a phase I and a phase II trial are combined into a single trial to accelerate drug development. Methods for the seamless combination of phases I and II parts are currently under investigation. In the phase II part, adaptive randomization on the basis of patient efficacy outcomes allocates more patients to the dose combinations considered to have higher efficacy. Patient toxicity outcomes are used for determining admissibility to each dose combination and are not used for selection of the dose combination itself. In cases where the objective is not to find the optimum dose combination solely for efficacy but regarding both toxicity and efficacy, the need exists to allocate patients to dose combinations with consideration of the balance of existing trade-offs between toxicity and efficacy. We propose a Bayesian hierarchical model and an adaptive randomization with consideration for the relationship with toxicity and efficacy. Using the toxicity and efficacy outcomes of patients, the Bayesian hierarchical model is used to estimate the toxicity probability and efficacy probability in each of the dose combinations. Here, we use Bayesian moving-reference adaptive randomization on the basis of desirability computed from the obtained estimator. Computer simulations suggest that the proposed method will likely recommend a higher percentage of target dose combinations than a previously proposed method.

  3. MRI-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy in neuro-oncology: a review of its current clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmathulla, Gazanfar; Recinos, Pablo F; Kamian, Kambiz; Mohammadi, Alireza M; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S; Barnett, Gene H

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) is a minimally invasive treatment modality with recent increasing use to ablate brain tumors. When originally introduced in the late 1980s, the inability to precisely monitor and control the thermal ablation limited the adoption of LITT in neuro-oncology. Popularized as a means of destroying malignant hepatic and renal metastatic lesions percutaneously, its selective thermal tumor destruction and preservation of adjacent normal tissues have since been optimized for use in neuro-oncology. The progress made in real-time thermal imaging with MRI, laser probe design, and computer algorithms predictive of tissue kill has led to the resurgence of interest in LITT as a means to ablate brain tumors. Current LITT systems offer a surgical option for some inoperable brain tumors. We discuss the origins, principles, current indications, and future directions of MRI-guided LITT in neuro-oncology.

  4. Nanomedicine in veterinary oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Yin; Rodriguez, Carlos O; Li, Yuanpei

    2015-08-01

    Nanomedicine is an interdisciplinary field that combines medicine, engineering, chemistry, biology and material sciences to improve disease management and can be especially valuable in oncology. Nanoparticle-based agents that possess functions such as tumor targeting, imaging and therapy are currently under intensive investigation. This review introduces the basic concept of nanomedicine and the classification of nanoparticles. Because of their favorable pharmacokinetics, tumor targeting properties, and resulting superior efficacy and toxicity profiles, nanoparticle-based agents can overcome several limitations associated with conventional diagnostic and therapeutic protocols in veterinary oncology. The two most important tumor targeting mechanisms (passive and active tumor targeting) and their dominating factors (i.e. shape, charge, size and nanoparticle surface display) are discussed. The review summarizes published clinical and preclinical studies that utilize different nanoformulations in veterinary oncology, as well as the application of nanoparticles for cancer diagnosis and imaging. The toxicology of various nanoformulations is also considered. Given the benefits of nanoformulations demonstrated in human medicine, nanoformulated drugs are likely to gain more traction in veterinary oncology.

  5. Initial clinical experience with a radiation oncology dedicated open 1.0T MR-simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glide-Hurst, Carri K; Wen, Ning; Hearshen, David; Kim, Joshua; Pantelic, Milan; Zhao, Bo; Mancell, Tina; Levin, Kenneth; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J; Siddiqui, M Salim

    2015-03-08

    -phase as compared to ten-phase MIPs, although < 2% difference was obtained for ≥ 4 phases. 4D MRI for a patient demonstrated acceptable image quality in ~ 7 min. MR-SIM was integrated into our workflow and QA procedures were developed. Clinical applicability was demonstrated for 4D MRI and UTE imaging to support MR-SIM for single modality treatment planning.

  6. Results of the 2005-2008 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology Survey of Chief Residents in the United States: Clinical Training and Resident Working Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondi, Vinai, E-mail: gondi@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bernard, Johnny Ray [Mayo Clinic Jacksonville, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Jabbari, Siavash [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Keam, Jennifer [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Amorim Bernstein, Karen L. de [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Dad, Luqman K. [SUNY Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York (United States); Li, Linna [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Poppe, Matthew M. [University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Hospital (United States); Strauss, Jonathan B. [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Chollet, Casey T. [Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To document clinical training and resident working conditions reported by chief residents during their residency. Methods and Materials: During the academic years 2005 to 2006, 2006 to 2007, and 2007 to 2008, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology conducted a nationwide survey of all radiation oncology chief residents in the United States. Chi-square statistics were used to assess changes in clinical training and resident working conditions over time. Results: Surveys were completed by representatives from 55 programs (response rate, 71.4%) in 2005 to 2006, 60 programs (75.9%) in 2006 to 2007, and 74 programs (93.7%) in 2007 to 2008. Nearly all chief residents reported receiving adequate clinical experience in commonly treated disease sites, such as breast and genitourinary malignancies; and commonly performed procedures, such as three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Clinical experience in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy increased over time (p < 0.001), whereas clinical experience in endovascular brachytherapy (p <0.001) decreased over time. The distribution of gynecologic and prostate brachytherapy cases remained stable, while clinical case load in breast brachytherapy increased (p = 0.006). A small but significant percentage of residents reported receiving inadequate clinical experience in pediatrics, seeing 10 or fewer pediatric cases during the course of residency. Procedures involving higher capital costs, such as particle beam therapy and intraoperative radiotherapy, and infrequent clinical use, such as head and neck brachytherapy, were limited to a minority of institutions. Most residency programs associated with at least one satellite facility have incorporated resident rotations into their clinical training, and the majority of residents at these programs find them valuable experiences. The majority of residents reported working 60 or fewer hours per week on required clinical duties

  7. Neurologic complications in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pace

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurologic side effects related to cancer therapy are a common problem in oncology practice. These complications can negatively affect the management of the patient, because they can inhibit treatment and diminish quality of life. Therefore specific skills are required to recognise symptoms and clinical manifestations. This review focuses on the most common neurologic complications to improve physician’s familiarity in determining the aetiology of these symptoms.

  8. Application of clinical pathway management mode in clinical nursing practice teaching of oncology%临床路径管理模式在肿瘤科护理实践教学中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦艳玲

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of clinical pathway management mode in nursing practice teaching of oncology.Methods Totals of 120 nursing students between September 2010 and June 2012 from oncology department,were randomly divided into the clinical pathway group (n =60) and control group (n =60) with 8 weeks practice.Control group used the traditional mentoring teaching method,while clinical pathway group according to the clinical pathway nursing teaching mode,developed teaching approach.Two days before the practice ended,all nursing students' knowledge and skills and satisfaction on practice teaching were assessed.Results The study showed that the scores of theoretical basis,the operating skills and the practical ability of nurses in the clinical pathway group were (93.75 ± 3.82),(92.36 ± 2.93),(90.31 ± 3.62),respectively,and those in the control group were (80.23 ± 3.06),(74.09 ± 5.35) and (78.25 ± 6.74),and the results of the clinical pathway group were significantly better than those of control group (t =10.25,11.94,8.24,respectively ;P < 0.05).Teaching quality satisfaction of nursing students in the clinical pathway group was significantly higher than that of the control group (93.33% vs 81.67%),and the difference was statistically significant (x2 =5.839,P < 0.05).Conclusions The clinical pathway is a kind of advanced management mode.If the management concept is introduced into oncology nursing practice teaching,the teaching goal,teaching method,and teaching quality will be improved.%目的 探讨临床路径管理模式在肿瘤科护理实践教学中的应用效果.方法 采用整群抽样法选择2010年9月至2012年6月在肿瘤科实习的护生120名,按照随机数字表法随机分为临床路径组和传统对照组各60名,实习时间均为8周.传统对照组采用传统“传帮带”的教学方法,临床路径组按照临床路径护理教学模式进行带教,首先制定教学路径,带教教师按照“肿瘤科护生临床

  9. Cell Line Derived Multi-Gene Predictor of Pathologic Response to Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Breast Cancer: A Validation Study on US Oncology 02-103 Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Kui

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study is to assess the predictive accuracy of a multi-gene predictor of response to docetaxel, 5-fluorouracil, epirubicin and cyclophosphamide combination chemotherapy on gene expression data from patients who received these drugs as neoadjuvant treatment. Methods Tumor samples were obtained from patients with stage II-III breast cancer before starting neoadjuvant chemotherapy with four cycles of 5-fluorouracil/epirubicin/cyclophosphamide (FEC followed by four cycles of docetaxel/capecitabine (TX on US Oncology clinical trial 02-103. Most patients with HER-2-positive cancer also received trastuzumab (H. The chemotherapy predictor (TFEC-MGP was developed from publicly available gene expression data of 42 breast cancer cell-lines with corresponding in vitro chemotherapy sensitivity results for the four chemotherapy drugs. No predictor was developed for treatment with trastuzumab. The predictive performance of TFEC-MGP in distinguishing cases with pathologic complete response from those with residual disease was evaluated for the FEC/TX and FEC/TX plus H group separately. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AU-ROC was used as the metric of predictive performance. Genomic predictions were performed blinded to clinical outcome. Results The AU-ROC was 0.70 (95% CI: 0.57-0.82 for the FEC/TX group (n=66 and 0.43 (95% CI: 0.20-0.66 for the FEC/TX plus H group (n=25. Among the patients treated with FEC/TX, the AU-ROC was 0.69 (95% CI: 0.52-0.86 for estrogen receptor (ER-negative (n=28 and it was 0.59 (95% CI: 0.36-0.82 for ER-positive cancers (n=37. ER status was not reported for one patient. Conclusions Our results indicate that the cell line derived 291-probeset genomic predictor of response to FEC/TX combination chemotherapy shows good performance in a blinded validation study, particularly in ER-negative patients.

  10. Medicinal cannabis in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Frederike K; de Jong, Floris A; Mathijssen, Ron H J; Erkens, Joëlle A; Herings, Ron M; Verweij, Jaap

    2007-12-01

    In The Netherlands, since September 2003, a legal medicinal cannabis product, constituting the whole range of cannabinoids, is available for clinical research, drug development strategies, and on prescription for patients. To date, this policy, initiated by the Dutch Government, has not yet led to the desired outcome; the amount of initiated clinical research is less than expected and only a minority of patients resorts to the legal product. This review aims to discuss the background for the introduction of legal medicinal cannabis in The Netherlands, the past years of Dutch clinical experience in oncology practice, possible reasons underlying the current outcome, and future perspectives.

  11. Prevention and Monitoring of Cardiac Dysfunction in Survivors of Adult Cancers: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenian, Saro H; Lacchetti, Christina; Barac, Ana; Carver, Joseph; Constine, Louis S; Denduluri, Neelima; Dent, Susan; Douglas, Pamela S; Durand, Jean-Bernard; Ewer, Michael; Fabian, Carol; Hudson, Melissa; Jessup, Mariell; Jones, Lee W; Ky, Bonnie; Mayer, Erica L; Moslehi, Javid; Oeffinger, Kevin; Ray, Katharine; Ruddy, Kathryn; Lenihan, Daniel

    2016-12-05

    Purpose Cardiac dysfunction is a serious adverse effect of certain cancer-directed therapies that can interfere with the efficacy of treatment, decrease quality of life, or impact the actual survival of the patient with cancer. The purpose of this effort was to develop recommendations for prevention and monitoring of cardiac dysfunction in survivors of adult-onset cancers. Methods Recommendations were developed by an expert panel with multidisciplinary representation using a systematic review (1996 to 2016) of meta-analyses, randomized clinical trials, observational studies, and clinical experience. Study quality was assessed using established methods, per study design. The guideline recommendations were crafted in part using the Guidelines Into Decision Support methodology. Results A total of 104 studies met eligibility criteria and compose the evidentiary basis for the recommendations. The strength of the recommendations in these guidelines is based on the quality, amount, and consistency of the evidence and the balance between benefits and harms. Recommendations It is important for health care providers to initiate the discussion regarding the potential for cardiac dysfunction in individuals in whom the risk is sufficiently high before beginning therapy. Certain higher risk populations of survivors of cancer may benefit from prevention and screening strategies implemented during cancer-directed therapies. Clinical suspicion for cardiac disease should be high and threshold for cardiac evaluation should be low in any survivor who has received potentially cardiotoxic therapy. For certain higher risk survivors of cancer, routine surveillance with cardiac imaging may be warranted after completion of cancer-directed therapy, so that appropriate interventions can be initiated to halt or even reverse the progression of cardiac dysfunction.

  12. Insufficiency Fractures After Pelvic Radiation Therapy for Uterine Cervical Cancer: An Analysis of Subjects in a Prospective Multi-institutional Trial, and Cooperative Study of the Japan Radiation Oncology Group (JAROG) and Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokumaru, Sunao, E-mail: tokumaru@cc.saga-u.ac.jp [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Toita, Takafumi [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Oguchi, Masahiko [Radiation Oncology Department, Cancer Institute Hospital, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Ohno, Tatsuya [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Maebashi (Japan); Kato, Shingo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University, International Medical Center, Saitama (Japan); Niibe, Yuzuru [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Sagamihara (Japan); Kazumoto, Tomoko [Department of Radiology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Kodaira, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya (Japan); Kataoka, Masaaki [Department of Radiology, National Shikoku Cancer Center, Matsuyama (Japan); Shikama, Naoto [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University, International Medical Center, Saitama (Japan); Kenjo, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Yamauchi, Chikako [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shiga Medical Center for Adults, Moriyama (Japan); Suzuki, Osamu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer, Osaka (Japan); Sakurai, Hideyuki [Proton Medical Research Center and Tsukuba University, Tuskuba (Japan); Teshima, Teruki [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita (Japan); Kagami, Yoshikazu [Department of Radiology, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Nakano, Takashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University, Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi (Japan); Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); and others

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate pelvic insufficiency fractures (IF) after definitive pelvic radiation therapy for early-stage uterine cervical cancer, by analyzing subjects of a prospective, multi-institutional study. Materials and Methods: Between September 2004 and July 2007, 59 eligible patients were analyzed. The median age was 73 years (range, 37-84 years). The International Federation of Gynecologic Oncology and Obstetrics stages were Ib1 in 35, IIa in 12, and IIb in 12 patients. Patients were treated with the constant method, which consisted of whole-pelvic external-beam radiation therapy of 50 Gy/25 fractions and high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy of 24 Gy/4 fractions without chemotherapy. After radiation therapy the patients were evaluated by both pelvic CT and pelvic MRI at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Diagnosis of IF was made when the patients had both CT and MRI findings, neither recurrent tumor lesions nor traumatic histories. The CT findings of IF were defined as fracture lines or sclerotic linear changes in the bones, and MRI findings of IF were defined as signal intensity changes in the bones, both on T1- and T2-weighted images. Results: The median follow-up was 24 months. The 2-year pelvic IF cumulative occurrence rate was 36.9% (21 patients). Using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0, grade 1, 2, and 3 IF were seen in 12 (21%), 6 (10%), and 3 patients (5%), respectively. Sixteen patients had multiple fractures, so IF were identified at 44 sites. The pelvic IF were frequently seen at the sacroileal joints (32 sites, 72%). Nine patients complained of pain. All patients' pains were palliated by rest or non-narcotic analgesic drugs. Higher age (>70 years) and low body weight (<50 kg) were thought to be risk factors for pelvic IF (P=.007 and P=.013, Cox hazard test). Conclusions: Cervical cancer patients with higher age and low body weight may be at some risk for the development of pelvic IF after pelvic radiation therapy.

  13. Implementing and Integrating a Clinically-Driven Electronic Medical Record (EMR for Radiation Oncology in a Large Medical Enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Paxton Kirkpatrick

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose/Objective: While our department is heavily invested in computer-based treatment planning, we historically relied on paper-based charts for management of Radiation Oncology patients. In early 2009, we initiated the process of conversion to an electronic medical record (EMR eliminating the need for paper charts. Key goals included the ability to readily access information wherever and whenever needed, without compromising safety, treatment quality, confidentiality or productivity.Methodology: In February, 2009, we formed a multi-disciplinary team of Radiation Oncology physicians, nurses, therapists, administrators, physicists/dosimetrists, and information technology (IT specialists, along with staff from the Duke Health System IT department. The team identified all existing processes and associated information/reports, established the framework for the EMR system and generated, tested and implemented specific EMR processes.Results: Two broad classes of information were identified: information which must be readily accessed by anyone in the health system versus that used solely within the Radiation Oncology department. Examples of the former are consultation reports, weekly treatment check notes and treatment summaries; the latter includes treatment plans, daily therapy records and quality assurance reports. To manage the former, we utilized the enterprise-wide system , which required an intensive effort to design and implement procedures to export information from Radiation Oncology into that system. To manage "Radiation Oncology" data, we used our existing system (ARIA, Varian Medical Systems. The ability to access both systems simultaneously from a single workstation (WS was essential, requiring new WS and modified software. As of January, 2010, all new treatments were managed solely with an EMR. We find that an EMR makes information more widely accessible and does not compromise patient safety, treatment quality or confidentiality

  14. Clinical Cancer Advances 2017: Annual Report on Progress Against Cancer From the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstein, Harold J; Krilov, Lada; Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B; Baxter, Nancy N; Chiorean, E Gabriela; Chow, Warren Allen; De Groot, John Frederick; Devine, Steven Michael; DuBois, Steven G; El-Deiry, Wafik S; Epstein, Andrew S; Heymach, John; Jones, Joshua Adam; Mayer, Deborah K; Miksad, Rebecca A; Pennell, Nathan A; Sabel, Michael S; Schilsky, Richard L; Schuchter, Lynn Mara; Tung, Nadine; Winkfield, Karen Marie; Wirth, Lori J; Dizon, Don S

    2017-02-01

    A MESSAGE FROM ASCO'S PRESIDENT I am pleased to present Clinical Cancer Advances 2017, which highlights the most promising advances in patient-oriented cancer research over the past year. The report gives us an opportunity to reflect on what an exciting time it is for cancer research and how swiftly our understanding of cancer has improved. One year ago, the White House announced the national Cancer Moonshot program to accelerate progress against cancer. This shared vision of progress has reinvigorated the research community, identified new areas of scientific collaboration, and raised our ambitions regarding what may be possible beyond the progress we have already made. When I entered the field 35 years ago, I could not have imagined where we would be today. We can now detect cancer earlier, target treatments more effectively, and manage adverse effects more effectively to enable patients to live better, more fulfilling lives. Today, two of three people with cancer live at least 5 years after diagnosis, up from roughly one of two in the 1970s. This progress has resulted from decades of incremental advances that have collectively expanded our understanding of the molecular underpinnings of cancer. There is no better current example of this than ASCO's 2017 Advance of the Year: Immunotherapy 2.0. Over the last year, there has been a wave of new successes with immunotherapy. Research has proven this approach can be effective against a wide range of hard-to-treat advanced cancers previously considered intractable. Researchers are now working to identify biologic markers that can help increase the effectiveness of treatment and determine who is most likely to benefit from immunotherapy. This knowledge will enable oncologists to make evidence-based decisions so as many patients as possible might benefit from this new type of treatment. Each successive advance builds on the previous hard work of generations of basic, translational, and clinical cancer researchers

  15. EGFR testing and clinical management of advanced NSCLC: a Galician Lung Cancer Group study (GGCP 048-10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vázquez S

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sergio Vázquez,1 Joaquín Casal,2 Francisco Javier Afonso Afonso,3 José Luis Fírvida,4 Lucía Santomé,5 Francisco Barón,6 Martín Lázaro,7 Carolina Pena,7 Margarita Amenedo,8 Ihab Abdulkader,9 Carmen González-Arenas,10 Laura Fachal,11 Ana Vega11 On behalf of the Galician Lung Cancer Group (GGCP1Medical Oncology Department, Lucus Augusti University Hospital, Lugo, 2Medical Oncology Department, University Hospital Complex of Vigo, Pontevedra, 3Medical Oncology Department, University Hospital Complex of Ferrol, Ferrol, 4Medical Oncology Department, University Hospital Complex of Ourense, Ourense, 5Medical Oncology Department Povisa Hospital, Vigo, 6Medical Oncology Department, University Hospital Complex of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, 7Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Complex of Pontevedra, Pontevedra, 8Medical Oncology Department, Oncology Center of Galicia, A Coruña, 9Anatomical Pathology Department, University Hospital Complex of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, 10AstraZeneca, Madrid, 11Galician Public Foundation of Genomic Medicine-SERGAS, Santiago de Compostela Clinic Hospital, Santiago de Compostela, Spain Purpose: This study aimed to assess the incidence of mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR gene in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients in the Galician region of Spain and the clinical management and outcome of patients carrying EGFR mutations. Patients and methods: All newly diagnosed advanced or metastatic NSCLC patients were screened for EGFR mutations in matched tumor samples (tissue or cytology specimens and serum samples. Results: Of 198 patients screened for EGFR mutations in tumor samples, 184 had evaluable data and, of these, 25 (13.6% had EGFR mutations (84% sensitizing mutations. EGFR mutation was found in serum in 14 (8.1% patients (of 174 evaluable. Compared to matched tumor tissue, serum EGFR mutation testing specificity and sensitivity were 99% and 52

  16. Perceived roles of oncology nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemonde, Manon; Payman, Naghmeh

    2015-01-01

    The Canadian Association of Nurses in Oncology (CANO) Standards of Care (2001) provides a framework that delineates oncology nursing roles and responsibilities. The purpose of this study was to explore how oncology nurses perceive their roles and responsibilities compared to the CANO Standards of Care. Six focus groups were conducted and 21 registered nurses (RNs) from a community-based hospital participated in this study. Transcripts were analyzed using qualitative inductive content analysis. Three themes were identified: (1) Oncology nurses perceive a gap between their defined roles and the reality of daily practice, as cancer care becomes more complex and as they provide advanced oncology care to more patients while there is no parallel adaptation to the health care system to support them, such as safe staffing; (2) Oncology nursing, as a specialty, requires sustained professional development and leadership roles; and (3) Oncology nurses are committed to providing continuous care as a reference point in the health care team by fostering interdisciplinary collaboration andfacilitating patient's navigation through the system. Organizational support through commitment to appropriate staffing and matching scope ofpractice to patient needs may lead to maximize the health and well-being of nurses, quality of patient care and organizational performance.

  17. From circle time to clinical prevention group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Marinelli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the author traces the experiences of the psychological work carried out in institutions, not just into the schools, for which she has used the group both as a main tool in primary and secondary prevention intervention of disease, as well as a supporter of mental well-being of children and teachers.  On the basis of group-analytic theory and using different theoretical references during time, author highlights differences, points of contact, and transformations. These practices, described by F. Di Maria and G. Lo Verso (2002, have a common ground in the concepts of "context", "set-setting" and "culture". They represent a progress in the thoughts of people that use these devices not exclusively in psychotherapeutic work with groups.Keywords: Institution, Context, Culture, Device Group, Set-Setting

  18. Tracers in oncology. Preclinical and clinical evaluation; Innovative Tracer in der onkologischen Diagnostik. Praeklinische und klinische Evaluierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, B.J.; Schwarzenboeck, S.; Schwaiger, M. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Klinikum rechts der Isar (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2010-07-01

    In oncology, PET and PET/CT with tracers beyond FDG target more specific biological processes, such as proliferation ({sup 18}F-3'-fluoro-3'-deoxy-L-thymidine; {sup 18}F-FLT), tumour hypoxia ({sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazol; {sup 18}F-FMISO) and phospholipid metabolism (radioactively labelled choline derivates). FLT is a thymidine analogue which can be labelled with {sup 18}F. PET with {sup 18}F-FLT enables to non-invasively image and to quantify the proliferation fraction of tumours. Proliferation dependent accumulation of FLT has been demonstrated for a variety of solid and haematologic neoplasms including lung cancer, breast cancer, gastric cancer, colorectal cancer and malignant lymphoma. Furthermore, FLT has been suggested as surrogate marker for the assessment of response to treatment, especially when targeted drugs are utilized. PET imaging in particular has emerged as a promising non-invasive tool to accurately characterize tumour oxygenation. The great promise of PET/CT is its potential as a single imaging modality for whole body staging that provides anatomical and biological information on the disease as a whole. It allows a more precise estimation of the hypoxic tumour volume as well as comparisons on a voxel-by-voxel basis (parametric mapping). PET and PET/CT with hypoxia tracers thus offer the potential to optimize and individualize therapy for patients suffering from cancer. PET- and PET/CT-studies using {sup 11}C- or {sup 18}F-labeled choline derivates recently have shown promising results for re-staging prostate cancer in patients with biochemical recurrence and advanced prostate cancer. In patients with biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer after primary therapy the detection rate of {sup 11}C-choline- PET/CT shows a positive relationship with serum PSA-levels. In these patients {sup 11}C-choline PET/CT allows not only to diagnose but also to localize recurrent disease with implications on disease management (localised vs. systemic

  19. From circle time to clinical prevention group

    OpenAIRE

    Paola Marinelli

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the author traces the experiences of the psychological work carried out in institutions, not just into the schools, for which she has used the group both as a main tool in primary and secondary prevention intervention of disease, as well as a supporter of mental well-being of children and teachers.  On the basis of group-analytic theory and using different theoretical references during time, author highlights differences, points of contact, and transformations. These practices, ...

  20. Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement of the American Cancer Society Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Lacchetti, Christina; Davis, Nancy B; Garvey, Thomas Q; Goldstein, David P; Nunnink, J Chris; Ninfea, Jose I Ruades; Salner, Andrew L; Salz, Talya; Siu, Lillian L

    2017-02-27

    Purpose This guideline provides recommendations on the management of adults after head and neck cancer (HNC) treatment, focusing on surveillance and screening for recurrence or second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, care coordination, and practice implications. Methods ASCO has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations. The American Cancer Society (ACS) HNC Survivorship Care Guideline was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. An ASCO Expert Panel reviewed the content and recommendations, offering modifications and/or qualifying statements when deemed necessary. Results The ASCO Expert Panel determined that the ACS HNC Survivorship Care Guideline, published in 2016, is clear, thorough, clinically practical, and helpful, despite the limited availability of high-quality evidence to support many of the recommendations. ASCO endorsed the ACS HNC Survivorship Care Guideline, adding qualifying statements aimed at promoting team-based, multispecialty, multidisciplinary, collaborative head and neck survivorship care. Recommendations The ASCO Expert Panel emphasized that caring for HNC survivors requires a team-based approach that includes primary care clinicians, oncology specialists, otolaryngologists, dentists, and other allied professionals. The HNC treatment team should educate the primary care clinicians and patients about the type(s) of treatment received, the likelihood of potential recurrence, and the potential late and long-term complications. Primary care clinicians should recognize symptoms of recurrence and coordinate a prompt evaluation. They should also be prepared to manage late effects either directly or by referral to appropriate specialists. Health promotion is critical, particularly regarding tobacco cessation and dental care. Additional information is available at www

  1. American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline update on chemotherapy for stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzoli, Christopher G; Baker, Sherman; Temin, Sarah; Pao, William; Aliff, Timothy; Brahmer, Julie; Johnson, David H; Laskin, Janessa L; Masters, Gregory; Milton, Daniel; Nordquist, Luke; Pfister, David G; Piantadosi, Steven; Schiller, Joan H; Smith, Reily; Smith, Thomas J; Strawn, John R; Trent, David; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2009-12-20

    The purpose of this article is to provide updated recommendations for the treatment of patients with stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer. A literature search identified relevant randomized trials published since 2002. The scope of the guideline was narrowed to chemotherapy and biologic therapy. An Update Committee reviewed the literature and made updated recommendations. One hundred sixty-two publications met the inclusion criteria. Recommendations were based on treatment strategies that improve overall survival. Treatments that improve only progression-free survival prompted scrutiny of toxicity and quality of life. For first-line therapy in patients with performance status of 0 or 1, a platinum-based two-drug combination of cytotoxic drugs is recommended. Nonplatinum cytotoxic doublets are acceptable for patients with contraindications to platinum therapy. For patients with performance status of 2, a single cytotoxic drug is sufficient. Stop first-line cytotoxic chemotherapy at disease progression or after four cycles in patients who are not responding to treatment. Stop two-drug cytotoxic chemotherapy at six cycles even in patients who are responding to therapy. The first-line use of gefitinib may be recommended for patients with known epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation; for negative or unknown EGFR mutation status, cytotoxic chemotherapy is preferred. Bevacizumab is recommended with carboplatin-paclitaxel, except for patients with certain clinical characteristics. Cetuximab is recommended with cisplatin-vinorelbine for patients with EGFR-positive tumors by immunohistochemistry. Docetaxel, erlotinib, gefitinib, or pemetrexed is recommended as second-line therapy. Erlotinib is recommended as third-line therapy for patients who have not received prior erlotinib or gefitinib. Data are insufficient to recommend the routine third-line use of cytotoxic drugs. Data are insufficient to recommend routine use of molecular markers to select chemotherapy.

  2. Dummy Run of Quality Assurance Program in a Phase 3 Randomized Trial Investigating the Role of Internal Mammary Lymph Node Irradiation in Breast Cancer Patients: Korean Radiation Oncology Group 08-06 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Yoonsun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jun Won [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyung Hwan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Su Ssan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Sung-Ja [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Won [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyung-Sik [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dong-A University Hospital, Dong-A University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Won [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyu Chan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Hyun Suk [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Hee [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hyun Soo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Bundang CHA Hospital, School of Medicine, CHA University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Bae, E-mail: ybkim3@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Chang-Ok [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: The Korean Radiation Oncology Group (KROG) 08-06 study protocol allowed radiation therapy (RT) technique to include or exclude breast cancer patients from receiving radiation therapy to the internal mammary lymph node (IMN). The purpose of this study was to assess dosimetric differences between the 2 groups and potential influence on clinical outcome by a dummy run procedure. Methods and Materials: All participating institutions were asked to produce RT plans without irradiation (Arm 1) and with irradiation to the IMN (Arm 2) for 1 breast-conservation treatment case (breast-conserving surgery [BCS]) and 1 mastectomy case (modified radical mastectomy [MRM]) whose computed tomography images were provided. We assessed interinstitutional variations in IMN delineation and evaluated the dose-volume histograms of the IMN and normal organs. A reference IMN was delineated by an expert panel group based on the study guidelines. Also, we analyzed the potential influence of actual dose variation observed in this study on patient survival. Results: Although physicians intended to exclude the IMN within the RT field, the data showed almost 59.0% of the prescribed dose was delivered to the IMN in Arm 1. However, the mean doses covering the IMN in Arm 1 and Arm 2 were significantly different for both cases (P<.001). Due to the probability of overdose in Arm 1, the estimated gain in 7-year disease-free survival rate would be reduced from 10% to 7.9% for BCS cases and 7.1% for MRM cases. The radiation doses to the ipsilateral lung, heart, and coronary artery were lower in Arm 1 than in Arm 2. Conclusions: Although this dummy run study indicated that a substantial dose was delivered to the IMN, even in the nonirradiation group, the dose differences between the 2 groups were statistically significant. However, this dosimetric profile should be studied further with actual patient samples and be taken into consideration when analyzing clinical outcomes according to IMN

  3. The organization of clinical trials for oncology at IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori "Fondazione G. Pascale" Napoli and the impact of the OECI accreditation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Feo, Gianfranco; D'Ambrosio, Francesca; Palmieri, Giada; Perrone, Francesco; Ciliberto, Gennaro

    2015-01-01

    The Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IRCCS) Istituto Nazionale Tumori "Fondazione G. Pascale" (INT-Pascale) is the largest Clinical Care and Research Cancer Center in Southern Italy. The mission is prevention, diagnosis, and care of cancer and innovative research in oncology. In 2013, INT-Pascale joined the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) accreditation and classification project along with other Italian IRCCS cancer centers. One of the major OECI requirements that a cancer center must fulfill in order to achieve and maintain OECI certification is a strong emphasis in translational and clinical research: increasing the number of patients enrolled in clinical trials, establishing easily accessible databases for operators, and informing all possible stakeholders, including patients. A characterizing theme of INT-Pascale is a strong commitment to clinical experimental studies. In the 2007-2014 period, 440 clinical trials were activated at INT-Pascale; in this period, the number of clinical trials and observational studies has had an increment achieving in 2014, respectively, the share of 60 clinical trials and 35 observational studies activated. Optimization of clinical trials management and dissemination of the clinical research culture at INT-Pascale are main objectives to be achieved through several actions and procedures being implemented as a component of the OECI improvement plan. Participation in the OECI program has represented an important challenge to improve quality and processes related to promoting, prioritizing, and monitoring clinical trials at INT-Pascale.

