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Sample records for clinical nursing practice

  1. Handbook of clinical nursing practice

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    Asheervath, J.; Blevins, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Written in outline format, this reference will help nurses further their understanding of advanced nursing procedures. Information is provided on the physiological, psychological, environmental, and safety considerations of nursing activities associated with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Special consideration is given to the areas of pediatric nursing, nursing assessment, and selected radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures for each system. Contents: Clinical Introduction. Clinical Nursing Practice: Focus on Basics. Focus on Cardiovascular Function. Focus on Respiratory Function. Focus on Gastrointestinal Function. Focus on Renal and Genito-Urological Function. Focus on Neuro-Skeletal and Muscular Function. Appendices.

  2. Concept maps: linking nursing theory to clinical nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, B J

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to offer a different methodology for teaching and learning in continuing nursing education and staff development. This article describes a qualitative research study that analyzed how linkages are made between theoretical material and clinical nursing practice. Findings indicate that nursing students did not link the elements of nursing process together, that clinical preparation was not linked to theoretical material, that the meaning students made of the information was different than the instructors' and that concepts from the basic sciences were not incorporated into student meaning structures. Implications for the use of concept maps as an educational strategy in continuing nursing education are drawn.

  3. Role modeling excellence in clinical nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, R N Beth

    2009-01-01

    Role modeling excellence in clinical nursing practice is the focus of this paper. The phenomenological research study reported involved a group of 8 nurses identified by their colleagues as exemplary. The major theme revealed in this study was that these exemplary nurses were also excellent role models in the clinical setting. This paper details approaches used by these nurses that made them excellent role models. Specifically, the themes of attending to the little things, making connections, maintaining a light-hearted attitude, modeling, and affirming others are presented. These themes are discussed within the framework of Watson [Watson, J., 1989. Human caring and suffering: a subjective model for health services. In: Watson, J., Taylor, R. (Eds.), They Shall Not Hurt: Human Suffering and Human Caring. Colorado University, Boulder, CO] "transpersonal caring" and [Bandura, A., 1997. Social Learning Theory. Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ] "Social Learning Theory." Particular emphasis in the discussion is on how positive role modeling by exemplary practitioners can contribute to the education of clinical nurses in the practice setting.

  4. Nursing students learning to utilize nursing research in clinical practice.

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    Mattila, Lea-Riitta; Eriksson, Elina

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the significance of a learning assignment in relation to research skills and learning of nursing students in clinical practice. The learning assignment included an oral presentation of a nursing research article, which the students gave to their fellow students and ward nurses. The students also chaired the discussion after the presentation. The target group for the study was nursing students of a Finnish polytechnic who had been studying for 2-2 1/2 years and had accomplished a minimum of 120 ECTS credits of the total of 210 ECTS credits. When participating in the study, the students were completing a six-week clinical practice of optional studies. The data were collected with a questionnaire designed for the study. It consisted of six open-ended questions. Three of the questions were related to learning of research skills. Two questions were concerned with learning during the ongoing clinical practice. The final question inquired the students' views on the development of the learning assignment. The students received the questionnaire before the commencement of their clinical practice, and they returned it to the other researcher after their clinical practice. The questionnaire was given to 80 students, of which 50 returned it; the response rate was 63%. The data were analysed by content analysis question by question. According to the results, the learning assignment advanced the understanding of research concepts for the majority of the students. In particular, the students reported that the oral presentation clarified the research concepts, and the structure of a scientific article was also elucidated. The students stated that the assignment generated ideas concerning the development of nursing care. In relation to the ongoing clinical practice, the assignment advanced patient encounters and interaction, and bearing responsibility the most. Proposals for the further development of the learning assignment were expressed by

  5. Nurses' intention to apply clinical practice guidelines.

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    Kogan, Ella; Tabak, Nili

    2012-12-01

    Using Ajzen and Madden's Theory of Planned Behavior, this study investigates factors which influence nurses' intention to apply clinical practice guidelines in their daily ward work. A convenience sample of 91 nurses in internal medicine wards in three Israeli hospitals answered four questionnaires. Data were processed by Pearson correlation coefficients and multivariate regression. The main findings were that burnout was negatively correlated with the intention to work according to guidelines and that professionalism (in the sense of a tendency to follow taught procedure rather than personal judgment) was positively correlated with it. Furthermore, nurses who perceive their behavioral control and subjective norms to be positive will be the most determined to work according to guidelines, provided they personally command the necessary resources to do so.

  6. District nurse clinics: accountability and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Richard; Tengnah, Cassam

    2013-02-01

    The numbers of district nurse clinics are continuing to grow in primary care and they provide timely and more cost effective intervention for patients. The clinics provide exciting opportunities for district nurses but also carry an increased risk of exposure to liability. This article discusses some of the key areas of accountability underpinning the duty of care of district nurses working in nurse-led clinics.

  7. Conceptualizing clinical nurse leader practice: an interpretive synthesis.

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    Bender, M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Institute of Medicine's Future of Nursing report identifies the clinical nurse leader as an innovative new role for meeting higher health-care quality standards. However, specific clinical nurse leader practices influencing documented quality outcomes remain unclear. Lack of practice clarity limits the ability to articulate, implement and measure clinical nurse leader-specific practice and quality outcomes. PURPOSE AND METHODS: Interpretive synthesis design and grounded theory...

  8. Exchange students crossing language boundaries in clinical nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhre, K

    2011-12-01

    This article examines challenges and learning outcomes for nursing students from a Central European university of applied sciences who completed 3 months of clinical practice in Norway. The clinical practice was supervised in English by Norwegian nurses and nursing teachers. English is not the primary language in any of the countries. Increases in global migration have contributed to the need for an international dimension in nursing education. Personal mobility is a crucial part of the European Union's goal of becoming a knowledge society. Clinically based experiences pose challenges that are additional to and often more complex than traditional course-based experiences. Students who come from a non-English-speaking country for clinical practice in Norway face challenges regarding language. Accepting incoming students is a way of achieving higher quality and more relevant education in nursing. The study shows that clinical practice in a foreign country gives added value compared with clinical practice at home. Greater self-confidence and understanding of core concepts in nursing is described by the participants. Language differences are not regarded as a problem but as a way of developing personal and professional competence. The ability to compare healthcare systems in the two counties is important in developing competencies in nursing. © 2011 The Author. International Nursing Review © 2011 International Council of Nurses.

  9. A wellness framework for pediatric nursing clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurr, Shelley; Bally, Jill; Ogenchuk, Marcella; Peternelj-Taylor, Cindy

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a proposed holistic Framework for Exploring Adolescent Wellness specific to the discipline of nursing. Conceptualized as a practical adolescent wellness assessment tool, the framework attends to the physical, spiritual, psychological and social dimensions of adolescent health. Through the discussion of a reconstructed case study the framework's application to nursing practice is illustrated. Nurses are distinctly positioned to promote adolescent wellness. This approach facilitates the exploration of the multiple influences on the health of adolescents, across a variety of clinical practice specialties and settings, by nurses of varying experiences.

  10. Clinical practice models in nursing education: implication for students' mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowolska, B; McGonagle, I; Jackson, C; Kane, R; Cabrera, E; Cooney-Miner, D; Di Cara, V; Pajnkihar, M; Prlić, N; Sigurdardottir, A K; Kekuš, D; Wells, J; Palese, A

    2015-03-01

    In accordance with the process of nursing globalization, issues related to the increasing national and international mobility of student and qualified nurses are currently being debated. Identifying international differences and comparing similarities for mutual understanding, development and better harmonization of clinical training of undergraduate nursing students is recommended. The aim of the study was to describe and compare the nature of the nursing clinical practice education models adopted in different countries. A qualitative approach involving an expert panel of nurses was adopted. The Nominal Group Technique was employed to develop the initial research instrument for data collection. Eleven members of the UDINE-C network, representing institutions engaged in the process of professional nursing education and research (universities, high schools and clinical institutes), participated. Three data collection rounds were implemented. An analysis of the findings was performed, assuring rigour. Differences and homogeneity are reported and discussed regarding: (a) the clinical learning requirements across countries; (b) the prerequisites and clinical learning process patterns; and (c) the progress and final evaluation of the competencies achieved. A wider discussion is needed regarding nursing student exchange and internalization of clinical education in placements across European and non-European countries. A clear strategy for nursing education accreditation and harmonization of patterns of organization of clinical training at placements, as well as strategies of student assessment during this training, are recommended. There is also a need to develop international ethical guidelines for undergraduate nursing students gaining international experience. © 2015 International Council of Nurses.

  11. Practice standards for quality clinical decision-making in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arries, E

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to formulate practice standards for quality clinical decision-making in nursing. Clinical decision-making is a critical component of nursing practice, as the life of the patient is at stake. The quality of clinical decision-making is, therefore, essential in delivering quality nursing care. The facilitation of quality clinical decision-making in nursing requires the development of standards to monitor, evaluate and implement remedial actions that improve on the quality of clinical decision-making (Muller, 2002:203; Beyea & Nicoll, 1999: 495). However, there are no such practice standards against which the quality of clinical decision-making by nurses can be evaluated and assessed. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and standard formulation research design (Mouton & Marais, 1990:45-46; Muller, 1990:49-55) has been followed to develop standards for quality clinical decision-making in nursing. Standard development was based on the principles described by Muller (in Booyens, 1998: 607-608; 636-637), and consists of development and quantification phases that are modified to meet the requirements for instrument development, as described by Lynn (1986: 382-385). The formulation of these practice-standards was derived deductively from a conceptual framework. The conceptual framework was constructed based on an exploration and description of the expectations of the stakeholders about quality clinical decision-making in nursing and a literature study on clinical decision-making. To ensure the credibility of the standards for clinical decision-making in nursing, principles of logic, prolonged engagement, triangulation, peer-group discussion, dense description, step-wise repetition and an investigative audit (Lincoln & Guba, 1985:289-331) were adhered to. Two experts were consulted to validate the standards for quality clinical decision-making in nursing.

  12. Practice standards for quality clinical decision-making in nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Arries

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to formulate practice standards for quality clinical decision making in nursing. Clinical decision-making is a critical component of nursing practice, as the life of the patient is at stake. The quality of clinical decision-making is, therefore, essential in delivering quality nursing care. The facilitation of quality clinical decision-making in nursing requires the development of standards to monitor, evaluate and implement remedial actions that improve on the quality of clinical decision-making (Muller, 2002:203; Beyea & Nicoll, 1999:495. However, there are no such practice standards against which the quality of clinical decision-making by nurses can be evaluated and assessed. A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and standard formulation research design (Mouton & Marais, 1990:45-46; Muller, 1990:49-55 has been followed to develop standards for quality clinical decision-making in nursing. Standard development was based on the principles described by Muller (in Booyens, 1998:607-608; 636-637, and consists of development and quantification phases that are modified to meet the requirements for instrument development, as described by Lynn (1986:382-385. The formulation of these practice-standards was derived deductively from a conceptual framework. The conceptual framework was constructed based on an exploration and description of the expectations of the stakeholders about quality clinical decisionmaking in nursing and a literature study on clinical decision-making. To ensure the credibility of the standards for clinical decision-making in nursing, principles of logic, prolonged engagement, triangulation, peer-group discussion, dense description, stepwise repetition and an investigative audit (Lincoln & Guba, 1985:289-331 were adhered to. Two experts were consulted to validate the standards for quality clinical decisionmaking in nursing.

  13. Preferred information sources for clinical practice by nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figen Çalışkan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the knowledge sources that nurses working in inpatient treatment institutions use in their practices. It is inevitable for nurses to base their nursing practices on evidence from knowledge sources in order to improve the quality of nursing care. In this context, it is necessary for the nurses to gain skill in using knowledge sources effectively during their basic education and to further develop this skill after graduation in order provide qualified and safe care. This study utilised descriptive design. The study sample consisted of 296 nurses who work in general training and research hospitals that serve in all regions of Istanbul and are subsidiary to the Ministry of Health. A demographic questionnaire and a Knowledge Source Scale for nurses were used for data collection. Data were analysed with Cruncher Statistical System (NCSS 2007&2008 Statistical Software (Utah USA package programme. The following figures are from the demographic questionnaires: mean age of study participants, 31.69±6.03 years; females, 91.6%; married, 65.2%; bachelor’s degree, 39.9%; worked in surgical units, 56.8%; and worked as clinic nurse, 74.7%. One of the main knowledge sources used in nursing practice is the knowledge acquired in nursing school. Basic nursing education plays an ongoing role as a source of practice knowledge. These knowledge sources should be renewed and updated with continuing education courses or short-term training programs. This research can be used to guide development of continuing education programs and underscores the sources of knowledge about general nursing practice. This study can serve as an impetus to further study the use and highlight education needs of practicing nurses.

  14. Benefits of nurse teachers returning to clinical practice.

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    Glossop, D; Hoyles, A; Lees, S; Pollard, C

    This article outlines an action research study developed to facilitate nurse teachers returning to clinical practice. The article explores how the teachers established partnerships with clinicians through which they were able to share the experience of returning to an area of nursing that they had previously only visited. It discusses four categories: expectations of self and others; entering someone else's world; more awareness of student needs; and teaching theory and practising nursing. These categories emerged following the analysis of journals, focus group interviews and individual interviews and led to a number of recommendations concerning the implications for other teachers wishing to return to clinical practice.

  15. Teaching and learning care--exploring nursing students' clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solvoll, Betty-Ann; Heggen, Kristin M

    2010-01-01

    Care has always been a key element of nursing. This paper presents findings from research on the following issue: What opportunities and limitations do nursing students encounter when learning nursing care? The study has a qualitative design with field methodology and the study of documents. Six nursing students have been closely monitored during their clinical studies in hospitals, nursing homes and home-based nursing. The study shows that nursing students are likely to possess the potential to provide care for sick and unknown people. The motivation for their commitment to patients may contain an egoistical orientation and runs contrary to former ideals of the nurse's self-sacrificing altruism. Moreover the study shows that there is a potential in the clinical field and in the university college to reflective considerations on experience of care. While clinical practice often has focus on practical problem-solving and procedures, the college tends to focus on abstract theory. Both of these promote the privatisation and neglect of the students' experience of care. The paper concludes with a call for teaching and learning strategies targeting the use of nursing students' personal experience of care.

  16. 'Nursing research culture' in the context of clinical nursing practice: addressing a conceptual problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2017-05-01

    To report an analysis of the concept of nursing research culture in the context of clinical nursing practice. Nursing research culture should be valued for its contribution to improving patient care and should be considered as a routine hospital activity. However, the demand for efficiency, nurses' barriers to research use and the lack of definition of the concept of nursing research culture make it difficult to establish. Concept analysis. Data were collected through a literature review in PubMed, CINAHL and PsycINFO during March 2016. Walker and Avant's eight-step framework for concept analysis. Five defining attributes of nursing research culture in the context of clinical nursing practice were identified: strong monodisciplinary nursing professionalism, academic thinking and socialization, research use as a part of daily nursing practice, acceptance by colleagues and management and facilitation of resources from management and organization. Although the method of concept analysis has been criticized and heavily debated, the development of nursing research cultures based on the defining attributes and antecedents of the concept will be important to emphasize evidence-based clinical nursing care. Further research should support the development and the implementation of nursing research culture in clinical nursing practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Best practice in clinical facilitation of undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, Judith; McMurray, Anne; Shaban, Ramon Z

    2016-09-01

    Clinical facilitation is critical to successful student clinical experience. The research reported in this paper used an interpretive case study to explore perspectives of clinical facilitators on what constitutes best practice in clinical facilitation of undergraduate nursing students. Eleven clinical facilitators from South East Queensland, Australia, participated in focus groups, interviews and a concept mapping exercise to gather their perspectives on best practice. The data gathered information regarding their prior and current experiences as registered nurses and facilitators, considering reasons they became clinical facilitators, their educational background and self-perceived adequacy of their knowledge for clinical facilitation. Analysis was through constant comparison. Findings of the study provided in-depth insight into the role of clinical facilitators, with best practice conceptualised via three main themes; 'assessing', 'learning to facilitate' and 'facilitating effectively'. While they felt there was some autonomy in the role, the clinical facilitators sought a closer liaison with academic staff and feedback about their performance, in particular their assessment of the students. Key strategies identified for improving best practice included educational support for the clinical facilitators, networking, and mentoring from more experienced clinical facilitators. When implemented, these strategies will help develop the clinical facilitators' skills and ensure quality clinical experiences for undergraduate nursing students.

  18. Promoting a Strategic Approach to Clinical Nurse Leader Practice Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Marjory; Avolio, Alice E; Ott, Karen M; Miltner, Rebecca S

    2016-01-01

    The Office of Nursing Services of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) piloted implementation of the clinical nurse leader (CNL) into the care delivery model and established a strategic goal in 2011 to implement the CNL role across the VA health care system. The VA Office of Nursing Services CNL Implementation and Evaluation (CNL I&E) Service was created as one mechanism to facilitate that goal in response to a need identified by facility nurse executives for consultative support for CNL practice integration. This article discusses strategies employed by the CNL I&E consultative team to help facility-level nursing leadership integrate CNLs into practice. Measures of success include steady growth in CNL practice capacity as well as positive feedback from nurse executives about the value of consultative engagement. Future steps to better integrate CNL practice into the VA include consolidation of lessons learned, collaboration to strengthen the evidence base for CNL practice, and further exploration of the transformational potential of CNL practice across the care continuum.

  19. Clinical Nursing Instructor Perception of the Influence of Engagement in Bedside Nursing Practice on Clinical Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Jodi L.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical experiences are an integral component of nursing education. Because the amount of time that a student spends in clinical experiences can be as many as twelve to sixteen hours per week, the clinical instructor plays a significant role in the nursing student's development of nursing knowledge. Many nurse educators attempt to balance dual…

  20. [A Study of the Evidence-Based Nursing Practice Competence of Nurses and Its Clinical Applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Ling; Hsieh, Suh-Ing; Huang, Ya-Hsuan

    2015-10-01

    Nurses must develop competence in evidence-based nursing in order to provide the best practice medical care to patients. Evidence-based nursing uses issue identification, data mining, and information consolidation from the related medical literature to help nurses find the best evidence. Therefore, for medical institutions to provide quality clinical care, it is necessary for nurses to develop competence in evidence-based nursing. This study aims to explore the effect of a fundamental evidence-based nursing course, as a form of educational intervention, on the development of evidence-based nursing knowledge, self-efficacy in evidence-based practice activities, and outcome expectations of evidence-based practice in nurse participants. Further the competence of these nurses in overcoming obstacles in evidence-based nursing practice. This quasi-experimental study used a pre-post test design with a single group of participants. A convenience sample of 34 nurses from a municipal hospital in northern Taiwan received 8 hours of a fundamental evidence-based nursing course over a two-week period. Participants were asked to complete four questionnaires before and after the intervention. The questionnaires measured the participants' basic demographics, experience in mining the medical literature, evidence-based nursing knowledge, self-efficacy in evidence-based practice activities, outcome expectations of evidence-based practice, competence in overcoming obstacles in evidence-based nursing practice, and learning satisfaction. Collected data was analyzed using paired t, Wilcoxon Signed Rank, and McNemar tests to measure the differences among participants' evidence-based nursing knowledge and practice activities before and after the workshop. The nurses demonstrated significantly higher scores from pre-test to post-test in evidence-based nursing knowledge II, self-efficacy in evidence-based nursing practice activities, and outcome expectations of evidence-based practice

  1. Structural empowerment and professional nursing practice behaviors of baccalaureate nursing students in clinical learning environments.

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    Livsey, Kae R

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the associations between professional behaviors of baccalaureate nursing students and student perceptions of select factors within the clinical learning environment, including the role of clinical faculty leadership. Participants (n=243) were recruited from a randomly selected list of 1000 members of the National Student Nurses Association (NSNA) among sixteen states within the Southern region of the United States. Results revealed a direct relationship exists between student perceptions of structural empowerment in their clinical learning environment and professional nursing practice behaviors among students. Also found was that relationships between variables in the model are significantly strengthened by student perceptions of strong leadership behaviors of clinical faculty. Findings from this study may assist nurse educators by contributing knowledge relevant to support/facilitate the transition of individuals from student nurses to professional registered nurses and, thus enhance the impact of professional nurses' contributions in healthcare delivery.

  2. 'Nursing research culture' in the context of clinical nursing practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2017-01-01

    for efficiency, nurses' barriers to research use and the lack of definition of the concept of nursing research culture make it difficult to establish. DESIGN: Concept analysis. DATA SOURCES: Data were collected through a literature review in PubMed, CINAHL and PsycINFO during March 2016. METHODS: Walker...

  3. Exploring nursing students' experience of peer learning in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravanipour, Maryam; Bahreini, Masoud; Ravanipour, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Peer learning is an educational process wherein someone of the same age or level of experience level interacts with other students interested in the same topic. There is limited evidence specifically focusing on the practical use of peer learning in Iran. The aim of this study was to explore nursing students' experiences of peer learning in clinical practice. A qualitative content analysis was conducted. Focus groups were used to find the students' experiences about peerlearning. Twenty-eight baccalaureate nursing students at Bushehr University of Medical Sciences were selected purposively, and were arranged in four groups of seven students each. The focus group interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview schedule. All interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using conventional content analysis method. The analysis identified four themes: Paradoxical dualism, peer exploitation, first learning efficacy, and socialization practice. Gained advantages and perceived disadvantages created paradoxical dualism, and peer exploitation resulted from peer selection and peer training. Nursing students reported general satisfaction concerning peer learning due to much more in-depth learning with little stress than conventional learning methods. Peer learning is a useful method for nursing students for practicing educational leadership and learning the clinical skills before they get a job.

  4. Exploring nursing students’ experience of peer learning in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravanipour, Maryam; Bahreini, Masoud; Ravanipour, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peer learning is an educational process wherein someone of the same age or level of experience level interacts with other students interested in the same topic. There is limited evidence specifically focusing on the practical use of peer learning in Iran. The aim of this study was to explore nursing students’ experiences of peer learning in clinical practice. Materials and Methods: A qualitative content analysis was conducted. Focus groups were used to find the students’ experiences about peerlearning. Twenty-eight baccalaureate nursing students at Bushehr University of Medical Sciences were selected purposively, and were arranged in four groups of seven students each. The focus group interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview schedule. All interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using conventional content analysis method. Results: The analysis identified four themes: Paradoxical dualism, peer exploitation, first learning efficacy, and socialization practice. Gained advantages and perceived disadvantages created paradoxical dualism, and peer exploitation resulted from peer selection and peer training. Conclusion: Nursing students reported general satisfaction concerning peer learning due to much more in-depth learning with little stress than conventional learning methods. Peer learning is a useful method for nursing students for practicing educational leadership and learning the clinical skills before they get a job. PMID:26097860

  5. Final assessment of nursing students in clinical practice: Perspectives of nursing teachers, students and mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helminen, Kristiina; Johnson, Martin; Isoaho, Hannu; Turunen, Hannele; Tossavainen, Kerttu

    2017-03-30

    To describe the phenomenon of final assessment of the clinical practice of nursing students and to examine whether there were differences in assessments by the students and their teachers and mentors. Final assessment of students in clinical practice during their education has great importance for ensuring that enough high-quality nursing students are trained, as assessment tasks affect what the nursing student learns during the clinical practice. This study used descriptive, cross-sectional design. The population of this study comprised nursing students (n = 276) and their teachers (n = 108) in five universities of applied sciences in Finland as well as mentors (n = 225) who came from five partner hospitals. A questionnaire developed for this study contained questions about background variables as well as structured questions scored on a four-point scale, which also allowed the respondents to provide additional comments. When comparing the results related to nursing teachers' presence in the final assessment situation, it was found that teachers and mentors evaluated this as being carried out more often than nursing students suggested. Nursing students noted that fair and consistent assessment is carried out more often than nursing teachers thought. Mentors and teachers said that honest and direct criteria-based final assessment was carried out more often than nursing students evaluated. Nursing students and mentors need support from educational institutions and from nursing teachers in order to ensure the completion of a relevant assessment process. The findings of this study highlight an awareness of final assessment process. It is desirable to have a common understanding, for example, of how the assessment should be managed and what the assessment criteria are, as this will ensure a good quality process. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The clinical nurse leader: helping psychiatric mental health nurses transform their practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seed, Mary S; Torkelson, Diane J; Karshmer, Judith F

    2009-04-01

    The national movement to transform the health care delivery systems must include a focus on mental health treatment. To address similar deficits across other practice domains, the Clinical Nurse Leader (CNL) role has been created. The CNL is a master's degree that prepares a nurse to use a systems perspective to improve outcomes for a cohort of patient, deliver care based on best practices, and coordinate care in a multidisciplinary team. Applying the CNL role to mental health care could help psychiatric mental health nursing be at the forefront in the transformation of mental health care delivery.

  7. Developing an advanced practice nurse-led liver clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAfee, Jean L

    2012-01-01

    End-stage liver disease (ESLD) is a leading cause of digestive disease deaths in the United States and continues to increase exponentially every year. Best practice does not currently recognize or utilize a clinic practice model for ESLD management. Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) can impact ESLD disease management by implementing an outpatient clinic care model to focus on treatment compliance, patient education, improvement of patient outcomes, and reduction in hospital admission rates for ESLD patients. A review of 15 research articles was completed to determine the impact APRNs can make on chronic care of ESLD patients. Results from the review support APRN analysis, assessment, diagnosis, treatment, intervention, and evaluation of ESLD patients. The literature reviewed also demonstrates that ESLD patients have improved symptom management when maintained in an outpatient setting, allowing for decreased hospital and insurance expenditures. Following evaluation of the evidence, it was concluded that an APRN-led ESLD clinic merits further study.

  8. Supporting nursing students with dyslexia in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jean

    To determine whether pre-registration nursing students with dyslexia experience specific problems in developing clinical competence, identify what strategies they use and how they may be supported in clinical practice. Qualitative case study methodology was used. Stage 1 involved semi-structured interviews with seven students, three support and eight teaching staff, postal questionnaires from nine mentors, in addition to a review of policy documentation. Stage 2 involved a two-year study of four students on their branch programme and included semi-structured interviews with seven mentors. The students' difficulties in clinical practice fell into three categories: dealing with information; performing the role; and administering drugs. Specific supporting measures included: informal and formal support networks; portable information technology equipment; and personal strategies, for example, rehearsing difficult tasks such as the handover report. The students' relationships with their mentors and the type of environment they were working in were key to the successful development of clinical competence. Nursing students who have dyslexia have specific learning difficulties in practice. Their response to these difficulties is individual and support needs to be tailored to meet their specific needs.

  9. [Domains in the clinical practice of Clinical Nursing Experts in Germany and their correspondence with the internationally described "Advanced Nursing Practice"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendel, Simon; Feuchtinger, Johanna

    2009-06-01

    In spite of a growing trend toward academic education and increasing numbers of "nursing experts" functioning as change agents in Germany, actual nursing experts as in the internationally described Advanced Nursing Practice (ANP) are scarce. Drawing from a ten-year experience in implementing the international concept, the University Hospital Freiburg (UKF), Germany, constitutes a notable exception, as it presently employs ten clinically practicing nursing experts. Based on this background of educating nursing experts, this presentation aims at describing the implementation of the nursing expert's role and its fit and conformance with the international ANP. A 3-stage Delphi design was used for interviewing all the nursing experts at the hospital (n = 10) about their expert opinions; in addition, all nursing managers (n = 7) as well as unit and team leaders (n = 49) were asked about their opinion to relevant functions and domains of nursing experts. The following clinical practice domains of nursing experts were identified: Direct patient care, patient education, support and supervision of nurses, maintenance and expansion of professional skills and knowledge of the nursing staff, counselling of managers, quality assurance and organizational development, theory to practice transfer, nursing research, maintenance of own professional skills and knowledge and continuing education, and publicity work. Additionally, a three-year nursing education, a longer lasting professional experience, a degree in nursing science or nursing education, and specialist skills in the respective area of expertise were identified as credentials for nursing expert practice. The nursing expert concept at UKF shows elements of the international ANP with similarities to the role of a Clinical Nurse Specialist.

  10. Effects of clinical practice environments on clinical teacher and nursing student outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babenko-Mould, Yolanda; Iwasiw, Carroll L; Andrusyszyn, Mary-Anne; Laschinger, Heather K S; Weston, Wayne

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to use a cross-sectional survey design, with an integrated theoretical perspective, to examine clinical teachers' (n = 64) and nursing students' (n = 352) empowerment, teachers' and students' perceptions of teachers' use of empowering teaching behaviors, students' perceptions of nurses' practice behaviors, and students' confidence for practice in acute care settings. In this study, teachers and students were moderately empowered. Teachers reported using a high level of empowering teaching behaviors, which corresponded with students' perceptions of teachers' use of such behaviors. Teachers' empowerment predicted 21% of their use of empowering teaching behaviors. Students reported nurses as using a high level of professional practice behaviors. Students felt confident for professional nursing practice. The findings have implications for practice contexts related to empowering teaching-learning environments and self-efficacy.

  11. Fostering nursing ethics for practical nursing

    OpenAIRE

    森田, 敏子; モリタ, トシコ; Morita, Toshiko

    2014-01-01

    Higher nursing ethics can raise nursing quality. The author attempts to define theproblem from the seedling of sensibility in practical nursing and focuses on the clinical environment surrounding nursing ethics from its pedagogical and historicalaspects. On the basis of these standpoints, the author discusses issues on the practical nursing as a practitioner of nursing ethics.

  12. Global and cultural perinatal nursing research: improving clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callister, Lynn Clark

    2011-01-01

    High-quality perinatal nursing care should be based on the best evidence including research findings, clinical expertise, and the preferences of women and their families. Principles of perinatal research initiatives are defined, with suggested research priorities designed to close current gaps in the micro and macro environments of perinatal nursing throughout the world. Nearly a decade ago, the following question was asked, "Where is the 'E' (evidence) in maternal child health?" Improving the quality and safety of perinatal nursing care for culturally diverse women globally is the primary goal of nurse researchers leading the future of perinatal healthcare.