  4. A Phase 3 Trial of 2 Years of Androgen Suppression and Radiation Therapy With or Without Adjuvant Chemotherapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Final Results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Phase 3 Randomized Trial NRG Oncology RTOG 9902

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, Seth A., E-mail: rosents@sutterhealth.org [Radiation Oncology, Sutter Cancer Centers, Roseville, California (United States); Hunt, Daniel [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sartor, A. Oliver [Tulane University Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana (United States); Pienta, Kenneth J. [Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Gomella, Leonard [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Grignon, David [Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana (United States); Rajan, Raghu [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Kerlin, Kevin J. [Community Clinical Oncology Program, Southeast Cancer Control Consortium, Inc, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Jones, Christopher U. [Radiation Oncology, Sutter Cancer Centers, Roseville, California (United States); Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, California (United States); Dobelbower, Michael [University of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Center, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); Shipley, William U. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Zeitzer, Kenneth [Albert Einstein Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A. [University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Donavanik, Viroon [Christiana Care Health Services, Inc, Wilmington, Delaware (United States); Rotman, Marvin [State University of New York Health Science Center–Brooklyn, Brooklyn, New York (United States); Hartford, Alan C. [Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Michalski, Jeffrey [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Seider, Michael [Akron City Hospital, Akron, Ohio (United States); Kim, Harold [Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States); and others

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Long-term (LT) androgen suppression (AS) with radiation therapy (RT) is a standard treatment of high-risk, localized prostate cancer (PCa). Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9902 was a randomized trial testing the hypothesis that adjuvant combination chemotherapy (CT) with paclitaxel, estramustine, and oral etoposide plus LT AS plus RT would improve overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Patients with high-risk PCa (prostate-specific antigen 20-100 ng/mL and Gleason score [GS] ≥7 or clinical stage ≥T2 and GS ≥8) were randomized to RT and AS (AS + RT) alone or with adjuvant CT (AS + RT + CT). CT was given as four 21-day cycles, delivered beginning 28 days after 70.2 Gy of RT. AS was given as luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone for 24 months, beginning 2 months before RT plus an oral antiandrogen for 4 months before and during RT. The study was designed based on a 6% improvement in OS from 79% to 85% at 5 years, with 90% power and a 2-sided alpha of 0.05. Results: A total of 397 patients (380 eligible) were randomized. The patients had high-risk PCa, 68% with GS 8 to 10 and 34% T3 to T4 tumors, and median prostate-specific antigen of 22.6 ng/mL. The median follow-up period was 9.2 years. The trial closed early because of excess thromboembolic toxicity in the CT arm. The 10-year results for all randomized patients revealed no significant difference between the AS + RT and AS + RT + CT arms in OS (65% vs 63%; P=.81), biochemical failure (58% vs 54%; P=.82), local progression (11% vs 7%; P=.09), distant metastases (16% vs 14%; P=.42), or disease-free survival (22% vs 26%; P=.61). Conclusions: NRG Oncology RTOG 9902 showed no significant differences in OS, biochemical failure, local progression, distant metastases, or disease-free survival with the addition of adjuvant CT to LT AS + RT. The trial results provide valuable data regarding the natural history of high-risk PCa treated with LT AS + RT and have implications for

  5. Report on the International Colloquium on Cardio-Oncology (Rome, 12–14 March 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewer, Michael; Gianni, Luca; Pane, Fabrizio; Sandri, Maria Teresa; Steiner, Rudolf K; Wojnowski, Leszek; Yeh, Edward T; Carver, Joseph R; Lipshultz, Steven E; Minotti, Giorgio; Armstrong, Gregory T; Cardinale, Daniela; Colan, Steven D; Darby, Sarah C; Force, Thomas L; Kremer, Leontien CM; Lenihan, Daniel J; Sallan, Stephen E; Sawyer, Douglas B; Suter, Thomas M; Swain, Sandra M; van Leeuwen, Flora E

    2014-01-01

    Cardio-oncology is a relatively new discipline that focuses on the cardiovascular sequelae of anti-tumour drugs. As any other young adolescent discipline, cardio-oncology struggles to define its scientific boundaries and to identify best standards of care for cancer patients or survivors at risk of cardiovascular events. The International Colloquium on Cardio-Oncology was held in Rome, Italy, 12–14 March 2014, with the aim of illuminating controversial issues and unmet needs in modern cardio-oncology. This colloquium embraced contributions from different kind of disciplines (oncology and cardiology but also paediatrics, geriatrics, genetics, and translational research); in fact, cardio-oncology goes way beyond the merging of cardiology with oncology. Moreover, the colloquium programme did not review cardiovascular toxicity from one drug or the other, rather it looked at patients as we see them in their fight against cancer and eventually returning to everyday life. This represents the melting pot in which anti-cancer therapies, genetic backgrounds, and risk factors conspire in producing cardiovascular sequelae, and this calls for screening programmes and well-designed platforms of collaboration between one key professional figure and another. The International Colloquium on Cardio-Oncology was promoted by the Menarini International Foundation and co-chaired by Giorgio Minotti (Rome), Joseph R Carver (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States), and Steven E Lipshultz (Detroit, Michigan, United States). The programme was split into five sessions of broad investigational and clinical relevance (what is cardiotoxicity?, cardiotoxicity in children, adolescents, and young adults, cardiotoxicity in adults, cardiotoxicity in special populations, and the future of cardio-oncology). Here, the colloquium chairs and all the session chairs briefly summarised what was said at the colloquium. Topics and controversies were reported on behalf of all members of the working group

  6. Preliminary Toxicity Analysis of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy Versus Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy on the High-Dose Arm of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0126 Prostate Cancer Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalski, Jeff M., E-mail: jmichalski@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Yan, Yan [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Watkins-Bruner, Deborah [Emory University School of Nursing, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Department of Radiation Oncology Washington University Medical Center, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Winter, Kathryn [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Galvin, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bahary, Jean-Paul [Department of Radiation Oncology Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal-Notre Dame, Montreal, QC (Canada); Morton, Gerard C. [Department of Radiation Oncology Toronto-Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Parliament, Matthew B. [Department of Oncology Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Sandler, Howard M. [Department of Radiation Oncology Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To give a preliminary report of clinical and treatment factors associated with toxicity in men receiving high-dose radiation therapy (RT) on a phase 3 dose-escalation trial. Methods and Materials: The trial was initiated with 3-dimensional conformal RT (3D-CRT) and amended after 1 year to allow intensity modulated RT (IMRT). Patients treated with 3D-CRT received 55.8 Gy to a planning target volume that included the prostate and seminal vesicles, then 23.4 Gy to prostate only. The IMRT patients were treated to the prostate and proximal seminal vesicles to 79.2 Gy. Common Toxicity Criteria, version 2.0, and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer late morbidity scores were used for acute and late effects. Results: Of 763 patients randomized to the 79.2-Gy arm of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0126 protocol, 748 were eligible and evaluable: 491 and 257 were treated with 3D-CRT and IMRT, respectively. For both bladder and rectum, the volumes receiving 65, 70, and 75 Gy were significantly lower with IMRT (all P<.0001). For grade (G) 2+ acute gastrointestinal/genitourinary (GI/GU) toxicity, both univariate and multivariate analyses showed a statistically significant decrease in G2+ acute collective GI/GU toxicity for IMRT. There were no significant differences with 3D-CRT or IMRT for acute or late G2+ or 3+ GU toxicities. Univariate analysis showed a statistically significant decrease in late G2+ GI toxicity for IMRT (P=.039). On multivariate analysis, IMRT showed a 26% reduction in G2+ late GI toxicity (P=.099). Acute G2+ toxicity was associated with late G3+ toxicity (P=.005). With dose–volume histogram data in the multivariate analysis, RT modality was not significant, whereas white race (P=.001) and rectal V70 ≥15% were associated with G2+ rectal toxicity (P=.034). Conclusions: Intensity modulated RT is associated with a significant reduction in acute G2+ GI/GU toxicity. There is a trend for a

  7. Clinical effectiveness of posaconazole versus fluconazole as antifungal prophylaxis in hematology–oncology patients: a retrospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Hsiang-Chi; Johnson, Melissa D; Drew, Richard H; Saha-Chaudhuri, Paramita; Perfect, John R

    2014-01-01

    In preventing invasive fungal disease (IFD) in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), clinical trials demonstrated efficacy of posaconazole over fluconazole and itraconazole. However, effectiveness of posaconazole has not been investigated in the United States in real-world setting outside the environment of controlled clinical trial. We performed a single-center, retrospective cohort study of 130 evaluable patients ≥18 years of age admitted to Duke University Hospital between 2004 and 2010 who received either posaconazole or fluconazole as prophylaxis during first induction or first reinduction chemotherapy for AML or MDS. The primary endpoint was possible, probable, or definite breakthrough IFD. Baseline characteristics were well balanced between groups, except that posaconazole recipients received reinduction chemotherapy and cytarabine more frequently. IFD occurred in 17/65 (27.0%) in the fluconazole group and in 6/65 (9.2%) in the posaconazole group (P = 0.012). Definite/probable IFDs occurred in 7 (10.8%) and 0 patients (0%), respectively (P = 0.0013). In multivariate analysis, fluconazole prophylaxis and duration of neutropenia were predictors of IFD. Mortality was similar between groups. This study demonstrates superior effectiveness of posaconazole over fluconazole as prophylaxis of IFD in AML and MDS patients. Such superiority did not translate to reductions in 100-day all-cause mortality. PMID:24644249

  8. Clinical effectiveness of posaconazole versus fluconazole as antifungal prophylaxis in hematology-oncology patients: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Hsiang-Chi; Johnson, Melissa D; Drew, Richard H; Saha-Chaudhuri, Paramita; Perfect, John R

    2014-06-01

    In preventing invasive fungal disease (IFD) in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), clinical trials demonstrated efficacy of posaconazole over fluconazole and itraconazole. However, effectiveness of posaconazole has not been investigated in the United States in real-world setting outside the environment of controlled clinical trial. We performed a single-center, retrospective cohort study of 130 evaluable patients ≥18 years of age admitted to Duke University Hospital between 2004 and 2010 who received either posaconazole or fluconazole as prophylaxis during first induction or first reinduction chemotherapy for AML or MDS. The primary endpoint was possible, probable, or definite breakthrough IFD. Baseline characteristics were well balanced between groups, except that posaconazole recipients received reinduction chemotherapy and cytarabine more frequently. IFD occurred in 17/65 (27.0%) in the fluconazole group and in 6/65 (9.2%) in the posaconazole group (P = 0.012). Definite/probable IFDs occurred in 7 (10.8%) and 0 patients (0%), respectively (P = 0.0013). In multivariate analysis, fluconazole prophylaxis and duration of neutropenia were predictors of IFD. Mortality was similar between groups. This study demonstrates superior effectiveness of posaconazole over fluconazole as prophylaxis of IFD in AML and MDS patients. Such superiority did not translate to reductions in 100-day all-cause mortality.

  9. Detection of MYCN Gene Amplification in Neuroblastoma by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization: A Pediatric Oncology Group Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Mathew

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available To assess the utility of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH for analysis of MYCN gene amplification in neuroblastoma, we compared this assay with Southern blot analysis using tumor specimens collected from 232 patients with presenting characteristics typical of this disease. The FISH technique identified MYCN amplification in 47 cases, compared with 39 by Southern blotting, thus increasing the total number of positive cases by 21%. The major cause of discordancy was a low fraction of tumor cells (≤30% replacement in clinical specimens, which prevented an accurate estimate of MYCN copy number by Southern blotting. With FISH, by contrast, it was possible to analyze multiple interphase nuclei of tumor cells, regardless of the proportion of normal peripheral blood, bone marrow, or stromal cells in clinical samples. Thus, FISH could be performed accurately with very small numbers of tumor cells from touch preparations of needle biopsies. Moreover, this procedure allowed us to discern the heterogeneous pattern of MYCN amplification that is characteristic of neuroblastoma. We conclude that FISH improves the detection of MYCN gene amplification in childhood neuroblastomas in a clinical setting, thus facilitating therapeutic decisions based on the presence or absence of this prognostically important biologic marker.

  10. Ethical issues at the interface of clinical care and research practice in pediatric oncology: a narrative review of parents' and physicians' experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Vries Martine C

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pediatric oncology has a strong research culture. Most pediatric oncologists are investigators, involved in clinical care as well as research. As a result, a remarkable proportion of children with cancer enrolls in a trial during treatment. This paper discusses the ethical consequences of the unprecedented integration of research and care in pediatric oncology from the perspective of parents and physicians. Methodology An empirical ethical approach, combining (1 a narrative review of (primarily qualitative studies on parents' and physicians' experiences of the pediatric oncology research practice, and (2 comparison of these experiences with existing theoretical ethical concepts about (pediatric research. The use of empirical evidence enriches these concepts by taking into account the peculiarities that ethical challenges pose in practice. Results Analysis of the 22 studies reviewed revealed that the integration of research and care has consequences for the informed consent process, the promotion of the child's best interests, and the role of the physician (doctor vs. scientist. True consent to research is difficult to achieve due to the complexity of research protocols, emotional stress and parents' dependency on their child's physician. Parents' role is to promote their child's best interests, also when they are asked to consider enrolling their child in a trial. Parents are almost never in equipoise on trial participation, which leaves them with the agonizing situation of wanting to do what is best for their child, while being fearful of making the wrong decision. Furthermore, a therapeutic misconception endangers correct assessment of participation, making parents inaccurately attribute therapeutic intent to research procedures. Physicians prefer the perspective of a therapist over a researcher. Consequently they may truly believe that in the research setting they promote the child's best interests, which maintains the

  11. Randomized use of cyclosporin A (CsA) to modulate P-glycoprotein in children with AML in remission: Pediatric Oncology Group Study 9421

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becton, David; Dahl, Gary V.; Ravindranath, Yaddanapudi; Chang, Myron N.; Behm, Fred G.; Raimondi, Susana C.; Head, David R.; Stine, Kimo C.; Lacayo, Norman J.; Sikic, Branimir Ivan; Arceci, Robert J.; Weinstein, Howard

    2006-01-01

    Relapse is a major obstacle in the cure of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The Pediatric Oncology Group AML Study 9421 tested 2 different strategies to improve event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS). Patients were randomized to receive standard-dose DAT (daunorubicin, cytarabine, and thioguanine) or high-dose DAT during induction. To interfere with P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-dependent drug efflux, the second randomization tested the benefit of cyclosporine (CsA) added to consolidation chemotherapy. Of the 282 children randomly assigned to receive standard DAT induction, 248 (87.9%) achieved remission compared to 253 (91%) of the 278 receiving high-dose DAT (P = ns). Children with HLA-identical sibling donors who achieved a complete remission received an allogeneic bone marrow transplant as consolidation. For the 83 patients receiving a matched related donor bone marrow transplantation (BMT), the 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) is 67%. Of the 418 children who achieved remission and went on to consolidation with and without CsA, the DFS was 40.6% and 33.9%, respectively (P = .24). Overexpression of P-gp was infrequent (14%) in this pediatric population. In this study, intensifying induction with high-dose DAT and the addition of CsA to consolidation chemotherapy did not prolong the durations of remission or improve overall survival for children with AML. PMID:16254147

  12. PACS影像系统与 PBL、CBL教学在肿瘤临床教学中联合应用的价值%Application of the PACS image system combined with PBL and CBL in oncological clinical teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闵卫利; 赵阳; 单昌友; 苏文君; 代志军; 王西京; 管海涛; 张淑群; 马清涌

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of the PACS image system in problem-based learning ( PBL ) and case-based learning ( CBL ) teaching methodology so as to further improve the quality of oncological clinical teaching.Methods In the teaching of oncological clinical practice, we used the PACS system to establish the classic cases database and taught with PBL and CBL methods. Then we assessed the students and made a questionnaire survey.We selected 38 students from Class 2010 of clinical medicine to receive the new teaching method;the control group consisted of 40 students from Class 2009 for retrospective analysis, who were taught with the traditional teaching method.Last we compared the academic performance of the two groups.Results Compared with the traditional method, the progressive teaching method based on PBL and CBL was more welcomed by the students.The average score of the observation group was (84.3 ±5.9), which was higher than (81.0 ±7.3) of the control group (P<0.05).Moreover, the scores of the observation group had smaller differences and were all over 70 while some students in the control group scored under 70.The questionnaire survey showed that the students were generally satisfied with the new teaching method, with the satisfaction rate of above 90%.Conclusion The PACS image system plays a significant role in PBL and CBL teaching methodo-logy of clinical oncology and can achieve satisfactory teaching effects.%目的:探讨PACS影像系统在临床肿瘤学PBL和CBL教学法中的作用,进一步提高临床肿瘤学的教学质量。方法在肿瘤学临床实习教学中,应用PACS系统建立典型病例库,采用PBL联合CBL教学法对学生进行授课,并进行评估和问卷调查。选取我校2010级临床专业学生38例采用新的教学方法进行肿瘤学教学;对照组为回顾分析2009级学生40例,给予传统教学方法进行肿瘤教学。分析两组学生的学习成绩无统计学差异。结果与传统

  13. Report of a Phase I Evaluation of Dose and Schedule of Interleukin-1 Alpha and Cyclophosphamide in Patients with Advanced Tumors: An Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Study (PX990) and Review of IL-1-Based Studies of Hematopoietic Reconstitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuberg, Donna; Atkins, Michael B.; Tester, William J.; Wadler, Scott; Stewart, James A.; Chachoua, Abraham; Schuchter, Lynn M.

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is a cytokine critical to inflammation, immunological activation, response to infection, and bone marrow hematopoiesis. Cyclophosphamide downmodulates immune suppressor cells and is cytotoxic to a variety of tumors. A phase I trial of IL-1 and cyclophosphamide was conducted by the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group. This study evaluated 3 dose levels and 3 schedules in patients with solid tumors. The goal was to evaluate the hematopoietic supportive care effect and possible antitumor effect. Toxicity was fever, chills, hypotension, nausea/emesis, hepatic, and neutropenia. Toxicity increased with dose increases of interleukin-1. Treatment at all dose levels resulted in significant increases in total white blood cell (WBC) counts above baseline. Nadir WBC and nadir absolute neutrophil counts were not significantly different by dose level of IL-1 or schedule of IL-1. Toxicity due to IL-1 at higher doses prohibited further evaluation of this agent for hematopoietic support, particularly in view of the activity and tolerability of more lineage-specific hematopoietic cytokines. Therapeutic interventions in the role of IL-1 in inflammatory conditions and cancer may be further informed by our definition of its clinical and biological effects in this evaluation of dose and schedule. PMID:24433038

  14. MUST ONCOLOGICAL PRINCIPLES BE IN THE SURGERY OF MENINGIOMAS? EN BLOC REMOVAL OF GIANT RIGHT FRONTAL MENINGIOMA WITH EXTRACRANIAL SPREAD. DESCRIPTION OF A CLINICAL CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Karakhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of the oncological principle – en bloc ablastic tumor resection – can expect a breakthrough in the treatment of baseline unfavorable patient groups. In the described case of atypical meningioma, its en bloc resection presents significant technical difficulties when accomplishing the task associated with the giant sizes of a tumor as an iceberg growing outside and into the cranial cavity, its rich vascularization from both the internal and external carotid artery system, with the involvement of the superior sagittal sinus, the presence of a dense bone crown that combines the three-component construction of a neoplasm, which made difficult safe mobilization and scanning in the cranial cavity.In such topographic variants, the criteria for the Simpson radical meningioma resection are inapplicable and only en bloc tumor resection may reflect the oncological principles of surgery. The technologies of en bloc resection of intracranial meningiomas should be more frequently used because preoperative neurovisualization and even histological diagnosis does not always allow the grade of meningiomas to be specified.

  15. ABO blood groups and malaria related clinical outcom

    OpenAIRE

    Deepa, Vanamala A. Alwar, Karuna Rameshkumar & Cecil Ross

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The study was undertaken to correlate the blood groups and clinical presentations in malaria patientsand to understand the differential host susceptibility in malaria.Methods: From October 2007 to September 2008, malaria positive patients’ samples were evaluated in thisstudy. Hemoglobin, total leukocyte count, and platelet count of each patient were done on an automated cellcounter. After determining the blood groups, malarial species and the severity of clinical course were corr...

  16. Are Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Para-aortic Contouring Guidelines for Pancreatic Neoplasm Applicable to Other Malignancies—Assessment of Nodal Distribution in Gynecological Malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabolizadeh, Peyman; Fulay, Suyash; Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy is used to reduce dose to adjacent critical structures while maintaining adequate target coverage, but it requires precise target localization. We report the 3-dimensional distribution of para-aortic (PA) lymph nodes (LN) in pelvic malignancies. We propose a guideline to accurately define the PA LN by anatomic landmarks and compare our data with published guidelines for pancreatic cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was performed on 46 patients with pelvic malignancies and positive PA LNs. Positive LNs were defined based on size and morphology or fluorodeoxyglucose avidity. All PA LNs were characterized into 3 groups based on location: left PA (between aorta and left psoas muscle), aortocaval (between aorta and inferior vena cava), and right paracaval (between inferior vena cava and right psoas muscle). Patients with retrocrural LNs were also analyzed. Results: One hundred thirty-three positive PA LNs were evaluated. The majority of the PA LNs were in the left PA (59%) and aortocaval (35) regions, and only 8% were in the right paracaval region. All patients with positive right paracaval LNs also had involved left PA LNs, with only 1 exception. The highest PA LN involvement was at the level of the renal vessels and was seen in 28% of patients. Of these patients with disease extending to renal vessels, 38% had retrocrural LN involvement. Conclusions: The nodal contouring for the PA region should not be defined by a fixed circumferential margin around the vessels. The left PA and aortocaval spaces should be covered adequately because these are common locations of PA LNs. For microscopic disease superiorly, contouring should extend up to renal vessels rather than a fixed bony landmark. For patients who have nodal involvement at renal vessels, one can consider including retrocrural LNs. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Para-aortic Contouring Guidelines for Pancreatic Neoplasm are not applicable to

  17. Metabolic Tumor Volume as a Prognostic Imaging-Based Biomarker for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Pilot Results From Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0522

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, David L., E-mail: david.schwartz@utsw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern School of Medicine, Dallas, Texas (United States); Harris, Jonathan [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Yao, Min [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rosenthal, David I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Opanowski, Adam; Levering, Anthony [American College of Radiology Imaging Network, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ang, K. Kian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Trotti, Andy M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jones, Christopher U. [Sutter Medical Group, Sacramento, California (United States); Harari, Paul [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Foote, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Holland, John [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Zhang, Qiang [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate candidate fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) imaging biomarkers for head-and-neck chemoradiotherapy outcomes in the cooperative group trial setting. Methods and Materials: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 0522 patients consenting to a secondary FDG-PET/CT substudy were serially imaged at baseline and 8 weeks after radiation. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), SUV peak (mean SUV within a 1-cm sphere centered on SUVmax), and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) using 40% of SUVmax as threshold were obtained from primary tumor and involved nodes. Results: Of 940 patients entered onto RTOG 0522, 74 were analyzable for this substudy. Neither high baseline SUVmax nor SUVpeak from primary or nodal disease were associated with poor treatment outcomes. However, primary tumor MTV above the cohort median was associated with worse local-regional control (hazard ratio 4.01, 95% confidence interval 1.28-12.52, P=.02) and progression-free survival (hazard ratio 2.34, 95% confidence interval 1.02-5.37, P=.05). Although MTV and T stage seemed to correlate (mean MTV 6.4, 13.2, and 26.8 for T2, T3, and T4 tumors, respectively), MTV remained a strong independent prognostic factor for progression-free survival in bivariate analysis that included T stage. Primary MTV remained prognostic in p16-associated oropharyngeal cancer cases, although sample size was limited. Conclusion: High baseline primary tumor MTV was associated with worse treatment outcomes in this limited patient subset of RTOG 0522. Additional confirmatory work will be required to validate primary tumor MTV as a prognostic imaging biomarker for patient stratification in future trials.

  18. PET/MR in oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balyasnikova, Svetlana; Löfgren, Johan; de Nijs, Robin

    2012-01-01

    of the challenges inherent in this new technology, but focus on potential applications for simultaneous PET/MR in the field of oncology. Methods and tracers for use with the PET technology will be familiar to most readers of this journal; thus this paper aims to provide a short and basic introduction to a number...... be applied together with PET increasing the amount of information about the tissues of interest. The potential clinical benefit of applying PET/MR in staging, radiotherapy planning and treatment evaluation in oncology, as well as the research perspectives for the use of PET/MR in the development of new...

  19. Interobserver Variability in Target Definition for Hepatocellular Carcinoma With and Without Portal Vein Thrombus: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Theodore S., E-mail: tshong1@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Krishnan, Sunil [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kim, Tae K. [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, Mount Sinai Hospital and Women' s College Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Mamon, Harvey J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Shyn, Paul [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ben-Josef, Edgar [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Seong, Jinsil [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Haddock, Michael G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Cheng, Jason C. [Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Feng, Mary U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Stephans, Kevin L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Roberge, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montreal General Hospital/McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Crane, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); and others

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Defining hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) gross tumor volume (GTV) requires multimodal imaging, acquired in different perfusion phases. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the variability in contouring and to establish guidelines and educational recommendations for reproducible HCC contouring for treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Anonymous, multiphasic planning computed tomography scans obtained from 3 patients with HCC were identified and distributed to a panel of 11 gastrointestinal radiation oncologists. Panelists were asked the number of HCC cases they treated in the past year. Case 1 had no vascular involvement, case 2 had extensive portal vein involvement, and case 3 had minor branched portal vein involvement. The agreement between the contoured total GTVs (primary + vascular GTV) was assessed using the generalized kappa statistic. Agreement interpretation was evaluated using Landis and Koch's interpretation of strength of agreement. The S95 contour, defined using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm consensus at the 95% confidence level, was created for each case. Results: Of the 11 panelists, 3 had treated >25 cases in the past year, 2 had treated 10 to 25 cases, 2 had treated 5 to 10 cases, 2 had treated 1 to 5 cases, 1 had treated 0 cases, and 1 did not respond. Near perfect agreement was seen for case 1, and substantial agreement was seen for cases 2 and 3. For case 2, there was significant heterogeneity in the volume identified as tumor thrombus (range 0.58-40.45 cc). For case 3, 2 panelists did not include the branched portal vein thrombus, and 7 panelists contoured thrombus separately from the primary tumor, also showing significant heterogeneity in volume of tumor thrombus (range 4.52-34.27 cc). Conclusions: In a group of experts, excellent agreement was seen in contouring total GTV. Heterogeneity exists in the definition of portal vein thrombus that may impact treatment

  20. Interaktiver Kleingruppenunterricht für Medizinstudenten der Klinischen Semester in einer onkologischen Gemeinschaftspraxis [Interactive medical education for medical students in an oncology group practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weide, Rudolf

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available [english] Background: The education of medical students to become qualified medical doctors should be improved in Germany. Reasons for this are medical teachers not properly trained in education, a lack of quality control and low esteem of medical education, too large groups, no intensive relationship between students and academic teachers and the triad for medical teachers at university hospitals to qualify in their discipline, to perform science and lecture medical students. At the same time experienced associate professors who left university are not integrated optimally in medical education programs. Pilotproject: Since 1998 we are performing weekend seminars for advanced medical students. 3 students are educated by 1 teacher. The topics of the training are differential diagnosis of anaemia, polyglobulinaemia, leukocytopenia, leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, thrombocytosis, training in morphology, diagnosis and treatment of leukaemia and lymphoma and principles of communication skills. Patient cases are presented in a problem oriented learning manner using patient files, a video microscope and a computer based learning programme for interactive purposes.Results: So far 320 students have participated in our seminars. Systematic quality evaluation of the teaching reveals excellent marks for practical relevance, learning atmosphere, didactics and effectiveness. Impressions of the routine work in an oncology group practice widens the experience of the students.Conclusion: Academical training for medical students is feasable and successful in an oncology group practice. This teaching model enables external associate professors to give their education in the environment where they are working and may relieve the University personally and financially.[german] Hintergrund: Die Ausbildung von Medizinstudenten zu guten Ärzten ist in Deutschland verbesserungsbedürftig. Die Gründe für ein suboptimales Studium sind die häufig fehlende Vernetzung von

  1. Personality types of oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, C A; Holcombe, J K

    1993-12-01

    Personality type influences the choice of occupation. The breadth of specialty areas within oncology nursing allows for divergent activities and relationships and, thus, the accommodation of different personality characteristics. This exploratory study examined personality types for a convenience sample of oncology nurses predominantly employed in hospitals. According to the personality typology defined by Carl Jung, a person demonstrates a preference among four dimensions, i.e., extraversion/introversion, sensory/intuition, thinking/feeling, and judging/perceiving. The type with the strongest self-selection for these oncology nurses was ISFJ, where feeling is introverted and perception is practical, so that helping others is both a responsibility and a pleasure. The discussion relates the personality types to Jung's theory and their impact in clinical practice. Strengths and weaknesses of each personality type are described.

  2. Comparison of diagnostic performance of CT and MRI for abdominal staging of pediatric renal tumors: a report from the Children's Oncology Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servaes, Sabah [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Khanna, Geetika [Washington University School of Medicine, Pediatric Radiology, St. Louis Children' s Hospital, Mallinckrodt Institute for Radiology, 510 S. Kingshighway, Campus Box 8131-MIR, St. Louis, MO (United States); Naranjo, Arlene [University of Florida, Department of Biostatistics, Gainesville, FL (United States); Geller, James I. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Oncology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Ehrlich, Peter F. [University of Michigan, Department of Surgery, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Gow, Kenneth W. [Seattle Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Surgery, Seattle, WA (United States); Perlman, Elizabeth J. [Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Department of Pathology, Chicago, IL (United States); Dome, Jeffrey S. [Children' s National Medical Center, Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders, Washington, DC (United States); Gratias, Eric; Mullen, Elizabeth A. [Harvard University, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Boston Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-08-19

    CT and MRI are both used for abdominal staging of pediatric renal tumors. The diagnostic performance of the two modalities for local and regional staging of renal tumors has not been systematically evaluated. To compare the diagnostic performance of CT and MRI for local staging of pediatric renal tumors. The study population was derived from the AREN03B2 study of the Children's Oncology Group. Baseline abdominal imaging performed with both CT and MRI within 30 days of nephrectomy was available for retrospective review in 82 renal tumor cases. Each case was evaluated for capsular penetration, lymph node metastasis, tumor thrombus, preoperative tumor rupture, and synchronous contralateral lesions. The surgical and pathological findings at central review were the reference standard. The sensitivity of CT and MRI for detecting capsular penetration was 68.6% and 62.9%, respectively (P = 0.73), while specificity was 86.5% and 83.8% (P = 1.0). The sensitivity of CT and MRI for detecting lymph node metastasis was 76.5% and 52.9% (P = 0.22), and specificity was 90.4% and 92.3% (P = 1.0). Synchronous contralateral lesions were identified by CT in 4/9 cases and by MRI in 7/9 cases. CT and MRI have similar diagnostic performance for detection of lymph node metastasis and capsular penetration. MR detected more contralateral synchronous lesions; however these were present in a very small number of cases. Either modality can be used for initial loco-regional staging of pediatric renal tumors. (orig.)

  3. Phase 2 Study of Temozolomide-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for High-Risk Low-Grade Gliomas: Preliminary Results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0424

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Barbara J., E-mail: barbara.fisher@lhsc.on.ca [London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Hu, Chen [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Macdonald, David R. [London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Lesser, Glenn J. [Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Coons, Stephen W. [Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Brachman, David G. [Arizona Oncology Services Foundation, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Ryu, Samuel [Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bahary, Jean-Paul [Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal-Notre Dame, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Liu, Junfeng [GCE Solutions, Inc., Bloomington, Illinois (United States); Chakravarti, Arnab [The Ohio State University, The James, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Mehta, Minesh [University of Maryland Medical Systems, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0424 was a phase 2 study of a high-risk low-grade glioma (LGG) population who were treated with temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation therapy (RT), and outcomes were compared to those of historical controls. This study was designed to detect a 43% increase in median survival time (MST) from 40.5 to 57.9 months and a 20% improvement in 3-year overall survival (OS) rate from 54% to 65% at a 10% significance level (1-sided) and 96% power. Methods and Materials: Patients with LGGs with 3 or more risk factors for recurrence (age ≥40 years, astrocytoma histology, bihemispherical tumor, preoperative tumor diameter of ≥6 cm, or a preoperative neurological function status of >1) were treated with RT (54 Gy in 30 fractions) and concurrent and adjuvant TMZ. Results: From 2005 to 2009, 129 evaluable patients (75 males and 54 females) were accrued. Median age was 49 years; 91% had a Zubrod score of 0 or 1; and 69%, 25%, and 6% of patients had 3, 4, and 5 risk factors, respectively. Patients had median and minimum follow-up examinations of 4.1 years and 3 years, respectively. The 3-year OS rate was 73.1% (95% confidence interval: 65.3%-80.8%), which was significantly improved compared to that of prespecified historical control values (P<.001). Median survival time has not yet been reached. Three-year progression-free survival was 59.2%. Grades 3 and 4 adverse events occurred in 43% and 10% of patients, respectively. One patient died of herpes encephalitis. Conclusions: The 3-year OS rate of 73.1% for RTOG 0424 high-risk LGG patients is higher than that reported for historical controls (P<.001) and the study-hypothesized rate of 65%.

  4. Do Intermediate Radiation Doses Contribute to Late Rectal Toxicity? An Analysis of Data From Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 94-06

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, Susan L., E-mail: sltucker@mdanderson.org [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Image-Guided Therapy QA Center, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Winter, Kathryn [American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the volumes of rectum exposed to intermediate doses, from 30 to 50 Gy, contribute to the risk of Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity among patients with prostate cancer receiving radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Data from 1009 patients treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 94-06 were analyzed using three approaches. First, the contribution of intermediate doses to a previously published fit of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model was determined. Next, the extent to which intermediate doses provide additional risk information, after taking the LKB model into account, was investigated. Third, the proportion of rectum receiving doses higher than a threshold, VDose, was computed for doses ranging from 5 to 85 Gy, and a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine which of these parameters were significantly associated with time to Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity. Results: Doses <60 Gy had no detectable impact on the fit of the LKB model, as expected on the basis of the small estimate of the volume parameter (n = 0.077). Furthermore, there was no detectable difference in late rectal toxicity among cohorts with similar risk estimates from the LKB model but with different volumes of rectum exposed to intermediate doses. The multivariate Cox proportional hazards model selected V75 as the only value of VDose significantly associated with late rectal toxicity. Conclusions: There is no evidence from these data that intermediate doses influence the risk of Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity. Instead, the critical doses for this endpoint seem to be {>=}75 Gy. It is hypothesized that cases of Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity occurring among patients with V75 less than approximately 12% may be due to a 'background' level of risk, likely due mainly to biological factors.

  5. 肿瘤内科学临床实习教学思考%Thinking on the clinical teaching of oncology medicine for medical students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李科; 沈丽达; 邓明佳; 刘馨

    2009-01-01

    Clinical practice is very important to medical students.In the clinical teaching of oncology medicine the cultivation of students'clinical thinking should be pond much attention to,conccption and significance about bilingual teaching should be understood correctly,mixed media should be used,education of the doctor-patient relationship should be attached importance to and strengthened,students to deal with rationally the relations of exercitation,employment and reading for graduate courses should be educated,thus a concrete foundation for medical students'future was formed.%临床实习是医学生十分重要的学习阶段.在肿瘤内科学临床教学中,应当注重实习医生临床思维能力的培养,正确认识双语教学的内涵及其在肿瘤内科学实习教学中的重要意义,注重临床教学中的多媒体应用,重视和加强实习医生的医患关系教育,教育学生摆正实习、就业、考研的关系,从而为顺利完成实习任务、成为合格的医师打下坚实基础.

  6. Different Clinical Utility of Oropharyngeal Bacterial Screening prior to Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in Oncological and Neurological Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radek Kroupa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study was to monitor oropharyngeal bacterial colonization in patients indicated for percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy (PEG. Methods. Oropharyngeal swabs were obtained from patients prior to PEG placement. A development of peristomal infection was evaluated. The analysis of oropharyngeal and peristomal site pathogens was done. Results. Consecutive 274 patients referred for PEG due to neurological disorder or cancer completed the study. Oropharyngeal colonization with pathogens was observed in 69% (190/274, dominantly in the neurologic subgroup of patients (P < 0.001. Peristomal infection occurred in 30 (10.9% of patients and in 57% of them the correlation between oropharyngeal and peristomal agents was present. The presence of oropharyngeal pathogens was assessed as an important risk factor for the development of peristomal infection only in oncological patients (OR = 8.33, 95% CI: 1.66–41.76. Despite a high prevalence of pathogens in neurological patients, it did not influence the risk of peristomal infection with the exception for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA carriers (OR 4.5, 95% CI: 1.08–18.76. Conclusion. During oropharyngeal microbial screening prior to the PEG insertion, the detection of pathogens may be a marker of the increased risk of peristomal infection in cancer patients only. In neurological patients the benefit of the screening is limited to the detection of MRSA carriers.

  7. Different Clinical Utility of Oropharyngeal Bacterial Screening prior to Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in Oncological and Neurological Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastych, Milan; Senkyrik, Michal; Pavlik, Tomas; Prokesova, Jitka; Jecmenova, Marketa; Dolina, Jiri; Hep, Ales

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to monitor oropharyngeal bacterial colonization in patients indicated for percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy (PEG). Methods. Oropharyngeal swabs were obtained from patients prior to PEG placement. A development of peristomal infection was evaluated. The analysis of oropharyngeal and peristomal site pathogens was done. Results. Consecutive 274 patients referred for PEG due to neurological disorder or cancer completed the study. Oropharyngeal colonization with pathogens was observed in 69% (190/274), dominantly in the neurologic subgroup of patients (P < 0.001). Peristomal infection occurred in 30 (10.9%) of patients and in 57% of them the correlation between oropharyngeal and peristomal agents was present. The presence of oropharyngeal pathogens was assessed as an important risk factor for the development of peristomal infection only in oncological patients (OR = 8.33, 95% CI: 1.66–41.76). Despite a high prevalence of pathogens in neurological patients, it did not influence the risk of peristomal infection with the exception for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriers (OR 4.5, 95% CI: 1.08–18.76). Conclusion. During oropharyngeal microbial screening prior to the PEG insertion, the detection of pathogens may be a marker of the increased risk of peristomal infection in cancer patients only. In neurological patients the benefit of the screening is limited to the detection of MRSA carriers. PMID:25243153

  8. ABO blood groups and malaria related clinical outcom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa, Vanamala A. Alwar, Karuna Rameshkumar & Cecil Ross

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The study was undertaken to correlate the blood groups and clinical presentations in malaria patientsand to understand the differential host susceptibility in malaria.Methods: From October 2007 to September 2008, malaria positive patients’ samples were evaluated in thisstudy. Hemoglobin, total leukocyte count, and platelet count of each patient were done on an automated cellcounter. After determining the blood groups, malarial species and the severity of clinical course were correlated.Results: A total of 100 patients were included in the study, of which 63 cases were positive for Plasmodiumfalciparum and 37 cases were positive for P. vivax infection and 11 patients had mixed infection. The results ofthe blood groups showed 22 – ‘A’ group, 42 – ‘B’ group, 35 – ‘O’ group and 1 was ‘AB’ group. When the clinicalcourses between different groups were compared using the following parameters for severe infection—a parasiticload of >10/1000 RBCs, severe anemia with hemoglobin 101oF and other organ involvement, it wasobserved that ‘O’ group had an advantage over other the groups. The difference in rosetting ability between redblood cells of different ‘ABO’ blood groups with a diminished rosetting potential in blood group ‘O’ red bloodcells was due to the differential host susceptibility.Conclusion: ‘O’ group had an advantage over the other three blood groups. Based on literature and the results ofthis study, the diminished rosetting potential in blood group ‘O’ red blood cells is suggested as the basis for thedifferential host susceptibility.