  13. Rural nurse specialists: clinical practice and the politics of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Ruth P

    2008-01-01

    Doctor flight from rural areas is an international phenomenon that places great pressure on primary health care delivery. In New Zealand, the response to these empty doctors' surgeries has been the introduction of nurse-led rural health clinics that have attracted controversy both in the media and from urban-based doctors over whether such nurse-led care is a direct substitution of medical care. This article analyzes the reflections of nurses working in some of these clinics who suggest that their situation is more complex than a direct substitution of labor. Although the nurses indicate some significant pressures moving them closer to the work of doctoring, they actively police this cross-boundary work and labor simultaneously to shore up their nursing identities. My own conclusions support their assertions. I argue that it is the maintenance of a holistic professional habitus that best secures their professional identity as nurses while they undertake the cross-boundary tasks of primary rural health care. There are clear professional benefits and disadvantages for the nurses in these situations, which make the positions highly politicized. These recurring divisions of labor within medical care giving and the elaboration of new types of care worker form an appropriate although neglected topic of study for anthropologists. The study of the social organization of clinical medicine is much enriched by paying closer attention to its interaction with allied health professions and their associated understandings of "good" care.

  14. Implementing a Gerontological Clinical Nursing Practice with an Interdisciplinary Focus: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlke, Sherry; Fehr, Cindy

    2010-01-01

    A gerontological clinical nursing practice with an interdisciplinary focus was developed to provide opportunities for student nurses to expand their knowledge about aging, hone assessment skills, and critically examine beliefs about older adults. The practice included theory about older adults and a rotation through a variety of clinical settings…

  15. Closing the Gap between Research Evidence and Clinical Practice: Jordanian Nurses' Perceived Barriers to Research Utilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Khalaileh, Murad; Al Qadire, Mohammad; Musa, Ahmad S.; Al-Khawaldeh, Omar A.; Al Qudah, Hani; Alhabahbeh, Atalla

    2016-01-01

    Background: The nursing profession is a combination of theory and practical skill, and nurses are required to generate and develop knowledge through implementing research into clinical practice. Considerable number of barriers could hind implementing research findings into practice. Barriers to research utilisation are not identified in the…

  16. Effects of incivility in clinical practice settings on nursing student burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babenko-Mould, Yolanda; Laschinger, Heather K S

    2014-10-31

    To examine the relationship between nursing students' exposure to various forms of incivility in acute care practice settings and their experience of burnout. Given that staff nurses and new nurse graduates are experiencing incivility and burnout in the workplace, it is plausible that nursing students share similar experiences in professional practice settings. A cross-sectional survey design was used to assess Year 4 nursing students' (n=126) perceptions of their experiences of incivility and burnout in the clinical learning environment. Students completed instruments to assess frequency of uncivil behaviors experienced during the past six months from nursing staff, clinical instructors, and other health professionals in the acute care practice setting and to measure student burnout. Reported incidences of incivility in the practice setting were related to burnout. Higher rates of incivility, particularly from staff nurses, were associated with higher levels of both components of burnout (emotional exhaustion and cynicism).

  17. Advanced urology nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Helen

    2014-03-01

    Urology nursing has developed as a specialty over the past few decades in response to several factors, workload demands being a prime reason. Nurses are taking on additional roles and activities including procedures such as cystoscopy and prostate biopsy, and running nurse-led clinics for a variety of urological conditions. Audits of advanced urological nursing practice have shown this care to be of a high standard and investigative procedures performed by these nurses match the diagnostic quality of existing services. Professional urological nursing organizations support the professional needs of these nurses, but the provision of education and training for advanced practice activities remains an unaddressed need. A range of confusing advanced urology nursing titles exists, and uncertainty regarding the roles and scope of practice for these nurses remains a concern. Acceptance and support from medical colleagues is required for the success of advanced urological nursing practice, but opinions on these roles remain divided.

  18. Learning Experience of Student Nurses through Reflection on Clinical Practice: A Case Study in Pediatric Nursing, Southern Thailand

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    Charuai SUWANBAMRUNG

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to describe student nurse experiences of clinical practice through their reflections. Forty reflections on clinical practice in a pediatric department were conducted at a tertiary hospital. Student nurses wrote reflections which were then thematically analyzed. Analysis was founded on the following: First, situations of nursing care in medical and surgical pediatrics; Second, clinical practice with nursing care as procedurals; Third, results after student’s activities; and Fourth, reflections of students presented as “what?”, “now what?”, and “new actions?” Particularly, reflections of student nurses were classed into 7 themes; 1 “Significant knowledge for nursing practice”, 2“Better self-confidence for nursing practices”, 3“Patient and family centers”, 4 “Concentration/attention must come first”, 5 “Practice carefully”, 6 “Make students have accountability, honesty, and ethics” and 7 “Mirror for improving intervention in the future as professional nurses”. Overall, student nurses had an improved learning experience in pediatric nursing care through reflection on clinical practice.

  19. Clinical Nurse Leader Integration Into Practice: Developing Theory To Guide Best Practice.

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    Bender, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Numerous policy bodies have identified the clinical nurse leader (CNL) as an innovative new role for meeting higher health care quality standards. Although there is growing evidence of improved care environment and patient safety and quality outcomes after redesigning care delivery microsystems to integrate CNL practice, significant variation in CNL implementation has been noted across reports, making it difficult to causally link CNL practice to reported outcomes. This variability reflects the overall absence in the literature of a well-defined CNL theoretical framework to help guide standardized application in practice. To address this knowledge gap, an interpretive synthesis with a grounded theory analysis of CNL narratives was conducted to develop a theoretical model for CNL practice. The model clarifies CNL practice domains and proposes mechanisms by which CNL-integrated care delivery microsystems improve health care quality. The model highlights the need for a systematic approach to CNL implementation including a well-thought out strategy for care delivery redesign; a consistent, competency-based CNL workflow; and sustained macro-to-micro system leadership support. CNL practice can be considered an effective approach to organizing nursing care that maximizes the scope of nursing to influence the ways care is delivered by all professions within a clinical microsystem.

  20. Enhancing medical-surgical nursing practice: using practice tests and clinical examples to promote active learning and program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuHamel, Martha B; Hirnle, Constance; Karvonen, Colleen; Sayre, Cindy; Wyant, Sheryl; Colobong Smith, Nancy; Keener, Sheila; Barrett, Shannon; Whitney, Joanne D

    2011-10-01

    In a 14-week medical-surgical nursing review course, two teaching strategies are used to promote active learning and assess the transfer of knowledge to nursing practice. Practice tests and clinical examples provide opportunities for participants to engage in self-assessment and reflective learning and enhance their nursing knowledge, skills, and practice. These strategies also contribute to program evaluation and are adaptable to a variety of course formats, including traditional classroom, web conference, and online self-study.

  1. Clinical simulation using deliberate practice in nursing education: a Wilsonian concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Jennifer

    2014-05-01

    Effective use of simulation is dependent on a complete understanding of simulation's central conceptual elements. Deliberate practice, a constituent of Ericsson's theory of expertise, has been identified as a central concept in effective simulation learning. Deliberate practice is compatible with simulation frameworks already being suggested for use in nursing education. This paper uses Wilson's Method of concept analysis for the purpose of exploring the concept of deliberate practice in the context of clinical simulation in nursing education. Nursing education should move forward in a manner that reflects best practice in nursing education.

  2. Do calculation errors by nurses cause medication errors in clinical practice? A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kerri

    2010-01-01

    This review aims to examine the literature available to ascertain whether medication errors in clinical practice are the result of nurses' miscalculating drug dosages. The research studies highlighting poor calculation skills of nurses and student nurses have been tested using written drug calculation tests in formal classroom settings [Kapborg, I., 1994. Calculation and administration of drug dosage by Swedish nurses, student nurses and physicians. International Journal for Quality in Health Care 6(4): 389 -395; Hutton, M., 1998. Nursing Mathematics: the importance of application Nursing Standard 13(11): 35-38; Weeks, K., Lynne, P., Torrance, C., 2000. Written drug dosage errors made by students: the threat to clinical effectiveness and the need for a new approach. Clinical Effectiveness in Nursing 4, 20-29]; Wright, K., 2004. Investigation to find strategies to improve student nurses' maths skills. British Journal Nursing 13(21) 1280-1287; Wright, K., 2005. An exploration into the most effective way to teach drug calculation skills to nursing students. Nurse Education Today 25, 430-436], but there have been no reviews of the literature on medication errors in practice that specifically look to see whether the medication errors are caused by nurses' poor calculation skills. The databases Medline, CINAHL, British Nursing Index (BNI), Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA) and Archives and Cochrane reviews were searched for research studies or systematic reviews which reported on the incidence or causes of drug errors in clinical practice. In total 33 articles met the criteria for this review. There were no studies that examined nurses' drug calculation errors in practice. As a result studies and systematic reviews that investigated the types and causes of drug errors were examined to establish whether miscalculations by nurses were the causes of errors. The review found insufficient evidence to suggest that medication errors are caused by nurses' poor

  3. [Development and Effects of Assertiveness Training applying Dongsasub Training for Nursing Students in Clinical Practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoungsuk

    2016-08-01

    This study was conducted to develop assertiveness training applying Dongsasub training for junior nursing students, and to verify effectiveness of the training on assertiveness behavior, self-esteem, clinical practice stress, and clinical competence. The study design was a non-equivalent control group non-synchronized design. Participants were 63 nursing students in clinical training (31 students in the experimental group and 32 students in the control group). The assertiveness training applying Dongsasub training consisted of four sessions. Outcome variables included assertiveness behavior, self-esteem, clinical practice stress, and clinical competence. Data were analyzed using Chi-square, Fisher's exact test and independent samples t-test with SPSS/WIN 21.0. Scores of assertiveness behavior (t=-2.49, p=.015), self-esteem (t=-4.80, passertiveness training applying Dongsasub training can be used as a nursing intervention to lower clinical practice stress and improve the clinical competence of nursing students.

  4. Teaching during clinical practice: strategies and techniques used by preceptors in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisabeth, Carlson; Christine, Wann-Hansson; Ewa, Pilhammar

    2009-07-01

    The preceptor is a nurse who teaches and supports the student and is seen as pivotal to student learning within the clinical setting. Earlier studies have shown that preceptors' pedagogical competence is significant for facilitating learning during clinical practice. However, studies describing pedagogical competence, especially in terms of teaching strategies, seem to be scarce. The aim of this study was to describe which strategies and techniques preceptors use to teach undergraduate nursing students during clinical practice. The study had an ethnographic approach; methods used were participant observations and focus group interviews with nurses who were experienced in precepting undergraduate nursing students. Findings illustrated how preceptors used different strategies and techniques in a continuous process of adjusting, performing and evaluating precepting. Increased knowledge on how the preceptors actually teach student nurses during clinical practice will help facilitate educational programmes for preceptors, which will enhance their pedagogical skills and competences.

  5. Evidence-based practice for the busy nurse practitioner: part one: relevance to clinical practice and clinical inquiry process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchiano, Lynda; Snyder, Charlene Hoffman

    2012-10-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) continues to gain momentum within health care. The purpose of this four-part EBP series is to provide an introductory overview of the EBP process, emphasizing EBP steps one through three, in order to assist nurse practitioners (NPs) in building EBP skills that can be integrated into clinical practice. The relevance of EBP to the NP's clinical practice, an introduction to the EBP process steps, and clinical inquiry process begin the series. Scientific literature review, gray literature, and online evidence-based practice databases and resources. EBP has become increasingly important to NPs, yet there is evidence suggesting it is not being fully implemented in clinical practice. EBP is one way to keep the busy NP's knowledge up to date, enhance clinical judgment, and augment the existing provider-client decision-making process. The principles of EBP have become the cornerstone strategy for NPs to translate research findings into clinical practice. Practicing in an ever-changing healthcare environment, NPs have a responsibility to provide their clients with the best available evidence, while incorporating that evidence into the provider-client decision-making process. ©2012 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2012 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  6. Reiki as a clinical intervention in oncology nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossi, Larraine M; Ott, Mary Jane; DeCristofaro, Susan

    2008-06-01

    Oncology nurses and their patients are frequently on the cutting edge of new therapies and interventions that support coping, health, and healing. Reiki is a practice that is requested with increasing frequency, is easy to learn, does not require expensive equipment, and in preliminary research, elicits a relaxation response and helps patients to feel more peaceful and experience less pain. Those who practice Reiki report that it supports them in self-care and a healthy lifestyle. This article will describe the process of Reiki, review current literature, present vignettes of patient responses to the intervention, and make recommendations for future study.

  7. Violence Experienced By Nursing Students in Clinical Practice Settings

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    Meltem KÜRTÜNCÜ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was made to determine violence experienced by nurse students in clinical settings. It was applied to the School of Health Nursing Student of a university during a week in June, 2010. There were 360 students, 53 of whom were senior, 60 of whom were thirdyear, 114 of whom were sophomore, 79 of whom were first-year and 102 of whom were prep-school students, at the school. Students in preparatory classes were not included in the scope of the study since they didn't take applied courses. 70,58% of the students were reached. It was determined that the students were often exposed to verbal abuse and sexism in clinical setting and the abuse was performed by their colleagues.

  8. Teaching efficacy of nurses in clinical practice education: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Kyeung; Shin, Sujin

    2017-07-01

    Clinical nurses play a vital role in clinical practice education; thus, it is necessary to help clinical nurses have teaching efficacy through the development and application of systematic education programs. To identify nurses' teaching efficacy for clinical education and analyze the influencing factors of teaching efficacy. The study used a cross-sectional design. We used a convenience sample of 263 nurses from two hospitals. Teaching efficacy, general characteristics, and perception of clinical practice education were collected via self-reported questionnaires. Teaching efficacy was measured using Hwang's (2006) questionnaire, while perception of clinical practice education was measured using the Clinical Nurse Teacher Survey developed by Nishioka et al. (2014). Participants completed the questionnaire directly. The collected data were then analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-tests, ANOVAs, and multiple regression analysis with PASW Statistics 18.0. The mean total score of teaching efficacy was 72.5 (range 21-105). The leadership for students subscale had the highest score (3.56±0.59). The factors influencing teaching efficacy were length of clinical career (β=0.26, pteaching efficacy in nurses. Based on these results, nursing educators might need to develop greater confidence in their knowledge and enhance control of their teaching strategies. Nursing schools and hospitals might need to provide greater support and educational opportunities to nurse clinical practice instructors. Furthermore, constructing a system of cooperation between these colleges and educational hospitals, developing programs to enhance teaching efficacy, and identifying the clinical instructor's role are all necessary to promote clinical practice education. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Changing Nephrology Nurses' Beliefs about the Value of Evidence-Based Practice and Their Ability to Implement in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, Debra; Haras, Mary S

    2015-01-01

    A rapidly evolving healthcare environment demands sound research evidence to inform clinical practice and improve patient outcomes. Over the past several decades, nurses have generated new knowledge by conducting research studies, but it takes time for this evidence to be implemented in practice. As nurses strive to be leaders and active participants in healthcare redesign, it is essential that they possess the requisite knowledge and skills to engage in evidence-based practice (EBP). Professional nursing organizations can make substantial contributions to the move healthcare quality forward by providing EBP workshops similar to those conducted by the American Nephrology Nurses'Association.