  9. [History of Oncology in Slovakia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondruš, D; Kaušitz, J

    2016-01-01

    The history of oncology in Slovakia is closely linked to the history of St. Elizabeth Hospital, which was set up in the mid-18th century by nuns of the St. Elizabeth Order in Bratislava. In the first half of the 20th century, a unit was set up in the hospital dedicated to diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Shortly after World War II, the unit was turned into the Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment. In 1950, St. Elizabeth Hospital was nationalized, and the Cancer Research Institute of the Slovak Academy of Science and the Institute of Clinical Oncology were located there as centers for oncological diagnosis and treatment. After the restitution of church property in the early 1990s, the hospital was returned to the Order of St. Elizabeth, which set up the St. Elisabeth Cancer Institute in the hospital premises in January of 1996. This year marks the 20th anniversary of this institute in its new premises and the 85th anniversary of the Institute of Radiumtherapy founded in Bratislava, and thus the establishment of institutional healthcare for cancer patients in Slovakia is the reason for balancing. We present a view of the consecutive changes in the organization, space and staff of the Institute and evaluate the impact of celebrities on medicine who developed oncology as a clinical, scientific and educational discipline in Bratislava and in other cities and regions of Slovakia.

  10. Palliative medicine and medical oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltoni, M; Amadori, D

    2001-04-01

    Traditionally, medical oncology and palliative care have been considered two distinct and separate disciplines, both as regards treatment objectives and delivery times. Palliative care in terminal stages, aimed exclusively at evaluating and improving quality of life, followed antitumor therapies, which concentrated solely on quantitative results (cure, prolongation of life, tumoral mass shrinkage). Over the years, more modern concepts have developed on the subject. Medical oncology, dealing with the skills and strategic co-ordination of oncologic interventions from primary prevention to terminal phases, should also include assessment and treatment of patients' subjective needs. Anticancer therapies should be evaluated in terms of both the quantitative and qualititative impact on patients' lives. Hence, the traditional view of palliative care has to be modified: it constitutes a philosophical and methodological approach to be adopted from the early phases of illness. It is not the evident cultural necessity of integrating medical oncology with palliative medicine that may be a matter of argument, but rather the organizational models needed to put this combined care into practice: should continuous care be guaranteed by a single figure, the medical oncologist, or rather by an interdisciplinary providers' team, including full-time doctors well-equipped for palliative care? In this paper the needs of cancer patients and the part that a complete oncologist should play to deal with such difficult and far-reaching problems are firstly described. Then, as mild provocation, data and critical considerations on the ever increasing needs of palliative care, the present shortcomings in quality of life and pain assessment and management by medical oncologists, and the uncertain efficacy of interventional programmes to change clinical practice are described. Finally, a model of therapeutic continuity is presented. which in our view is realistic and feasible: an Oncologic

  11. Development of cancer cooperative groups in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Haruhiko

    2010-09-01

    Investigator-initiated clinical trials are essential for improving the standard of care for cancer patients, because pharmaceutical companies do not conduct trials that evaluate combination chemotherapy using drugs from different companies, surgery, radiotherapy or multimodal treatments. Government-sponsored cooperative groups have played a vital role in developing cancer therapeutics since the 1950s in the USA; however, the establishment of these groups in Japan did not take place until 30 years later. Methodological standards for multicenter cancer clinical trials were established in the 1980s by the National Cancer Institute and cooperative groups. The Japan Clinical Oncology Group, one of the largest cooperative groups in the country, was instituted in 1990. Its data center and operations office, formed during the 1990s, applied the standard methods of US cooperative groups. At present, the Japan Clinical Oncology Group consists of 14 subgroups, a Data Center, an Operations Office, nine standing committees and an Executive Committee represented by the Japan Clinical Oncology Group Chair. Quality control and quality assurance at the Japan Clinical Oncology Group, including regular central monitoring, statistical methods, interim analyses, adverse event reporting and site visit audit, have complied with international standards. Other cooperative groups have also been established in Japan since the 1980s; however, nobody figures out all of them. A project involving the restructuring of US cooperative groups has been ongoing since 2005. Learning from the success of this project will permit further progress of the cancer clinical trials enterprise in Japan.

  12. [Clinical evaluation of new drugs against orphan diseases in oncology - the current situation in Europe and in our country].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stěrba, Jaroslav; Stěrbová, Sylva; Kodytková, Daniela; Valík, Dalibor; Demlová, Regina

    2014-01-01

    Cancer represents one of the main causes of death among diseases across the age spectrum. Tumors in children, however, represent less than 1% of the total number of cancers in the population and in terms of the definition of orphan diseases in Europe are all children's cancers considered as orphan diseases. This is the reason why the research and development of new agents against cancer in childhood stands outside of the main interest. Every year around 30,000 new cases of cancer in children and adolescents are diagnosed in the European Unioun (EU) and approximately 80% of them achieve long-term remission using mainly conventional methods of treatment. However, almost 6,000 children and adolescents die every year of malignant tumors therefore cancer remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Consequently, there is a demand for new and safe drugs for children suffering from cancer which would lead to improved survival and to risk reduction of late adverse effects of cancer treatment. In the past 10 years in the EU, more in the EU-15 than in our country, 20 performed oncology trials in phase I involving adults account for only one trial in pediatric patients. The issue of new drugs clinical testing in rare cancers is very complex, complicated and for current unsatisfactory situation might be responsible various aspects. These aspects contain the legislative field, the problem of determining the correct dose of testing drug as a single agent or in combination therapy, the use of testing drug in advanced disease or already in de novo diagnosed patients, as well as equity (equal) access to new drugs being tested, the goal set for each molecule/drug in clinical trials, the conflict of interest balanced with sufficient professionalism and last but not least, the need for new methodologies and statistical approaches. The aim of this article is to describe the issue complexity of incorporation of new, modern drug for cancer patients with orphan diseases, including

  13. Personalized oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuxen, Ida Viller; Jønson, Lars; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric;

    2014-01-01

    accelerated drug development. The overall advantage is to determine which mutation profiles correlate with sensitivity or lack of resistance to specific targeted therapies. The utility and current limitations of genomic screening to guide selection to Phase 1 clinical trial will be discussed....

  14. Thirty years since foundation of the department of gynaecology at the Institute of Clinical Oncology in Bratislava

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manka, I. (Komenskeho Univerzita, Bratislava (Czechoslovakia). Gynaecological Dept.)

    1980-09-01

    In 1949, the department of gynaecology was set up. After a brief historical draft describing the development of the oncological center, we draw attention to the advantages of its multidisciplinary structure demonstrated in our cooperation with that of radiotherapy. The kinds of treatment and their results are reported with regard to the carcinomas of the cervix, corpus and vulva. Radiotherapy of the carcinoma of the cervix using a modified Stockholm method covers two sessions, with an interval of two to three weeks during which 60 mg radium (= 1600 mgh) intrauterine and twice 30 mg radium (= 1600 mgh) intravaginal are applied for 26.5 hours combined with a percutaneous irradiation of the parametries with 3500 to 4000 rad (gammatron, /sup 60/Co; betatron, 42 MeV). We prefer surgical therapy for the carcinoma of the cervix in the Ia, Ib and IIa stages up to the age of 65. We operated on 604 patients between 1957 and 1978, all of them receiving additional radiotherapy, a third preoperative irradiation. Carcinoma of the corpus has rarely been treated surgically in account of the negative selection of our patients. The radiotherapeutic procedure mostly applied is the tamponade of the uterine cavum whereby twelfe 10-mg radium tubes are applied in two sessions for 25 hours, 6000 mgh in all, plus a vaginal implant of 1500 mgh in stage-I cases, and in stage-II cases 3000 mgh intravaginally and a percutaneous telecobalt-dose of 3000 to 4000 rad. Carcinoma of the vulva is, if possible, primarily to be treated surgically by radical vulvectomy and lymphadenectomy of the inguinal and subinguinal lymphodes. Postoperative radiotherapy is carried out, when the lymphodes are positive.

  15. Impact of Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Technique for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Secondary Analysis of the NRG Oncology RTOG 0617 Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Stephen G; Hu, Chen; Choy, Hak; Komaki, Ritsuko U; Timmerman, Robert D; Schild, Steven E; Bogart, Jeffrey A; Dobelbower, Michael C; Bosch, Walter; Galvin, James M; Kavadi, Vivek S; Narayan, Samir; Iyengar, Puneeth; Robinson, Clifford G; Wynn, Raymond B; Raben, Adam; Augspurger, Mark E; MacRae, Robert M; Paulus, Rebecca; Bradley, Jeffrey D

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Although intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is increasingly used to treat locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), IMRT and three-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-CRT) have not been compared prospectively. This study compares 3D-CRT and IMRT outcomes for locally advanced NSCLC in a large prospective clinical trial. Patients and Methods A secondary analysis was performed to compare IMRT with 3D-CRT in NRG Oncology clinical trial RTOG 0617, in which patients received concurrent chemotherapy of carboplatin and paclitaxel with or without cetuximab, and 60- versus 74-Gy radiation doses. Comparisons included 2-year overall survival (OS), progression-free survival, local failure, distant metastasis, and selected Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 3) ≥ grade 3 toxicities. Results The median follow-up was 21.3 months. Of 482 patients, 53% were treated with 3D-CRT and 47% with IMRT. The IMRT group had larger planning treatment volumes (median, 427 v 486 mL; P = .005); a larger planning treatment volume/volume of lung ratio (median, 0.13 v 0.15; P = .013); and more stage IIIB disease (30.3% v 38.6%, P = .056). Two-year OS, progression-free survival, local failure, and distant metastasis-free survival were not different between IMRT and 3D-CRT. IMRT was associated with less ≥ grade 3 pneumonitis (7.9% v 3.5%, P = .039) and a reduced risk in adjusted analyses (odds ratio, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.171 to 0.986; P = .046). IMRT also produced lower heart doses ( P < .05), and the volume of heart receiving 40 Gy (V40) was significantly associated with OS on adjusted analysis ( P < .05). The lung V5 was not associated with any ≥ grade 3 toxicity, whereas the lung V20 was associated with increased ≥ grade 3 pneumonitis risk on multivariable analysis ( P = .026). Conclusion IMRT was associated with lower rates of severe pneumonitis and cardiac doses in NRG Oncology clinical trial RTOG 0617, which supports

  16. Importance of dose intensity in neuro-oncology clinical trials: summary report of the Sixth Annual Meeting of the Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, N D; Anderson, C P; Bleyer, W A; Cairncross, J G; Cloughesy, T; Eck, S L; Guastadisegni, P; Hall, W A; Muldoon, L L; Patel, S J; Peereboom, D; Siegal, T; Neuwelt, E A

    2001-01-01

    Therapeutic options for the treatment of malignant brain tumors have been limited, in part, because of the presence of the blood-brain barrier. For this reason, the Sixth Annual Meeting of the Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Consortium, the focus of which was the "Importance of Dose Intensity in Neuro-Oncology Clinical Trials," was convened in April 2000, at Government Camp, Mount Hood, Oregon. This meeting, which was supported by the National Cancer Institute, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, brought together clinicians and basic scientists from across the U.S. to discuss the role of dose intensity and enhanced chemotherapy delivery in the treatment of malignant brain tumors and to design multicenter clinical trials. Optimizing chemotherapy delivery to the CNS is crucial, particularly in view of recent progress identifying certain brain tumors as chemosensitive. The discovery that specific constellations of genetic alterations can predict which tumors are chemoresponsive, and can therefore more accurately predict prognosis, has important implications for delivery of intensive, effective chemotherapy regimens with acceptable toxicities. This report summarizes the discussions, future directions, and key questions regarding dose-intensive treatment of primary CNS lymphoma, CNS relapse of systemic non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, anaplastic oligodendroglioma, high-grade glioma, and metastatic cancer of the brain. The promising role of cytoenhancers and chemoprotectants as part of dose-intensive regimens for chemosensitive brain tumors and development of improved gene therapies for malignant gliomas are discussed.

  17. The impact of genomics on oncology nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamer, Laura Curr; Linder, Lauri; Wu, Bohua; Eggert, Julia

    2013-12-01

    Since 2003, genetics and genomics information has led to exciting new diagnostics, prognostics, and treatment options in oncology practice. Profiling of cancers offers providers insight into treatment and prognostic factors. Germline testing provides an individual with information for surveillance or therapy that may help them prevent cancer in their lifetime and options for family members as yet untouched by malignancy. This offers a challenge for oncology nurses and other oncology health care providers to become comfortable with incorporating education about genetics/genomics into their clinical practice and patient education.

  18. Attachment disorganization in different clinical groups: What underpins unresolved attachment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juen Florian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes findings and clinical implications of research on attachment disorganization in diverse clinical groups. Disorganized/unresolved attachment is overrepresented in these groups compared to healthy control participants, but disorder specific characteristics of this attachment pattern are still poorly understood. The focus of this study was to explore defensive processes in participants whose narratives were classified as disorganized/unresolved using the Adult Attachment Projective Picture System (AAP. Besides the predominance of disorganized attachment, clinical participants demonstrated more “segregated system material” especially in stories representing aloneness and more “Personal Experience material” compared to healthy individuals. Within the disorganized/ unresolved clinical individuals, BPD and PTSD patients showed the highest proportion of attachment disorganization and were less able to use other attachment-related defenses to maintain organized. Furthermore, PTSD patients were emotionally overwhelmed by the projective attachment scenes compared to the other clinical groups as indexed by an incapacity to complete sections of the AAP. BPD and addicted patients were characterized by a high degree of self-other boundary confusion. Depressive and schizophrenic patients showed a high overall defensive intensity to remain organized.

  19. Diabetes quality management in care groups and outpatient clinics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, M.J.E.

    2015-01-01

    This research project relates to diabetes quality management in Dutch care groups (40-200 GP practices) and outpatient clinics. Improvement of quality management at an organisational level on top of the existing quality management in separate general practices is expected to be associated with bette

  20. Apps for Radiation Oncology. A Comprehensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.J. Calero

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Software applications executed on a smart-phone or mobile device (“Apps” are increasingly used by oncologists in their daily work. A comprehensive critical review was conducted on Apps specifically designed for Radiation Oncology, which aims to provide scientific support for these tools and to guide users in choosing the most suited to their needs. Material and methods: A systematic search was conducted in mobile platforms, iOS and Android, returning 157 Apps. Excluding those whose purpose did not match the scope of the study, 31 Apps were methodically analyzed by the following items: Objective Features, List of Functionalities, Consistency in Outcomes and Usability. Results: Apps are presented in groups of features, as Dose Calculators (7 Apps, Clinical Calculators (4, Tools for Staging (7, Multipurpose (7 and Others (6. Each App is presented with the list of attributes and a brief comment. A short summary is provided at the end of each group. Discussion and Recommendations: There are numerous Apps with useful tools at the disposal of radiation oncologists. The most advisable Apps do not match the more expensive. Three all-in-one apps seem advisable above all: RadOnc Reference (in English, Easy Oncology (in German and iOncoR (in Spanish. Others recommendations are suggested for specific tasks: dose calculators, treatment-decision and staging.

  1. Group-sequential clinical trials with multiple co-objectives

    CERN Document Server

    Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Evans, Scott R; Ochiai, Toshimitsu

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on group sequential methods for clinical trials with co-primary endpoints based on the decision-making frameworks for: (1) rejecting the null hypothesis (stopping for efficacy), (2) rejecting the alternative hypothesis (stopping for futility), and (3) rejecting the null or alternative hypothesis (stopping for either futility or efficacy), where the trial is designed to evaluate whether the intervention is superior to the control on all endpoints. For assessing futility, there are two fundamental approaches, i.e., the decision to stop for futility based on the conditional probability of rejecting the null hypothesis, and the other based on stopping boundaries using group sequential methods. In this book, the latter approach is discussed. The book also briefly deals with the group sequential methods for clinical trials designed to evaluate whether the intervention is superior to the control on at least one endpoint. In addition, the book describes sample size recalculation and the resulting ef...

  2. [Dermato-oncological rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhles, N; Sander, C

    2005-07-01

    National insurance companies in Germany support health cures for patients with malignant tumors (malignant melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, Merkel cell tumor, malignant cutaneous lymphoma). The clinical requirements are an invasively growing tumor, problems of self-assurance, and dis-integration of the patient regarding his social and/or professional environment. The decision for a health cure is made by the treating dermatologist in the hospital. In this context, the following sociomedical criteria should be applied: impairment, disability, and handicap. Usually, rehabilitation starts after the patient is discharged from the hospital. The inpatient rehabilitation program should be performed at an institution capable of providing dermatological and psychological treatment. The dermatologist acts as a manager for the members of the rehabilitation team (psychologists, physiotherapists, social workers, and ergo-therapists). In conclusion, dermato-oncologic rehabilitation plays an important role in re-integrating the patient into his professional life to avoid retirement.

  3. AllergoOncology - the impact of allergy in oncology: EAACI position paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen-Jarolim, E; Bax, H J; Bianchini, R; Capron, M; Corrigan, C; Castells, M; Dombrowicz, D; Daniels-Wells, T R; Fazekas, J; Fiebiger, E; Gatault, S; Gould, H J; Janda, J; Josephs, D H; Karagiannis, P; Levi-Schaffer, F; Meshcheryakova, A; Mechtcheriakova, D; Mekori, Y; Mungenast, F; Nigro, E A; Penichet, M L; Redegeld, F; Saul, L; Singer, J; Spicer, J F; Siccardi, A G; Spillner, E; Turner, M C; Untersmayr, E; Vangelista, L; Karagiannis, S N

    2016-12-29

    Th2 immunity and allergic immune surveillance play critical roles in host responses to pathogens, parasites and allergens. Numerous studies have reported significant links between Th2 responses and cancer, including insights into the functions of IgE antibodies and associated effector cells in both antitumour immune surveillance and therapy. The interdisciplinary field of AllergoOncology was given Task Force status by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology in 2014. Affiliated expert groups focus on the interface between allergic responses and cancer, applied to immune surveillance, immunomodulation and the functions of IgE-mediated immune responses against cancer, to derive novel insights into more effective treatments. Coincident with rapid expansion in clinical application of cancer immunotherapies, here we review the current state-of-the-art and future translational opportunities, as well as challenges in this relatively new field. Recent developments include improved understanding of Th2 antibodies, intratumoral innate allergy effector cells and mediators, IgE-mediated tumour antigen cross-presentation by dendritic cells, as well as immunotherapeutic strategies such as vaccines and recombinant antibodies, and finally, the management of allergy in daily clinical oncology. Shedding light on the crosstalk between allergic response and cancer is paving the way for new avenues of treatment.

  4. Consensus of the Brazilian Society of Infectious Diseases and Brazilian Society of Clinical Oncology on the management and treatment of Kaposi's sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érico Arruda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma is a multifocal vascular lesion of low-grade potential that is most often present in mucocutaneous sites and usually also affects lymph nodes and visceral organs. The condition may manifest through purplish lesions, flat or raised with an irregular shape, gastrointestinal bleeding due to lesions located in the digestive system, and dyspnea and hemoptysis associated with pulmonary lesions. In the early 1980s, the appearance of several cases of Kaposi's sarcoma in homosexual men was the first alarm about a newly identified epidemic, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. In 1994, it was finally demonstrated that the presence of a herpes virus associated with Kaposi's sarcoma called HHV-8 or Kaposi's sarcoma herpes virus and its genetic sequence was rapidly deciphered. The prevalence of this virus is very high (about 50% in some African populations, but stands between 2% and 8% for the entire world population. Kaposi's sarcoma only develops when the immune system is depressed, as in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, which appears to be associated with a specific variant of the Kaposi's sarcoma herpes virus. There are no treatment guidelines for Kaposi's sarcoma established in Brazil, and thus the Brazilian Society of Clinical Oncology and the Brazilian Society of Infectious Diseases developed the treatment consensus presented here.

  5. Acute oncological emergencies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gabriel, J

    2012-01-01

    The number of people receiving systemic anti-cancer treatment and presenting at emergency departments with treatment-related problems is rising. Nurses will be the first point of contact for most patients and need to be able to recognise oncological emergencies to initiate urgent assessment of patients and referral to the acute oncology team so that the most appropriate care can be delivered promptly. This article discusses the role of acute oncology services, and provides an overview of the most common acute oncological emergencies.

  6. Interpreting the clinical importance of group differences in chronic pain clinical trials: IMMPACT recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Robert H; Turk, Dennis C; McDermott, Michael P; Peirce-Sandner, Sarah; Burke, Laurie B; Cowan, Penney; Farrar, John T; Hertz, Sharon; Raja, Srinivasa N; Rappaport, Bob A; Rauschkolb, Christine; Sampaio, Cristina

    2009-12-01

    An essential component of the interpretation of results of randomized clinical trials of treatments for chronic pain involves the determination of their clinical importance or meaningfulness. This involves two distinct processes--interpreting the clinical importance of individual patient improvements and the clinical importance of group differences--which are frequently misunderstood. In this article, we first describe the essential differences between the interpretation of the clinical importance of patient improvements and of group differences. We then discuss the factors to consider when evaluating the clinical importance of group differences, which include the results of responder analyses of the primary outcome measure, the treatment effect size compared to available therapies, analyses of secondary efficacy endpoints, the safety and tolerability of treatment, the rapidity of onset and durability of the treatment benefit, convenience, cost, limitations of existing treatments, and other factors. The clinical importance of individual patient improvements can be determined by assessing what patients themselves consider meaningful improvement using well-described methods. In contrast, the clinical meaningfulness of group differences must be determined by a multi-factorial evaluation of the benefits and risks of the treatment and of other available treatments for the condition in light of the primary goals of therapy. Such determinations must be conducted on a case-by-case basis, and are ideally informed by patients and their significant others, clinicians, researchers, statisticians, and representatives of society at large.

  7. Challenges relating to solid tumour brain metastases in clinical trials, part 1: patient population, response, and progression. A report from the RANO group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Nancy U; Lee, Eudocia Q; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Barani, Igor J; Baumert, Brigitta G; Brown, Paul D; Camidge, D Ross; Chang, Susan M; Dancey, Janet; Gaspar, Laurie E; Harris, Gordon J; Hodi, F Stephen; Kalkanis, Steven N; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Linskey, Mark E; Macdonald, David R; Margolin, Kim; Mehta, Minesh P; Schiff, David; Soffietti, Riccardo; Suh, John H; van den Bent, Martin J; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Wefel, Jeffrey S; Wen, Patrick Y

    2013-09-01

    Therapeutic outcomes for patients with brain metastases need to improve. A critical review of trials specifically addressing brain metastases shows key issues that could prevent acceptance of results by regulatory agencies, including enrolment of heterogeneous groups of patients and varying definitions of clinical endpoints. Considerations specific to disease, modality, and treatment are not consistently addressed. Additionally, the schedule of CNS imaging and consequences of detection of new or progressive brain metastases in trials mainly exploring the extra-CNS activity of systemic drugs are highly variable. The Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (RANO) working group is an independent, international, collaborative effort to improve the design of trials in patients with brain tumours. In this two-part series, we review the state of clinical trials of brain metastases and suggest a consensus recommendation for the development of criteria for future clinical trials.

  8. PBL教学法在肿瘤科临床教学中的应用研究%Study on Application of PBL Teaching Method in Oncology Clinical Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨波

    2016-01-01

    Objective Objective To study the application effect of PBL teaching mode in oncology clinical teaching.Methods 60 cases of undergraduate intern in our hospital from September 2015 to January 2016 were selected, and divided into control group and experimental group according to random number table. The control group was given conventional teaching methods - traditional lecture teaching method–LBL, while the experimental group was given PBL teaching method. Students learning ability, teamwork and other reference data of two groups were compared.Results Total score of experimental group and control group members was (85.51±8.35), (78.32±8.35), showed the results of PBL in clinical teaching prominent were superior to the traditional mode of teaching methods (P0.05), showing the effect of PBL is more signiifcant.ConclusionPBL teaching mode can improve the oncology students' interest in learning, and improve their ability to deal with and solve problems, and develop team spirit.%目的:探究PBL教学法在肿瘤科临床教学中的应用。方法选取2015年9月~2016年1月在我院实习的本科实习生60例,按照随机数表的方法,分为对照组和实验组。对照组采用常规的教学方法即传统的LBL教学模式,实验组采用PBL教学模式。两组学生学习能力、团队精神等数据比较参考临床教学效果评价。结果实验组组员和对照组成员的总成绩分别为(85.51±8.35)分、(78.32±8.35)分,表明PBL教学法在临床教学中的成绩突出,优于传统模式的教学方法(P<0.05);两组学生对教学效果的评价中独立学习、团队精神等项目实验组数据均优于对照组(P<0.05),即表明PBL教学的效果更加显著。结论 PBL教学模式能够提高肿瘤科学生的学习兴趣,提高其解决与处理问题的能力,培养团队合作精神。

  9. Application of TBL integrated PBL on oncology clinical graduate teaching%PBL中增加 TBL教学法在肿瘤专业研究生教学中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董岩; 李淑霞; 周涛; 刘基巍; 高亚杰

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the advantage of the team-based pedagogy ( TBL) combined with problem-based teaching ( PBL) in the graduate's clinical-teaching.Methods The study took the 2011 session graduate of Oncology in Dalian Medical University as objects.The students were randomly divided into two groups: TBL group ( experimental group) and the PBL group ( control group) , who received TBL and PBL teaching, respectively.There were 20 students in TBL group and 21 students in PBL group.The results of discussion and examination scoring, combined midterm with final surveys of the students and the teachers were used to evaluate the effect.Results The TBL group had higher scores than the PBL group;but there was no significant difference between the two groups.The student's evaluation to the teachers and the teachers'self-assessment indicated that the role of teachers was more likely from the boot turn towards partnership.The TBL mode more likely developed the students'interest in learning.Conclusion The TBL remedy compensates the PBL.Use of PBL and TBL in the Oncology helps to culture the teamwork, to improve learning efficiency, and to induce creative thinking, and is worthy of further promotion practices.%目的:探讨在研究生临床教学中以团队为基础教学法( TBL)结合以问题为基础教学法( PBL)的优势。方法以大连医科大学肿瘤学2011级三年制硕士研究生为对象,随机分成两组:TBL组(试验组)和PBL组(对照组),其中TBL组20人,PBL组21人,分别进行TBL和PBL教学。两组成绩均包括讨论计分和考试计分,结合期中和期末两次对学生和教师的问卷调查,综合评价两组的教学效果。结果 TBL组的课堂讨论成绩明显高于PBL组,但两组总成绩无明显差异。学生对教学的评价提示TBL组在多项评价项目中优于PBL组。教师对教学的评价也显示TBL教学更具挑战性,更能调动学生的积极性,提

  10. Updates from the 2013 Society for Neuro-Oncology annual and World Federation for Neuro-Oncology quadrennial meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, Rimas V; Amidei, Christina

    2014-01-01

    We present an overview of a number of key clinical studies in infiltrating gliomas presented at the 2013 Society for Neuro-Oncology and World Federation of Neuro-Oncology joint meeting. This review focuses on efficacy results, including quality of life studies, from larger clinical trials in both high- and low-grade infiltrating gliomas.

  11. The non tumour uptake of (111)In-octreotide creates new clinical indications in benign diseases, but also in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascini, G L; Cuccurullo, V; Mansi, L

    2010-02-01

    The use of somatostatin (SS) analogues in humans takes advantage by the availability of many related chemical forms that can be used for receptor therapy and, after radiolabelling, for diagnostic imaging and radionuclide therapy. The first proposed radiocompound, yet clinically widely diffuse, has been (111)In-octreotide (OCT), followed by positron emission tomography (PET) and beta emitter tracers. The main field of clinical applications is in neuroendocrine tumours (NET), starting by the demonstration of SS receptors (SSR) on the majority of NET, particularly on gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) tumours. Uptake of SS analogues can also be due to a SSR expression on non malignant cells when activated, as lymphocytes, macrophages, fibroblasts , vascular cells. Because of this uptake clinical indications can be found also in active benign diseases, as Grave's ophthalmopathy, rheumatoid arthritis, histiocitosis, sarcoidosis, idiopatic pulmonary fibrosis. Moreover, these cells can also determine the OCT in vivo uptake in tumours non expressing in vitro SSR, as non-snall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Because of a different kinetic respect to SCLC a differential histotype diagnosis could be obtained. Starting from this premise OCT can also allows radioguided surgery in tumours non expressing SSR. Finally a relevant clinical role can be defined in the a priori recruitment and as marker of therapeutic efficacy in all the therapeutic strategies utilizing SSR, both in malignant and benign diseases.

  12. Case management in oncology rehabilitation (CAMON: The effect of case management on the quality of life in patients with cancer after one year of ambulant rehabilitation. A study protocol for a randomized controlled clinical trial in oncology rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bardheci Katarina

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer diseases and their therapies have negative effects on the quality of life. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of case management in a sample of oncological outpatients with the intent of rehabilitation after cancer treatment. Case management wants to support the complex information needs of the patients in addition to the segmented structure of the health care system. Emphasis is put on support for self-management in order to enhance health - conscious behaviour, learning to deal with the burden of the illness and providing the opportunity for regular contacts with care providers. We present a study protocol to investigate the efficacy of a case management in patients following oncology rehabilitation after cancer treatment. Methods The trial is a multicentre, two-arm randomised controlled study. Patients are randomised parallel in either 'usual care' plus case management or 'usual care' alone. Patients with all types of cancer can be included in the study, if they have completed the therapy with chemo- and/or radiotherapy/surgery with curative intention and are expected to have a survival time >1 year. To determine the health-related quality of life the general questionnaire FACT G is used. The direct correlation between self-management and perceived self-efficacy is measured with the Jerusalem & Schwarzer questionnaire. Patients satisfaction with the care received is measured using the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care 5 As (PACIC-5A. Data are collected at the beginning of the trial and after 3, 6 and 12 months. The power analysis revealed a sample size of 102 patients. The recruitment of the centres began in 2009. The inclusion of patients began in May 2010. Discussion Case management has proved to be effective regarding quality of life of patients with chronic diseases. When it comes to oncology, case management is mainly used in cancer treatment, but it is not yet common in the

  13. Oncology of Reptiles: Diseases, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christman, Jane; Devau, Michael; Wilson-Robles, Heather; Hoppes, Sharman; Rech, Raquel; Russell, Karen E; Heatley, J Jill

    2017-01-01

    Based on necropsy review, neoplasia in reptiles has a comparable frequency to that of mammals and birds. Reptile neoplasia is now more frequently diagnosed in clinical practice based on increased use of advanced diagnostic techniques and improvements in reptilian husbandry allowing greater longevity of these species. This article reviews the current literature on neoplasia in reptiles, and focuses on advanced diagnostics and therapeutic options for reptilian patientssuffering neoplastic disease. Although most applied clinical reptile oncology is translated from dog and cat oncology, considerations specific to reptilian patients commonly encountered in clinical practice (turtles, tortoises, snakes, and lizards) are presented.

  14. Chemotherapy drug shortages in pediatric oncology: a consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decamp, Matthew; Joffe, Steven; Fernandez, Conrad V; Faden, Ruth R; Unguru, Yoram

    2014-03-01

    Shortages of essential drugs, including critical chemotherapy drugs, have become commonplace. Drug shortages cost significant time and financial resources, lead to adverse patient outcomes, delay clinical trials, and pose significant ethical challenges. Pediatric oncology is particularly susceptible to drug shortages, presenting an opportunity to examine these ethical issues and provide recommendations for preventing and alleviating shortages. We convened the Working Group on Chemotherapy Drug Shortages in Pediatric Oncology (WG) and developed consensus on the core ethical values and practical actions necessary for a coordinated response to the problem of shortages by institutions, agencies, and other stakeholders. The interdisciplinary and multiinstitutional WG included practicing pediatric hematologist-oncologists, nurses, hospital pharmacists, bioethicists, experts in emergency management and public policy, legal scholars, patient/family advocates, and leaders of relevant professional societies and organizations. The WG endorsed 2 core ethical values: maximizing the potential benefits of effective drugs and ensuring equitable access. From these, we developed 6 recommendations: (1) supporting national polices to prevent shortages, (2) optimizing use of drug supplies, (3) giving equal priority to evidence-based uses of drugs whether they occur within or outside clinical trials, (4) developing an improved clearinghouse for sharing drug shortage information, (5) exploring the sharing of drug supplies among institutions, and (6) developing proactive stakeholder engagement strategies to facilitate prevention and management of shortages. Each recommendation includes an ethical rationale, action items, and barriers that must be overcome. Implemented together, they provide a blueprint for effective and ethical management of drug shortages in pediatric oncology and beyond.

  15. Integration of imaging into clinical practice to assess the delivery and performance of macromolecular and nanotechnology-based oncology therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Tara; De Souza, Raquel; Dou, Yannan; Stapleton, Shawn; Reilly, Raymond M; Allen, Christine

    2015-12-10

    Functional and molecular imaging has become increasingly used to evaluate interpatient and intrapatient tumor heterogeneity. Imaging allows for assessment of microenvironment parameters including tumor hypoxia, perfusion and proliferation, as well as tumor metabolism and the intratumoral distribution of specific molecular markers. Imaging information may be used to stratify patients for targeted therapies, and to define patient populations that may benefit from alternative therapeutic approaches. It also provides a method for non-invasive monitoring of treatment response at earlier time-points than traditional cues, such as tumor shrinkage. Further, companion diagnostic imaging techniques are becoming progressively more important for development and clinical implementation of targeted therapies. Imaging-based companion diagnostics are likely to be essential for the validation and FDA approval of targeted nanotherapies and macromolecular medicines. This review describes recent clinical advances in the use of functional and molecular imaging to evaluate the tumor microenvironment. Additionally, this article focuses on image-based assessment of distribution and anti-tumor effect of nano- and macromolecular systems.

  16. Helen Hudson Lecture. Positive practice change using appreciative inquiry in oncology primary care nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Colleen P

    2013-01-01

    Ambulatory oncology nurses struggle to meet the increasing demands placed on them. Increased volume of patients, more complex treatments and symptom management, an older population with multiple co-morbidities combined with fiscal and human resource restraints has created job dissatisfaction and the feeling of powerlessness in the current environment. The Appreciative Inquiry process enables nurses to become engaged in planning and creating positive change based on their knowledge, experiences and clinical expertise, as oncology professionals. Through surveys and group work, nurses in this project were able to turn theory into positive practice change, inspiring a new paradigm of primary oncology nursing. Through the promotion of innovation, we have inspired hope while advocating for our profession.

  17. Association between burnout and anger in oncology versus ophthalmology health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, M R A; Bruno, A; Carroccio, C; Cedro, C; La Torre, D; Di Rosa, A E; Zoccali, R; Aragona, M; La Torre, F; Mattei, A; Angelone, A M; Di Orio, F

    2006-10-01

    The prevalence of burnout in oncology staff was compared with that of the ophthalmology staff, who normally present a low prevalence of burnout as described in this literature. The correlation of burnout with the emotion of anger was also investigated. Thirty-six subjects working in an oncology department and 32 working in an ophthalmology department were examined using the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory. The oncology group showed higher mean scores on the MBI Emotive Exhaustion and Depersonalization scales with respect to ophthalmology staff. Correlation analysis showed that increasing burnout was associated with higher anger expressed towards the environment and loss of anger control. Anger, as a response to frustration, appears to be a feature constantly associated with the clinical expression of burnout and it should not be underestimated in theoretical and preventive contexts.

  18. Clinical and no-clinical setting specificities in first session short-term psychotherapy psychodrama group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakulić, Aleksandra Mindoljević

    2011-03-01

    Modern history of short-term group psychotherapy dates back to the late 1950-ies. From then to present day, this psychotherapeutic method has been used in various forms, from dynamic-oriented to cognitive behavioural psychotherapies. Although it has always been considered rather controversial, due its cost-effectiveness, it has been capturing more and more popularity. This paper presents the specificities of first session short-term psychotherapy psychodrama group through session work with two examined groups: a group of 20 adult women who suffer from mild or moderate forms of unipolar depression and a group of 20 students of the School of Medicine in Zagreb without any psychiatric symptomatology. The results indicate the high importance of having structure in first psychodrama session, of relating it with the previously thoroughly conducted, initial, clinical, interviews, and of the clarity and focus in terms of determining the goals of therapy, especially in a clinical context. This study also confirmed assumptions regarding the need for different approaches of warming-up in psychodrama, both in the clinical and in non-clinical samples. A psychodrama psychotherapist should have good time managing skills and capability to convert the time available into an opportunity for directly boosting the group energy and work on therapeutic alliance.

  19. Implantable port devices are catheters of choice for administration of chemotherapy in pediatric oncology patients-a clinical experience in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooda, Barkat; Lalani, Gulrose; Fadoo, Zehra; Billoo, Ghaffar

    2008-09-01

    Phlebitis and cellulitis are commonly encountered problems in oncology patients receiving chemotherapy through peripherally inserted intravenous catheters. Use of central venous access devices (CVAD) is desirable. We have seen a steady increase in the use of CVADs in our oncology service with frequent use of indwelling ports, particularly during the last 2 years. In this study we have attempted to elucidate advantages of CVAD and compared them to peripheral catheters. This is a retrospective study with chart review of all oncology patients admitted in our oncology service at the Aga Khan University Hospital from March 2003 to March 2005. A survey was also conducted from a randomly selected sample of parents of children with cancer to elicit parental views regarding their choice of a particular catheter. Catheter-related infections were quite common (over 50%) in patients with peripheral lines, resulting in increased costs and prolonged hospitalization. Externalized CVADs were found difficult to care for, carried a risk of being accidentally pulled out or punctured, and were deemed undesirable for older female patients for cosmetic reasons. We found that the internalized CVADs (portacath) were superior to the externalized or peripheral lines and resulted in better patient and family satisfaction. Use of peripheral lines must be gradually phased out of pediatric oncology practice in Pakistan. Indwelling CVADs have become the standard of care internationally and should be considered for most patients in developing countries whenever resources are available.

  20. Contemporary analysis of erectile, voiding, and oncologic outcomes following primary targeted cryoablation of the prostate for clinically localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Diblasio

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate erectile function (EF and voiding function following primary targeted cryoablation of the prostate (TCAP for clinically localized prostate cancer (CaP in a contemporary cohort. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all patients treated between 2/2000-5/2006 with primary TCAP. Variables included age, Gleason sum, pre-TCAP prostate specific antigen (PSA, prostate volume, clinical stage, pre-TCAP hormonal ablation, pre-TCAP EF and American Urologic Association Symptom Score (AUASS. EF was recorded as follows: 1 = potent; 2 = sufficient for intercourse; 3 = partial/insufficient; 4 = minimal/insufficient; 5 = none. Voiding function was analyzed by comparing pre/post-TCAP AUASS. Statistical analysis utilized SAS software with p < 0.05 considered significant. RESULTS: After exclusions, 78 consecutive patients were analyzed with a mean age of 69.2 years and follow-up 39.8 months. Thirty-five (44.9% men reported pre-TCAP EF level of 1-2. Post-TCAP, 9 of 35 (25.7% regained EF of level 1-2 while 1 (2.9% achieved level 3 EF. Median pre-TCAP AUASS was 8.75 versus 7.50 postoperatively (p = 0.39. Six patients (7.7% experienced post-TCAP urinary incontinence. Lower pre-TCAP PSA (p = 0.008 and higher Gleason sum (p = 0.002 were associated with higher post-TCAP AUASS while prostate volume demonstrated a trend (p = 0.07. Post-TCAP EF and stable AUASS were not associated with increased disease-recurrence (p = 0.24 and p = 0.67, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Stable voiding function was observed post-TCAP, with an overall incontinence rate of 7.7%. Further, though erectile dysfunction is common following TCAP, 25.7% of previously potent patients demonstrated erections suitable for intercourse. While long-term data is requisite, consideration should be made for prospective evaluation of penile rehabilitation following primary TCAP.

  1. Oncology Advanced Practitioners Bring Advanced Community Oncology Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Wendy H

    2016-01-01

    Oncology care is becoming increasingly complex. The interprofessional team concept of care is necessary to meet projected oncology professional shortages, as well as to provide superior oncology care. The oncology advanced practitioner (AP) is a licensed health care professional who has completed advanced training in nursing or pharmacy or has completed training as a physician assistant. Oncology APs increase practice productivity and efficiency. Proven to be cost effective, APs may perform varied roles in an oncology practice. Integrating an AP into an oncology practice requires forethought given to the type of collaborative model desired, role expectations, scheduling, training, and mentoring.

  2. Clinical and CT features of benign pneumatosis intestinalis in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant and oncology patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarville, M.B.; Goodin, Geoffrey S. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); The University of Tennessee College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Whittle, Sarah B. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); Li, Chin-Shang; Smeltzer, Matthew P. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Biostatistics, Memphis, TN (United States); Hale, Gregory A. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Oncology, Memphis, TN (United States); The University of Tennessee College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Memphis, TN (United States); Kaufman, Robert A. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); The University of Tennessee College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); The University of Tennessee College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2008-10-15

    Pneumatosis intestinalis in children is associated with a wide variety of underlying conditions and often has a benign course. The CT features of this condition have not been systematically investigated. Defining benign pneumatosis intestinalis as pneumatosis intestinalis that resolved with medical management alone, we sought to: (1) determine whether the incidence of benign pneumatosis intestinalis had increased at our pediatric cancer hospital; (2) characterize CT features of benign pneumatosis intestinalis; and (3) determine the relationship between imaging features and clinical course of benign pneumatosis intestinalis in this cohort. Radiology reports from November 1994 to December 2006 were searched for ''pneumatosis intestinalis,'' ''free intraperitoneal air,'' and ''portal venous air or gas.'' Corresponding imaging was reviewed by two radiologists who confirmed pneumatosis intestinalis and recorded the presence of extraluminal free air, degree of intramural gaseous distension, number of involved bowel segments, and time to pneumatosis resolution. The search revealed 12 boys and 4 girls with pneumatosis intestinalis; 11 were hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. The annual incidences of benign pneumatosis have not changed at our institution. Increases in intramural distension marginally correlated with the number of bowel segments involved (P=0.08). Three patients had free air and longer times to resolution of pneumatosis (P=0.03). Male children may be at increased risk of benign pneumatosis intestinalis. The incidence of benign pneumatosis at our institution is proportional to the number of hematopoietic stem cell transplants. The degree of intramural distension may correlate with the number of bowel segments involved. Patients with free air have a longer time to resolution of benign pneumatosis. (orig.)

  3. Brachytherapy for Patients With Prostate Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology/Cancer Care Ontario Joint Guideline Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Joseph; Rumble, R Bryan; Kollmeier, Marisa; Heath, Elisabeth; Efstathiou, Jason; Dorff, Tanya; Berman, Barry; Feifer, Andrew; Jacques, Arthur; Loblaw, D Andrew

    2017-03-27

    Purpose To jointly update the Cancer Care Ontario guideline on brachytherapy for patients with prostate cancer to account for new evidence. Methods An Update Panel conducted a targeted systematic literature review and identified more recent randomized controlled trials comparing dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with brachytherapy in men with prostate cancer. Results Five randomized controlled trials provided the evidence for this update. Recommendations For patients with low-risk prostate cancer who require or choose active treatment, low-dose rate brachytherapy (LDR) alone, EBRT alone, and/or radical prostatectomy (RP) should be offered to eligible patients. For patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer choosing EBRT with or without androgen-deprivation therapy, brachytherapy boost (LDR or high-dose rate [HDR]) should be offered to eligible patients. For low-intermediate risk prostate cancer (Gleason 7, prostate-specific antigen < 10 ng/mL or Gleason 6, prostate-specific antigen, 10 to 20 ng/mL), LDR brachytherapy alone may be offered as monotherapy. For patients with high-risk prostate cancer receiving EBRT and androgen-deprivation therapy, brachytherapy boost (LDR or HDR) should be offered to eligible patients. Iodine-125 and palladium-103 are each reasonable isotope options for patients receiving LDR brachytherapy; no recommendation can be made for or against using cesium-131 or HDR monotherapy. Patients should be encouraged to participate in clinical trials to test novel or targeted approaches to this disease. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/Brachytherapy-guideline and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki .

  4. Initial results and clinical application of non dedicated 18-FDG/PET in head and neck oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correia, Luiz Mauricio; Priante, Antonio Vitor; Carvalho, Andre Lopes; Kowalski, Luiz Paulo [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Cirurgia do Pescoco e da Cabeca]. E-mail: lp_kowalski@uol.com.br; Torres, Ivone Goncalves; Lima, Eduardo Nobrega Pereira [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia

    2005-07-01

    Imaging procedures are important methods for proper stage and treatment planning. Especially in previously treated patients, although not perfectly accurate. PET scan is a functional and imaging technique that has been used to diagnose and stage recurrent cancer from different sites. The combination of computed tomography coupled with FDG-PET (18-FDG-PET/CT) reaches high quality anatomical and functional images. Objective: to describe the initial results of FDG-PET/CT performed at a single institution. Material and methods: this technique was used in 63 patients with head and neck tumors. The purposes of the exam were to rule out recurrent disease - 55 patients; to search for hidden primary tumor - 2 patients; and postoperative follow-up of residual disease - 6 patients. Computed tomography (CT) was performed in 56 cases (88.9%). Pathological confirmation was obtained in 24 cases (38.1%), all the remaining cases were considered negative based on clinical follow-up information with no evidence of recurrent disease 12 months after the PET/CT exam. Results: overall results for the accuracy of FDG-PET were: 93.9% of sensitivity, 64.2% of specificity, 75.6% of positive predictive value and 90.0% of negative predictive value. FDG-PET was able to find 1 out of 2 undetected primary tumors (base of the tongue). The best results were obtained regarding the detection of local and distant recurrences of larynx, thyroid and oral cavity cancers. Conclusion: the FDG-PET/CT fusion image makes anatomical localization easier and the accuracy for detection of recurrent disease was found to be higher than CT alone. (author)

  5. How many research nurses for how many clinical trials in an oncology setting? Definition of the Nursing Time Required by Clinical Trial-Assessment Tool (NTRCT-AT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Alessandra; Mazzocco, Ketti; Stucchi, Sara; Magon, Giorgio; Pravettoni, Gabriella; Passoni, Claudia; Ciccarelli, Chiara; Tonali, Alessandra; Profeta, Teresa; Saiani, Luisa

    2017-02-01

    Few resources are available to quantify clinical trial-associated workload, needed to guide staffing and budgetary planning. The aim of the study is to describe a tool to measure clinical trials nurses' workload expressed in time spent to complete core activities. Clinical trials nurses drew up a list of nursing core activities, integrating results from literature searches with personal experience. The final 30 core activities were timed for each research nurse by an outside observer during daily practice in May and June 2014. Average times spent by nurses for each activity were calculated. The "Nursing Time Required by Clinical Trial-Assessment Tool" was created as an electronic sheet that combines the average times per specified activities and mathematic functions to return the total estimated time required by a research nurse for each specific trial. The tool was tested retrospectively on 141 clinical trials. The increasing complexity of clinical research requires structured approaches to determine workforce requirements. This study provides a tool to describe the activities of a clinical trials nurse and to estimate the associated time required to deliver individual trials. The application of the proposed tool in clinical research practice could provide a consistent structure for clinical trials nursing workload estimation internationally.

  6. The Danish Neuro-Oncology Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steinbjørn; Nielsen, Jan; Laursen, René J;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Danish Neuro-Oncology Registry (DNOR) is a nationwide clinical cancer database that has prospectively registered data on patients with gliomas since January 2009. The purpose of this study was to describe the establishment of the DNOR and further to evaluate the database completen......BACKGROUND: The Danish Neuro-Oncology Registry (DNOR) is a nationwide clinical cancer database that has prospectively registered data on patients with gliomas since January 2009. The purpose of this study was to describe the establishment of the DNOR and further to evaluate the database...

  7. Nine-year change in statistical design, profile, and success rates of Phase II oncology trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Anastasia; Paul, Barry; Marchenko, Olga; Song, Guochen; Patel, Neerali; Moschos, Stergios J

    2016-01-01

    We investigated nine-year trends in statistical design and other features of Phase II oncology clinical trials published in 2005, 2010, and 2014 in five leading oncology journals: Cancer, Clinical Cancer Research, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Annals of Oncology, and Lancet Oncology. The features analyzed included cancer type, multicenter vs. single-institution, statistical design, primary endpoint, number of treatment arms, number of patients per treatment arm, whether or not statistical methods were well described, whether the drug was found effective based on rigorous statistical testing of the null hypothesis, and whether the drug was recommended for future studies.

  8. Application of the NCCN Guidelines in the Clinical Practice Teaching of Gynecological Oncology%NCCN指南在妇科肿瘤临床实习教学中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张娟; 陈慧君; 张蔚; 何小艳; 刘静; 毛林; 易跃雄; 吕琼莹; 王细文; 郭娟娟

    2016-01-01

    Gynecologic oncology is a very important part of Obstetrics and Gynecology. The teaching of gynecology oncology mainly consists of the classroom theory teaching and clinical practice teaching, the clinical practice teaching not only can consolidate the theoretical knowledge, but also is the critical phase which medical students become to be a qualiifed doctor. This article has analyzed the problems which inlfuence improving the quality of clinical practice teaching of current domestic gynecological oncology, introduced and explained the advantages of NCCN Guidelines used in gynecological tumor clinical practice teaching. Preliminary discuss the feasibility and signiifcance of applying the NCCN Guidelines in clinical practice teaching of gynecological tumor. To provide a theoretical basis for the application and promotion of NCCN guide in the clinical practice teaching of gynecological oncology.%妇科肿瘤是《妇产科学》中非常重要的部分。妇科肿瘤教学主要由课堂理论教学和临床实习教学组成,其中临床实习教学不仅可以巩固理论知识,更是医学生成为一名合格医生的关键阶段。本文分析了当前国内妇科肿瘤临床实习教学中影响临床实习质量提高的问题,介绍并阐述了NCCN肿瘤临床实践指南运用于妇科肿瘤临床实习教学中的优势。初步探讨NCCN指南在妇科肿瘤临床实习教学中应用的可行性及意义。为NCCN指南在妇科肿瘤临床实习教学中的应用和推广提供理论依据。

  9. Orthodontic treatment in oncological patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mituś-Kenig, Maria; Łoboda, Magdalena; Marcinkowska-Mituś, Agata; Durka-Zajac, Magdalena; Pawłowska, Elzbieta

    2015-01-01

    The progress in oncological treatment has led to the current increase of childhood cancer survival rate to 80%. That is why orthodontists more and more frequently consult patients who had completed a successful anti-cancer therapy in childhood. Oncological treatments such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy or supportive immunosuppressive therapy cause numerous side effects in growing patients, connected i.a. with growth, the development of teeth or the viscerocranium. This is a special group of patients that needs an optimised plan of orthodontic treatment and often has to accept a compromise result. The purpose of the current work is to discuss the results of orthodontic treatment in patients after an anti-cancer therapy. Time of treatment was 12,5 months. In 6 patients (from 40 undergoing orthodontic therapy) we haven't reached a normocclusion, in 9 patients we should have stopped the therapy because of the recurrence. In 11 patients we found mucosa inflammation and in 1 patient the therapy stopped before the end because of very low oral hygiene level. Bearing in mind the limited number of original works on the above topic in Polish medical literature, the study has been carried out in order to make Polish orthodontists more acquainted with the topic and the standards of dealing with an oncological patient.

  10. Views on clinically suspect arthralgia: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsum, Elize C; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M; Kaptein, Adrian A

    2016-05-01

    The rheumatology field is moving towards identifying individuals with an increased risk for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) at a stage when arthritis is still absent but persons having clinically suspect arthralgia (CSA). Incorporating patients' views in rheumatologic care is pivotal; however, the views of persons with CSA on their condition are unknown. We aimed to help fill this gap by exploring illness perceptions of persons with CSA and their views on hypothetical prognoses for developing RA. Persons with CSA were invited to participate in a semi-structured focus group discussion. Illness perceptions according to the Common Sense Model (CSM) and four a priori formulated themes were explored in detail during the group discussion. The discussion was audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were analysed in an interpretative phenomenological approach manner, on the basis of the dimensions of the CSM by three researchers independently. The views of four participants with CSA were explored during one focus group discussion. Four dimensions of the CSM were mainly observed: Identity, Consequences, Personal Control and Concern. None of the patients identified themselves as being a patient. They did experience pain and impairments in daily functioning and were concerned that their symptoms would progress. In the absence of physician-initiated treatment, some patients changed lifestyle in order to reduce pain and to promote health. Patients unanimously said that they could not interpret prognostic information on RA development expressed in hypothetical chances. Persons with CSA do not consider themselves patients. Prognostic information related to the development of RA based on risk percentages was considered as not useful by persons with CSA. Understanding of the illness perceptions of persons with CSA by health care professionals might improve medical management and facilitate shared decision-making.

  11. Highlights from the 36th European Society of Surgical Oncology Congress (ESSO 36), 14–16 September 2016, Kracow, Poland: optimising European cancer surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichosik, Danuta

    2017-01-01

    The ESSO Congress is the event for all surgeons with an interest in surgical oncology. The congress is a gathering for the surgical oncology community from all around the world to meet and gain an insight into state-of-the-art technology, latest healthcare services, and solutions within their field. The ESSO 36 congress gathered over 750 participants from 58 countries. With over 100 speakers, the scientific programme featured 18 scientific symposia including a joint symposium with the American Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO), 6 multidisciplinary sessions including joint sessions with CIRSE (Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe) and JCOG (Japanese Clinical Oncology Group), 8 meet-the-expert sessions, 5 debates, 13 proffered paper sessions, and 2 video sessions. PMID:28386298

  12. Use of Biomarkers to Guide Decisions on Adjuvant Systemic Therapy for Women With Early-Stage Invasive Breast Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Lyndsay N.; McShane, Lisa M.; Andre, Fabrice; Collyar, Deborah E.; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Hammond, Elizabeth H.; Kuderer, Nicole M.; Liu, Minetta C.; Mennel, Robert G.; Van Poznak, Catherine; Bast, Robert C.; Hayes, Daniel F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To provide recommendations on appropriate use of breast tumor biomarker assay results to guide decisions on adjuvant systemic therapy for women with early-stage invasive breast cancer. Methods A literature search and prospectively defined study selection sought systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized controlled trials, prospective-retrospective studies, and prospective comparative observational studies published from 2006 through 2014. Outcomes of interest included overall survival and disease-free or recurrence-free survival. Expert panel members used informal consensus to develop evidence-based guideline recommendations. Results The literature search identified 50 relevant studies. One randomized clinical trial and 18 prospective-retrospective studies were found to have evaluated the clinical utility, as defined by the guideline, of specific biomarkers for guiding decisions on the need for adjuvant systemic therapy. No studies that met guideline criteria for clinical utility were found to guide choice of specific treatments or regimens. Recommendations In addition to estrogen and progesterone receptors and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, the panel found sufficient evidence of clinical utility for the biomarker assays Oncotype DX, EndoPredict, PAM50, Breast Cancer Index, and urokinase plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 in specific subgroups of breast cancer. No biomarker except for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 was found to guide choices of specific treatment regimens. Treatment decisions should also consider disease stage, comorbidities, and patient preferences. PMID:26858339

  13. One Decade Later: Trends and Disparities in the Application of Post-Mastectomy Radiotherapy Since the Release of the American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dragun, Anthony E., E-mail: aedrag01@louisville.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States); Huang, Bin [Kentucky Cancer Registry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Divison of Cancer Biostatistics, College of Public Health, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Gupta, Saurabh; Crew, John B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States); Tucker, Thomas C. [Kentucky Cancer Registry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: In 2001 ASCO published practice guidelines for post mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT). We analyzed factors that influence the receipt of radiotherapy therapy and trends over time. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 8889 women who underwent mastectomy as primary surgical treatment for stage II or III breast cancer between 1995 and 2008 using data from the Kentucky Cancer Registry. We categorized patients according to ASCO group: group 1, PMRT not routinely recommended (T2, N0); group 2, PMRT controversial/evidence insufficient (T1-2, N1); group 3, PMRT recommended or suggested (T3-4 or N2-3). Probability of receiving PMRT was assessed using logistic regression. Results: Overall, 24.0% of women received PMRT over the study period. The rates of PMRT for group 1, 2, and 3 were 7.5%, 19.5%, and 47.3%, respectively. Since 2001, there was an increase in the use of PMRT (from 21.1%-26.5%, P<.0001), which occurred mainly among group 3 members (from 40.8%-51.2%, P<.0001). The average rate remained constant in group 1 (from 7.1%-7.4%, P=.266) and decreased in group 2 (from 20.0%-18.1%, P<.0001). On multivariate analysis, the rate of PMRT was significantly lower for women aged >70 years (vs. younger), rural Appalachia (vs. non-Appalachia) populations, and Medicaid (vs. privately insured) patients. Conclusions: ASCO guidelines have influenced practice in an underserved state; however PMRT remains underused, even for highest-risk patients. Barriers exist for elderly, rural and poor patients, which independently predict for lack of adequate care. Updated guidelines are needed to clarify the use of PMRT for patients with T1-2, N1 disease.

  14. Group-based exercise in daily clinical practice to improve physical fitness in men with prostate cancer undergoing androgen deprivation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergren, Peter; Ragle, Anne-Mette; Jakobsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    . This article describes the design of an ongoing prospective observational study to evaluate the potential benefits of exercise in daily clinical practice. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Men diagnosed with prostate cancer starting or already receiving ADT at our facility are invited to participate in a 12-week exercise......INTRODUCTION: Level 1 evidence supports the use of supervised exercise to mitigate the adverse effects of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in men with prostate cancer. The data, however, have been generated in controlled research settings and might not be transferable to daily clinical practice...... programme implemented as the standard of care. Exclusion criteria are opioid-demanding treatment for skeletal pain, an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status above 2 or the inability to perform floor and machine exercises independently. The intervention consists of an initial...

  15. Instruction in medical ethics during clinical training for medical students. Report on experience in radio-oncology; Unterricht in Medizinethik im Rahmen der klinischen Ausbildung von Medizinstudenten. Ein Erfahrungsbericht aus der Radioonkologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, C. [Universitaet Regensburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Universitaetsklinikum, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Regensburg (Germany); Lenk, C. [Universitaet Goettingen (Germany). Abt. Ethik und Geschichte der Medizin; Koelbl, O. [Universitaet Regensburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie

    2006-12-15

    The article gives a review of the current state of education in medical ethics in Germany. The issue is considered from the viewpoint of radio-oncology. Both the pertinent literature and our own experience in teaching medical ethics are presented. In October 2003, medical ethics was integrated into the curriculum of medicine. The aim was to train competence in the field of personal attitudes and to intensify skills of moral reasoning. Our own experiences are positive, which is in accordance with the reports of other working groups. Most of the students were interested in education in medical ethics and looked upon ethical training as being an important part of their studies. Medical students are interested in ethical education during the clinical period of their studies, which has been taken into account since the actual change of the curriculum. Radio-oncologists as specialists in other clinical fields can offer important contributions when they discuss clinical cases from the viewpoint of medical ethics. The long-term effect of such an education will become the subject of future research. (orig.) Dieser Beitrag gibt aus dem Blickwinkel der Radioonkologie eine Uebersicht ueber den gegenwaertigen Stand der medizinethischen Ausbildung von Medizinstudenten in Deutschland. Es wird die Literatur zum Thema vorgestellt und eigene Erfahrungen aus dem Studentenunterricht auf der radioonkologischen Bettenstation beschrieben. Mit der Aenderung der Approbationsordnung vom Oktober 2003 wurde die Medizinethik als Fachgebiet erstmals in das Medizinstudium integriert. Damit sollen Kompetenzen im Bereich der eigenen Haltungen geschult und das Argumentieren auf der Grundlage analytisch gewonnener Ueberzeugungen vermittelt werden. Studenten sollen lernen, moegliche ethische Konflikte rational zu loesen. Die eigenen Erfahrungen mit der medizinethischen Ausbildung sind ueberwiegend positiv, was mit den Mitteilungen anderer Arbeitsgruppen uebereinstimmt. So stuften die meisten

  16. Difficult conversations: teaching medical oncology trainees communication skills one hour at a time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epner, Daniel E; Baile, Walter F

    2014-04-01

    Difficult conversations about prognosis, end of life, and goals of care arise commonly in medical oncology practice. These conversations are often highly emotional. Medical oncologists need outstanding, patient-centered communication skills to build trust and rapport with their patients and help them make well-informed decisions. Key skills include exploring patients' perspectives, responding to emotion with empathy, and maintaining mindfulness during highly charged conversations. These skills can be taught and learned. Most previously described communication skills training curricula for oncology providers involve multiday retreats, which are costly and can disrupt busy clinical schedules. Many curricula involve a variety of oncology providers, such as physicians and nurses, at various stages of their careers. The authors developed a monthly, one-hour communication skills training seminar series exclusively for physicians in their first year of medical oncology subspecialty training. The curriculum involved a variety of interactive and engaging educational methods, including sociodramatic techniques, role-play, reflective writing, and Balint-type case discussion groups. Medical oncologists in their second and third years of training served as teaching assistants and peer mentors. Learners had the opportunity to practice skills during sessions and with patients between sessions. Learners acquired important skills and found the curriculum to be clinically relevant, judging by anonymous surveys and anonymous responses on reflective writing exercises. Results from the current curriculum are preliminary but lay the foundation for enhanced and expanded communication skills training programs in the future.

  17. Staff Time and Motion Assessment for Administration of Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agents: A Two-Phase Pilot Study in Clinical Oncology Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Reitan, John F.; van Breda, Arletta; Corey-Lisle, Patricia K.; Shreay, Sanatan; Cong, Ze; Legg, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Background Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are used for the management of anaemia in patients with non-myeloid malignancies where anaemia is due to the effect of concomitant myelosuppressive chemotherapy. Assessing the impact of different ESA dosing regimens on office staff time and projected labour costs is an important component of understanding the potential for optimization of oncology practice efficiencies. Objectives A two-phase study was conducted to evaluate staff time and la...

  18. Optical imaging probes in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Cristina; Lo Dico, Alessia; Diceglie, Cecilia; Lucignani, Giovanni; Ottobrini, Luisa

    2016-07-26

    Cancer is a complex disease, characterized by alteration of different physiological molecular processes and cellular features. Keeping this in mind, the possibility of early identification and detection of specific tumor biomarkers by non-invasive approaches could improve early diagnosis and patient management.Different molecular imaging procedures provide powerful tools for detection and non-invasive characterization of oncological lesions. Clinical studies are mainly based on the use of computed tomography, nuclear-based imaging techniques and magnetic resonance imaging. Preclinical imaging in small animal models entails the use of dedicated instruments, and beyond the already cited imaging techniques, it includes also optical imaging studies. Optical imaging strategies are based on the use of luminescent or fluorescent reporter genes or injectable fluorescent or luminescent probes that provide the possibility to study tumor features even by means of fluorescence and luminescence imaging. Currently, most of these probes are used only in animal models, but the possibility of applying some of them also in the clinics is under evaluation.The importance of tumor imaging, the ease of use of optical imaging instruments, the commercial availability of a wide range of probes as well as the continuous description of newly developed probes, demonstrate the significance of these applications. The aim of this review is providing a complete description of the possible optical imaging procedures available for the non-invasive assessment of tumor features in oncological murine models. In particular, the characteristics of both commercially available and newly developed probes will be outlined and discussed.

  19. The Characteristics of a Research Network for Radiation Oncology in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jin Hyun; Park, Seo Hyun; Kang, Jin Oh [Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    To evaluate the structural characteristics of a scientific network of radiation oncology society A total of 1,512 articles published from 1986 to April 2010 with the terms 'radiation oncology' or 'therapeutic radiology' were obtained in the Korea Med database. The co-authors were analyzed according to their affiliation, and their relationship was used to build a matrix. With the matrix, centralization indices and the Key Player index were analyzed. We used UCINET 6.0 for the network analysis, Netdraw for determining a sociogram and Key Player 1.44 for the key player analysis. The centralization of the radiation oncology field decreased from 8.29% for the period from 1986-1990 to 1.84% from 2006-2010. However, when the Korean Journal of Medical Physics was excluded, centralization increased from 2.32% for the period from 2001-2005 to 3.80% from 2006-2010. This suggested that the communication in the clinical research field of radiation oncology is decreasing. In a node centralization analysis, Seoul National University was found to be the highest at 7.9%. Seoul National University showed the highest indices in the Outdegree (6.50%) and Indegree (8.54%), in addition to Betweenness (14.94%) and Eigenvector (135.234%). The Key Player analysis indicated that Inha University had the highest index at 0.491, but when the Korean Journal of Medical Physics was excluded, Yonsei University had the highest Key Player index at 0.584. The degree centrality in the network of radiation oncology decreased in the most recent period as more institutions are participating in network. However, the Betweenness centrality is still increasing, suggesting that the communications among research groups (clique) in radiation oncology is warranted.

  20. An overview of viral oncology in Italy - report from the Pavia meeting on solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perfetti Vittorio

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This is a report on some of the research activities currently ongoing in Italy as outlined at the “Viruses and solid tumors” meeting jointly organized by the Oncology Sections of IRCCS Policlinico “San Matteo” (Pavia and IRCCS National Cancer Institute (Aviano, held in Pavia, Italy, on October 2011. Experts from the various disciplines involved in the study of the complex relationships between solid tumors and viruses met to discuss recent developments in the field and to report their personal contributions to the specified topics. Secondary end point was to establish a multidisciplinary work group specifically devoted to solid tumors and infectious agents, aimed to identify areas of common interest, promoting and establishing collaborative projects and programs, and to coordinate clinical and research activities. The group, which will be named IVOG (Italian Viral Oncology Group, will operate under the patronage of the various scientific societies of interest.

  1. American Society for Radiation Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for other cancer types View videos on radiation oncology Please Select an Action Read a news release ... This online career board is the premier radiation oncology recruitment tool, offering employers and job seekers an ...

  2. Medical Student Knowledge of Oncology and Related Disciplines: a Targeted Needs Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskvarek, Jonathan; Braunstein, Steve; Farnan, Jeanne; Ferguson, Mark K; Hahn, Olwen; Henderson, Tara; Hong, Susan; Levine, Stacie; Rosenberg, Carol A; Golden, Daniel W

    2016-09-01

    Despite increasing numbers of cancer survivors, non-oncology physicians report discomfort and little training regarding oncologic and survivorship care. This pilot study assesses medical student comfort with medical oncology, surgical oncology, radiation oncology, hospice/palliative medicine, and survivorship care. A survey was developed with input from specialists in various fields of oncologic care at a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center. The survey included respondent demographics, reports of experience with oncology, comfort ratings with oncologic care, and five clinical vignettes. Responses were yes/no, multiple choice, Likert scale, or free response. The survey was distributed via email to medical students (MS1-4) at two US medical schools. The 105 respondents were 34 MS1s (32 %), 15 MS2s and MD/PhDs (14 %), 26 MS3s (25 %), and 30 MS4s (29 %). Medical oncology, surgical oncology, and hospice/palliative medicine demonstrated a significant trend for increased comfort from MS1 to MS4, but radiation oncology and survivorship care did not. MS3s and MS4s reported the least experience with survivorship care and radiation oncology. In the clinical vignettes, students performed the worst on the long-term chemotherapy toxicity and hospice/palliative medicine questions. Medical students report learning about components of oncologic care, but lack overall comfort with oncologic care. Medical students also fail to develop an increased self-assessed level of comfort with radiation oncology and survivorship care. These pilot results support development of a formalized multidisciplinary medical school oncology curriculum at these two institutions. An expanded national survey is being developed to confirm these preliminary findings.

  3. Medical oncology, history and its future in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzania, Mehrzad; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir; Asvadi Kermani, Iraj; Ashrafi, Farzaneh; Allahyari, Abolghasem; Rostami, Nematollah; Razavi, Seyed Mohsen; Ramzi, Mani; Nemanipour, Gholamreza

    2015-11-01

    Systemic therapy is one of the cornerstones of cancer treatment. In 1972, following representations by American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) recognized medical oncology as a new subspecialty of internal medicine. Subspecialty of Hematology and Medical Oncology was emerged in Iran in 1983. In the past, modern medical treatments and education were started in Dar Al-fonun school and then in Tehran University; now six universities in Iran are training in Subspecialty of Hematology and Medical Oncology. There are also ten active hematopoietic stem cell transplantation centers, thirty-one provincial medical schools use their specialized services. Future goals for Hematology and Medical Oncology in Iran include expansion and reinforcement of multidisciplinary teams across the country, early detection and prevention of cancer, providing educational program and conducting cancer researches. To achieve these goals, it is necessary to establish Cancer Hospitals in each province that link together through a network.

  4. Comparative oncology today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paoloni, Melissa C; Khanna, Chand

    2007-11-01

    The value of comparative oncology has been increasingly recognized in the field of cancer research, including the identification of cancer-associated genes; the study of environmental risk factors, tumor biology, and progression; and, perhaps most importantly, the evaluation of novel cancer therapeutics. The fruits of this effort are expected to be the creation of better and more specific drugs to benefit veterinary and human patients who have cancer. The state of the comparative oncology field is outlined in this article, with an emphasis on cancer in dogs.

  5. Application of a Static Fluorescence-based Cytometer (the CellScan in Basic Cytometric Studies, Clinical Pharmacology, Oncology and Clinical Immunology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Harel

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The CellScan apparatus is a laser scanning cytometer enabling repetitive fluorescence intensity (FI and polarization (FP measurements in living cells, as a means of monitoring lymphocyte activation. The CellScan may serve as a tool for diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE as well as other autoimmune diseases by monitoring FP changes in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs following exposure to autoantigenic stimuli. Changes in FI and FP in atherosclerotic patients' PBLs following exposure to various stimuli have established the role of the immune system in atherosclerotic disease. The CellScan has been evaluated as a diagnostic tool for drug-allergy, based on FP reduction in PBLs following incubation with allergenic drugs. FI and FP changes in cancer cells have been found to be well correlated with the cytotoxic effect of anti-neoplastic drugs. In conclusion, the CellScan has a variety of applications in cell biology, immunology, cancer research and clinical pharmacology.

  6. Transformation of Physical DVHs to Radiobiologically Equivalent Ones in Hypofractionated Radiotherapy Analyzing Dosimetric and Clinical Parameters: A Practical Approach for Routine Clinical Practice in Radiation Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoi Thrapsanioti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to transform DVHs from physical to radiobiological ones as well as to evaluate their reliability by correlations of dosimetric and clinical parameters for 50 patients with prostate cancer and 50 patients with breast cancer, who were submitted to Hypofractionated Radiotherapy. Methods and Materials. To achieve this transformation, we used both the linear-quadratic model (LQ model and the Niemierko model. The outcome of radiobiological DVHs was correlated with acute toxicity score according to EORTC/RTOG criteria. Results. Concerning the prostate radiotherapy, there was a significant correlation between RTOG acute rectal toxicity and ( and ( dosimetric parameters, calculated for  Gy. Moreover, concerning the breast radiotherapy there was a significant correlation between RTOG skin toxicity and dosimetric parameter, calculated for both  Gy ( and  Gy (. The new tool seems reliable and user-friendly. Conclusions. Our proposed model seems user-friendly. Its reliability in terms of agreement with the presented acute radiation induced toxicity was satisfactory. However, more patients are needed to extract safe conclusions.