  10. Nursing students’ stressors and anxiety in their first clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Isabel Cobo Cuenca

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Nursery practices are crucial for the subsequent professional development of the nurse, but because of her contact with suffering, death and in general the human aspects of health care, mean a stressful moment for nursing students.Objectives: know the levels of anxiety and condition, as well to determine the stressors that have influence in such anxiety in the students of Nursing Schools of the University of Castilla la ManchaMethodology: A observational, longitudinal and prospective study. The Stai-R and Stai-E questionnaires will be used to know the anxiety trait and state and the Kezkak questionnaire, validated by Zupiria, will be used to know the most frequent stressors that appear in the population subject of this survey.The population is limited to the students registered for the Introductory Practicum subject, that mean the first practices and therefore the student’s first contact with the reality of the nursery care.The analysis of information will be realized by statistical package SPSS V15.0.

  11. Nursing clinical handover improvement practices among acute inpatients in a tertiary hospital in Sydney: a best practice implementation project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, Craig; Wright, Kylie M

    2016-10-01

    The nursing handover normally occurs at the beginning of a nurse's shift and is considered essential for continuity of care. Nursing handovers have the potential to communicate accurate information about a patient's condition, treatment and anticipated needs but also to be ineffective or even harmful if information is incomplete or omitted. The Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care has recognized clinical handover as a National Standard, thus reinforcing its importance. This project aimed to conduct an audit of nursing clinical handover practices to implement evidence-based best practice recommendations to assess the effectiveness of these strategies to maximize the effectiveness of clinical handover across 11 units in a large tertiary hospital. The project used the Joanna Briggs Institute's Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System and Getting Research into Practice audit tool for promoting change in healthcare practice. A baseline audit of 330 observations of nursing clinical handover was conducted and measured against seven best practice recommendations, followed by the implementation of targeted strategies and a follow-up audit. The baseline audit revealed significant deficits between current practice and best practice in all but one criterion. Barriers for implementation of nursing clinical handover best practice criteria were identified by the project team, and a bundled education strategy was implemented. There were significantly improved outcomes across all best practice criteria in the follow-up audit. The findings showed how audits may be used to promote best practice in healthcare and that focused education and provision of relevant resources can have an immediate and positive impact on clinical practice. Some of the measured criteria improved to a moderate degree, leaving room for improvement; however, by the end of the project attitudes toward nursing clinical handover had been "transformed" from a passive routine "must do

  12. Best practices in nursing homes. Clinical supervision, management, and human resource practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellefield, Mary Ellen

    2008-07-01

    Human resource practices including supervision and management are associated with organizational performance. Evidence supportive of such an association in nursing homes is found in the results of numerous research studies conducted during the past 17 years. In this article, best practices related to this topic have been culled from descriptive, explanatory, and intervention studies in a range of interdisciplinary research journals published between 1990 and 2007. Identified best practices include implementation of training programs on supervision and management for licensed nurses, certified nursing assistant job enrichment programs, implementation of consistent nursing assignments, and the use of electronic documentation. Organizational barriers and facilitators of these best practices are described. Copyright 2009, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Factors impacting on nurses' transference of theoretical knowledge of holistic care into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Saras

    2002-12-01

    Since nurse education moved to universities, a reoccurring concern of health consumers, health administrators, and some practising nurses is that nurses are not able to transfer the theoretical knowledge of holistic care into practice. Much has been written about this concern usually under the heading of the theory-practice gap. A common reason that has been highlighted as the cause of this gap is that the theoretical knowledge that nurses learn in academia is predicated on concepts such as humanism and holistic caring. In contrast, the bureaucratic organisation where nurses provide care tends to be based on management concepts where cost containment and outcome measures are more acceptable. Hence nurses' learned values of holistic caring are pitted against the reality of the practice setting. So what is this practice reality? This paper attempts to provide an insider view of why the theoretical knowledge of holistic care may be difficult to enact in the clinical setting. In-depth taped interviews with nurses and participant observation were conducted in acute care hospitals in Western Australia. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using the constant comparative method. The findings indicated that utilitarian nursing and role models had impacted on the transference of theoretical knowledge of holistic care into practice. The paper outlines some measures that nurses themselves can undertake to ensure the narrowing of the theory-practice gap in this area.

  14. Developing students' time management skills in clinical settings: practical considerations for busy nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Michelle; Horsfall, Jan

    2011-06-01

    In clinical settings, nursing staff often find themselves responsible for students who have varying time management skills. Nurses need to respond sensitively and appropriately, and to teach nursing students how to prioritize and better allocate time. This is important not only for developing students' clinical skills but also for shaping their perceptions about the quality of the placement and their willingness to consider it as a potential work specialty. In this column, some simple, practical strategies that nurses can use to assist students with improving their time management skills are identified.

  15. Nurses’ Research Behavior and Barriers to Research Utilization Into Clinical Nursing Practice: a Closer Look

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    Efstratios Athanasakis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is widely accepted that utilization of the best-known research evidence in nursing practice entails improvement of nursing care received by patients and strengthening of nursing profession.Aim: The aim of this paper was the review of nurses’ research behavior and the barriers that nurses meet in order to utilize research evidence into clinical nursing practice.Methodology: There has been conducted a literature search in Pubmed and Science Direct libraries, using specific search terms. An important inclusion criterion for the studies was the use of barriers to research utilization scale (BRUS, along or combined with another instrument.Results: A total of 37 original papers included in the present article. A table of the top five barriers to research utilization scale has been conducted. Data from the table indicate that the existence of barriers to incorporation of evidence into practice comes mainly from clinical settings characteristics. In addition, issues about nursing education, nurses’ research and reading habits, facilitators of research utilization and their relevance for nursing staff and clinical practice are also discussed.Conclusions: Since the barriers to research utilization are well identified in the nursing literature and there is a wealth of information on this subject, the next step is to find ways to overcome them and value the impact of the relevant interventions towards research utilization behavior.

  16. The concept and characteristics of clinical practice ability in Master Degree of Nursing (specialty)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Zeng; Jing-Ci Zhu; Xiao-Yu Zhao

    2016-01-01

    The concepts of ability, practice ability, and professional practice ability were analyzed using a theoretical research method. Based on the results of the analysis, the concept of clinical practice ability for Master Degree of Nursing (specialty) students was defined, and the characteristics were interpreted to provide references for future in-depth studies.

  17. Classroom to clinic: incorporating adolescent spiritual/faith assessment into nurse practitioner education & practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    Although nursing is well grounded in the conceptualization of person as body-mind-spirit, there is little evidence that advanced practice nurses routinely address the spirit in giving patient care, especially with adolescents in the outpatient setting. The neglect of spiritual aspects of care may be related to lack of a framework, or education/incorporation into nurse practitioner preparation. This article describes one method of integrating adolescent spiritual/faith assessment into a nurse practitioner clinical course. Readings, assignments, and a grading rubric are offered.

  18. Ethical Issues of Air Force Nurse Practitioners in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-05-01

    cognitive theory of moral development as set forth by Kohlberg. Crisham explained building on the works of Piaget in the early 30’s, Kohlberg (1976...late 1980s, nursing research has addressed caring as a central theme to nursing. In 1989, Jean Watson’s philosophy and theory of human caring in nursing

  19. The role of the nurse teacher in clinical practice: an empirical study of Finnish student nurse experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarikoski, Mikko; Warne, Tony; Kaila, Päivi; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2009-08-01

    This paper focuses on the role of the nurse teacher (NT) in supporting student nurse education in clinical practice. The paper draws on the outcomes of a study aimed at exploring student nurse experiences of the pedagogical relationship with NTs during their clinical placements. The participants (N=549) were student nurses studying on pre-registration nursing programmes in Finland. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, cross-tabulation and ANOVA. The study showed that the core aspect of NTs work in clinical practice revolved around the relationship between student, mentor and NT. Higher levels of satisfaction were experienced in direct proportion to the number of meetings held between the student and NT. However, whilst the importance of this relationship has been reported elsewhere, an additional aspect of this relationship emerged in the data analysis. Those NT who facilitated good face to face contact also used other methods to enhance the relationship, particularly e-mail, virtual learning environment and texting. This outcome suggests that NT's interpersonal and communicative skills are as important as their clinical knowledge and skills in promoting effective learning in the clinical practice area. The paper argues for such approaches to be utilised within the emergent opportunities afforded by new communication and educational technologies.

  20. Perceptions of students on the physical exams in clinical nursing practice

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    Maria de Fátima Lima de Oliveira

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to understand the perceptions of students from an undergraduate course in nursing on the importance of physical exams in clinical nursing practice. Methods: a qualitative study with 12 students of a private institution. For data analysis, the method of interpretation of meanings was used, based on the hermeneutic-dialectic perspective. Results: directions have been identified which give the physical exam an objective dimension, in which the accuracy of propaedeutic techniques is essential, and a relational dimension in which to give meaning to human actions permeated by subjectivity, new forms of production clinical nursing care are used. Conclusion: the physical exam contributes to the development of critical thinking in nursing care for the safety of the patient and autonomy to act in the scope of the clinical practice.

  1. Nursing clinical practice changes to improve self-management in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilha, J M; Sousa, P A F; Pereira, F M S

    2017-03-13

    To propose nursing clinical practice changes to improve the development of patient self-management. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is one of the main causes of chronic morbidity, loss of quality of life and high mortality rates. Control of the disease's progression, the preservation of autonomy in self-care and maintenance of quality of life are extremely challenging for patients to execute in their daily living. However, there is still little evidence to support nursing clinical practice changes to improve the development of self-management. A participatory action research study was performed in a medicine inpatient department and the outpatient unit of a Portuguese hospital. The sample comprised 52 nurses and 99 patients. For data collection, we used interviews, participant observation and content analysis. The main elements of nursing clinical practice that were identified as a focus for improvement measures were the healthcare model, the organization of healthcare and the documentation of a support decision-making process. The specific guidelines, the provision of material to support decision-making and the optimization of information sharing between professionals positively influenced the change process. This change improved the development of self-management skills related to the awareness of the need for 'change', hope, involvement, knowledge and abilities. The implemented changes have improved health-related behaviours and clinical outcomes. To support self-management development skills, an effective nursing clinical practice change is needed. This study has demonstrated the relevance of a portfolio of techniques and tools to help patients adopt healthy behaviours. The involvement and participation of nurses and patients in the conceptualization, implementation and evaluation of policy change are fundamental issues to improve the quality of nursing care and clinical outcomes. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  2. The Strategic Impact of Clinical Practice Guidelines in Nursing on the Managerial Function of Supervision

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    Jose Antonio Vinagre Romero

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Clinical practice guidelines in nursing (CPG-N are tools that allow the necessary knowledge that frequently remains specialist-internalised to be made explicit. These tools are a complement to risk adjustment systems (RAS, reinforcing their effectiveness and permitting a rationalisation of healthcare costs. This theoretical study defends the importance of building and using CPG-Ns as instruments to support the figure of the nursing supervisor in order to optimise the implementation of R&D and hospital quality strategies, enabling clinical excellence in nursing processes and cost-efficient reallocation of economic resources through their linear integration with SARs.

  3. Thinking in Clinical Nursing Practice: A Study of Critical Care Nurses' Thinking Applying the Think-Aloud, Protocol Analysis Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Ja Han, RN, PhD

    2007-06-01

    Conclusion: This study specifies the initial categories of thoughts for each of the processes and various patterns with which these processes are sequentially combined, providing insights into the ways nurses think about problems and address their concerns. The findings suggest that the thinking in clinical practice involves more than focused decision-making and reasoning, and needs to be examined from a broader perspective.

  4. Unsafe clinical practices as perceived by final year baccalaureate nursing students: Q methodology

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    Killam Laura A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nursing education necessitates vigilance for clinical safety, a daunting challenge given the complex interchanges between students, patients and educators. As active learners, students offer a subjective understanding concerning safety in the practice milieu that merits further study. This study describes the viewpoints of senior undergraduate nursing students about compromised safety in the clinical learning environment. Methods Q methodology was used to systematically elicit multiple viewpoints about unsafe clinical learning from the perspective of senior students enrolled in a baccalaureate nursing program offered at multiple sites in Ontario, Canada. Across two program sites, 59 fourth year students sorted 43 theoretical statement cards, descriptive of unsafe clinical practice. Q-analysis identified similarities and differences among participant viewpoints yielding discrete and consensus perspectives. Results A total of six discrete viewpoints and two consensus perspectives were identified. The discrete viewpoints at one site were Endorsement of Uncritical Knowledge Transfer, Non-student Centered Program and Overt Patterns of Unsatisfactory Clinical Performance. In addition, a consensus perspective, labelled Contravening Practices was identified as responsible for compromised clinical safety at this site. At the other site, the discrete viewpoints were Premature and Inappropriate Clinical Progression, Non-patient Centered Practice and Negating Purposeful Interactions for Experiential Learning. There was consensus that Eroding Conventions compromised clinical safety from the perspective of students at this second site. Conclusions Senior nursing students perceive that deficits in knowledge, patient-centered practice, professional morality and authenticity threaten safety in the clinical learning environment. In an effort to eradicate compromised safety associated with learning in the clinical milieu, students and educators

  5. The transition to practice of Direct Entry Clinical Nurse Leader graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatto, Bobbi; Meyer, Geralyn; Delicath, Timothy A

    2016-07-01

    This study looks at Direct Entry Clinical Nurse Leader graduates and how their transition to practice experiences develops over time as well as factors influencing their transition. Graduates were surveyed at graduation, three, six and 12 months. Seventeen participated; eight completed all surveys. Most were from the Millennial generation. The survey consisted of two parts: school satisfaction and the Casey-Fink Graduate Nurse Experience Scale. The results showed the Casey-Fink total score at 12 months was 0.75 points higher than at three months; suggesting a positive transition. The highest score occurred at six months which conversely had the lowest levels of satisfaction with both educational experience and intent to stay in their current role. Despite having 850 precepted/mentored clinical hours, 57.1% of these graduates stated they felt unprepared for the reality of nursing after 12 months. Regardless of feeling unprepared, the results suggest these students displayed a positive transition to practice. At 12 months, 88.2% were still with their first employers which contrasted the results of Casey-Fink and other studies of Millennial gradate nurses, which showed higher actual and intent to leave results. This study suggests that Direct Entry Clinical Nurse Leader students do indeed transition to practice more positively than traditional nursing graduates.

  6. Preparing for practice: Nursing intern and faculty perceptions on clinical experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlThiga, Hanan; Mohidin, Sharifah; Park, Yoon Soo; Tekian, Ara

    2017-04-01

    Clinical experience and exposure to real patients are required elements of nursing education. Trainees in nursing are expected to be prepared adequately for the hard-working environment, increasing patient complexity, and higher-level competencies. This study investigates differences between nursing interns and clinical faculty on actual and perceived importance of educational preparation and development of clinical competencies, focusing on the nursing curriculum and transition to practice. A convenient sampling technique with a mixed-methods design was used to collect quantitative and qualitative data, by surveying and interviewing nursing interns and faculty members from King Abdul-Aziz University in Saudi Arabia; data collection occurred in December 2015. The survey (23 items) and focused interviews measured perceptions of clinical instruction and experience. Descriptive statistics and t-tests were used to analyze differences in mean ratings between actual and perceived importance. Themes collected from narrative interview data were summarized. Significant differences were found between nursing interns (n = 46) and faculty (n = 29) perceptions of actual clinical teaching and experiences and its importance including the clinical teaching and the development of clinical competence, p interns rated actual experiences of knowledge base and skills significantly lower than faculty perceptions, p = .001. Narrative data provided in-depth information on factors contributing and hindering the learning and teaching environment. Findings from this study call for clinical instruction and experiences to take a step further to meet current practice standards and to improve patient safety in the health professions education of nurses.