  7. Tobacco control policies of oncology nursing organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarna, Linda; Bialous, Stella Aguinaga

    2004-05-01

    Nurses, the largest group of health care professionals, and the policies of nursing organizations, have tremendous potential to promote health and tobacco control. Policies addressing tobacco use have been implemented by a variety of national and international nursing organizations. This article reviews existing tobacco control policies in oncology nursing organizations.

  8. Late xerostomia after intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy of upper aero-digestive tract cancers: study 2004-03 by the head and neck oncology and radiotherapy Group (Gortec); Xerostomie tardive apres radiotherapie conformationnelle avec modulation d'intensite des cancers des voies aero-digestives superieures: etude 2004-03 du Groupe oncologie et radiotherapie de la tete et du cou (Gortec)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toledano, I.; Lapeyre, M. [Centre Jean-Perrin, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France); Graff, P. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Serre, C. [Centre Val d' Aurelle, 34 - Montpellier (France); Bensadoun, R.J. [CHU La Miletrie, 86 - Poitiers (France); Bensadoun, R.J.; Ortholan, C. [Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 06 - Nice (France); Calais, G. [CHU Bretonneau, 37 - Tours (France); Alfonsi, M. [Institut Sainte-Catherine, 84 - Avignon (France); Giraud, P. [Institut Curie, 75 - Paris (France); Hopital europeen Georges-Pompidou, 75 - Paris (France); Racadot, S. [Centre Leon-Berrard, 69 - Lyon (France)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report a retrospective assessment of late xerostomia according to the RTOG (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group) classification of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) among patients treated by intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy (IMRT) and suffering from upper aero-digestive tract carcinomas of different stages. Some of these patients have bee operated, and some have been treated by chemotherapy. It appears that the IMRT results in a reduction of late xerostomia, and even in an absence of salivary toxicity. Short communication

  9. Breakthrough cancer medicine and its impact on novel drug development in China:report of the US Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (USCACA) and Chinese Society of Clinical Oncology (CSCO) Joint Session at the 17th CSCO Annual Meeting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Roger Luo; Ge Zhang; Li Xu; Pascal Qian; Li Yan; Jian Ding; Helen X. Chen; Hao Liu; Man-Cheong Fung; Maria Koehler; Jean Pierre Armand; Lei Jiang; Xiao Xu

    2014-01-01

    The US Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (USCACA) teamed up with Chinese Society of Clinical Oncology (CSCO) to host a joint session at the17th CSCO Annual Meeting on September 20th, 2014 in Xiamen, China. With a focus on breakthrough cancer medicines, the session featured innovative approaches to evaluate breakthrough agents and established a platform to interactively share successful experiences from case studies of 6 novel agents from both the United States and China. The goal of the session is to inspire scientific and practical considerations for clinical trial design and strategy to expedite cancer drug development in China. A panel discussion further provided in-depth advice on advancing both early and ful development of novel cancer medicines in China.

  10. Verification of monitor unit calculations for non-IMRT clinical radiotherapy: report of AAPM Task Group 114.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Robin L; Heaton, Robert; Fraser, Martin W; Goddu, S Murty; Kirby, Thomas H; Lam, Kwok Leung; Molineu, Andrea; Zhu, Timothy C

    2011-01-01

    The requirement of an independent verification of the monitor units (MU) or time calculated to deliver the prescribed dose to a patient has been a mainstay of radiation oncology quality assurance. The need for and value of such a verification was obvious when calculations were performed by hand using look-up tables, and the verification was achieved by a second person independently repeating the calculation. However, in a modern clinic using CT/MR/PET simulation, computerized 3D treatment planning, heterogeneity corrections, and complex calculation algorithms such as convolution/superposition and Monte Carlo, the purpose of and methodology for the MU verification have come into question. In addition, since the verification is often performed using a simpler geometrical model and calculation algorithm than the primary calculation, exact or almost exact agreement between the two can no longer be expected. Guidelines are needed to help the physicist set clinically reasonable action levels for agreement. This report addresses the following charges of the task group: (1) To re-evaluate the purpose and methods of the "independent second check" for monitor unit calculations for non-IMRT radiation treatment in light of the complexities of modern-day treatment planning. (2) To present recommendations on how to perform verification of monitor unit calculations in a modern clinic. (3) To provide recommendations on establishing action levels for agreement between primary calculations and verification, and to provide guidance in addressing discrepancies outside the action levels. These recommendations are to be used as guidelines only and shall not be interpreted as requirements.

  11. Active surveillance: Oncologic outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.D.F. Venderbos (Lionne); L.P. Bokhorst (Leonard); C.H. Bangma (Chris); M.J. Roobol-Bouts (Monique)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE OF REVIEW: To give insight into recent literature (during the past 12-18 months) reporting on oncologic outcomes of men on active surveillance. RECENT FINDINGS: From recent published trials comparing radical prostatectomy vs. watchful waiting, we learn that radical treatment only

  12. Nasopharyngeal carcinoma in a low incidence European area. A prospective observational analysis from the Head and Neck Study Group of the Italian Society of Radiation Oncology (AIRO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonoli, S.; Bruschieri, L. [Brescia University, Istituto del Radio, Brescia (Italy); Alterio, D. [European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Caspiani, O. [Isola Tiberina Hospital, Rome (Italy); Bacigalupo, A. [IRCCS A.O.U. San Martino IST Genoa, Genoa (Italy); Bunkheila, F. [S. Orsola Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Cianciulli, M. [S. Camillo Hospital, Rome (Italy); Merlotti, A. [Busto Arsizio Hospital, Busto Arsizio (Italy); Podhradska, A. [Milan University - Monza S. Gerardo Hospital, Milan (Italy); Rampino, M. [Turin University, Turin (Italy); Cante, D. [Treviglio Hospital, Treviglio (Italy); Gatta, R. [Brescia University, Istituto del Radio, Brescia (Italy); Prato Hospital, Prato (Italy); Magrini, S.M.

    2016-12-15

    To evaluate the outcomes with respect to long-term survival and toxicity in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated in a European country with low incidence. A prospective observational study carried out by the AIRO Head and Neck group in 12 Italian institutions included 136 consecutive patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) ± chemotherapy (CHT) for NPC (without distant metastasis) between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2010. The disease-specific survival (DSS), overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival (DFS) at 5 years were 92 (±2), 91 (±3), and 69 % (±5 %), respectively. Distant failure was the most frequent modality of relapse. The local, regional, and locoregional control at 5 years were 89 (±3), 93 (±3), and 84 % (±4 %), respectively. The incidence of acute and late toxicity and the correlations with different clinical/technical variables were analyzed. Neoadjuvant CHT prolongs radiotherapy overall treatment time (OTT) and decreases treatment adherence during concomitant chemoradiotherapy. An adequate minimum dose coverage to PTV(T) is a predictive variable well related to outcome. Our data do not substantially differ in terms of survival and toxicity outcomes from those reported in larger series of patients treated in countries with higher incidences of NPC. The T stage (TNM 2002 UICC classification) is predictive of DSS and OS. The GTV volume (T ± N) and an adequate minimum PTV(T) coverage dose (D95 %) were also identified as potential predictive variables. Sophisticated technologies of dose delivery (IMRT) with image-guided radiotherapy could help to obtain better minimum PTV(T) coverage dose with increased DFS; distant metastasis after treatment still remains an unresolved issue. (orig.) [German] Bewertung von langfristigem Ueberleben und Toxizitaet bei Patienten mit Nasopharynxkarzinom (NPC), die in einem europaeischen Land mit geringer Inzidenz behandelt wurden. Die prospektive Beobachtungsanalyse, durchgefuehrt von der

  13. Big data in oncologic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regge, Daniele; Mazzetti, Simone; Giannini, Valentina; Bracco, Christian; Stasi, Michele

    2016-09-13

    Cancer is a complex disease and unfortunately understanding how the components of the cancer system work does not help understand the behavior of the system as a whole. In the words of the Greek philosopher Aristotle "the whole is greater than the sum of parts." To date, thanks to improved information technology infrastructures, it is possible to store data from each single cancer patient, including clinical data, medical images, laboratory tests, and pathological and genomic information. Indeed, medical archive storage constitutes approximately one-third of total global storage demand and a large part of the data are in the form of medical images. The opportunity is now to draw insight on the whole to the benefit of each individual patient. In the oncologic patient, big data analysis is at the beginning but several useful applications can be envisaged including development of imaging biomarkers to predict disease outcome, assessing the risk of X-ray dose exposure or of renal damage following the administration of contrast agents, and tracking and optimizing patient workflow. The aim of this review is to present current evidence of how big data derived from medical images may impact on the diagnostic pathway of the oncologic patient.

  14. Genetics in neuro-oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martuza, R L

    1983-01-01

    This review provides a framework for the neurosurgeon in understanding the increasingly important role of genetics in the study of nervous system tumors. The three tumors discussed (retinoblastoma, meningioma, and neurofibroma) are neither the most common nor the most clinically devastating tumors faced by neurosurgeons. Rather, the studies on these tumors are presented because of the important lessons each provides. Studies of retinoblastoma demonstrate the ability of a gene which is recessive at the cellular level to require a second mutation for tumorigenesis and therein to appear as a dominantly inherited disorder at the level of the organism. This "multi-hit" theory could easily be applied to other nervous system tumors which have both sporadic solitary tumors and familial multiple tumors. In this group we should include acoustic neuromas, meningiomas, gliomas, neurofibromas, paragangliomas (glomus and carotid body tumors), and the pituitary tumors (and others) associated with the multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes. The limits of this review do not allow a separate discussion of the neurosurgical aspect of these lesions; for this, the reader is referred elsewhere (18, 19). Meningiomas are discussed because it appears that two separate lines of inquiry may eventually be related at a cellular level. These directions of study are the demonstration that a common karyotypic abnormality (monosomy 22) is associated with a female preponderance of meningiomas and the demonstration of sex hormone binding in meningiomas. Future studies should be aimed at showing an in vitro biologic response of these tumors to exogenously added hormones or to their blocking agents. Moreover, one would hope that this response would correlate with a specific chromosomal abnormality. It is possible that some portion of the DNA which has been deleted or altered in these tumors plays an essential role in the regulation of the sex steroid regulatory system. If this segment of the genome

  15. The estimation of the magnitude of affective descriptors of pain by doctors, nurses and patients of an oncology service: a clinical psychophysics approach - doi:10.5020/18061230.2007.p143

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Nívea Bezerra Menezes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this experimental study was to validate a psychophysical scale of languageperception and to rank the pain intensity associated to each one of the descriptors, verifying its consistency-reliability and inter-subjective agreement among professionals and patients. The research was held at the Clinics Hospital of Ribeirão Preto Medical School, from January to June, 2005, with 41 professionals and 20 patients. The pain descriptors were submitted to the analysis of psychophysical scale methods in a single method of category and magnitude estimation. The pain for the professionals of a Gynecologic Oncology service was referred as pungent, thin and piercing and for the patients, as cutting and burning. On the Pediatric Oncology, the professionals expressed the pain as pungent, thin and burning, while the patients as burning; compressive, persistent and piercing. By Spearman’s correlation (0,713, it was demonstrated that there is a high correlation among the doctors. Concerning to magnitude estimation, a high correlation between doctors and nurses (0,871 was verified. It was evidenced by the study that the correlation analyses suggest that the magnitude of different describers, associated to the displeasure of the pain judged by the patients, differ of those referred by different health professionals.

  16. Quality of Life (QOL) Analysis of a Randomized Radiation Dose Escalation Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Study: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Trial 0617

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movsas, Benjamin; Hu, Chen; Sloan, Jeffrey; Bradley, Jeffrey; Komaki, Ritsuko; Masters, Gregory; Kavadi, Vivek; Narayan, Samir; Michalski, Jeff; Johnson, Douglas W.; Koprowski, Christopher; Curran, Walter J.; Garces, Yolanda I.; Gaur, Rakesh; Wynn, Raymond B.; Schallenkamp, John; Gelblum, Daphna Y.; MacRae, Robert M; Paulus, Rebecca; Choy, Hak

    2015-01-01

    Importance A recent randomized radiation dose escalation trial in unresectable stage III NSCLC showed a lower survival in the high-dose arm (74Gy vs. 60Gy) with concurrent chemotherapy. Quality of life (QOL), an important secondary endpoint, is presented here. Objective The primary QOL hypothesis predicted a clinically meaningful decline (CMD) in QOL via the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) in the high-dose RT-arm at 3 months. Design RTOG 0617 was a randomized phase III study (conducted from Nov 2007 to Nov 2011) in stage III NSCLC using a 2×2 factorial design and stratified by histology, PET staging, performance status and radiation technique (3D-conformal RT [3DCRT] vs. intensity-modulated radiation [IMRT]). Setting 185 institutions in the USA and Canada. Participants Of 424 eligible stage III NSCLC patients randomized, 360 (85%) consented to QOL, of whom 313 (88%) completed baseline QOL assessments. Intervention for Clinical Trials 74Gy vs. 60Gy with concurrent and consolidation carboplatin/paclitaxel +/− cetuximab. Main Outcomes and Measures QOL was collected prospectively via FACT-Trial Outcome Index (FACT-TOI), equaling Physical-Well-Being (PWB) + Functional-Well-Being (FWB) + Lung Cancer Subscale (LCS). Data are presented at baseline & 3 and 12 months via minimal clinically meaningful changes of >=2 points for PWB, FWB or LCS or >=5 points for TOI. Results Patient demographics and baseline QOL scores were comparable between the 74Gy and 60Gy arms. Two-hundred-nineteen (72%) of living patients who completed QOL at baseline did so at 3 months and 137 (57%) of living patients did so at 12 months. Significantly more patients on 74Gy arm had clinically meaningful decline in FACT-LCS at 3 months than on the 60Gy arm (45% vs. 30%, p=0.02). At 12 months, fewer patients who received IMRT (vs 3DCRT) had clinically meaningful decline in FACT-LCS (21% vs 46%, p=0.003). Baseline FACT-TOI was associated with overall survival in

  17. Anti-CD13 Abs in children with extensive chronic GVHD and their relation to soluble CD13 after allogeneic blood and marrow transplantation from a Children's Oncology Groups Study, ASCT0031.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuvelier, G D E; Kariminia, A; Fujii, H; Aslanian, S; Wall, D; Goldman, F; Grupp, S A; Dunn, S E; Krailo, M; Shapiro, L H; Gilman, A; Schultz, K R

    2010-11-01

    Our group previously demonstrated a strong association between elevated plasma soluble CD13 enzyme activity and newly diagnosed extensive chronic GVHD (cGVHD) in children. As cytotoxic anti-CD13 Abs have been documented after blood and marrow transplant (BMT) in association with CMV infection and cGVHD, we hypothesized that soluble CD13 contributes to cGVHD pathogenesis by induction of CD13 reactive Abs and that anti-CD13 Abs could be additional biomarkers for newly diagnosed pediatric extensive cGVHD. Using prospectively collected plasma samples from pediatric allogeneic BMT (allo-BMT) subjects with cGVHD and controls without cGVHD enrolled in a large multi-institution Children's Oncology Group cGVHD therapeutic trial, we evaluated whether soluble CD13 correlates with induction of anti-CD13 Abs. We found that CD13 reactive Abs are present in a proportion of patients after allo-BMT, but did not seem to correlate with the presence of soluble CD13. Anti-CD13 Abs also did not meet our criteria as a diagnostic biomarker for cGVHD. These data do not confirm that induction of CD13 reactive Abs is a mechanism for cGVHD in children nor are part of the pathogenesis of cGVHD associated with elevated soluble CD13. The exact role of CD13 in cGVHD remains to be determined.

  18. Designs and Discriminations for Clinical Group Supervision in Counselling Psychology: An Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigg, Glen

    2006-01-01

    Evidence suggests that group clinical supervision of counsellors and trainees is an effective mode of service delivery. However, clinical supervision is often understood to be concerned with teaching a generic set of skills. Without specifically labeling them as such, clinical supervision groups are implicitly identified as psycho-educational…

  19. Risk factor analysis of coexisting endometrial carcinoma in patients with endometrial hyperplasia: a retrospective observational study of Taiwanese Gynecologic Oncology Group

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yu-Li; Wang, Kung-Liahng; Chen, Min-Yu; Yu, Mu-Hsien; Wu, Chen-Hsuan; Ke, Yu-Min; Chen, Yi-Jen; Chang, Yin-Yi; Hsu, Keng-Fu; Yen, Ming-Shyen

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical outcome and parameters related to coexisting endometrial carcinoma in women with tissue-diagnosed endometrial hyperplasia. Methods Between January 1991 and December 2009, three hundred and eighty-six patients with the presumptive diagnosis of endometrial hyperplasia were retrieved. Among these, one hundred and twenty-five patients were identified as having coexisting endometrial carcinoma in hysterectomy specimens. The three hundred and eighty-six patients w...

  20. Individualized Prediction of Overall Survival After Postoperative Radiation Therapy in Patients With Early-Stage Cervical Cancer: A Korean Radiation Oncology Group Study (KROG 13-03)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Jin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Seungbong [Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Seok, E-mail: ysk@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Joo-Hyun [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak Jae [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Weon [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Won [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byoung-Gie [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Hee [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Soon Do [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Juree [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cheil General Hospital and Women' s Healthcare Center, Kwandong University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ki-Heon [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Cheil General Hospital and Women' s Healthcare Center, Kwandong University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Mee Sun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Chonnam National University Medical School, Jeollanam-do (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: A nomogram is a predictive statistical model that generates the continuous probability of a clinical event such as death or recurrence. The aim of the study was to construct a nomogram to predict 5-year overall survival after postoperative radiation therapy for stage IB to IIA cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: The clinical data from 1702 patients with early-stage cervical cancer, treated at 10 participating hospitals from 1990 to 2011, were reviewed to develop a prediction nomogram based on the Cox proportional hazards model. Demographic, clinical, and pathologic variables were included and analyzed to formulate the nomogram. The discrimination and calibration power of the model was measured using a concordance index (c-index) and calibration curve. Results: The median follow-up period for surviving patients was 75.6 months, and the 5-year overall survival probability was 87.1%. The final model was constructed using the following variables: age, number of positive pelvic lymph nodes, parametrial invasion, lymphovascular invasion, and the use of concurrent chemotherapy. The nomogram predicted the 5-year overall survival with a c-index of 0.69, which was superior to the predictive power of the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging system (c-index of 0.54). Conclusions: A survival-predicting nomogram that offers an accurate level of prediction and discrimination was developed based on a large multi-center study. The model may be more useful than the FIGO staging system for counseling individual patients regarding prognosis.

  1. Nutrition support in surgical oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhmann, Maureen B; August, David A

    2009-01-01

    This review article, the second in a series of articles to examine the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) Guidelines for the Use of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition in Adult and Pediatric Patients, evaluates the evidence related to the use of nutrition support in surgical oncology patients. Cancer patients develop complex nutrition issues. Nutrition support may be indicated in malnourished cancer patients undergoing surgery, depending on individual patient characteristics. As with the first article in this series, this article provides background concerning nutrition issues in cancer patients, as well as discusses the role of nutrition support in the care of surgical cancer patients. The goal of this review is to enrich the discussion contained in the clinical guidelines as they relate to recommendations made for surgical patients, cite the primary literature more completely, and suggest updates to the guideline statements in light of subsequently published studies.

  2. [Clinical features and genetics of the ichthyosis vulgaris group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traupe, H; Happle, R

    1980-12-11

    Combined application of clinical, genetic and histological criteria in general allows a definite diagnosis of autosomal dominant ichthyosis vulgaris and of X-linked recessive ichthyosis. For differential diagnosis, the following rare syndromes should be considered: ichthyosis bullosa: Refsum syndrome; Jung-Vogel syndrome; ichthyosis with corneal opacity, pili torti and alopecia; ichthyosis with deafness, pili torti and dental anomalies; and ichthyosis with hepatosplenomegaly and cerebellar degeneration.

  3. A Phase 2 Trial of Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Paclitaxel Chemotherapy After Surgery in Patients With High-Risk Endometrial Cancer: A Korean Gynecologic Oncologic Group Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hanbyoul [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Women' s Life Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Byung-Ho [Cancer Biostatistics Branch, Research Institute for National Cancer Control and Evaluation, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seok Mo [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chonnam National University School of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Chi-Heum [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byoung Gie [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Hee-Sug [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Soon Beom [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Hoon, E-mail: jaehoonkim@yuhs.ac [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Women' s Life Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: A phase 2 study was completed by the Korean Gynecologic Oncologic Group to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of concurrent chemoradiation with weekly paclitaxel in patients with high-risk endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Pathologic requirements included endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma stages III and IV. Radiation therapy consisted of a total dose of 4500 to 5040 cGy in 5 fractions per week for 6 weeks. Paclitaxel 60 mg/m{sup 2} was administered once weekly for 5 weeks during radiation therapy. Results: Fifty-seven patients were enrolled between January 2006 and March 2008. The median follow-up time was 60.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 51.0-58.2). All grade 3/4 toxicities were hematologic and usually self-limited. There was no life-threatening toxicity. The cumulative incidence of intrapelvic recurrence sites was 1.9% (1/52), and the cumulative incidence of extrapelvic recurrence sites was 34.6% (18/52). The estimated 5-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 63.5% (95% CI, 50.4-76.5) and 82.7% (95% CI, 72.4-92.9), respectively. Conclusions: Concurrent chemoradiation with weekly paclitaxel is well tolerated and seems to be effective for high-risk endometrioid endometrial cancers. This approach appears reasonable to be tested for efficacy in a prospective, randomized controlled study.

  4. Integrative oncology: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Gary; Cassileth, Barrie

    2014-01-01

    Integrative oncology, the diagnosis-specific field of integrative medicine, addresses symptom control with nonpharmacologic therapies. Known commonly as "complementary therapies" these are evidence-based adjuncts to mainstream care that effectively control physical and emotional symptoms, enhance physical and emotional strength, and provide patients with skills enabling them to help themselves throughout and following mainstream cancer treatment. Integrative or complementary therapies are rational and noninvasive. They have been subjected to study to determine their value, to document the problems they ameliorate, and to define the circumstances under which such therapies are beneficial. Conversely, "alternative" therapies typically are promoted literally as such; as actual antitumor treatments. They lack biologic plausibility and scientific evidence of safety and efficacy. Many are outright fraudulent. Conflating these two very different categories by use of the convenient acronym "CAM," for "complementary and alternative therapies," confuses the issue and does a substantial disservice to patients and medical professionals. Complementary and integrative modalities have demonstrated safety value and benefits. If the same were true for "alternatives," they would not be "alternatives." Rather, they would become part of mainstream cancer care. This manuscript explores the medical and sociocultural context of interest in integrative oncology as well as in "alternative" therapies, reviews commonly-asked patient questions, summarizes research results in both categories, and offers recommendations to help guide patients and family members through what is often a difficult maze. Combining complementary therapies with mainstream oncology care to address patients' physical, psychologic and spiritual needs constitutes the practice of integrative oncology. By recommending nonpharmacologic modalities that reduce symptom burden and improve quality of life, physicians also enable

  5. Drug interactions in female oncologic inpatients: differences among databases

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Moriel; Jorge Augusto Siqueira; Renata Cavalcanti Carnevale; Caroline de Godoi Rezende Costa; Aline Aparecida da Cruz; Nice Maria Oliveira da Silva; Adélia Corina Bernardes; Roberta Paro Carvalho; Priscila Gava Mazzola

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to quantify drug interactions in prescriptions for women undergoing supportive therapy in an oncology setting at a women’s hospital in Brazil and compare the information provided by different databases regarding these drug interactions. A convenience sample was selected of prescriptions for patients diagnosed with breast or gynecological tumors hospitalized in the clinical oncology and surgery wards from April to June 2009. DRUGDEX/M...

  6. Pharmacists’ Interventions in A Paediatric Haematology-Oncology Pharmacy: Do They Matter to Minimise Medication Misadventure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesty U. Ramadaniati

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Paediatric patients with cancer are a high-risk patient population for medication misadventures. This study aimed to document and evaluate the role of pharmacists’ interventions during dispensing-related activities in minimising the occurrence of medication misadventure in haematology-oncology patients. The primary investigator observed and documented all clinical interventions during dispensing-related activities performed by clinical pharmacists in a haematology-oncology pharmacy during 33-day. A total of 359 interventions were performed for 1028 patients. The rates of intervention were 20.04 per 100 medication orders and 34.92 per 100 patients. Provision of drug information was the most common interventions constituting more than three quarters of all interventions. According to therapeutic groups, cytotoxic antineoplastics made up more than half of all interventions. Of all interventions, 22 involved recommendations leading to changes in patients’ treatment (active interventions, and all recommendations were accepted. The top three medication errors were due to inappropriate dosing, labelling error, and unfulfilled indication. Clinical pharmacists’ intervention during dispensing in a paediatric haematology-oncology pharmacy improved medication safety and patient care by minimising the incidence of medication misadventures.

  7. Whole body MR imaging: applications in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, C; Brennan, S; Ford, S; Eustace, S

    2006-04-01

    This article reviews technique and clinical applications of whole body MR imaging as a diagnostic tool in cancer staging. In particular the article reviews its role as an alternative to scintigraphy (bone scan and PET) in staging skeletal spread of disease, its role in assessing total tumour burden, its role in multiple myeloma and finally its evolving non oncologic role predominantly assessing total body composition.

  8. Multidisciplinary approach to the geriatric oncology patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terret, Catherine; Zulian, Gilbert B; Naiem, Arash; Albrand, Gilles

    2007-05-10

    Given the dramatic demographic shift observed in developed countries, the medical community, especially oncologists, geriatricians, and primary care providers, are confronted with the expanding challenge of the management of elderly people with cancer. Ageing is associated with the accumulation of multiple and various medical and social problems. With a prevalence comparable to that of other chronic conditions in this age group, such as diabetes or dementia, cancer holds a prominent place among diseases of the elderly. The care of elderly cancer patients is fundamentally interdisciplinary. Communication and collaboration between geriatricians/primary care providers and oncologists represent key features of effective care in geriatric oncology. The combination of the disease-oriented approach of oncologists and the patient-oriented approach of geriatricians is the most powerful way to better serve this specific population. The medical approach of elderly cancer patients should ideally be under the lead of geriatricians or primary care providers sensitive to geriatric issues. Oncologists should manage the biologic consequences of the interplay between cancer and ageing. Close collaboration between clinicians will help promote active dedicated clinical research and the development of guidelines on the management of elderly people with cancer.

  9. Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Oncology in the United States: A Specialty in Its Late Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Peter H; Reed, Damon R; Yeager, Nicholas; Zebrack, Bradley; Castellino, Sharon M; Bleyer, Archie

    2015-04-01

    Over the last 30 years, it has become apparent that oncology patients ages 15 to 39 have not reaped the same rewards of improved survival that we have seen in younger and older patients. As a result, in 2006 the Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Oncology Progress Review Group convened and examined the factors that impact the care of the 70,000 new cases per year (approximately 7% of all new cases) in the United States and published their findings. The reasons for inferior survival gains are of course multiple and include the settings in which patients are cared for, clinical trial enrollment, insurance coverage, varied treatment of sarcomas, varied treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the psychosocial impact of cancer and cancer survivorship. A new area of a yet-to-be completely defined subspecialty was born out of this meeting: AYA oncology. As a medical community we realized that these patients do not fit neatly into the pediatric nor adult world and, therefore, require a unique approach which many individuals, oncology centers, advocacy groups, and cooperative trial groups have started to address. This group of dedicated providers and advocates has made strides but there is still much work to be done on the local, national, and international level to make up for shortcomings in the medical system and improve outcomes. We review key components of AYA cancer care in 2015 that all providers should be aware of, how far we have come, where this movement is headed, and the obstacles that continue to stand in the way of better cure rates and quality of life after cure for this unique group of patients. Like an adolescent maturing into adulthood, this movement has learned from the past and is focused on moving into the future to achieve its goals.

  10. The development, facilitation and initial evaluation of a mindfulness group for a clinical psychology training course

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Paul; Hemanth, P

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an evaluation of a Mindfulness group facilitate for trainee and qualified psychologists working in a university psychology clinic. the group was shown to have both personal and professional benefits for participants, but further evaluation is required.

  11. Interventional oncology in multidisciplinary cancer treatment in the 21(st) century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Andreas; Kenny, Lizbeth M

    2015-02-01

    Interventional oncology is an evolving branch of interventional radiology, which relies on rapidly evolving, highly sophisticated treatment tools and precise imaging guidance to target and destroy malignant tumours. The development of this field has important potential benefits for patients and the health-care system, but as a new discipline, interventional oncology has not yet fully established its place in the wider field of oncology; its application does not have a comprehensive evidence base, or a clinical or quality-assurance framework within which to operate. In this regard, radiation oncology, a cornerstone of modern cancer care, has a lot of important information to offer to interventional oncologists. A strong collaboration between radiation oncology and interventional oncology, both of which aim to cure or control tumours or to relieve symptoms with as little collateral damage to normal tissue as possible, will have substantial advantages for both disciplines. A close relationship with radiation oncology will help facilitate the development of a robust quality-assurance framework and accumulation of evidence to support the integration of interventional oncology into multidisciplinary care. Furthermore, collaboration between interventional oncology and radiation oncology fields will have great benefits to practitioners, people affected by cancer, and to the wider field of oncology.

  12. Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetty, Indrin J; Martel, Mary K; Jaffray, David A; Benedict, Stanley H; Hahn, Stephen M; Berbeco, Ross; Deye, James; Jeraj, Robert; Kavanagh, Brian; Krishnan, Sunil; Lee, Nancy; Low, Daniel A; Mankoff, David; Marks, Lawrence B; Ollendorf, Daniel; Paganetti, Harald; Ross, Brian; Siochi, Ramon Alfredo C; Timmerman, Robert D; Wong, John W

    2015-11-01

    Radiation therapy is an effective, personalized cancer treatment that has benefited from technological advances associated with the growing ability to identify and target tumors with accuracy and precision. Given that these advances have played a central role in the success of radiation therapy as a major component of comprehensive cancer care, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored a workshop entitled "Technology for Innovation in Radiation Oncology," which took place at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, on June 13 and 14, 2013. The purpose of this workshop was to discuss emerging technology for the field and to recognize areas for greater research investment. Expert clinicians and scientists discussed innovative technology in radiation oncology, in particular as to how these technologies are being developed and translated to clinical practice in the face of current and future challenges and opportunities. Technologies encompassed topics in functional imaging, treatment devices, nanotechnology, and information technology. The technical, quality, and safety performance of these technologies were also considered. A major theme of the workshop was the growing importance of innovation in the domain of process automation and oncology informatics. The technologically advanced nature of radiation therapy treatments predisposes radiation oncology research teams to take on informatics research initiatives. In addition, the discussion on technology development was balanced with a parallel conversation regarding the need for evidence of efficacy and effectiveness. The linkage between the need for evidence and the efforts in informatics research was clearly identified as synergistic.

  13. Interpretation of NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology:Cervical Cancer(Version 1. 2016)%《2016年 NCCN 宫颈癌临床实践指南》解读

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚静; 张军

    2016-01-01

    National Comprehensive Cancer Network( NCCN) is an academic institution that composed of 21 authoritative cancer research centers in United States. Every year NCCN regularly publishes a variety of clinical practice guidelines of malignant tumor. NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology:Cervical Cancer developed by NCCN is the using standard of clinical decision of gynecological tumor in America,and also recognized by gynecologic oncologists worldwide and becomes the most widely used guideline around the world. In our country,because of the differences in health care system, medical level and patient factors,it has certain degree of difficulty in directly applying this guideline,but it can also be used as an important reference of clinical diagnosis and treatment of cervical cancer patients. The paper makes a brief interpretation and explanation of NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology:Cervical Cancer(Version 1. 2016),and mainly combines it with medical practice and clinical practice in our country. The purpose is to help clinicians better understand,inquire and apply of the content of NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology:Cervical Cancer(Version 1. 2016).%美国国立综合癌症网络(NCCN)是美国地区21家权威肿瘤研究中心组成的学术机构,每年定期公布多种恶性肿瘤临床实践指南。其制定的《NCCN 宫颈癌临床实践指南》是美国妇科肿瘤临床决策的使用标准,也被全球妇科肿瘤专家认同并成为世界范围内应用最广泛的指南。在我国,由于医疗体制、医疗水平和患者因素等情况的差异,直接应用该指南存在一定程度的困难,但仍可作为宫颈癌患者临床诊治实践的重要参考。本文对《2016年 NCCN宫颈癌临床实践指南》进行简要解读和阐释,重点与我国医疗和临床工作实际相结合,目的是帮助临床更好地了解、查询和应用《2016年 NCCN 宫颈癌临床实践指南》中的内容。

  14. Diagnosis and management of acquired aplastic anemia in childhood. Guidelines from the Marrow Failure Study Group of the Pediatric Haemato-Oncology Italian Association (AIEOP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Angelica; Lucarelli, Annunziata; Onofrillo, Daniela; Verzegnassi, Federico; Bonanomi, Sonia; Cesaro, Simone; Fioredda, Francesca; Iori, Anna Paola; Ladogana, Saverio; Locasciulli, Anna; Longoni, Daniela; Lanciotti, Marina; Macaluso, Alessandra; Mandaglio, Rosalba; Marra, Nicoletta; Martire, Baldo; Maruzzi, Matteo; Menna, Giuseppe; Notarangelo, Lucia Dora; Palazzi, Giovanni; Pillon, Marta; Ramenghi, Ugo; Russo, Giovanna; Svahn, Johanna; Timeus, Fabio; Tucci, Fabio; Cugno, Chiara; Zecca, Marco; Farruggia, Piero; Dufour, Carlo; Saracco, Paola

    2015-06-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (AA) is a rare heterogeneous disease characterized by pancytopenia and hypoplastic bone marrow. The incidence is 2-3/million inhabitants/year, in Europe, but higher in East Asia. Survival in severe aplastic anemia (SAA) has markedly improved in the past 2 decades because of advances in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, immunosuppressive and biologic drugs, and supportive care. In SAA hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) from a matched sibling donor (MSD) is the treatment of choice. If a MSD is not available, the options include immunosuppressive therapy (IST) or unrelated donor HSCT. The objective of this guideline is to provide healthcare professionals with clear guidance on the diagnosis and management of pediatric patients with AA. A preliminary, evidence-based document issued by a group of pediatric hematologists was discussed, modified and approved during a series of "Consensus Conferences" according to procedures previously validated by the AIEOP Board. The guidelines highlight the importance of referring pediatric patients with AA to pediatric centers with long experience in diagnosis, differential diagnosis, management, supportive care and follow-up of AA.

  15. A randomized phase II study of carboplatin plus pegylated liposomal doxorubicin versus carboplatin plus paclitaxel in platinum sensitive ovarian cancer patients: a Hellenic Cooperative Oncology Group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briasoulis Evangelos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platinum-based combinations are the standard second-line treatment for platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer (OC. This randomized phase II study was undertaken in order to compare the combination of carboplatin and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (LD with carboplatin and paclitaxel (CP in this setting. Methods Patients with histologically confirmed recurrent OC, at the time of or more than 6 months after platinum-based chemotherapy, were randomized to six cycles of CP (carboplatin AUC5 + paclitaxel 175 mg/m2, d1q21 or CLD (carboplatin AUC5 + pegylated LD 45 mg/m2, d1q28. Results A total of 189 eligible patients (CP 96, CLD 93, with a median age of 63 years, median Performance Status (PS 0 and a median platinum free interval (PFI of 16.5 months, entered the study. Discontinuation due to toxicity was higher in the CP patients (13.5% versus 3%, P = 0.016. The overall response rate was similar: CP 58% versus CLD 51%, P = 0.309 (Complete Response; CR 34% versus 23% and there was no statistical difference in time-to-progression (TTP or overall survival (OS; TTP 10.8 months CP versus 11.8 CLD, P = 0.904; OS 29.4 months CP versus 24.7 CLD, P = 0.454. No toxic deaths were recorded. Neutropenia was the most commonly seen severe toxicity (CP 30% versus CLD 35%. More frequent in CLD were severe thrombocytopenia (11% versus 2%, P = 0.016, skin toxicity and Palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia (PPE grade 1-2 (38% versus 9%, PP = 0.029, 20% versus 5%, P = 0.003. PS and PFI were independent prognostic factors for TTP and OS. Conclusions The combination of pegylated LD with carboplatin is effective, showing less neurotoxicity and alopecia than paclitaxel-carboplatin. It thus warrants a further phase III evaluation as an alternative treatment option for platinum-sensitive OC patients. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12609000436279

  16. [The importance of social psychological and clinical factors for prescribing group psychotherapy for neurosis patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grineva, I M; Khokholeva, A A; Obora, V V; Karagodina, E G; Lazarenko, A N

    1989-11-01

    Socio-psychological and clinical factors and their significance for group psychotherapy were investigated in 62 patients with neuroses. The obtained statistically valid differences of some characteristic aspects between groups of patients with positive and negative directives. This indicates the necessity of differential approach to group psychotherapy and active individual and group work on the creation of positive motivation to this type of treatment.

  17. Prevalence of BRCA1 mutations among 403 women with triple-negative breast cancer: implications for genetic screening selection criteria: a Hellenic Cooperative Oncology Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fostira, Florentia; Tsitlaidou, Marianthi; Papadimitriou, Christos; Pertesi, Maroulio; Timotheadou, Eleni; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V; Glentis, Stavros; Bournakis, Evangelos; Bobos, Mattheos; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Papakostas, Pavlos; Pentheroudakis, George; Gogas, Helen; Skarlos, Pantelis; Samantas, Epaminontas; Bafaloukos, Dimitrios; Kosmidis, Paris A; Koutras, Angelos; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Fountzilas, George

    2012-07-01

    In spite the close association of the triple-negative breast cancer immunophenotype with hereditary breast cancers and the BRCA1 pathway, there is a lack of population studies that determine the frequency of BRCA1 mutations among triple-negative breast cancer patients. To address this, we have screened a large sample of 403 women diagnosed with triple-negative invasive breast cancer, independently of their age or family history, for germline BRCA1 mutations. Median age at diagnosis was 50 years (range 20-83). The overall prevalence of triple-negative cases among the initial patient group with invasive breast cancer was 8%. BRCA1 was screened by direct DNA sequencing in all patients, including all exons where a mutation was previously found in the Greek population (exons 5, 11, 12, 16, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24-77% of the BRCA1 coding region), including diagnostic PCRs to detect the three Greek founder large genomic rearrangements. Sixty-five deleterious BRCA1 mutations were identified among the 403 triple-negative breast cancer patients (16%). Median age of onset for mutation carriers was 39 years. Among a total of 106 women with early-onset triple-negative breast cancer (<40 years), 38 (36%) had a BRCA1 mutation, while 27% of women with triple-negative breast cancer diagnosed before 50 years (56/208) had a BRCA1 mutation. A mutation was found in 48% (50/105) of the triple-negative breast cancer patients with family history of breast or ovarian cancer. It is noteworthy, however, that of the 65 carriers, 15 (23%) had no reported family history of related cancers. All but one of the carriers had grade III tumors (98%). These results indicate that women with early-onset triple-negative breast cancer, and ideally all triple-negative breast cancer patients, are candidates for BRCA1 genetic testing even in the absence of a family history of breast or ovarian cancer.

  18. Validation of Lysyl Oxidase As a Prognostic Marker for Metastasis and Survival in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trial 90-03

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Quynh-Thu; Harris, Jonathan; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Kong, Christina S.; Diaz, Roman; Shin, Brian; Cao, Hongbin; Trotti, Andy; Erler, Janine T.; Chung, Christine H.; Dicker, Adam; Pajak, Thomas F.; Giaccia, Amato J.; Ang, K. Kian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To validate lysyl oxidase (LOX), a hypoxia-related protein, as a marker for metastasis in an independent head and neck cancer (HNC) patient group enrolled onto a prospective trial. Patients and Methods We performed traditional immunohistochemical (IHC) staining and automated quantitative analysis (AQUA) for LOX expression in 66 HNC patients from one institution. We also performed AQUA staining for LOX in 306 of 1,113 patients treated on a phase III trial comparing four radiation fractionation schedules in locally advanced HNC (RTOG 90-03). Pretreatment characteristics and outcome were similar between patients with and without LOX assessment. We correlated AQUA LOX expression with time to metastasis (TTM), time to progression (TTP), and overall survival (OS). Results LOX expression from both staining methods predicted for TTM in the first 66 patients. Multivariate analysis, controlling for significant parameters including nodal stage and performance status, revealed tumor LOX expression, as a continuous variable, was an independent predictor for TTM (hazard ratio [HR], 1.21; 95% CI, 1.10 to 1.33; P = .0001), TTP (HR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.10; P = .0069), and OS (HR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.07; P = .0311) in RTOG 90-03 patients. This translates into a 259% increase in metastatic risk for a patient at the 75th percentile of LOX compared with one at the 25th percentile. Conclusion AQUA LOX expression was strongly associated with increased metastasis, progression, and death in RTOG 90-03 patients. This study validates that LOX is a marker for metastasis and survival in HNC. PMID:19667273

  19. Grade Inflation in Medical Student Radiation Oncology Clerkships: Missed Opportunities for Feedback?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grover, Surbhi, E-mail: surbhi.grover@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Swisher-McClure, Samuel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sosnowicz, Stasha [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Li, Jiaqi; Mitra, Nandita [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Berman, Abigail T.; Baffic, Cordelia; Vapiwala, Neha; Freedman, Gary M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that medical student radiation oncology elective rotation grades are inflated and cannot be used to distinguish residency applicants. Methods and Materials: The records of 196 applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program in 2011 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. The grades for each rotation in radiation oncology were collected and converted to a standardized 4-point grading scale (honors, high pass, pass, fail). Pass/fail grades were scored as not applicable. The primary study endpoint was to compare the distribution of applicants' grades in radiation oncology with their grades in medicine, surgery, pediatrics, and obstetrics/gynecology core clerkships. Results: The mean United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 score of the applicants was 237 (range, 188-269), 43% had additional Masters or PhD degrees, and 74% had at least 1 publication. Twenty-nine applicants were graded for radiation oncology rotations on a pass/fail basis and were excluded from the final analysis. Of the remaining applicants (n=167), 80% received the highest possible grade for their radiation oncology rotations. Grades in radiation oncology were significantly higher than each of the other 4 clerkships studied (P<.001). Of all applicants, 195 of 196 matched into a radiation oncology residency. Higher grades in radiation oncology were associated with significantly higher grades in the pediatrics core clerkship (P=.002). However, other medical school performance metrics were not significantly associated with higher grades in radiation oncology. Conclusions: Although our study group consists of a selected group of radiation oncology applicants, their grades in radiation oncology clerkships were highly skewed toward the highest grades when compared with grades in other core clerkships. Student grading in radiation oncology clerkships should be re-evaluated to incorporate more objective and detailed performance metrics to allow for

  20. Significance of PIK3CA Mutations in Patients with Early Breast Cancer Treated with Adjuvant Chemotherapy: A Hellenic Cooperative Oncology Group (HeCOG Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Papaxoinis

    Full Text Available The PI3K-AKT pathway is frequently activated in breast cancer. PIK3CA mutations are most frequently found in the helical (exon 9 and kinase (exon 20 domains of this protein. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of different types of PIK3CA mutations in combination with molecular biomarkers related to PI3K-AKT signaling in patients with early breast cancer.Tumor tissue samples from 1008 early breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy in two similar randomized trials of HeCOG were examined. Tumors were subtyped with immunohistochemistry (IHC and FISH for ER, PgR, Ki67, HER2 and androgen receptor (AR. PIK3CA mutations were analyzed by Sanger sequencing (exon 20 and qPCR (exon 9 (Sanger/qPCR mutations. In 610 cases, next generation sequencing (NGS PIK3CA mutation data were also available. PIK3CA mutations and PTEN protein expression (IHC were analyzed in luminal tumors (ER and/or PgR positive, molecular apocrine carcinomas (MAC; ER/PgR negative / AR positive and hormone receptor (ER/PgR/AR negative tumors.PIK3CA mutations were detected in 235/1008 tumors (23% with Sanger/qPCR and in 149/610 tumors (24% with NGS. Concordance between the two methods was good with a Kappa coefficient of 0.76 (95% CI 0.69-0.82. Lobular histology, low tumor grade and luminal A tumors were associated with helical domain mutations (PIK3CAhel, while luminal B with kinase domain mutations (PIK3CAkin. The overall incidence of PIK3CA mutations was higher in luminal as compared to MAC and hormone receptor negative tumors (p = 0.004. Disease-free and overall survival did not significantly differ with respect to PIK3CA mutation presence and type. However, a statistically significant interaction between PIK3CA mutation status and PTEN low protein expression with regard to prognosis was identified.The present study did not show any prognostic significance of specific PIK3CA mutations in a large group of predominantly lymph-node positive breast cancer

  1. Group sequential and confirmatory adaptive designs in clinical trials

    CERN Document Server

    Wassmer, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an up-to-date review of the general principles of and techniques for confirmatory adaptive designs. Confirmatory adaptive designs are a generalization of group sequential designs. With these designs, interim analyses are performed in order to stop the trial prematurely under control of the Type I error rate. In adaptive designs, it is also permissible to perform a data-driven change of relevant aspects of the study design at interim stages. This includes, for example, a sample-size reassessment, a treatment-arm selection or a selection of a pre-specified sub-population. Essentially, this adaptive methodology was introduced in the 1990s. Since then, it has become popular and the object of intense discussion and still represents a rapidly growing field of statistical research. This book describes adaptive design methodology at an elementary level, while also considering designing and planning issues as well as methods for analyzing an adaptively planned trial. This includes estimation methods...

  2. Clinical applications of single photon emission tomography in neuromedicine. Part 1. Neuro-oncology, epilepsy, movement disorders, cerebrovascular disease; Klinische Anwendungen der Single-Photon-Emissionstomographie in der Neuromedizin. Teil 1. Neuroonkologie, Epilepsien, Basalganglienerkrankungen, zerebrovaskulaere Erkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartenstein, P.; Gruenwald, F.; Kuwert, T.; Tatsch, K.; Sabri, O.; Benkert, O.; Fahlbusch, R.; Gruender, G.; Herzholz, K.; Weiller, C. [Universitaetsklinikum Mainz (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizinn

    2000-11-01

    Single photon emission tomography is, because of its availability and the relatively low costs, the functional imaging modality currently most widely used for clinical applications in the brain. Beside the application of radiopharmaceuticals for the assessment of regional cerebral blood flow there is an increasing clinical use of more selective SPECT-radiopharmaceuticals, like amino acid analogs or receptor ligands. This article gives in its first part a critical review of the clinical applications of SPECT in neuro-oncology, epilepsy, basal ganglia disorders and cerebrovascular disease. (orig.) [German] Die Single-Photon-Emissionstomographie ist wegen ihrer allgemeinen Verfuegbarkeit und der relativen Kostenguenstigkeit weiterhin das funktionell bildgebende Verfahren mit der groessten klinischen Bedeutung fuer die Diagnostik von Erkrankungen des zentralen Nervensystems. Neben Radiopharmaka, die den regionalen zerebralen Blutfluss erfassen, werden zunehmend selektivere Pharmaka fuer klinische Fragestellungen eingesetzt, wie Aminosaeurederivate oder Rezeptorliganden. Die Arbeit vermittelt in ihrem ersten Teil eine kritisch wertende Uebersicht ueber die klinischen Anwendungsmoeglichkeiten von SPECT-Untersuchungen bei Fragestellungen aus der Neuroonkologie, der Epilepsiediagnostik, bei Basalganglienerkrankungen und zerebrovaskulaeren Erkrankungen. (orig.)

  3. WE-AB-BRA-07: Quantitative Evaluation of 2D-2D and 2D-3D Image Guided Radiation Therapy for Clinical Trial Credentialing, NRG Oncology/RTOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giaddui, T; Yu, J; Xiao, Y [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Jacobs, P [MIM Software, Inc, Cleavland, Ohio (United States); Manfredi, D; Linnemann, N [IROC Philadelphia, RTQA Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: 2D-2D kV image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) credentialing evaluation for clinical trial qualification was historically qualitative through submitting screen captures of the fusion process. However, as quantitative DICOM 2D-2D and 2D-3D image registration tools are implemented in clinical practice for better precision, especially in centers that treat patients with protons, better IGRT credentialing techniques are needed. The aim of this work is to establish methodologies for quantitatively reviewing IGRT submissions based on DICOM 2D-2D and 2D-3D image registration and to test the methodologies in reviewing 2D-2D and 2D-3D IGRT submissions for RTOG/NRG Oncology clinical trials qualifications. Methods: DICOM 2D-2D and 2D-3D automated and manual image registration have been tested using the Harmony tool in MIM software. 2D kV orthogonal portal images are fused with the reference digital reconstructed radiographs (DRR) in the 2D-2D registration while the 2D portal images are fused with DICOM planning CT image in the 2D-3D registration. The Harmony tool allows alignment of the two images used in the registration process and also calculates the required shifts. Shifts calculated using MIM are compared with those submitted by institutions for IGRT credentialing. Reported shifts are considered to be acceptable if differences are less than 3mm. Results: Several tests have been performed on the 2D-2D and 2D-3D registration. The results indicated good agreement between submitted and calculated shifts. A workflow for reviewing these IGRT submissions has been developed and will eventually be used to review IGRT submissions. Conclusion: The IROC Philadelphia RTQA center has developed and tested a new workflow for reviewing DICOM 2D-2D and 2D-3D IGRT credentialing submissions made by different cancer clinical centers, especially proton centers. NRG Center for Innovation in Radiation Oncology (CIRO) and IROC RTQA center continue their collaborative efforts to enhance

  4. Evaluación del riesgo nutricional e instauración de soporte nutricional en pacientes oncológicos, según el protocolo del grupo español de Nutrición y Cáncer Nutritional risk evalution and establishment of nutritional support in oncology patients according to the protocol of the Spanish Nutrition and Cancer Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Marín Caro

    2008-10-01

    porcentaje de pérdida de peso es del 6,64% ± 0,87 (min 0, máx 33%. El 32% de la población presenta cifras de albúmina entre 3 y 3,5 g/dl, existiendo una correlación negativa entre ésta y las dificultades con la alimentación p = 0,001. El IMC no mostró ser un parámetro significativo para detectar malnutrición (sólo un 10% se encontraba por debajo de 19,9 kg/m², pero tiene una tendencia lineal significativa con las dificultades en la alimentación, de forma tal que a medida que disminuye el IMC aumentan las dificultades p = 0,001. Más de la mitad de la población, requirió recomendaciones dietéticas específicas para el control de los síntomas que dificultaban la ingesta y una tercera parte de la población necesitó la indicación de suplementos nutricionales. Tras la intervención nutricional más de la mitad (60% mantuvo su peso y una sexta parte lo aumentó. Conclusión: La aplicación de este protocolo es útil, sencillo y podría facilitar la detección de malnutrición en los pacientes oncológicos. Seleccionando a los pacientes que realmente se podrían beneficiar de una intervención nutricional específica, pero debería aplicarse al inicio coincidiendo si fuera posible con el diagnóstico de la enfermedad. El soporte nutricional resulta eficaz en la mayoría de los pacientes.Introduction: Cancer and its oncological treatment cause symptoms which increase the patients risk to suffer from malnutrition. This affects the patients health status negatively by increasing the number of complications, reducing the tolerance to the oncology treatment and a decrease of the patients quality of life. Motivated by this, a group of health professionals from several spanish regions met with the backing of the Sociedad Española de Nutrición Básica y Aplicada (SENBA to address strategies to improve the quality of nutritional intervention in cancer patients. Methods: This multidisciplinary group developed a protocol describing nutritional assessment and

  5. A Phase 3 Trial of Whole Brain Radiation Therapy and Stereotactic Radiosurgery Alone Versus WBRT and SRS With Temozolomide or Erlotinib for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and 1 to 3 Brain Metastases: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0320

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sperduto, Paul W., E-mail: psperduto@mropa.com [Metro MN CCOP, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Wang, Meihua [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Robins, H. Ian [University of Wisconsin Medical School Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Schell, Michael C. [Wilmot Cancer Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (United States); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Souhami, Luis [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Buyyounouski, Mark K. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Khuntia, Deepak [University of Wisconsin Hospital, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Demas, William [Akron City Hospital, Akron, Ohio (United States); Shah, Sunjay A. [Christiana Care Health Services, Inc, CCOP, Newark, Delaware (United States); Nedzi, Lucien A. [University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, Texas (United States); Perry, Gad [The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Suh, John H. [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Mehta, Minesh P. [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Background: A phase 3 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) study subset analysis demonstrated improved overall survival (OS) with the addition of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases. Because temozolomide (TMZ) and erlotinib (ETN) cross the blood-brain barrier and have documented activity in NSCLC, a phase 3 study was designed to test whether these drugs would improve the OS associated with WBRT + SRS. Methods and Materials: NSCLC patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases were randomized to receive WBRT (2.5 Gy × 15 to 37.5 Gy) and SRS alone, versus WBRT + SRS + TMZ (75 mg/m{sup 2}/day × 21 days) or ETN (150 mg/day). ETN (150 mg/day) or TMZ (150-200 mg/m{sup 2}/day × 5 days/month) could be continued for as long as 6 months after WBRT + SRS. The primary endpoint was OS. Results: After 126 patients were enrolled, the study closed because of accrual limitations. The median survival times (MST) for WBRT + SRS, WBRT + SRS + TMZ, and WBRT + SRS + ETN were qualitatively different (13.4, 6.3, and 6.1 months, respectively), although the differences were not statistically significant. Time to central nervous system progression and performance status at 6 months were better in the WBRT + SRS arm. Grade 3 to 5 toxicity was 11%, 41%, and 49% in arms 1, 2, and 3, respectively (P<.001). Conclusion: The addition of TMZ or ETN to WBRT + SRS in NSCLC patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases did not improve survival and possibly had a deleterious effect. Because the analysis is underpowered, these data suggest but do not prove that increased toxicity was the cause of inferior survival in the drug arms.

  6. Results of a Quality Assurance Review of External Beam Radiation Therapy in the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (Europe) Neuroblastoma Group's High-risk Neuroblastoma Trial: A SIOPEN Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaze, Mark N., E-mail: mark.gaze@uclh.nhs.uk [Department of Oncology, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Boterberg, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Dieckmann, Karin; Hoermann, Marcus [General Hospital Vienna, Medical University Vienna (Austria); Gains, Jennifer E.; Sullivan, Kevin P. [Department of Oncology, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Ladenstein, Ruth [Children' s Cancer Research Institute, St. Anna Children' s Hospital, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy is important for local control in neuroblastoma. This study reviewed the compliance of plans with the radiation therapy guidelines of the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (Europe) Neuroblastoma Group (SIOPEN) High-Risk Trial protocol. Methods and Materials: The SIOPEN trial central electronic database has sections to record diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy planning data. Individual centers may upload data remotely, but not all centers involved in the trial chose to use this system. A quality scoring system was devised based on how well the radiation therapy plan matched the protocol guidelines, to what extent deviations were justified, and whether adverse effects may result. Central review of radiation therapy planning was undertaken retrospectively in 100 patients for whom complete diagnostic and treatment sets were available. Data were reviewed and compared against protocol guidelines by an international team of radiation oncologists and radiologists. For each patient in the sample, the central review team assigned a quality assurance score. Results: It was found that in 48% of patients there was full compliance with protocol requirements. In 29%, there were deviations for justifiable reasons with no likely long-term adverse effects resulting. In 5%, deviations had occurred for justifiable reasons, but that might result in adverse effects. In 1%, there was a deviation with no discernible justification, which would not lead to long-term adverse events. In 17%, unjustified deviations were noted, with a risk of an adverse outcome resulting. Conclusions: Owing to concern over the proportion of patients in whom unjustified deviations were observed, a protocol amendment has been issued. This offers the opportunity for central review of radiation therapy plans before the start of treatment and the treating clinician a chance to modify plans.

  7. Radiation oncology a physicist's-eye view

    CERN Document Server

    Goitein, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Radiation Oncology: A Physicist's-Eye View was written for both physicists and medical oncologists with the aim of helping them approach the use of radiation in the treatment of cancer with understanding, confidence, and imagination. The book will let practitioners in one field understand the problems of, and find solutions for, practitioners in the other. It will help them to know "why" certain approaches are fruitful while, at the same time, encouraging them to ask the question "Why not?" in the face of assertions that some proposal of theirs is impractical, unreasonable, or impossible. Unlike a textbook, formal and complete developments of the topics are not among the goals. Instead, the reader will develop a foundation for understanding what the author has found to be matters of importance in radiation oncology during over thirty years of experience. Presentations cover, in largely non-technical language, the principal physical and biological aspects of radiation treatment and address practical clinical c...

  8. Neuro-oncology of CNS tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonn, J.C. [Klinikum Grosshadern, Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Westphal, M. [Universitaetskrankenhaus Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Neurochirurgische Klinik; Rutka, J.T. [Toronto Univ. Hospital for Sick Children, ON (Canada). Div. of Neurosurgery; Grossmann, S.A. (eds.) [Johns Hopkins Oncology Center Neuro-Oncology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Diagnosis and treatment modalities for neuro-oncologic diseases have made considerable advances in recent years. There is hardly a segment of the field of solid tumours that is experiencing such dynamic development with regard to basic scientific findings and clinical results. In the present book the world's leading experts have compiled the current practice-relevant knowledge of neuro-oncologic diseases. The book's clear structure and the uniform presentation of all chapters make this volume a valuable reference, especially for practice-oriented activities, allowing swift access to information about current treatment standards. Hence it will be of great value to both clinicians and researchers. (orig.)

  9. Three important clinical processes in individual and group interpersonal psychotherapy sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivlighan, Dennis M

    2014-03-01

    I describe three clinical processes: (a) bringing the discussion into the here-and-now; (b) making impact disclosures; and (c) creating a corrective emotional experience, derived from interpersonal theory, that occurs in most of my individual and group therapy sessions. For each of these clinical processes, I provide: (a) the theoretical principals that support the clinical process, (b) clinical descriptions and dialogue that demonstrate the process, and (c) a review of some of the research examining the clinical process. Finally, I propose a task model of interpersonal therapy, which illustrates how the three clinical processes come together in interpersonal therapy.

  10. Oncology in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eav, S; Schraub, S; Dufour, P; Taisant, D; Ra, C; Bunda, P

    2012-01-01

    Cambodia, a country of 14 million inhabitants, was devastated during the Khmer Rouge period and thereafter. The resources of treatment are rare: only one radiotherapy department, renovated in 2003, with an old cobalt machine; few surgeons trained to operate on cancer patients; no hematology; no facilities to use intensive chemotherapy; no nuclear medicine department and no palliative care unit. Cervical cancer incidence is one of the highest in the world, while in men liver cancer ranks first (20% of all male cancers). Cancers are seen at stage 3 or 4 for 70% of patients. There is no prevention program - only a vaccination program against hepatitis B for newborns - and no screening program for cervical cancer or breast cancer. In 2010, oncology, recognized as a full specialty, was created to train the future oncologists on site at the University of Phnom Penh. A new National Cancer Center will be built in 2013 with modern facilities for radiotherapy, medical oncology, hematology and nuclear medicine. Cooperation with foreign countries, especially France, and international organizations has been established and is ongoing. Progress is occurring slowly due to the shortage of money for Cambodian institutions and the lay public.

  11. American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Emerging Technology Committee report on electronic brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Catherine C; Yom, Sue S; Podgorsak, Matthew B; Harris, Eleanor; Price, Robert A; Bevan, Alison; Pouliot, Jean; Konski, Andre A; Wallner, Paul E

    2010-03-15

    The development of novel technologies for the safe and effective delivery of radiation is critical to advancing the field of radiation oncology. The Emerging Technology Committee of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology appointed a Task Group within its Evaluation Subcommittee to evaluate new electronic brachytherapy methods that are being developed for, or are already in, clinical use. The Task Group evaluated two devices, the Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy System by Xoft, Inc. (Fremont, CA), and the Intrabeam Photon Radiosurgery Device by Carl Zeiss Surgical (Oberkochen, Germany). These devices are designed to deliver electronically generated radiation, and because of their relatively low energy output, they do not fall under existing regulatory scrutiny of radioactive sources that are used for conventional radioisotope brachytherapy. This report provides a descriptive overview of the technologies, current and future projected applications, comparison of competing technologies, potential impact, and potential safety issues. The full Emerging Technology Committee report is available on the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Web site.

  12. Advanced MR Imaging in Neuro-oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radbruch, A; Bendszus, M

    2015-10-01

    The value of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for the clinical management of brain tumour patients has greatly increased in recent years through the introduction of functional MR sequences. Previously, MR imaging for brain tumours relied for the most part on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR sequences but today with the help of advanced functional MR sequences, the pathophysiological aspects of tumour growth can be directly visualised and investigated. This article will present the pathophysiological background of the MR sequences relevant to neuro-oncological imaging as well as potential clinical applications. Ultimately, we take a look at possible future developments for ultra-high-field MR imaging.

  13. Biomarkers for personalized oncology: recent advances and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalia, Madhu

    2015-03-01

    Cancer is a group of diseases characterized by the uncontrolled growth and spread of abnormal cells and oncology is a branch of medicine that deals with tumors. The last decade has seen significant advances in the development of biomarkers in oncology that play a critical role in understanding molecular and cellular mechanisms which drive tumor initiation, maintenance and progression. Clinical molecular diagnostics and biomarker discoveries in oncology are advancing rapidly as we begin to understand the complex mechanisms that transform a normal cell into an abnormal one. These discoveries have fueled the development of novel drug targets and new treatment strategies. The standard of care for patients with advanced-stage cancers has shifted away from an empirical treatment strategy based on the clinical-pathological profile to one where a biomarker driven treatment algorithm based on the molecular profile of the tumor is used. Recent advances in multiplex genotyping technologies and high-throughput genomic profiling by next-generation sequencing make possible the rapid and comprehensive analysis of the cancer genome of individual patients even from very little tumor biopsy material. Predictive (diagnostic) biomarkers are helpful in matching targeted therapies with patients and in preventing toxicity of standard (systemic) therapies. Prognostic biomarkers identify somatic germ line mutations, changes in DNA methylation, elevated levels of microRNA (miRNA) and circulating tumor cells (CTC) in blood. Predictive biomarkers using molecular diagnostics are currently in use in clinical practice of personalized oncotherapy for the treatment of five diseases: chronic myeloid leukemia, colon, breast, lung cancer and melanoma and these biomarkers are being used successfully to evaluate benefits that can be achieved through targeted therapy. Examples of these molecularly targeted biomarker therapies are: tyrosine kinase inhibitors in chronic myeloid leukemia and

  14. The minutes of Beijing-Tianjin seminar of Chinese Society of Clinical Oncology experts'-consensus on the diagnosis and treatment of osteosarcoma%CSCO骨肉瘤诊治专家共识北京-天津研讨会会议纪要

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙扬; 金韬; 张清

    2012-01-01

    In order to reach a consensus on the standardized clinical diagnosis and treatment of osteosarcoma and lay the foundation for the future Chinese version of "Experts' Consensus of the Clinical Diagnosis and Treatment of Osteosarcoma", the Beijing-Tianjin seminar of Chinese Society of Clinical Oncology (CSCO) experts' consensus on the diagnosis and treatment of osteosarcoma was held at the China National Convention Centre on April 20, 2012. More than 40 representatives from over 20 hospitals nationwide attended the conference. Insisting on the aim of multidisciplinary mutual learning, communication and enhancement, in the conference there was a heated exchange and discussion in the area of the standardized clinical diagnosis and treatment of osteosarcoma.

  15. Mathematical oncology 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Gandolfi, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    With chapters on free boundaries, constitutive equations, stochastic dynamics, nonlinear diffusion–consumption, structured populations, and applications of optimal control theory, this volume presents the most significant recent results in the field of mathematical oncology. It highlights the work of world-class research teams, and explores how different researchers approach the same problem in various ways. Tumors are complex entities that present numerous challenges to the mathematical modeler. First and foremost, they grow. Thus their spatial mean field description involves a free boundary problem. Second, their interiors should be modeled as nontrivial porous media using constitutive equations. Third, at the end of anti-cancer therapy, a small number of malignant cells remain, making the post-treatment dynamics inherently stochastic. Fourth, the growth parameters of macroscopic tumors are non-constant, as are the parameters of anti-tumor therapies. Changes in these parameters may induce phenomena that a...

  16. Randomized Trial Comparing Conventional-Dose With High-Dose Conformal Radiation Therapy in Early-Stage Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate: Long-Term Results From Proton Radiation Oncology Group/American College of Radiology 95-09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zietman, Anthony L.; Bae, Kyounghwa; Slater, Jerry D.; Shipley, William U.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Coen, John J.; Bush, David A.; Lunt, Margie; Spiegel, Daphna Y.; Skowronski, Rafi; Jabola, B. Rodney; Rossi, Carl J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To test the hypothesis that increasing radiation dose delivered to men with early-stage prostate cancer improves clinical outcomes. Patients and Methods Men with T1b-T2b prostate cancer and prostate-specific antigen ≤ 15 ng/mL were randomly assigned to a total dose of either 70.2 Gray equivalents (GyE; conventional) or 79.2 GyE (high). No patient received androgen suppression therapy with radiation. Local failure (LF), biochemical failure (BF), and overall survival (OS) were outcomes. Results A total of 393 men were randomly assigned, and median follow-up was 8.9 years. Men receiving high-dose radiation therapy were significantly less likely to have LF, with a hazard ratio of 0.57. The 10-year American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology BF rates were 32.4% for conventional-dose and 16.7% for high-dose radiation therapy (P < .0001). This difference held when only those with low-risk disease (n = 227; 58% of total) were examined: 28.2% for conventional and 7.1% for high dose (P < .0001). There was a strong trend in the same direction for the intermediate-risk patients (n = 144; 37% of total; 42.1% v 30.4%, P = .06). Eleven percent of patients subsequently required androgen deprivation for recurrence after conventional dose compared with 6% after high dose (P = .047). There remains no difference in OS rates between the treatment arms (78.4% v 83.4%; P = .41). Two percent of patients in both arms experienced late grade ≥ 3 genitourinary toxicity, and 1% of patients in the high-dose arm experienced late grade ≥ 3 GI toxicity. Conclusion This randomized controlled trial shows superior long-term cancer control for men with localized prostate cancer receiving high-dose versus conventional-dose radiation. This was achieved without an increase in grade ≥ 3 late urinary or rectal morbidity. PMID:20124169

  17. [Molecular diagnostic and targeted therapy--"Barking dogs are going to bite": presentations from the 42nd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, Atlanta 2006].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rody, A; Loibl, S; Kaufmann, M

    2006-10-01

    This years ASCO-meeting reinforced the trend of the recent years to get off from empirical treatment concepts to tailored and individualized diagnostics and therapy. However, the basis for an individual therapy is a specific molecular diagnostic which can be reflected in the analysis of hormonal receptor, HER-1, HER-2 and topoisomerase IIalpha in breast cancer. All these markers are not only able to prognosticate the course of disease but they also can predict the success of specific treatment approaches. Trastuzumab is standard therapy in HER-2 positive breast cancer both in the adjuvant and palliative setting. But new therapeutic agents, as e. g. lapatinib, are promising in the treatment of HER-2 positive breast cancer even if trastuzumab is failing. Otherwise it might possibly be an alternative option but adequate clinical results have to be awaited. The targeted inactivation of EGFR-related signal transduction pathways by e. g. gefitinib did not show a substantial improvement neither as a single agent nor in combination with endocrine treatment. However, the appropriate subgroup which might benefit from this therapy has to be defined even if molecular data suggest that patients with ER positive and PR negative breast cancer might be such a group. The increasing knowledge in terms of the biology of bone metastasis led to the development of new treatment options as e. g. denosumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody for RANK ligand. Two adjuvant cytotoxic treatment trials revealed that taxanes improve the prognosis of node positive breast cancer and should be administered sequentially. The advantage of switching to an aromatase inhibitor after two to three years of tamoxifen in endocrine treatment of postmenopausal patients is proved by two clinical trials (IES, ARNO) which could demonstrate a survival benefit. In conclusion it seems to be evident that new targeted therapy options are effective and will set new standards for the treatment of breast cancer patients

  18. ESMO / ASCO Recommendations for a Global Curriculum in Medical Oncology Edition 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dittrich, Christian; Kosty, Michael; Jezdic, Svetlana; Pyle, Doug; Berardi, Rossana; Bergh, Jonas; El-Saghir, Nagi; Lotz, Jean-Pierre; Österlund, Pia; Pavlidis, Nicholas; Purkalne, Gunta; Awada, Ahmad; Banerjee, Susana; Bhatia, Smita; Bogaerts, Jan; Buckner, Jan; Cardoso, Fatima; Casali, Paolo; Chu, Edward; Close, Julia Lee; Coiffier, Bertrand; Connolly, Roisin; Coupland, Sarah; De Petris, Luigi; De Santis, Maria; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; Dizon, Don S; Duff, Jennifer; Duska, Linda R; Eniu, Alexandru; Ernstoff, Marc; Felip, Enriqueta; Fey, Martin F; Gilbert, Jill; Girard, Nicolas; Glaudemans, Andor W J M; Gopalan, Priya K; Grothey, Axel; Hahn, Stephen M; Hanna, Diana; Herold, Christian; Herrstedt, Jørn; Homicsko, Krisztian; Jones, Dennie V; Jost, Lorenz; Keilholz, Ulrich; Khan, Saad; Kiss, Alexander; Köhne, Claus-Henning; Kunstfeld, Rainer; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Lichtman, Stuart; Licitra, Lisa; Lion, Thomas; Litière, Saskia; Liu, Lifang; Loehrer, Patrick J; Markham, Merry Jennifer; Markman, Ben; Mayerhoefer, Marius; Meran, Johannes G; Michielin, Olivier; Moser, Elizabeth Charlotte; Mountzios, Giannis; Moynihan, Timothy; Nielsen, Torsten; Ohe, Yuichiro; Öberg, Kjell; Palumbo, Antonio; Peccatori, Fedro Alessandro; Pfeilstöcker, Michael; Raut, Chandrajit; Remick, Scot C; Robson, Mark; Rutkowski, Piotr; Salgado, Roberto; Schapira, Lidia; Schernhammer, Eva; Schlumberger, Martin; Schmoll, Hans-Joachim; Schnipper, Lowell; Sessa, Cristiana; Shapiro, Charles L; Steele, Julie; Sternberg, Cora N; Stiefel, Friedrich; Strasser, Florian; Stupp, Roger; Sullivan, Richard; Tabernero, Josep; Travado, Luzia; Verheij, Marcel; Voest, Emile; Vokes, Everett; Von Roenn, Jamie; Weber, Jeffrey S; Wildiers, Hans; Yarden, Yosef

    2016-01-01

    The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) are publishing a new edition of the ESMO/ASCO Global Curriculum (GC) thanks to contribution of 64 ESMO-appointed and 32 ASCO-appointed authors. First published in 2004 and updated in 2010, the GC ed

  19. Phenotypic sub-grouping in microtia using a statistical and a clinical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luquetti, Daniela V; Saltzman, Babette S; Heike, Carrie L; Sie, Kathleen C; Birgfeld, Craig B; Evans, Kelly N; Leroux, Brian G

    2015-04-01

    The clinical presentation of microtia varies widely from minimal morphological abnormalities to complete absence of the ear. In this study we sought to identify and characterize sub-groups of microtia using a statistical and a clinical approach. Photographs of 86 ears were classified in relation to all the external ear components. We used cluster analysis and rater's clinical opinion to identify groups with similar phenotypes in two separate analyses. We used Cramer's Phi coefficient of association to assess the similarity among the clinician's groupings as well as among the statistical sub-phenotypic groups and each of the clinician's groupings. The cluster analysis initially divided the 86 ears into a more and a less severe group. The less severe group included two sub-groups that included ears classified as normal and a group that had very few anomalous components. The group of 48 more affected ears all had abnormalities of the helix crus; antihelix-stem, -superior crus and -inferior crus; and antitragus. These were further divided into 4 sub-phenotypes. There was a moderate degree of association among the raters' groupings (Cramer's Phi: 0.64 to 0.73). The statistical and clinical groupings had a lower degree of association (Cramer's Phi: 0.49 to 0.58). Using standardized characterization of structural abnormalities of the ear we identified six distinct phenotypic groups; correlations with clinicians' groupings were moderate. These clusters may represent groups of ear malformations associated with the same etiology, similar time of insult or target cell population during embryonic development. The results will help inform investigations on etiology.