  7. Validation of evidence-based clinical practice guideline: Nursing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amel Ibrahim Ahmed

    2012-01-31

    Jan 31, 2012 ... Introduction ... 5% of treatment outcome of new smear positive cases.7 Treat- ... well as, to operate the implementation of evidence-based prac- ... (nurses) and the end point beneficiaries (newly diagnosed pa- ..... through sputum test. Also ..... national Standards for tuberculosis care: Diagnosis, Treatment.

  8. Perceived Stress and Coping Strategies among Newly Nurse Students in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfouz, Rasha; Alsahli, Haya

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed at assessing the stress level and coping strategies among students who were newly in Practicing the clinical training in different hospitals, at the Nursing College, Princess Nourah University. The study design was a descriptive analytical one. The study was conducted at the beginning of second semester in the academic year…

  9. A Bridge between Two Cultures: Uncovering the Chemistry Concepts Relevant to the Nursing Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Corina E.; Henry, Melissa L. M.; Barbera, Jack; Hyslop, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on the undergraduate course that covers basic topics in general, organic, and biological (GOB) chemistry at a mid-sized state university in the western United States. The central objective of the research was to identify the main topics of GOB chemistry relevant to the clinical practice of nursing. The collection of data was…

  10. Effectiveness of a Brief, Basic Evidence-Based Practice Course for Clinical Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Morcillo, Antonio J; Fernández-Salazar, Serafín; Ruzafa-Martínez, María; Del-Pino-Casado, Rafael

    2015-08-01

    Barriers to the implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) by nursing professionals include a lack of knowledge, inadequate skills in searching for and appraising evidence, and consulting research articles. However, few studies have addressed the effectiveness of educational interventions to improve their competence. To evaluate the effectiveness of a brief basic online and face-to-face educational intervention to promote EBP attitudes, knowledge and skills, and practice in clinical care nurses. This study was quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest design with a comparison group. The sample included registered nurses enrolled in the free continuing education courses offered in 2013 by the Nursing Council of Jaén (Spain). The study included 109 participants (54 in the intervention group and 55 in the comparison group). The intervention was a brief, basic EBP course with online and face-to-face learning. The comparison group received an educational intervention with different content. The evidence-based practice questionnaire (EBPQ) was used to evaluate EBP attitude, knowledge and skills, and practice before the intervention, and at 21 and 60 days following the intervention. Two-way mixed analysis of variance was conducted. There was a significant difference between intervention and comparison groups in the knowledge and skills dimension. The difference between groups was not significant in the EBP practice dimension. Both groups had high scores in the attitude dimension that did not change after the intervention. A brief basic educational intervention on EBP with online and face-to-face learning can produce improvements in the knowledge and skills of clinical nurses. © 2015 The Authors. Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Sigma Theta Tau International The Honor Society of Nursing.

  11. The significance of communities of practice: Norwegian nursing students' experience of clinical placement in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Wanja; Hadders, Hans

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain understanding of Norwegian students' experience of learning in clinical placement in Bangladesh without formal one-to-one supervision, by a personal mentor in the ward. Using focus group interviews with bachelor nursing students we explored the significance of 'communities of practice' in nursing practicum abroad, socialization and knowledge transfer. Seven third year bachelor nursing students enrolled in a clinical placement programme in Bangladesh participated in focus group interviews prior to their departure to Bangladesh, during their stay in Bangladesh and after their return to Norway. The Students' marginality and 'peripheral participation' triggered insight and reflection. The challenging but advantageous position of the peripheral students was heightened further due to the lack of one-to-one supervision in the clinic. Their previous experience with problem based learning and group learning was an asset that made them more resilient and helped them to cope.

  12. The perception of intuition in clinical practice by Iranian critical care nurses: a phenomenological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassani P

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Parkhide Hassani,1 Alireza Abdi,1 Rostam Jalali,2 Nader Salari3 1Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 2Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran; 3Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran Background: Intuition as a way of learning in nursing is applied to decision making and judgment in complicated clinical situations. Several studies have been conducted on intuition in clinical settings, but comprehension of this concept is unclear. Moreover, there is a lack of information about intuition in critical care nurses caring for more seriously ill patients. This study aimed to explore Iranian critical care nurses’ understanding of intuition in clinical practice. Methods: In a descriptive–phenomenological study, 12 nurses employed in critical care units of the hospitals affiliated to Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences were purposively recruited to the study. A semistructured interview was administered, and then written verbatim. The data were managed by MAXQDA 10 software, and qualitative analysis was undertaken using the seven-stage approach of Colaizzi. Results: Of the 12 nurses who participated in the study, 7 (58.3% were female and married, and 10 (88.3% held a bachelor's degree in nursing. The mean and standard deviations of participants' age, job experience, and critical care experience were 36.66±7.01, 13.75±6.82, and 7.66±3.36 years, respectively. Four main themes and eleven sub-themes were elicited from the qualitative analysis; the main themes including “Understanding intuition as a feeling”, “Understanding intuition as a thought”, “Understanding intuition as receiving signs”, and “Understanding intuition as an alarm”. Because they have trust in their own intuition, the nurses made further assessments and paid more

  13. Effects of Education Programs on Evidence-Based Practice Implementation for Clinical Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Jae Youn; Jang, Keum Seong; Kim, Nam Young

    2016-08-01

    This study was conducted to identify the effectiveness of an education program for evidence-based practice (EBP) implementation of clinical nursing. EBP knowledge/skill, attitude, and belief; information search ability; and EBP implementation were significantly higher in the experimental group than in the control group. Furthermore, the effect on implementation was maintained at week 4 and week 8, indicating that the education program practically promotes the EBP implementation of nurses. Results confirm that the education program for EBP implementation is critical and the continuous education program is an essential part of EBP implementation. Also, to promote EBP implementation and disseminate it to nursing organizations, an immediate concern should be the cultivation of mentors for EBP and fortification of the belief and ability regarding EBP implementation. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(8):363-371.

  14. Systematic implementation of evidence-based practice in a clinical nursing setting : a participatory action research project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friesen-Storms, Jolanda; Moser, Albine; Loo, Sandra van der; Beurskens, Anna; Bours, Gerrie

    2015-01-01

    Aims and objectives: To describe the process of implementing evidence-based practice (EBP) in a clinical nursing setting. Background: EBP has become a major issue in nursing, it is insufficiently integrated in daily practice and its implementation is complex. Design: Participatory action researc

  15. To what extent do nurses use research in clinical practice? A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Rourke Hannah M

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past forty years, many gains have been made in our understanding of the concept of research utilization. While numerous studies exist on professional nurses' use of research in practice, no attempt has been made to systematically evaluate and synthesize this body of literature with respect to the extent to which nurses use research in their clinical practice. The objective of this study was to systematically identify and analyze the available evidence related to the extent to which nurses use research findings in practice. Methods This study was a systematic review of published and grey literature. The search strategy included 13 online bibliographic databases: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, HAPI, Web of Science, SCOPUS, OCLC Papers First, OCLC WorldCat, ABI Inform, Sociological Abstracts, and Dissertation Abstracts. The inclusion criteria consisted of primary research reports that assess professional nurses' use of research in practice, written in the English or Scandinavian languages. Extent of research use was determined by assigning research use scores reported in each article to one of four quartiles: low, moderate-low, moderate-high, or high. Results Following removal of duplicate citations, a total of 12,418 titles were identified through database searches, of which 133 articles were retrieved. Of the articles retrieved, 55 satisfied the inclusion criteria. The 55 final reports included cross-sectional/survey (n = 51 and quasi-experimental (n = 4 designs. A sensitivity analysis, comparing findings from all reports with those rated moderate (moderate-weak and moderate-strong and strong quality, did not show significant differences. In a majority of the articles identified (n = 38, 69%, nurses reported moderate-high research use. Conclusions According to this review, nurses' reported use of research is moderate-high and has remained

  16. Development and Psychometric Properties of the Nursing Critical Thinking in Clinical Practice Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuriguel-Pérez, Esperanza; Falcó-Pegueroles, Anna; Roldán-Merino, Juan; Agustino-Rodriguez, Sandra; Gómez-Martín, Maria Del Carmen; Lluch-Canut, Maria Teresa

    2017-08-01

    A complex healthcare environment, with greater need for care based on the patient and evidence-based practice, are factors that have contributed to the increased need for critical thinking in professional competence. At the theoretical level, Alfaro-LeFevre () put forward a model of critical thinking made up of four components. And although these explain the construct, instruments for their empirical measurement are lacking. The purpose of the study was to develop and validate the psychometric properties of an instrument, the Nursing Critical Thinking in Clinical Practice Questionnaire (N-CT-4 Practice), designed to evaluate the critical thinking abilities of nurses in the clinical setting. A cross-sectional survey design was used. A pool of items was generated for evaluation by a panel of experts who considered their validity for the new instrument, which was finally made up of 109 items. Following this, validation was carried out using a sample of 339 nurses at a hospital in Barcelona, Spain. Reliability was determined by means of internal consistency and test-retest stability over time, although the validity of the construct was assessed by means of confirmatory factor analysis. The content validity index of the N-CT-4 Practice was .85. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the whole instrument was .96. The intraclass correlation coefficient was .77. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the instrument was in line with the four-dimensional model proposed by Alfaro-LeFevre (). The psychometric properties of theN-CT-4 Practice uphold its potential for use in measuring critical thinking and in future research related with the examination of critical thinking. © 2017 The Authors Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Sigma Theta Tau International The Honor Society of Nursing.

  17. Nurses' pressure ulcer related judgements and decisions in clinical practice: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuriwo, Ray; Dowding, Dawn

    2014-12-01

    Pressure ulcers are considered to be an adverse outcome of care that should never occur in clinical practice. The formation of a pressure ulcer is also perceived to be an indicator of poor quality nursing care. Therefore, pressure ulcer prevention is a priority for nurses, healthcare professionals and healthcare organisations throughout the world. A key factor in pressure ulcer prevention and management is individual nurse decision making. To synthesise the literature on the judgement and decision making of nurses in relation to the assessment, prevention, grading and management of pressure ulcers in all care settings (hospital and community). A systematic search of published literature relating to judgement and decision making in nurses, with a focus on the prevention and management of pressure ulcers. A search of electronic databases from 1992 to present, together with hand searching of the reference lists of retrieved publications, to identify published papers that reported results of studies evaluating the decision making of nurses in relation to the prevention and management of pressure ulcers. Abstracts were independently reviewed by two authors and full text of potentially relevant articles retrieved. Each paper included in this systematic review was evaluated using recognised appraisal criteria relevant to the specific study design. Included papers provided empirical data on key aspects of nurses' pressure ulcer related judgements and decision making. Data were synthesised into themes using narrative analysis. Sixteen studies and one systematic review were included in the review, focusing on pressure ulcer risk assessment, pressure ulcer prevention, grading of pressure ulcers and treatment decisions. The results indicated that assessment tools were not routinely used to identify pressure ulcer risk, and that nurses rely on their own knowledge and experience rather than research evidence to decide what skin care to deliver. Emphasising pressure ulcer risk

  18. Placebo use in clinical practice by nurses in an Iranian teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghcheghi, Nayereh; Koohestani, Hamid Reza

    2011-05-01

    The present study was carried out to explore Iranian nurses' use of placebos in clinical practice and their knowledge and attitude towards its use. A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted using self-report questionnaires. All nurses working in a university hospital in Arak (n=342) were invited to participate in the study. Among 295 respondents, 221 (75%) reported that they had used at least one placebo within the past year and 179 (81%) told patients they were receiving actual medication. The most common reason and symptom for placebo use were after unjustified demand for medication and pain, respectively. Only 60 (20.33%) of the nurses believed that placebos should never be used. Results showed that most nurses in our study had used placebos and probably will continue to use them. Placebo use is viewed as ethically permissible among nurses. Some patients benefit from the placebos, but their use raises ethical questions. The role of placebo treatment, its mechanisms, and its ethics issues should be taught to nurses.

  19. Influence of the training: " Clinical practice based on the evidence " in the daily practice of the nurse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligia Rojas Valenciano

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to present the results of the project Not. 421-B1-261: Influence of the training of theClinical Practice Based on the Evidence on the daily practice of the professional of nursing, approved by the Vicerrectoríaof Investigation of the University of Costa Rica. The commitment to renew the practice of Nursing in Costa Rica relates in adirect way to the improvement of the health of the society both in the collective thing and in the individual thing, in order toreduce the mistakes in the practice. A search was realized in EBSCO's databases, PubMed, Academic Research Completes,MedLine Plus and Scielo. A preliminary search was carried out, then limits of search interfered per date and describers;finally, for the critical analysis they were included only to complete text by title and they summarize 30 documents thatincluded reviews of literature, primary studies and conceptual frames that were relevant to give response to the clinicalquestion. Of 30 documents only it was considered six of them by your content, methodological structure and quality.Though there was not situated a forceful and direct response to the clinical question raised in this study, for the effectedreview it is possible to conclude that the professionals of Nursing consider to be essential the enrichment of a clinicalpractice based on the evidence, which generates a major quality and safety in the executed care.

  20. Integrating nurse researchers in clinical practice – a challenging, but necessary task for nurse leaders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi; Kjerholt, Mette; Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher

    2016-01-01

    nursing, including integrating nurse researchers in ANP positions. Methods A collective case study including three ANPs took place at a large regional hospital in Denmark. The cases were first analysed by focusing on the generic features, functions and skills of ANPs, and second by focusing...... ensure a process where the content and expectations of the particular role are mutually clarified and adjusted to the individual ANP and to the specific context, in order to create a harmonious match. Implications for nursing management In order to clarify expectations regarding the inclusion of nurse...

  1. Difficulties of bachelor of nursing students in clinical practice - teacher's perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Longo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on representations of teachers about the difficulties perceived or felt by students in clinical training. This is the partial result of a study in construction process, carried out under the PhD in Educational Sciences in the area of Teacher Education. This research aims to understand the formative effect of the practice in the workplace in terms of knowledge acquisitions, development of professional knowledge and skills, and also in identity construction of teachers and students. This study is framed in the area of initial teacher education in nursing, more specifically in its practical component, and it is designed to answer the question: what are the main difficulties encountered by students in the workplace in initial nursing education? And the goal: to understand to what extent these difficulties can be constraints of learning and personal and professional development of the student. This is a study based on a qualitative approach of descriptive and interpretative nature. The sample is intentional, consisting of sixty-eight teachers of thirteen Nursing / Health High Schools in Portugal. Data collection was carried out through focus group, and their examination was performed using the thematic content analysis according to Bardin[1]. The results show, according to the teaching perspective, that the difficulties experienced by students are polarized around six main categories: the reality shock; interact with the medical monitor; the self training process; interaction with the teacher; interaction with the patient / family, and also interaction with the nursing staff.

  2. Using portfolios for clinical practice learning and assessment: the pre-registration nursing student's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullan, Miriam

    2008-10-01

    Portfolios have been introduced to help to integrate theory and practice and thereby address the issue of the theory-practice divide. Although there has been much theoretical discussion about portfolio use in clinical placements, few studies have focused on the students' perceptions regarding their use. To obtain adult branch pre-registration nursing students' perspectives on using portfolios for their clinical practice learning and assessment, postal questionnaires were sent to 253 diploma of nursing students with a reminder to all students three weeks later. The response rate was 69% (174/253). This paper reports on the qualitative findings of the study, which employed both quantitative and qualitative methods. Although students stated that portfolios helped them in their development of self-awareness and independent learning, they indicated that portfolios do not sufficiently address the assessment of their clinical skills and the integration of theory and practice. They considered that portfolios could be greatly improved in three areas, namely in the conflict between using portfolios for both assessment and learning, the amount of support and guidance students feel they receive with their portfolio use and the portfolio design.

  3. Nursing students' evaluation of quality indicators during learning in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Inger; Ene, Kerstin W

    2016-09-01

    A supportive clinical learning environment is important for nursing students' learning. In this study, a contract between a county and a university involving a preceptor model of clinical education for nursing students is described. The aim of this study was to describe nursing students' clinical education based on quality indicators and to describe the students' experiences of what facilitated or hindered the learning process during their clinical practice. During autumn 2012 and spring 2013, 269 student evaluations with quantitative and qualitative answers were filled out anonymously. Quantitative data from the questionnaires concerning the quality indicators: Administration/information, Assessments/examinations and Reflection were processed to generate descriptive statistics that revealed gaps in what the preceptor model demands and what the students reported. The answers from the qualitative questions concerning the quality indicator Learning were analysed using content analysis. Four categories emerged: Independence and responsibility, continuity of learning, time, and the competence and attitudes of the staff. The study underlines that reflection, continuity, communication and feedback were important for the students' learning process, whereas heavy workload among staff and being supervised by many different preceptors were experienced as stressful and hindering by students. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Involving users and carers in the assessment of preregistration nursing students' clinical nursing practice: a strategy for patient empowerment and quality improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haycock-Stuart, Elaine; Donaghy, Eddie; Darbyshire, Chris

    2016-07-01

    To examine (1) nursing lecturers' and (2) preregistration nursing students' perspectives of user and carer involvement in the formal assessment of preregistration nursing students' clinical practice. The involvement of service users and carers in the assessment of clinical practice in nursing education is a recent phenomenon. The Nursing and Midwifery Council Standards in the UK clearly reflect a shift in thinking from paternalistic approaches to person-centred approaches. This shift in thinking includes service user and carer involvement in student nursing assessment and there is evidence that this is being developed in several countries. Located in the interpretive paradigm, data from a two-staged, multicentre qualitative study are presented. Interpretive analysis of semi-structured, one to one interviews with nursing lecturers (n = 15) and focus groups with nursing students (n = 51) across 11 Higher Educational Institutions. There is a strong commitment for working alongside service users and carers in the education and training of nursing students; however, involving service users and carers in formal practice assessment is identified as more challenging compared with other areas of service user/carer involvement. Service user/carers should provide feedback/review or comment, but not necessarily formal, summative 'assessment'. The evidence base for involving users and carers in assessment is limited. Involvement of users and carers in providing feedback to nursing students is welcomed. However, concerns exist about the preparedness of users and carers for formal clinical assessment. Discussion and clarification with clinical mentors and user and carer groups is necessary to understand if they agree with the policy direction of user and carer involvement in the assessment of nursing students. Quality assurance concerns are raised by students and lecturers when involving user and carer in assessing nursing students' clinical skills. Mentors are seen as key to

  5. The disclosure of dyslexia in clinical practice: experiences of student nurses in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, David K; Turnbull, Patricia A

    2007-01-01

    Heightened awareness and increasingly sophisticated psychological tests have seen a dramatic rise in the numbers of people diagnosed with dyslexia. Accordingly, there is a reported increase in the numbers of students with dyslexia entering Higher Education (HE) in the United Kingdom (UK) [Singleton, C.H., Chair, 1999. Dyslexia in higher education: policy, provision and practice. Report of the national working party on dyslexia in higher education. University of Hull on behalf of the Higher Education Funding Councils of England and Scotland, Hull], [Higher Education Statistics Agency. HESA. Available from: (accessed 21.12.05)]. Studies researching the effects of dyslexia on the clinical practice of nurses are almost non-existent. This paper reports part of a UK study exploring the clinical experiences of student nurses with dyslexia. In depth interviewing of 18 adult branch student nurses revealed a range of difficulties encountered and a variety of coping mechanisms to manage these. Other than in exceptional circumstances there is no legal requirement to disclose a dyslexia diagnosis. The decision to conceal or disclose their dyslexia was particularly prominent and contentious for these participants. This related to the attitudes of co-workers, concerns for patient safety, expectations of support, confidentiality issues and potential discrimination. Dyslexia continues to attract an unwarranted stigma and can adversely affect the learning experience. The need for disability awareness training in the workplace and improved education/service partnerships to support these students is considered crucial.

  6. Developing a Culture to Facilitate Research Capacity Building for Clinical Nurse Consultants in Generalist Paediatric Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley Wilkes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a research capacity building exercise with a group of CNCs practicing in the speciality of paediatrics in New South Wales (NSW, Australia. It explores the first step in building a research culture, through identifying the research priorities of members of the NSW Child Health Networks Paediatric Clinical Nurse Consultant group, and this forms the major focus of this paper. A nominal group technique (NGT was utilised with sixteen members to identify research topics for investigation which were considered a priority for improving children's health care. The group reviewed and prioritised 43 research topics in children's health which were identified in the literature. As a result of conducting this research prioritisation exercise, the group chose two research topics to investigate: reasons for children representing to the Emergency Department and a comparison of the use of high-flow and low-flow nasal prongs in children with bronchiolitis. The research team will continue to mentor the nurses throughout their research projects which resulted from the NGT. One bridge to leadership development in enhancing patient care is translating knowledge to practice and policy development. This study leads the way for a group of CNCs in paediatric nursing to combine their research capacity and influence clinical knowledge.

  7. Sexuality in early childhood: pediatric nurses' attitudes, knowledge, and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovich, D M

    2000-01-01

    This exploratory study assessed pediatric nurses' attitudes, knowledge, and patient care practices related to the sexuality of hospitalized preschool and early school-age children. Sexuality was defined as the sum of the physical, emotional, and psychologic attributes that are expressed in gender identity and behavior. For this study, a questionnaire containing 24 attitude, 20 knowledge, and 29 nursing practice Likert-scale items was used to survey 45 pediatric nurses in a southeastern tertiary care teaching hospital. Results indicated that, in general, the nurses surveyed had positive attitudes, sound knowledge, and appropriate practice with regard to the sexuality-related needs of their patients. However, there appeared to be some attitudinal biases and knowledge gaps that could adversely affect nursing practice. These findings were used to alter the content in pediatric nursing education at the study institution.

  8. Self-perception of readiness for clinical practice: A survey of accelerated Masters program graduate registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantlay, Andrew; Salamanca, Jennifer; Golaw, Cherie; Wolf, Daniel; Maas, Carly; Nicholson, Patricia

    2017-05-01

    Accelerated nursing programs are gaining momentum as a means of career transition into the nursing profession for mature age learners in an attempt to meet future healthcare workforce demands in Australia. With a gap in the literature on readiness for practice of graduates from accelerated nursing programs at the Masters level the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the program based on graduates' preparedness for practice and graduate outcomes. Using a descriptive, exploratory design an online survey was used to explore the perception of graduate nurses' readiness for clinical practice. Forty-nine graduates from a nursing Masters program at an Australian university completed the survey defining readiness for practice as knowledge of self-limitations and seeking help, autonomy in basic clinical procedures, exhibiting confidence, possessing theoretical knowledge and practicing safe care. Graduates perceived themselves as adequately prepared to work as a beginner practitioner with their perception of readiness for clinical practice largely positive. The majority of participants agreed that the program had prepared them for work as a beginner practitioner with respondents stating that they felt adequately prepared in most areas relating to clinical practice. This would suggest that educational preparation was adequate and effective in achieving program objectives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Theory before practice: implicit assumptions about clinical nursing education in Australia as revealed through a shared critical reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grealish, Laurie; Smale, Lacey Anne

    2011-08-01

    The transfer of nursing education into the higher education sector occurred over a 10-year period in Australia (1985-1994). Australian nurse leaders settled on a single outcome measure to be applied for all nursing graduates in the form of national competency standards. While this move enabled diversity, the lack of consistency in curriculum design has subsequently led to increasing confusion for clinicians who support students' learning in clinical placements. Using a shared critical reflection method, the authors reviewed (1) the evaluation comments from nurses in one nursing unit of a hospital in one Australian jurisdiction and (2) an historical review of nursing literature at the time of the transfer of nursing education into the higher education sector. The reflection suggests that the aim of the transfer, to create critical thinking graduates, has been undermined by the implicit clinical education practices that have since emerged. In order to address the contemporary challenges for clinical staff working with students from multiple universities, as well as increased student numbers to address the nursing shortage, we recommend a new approach to curriculum design: a national clinical curriculum drawn from social, as well as cognitive, learning theory that at once informs clinicians of students' potential abilities and provides the scope to accommodate the increasingly difficult and critical learning requirements of tertiary-based nursing students.

  10. Pre-registration nursing student's quality of practice learning: Clinical learning environment inventory (actual) questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivers, Eleanor; Hasson, Felicity; Slater, Paul

    2017-08-01

    Clinical learning is a vital component of nurse education and assessing student's experiences can provide useful insights for development. Whilst most research in this area has focused on the acute setting little attention has been given to all pre-registration nurses' experience across the clinical placements arenas. To examine of pre-registration nursing students (first, second and third year) assessment of their actual experiences of their most recent clinical learning clinical learning experience. A cross sectional survey involving a descriptive online anonymous questionnaire based on the clinical learning environment inventory tool. One higher education institution in the United Kingdom. Nursing students (n=147) enrolled in an undergraduate nursing degree. This questionnaire included demographic questions and the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory (CLEI) a 42 item tool measuring student's satisfaction with clinical placement. SPPS version 22 was employed to analyse data with descriptive and inferential statistics. Overall students were satisfied with their clinical learning experience across all placement areas. This was linked to the 6 constructs of the clinical learning environment inventory; personalization, innovation, individualization, task orientation, involvement, satisfaction. Significant differences in student experience were noted between age groups and student year but there was no difference noted between placement type, age and gender. Nursing students had a positive perception of their clinical learning experience, although there remains room for improvement. Enabling a greater understanding of students' perspective on the quality of clinical education is important for nursing education and future research. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. [Field study of nursing care quality. Interaction and asepsis in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brataas, H V

    1996-01-01

    Competence as communication skills and as skilled practice of asepsis were studied by observing four nurses while interacting with patients and performing intravenous procedures. Nurses were observed using sterile equipment for methods of intravenous therapy. Asepsis is performed frequently, but through misunderstanding in the learning of asepsis or improper model learning the nurses may establish incorrect routines. When performing procedures, unexpected factors can distract both the expert and the inexperienced, resulting in a failure to apply basic aseptic techniques. The nurses showed an interest in the patient by listening and giving responses. Nurses may control interactions with the patient by using undesirable communication skills which include incomplete sentences, incomplete explanations and closed questions. Asked to evaluate their own behavior, the nurses did not estimate whether or not the appropriate skills were applied in observed situations. To improve the quality of nursing care performance it is recommended to further develop and apply skill training programs.

  12. Spirituality in nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Melanie; Wattis, John

    2015-05-27

    Spirituality is an important aspect of holistic care that is frequently overlooked. This is because of difficulties in conceptualising spirituality and confusion about how it should be integrated into nursing care. This article explores what is meant by spirituality and spiritually competent practice. It examines attitudes to spirituality, describes factors that might affect the integration of spirituality into nursing care and offers practical guidance to equip nurses to incorporate spirituality into their practice.

  13. Best nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    As part of this year's centenary celebrations, the RCN is showcasing the best nursing practice, focusing on that which often goes unobserved. Nurses, healthcare assistants and nursing students are asked to share ideas and innovations for improving practice and patient care. These will contribute to the development of a library of good practice and the RCN will invest in a small number of the successful projects. The closing date is 31 December.

  14. [Nursing care for patients undergoing pharmacological stress echocardiography: implications for clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Goes, Marta Georgina Oliveira; Lautert, Liana; Lucena, Amália Fátima

    2012-06-01

    The study aim was both to identify signs and symptoms previous to and during the pharmacological stress echocardiography test and to describe the nurse's role and nursing care principles for this exam. This is a descriptive study, carried out in cardiac care unit in a University Hospital in Porto Alegre, RS. Two hundred forty-six records of patients submitted to stress echocardiography were retrospectively reviewed, according to four different pharmacological schedules. The statistical comparison showed that signs and symptoms were related to the type of drug used during the exam, namely: typical angina, precordial ache, tiredness, headache and premature complexes. These results enabled a better understanding of pharmacological stress echocardiography and the instrumentalization of nurses in order to plan individualized and qualified nursing care assistance. Aside from helping develop nursing practices for the pharmacological stress echocardiography test this knowledge could also be used by nurses who carry out their activities in institutions that use this diagnostic method.

  15. Disconnects in pedagogy and practice in community health nursing clinical experiences: Qualitative findings of a mixed method study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijl-Zieber, Em M; Barton, Sylvia; Awosoga, Olu; Konkin, Jill

    2015-10-01

    Many baccalaureate schools of nursing are using non-traditional placements for undergraduate community health clinical rotations. These placements occur at agencies not organizationally affiliated with the health care system and they typically do not employ registered nurses (RNs). In this paper, we describe the qualitative findings of a mixed method study that explored these gaps as they relate to pre-registration nursing students' preparation for community health roles. While non-traditional community health placements offer unique opportunities for learning through carefully crafted service learning pedagogy, these placements also present challenges for student preparation for practice in community health roles. The theory-practice gap and the gap between the expected and actual performance of new graduates are accentuated through the use of non-traditional community clinical experiences. These gaps are not necessarily due to poor pedagogy, but rather due to the perceptions and values of the stakeholders involved: nursing students, community health nursing faculty, and community health nurses. New ways must be developed between academe and community health practice areas to provide students with opportunities to develop competence for practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Perceived stress and coping strategies among Jordanian nursing students during clinical practice in psychiatric/mental health courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zayyat, Abdulkarim Subhi; Al-Gamal, Ekhlas

    2014-08-01

    Clinical practice in the psychiatric/mental health nursing (PMHN) field is considered a highly-stressful experience for nursing students. The purpose of the present study was to identify the degrees of stress, the types of stressors, and coping strategies perceived by undergraduate nursing students during their clinical practice in PMHN courses. A descriptive, longitudinal design was used. Sixty-five students registered in PMHN clinical courses were recruited from five Jordanian universities using a systematic random-sampling method. Data collection was conducted in the second semester of the 2012-2013 academic year at two points of time: pre-PMHN clinical training and post-PMHN training. The Basic Information Questionnaire, Perceived Stress Scale, and Coping Behavior Inventory were administered. Students' ages ranged from 20 to 25 years. The findings illustrate that the highest reported types of stressors at both data-collection times were taking care of patients, stress related to teachers and nursing staff, and from assignments and workloads. The most utilized coping strategy at both data-collection times was problem solving. The findings of the present study are useful for clinical educators in identifying nursing students' stressors, easing their learning in the clinical setting, and establishing an efficient PMHN course programme.