  20. Novas diretrizes na abordagem clínica da neutropenia febril e da sepse em oncologia pediátrica New guidelines for the clinical management of febrile neutropenia and sepsis in pediatric oncology patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Verena Almeida Mendes

    2007-05-01

    precoce são fundamentais para a melhora da sobrevida.OBJECTIVES: To provide a foundation for the diagnostic, prophylactic and therapeutic management of febrile neutropenia and sepsis in children with oncological diseases, with special attention to new protocols and guidelines. SOURCES: A review of the scientific literature utilizing an electronic bibliographic search on MEDLINE, Medscape, SciELO, Google, Cochrane and PubMED using the keywords febrile, neutropenic, cancer, children, sepsis, intensive, care. Articles published between 1987 and 2007 were selected, with preference given to review articles, protocols, systematic reviews, epidemiological studies, task force recommendations and phase III clinical trials. Consensus documents published by the Infectious Diseases Society of America, the Center for Diseases Control and the Infectious Diseases Working Party of the German Society of Hematology and Oncology, in addition to the recommendations of the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies and Society of Critical Care Medicine, were also reviewed. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: The use of aggressive chemotherapy regimens, bone marrow transplantation and intensive care resources have increased the survival rates of children with cancer and also their infectious morbidity, with septic complications as the principal cause of mortality. Several risk factors have been identified, such as neutropenia, oncology type, clinical signs and inflammatory response markers (polymerase chain reaction, procalcitonin and also increased resistance to antimicrobials and antifungal agents. Protocols for risk classification, diagnosis and treatment should be established at each service, taking into account the microbiological flora of each population. Pediatric intensive care has increased the short and long-term survival of these patients. CONCLUSIONS: Oncology patients are particularly vulnerable to infectious complications. Early identification and treatment are

  1. Low Interrater Reliability in Grading of Rectal Bleeding Using National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Toxicity Scales: A Survey of Radiation Oncologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huynh-Le, Minh-Phuong [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Zhang, Zhe [Department of Oncology Biostatistics, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Tran, Phuoc T.; DeWeese, Theodore L. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Song, Daniel Y., E-mail: dsong2@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To measure concordance among genitourinary radiation oncologists in using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (NCI CTC) and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading scales to grade rectal bleeding. Methods and Materials: From June 2013 to January 2014, a Web-based survey was sent to 250 American and Canadian academic radiation oncologists who treat prostate cancer. Participants were provided 4 case vignettes in which patients received radiation therapy and developed rectal bleeding and were asked for management plans and to rate the bleeding according to NCI CTC v.4 and RTOG late toxicity grading (scales provided). In 2 cases, participants were also asked whether they would send the patient for colonoscopy. A multilevel, random intercept modeling approach was used to assess sources of variation (case, respondent) in toxicity grading to calculate the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Agreement on a dichotomous grading scale (low grades 1-2 vs high grades 3-4) was also assessed, using the κ statistic for multiple respondents. Results: Seventy-two radiation oncologists (28%) completed the survey. Forty-seven (65%) reported having either written or been principal investigator on a study using these scales. Agreement between respondents was moderate (ICC 0.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.47-0.58) when using NCI CTC and fair using the RTOG scale (ICC 0.28, 95% CI 0.20-0.40). Respondents who chose an invasive management were more likely to select a higher toxicity grade (P<.0001). Using the dichotomous scale, we observed moderate agreement (κ = 0.42, 95% CI 0.40-0.44) with the NCI CTC scale, but only slight agreement with the RTOG scale (κ = 0.19, 95% CI 0.17-0.21). Conclusion: Low interrater reliability was observed among radiation oncologists grading rectal bleeding using 2 common scales. Clearer definitions of late rectal bleeding toxicity should be constructed to reduce this variability and avoid ambiguity in both

  2. Decline in Tested and Self-Reported Cognitive Functioning After Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation for Lung Cancer: Pooled Secondary Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Randomized Trials 0212 and 0214

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondi, Vinai, E-mail: vgondi@chicagocancer.org [Central Dupage Hospital Cancer Center, Warrenville, Illinois (United States); University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Paulus, Rebecca [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bruner, Deborah W. [Nell Hodgson Woodfull School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Meyers, Christina A. [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gore, Elizabeth M. [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Wolfson, Aaron [University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sun, Alexander Y. [Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Choy, Hak [University of Texas Southwestern Moncreif Cancer Center, Fort Worth, Texas (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To assess the impact of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) on self-reported cognitive functioning (SRCF), a functional scale on the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30). Methods and Materials: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 0214 randomized patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer to PCI or observation; RTOG 0212 randomized patients with limited-disease small cell lung cancer to high- or standard-dose PCI. In both trials, Hopkins Verbal Learning Test (HVLT)-Recall and -Delayed Recall and SRCF were assessed at baseline (after locoregional therapy but before PCI or observation) and at 6 and 12 months. Patients developing brain relapse before follow-up evaluation were excluded. Decline was defined using the reliable change index method and correlated with receipt of PCI versus observation using logistic regression modeling. Fisher's exact test correlated decline in SRCF with HVLT decline. Results: Of the eligible patients pooled from RTOG 0212 and RTOG 0214, 410 (93%) receiving PCI and 173 (96%) undergoing observation completed baseline HVLT or EORTC QLQ-C30 testing and were included in this analysis. Prophylactic cranial irradiation was associated with a higher risk of decline in SRCF at 6 months (odds ratio 3.60, 95% confidence interval 2.34-6.37, P<.0001) and 12 months (odds ratio 3.44, 95% confidence interval 1.84-6.44, P<.0001). Decline on HVLT-Recall at 6 and 12 months was also associated with PCI (P=.002 and P=.002, respectively) but was not closely correlated with decline in SRCF at the same time points (P=.05 and P=.86, respectively). Conclusions: In lung cancer patients who do not develop brain relapse, PCI is associated with decline in HVLT-tested and self-reported cognitive functioning. Decline in HVLT and decline in SRCF are not closely correlated, suggesting that they may represent distinct elements of the cognitive spectrum.

  3. Higher Biologically Effective Dose of Radiotherapy Is Associated With Improved Outcomes for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Treated With Chemoradiation: An Analysis of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machtay, Mitchell, E-mail: Mitchell.machtay@uhhospitals.org [University Hospitals/Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Bae, Kyounghwa [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Department of Statistics, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States); Paulus, Rebecca [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Department of Statistics, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Gore, Elizabeth M. [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Albain, Kathy [Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, IL (United States); Sause, William T. [LDS Hospital, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Curran, Walter J. [Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Patients treated with chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced non-small-cell lung carcinoma (LA-NSCLC) were analyzed for local-regional failure (LRF) and overall survival (OS) with respect to radiotherapy dose intensity. Methods and Materials: This study combined data from seven Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials in which chemoradiotherapy was used for LA-NSCLC: RTOG 88-08 (chemoradiation arm only), 90-15, 91-06, 92-04, 93-09 (nonoperative arm only), 94-10, and 98-01. The radiotherapeutic biologically effective dose (BED) received by each individual patient was calculated, as was the overall treatment time-adjusted BED (tBED) using standard formulae. Heterogeneity testing was done with chi-squared statistics, and weighted pooled hazard ratio estimates were used. Cox and Fine and Gray's proportional hazard models were used for OS and LRF, respectively, to test the associations between BED and tBED adjusted for other covariates. Results: A total of 1,356 patients were analyzed for BED (1,348 for tBED). The 2-year and 5-year OS rates were 38% and 15%, respectively. The 2-year and 5-year LRF rates were 46% and 52%, respectively. The BED (and tBED) were highly significantly associated with both OS and LRF, with or without adjustment for other covariates on multivariate analysis (p < 0.0001). A 1-Gy BED increase in radiotherapy dose intensity was statistically significantly associated with approximately 4% relative improvement in survival; this is another way of expressing the finding that the pool-adjusted hazard ratio for survival as a function of BED was 0.96. Similarly, a 1-Gy tBED increase in radiotherapy dose intensity was statistically significantly associated with approximately 3% relative improvement in local-regional control; this is another way of expressing the finding that the pool-adjusted hazard ratio as a function of tBED was 0.97. Conclusions: Higher radiotherapy dose intensity is associated with improved local-regional control

  4. Assessment of the Prognostic Value of Two Common Variants of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Genes in Ovarian Cancer Patients Treated with Cisplatin and Paclitaxel: A Gynecologic Oncology Group Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunqiao eTian

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: BRCA1/BRCA2 germline mutations appear to enhance the platinum-sensitivity, but little is known about the prognostic relevance of polymorphisms in BRCA1/BRCA2 in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC. This study evaluated whether common variants of BRCA1/BRCA2 are associated with progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS in patients with advanced stage sporadic EOC.Experimental Design: The allelic frequency of BRCA1 (2612C>T, P871L-rs799917 and BRCA2 (114A>C, N372H-rs144848 were determined in normal blood DNA from women in Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG protocol #172 phase III trial with optimally-resected stage III EOC treated with intraperitoneal or intravenous cisplatin and paclitaxel (C+P. Associations between polymorphisms and PFS or OS were assessed. Results: 232 women were included for analyses. African Americans (AA had different distributions for the two polymorphisms from Caucasians and others. For non-AA patients, the genotype for BRCA1 P871L was distributed as 38% for CC, 49% for CT and 13% for TT. Median PFS was estimated to be 31, 21 and 21 months, respectively. After adjusting for cell type, residual disease and chemotherapy regimen, CT/TT genotypes were associated with a 1.40-fold increased risk of disease progression (95% confidence interval [CI]=1.00-1.95, p=0.049. After removing 7 patients with known BRCA1 germline mutations, the hazard ratio (HR was 1.36 (95% CI=0.97-1.91, p=0.073. The association between BRCA1 P871L and OS was not significant (HR =1.25, 95% CI=0.88-1.76, p=0.212. Genotype distribution of BRCA2 N372H among non-AA patients was 50%, 44% and 6% for AA, AC and CC, respectively and there is no evidence that this BRCA2 polymorphism was related to PFS or OS. Conclusion: Polymorphisms in BRCA1 P871L or in BRCA2 N372H were not associated with either PFS or OS in women with optimally-resected, stage III EOC treated with cisplatin and paclitaxel.

  5. [Oncologic gynecology and the Internet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizler, Robert; Bielanów, Tomasz; Kulikiewicz, Krzysztof

    2002-11-01

    The strategy of World Wide Web searching for medical sites was presented in this article. The "deep web" and "surface web" resources were searched. The 10 best sites connected with the gynecological oncology, according to authors' opinion, were presented.

  6. International Outreach: What Is the Responsibility of ASTRO and the Major International Radiation Oncology Societies?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayr, Nina A., E-mail: ninamayr@uw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Hu, Kenneth S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Viswanathan, Akila N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wall, Terry J. [St. Luke' s Cancer Institute, Kansas City, Missouri (United States); Amendola, Beatriz E. [Innovative Cancer Institute, Miami, Florida (United States); Calaguas, Miriam J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke' s Medical Center, Quezon City (Philippines); Palta, Jatinder R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Yue, Ning J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Rengan, Ramesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Williams, Timothy R. [Lynn Cancer Institute, Boca Raton Regional Hospital, Boca Raton, Florida (United States)

    2014-07-01

    In this era of globalization and rapid advances in radiation oncology worldwide, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) is committed to help decrease profound regional disparities through the work of the International Education Subcommittee (IES). The IES has expanded its base, reach, and activities to foster educational advances through a variety of educational methods with broad scope, in addition to committing to the advancement of radiation oncology care for cancer patients around the world, through close collaboration with our sister radiation oncology societies and other educational, governmental, and organizational groups.

  7. Establishing a Global Radiation Oncology Collaboration in Education (GRaCE): Objectives and priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Sandra; Eriksen, Jesper G; Trotter, Theresa; Verfaillie, Christine; Benstead, Kim; Giuliani, Meredith; Poortmans, Philip; Holt, Tanya; Brennan, Sean; Pötter, Richard

    2015-10-01

    Representatives from countries and regions world-wide who have implemented modern competency-based radiation- or clinical oncology curricula for training medical specialists, met to determine the feasibility and value of an ongoing international collaboration. In this forum, educational leaders from the ESTRO School, encompassing many European countries adopting the ESTRO Core Curriculum, and clinician educators from Canada, Denmark, the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand considered the training and educational arrangements within their jurisdictions, identifying similarities and challenges between programs. Common areas of educational interest and need were defined, which included development of new competency statements and assessment tools, and the application of the latter. The group concluded that such an international cooperation, which might expand to include others with similar goals, would provide a valuable vehicle to ensure training program currency, through sharing of resources and expertise, and enhance high quality radiation oncology education. Potential projects for the Global Radiation Oncology Collaboration in Education (GRaCE) were agreed upon, as was a strategy designed to maintain momentum. This paper describes the rationale for establishing this collaboration, presents a comparative view of training in the jurisdictions represented, and reports early goals and priorities.

  8. An Empirical Investigation of Group Treatment for a Clinical Population of Adult Female Incest Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxe, Brenda J.; Johnson, Susan M.

    1999-01-01

    Empirically assesses the effectiveness of a group treatment program on intrapersonal symptomatology and interpersonal difficulties in a clinical population of women with a history of incest. Results indicate that a time-limited group, which focuses on the original trauma, is effective in reducing intrapersonal symptomatology for women with a…

  9. [Clinical and epidemiologic evaluation of carcinogenic pollution in the wood-processing industry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladkova, E V; Dymova, E G; Gurvich, E B; Antonova, O N; Gutnikova, O V; Saprykova, V V; Prosina, I I

    1993-01-01

    Hygienic, clinical, epidemiologic studies in primary woodworking and chipboard production workers showed that exposure to occupational hazards (wooden dust, formaldehyde and other chemicals of wooden origin) results in frequent allergy and irritation of upper respiratory tract and skin. High oncologic risk among woodworking production employees assigns the industry to a group with oncologic jeopardy. MAC for wooden dust should be corrected taking into account the chemicals (phenol, formaldehyde, furans et al.) content.

  10. ULTRASOUND APPLICATION FOR TREATMENT OF ONCOLOGICAL DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Minchenya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes methods for treatment of oncological diseases while applying ultrasound as an independent method and modifier of radiation therapy.Experimental and clinical investigations show effectiveness of ultrasound as an independent remedy against malignant tumors and its usage in combination with other anti-tumor agents. However combination effect of ultrasound and radiation on malignant neoplasms and mechanisms of radiation-sensitizing action of low-frequency ultrasonic radiation is still understudied. Influence of ultrasound input direction in malignant tumor zone has not been investigated yet and there are no rational designs of waveguides for controllable vibration impact on skin neoplasms.

  11. Case Study for Integration of an Oncology Clinical Site in a Semantic Interoperability Solution based on HL7 v3 and SNOMED-CT: Data Transformation Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ahmed; Bucur, Anca; Perez-Rey, David; Alonso, Enrique; de Hoog, Matthy; Dekker, Andre; Marshall, M Scott

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the data transformation pipeline defined to support the integration of a new clinical site in a standards-based semantic interoperability environment. The available datasets combined structured and free-text patient data in Dutch, collected in the context of radiation therapy in several cancer types. Our approach aims at both efficiency and data quality. We combine custom-developed scripts, standard tools and manual validation by clinical and knowledge experts. We identified key challenges emerging from the several sources of heterogeneity in our case study (systems, language, data structure, clinical domain) and implemented solutions that we will further generalize for the integration of new sites. We conclude that the required effort for data transformation is manageable which supports the feasibility of our semantic interoperability solution. The achieved semantic interoperability will be leveraged for the deployment and evaluation at the clinical site of applications enabling secondary use of care data for research. This work has been funded by the European Commission through the INTEGRATE (FP7-ICT-2009-6-270253) and EURECA (FP7-ICT-2011-288048) projects.

  12. Payment Reform: Unprecedented and Evolving Impact on Gynecologic Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin eApte

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available With the signing of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA in April 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS is now positioned to drive the development and implementation of sweeping changes to how physicians and hospitals are paid for the provision of oncology related services. These changes will have a long-lasting impact on the sub-specialty of gynecologic oncology, regardless of practice structure, physician employment and compensation model, or local insurance market. Recently, commercial payers have piloted various models of payment reform via oncology specific clinical pathways, oncology medical homes, episode payment arrangements, and accountable care organizations. Despite the positive results of some pilot programs, adoption remains limited. The goals are to eliminate unnecessary variation in cancer treatment, provide coordinated patient-centered care, while controlling costs. Yet, meaningful payment reform in oncology remains elusive. As the largest payer for oncology services in the United States, CMS has the leverage to make cancer services more value-based. Thus far, the focus has been around pricing of physician-administered drugs with recent work in the area of the Oncology Medical Home. Gynecologic oncology is a unique sub-specialty which blends surgical and medical oncology, with treatment that often involves radiation therapy. This forward-thinking, multi-disciplinary model works to keep the patient at the center of the care continuum and emphasizes care coordination. Because of the breadth and depth of gynecologic oncology, this sub-specialty has both the potential to be disrupted by payment reform as well as potentially benefit from the aspects of reform which can align incentives appropriately to improve coordination. Although the precise future payment models are unknown at this time, focused engagement of gynecologic oncologists and the full care team is imperative to assure that the

  13. Payment Reform: Unprecedented and Evolving Impact on Gynecologic Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apte, Sachin M.; Patel, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    With the signing of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act in April 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is now positioned to drive the development and implementation of sweeping changes to how physicians and hospitals are paid for the provision of oncology-related services. These changes will have a long-lasting impact on the sub-specialty of gynecologic oncology, regardless of practice structure, physician employment and compensation model, or local insurance market. Recently, commercial payers have piloted various models of payment reform via oncology-specific clinical pathways, oncology medical homes, episode payment arrangements, and accountable care organizations. Despite the positive results of some pilot programs, adoption remains limited. The goals are to eliminate unnecessary variation in cancer treatment, provide coordinated patient-centered care, while controlling costs. Yet, meaningful payment reform in oncology remains elusive. As the largest payer for oncology services in the United States, CMS has the leverage to make cancer services more value based. Thus far, the focus has been around pricing of physician-administered drugs with recent work in the area of the Oncology Medical Home. Gynecologic oncology is a unique sub-specialty that blends surgical and medical oncology, with treatment that often involves radiation therapy. This forward-thinking, multidisciplinary model works to keep the patient at the center of the care continuum and emphasizes care coordination. Because of the breadth and depth of gynecologic oncology, this sub-specialty has both the potential to be disrupted by payment reform as well as potentially benefit from the aspects of reform that can align incentives appropriately to improve coordination. Although the precise future payment models are unknown at this time, focused engagement of gynecologic oncologists and the full care team is imperative to assure that the practice remains patient centered

  14. [Unproven methods in oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jallut, O; Guex, P; Barrelet, L

    1984-09-08

    As in some other chronic diseases (rheumatism, multiple sclerosis, etc.), unproven methods of diagnosis and treatment have long been current in cancer. Since 1960 the American Cancer Society has published an abundant literature on these "unproven methods", which serves as a basis for a historical review: some substances (Krebiozen, Laetrile) have enjoyed tremendous if shortlived success. The present trend is back to nature and "mild medicine". The proponents of this so-called natural medicine are often disciples of a pseudoscientific religion using irrational arguments. Direct attacks on these erroneous theories and their public refutation fail to convince the adepts, who trust in these methods and are not amenable to a scientific approach. Study of their psychological motivations reveals that in fact they seek something more reassuring than plain medical explanation which is aware of its limits. They feel reassured by theories which often bear some resemblance to the old popular medicine. To protect patients against these dangerous methods and all the disillusionment they entail, the Swiss Society of Oncology and the Swiss Cancer League have decided to gather information and draw up a descriptive list of the commonest unproven methods in Switzerland (our File No. 2, "Total anti-cancer cure", is given as an example). The files are published in French, German and English and are available to physicians, nursing teams, and also patients who wish to have more objective information on these methods.

  15. Micronutrients in Oncological Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Gröber

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional supplements are widely used among patients with cancer who perceive them to be anticancer and antitoxicity agents. Depending on the type of malignancy and the gender 30%–90% of the cancer patients supplement their diets with antioxidant and immuno-stabilizing micronutrients, such as selenium, vitamin C, and vitamin D, often without the knowledge of the treating physician. From the oncological viewpoint, there are justifiable concerns that dietary supplements decrease the effectiveness of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recent studies, however, have provided increasing evidence that treatment is tolerated better—with an increase in patient compliance and a lower rate of treatment discontinuations—when micronutrients, such as selenium, are added as appropriate to the patient’s medication. Nutritional supplementation tailored to an individual’s background diet, genetics, tumor histology, and treatments may yield benefits in subsets of patients. Clinicians should have an open dialogue with patients about nutritional supplements. Supplement advice needs to be individualized and come from a credible source, and it is best communicated by the physician.

  16. A Study of Layered Learning in Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Jill S; Buie, Larry W; Lyons, Kayley; Rao, Kamakshi; Pinelli, Nicole R; McLaughlin, Jacqueline E; Roth, Mary T

    2016-05-25

    Objective. To explore use of pharmacy learners as a means to expand pharmacy services in a layered learning practice model (LLPM), to examine whether an LLPM environment precludes achievement of knowledge-based learning objectives, and to explore learner perception of the experience. Design. An acute care oncology pharmacy practice experience was redesigned to support the LLPM. Specifically, the redesign focused on micro discussion, standardized feedback (eg, rubrics), and cooperative learning to enhance educational gain through performing clinical activities. Assessment. Posttest scores evaluating knowledge-based learning objectives increased in mean percentage compared to pretest values. Learners viewed the newly designed practice experience positively with respect to perceived knowledge attainment, improved clinical time management skills, contributions to patient care, and development of clinical and self-management skills. A fifth theme among students, comfort with learning, was also noted. Conclusion. Layered learning in an oncology practice experience was well-received by pharmacy learners. Data suggest a practice experience in the LLPM environment does not preclude achieving knowledge-based learning objectives and supports further studies of the LLPM.

  17. Clinical course teaching in transport of critically ill patients: Small group methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Beigmohammadi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Critically ill patient transfer is potentially risky and may be lead to morbidity and mortality. Physicians' skill is very important for safe transport. We want to evaluate the effect of clinical course teaching on the promotion of physicians' abilities in the transport of critically ill patients. In an interventional study, 320 interns, male and female, were taught about patient transfer in two groups include in one day clinical course as the small group system (n=160 and other group the lecture base learning (n=160. In the clinical course, each participant under observation of an anesthesiologist in the operation room and ICU was acquainted with mask ventilation, intubation and learned to work with a defibrillator, infusion pump, portable ventilator and pulse oximeter. In lecture group, the anesthesiologist explained the topics by video and dummy. At the end of education course, the interns’ abilities were evaluated based on checklist method and scored by the project colleague in all educational items. Three hundred twenty interns, 122 males, and 198 females; were enrolled, two groups. The clinical course training caused improvements in the interns’ knowledge and abilities in intubation and use of the defibrillator and portable ventilator vs.lecture group significantly (P<0.005. The males were better than females in laryngoscopy, but the progress of the females was significantly better than males (P=0.003. The rate of adverse events was reduced significantly after clinical course teaching (P=0.041 Clinical course teaching could promote interns' clinical competencies in the transport of critically ill patients.

  18. 2011版《NCCN胰腺癌临床实践指南》中若干问题的探讨%The discussion on the issues related to NCCN clinical practice guidelines in oncology for pancreatic adenocarcinoma ( V2011 )

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘子文; 赵玉沛

    2011-01-01

    《NCCN胰腺癌临床实践指南》2011中国版已修订完成,新版指南在原有内容基础上结合近年来临床研究进展,在胰腺癌的诊断和治疗路线、原则、循证医学证据上进行了细微更新,并在理念上有了新的阐述,本文就更新中的相关问题进行探讨.《NCCN胰腺癌临床实践指南》2011版中针对胰腺癌的诊断提出了多学科评估的理念,治疗上重视肿瘤可切除性判定标准,化疗中对于体力状态好的患者可选用FOLFIRINOX方案,强调了吉西他滨和5-氟尿嘧啶(5-FU)均作为胰腺癌化疗的Ⅰ类证据.%The revision of the Chinese version of NCCN clinical practice guidelines in oncology for pancreatic adenocarcinoma ( V2011) has been completed. Based on the clinical research in recent years, the new version of the guidelines expressed new ideas and made minor updates on the diagnosis, treatment, and evidence based medicine of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. This article discusses issues related to these new updates. NCCN pancreatic adenocarcinoma guidelines (V2011) presented the concept of multidisciplinary review and emphasized the criteria defining resectability status in treatment. In addition, greater emphasis was placed on the principles of chemotherapy. FOLFIRINOX therapy was recommended for patients in good physical condition. Gemcitabine and 5 - FU were also highlighted as Category 1 evidence for chemotherapy of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  19. Clinical and immunological characteristics of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in women of different age groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kutdusova A.M.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the clinical and immunological features of the hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in women of different age groups. Materials and methods: Clinical and laboratory characteristics of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in 148 women aged 17 to 65 years old have been investigated. Patients have been divided into two groups: group I included 101 patients with normal menstrual rhythm, group II included 47 female patients with menopause. In 57 women (36 from group I, 21 — from group II the content of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD16+, CD19+ — sub-populations of peripheral blood lymphocytes has been determined. Results: In compared groups significant differences in structure and frequency of complications of the disease have been revealed. Unidirectional tendency to increase significantly reduced absolute rates of investigated lymphocyte subpopulations in dynamics of the disease has been identified. It also has been stated that by the time of early convalescence in case of severe form of HFRS the indices did not reach the standard level. In an older group of women deeper damage and long-term recovery of immune system have been marked. Conclusion: According to the results of clinical and immunological studies the research work has revealed that in young women the response of the immune system to HFRS has developed faster and stronger than that in patients during the menopause period.

  20. A framework for prescription in exercise-oncology research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasso, John P; Eves, Neil D; Christensen, Jesper F;

    2015-01-01

    of exercise treatment in the oncology setting. Against this background, this opinion paper provides an overview of the fundamental tenets of human exercise physiology known as the principles of training, with specific application of these principles in the design and conduct of clinical trials in exercise...

  1. NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) is a national network of cancer care investigators, providers, academia, and other organizations that care for diverse populations in health systems. View the list of publications from NCORP. | Clinical Trials network of cancer care professionals who care for diverse populations across the U.S.

  2. NCI Community Oncology Research Program Approved | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    On June 24, 2013, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Board of Scientific Advisors approved the creation of the NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP). NCORP will bring state-of-the art cancer prevention, control, treatment and imaging clinical trials, cancer care delivery research, and disparities studies to individuals in their own communities. |

  3. International Conference on Harmonisation; choice of control group and related issues in clinical trials; availability. Notice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-14

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a guidance entitled "E10 Choice of Control Group and Related Issues in Clinical Trials." The guidance was prepared under the auspices of the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH). The guidance sets forth general principles that are relevant to all controlled trials and are especially pertinent to the major clinical trials intended to demonstrate drug (including biological drug) efficacy. The guidance describes the principal types of control groups and discusses their appropriateness in particular situations. The guidance is intended to assist sponsors and investigators in the choice of control groups for clinical trials.

  4. Ethical Challenges and Lessons Learned During the Clinical Development of a Group A Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Martellet, Lionel; Sow, Samba O.; Diallo, Aldiouma; Hodgson, Abraham; Kampmann, Beate; Hirve, Siddhivinayak; Tapia, Milagritos; Haidara, Fadima Cheick; Ndiaye, Assane; Diarra, Bou; Ansah, Patrick Odum; Akinsola, Adebayo; Idoko, Olubukola T.; Adegbola, Richard A.; Bavdekar, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Background.  The group A meningococcal vaccine (PsA-TT) clinical development plan included clinical trials in India and in the West African region between 2005 and 2013. During this period, the Meningitis Vaccine Project (MVP) accumulated substantial experience in the ethical conduct of research to the highest standards. Methods.  Because of the public–private nature of the sponsorship of these trials and the extensive international collaboration with partners from a diverse setting of countr...

  5. Moving the Self-Esteem of People with Epilepsy by Supportive Group: A Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kritaya Sawangchareon

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: People with epilepsy (PWE face physical and mental illness, and social stigma, which affect their self-esteem and quality of life. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a support group on the self-esteem of PWE. Methods: A Quasi-experimental study was performed on 120 PWE in the Epilepsy Clinic at Srinagarind Hospital. The experimental group (N=60 attended the support group before receiving regular health care services. The control group (N=60 received only regular healthcare services. Data was collected by using the Rosenberg self-esteem scale scoring before and after the experiment. The score was analyzed by using a paired t-test and an independent t-test. Results: The study showed that before the experiment, the self–esteem score of the control group was significantly higher than the experimental group. After the experiment, the scores of the control group and the experimental group showed a significant statistical difference. The score in the control group was significantly lower than the experimental group, while the score in the experimental group was significantly higher than before the experiment. Conclusion: The support group improves the self-esteem of PWE. Medical personnel should set up a support group for PWE to enhance their self-esteem.

  6. The MRI-Linear Accelerator Consortium: Evidence-Based Clinical Introduction of an Innovation in Radiation Oncology Connecting Researchers, Methodology, Data Collection, Quality Assurance, and Technical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkmeijer, Linda G. W.; Fuller, Clifton D.; Verkooijen, Helena M.; Verheij, Marcel; Choudhury, Ananya; Harrington, Kevin J.; Schultz, Chris; Sahgal, Arjun; Frank, Steven J.; Goldwein, Joel; Brown, Kevin J.; Minsky, Bruce D.; van Vulpen, Marco

    2016-01-01

    An international research consortium has been formed to facilitate evidence-based introduction of MR-guided radiotherapy (MR-linac) and to address how the MR-linac could be used to achieve an optimized radiation treatment approach to improve patients’ survival, local, and regional tumor control and quality of life. The present paper describes the organizational structure of the clinical part of the MR-linac consortium. Furthermore, it elucidates why collaboration on this large project is necessary, and how a central data registry program will be implemented. PMID:27790408

  7. Psycho-oncology in India: Emerging trends from Kerala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswaran Chitra

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that around 2.5 million people suffer from cancer at any given time in India. Almost 80% of patients reach hospitals in advanced stages of the disease. The majority needs palliative care, whereas only a minority of the needy receives this input. The challenge in the developing world is to evolve a culturally and socio-economically appropriate and acceptable system of care, while addressing psychosocial issues along with long-term care needs, that is accessible to the majority of those who need it. The evolution of a specific service for psychosocial care for persons and families started in the 1970s, initial work focusing mainly on research. Contributions from persons in varied topics have been outlined. Only a few organized clinical services function as part of large tertiary hospitals, oncology centers or palliative care units. The emerging trend in Northern Kerala is based on an integrated service linking training, clinical services and research activities which are linked at several levels, involving volunteers in the community. Future hopes lie in developing core groups; establishing specific clinical services liaising with cancer care teams, large scale research projects and discussion with policy makers to develop guidelines at national level.

  8. Nutrition in oncology: the case of micronutrients (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ströhle, Alexander; Zänker, Kurt; Hahn, Andreas

    2010-10-01

    In the course of cancer disease, many oncological patients develop tumor-associated malnutrition characterized by an insufficient supply of macro- and micronutrients. The inadequate nutritional status and the cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome related to it are clinically relevant, as the response to antineoplastic measures, such as radiation and chemotherapy, is diminished, their side effects aggravated and the patient's quality of life and prognosis negatively affected. Therefore, the supportive nutrition care of oncological patients is of central importance. In this context, vitamins, minerals and long-chain omega -3 fatty acids are becoming more and more relevant in oncology although the benefit of such supplements is discussed controversially. Starting from a description of the etiopathogenesis and the pathophysiological consequences of cancer-associated malnutrition, the present study provides an overview of the importance of micronutrients for oncological patients. In the case of reduced food intake and/or inappropriate food choice the use of a multi-vitamin-multimineral supplement administered in physiological doses, i.e. nutrient quantities approximately corresponding to the recommended daily allowances, can be generally recommended. However, to enhance postoperative wound healing, it seems that cancer patients require higher amounts of micronutrients than healthy individuals. Because vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in oncological patients, improvement of vitamin D status is of special interest.

  9. A Nationwide Medical Student Assessment of Oncology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattes, Malcolm D; Patel, Krishnan R; Burt, Lindsay M; Hirsch, Ariel E

    2016-12-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the USA, but there is minimal data on how oncology is taught to medical students. The purpose of this study is to characterize oncology education at US medical schools. An electronic survey was sent between December 2014 and February 2015 to a convenience sample of medical students who either attended the American Society for Radiation Oncology annual meeting or serve as delegates to the American Association of Medical Colleges. Information on various aspects of oncology instruction at participants' medical schools was collected. Seventy-six responses from students in 28 states were received. Among the six most common causes of death in the USA, cancer reportedly received the fourth most curricular time. During the first, second, and third years of medical school, participants most commonly reported 6-10, 16-20, and 6-10 h of oncology teaching, respectively. Participants were less confident in their understanding of cancer treatment than workup/diagnosis or basic science/natural history of cancer (p medical oncologists reportedly performed the majority of teaching, whereas during the clinical clerkships, medical and surgical oncologists reportedly performed the majority of teaching. Radiation oncologists were significantly less involved during both periods (p medical schools, suggesting a need for reform.

  10. Relationship between ABO blood groups and malaria with clinical outcome in rural area of South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayathri B.N.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background A number of studies have shown that susceptibility to several infectious diseases is related to the patient’s blood group. Although the relationship between blood group and susceptibility to malaria has been studied by several researchers, the results have been contradictory. Since malaria has re-emerged as a major problem in India during the past few years, it would be useful to know whether there is any relationship between blood group and infection. Objectives The study will be undertaken to correlate the blood groups and clinical presentations in malaria patients and to understand the differential host susceptibility in malaria. Method Over a period of 4 years malaria positive samples identified by peripheral smear (thin and thick smears will be evaluated in this study. Haemoglobin, total leucocyte count, differential leucocyte count and platelet count of each patient done on an automated cell counter will be retrieved from the data. Blood group was determined by forward and reverse method. The demographic details of the patients and clinical details were obtained from case records of the patients. Malarial species and the severity of clinical course were correlated with blood groups Results A total of 205 patients were included in the study, of which 123 cases were positive for plasmodium falciparum and 78 cases were positive for P. vivax infection and 4 patients had mixed infection. The results of blood groups showed 33 -‘A’ group, 84 -‘B’ group, 70 -‘O’ group and 18 were ‘AB’ group. When the clinical courses between different groups were compared using the following parameters for severe infection- a parasitic load of > 10/1000 RBCs, severe anemia with haemoglobin 101o F and the other organ involvement, it was observed that there was no significant relationship between ABO blood group and malaria in our population, this could be due to various demographic reasons. Conclusions The present study indicate that

  11. Typing of feline calicivirus isolates from different clinical groups by virus neutralisation tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, S; McArdle, F; Bennett, M; Carter, M; Milton, I P; Turner, P; Meanger, J; Gaskell, R M

    1993-07-03

    One hundred and thirteen isolates of feline calicivirus originating from seven different clinical groups were typed by virus neutralisation tests using eight different cat antisera. The clinical groups comprised 'healthy' cats, cases of acute oral/respiratory disease, chronic stomatitis, acute febrile lameness syndrome, vaccine reactions (clinical disease seen within 21 days of vaccination) and vaccine breakdowns (clinical disease seen more than 21 days after but within one year of vaccination). Isolates from the vaccine reaction cases were grouped into those associated with acute oral/respiratory disease alone and those associated with the lameness syndrome, and the latter group was further subdivided according to the vaccine used. Two groups appeared significantly different from others with some of the antisera. Thus the lameness vaccine reaction isolates associated with vaccine B were significantly different from the isolates from all the other clinical groups, including other lameness isolates, with a number of the antisera. In addition, the chronic stomatitis isolates were significantly different from those from the 'healthy' and the acute oral/respiratory disease groups with one or two of the antisera. Eighty-five to 88 per cent of the isolates were neutralised by antisera raised against F9 or F9-like vaccine strains at a dilution of 1 in 2. Twenty antibody units of such antisera neutralised 42 to 80 per cent of the isolates. A bivalent antiserum raised against a vaccine F9 strain and field strain LS015 neutralised 96 per cent of the isolates at a dilution of 1 in 2, and 20 antibody units neutralised 68 per cent of isolates. Antisera to field strain F65 neutralised all the remaining isolates at a dilution of 1 in 2 and 44 per cent of the remaining isolates at a dilution of 20 antibody units. Therefore, strains LS015 and F65 may be of use in the production of a polyvalent feline calicivirus vaccine, together with the widely used strain F9.