  17. Expanding the use of empiricism in nursing: can we bridge the gap between knowledge and clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Karen K

    2003-04-01

    The philosophy of Aristotle and its impact on the process of empirical scientific inquiry has been substantial. The influence of the clarity and orderliness of his thinking, when applied to the acquisition of knowledge in nursing, can not be overstated. Traditional empirical approaches have and will continue to have an important influence on the development of nursing knowledge through nursing research. However, as nursing is primarily a practice discipline, the transition from empirical and syllogistic reasoning is problematic. Other types of inquiry are essential in the application of nursing knowledge obtained by empirical scientific approaches and to understand how that knowledge can best be used in the care of patients. This paper reviews the strengths and limitations of syllogistic reasoning by applying it to a recently published study on temperature measurement in nursing. It then discusses possible ways that the empirical knowledge gained from that study and confirmed in its reasoning by logical analysis could be used in the daily care of critically ill patients. It concludes by highlighting the utility of broader approaches to knowledge development, including interpretative approaches and contemporary empiricism, as a way to bridge the gap between factual empirical knowledge and the practical application of that knowledge in everyday clinical nursing practice.

  18. [Approaches, knowledge and capabilities of nurses and physicians regarding evidence-based clinical practice in the Imbadura province (Ecuador)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina Mula, Jesús; Muñoz Navarro, Paulina; Vaca Auz, Janeth; Cabascango Cabascango, Carmita; Cabascango Cabascango, Katty

    2015-01-01

    The research raises the need to increase understanding of organizational and personal factors that influence the attitude and aptitude of each professional, with respect to evidence-based clinical practice. The aim of this study is to describe the transfer of knowledge into clinical practice in hospital units in Imbabura (Ecuador) identifying the obstacles to implementing evidence-based clinical practice validated questionnaire EBPQ-19. A cross-sectional observational study was conducted in hospitals of the Ministry of Public Health of Imbabura of Ecuador took place, including a total of 281 nurses and physicians. Nurses and physicians showed positive attitudes toward evidence-based clinical practice (EBCP) and their use to support clinical decision-making. This research evidences perceptions of professionals on strategies for knowledge transfer and obstacles to carry it out. Significant differences between the perception of the use of EBCP strategies between nurses and physicians are observed. Physicians consider they use them frequently, while nurses acknowledge using them less (chi-square: 105.254, P=.018). In conclusion, we can say that these factors should be considered as necessary to improve the quality of care that is provided to users based on the best available evidence. It is necessary to start developing change interventions in this regard to remedy the current situation of clinical practice based not on evidence, but rather on experience only. Experimental studies demonstrating the effectiveness of strategies to eliminate barriers to scientific evidence-based clinical practice should be conducted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Resilience moderates the relationship between emotional intelligence and clinical communication ability among Chinese practice nursing students: A structural equation model analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Linghua; Liu, Yun; Li, Guopeng; Fang, Yueyan; Kang, Xiaofei; Li, Ping

    2016-11-01

    To examine the positive association between emotional intelligence and clinical communication ability among practice nursing students, and to determine whether resilience plays a moderating role in the relationship between emotional intelligence and clinical communication ability among Chinese practice nursing students. Three hundred and seventy-seven practice nursing students from three hospitals participated in this study. They completed questionnaires including the Emotional Intelligence Inventory (EII), Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC-10), and Clinical Communication Ability Scale (CCAS). Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the relationships among emotional intelligence, resilience, and clinical communication ability. Emotional intelligence was positively associated with clinical communication ability (Pintelligence and clinical communication ability (Pintelligence is positively related to clinical communication ability among Chinese practice nursing students, and resilience moderates the relationship between emotional intelligence and clinical communication ability, which may provide scientific evidence to aid in developing intervention strategies to improve clinical communication ability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Improving the process of community-based student nurse practice through a high-fidelity simulated clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotwals, Beth; Yeager, Shelley T

    2014-01-01

    Simulation can be used to facilitate knowledge and practice with clients/families in the community. Because student nurses appreciate the opportunity to practice skills in a nonthreatening environment, and faculty welcome the opportunity to observe all students providing a home visit to a similar type of client, the authors developed such a simulation. In this article, they outline the process taken to develop and evaluate a high-fidelity community simulated clinical experience.

  1. Smartphones in Clinical Nursing Practice: A Multiphased Approach to Implementation and Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brad; Davison, C. J.; Moralejo, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Students in the undergraduate nursing program at the University of Calgary-Qatar are required to work with patients in clinical settings under faculty supervision. One of the main goals of clinical courses is to provide students with the opportunity to learn in context and "just-in-time," a much more realistic and memorable learning…

  2. Spirituality in nursing practice

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, Melanie; Wattis, John

    2015-01-01

    Spirituality is an important aspect of holistic care which is frequently overlooked owing to difficulty conceptualising spirituality and confusion about how to integrate it into nursing care.\\ud This article seeks to understand what is meant by spirituality and spiritually competent practice, it explores some of the attitudes towards spirituality and describes some of issues affecting integration of spirituality into nursing care.

  3. Globalisation as we enter the 21st century: reflections and directions for nursing education, science, research and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Patricia M; Meleis, Afaf; Daly, John; Douglas, Marilyn Marty

    2003-10-01

    The events of September 11th, 2001 in the United States and the Bali bombings of October 2002 are chastening examples of the entangled web of the religious, political, health, cultural and economic forces we experience living in a global community. To view these forces as independent, singular, linearly deterministic entities of globalisation is irrational and illogical. Understanding the concept of globalisation has significant implications not only for world health and international politics, but also the health of individuals. Depending on an individual's political stance and world-view, globalisation may be perceived as an emancipatory force, having the potential to bridge the chasm between rich and poor or, in stark contrast, the very essence of the divide. It is important that nurses appreciate that globalisation does not pertain solely to the realms of economic theory and world politics, but also that it impacts on our daily nursing practice and the welfare of our patients. Globalisation and the closer interactions of human activity that result, have implications for international governance, policy and theory development as well as nursing education, research and clinical practice. Nurses, individually and collectively, have the political power and social consciousness to influence the forces of globalisation to improve health for all. This paper defines and discusses globalisation in today's world and its implications for contemporary nursing education, science, research and clinical practice.

  4. Nursing agency: the link between practical nursing science and nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfield, Barbara E

    2011-01-01

    The relationship of nursing science and nursing practice has been the topic of numerous discussions over the past decades. According to Orem, nursing science is a practical science, meaning that knowledge is developed for the sake of nursing practice. Within Orem's self-care deficit nursing theory, the concept of nursing agency links nursing science and nursing practice. Nursing agency refers to the power or ability of the nurse to design and produce systems of care. The relationship of practical nursing science, nursing practice, and nursing agency is examined in this article. Suggestions for further work related to nursing agency are provided.

  5. Nursing students' experiences of and satisfaction with the clinical learning environment: the role of educational models in the simulation laboratory and in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremonini, Valeria; Ferri, Paola; Artioli, Giovanna; Sarli, Leopoldo; Piccioni, Enrico; Rubbi, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Student satisfaction is an important element of the effectiveness of clinical placement, but there is little consensus in the literature as to the preferred model of clinical experience for undergraduate nursing students. The aim of this study was assess, for each academic year, students' perception of the roles of nurse teachers (NT) and clinical nurse supervisors (CNS) who perform tutoring in both apprenticeship and laboratories and to identify and evaluate students' satisfaction with the environment of clinical learning. This analytic cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of 173 nursing students in the Northern Italy. The research instrument used is the Clinical learning environment, supervision and nurse teacher (CLES+T) evaluation scale. Data were statistically analysed. 94% of our sample answered questionnaires. Students expressed a higher level of satisfaction with their training experiences. The highest mean value was in the sub-dimension "Pedagogical atmosphere on the ward". Third year students expressed higher satisfaction levels in their relationship with the CNS and lower satisfaction levels in their relationship with the NT. This result may be due to the educational model that is adopted in the course, in which the simulation laboratory didactic activities of the third year are conducted by CNS, who also supervises experiences of clinical learning in the clinical practice. The main finding in this study was that the students' satisfaction with the supervisory relationship and the role of NT depend on how supervision in the clinical practice and in the simulation laboratory is organized.

  6. A review of the organization, regulation, and financing practices of postgraduate education in clinical nursing in 12 European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautiainen, Elina; Vallimies-Patomäki, Marjukka

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to generate information of postgraduate education in clinical nursing in the EU member states. Data were collected via a structured electronic questionnaire and the questionnaire was sent to the government chief nurses in 26 EU countries in May 2013. Response rate was 46% (n=12). In total, 42 domains of specialization were identified. The most common domains were intensive care, mental health, operating room, emergency care, and pediatrics. Specialization programs were organized by university in two of the respondent countries, as residency program in one country, and as a mix of them in four countries. Regulation practices varied remarkably between the countries: scope of practice, subjects, entry requirements, length of education, description of the minimum competence requirements, and education standards related to the specialization programs were most often regulated by act, decree or other regulation. In some of the countries, no registration was required beyond the initial registration, whereas in some others, registration practices varied depending on the specialization program. New information was gathered on the regulation practices of postgraduate education in clinical nursing in the European Region concerning title provision, entry requirements, and financing practices. The awarded title on specialization programs depended on the level of postgraduate education, and the title might vary between the domains. General clinical experience was included in the entry requirements in seven countries. The government was mainly responsible for financing the postgraduate education in four countries, employer in three countries, and in the rest of the countries, there was a combination of different financiers. The importance of knowledge exchange on postgraduate education across the European countries needs to be acknowledged. Information provided by this study on international regulation practices provides useful information for the policy

  7. Bullying in undergraduate clinical nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Colette M; Kane, Deborah J; Rajacich, Dale L; Lafreniere, Kathryn D

    2012-05-01

    Although a limited number of studies have focused on bullying in nursing education to date, all of those studies demonstrate the existence of bullying in clinical settings, where nursing students undertake a significant amount of their nursing education. The purpose of this study was to examine the state of bullying in clinical nursing education among Canadian undergraduate nursing students (N = 674) in all 4 years of their nursing program. Results suggest that nursing students experience and witness bullying behaviors at various frequencies, most notably by clinical instructors and staff nurses. Third-year and fourth-year students experience more bullying behaviors than first-year and second-year students. Implications for practice include ensuring that clinical instructors are well prepared for their role as educators. Policies must be developed that address the issue of bullying within nursing programs and within health care facilities where nursing students undertake their clinical nursing education.

  8. Traffic control: nursing practice calendar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rus, Linda; Cheesebro, Kathy; Nagra, Erica; Neff, Alaina

    2013-01-01

    Educating nurses on the multitude of new and updated best practices, changes in regulatory standards, new equipment, and enhanced technology creates an "information traffic jam." Multiple practice changes occurring simultaneously pose challenges for nurses to retain information to practice safely and effectively. An absence of coordination between various nursing and allied health teaching initiatives compounds this problem. A nursing practice calendar was developed to facilitate the prioritization, communication, and education of hospital-wide initiatives affecting nursing practice.

  9. Enhancing critical thinking in clinical practice: implications for critical and acute care nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoulders, Bridget; Follett, Corrinne; Eason, Joyce

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of patients in the critical and acute care settings requires that nurses be skilled in early recognition and management of rapid changes in patient condition. The interpretation and response to these events can greatly impact patient outcomes. Nurses caring for these complex patients are expected to use astute critical thinking in their decision making. The purposes of this article were to explore the concept of critical thinking and provide practical strategies to enhance critical thinking in the critical and acute care environment.

  10. Simply the best: teaching gerontological nursing students to teach evidence-based practice. Creating tip sheets can help achieve the goal of implementing EBP in clinical facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfelder, Deborah Perry

    2007-08-01

    This article describes a teaching strategy used in an undergraduate gerontological nursing clinical course to familiarize students with evidence-based practice. Students are required to read and summarize an assigned evidence-based practice guideline published by The University of Iowa Gerontological Nursing Interventions Research Center. They then develop a "tip sheet," based on the assigned guideline, to disseminate to health care staff at their practicum sites, which is either a long-term care facility or a hospital-based skilled nursing facility. Nursing students' reactions to the assignment and nursing staff's responses to the tip sheets are discussed.

  11. Exploration of the affordances of mobile devices in integrating theory and clinical practice in an undergraduate nursing programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana J. Willemse

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Promoting the quality and effectiveness of nursing education is an important factor, given the increased demand for nursing professionals. It is important to establish learning environments that provide personalised guidance and feedback to students about their practical skills and application of their theoretical knowledge.Objective: To explore and describe the knowledge and points of view of students and educators about introduction of new technologies into an undergraduate nursing programme.Method: The qualitative design used Tesch’s (1990 steps of descriptive data analysis to complete thematic analysis of the data collected in focus group discussions (FGDs andindividual interviews to identify themes.Results: Themes identified from the students’ FGDs and individual interviews included:mobile devices as a communication tool; email, WhatsApp and Facebook as methods of communication; WhatsApp as a method of communication; nurses as role-models in the clinical setting; setting personal boundaries; and impact of mobile devices in clinical practiceon professionalism. Themes identified from the FGD, individual interviews and a discussion session held with educators included: peer learning via mobile devices; email, WhatsApp and Facebook as methods of communication; the mobile device as a positive learning method; students need practical guidance; and ethical concerns in clinical facilities about Internet access and use of mobile devices.Conclusion: The research project established an understanding of the knowledge and points of view of students and educators regarding introduction of new technologies into an undergraduate nursing programme with the aim of enhancing integration of theory and clinical practice through use of mobile devices.

  12. Remote nursing certified practice: viewing nursing and nurse practitioner practice through a social justice lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarlier, Denise S; Browne, Annette J

    2011-06-01

    Remote Nursing Certified Practice (RNCP) was introduced in 2010 to regulate nursing practice in remote, largely First Nations communities in British Columbia, Canada. These are communities that often experience profound health and health-care inequities. Typically nurses are the main health-care providers. Using a critical social justice lens, the authors explore the clinical and ethical implications of RNCP in terms of access to equitable, high-quality primary health care.They examine the fit between the level and scope of health services provided by registered nurses working under RNCP and the health needs of remote First Nations communities. In doing so, they draw comparisons between nurse practitioners (NPs) and outpost nurses working in NP roles who historically were employed to provide health care in these communities.The authors conclude by calling for nursing regulations that support equitable, high-quality primary care for all British Columbians.