  12. The Hampstead Clinic at work. Discussions in the Diagnostic Profile Research Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Ehud

    2012-01-01

    Minutes of the Hampstead Clinic's Diagnostic Profile Research Group during a fifteen-month period (1964-1965) are reviewed and discussed. A wide range of topics were considered and discussed, with a special focus on the affective life, object relations, and ego function of atypical children in comparison to the early ego functions and differentiation of normal and neurotic children. These lively clinical and theoretical discussions and their implications for therapeutic work with a wide range of children, demonstrate the multifaceted leadership and contributions of Anna Freud as teacher, clinician, and thinker, and of the Hampstead Clinic as a major center for psychoanalytic studies.

  13. The first 10,000 Adult Attachment Interviews: distributions of adult attachment representations in clinical and non-clinical groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H

    2009-05-01

    More than 200 adult attachment representation studies, presenting more than 10,500 Adult Attachment Interview (AAI; George, Kaplan, & Main, 1985) classifications, have been conducted in the past 25 years. In a series of analyses on the distributions of the AAI classifications in various cultural and age groups, fathers, and high-risk and clinical samples, we used the distribution of the combined samples of North American non-clinical mothers (23% dismissing, 58% secure, 19% preoccupied attachment representations, and 18% additionally coded for unresolved loss or other trauma) to examine deviations from this normative pattern, through multinomial tests and analyses of correspondence. The analyses were restricted to AAI classifications coded according to the Main, Goldwyn, and Hesse (2003) system. We did not find gender differences in the use of dismissing versus preoccupied attachment strategies, and the AAI distributions were largely independent of language and country of origin. Clinical subjects showed more insecure and unresolved attachment representations than the norm groups. Disorders with an internalizing dimension (e.g., borderline personality disorders) were associated with more preoccupied and unresolved attachments, whereas disorders with an externalizing dimension (e.g., antisocial personality disorders) displayed more dismissing as well as preoccupied attachments. Depressive symptomatology was associated with insecurity but not with unresolved loss or trauma, whereas adults with abuse experiences or PTSD were mostly unresolved. In order to find more reliable associations with clinical symptoms and disorders, future AAI studies may make more fruitful use of continuous AAI scales in addition to the conventionally used categorical classifications.

  14. Daily Bathing with Chlorhexidine and Its Effects on Nosocomial Infection Rates in Pediatric Oncology Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raulji, Chittalsinh M; Clay, Kristin; Velasco, Cruz; Yu, Lolie C

    2015-01-01

    Infections remain a serious complication in pediatric oncology patients. To determine if daily bathing with Chlorhexidine gluconate can decrease the rate of nosocomial infection in pediatric oncology patients, we reviewed rates of infections in pediatric oncology patients over a 14-month span. Intervention group received daily bath with Chlorhexidine, while the control group did not receive daily bath. The results showed that daily bath with antiseptic chlorhexidine as daily prophylactic antiseptic topical wash leads to decreased infection density amongst the pediatric oncology patients, especially in patients older than 12 years of age. Furthermore, daily chlorhexidine bathing significantly reduced the rate of hospital acquired infection in patients older than 12 years of age. The findings of this study suggest that daily bathing with chlorhexidine may be an effective measure of reducing nosocomial infection in pediatric oncology patients.

  15. Time-dependent estimates of recurrence and survival in colon cancer: clinical decision support system tool development for adjuvant therapy and oncological outcome assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Scott R; Bilchik, Anton; Johnson, Eric K; Nissan, Aviram; Peoples, George E; Eberhardt, John S; Kalina, Philip; Petersen, Benjamin; Brücher, Björn; Protic, Mladjan; Avital, Itzhak; Stojadinovic, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Unanswered questions remain in determining which high-risk node-negative colon cancer (CC) cohorts benefit from adjuvant therapy and how it may differ in an equal access population. Machine-learned Bayesian Belief Networks (ml-BBNs) accurately estimate outcomes in CC, providing clinicians with Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) tools to facilitate treatment planning. We evaluated ml-BBNs ability to estimate survival and recurrence in CC. We performed a retrospective analysis of registry data of patients with CC to train-test-crossvalidate ml-BBNs using the Department of Defense Automated Central Tumor Registry (January 1993 to December 2004). Cases with events or follow-up that passed quality control were stratified into 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-year survival cohorts. ml-BBNs were trained using machine-learning algorithms and k-fold crossvalidation and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis used for validation. BBNs were comprised of 5301 patients and areas under the curve ranged from 0.85 to 0.90. Positive predictive values for recurrence and mortality ranged from 78 to 84 per cent and negative predictive values from 74 to 90 per cent by survival cohort. In the 12-month model alone, 1,132,462,080 unique rule sets allow physicians to predict individual recurrence/mortality estimates. Patients with Stage II (N0M0) CC benefit from chemotherapy at different rates. At one year, all patients older than 73 years of age with T2-4 tumors and abnormal carcinoembryonic antigen levels benefited, whereas at five years, all had relative reduction in mortality with the largest benefit amongst elderly, highest T-stage patients. ml-BBN can readily predict which high-risk patients benefit from adjuvant therapy. CDSS tools yield individualized, clinically relevant estimates of outcomes to assist clinicians in treatment planning.

  16. RESULTS OF CONCOMITANT PHOTON-NEUTRON THERAPY IN THE PALLIATIVE TREATMENT OF METASTATIC BRAIN TUMORS ACCORDING TO THE DATA OF THE CHELYABINSK REGIONAL CLINICAL ONCOLOGY DISPENSARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Bobkova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors analyzed the long-term results of standard radiotherapy (RT in 153 patients and those of concomitant photon-neuron therapy (CPNT in 24 patients in the combined treatment programs. The use of densely ionizing radiation in combined palliative programs for radio-resistant tumors, that include brain metastases, increased survival and improved quality of life. The survival after CPNT was 10–24 months in all the treatment programs: in the control group, that after RT and combined treatment was 4–6 and 7–11 months, respectively.

  17. Nurse lecturers' perceptions of what baccalaureate nursing students could gain from clinical group supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Barbro; Athlin, Elsy

    2010-05-01

    The extensive amount of studies on clinical supervision during the nursing students' clinical programmes has shown that supervision most often is given on a one-to-one basis, and that many challenges are embedded in this kind of supervision. In some studies group supervision has been used, with mostly successful effects according to the nursing students. At a university in Sweden, a model of group supervision was included in the baccalaureate nursing programme, conducted by nurse lecturers. The purpose of this study was to describe the value of clinical group supervision to nursing students, as perceived by the nurse lecturers. Data consisted of field notes written by the nurse lecturers after 60 supervision sessions, and qualitative content analysis was performed. The findings showed how reflection in a group of equals was considered to give the nursing students opportunities to increase their understanding of themselves and others, prepare them for coming events, increase their personal and professional strengths, and inspire them for further development. On the basis of the findings and previous studies the value of using nurse lecturers as group supervisors was discussed. The impact of a contract to achieve a good learning environment in group supervision was also stressed.

  18. Potential role of group clinics to boost outcomes among elderly Spanish-only speaking stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2010-06-01

    Ethnic minorities are generally at higher risk for experiencing a stroke and dying from a stroke than non-Hispanic Whites, but are less likely to have optimal stroke risk factor control. Part of this ethnic disparity in stroke outcomes can be attributed to sociocultural factors. As such, there is a need to use culturally sensitive qualitative analysis to explore various strategies for enhancing vascular risk reduction in minority stroke patients encountered in under-resourced health systems. One potential strategy could be the use of nurse-led group clinics. Group clinics might be a relatively straightforward way of supplementing physician-centered efforts to improve outcomes in under-resourced settings by improving efficiency and encouraging patient self-management. However, research is limited on the implementation of group clinics among low-income, ethnic minority populations. This study aimed to obtain information about the feasibility of successfully implementing group clinics to boost treatment adherence among elderly Spanish-speaking only stroke patients within an under-resourced urban health system. A total of 13 Spanish-only speaking participants aged >or=60 years discharged from a local government hospital in Los Angeles within 18 months of an index ischemic stroke, and 6 caregivers, engaged in focus groups and interviews. Structured interviews were conducted with 11 care providers and 9 administrators at the hospital. Framework analysis examined the data and elicited themes necessary for successful execution of nurse-led group clinics for promoting vascular risk reduction treatment adherence among Elderly Spanish-only speaking stroke patients encountered within an urban health care system.

  19. Vincristine, doxorubicin and mitomycin (VAM) in patients with advanced breast cancer previously treated with cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and fluorouracil (CMF). A clinical trial of the Piedmont Oncology Association (POA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipp, S K; Muss, H B; Westrick, M A; Cooper, M R; Jackson, D V; Richards, F C; White, D R; Stuart, J J; Christian, R M; Ramseur, W

    1983-01-01

    Thirty-six evaluable patients with advanced breast cancer who had failed prior CMF therapy [15 (42%) as adjuvant treatment and 21 (58%) for advanced disease] were treated with a combination of vincristine, doxorubicin, and mitomycin (VAM). There was one CR and 10 PR, giving a response rate of 31% (P, 95% confidence interval, 15%-47%). Response was not significantly related to age, performance status, disease-free interval, dominant site of disease, number of sites of disease, or estrogen receptor status. The median duration of response was 5 months for patients attaining CR or PR and 4.6 months for patients with stable disease. The median survival for patients with CR or PR of 7.9 months was not better than for those with stable disease (8.0 months), but both groups had significantly longer survival than those with initial progression. Patients who received VAM after failing adjuvant CMF had a 53% response rate (8 of 15), as against a 14% response rate (3 of 21) in those failing CMF for advanced disease (P less than 0.05). In spite of this difference, the survival distributions for these two groups were not significantly different. Myelosuppression was moderate and no cardiac toxicity was seen. The addition of mitomycin to vincristine and doxorubicin in previously treated patients does not appear to improve the results obtained with vincristine and doxorubicin alone.

  20. Oocyte cryopreservation in oncological patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcu, Eleonora; Fabbri, Raffaella; Damiano, Giuseppe; Fratto, Rosita; Giunchi, Susanna; Venturoli, Stefano

    2004-04-05

    The use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in oncological patients may reduce their reproductive potential. Sperm cryopreservation has been already used in men affected by neoplastic disease. Oocyte cryopreservation might be an important solution for these patients at risk of losing ovarian function. A program of oocyte cryopreservation for oncological patients is also present in our center. From June 1996 to January 2000, 18 patients awaiting chemotherapy and radiotherapy for neoplastic disease were included in our oocyte cryopreservation program. Our experience documents that oocyte storage may be a concrete and pragmatic alternative for oncological patients. The duration of oocyte storage does not seem to interfere with oocyte survival as pregnancies occurred even after several years of gamete cryopreservation in liquid nitrogen.

  1. 77 FR 57095 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of... plans for four products that are in development for an adult oncology indication. The subcommittee...

  2. 75 FR 66773 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of... were either recently approved by FDA or, are in late stage development for an adult oncology...

  3. 78 FR 63222 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... ] (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of... relevance and potential use of such measures in the pediatric development plans of oncology products....

  4. 78 FR 63224 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of... late stage development for various adult oncology indications. The subcommittee will consider...

  5. 76 FR 61713 - Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of the Oncologic Drugs... (FDA). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Pediatric Oncology Subcommittee of..., are in late stage development for an adult oncology indication, or in late stage development...

  6. Selected clinically established and scientific techniques of diffusion-weighted MRI. In the context of imaging in oncology; Ausgewaehlte klinisch etablierte und wissenschaftliche Techniken der diffusionsgewichteten MRT. Im Kontext der onkologischen Bildgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitag, M.T.; Bickelhaupt, S.; Ziener, C.; Mosebach, J.; Schlemmer, H.P. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Abteilung fuer Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Meier-Hein, K. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Abteilung fuer medizinische Informatik, Heidelberg (Germany); Radtke, J.P. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Abteilung fuer Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg, Abteilung fuer Urologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Kuder, T.A.; Laun, F.B. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Abteilung fuer Medizinische Physik in der Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that was established in the clinical routine primarily for the detection of brain ischemia. In the past 15 years its clinical use has been extended to oncological radiology, as tumor and metastases can be depicted in DWI due to their hypercellular nature. The basis of DWI is the Stejskal-Tanner experiment. The diffusion properties of tissue can be visualized after acquisition of at least two diffusion-weighted series using echo planar imaging and a specific sequence of gradient pulses. The use of DWI in prostate MRI was reported to be one of the first established applications that found its way into internationally recognized clinical guidelines of the European Society of Urological Radiology (ESUR) and the prostate imaging reporting and data system (PI-RADS) scale. Due to recently reported high specificity and negative predictive values of 94 % and 92 %, respectively, its regular use for breast MRI is expected in the near future. Furthermore, DWI can also reliably be used for whole-body imaging in patients with multiple myeloma or for measuring the extent of bone metastases. New techniques in DWI, such as intravoxel incoherent motion imaging, diffusion kurtosis imaging and histogram-based analyses represent promising approaches to achieve a more quantitative evaluation for tumor detection and therapy response. (orig.) [German] Die diffusionsgewichtete Bildgebung (''diffusion-weighted imaging'', DWI), ein Verfahren aus der Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT), wurde in der klinischen Routine primaer fuer die Detektion von Schlaganfaellen etabliert. Der Einsatz dieser Methode hat in den letzten 15 Jahren auch fuer die onkologische Diagnostik stark zugenommen, da Tumoren und Metastasen aufgrund ihrer hochzellulaeren Zusammensetzung in der DWI sehr gut sichtbar gemacht werden koennen. Basis der diffusionsgewichteten Bildgebung ist das Experiment nach Stejskal-Tanner. Hier

  7. Establishment of the Asia Oncology Nursing Society (AONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuko Onishi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the past several years, whenever an informal group of Asian oncology nurses gathered, they talked about their mutual desire to create an organization closer to their homes that would be similar to the European Oncology Nursing Society (EONS. They saw this as a means for more of their colleagues to learn about the latest in cancer nursing and to have a time and place to network among themselves. This message continued to gain strength whenever these nurses met at other international meetings such as the International Conference on Cancer Nursing (ICCN, the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC and the Oncology Nursing Society in US. A definite and planned step toward forming an Asian organization as the first meeting was taken on June 24 2011 when several Asian nurses were attending a MASCC meeting in Greece. The second meeting was held in Prague, Czech Republic, in conjunction with the 17 th ICCN meeting on September 10 2012, where the participants of the meeting included 21 oncology nurses from Asian countries. Finally, the first official meeting of the board directors from nine countries was held on November 21 2013 in Bangkok, Thailand. Now, and in the future, sharing and collaborating in the practice, education and research for oncology nursing in Asia is needed.

  8. Establishment of the Asia Oncology Nursing Society (AONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuko Onishi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past several years, whenever an informal group of Asian oncology nurses gathered, they talked about their mutual desire to create an organization closer to their homes that would be similar to the European Oncology Nursing Society (EONS. They saw this as a means for more of their colleagues to learn about the latest in cancer nursing and to have a time and place to network among themselves. This message continued to gain strength whenever these nurses met at other international meetings such as the International Conference on Cancer Nursing (ICCN, the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC and the Oncology Nursing Society in US. A definite and planned step toward forming an Asian organization as the first meeting was taken on June 24 2011 when several Asian nurses were attending a MASCC meeting in Greece. The second meeting was held in Prague, Czech Republic, in conjunction with the 17 th ICCN meeting on September 10 2012, where the participants of the meeting included 21 oncology nurses from Asian countries. Finally, the first official meeting of the board directors from nine countries was held on November 21 2013 in Bangkok, Thailand. Now, and in the future, sharing and collaborating in the practice, education and research for oncology nursing in Asia is needed.

  9. Geriatric oncology in the Netherlands: a survey of medical oncology specialists and oncology nursing specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, J M; Smorenburg, C H; Schiphorst, A H; van Rixtel, B; Portielje, J E A; Hamaker, M E

    2014-11-01

    To identify ways to improve cancer care for older patients, we set out to examine how older patients in the Netherlands are currently being evaluated prior to oncological treatment and to explore the potential obstacles in the incorporation of a geriatric evaluation, using a web-based survey sent to Dutch medical oncology specialists and oncology nursing specialists. The response rate was 34% (183 out of 544). Two-thirds of respondents reported that a geriatric evaluation was being used, although primarily on an ad hoc basis only. Most respondents expressed a desire for a routine evaluation or more intensive collaboration with the geriatrician and 86% of respondents who were not using a geriatric evaluation expressed their interest to do so. The most important obstacles were a lack of time or personnel and insufficient availability of a geriatrician to perform the assessment. Thus, over 30% of oncology professionals in the Netherlands express an interest in geriatric oncology. Important obstacles to a routine implementation of a geriatric evaluation are a lack of time, or insufficient availability of geriatricians; this could be overcome with policies that acknowledge that quality cancer care for older patients requires the investment of time and personnel.

  10. Dreams of Deceased Children and Countertransference in the Group Psychotherapy of Bereaved Mothers: Clinical Illustration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begovac, Branka; Begovac, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    This article presents, in the form of a clinical illustration, a therapeutic group of bereaved mothers with special reference to their dreams about their deceased children. The article presents descriptions of the emotions of these mothers and countertransference feelings, a topic that, to our knowledge, has not been frequently studied. The group…

  11. Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia in a VA Mental Health Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Lawrence M.; Arnedt, J. Todd; Earnheart, Kristie L.; Gorman, Ashley A.; Shirley, Katherine G.

    2008-01-01

    Effective cognitive-behavioral therapies for insomnia have been developed over the past 2 decades, but they have not been systematically evaluated in some clinical settings. While insomnia is common among veterans with mental health problems, the availability of effective treatments is limited. We report on the group application of a…

  12. Change in quality management in diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics after feedback and tailored support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, Marjo J.; Baan, Caroline A.; Lemmens, Lidwien C.; Rutten, Guy E.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the change in level of diabetes quality management in primary care groups and outpatient clinics after feedback and tailored support. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This before-and-after study with a 1-year follow-up surveyed qualitymanagers on six domains of quality management. Q

  13. Mutual assumptions and facts about nondisclosure among clinical supervisors and students in group supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Geir Høstmark; Skjerve, Jan; Jacobsen, Claus Haugaard;

    2009-01-01

    In the two preceding papers of this issue of Nordic Psychology the authors report findings from a study of nondisclosure among student therapists and clinical supervisors. The findings were reported separately for each group. In this article, the two sets of findings are held together and compared......, so as to draw a picture of mutual assumptions and facts about nondisclosure among students and supervisors....

  14. A group-mediated psychotherapy with children: Clinical observation and assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Cuticchio

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The study is based on clinical evaluation of a psychotherapy group for children, employing Sicilian puppets, objects as mediators, to reflect on significant moments and the dynamic processes of change during the therapy. TCM (Therapeutic Cycle Model, 1996, designed by Mergenthaler, is used to identify whether and how the assessment corresponds to the changes detected by observation of each subject and the group. During the 8 sessions of therapy, verbal productions of children and therapists were analyzed and compared. Keywords:Evaluation; Group therapy; Mediating object; Children 

  15. A Randomized Trial (Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group 97-01) Comparing Short Versus Protracted Neoadjuvant Hormonal Therapy Before Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Armstrong, John G

    2010-08-24

    PURPOSE: To examine the long-term outcomes of a randomized trial comparing short (4 months; Arm 1) and long (8 months; Arm 2) neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Between 1997 and 2001, 276 patients were enrolled and the data from 261 were analyzed. The stratification risk factors were prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng\\/mL, Gleason score >\\/=7, and Stage T3 or more. The intermediate-risk stratum had one factor and the high-risk stratum had two or more. Staging was done from the bone scan and computed tomography findings. The primary endpoint was biochemical failure-free survival. RESULTS: The median follow-up was 102 months. The overall survival, biochemical failure-free survival. and prostate cancer-specific survival did not differ significantly between the two treatment arms, overall or at 5 years. The cumulative probability of overall survival at 5 years was 90% (range, 87-92%) in Arm 1 and 83% (range, 80-86%) in Arm 2. The biochemical failure-free survival rate at 5 years was 66% (range, 62-71%) in Arm 1 and 63% (range, 58-67%) in Arm 2. CONCLUSION: No statistically significant difference was found in biochemical failure-free survival between 4 months and 8 months of neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer.

  16. [Group psychotherapy with an analytical orientation at the Tlatelolco clinic of neuropsychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Since most of the patients who attend for psychiatric consultation at a clinic are little motivated for psychotherapy, analytic group therapy was attempted, with basis on studies on psychological genetics, on groups management, and on the theories of Freud, Klein and Bion. Several open groups were handled, with the following achievements: 1. A decrease in anxiety, and increase in the objective vision of reality and in increase in the ability to see past and present conflicts. 2. A greater tolerance to agressive and sexual instincts and to frustration. 3. A greater personal acceptance, ability to sublimate productively and elimination of clinical symptoms. Varying degrees of improvement, and lesser need for psychiatric medication and hospitalization were obtained. Several problems were encountered: a) Desertion of 30% of patients from the sessions, due to the disapearance of symptoms buth with no character changes (resistances). b) Temporary absence or habit of arriving late to the sessions (resistances). c) Overwhelming passivity. The groups were handled in cotherapy and the work was supervised with experienced therapists. To attempt solving the above mentioned problems a better selection of patients was made, complete clinical histories were elaborated, a battery of psychological tests was made, and diagnosis, dynamics and prognosis of each case were outlined; this allowed the evaluation of middle and long term treatment. It was suggested to change the technique to that of operative groups.

  17. Clinical group supervision in yoga therapy: model effects, and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Bo; Volpe Horii, Cassandra; Earls, Bethany; Mashek, Stephanie; Akhtar, Fiona

    2012-01-01

    Clinical supervision is an integral component of therapist training and professional development because of its capacity for fostering knowledge, self-awareness, and clinical acumen. Individual supervision is part of many yoga therapy training programs and is referenced in the IAYT Standards as "mentoring." Group supervision is not typically used in the training of yoga therapists. We propose that group supervision effectively supports the growth and development of yoga therapists-in-training. We present a model of group supervision for yoga therapist trainees developed by the New England School of Integrative Yoga Therapeutics™ (The NESIYT Model) that includes the background, structure, format, and development of our inaugural 18-month supervision group. Pre-and post-supervision surveys and analyzed case notes, which captured key didactic and process themes, are discussed. Clinical issues, such as boundaries, performance anxiety, sense of self efficacy, the therapeutic alliance, transference and counter transference, pacing of yoga therapy sessions, evaluation of client progress, and adjunct therapist interaction are reviewed. The timing and sequence of didactic and process themes and benefits for yoga therapist trainees' professional development, are discussed. The NESIYT group supervision model is offered as an effective blueprint for yoga therapy training programs.

  18. ABO blood groups and oral premalignancies: A clinical study in selected Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Bhateja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ABO blood group antigens are present on the surface of red blood cells and various epithelial cells. As the majority of human cancers are derived from epithelial cells, changes in blood group antigens constitute an important aspect of human cancers. The aim of the study was to establish clinical usefulness of ABO blood group as a predisposing factor in early diagnosis and management of patients with oral precancerous lesions/conditions. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of 50 control and 50 oral precancer (25 leukoplakia and 25 Oral Submucous Fibrosis confirmed by histopathologic examination. All samples were subjected to blood group testing and their prevalence was compared by Z-test using STATA version 8. Results: The "A" blood group was prevalent among the precancerous group. Significant differences on prevalences of blood groups were found (P < 0.05 between control versus leukoplakia and OSMF. Interestingly, 24% gutka chewers who had higher number of grades of dysplasia were falling in "A" blood group. Conclusion: Blood group type should be considered along with other risk factors to understand the individual patient′s risk and further studies in larger samples with inclusion of Rh factor is needed to elucidate the relationship with ABO blood group types.

  19. ABO blood groups and oral premalignancies: A clinical study in selected Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhateja, S; Arora, G

    2014-01-01

    Background: The ABO blood group antigens are present on the surface of red blood cells and various epithelial cells. As the majority of human cancers are derived from epithelial cells, changes in blood group antigens constitute an important aspect of human cancers. The aim of the study was to establish clinical usefulness of ABO blood group as a predisposing factor in early diagnosis and management of patients with oral precancerous lesions/conditions. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of 50 control and 50 oral precancer (25 leukoplakia and 25 Oral Submucous Fibrosis) confirmed by histopathologic examination. All samples were subjected to blood group testing and their prevalence was compared by Z-test using STATA version 8. Results: The "A" blood group was prevalent among the precancerous group. Significant differences on prevalences of blood groups were found (P blood group. Conclusion: Blood group type should be considered along with other risk factors to understand the individual patient's risk and further studies in larger samples with inclusion of Rh factor is needed to elucidate the relationship with ABO blood group types.

  20. Pharmacogenomics in Oncology Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly K Filipski

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cancer pharmacogenomics have contributed a number of important discoveries to current cancer treatment, changing the paradigm of treatment decisions. Both somatic and germline mutations are utilized to better understand the underlying biology of cancer growth and treatment response. The level of evidence required to fully translate pharmacogenomic discoveries into the clinic has relied heavily on randomized clinical trials. In this review, the use of observational studies, as well as, the use of adaptive trials and next generation sequencing to develop the required level of evidence for clinical implementation are discussed.

  1. International Society of Geriatric Oncology Consensus on Geriatric Assessment in Older Patients With Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildiers, Hans; Heeren, Pieter; Puts, Martine; Topinkova, Eva; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L.G.; Extermann, Martine; Falandry, Claire; Artz, Andrew; Brain, Etienne; Colloca, Giuseppe; Flamaing, Johan; Karnakis, Theodora; Kenis, Cindy; Audisio, Riccardo A.; Mohile, Supriya; Repetto, Lazzaro; Van Leeuwen, Barbara; Milisen, Koen; Hurria, Arti

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To update the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) 2005 recommendations on geriatric assessment (GA) in older patients with cancer. Methods SIOG composed a panel with expertise in geriatric oncology to develop consensus statements after literature review of key evidence on the following topics: rationale for performing GA; findings from a GA performed in geriatric oncology patients; ability of GA to predict oncology treatment–related complications; association between GA findings and overall survival (OS); impact of GA findings on oncology treatment decisions; composition of a GA, including domains and tools; and methods for implementing GA in clinical care. Results GA can be valuable in oncology practice for following reasons: detection of impairment not identified in routine history or physical examination, ability to predict severe treatment-related toxicity, ability to predict OS in a variety of tumors and treatment settings, and ability to influence treatment choice and intensity. The panel recommended that the following domains be evaluated in a GA: functional status, comorbidity, cognition, mental health status, fatigue, social status and support, nutrition, and presence of geriatric syndromes. Although several combinations of tools and various models are available for implementation of GA in oncology practice, the expert panel could not endorse one over another. Conclusion There is mounting data regarding the utility of GA in oncology practice; however, additional research is needed to continue to strengthen the evidence base. PMID:25071125

  2. Training oncology practitioners in communication skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baile, Walter F

    2011-10-01

    Many practitioners in oncology receive no or little training in how to effectively communicate with patients and families who are dealing with cancer. Moreover medical teachers are not always aware of the pedagogy of teaching communication skills in a way that results in performance improvement in this area. In this paper a method of small group teaching that was used to instruct medical oncology fellows in the essentials of communication using a retreat format that lasted three days is described. The paper covers the theoretical basis for the teaching format as well as the specific components of the workshops. It describes the process of facilitation using a "learner-centered" approach using standardized patients who take on the role of cancer patients along the trajectory of the illness. It discuss the use of small group process to facilitate skills acquisition and other strategies that facilitate learning such as reflective exercises, open role play and parallel process. It concludes with a consideration of the various ways that such workshops can be evaluated.

  3. Corporate culture assessments in integrative oncology: a qualitative case study of two integrative oncology centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittring, Nadine; Pérard, Marion; Witt, Claudia M

    2013-01-01

    The offer of "integrative oncology" is one option for clinics to provide safe and evidence-based complementary medicine treatments to cancer patients. As known from merger theories, corporate culture and integration models have a strong influence on the success of such integration. To identify relevant corporate culture aspects that might influence the success in two highly visible integrative oncology clinics, we interviewed physicians, nurses, practitioners, and managers. All interviews (11 in a German breast cancer clinic and 9 in an integrative medicine cancer service in the USA) were audio-recorded, transcribed and analyzed with content analysis. According to the theoretical framework of mergers, each clinic selected a different integration type ("best of both worlds" and "linking"). Nonetheless, each developed a similar corporate culture that has a strong focus on research and safe and evidence-based treatments, and fosters a holistic and patient-centered approach. Structured communication within the team and with other departments had high relevance. Research was highlighted as a way to open doors and to facilitate a more general acceptance within the hospital. Conventional physicians felt unburdened by the provision of integrative medicine service but also saw problems in the time required for scheduled treatments, which often resulted in long waiting lists.

  4. Comparison of Hemagglutination and Hemolytic Activity of Various Bacterial Clinical Isolates Against Different Human Blood Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    HRV, Rajkumar; Devaki, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Among the various pathogenic determinants shown by microorganisms hemagglutination and hemolysin production assume greater significance in terms of laboratory identification. This study evaluated the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of various bacterial isolates against different blood groups. One hundred and fifty bacterial strains, isolated from clinical specimens like urine, pus, blood, and other body fluids were tested for their hemagglutinating and hemolytic activity against human A, B, AB, and O group red blood cells. Among the 150 isolates 81 were Escherichia coli, 18 were Klebsiella pneumoniae, 19 were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 10 were Pseudomonas spp, six were Proteus mirabilis, and the rest 16 were Staphylococcus aureus. Nearly 85% of the isolates agglutinated A group cells followed by B and AB group (59.3% and 60.6% respectively). Least number of isolates agglutinated O group cells (38.0%). When the hemolytic activity was tested, out of these 150 isolates 79 (52.6%) hemolyzed A group cells, 61 (40.6%) hemolyzed AB group cells, 46 (30.6%) hemolyzed B group cells, and 57 (38.6%) isolates hemolyzed O group cells. Forty-six percent of the isolates exhibited both hemagglutinating and hemolytic property against A group cells, followed by B and AB group cells (28.6% and 21.3% respectively). Least number of isolates i.e., 32 (21.3%) showed both the properties against O group cells. The isolates showed wide variation in their hemagglutination and hemolytic properties against different combinations of human blood group cells. The study highlights the importance of selection of the type of cells especially when human RBCs are used for studying the hemagglutination and hemolytic activity of bacterial isolates because these two properties are considered as characteristic of pathogenic strains. PMID:27014523

  5. [What's new in geriatric oncology?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terret, Catherine; Albrand, Gilles; Jeanton, Martine; Courpron, Philippe; Droz, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Remarkably, although 60% of new cancer cases and over 70% of cancer deaths occur in patients aged 65 years and older in Europe, standard treatment strategies have been mostly validated in younger adults. This demographic trend has led to the emergence of a new medical discipline, geriatric oncology and the development worldwide of geriatric oncology programs for the individualized management of elderly cancer patients. Elderly cancer patients represent an increasing share of the population and strategies for treating cancer must evolve to face this ineluctable reality. Treatment should take into account the highly heterogeneous physiological age of the elderly, their individual life expectancy, functional reserves, social support and preferences. French geriatric oncology programs have been mostly based on the interdependence of geriatricians, oncologists and auxiliary nursing people. This approach represent the best way to offer patients optimal management; oncologists and geriatricians collaborate to assess both global health status by means of Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) and tumor stage by means of Comprehensive Tumor Assessment (CTA) and to initiate individualized care plans, involving comprehensive management and follow-up of all identified problems. This paper focuses on progress observed in the field of geriatric oncology both in France and worldwide.

  6. Exploring targeted therapies in oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mom, Constantijne Helene

    2007-01-01

    Targeted therapy in oncology is treatment directed at specific biological pathways and processes that play a critical role in carcinogenesis. Increased knowledge regarding the molecular changes underlying tumor progression and metastatis has resulted in the development of agents that are designed to

  7. Advances in radiation oncology in new millennium in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Seung Jae [College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Charn Il [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-06-01

    The objective of recent radiation therapy is to improve the quality of treatment and the after treatment quality of life. In Korea, sharing the same objective, significant advancement was made due to the gradual increase of patient number and rapid increase of treatment facilities. The advancement includes generalization of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), application of linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and furthermore, the introduction of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Authors in this paper prospectively review the followings: the advancement of radiation oncology in Korea, the recent status of four-dimensional radiation therapy. IMRT, the concept of the treatment with biological conformity, the trend of combined chemoradiotherapy, the importance of internet and radiation oncology information management system as influenced by the revolution of information technology, and finally the global trend of telemedicine in radiation oncology. Additionally, we suggest the methods to improve radiotherapy treatment, which include improvement of quality assurance (QA) measures by developing Koreanized QA protocol and system, regional study about clinical protocol development for phase three clinical trial, suggestion of unified treatment protocol and guideline by academic or research societies, domestic generation of treatment equipment's or system, establishment of nationwide data base of radiation-oncology-related information, and finally pattems-of-care study about major cancers.

  8. Reorganisation of Oncologic Care in Greece: A Proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouilides Christos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is becoming a major public health issue as patients enjoy longer survivals than ever before due to the introduction innovative but expensive drugs in the clinic. In addition, the ageing of the population in Greece is expected to increase the absolute incidence of cancer. The National Health System should rapidly and efficiently adapt to the new challenges, including increased pharmaceutical costs. Resources ought to be allocated rationally and efficiently while maintaining adequate coverage for the insured population. Economising due to large-scale operations should be pursued by the governmental single payor (EOPYY, so that affordable coverage remains feasible. Establishment of mechanisms to deal with new and very costly drugs should be put in place. The major changes in anchor oncologic hospitals are needed in order to play a role as regional leaders in oncologic care, including merging of similar divisions, subspecialisation of services and promotion of clinical research. These major centres could coordinate a host of satellite oncology services in other urban hospitals and in the provinces. In addition, joint operations in training and patient care should be pursued with major private centres, without mutual mistrust or obsolete inflexibilities. The current financial crisis represents an excellent opportunity for revisioning and restructuring oncologic care in Greece, taking into account the societal needs and based on flexibility and efficiency.

  9. Improving oncology nurses' communication skills for difficult conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, Linda; Weinstein, Elizabeth

    2013-06-01

    When oncology nurses have strong communication skills, they play a pivotal role in influencing patient satisfaction, adherence to plans of care, and overall clinical outcomes. However, research studies indicate that nurses tend to keep communication with patients and families at a superficial, nontherapeutic level. Processes for teaching goals-of-care communication skills and for implementing skills into clinical practice are not clearly defined. Nurses at a large comprehensive cancer center recognized the need for help with this skill set and sought out communication experts to assist in providing the needed education. An educational project was developed to improve therapeutic communication skills in oncology nurses during goals-of-care discussions and giving bad news. The program was tailored to nurses and social workers providing care to patients in a busy, urban, academic, outpatient oncology setting. Program topics included exploring the patient's world, eliciting hopes and concerns, and dealing with conflict about goals. Sharing and discussing specific difficult questions and scenarios were encouraged throughout the program. Th