  13. Rethinking theory and practice: pre-registration student nurses experiences of simulation teaching and learning in the acquisition of clinical skills in preparation for practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Angela; Garside, Joanne; Prescott, Stephen

    2011-10-01

    In the United Kingdom (UK) simulation learning has been recognised in the form of a regulatory agreement that may replace hours from clinical practice. This integration has become an embedded feature of the pre-registration nursing programme at a University in the North of England, along with strategic investment in staff and simulation suites developed to underpin this curriculum change albeit in the absence of sparse empirical evidence, hence the rationale for the study which was designed to explore the relationship between simulation, theory and practice. The study features a thematic analysis of evaluation questionnaires from pre-registration student nurses (n=>500) collected over a 2 year period which informed subsequent focus group interviews to explore the themes in more detail. Consistent data findings were the students' positive response to simulation as a learning approach facilitating the application of theory in a safe controlled environment. Students reported that they felt prepared for practice, recognising that simulated learning improved their humanistic and problem solving abilities as well as the development of psychomotor, technical skills, and overall confidence. The theory-practice gap is a recurring narrative in the nursing literature, the findings of this study recognises that simulation offers an opportunity to enact the integration of theory and practice illuminating this relationship in a controlled environment thus, reinforcing the theory-practice relationship for nursing students.

  14. [Recontextualization of nursing clinical simulation based on Basil Bernstein: semiology of pedagogical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Mateus Casanova; Leite, Maria Cecília Lorea; Heck, Rita Maria

    2010-12-01

    This is an investigative case study with descriptive and participative character, based on an educational experience with the Simulation in Nursing learning trigger. It was carried out during the second semester of the first cycle of Faculdade de Enfermagem (FEN), Universidade Federal de Pelotas (UFPel). The aim is to study the recontextualization of pedagogic practice of simulation-based theories developed by Basil Bernstein, an education sociologist, and to contribute with the improvement process of education planning, and especially the evaluation of learning trigger. The research shows that Bernstein's theory is a powerful tool semiotic pedagogical of practices which contributes to the planning and analysis of curricular educational device.

  15. Stress, sense of coherence and quality of life among Norwegian nurse students after a period of clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedicte Kleiveland

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Previous research has found that sense of coherence is significantly related to aspects of health, but studies on nurse students with a salutogenic approach are limited.Objectives. To investigate (1 if nurse students’ experience of stress differs among clinical practice in nursing homes and medical/surgical wards. (2 Whether sense of coherence and stress are associated with quality of life. (3 If sense of coherence acts as a moderator in the relationship between stress and quality of life.Participants. Data were collected from 227 nurse students between January and April 2014.Methods. Questionnaires measuring stress, sense of coherence and quality of life were completed after a period of clinical practice. Linear regression analyses were used to measure associations between stress, and sense of coherence respectively, and quality of life.Results. The results showed that 33.92% of the students experienced moderate or high levels of stress, and there was significantly more stress in hospital wards compared to nursing homes (p = 0.027. Sense of coherence was positively associated with quality of life in the simple and multiple regression analyses (p < 0.01. Stress was negatively associated with quality of life in the simple regression analysis (p < 0.01, but not in the multiple analyses when sense of coherence was included. However, when we included an interaction term, stress was no longer associated with quality of life and sense of coherence appeared to be a significant moderator in the relationship between stress and quality of life (p = 0.015. Thus, a negative association was seen among students with the lowest levels of sense of coherence.Conclusion. These findings suggest that sense of coherence could be seen as a resource that nurse educators can build upon when supporting students in coping with stress.

  16. Stress, sense of coherence and quality of life among Norwegian nurse students after a period of clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiveland, Benedicte; Natvig, Gerd Karin; Jepsen, Randi

    2015-01-01

    Background. Previous research has found that sense of coherence is significantly related to aspects of health, but studies on nurse students with a salutogenic approach are limited. Objectives. To investigate (1) if nurse students' experience of stress differs among clinical practice in nursing homes and medical/surgical wards. (2) Whether sense of coherence and stress are associated with quality of life. (3) If sense of coherence acts as a moderator in the relationship between stress and quality of life. Participants. Data were collected from 227 nurse students between January and April 2014. Methods. Questionnaires measuring stress, sense of coherence and quality of life were completed after a period of clinical practice. Linear regression analyses were used to measure associations between stress, and sense of coherence respectively, and quality of life. Results. The results showed that 33.92% of the students experienced moderate or high levels of stress, and there was significantly more stress in hospital wards compared to nursing homes (p = 0.027). Sense of coherence was positively associated with quality of life in the simple and multiple regression analyses (p life in the simple regression analysis (p sense of coherence was included. However, when we included an interaction term, stress was no longer associated with quality of life and sense of coherence appeared to be a significant moderator in the relationship between stress and quality of life (p = 0.015). Thus, a negative association was seen among students with the lowest levels of sense of coherence. Conclusion. These findings suggest that sense of coherence could be seen as a resource that nurse educators can build upon when supporting students in coping with stress.

  17. Scope-of-practice laws for nurse practitioners limit cost savings that can be achieved in retail clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spetz, Joanne; Parente, Stephen T; Town, Robert J; Bazarko, Dawn

    2013-11-01

    Retail clinics have the potential to reduce health spending by offering convenient, low-cost access to basic health care services. Retail clinics are often staffed by nurse practitioners (NPs), whose services are regulated by state scope-of-practice regulations. By limiting NPs' work scope, restrictive regulations could affect possible cost savings. Using multistate insurance claims data from 2004-07, a period in which many retail clinics opened, we analyzed whether the cost per episode associated with the use of retail clinics was lower in states where NPs are allowed to practice independently and to prescribe independently. We also examined whether retail clinic use and scope of practice were associated with emergency department visits and hospitalizations. We found that visits to retail clinics were associated with lower costs per episode, compared to episodes of care that did not begin with a retail clinic visit, and the costs were even lower when NPs practiced independently. Eliminating restrictions on NPs' scope of practice could have a large impact on the cost savings that can be achieved by retail clinics.

  18. Positive practice environments influence job satisfaction of primary health care clinic nursing managers in two South African provinces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munyewende, Pascalia Ozida; Rispel, Laetitia Charmaine; Chirwa, Tobias

    2014-05-15

    and addressing workloads could improve the practice environment and job satisfaction of PHC clinic nursing managers.

  19. Curbing the urge to care : A Bourdieusian analysis of the effect of the caring disposition on nurse middle managers’ clinical leadership in patient safety practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalleman, P. C B; Smid, G. A C; Lagerwey, M. D.; Shortridge-Baggett, L. M.; Schuurmans, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Nurse managers play an important role in implementing patient safety practices in hospitals. However, the influence of their professional background on their clinical leadership behaviour remains unclear. Research has demonstrated that concepts of Bourdieu (dispositions of habitus,

  20. Teaching practice experiences of nursing students: a comparison ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Teaching practice experiences of nursing students: a comparison between direct entry ... insight to develop effective classroom and clinical teaching strategies in nursing. ... of nursing students, expectations and benefits for effective learning.

  1. The practical skills of newly qualified nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danbjørg, Dorthe Boe; Birkelund, Regner

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the findings from a study of newly qualified nurses and which subjects the nurses regarded as the most important in order to be able to live up to the requirements of clinical practice, and how they experience their potential for developing practical and moral skills, after...

  2. Usefulness of a personal digital assistant-based advanced practice nursing student clinical log: Faculty stakeholder exemplars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakken, Suzanne; Jenkins, Melinda; Choi, Jeeyae; Hyun, Sookyung; John, Ritamarie; Joyce, Myra; Lee, Nam-Ju; Roberts, Wm Dan; Soupios, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The number of health sciences educational programs that are integrating personal digital assistants (PDAs) into their curricula is on the rise. In this paper, we report an evaluation of the usefulness of a PDA-based advanced practice nursing (APN) student clinical log through faculty stakeholder exemplars in three areas: pediatric asthma care; procedures of Acute Care Nurse Practitioner (NP) students; and diagnostic and screening procedures of Women's Health NP students. We generated descriptive data through routine queries and through custom SQL queries at the request of a specific faculty member who wished to examine a particular aspect of an educational program. In addition, we discussed the potential implications of the data with the respective faculty members. The exemplars provide evidence that faculty stakeholders found the APN student clinical log to be useful for a variety of purposes including monitoring of student performance, benchmarking, and quality of care assessments.

  3. The study of perceived stress, coping strategy and self-efficacy of Chinese undergraduate nursing students in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fang-Fang; Lei, Xiao-Ling; He, Wei; Gu, Yan-Hong; Li, Dong-Wen

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the coping strategy and the effects of self-efficacy of Chinese undergraduate nursing students when they face the stress in clinical practice. Convenience sampling was used to recruit undergraduate nursing students in Mainland China who have practiced 3 months in hospitals in their final college year. Self-report questionnaires including demographics, Perceived Stress Scale, coping behaviour inventory and Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale were collected. The results showed that during clinical practice, assignments and workload were the most common stress to students; transference was the most frequently used coping strategy by students. Self-efficacy not only had a positive main effect in predicting the frequency of use of staying optimistic and problem solving strategies but also moderated the effects of stress from taking care of patients on transference strategy, as well as stress from assignments and workload on problem solving strategy. It is essential to bolster the students' self-efficacy to reduce stress and adopt positively the coping strategies during clinical practice.

  4. Design, Development, and Psychometric Analysis of a General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry Topic Inventory Based on the Identified Main Chemistry Topics Relevant to Nursing Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Corina E.

    2013-01-01

    This two-stage study focused on the undergraduate nursing course that covers topics in general, organic, and biological (GOB) chemistry. In the first stage, the central objective was to identify the main concepts of GOB chemistry relevant to the clinical practice of nursing. The collection of data was based on open-ended interviews of both nursing…

  5. Compassion in nursing. 2: Factors that influence compassionate care in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Neil; Williams, Katherine

    This second in a two-part unit on compassion examines the factors that influence the use of this quality in daily clinical practice. Part 1 examined the concept of compassion and how to identify and measure it.

  6. In the Palm of Your Hand - Normalizing the Use of Mobile Technology for Nurse Practitioner Education and Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, Kimberley; Park, Caroline; Fraser, Shawn; Rich, Mariann; MacKenzie, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The use of mobile devices by nurse practitioners (NPs) to meet an evolving technological landscape is expanding rapidly. A longitudinal study of the ways NP students "normalize" the use of mobile devices in clinical education was completed. This study used researcher-designed survey tools, including sociodemographic questions, and the numerical picture was augmented and interpreted in light of the textual data in the form of selected interviews. Data indicate that mobile technology is normalized in the social realm but still developing in the clinical realm. Progress is hindered by non-modelling by faculty, inconsistent healthcare policy and lack of understanding of the affordances available through this technology. Overall, mobile technology is utilized and normalized in practice; this in turn has influenced their ability to prepare students for practice. Data presented can assist educators and clinicians alike in developing a more fulsome understanding on how to appropriately incorporate mobile technology into education and practice.

  7. Developing practice protocols for advanced practice nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, S

    1999-08-01

    In most states, the role of an advanced practice nurse is dependent on practice protocols that provide an organized method for analyzing and managing a disease or major symptom. They are also used to control the process of medical care and to specify steps in the delivery of that care. Creating appropriate practice protocols is one of the most important precursors to implementing the advanced practice role, because they virtually drive the clinician's ability to treat or manage clinical situations or disease states. This article outlines the steps involved in developing practice protocols and discusses the content that should be included in a protocol, providing an example of narrative and algorithm format protocols. Pros and cons, as well as legal issues related to practice protocols, are also presented.

  8. Improvement of learning domains of nursing students with the use of authentic assessment pedagogy in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Edmund Jun Meng; Lim, Jessica Shih Wei; Liu, Yuchan; Lau, Yvonne Yen Lin; Wu, Vivien Xi

    2016-09-01

    With evolving healthcare demands, nursing educators need to constantly review their teaching methodologies in order to enhance learners' knowledge and competency of skills in the clinical settings. Learning is an active process in which meaning is accomplished on the basis of experience and that authentic assessment pedagogy will enable nursing students to play an active part in their learning. The study was conducted with an aim to examine nursing students' learning domains through the introduction of the authentic assessment pedagogy during their clinical practice. A quasi-experimental study (n = 54) was conducted over a period of 10 weeks at a local tertiary hospital. The experimental group was exposed to the authentic assessment pedagogy and were taught to use the assessment rubrics as an instrument to help enhance their learning. Students were assessed and scored according to the assessment rubrics, which were categorized into four domains; cognitive, psychomotor, affective and critical thinking abilities. The findings indicated that an overall score for the four domains between the experimental and control groups were significant, with p value of pedagogy in the clinical setting.

  9. Identification of Hypertension Management-related Errors in a Personal Digital Assistant-based Clinical Log for Nurses in Advanced Practice Nurse Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nam-Ju; Cho, Eunhee; Bakken, Suzanne

    2010-03-01

    The purposes of this study were to develop a taxonomy for detection of errors related to hypertension management and to apply the taxonomy to retrospectively analyze the documentation of nurses in Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) training. We developed the Hypertension Diagnosis and Management Error Taxonomy and applied it in a sample of adult patient encounters (N = 15,862) that were documented in a personal digital assistant-based clinical log by registered nurses in APN training. We used Standard Query Language queries to retrieve hypertension-related data from the central database. The data were summarized using descriptive statistics. Blood pressure was documented in 77.5% (n = 12,297) of encounters; 21% had high blood pressure values. Missed diagnosis, incomplete diagnosis and misdiagnosis rates were 63.7%, 6.8% and 7.5% respectively. In terms of treatment, the omission rates were 17.9% for essential medications and 69.9% for essential patient teaching. Contraindicated anti-hypertensive medications were documented in 12% of encounters with co-occurring diagnoses of hypertension and asthma. The Hypertension Diagnosis and Management Error Taxonomy was useful for identifying errors based on documentation in a clinical log. The results provide an initial understanding of the nature of errors associated with hypertension diagnosis and management of nurses in APN training. The information gained from this study can contribute to educational interventions that promote APN competencies in identification and management of hypertension as well as overall patient safety and informatics competencies. Copyright © 2010 Korean Society of Nursing Science. Published by . All rights reserved.

  10. The documentation practice of perioperative nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Susanne Friis; Lorentzen, Vibeke; Sørensen, Erik Elgaard;

    2016-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVE: The aim of this review was to explore and present the existing knowledge of the documentation practices of perioperative nurses in the operating room. BACKGROUND: Studies demonstrate that the documentation of nursing care provided is important for the continuity of patient care...... as well as patient safety. Nurses find that documenting their perioperative services is important to the surgical pathway; however, a number of studies indicate that the documentation practices of perioperative nurses are characterised by subjectivity, randomness and poor quality. DESIGN: A literature....... RESULTS: Three general themes were found to be important for perioperative nurses' documentation practices. 1) The documentation tool must be adapted to the clinical practice. 2) Nurses document to improve patient safety and protect themselves legally. 3) Traditions and conditions for documentation...

  11. Development and analysis of an instrument to assess student understanding of GOB chemistry knowledge relevant to clinical nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Corina E; Hyslop, Richard M; Barbera, Jack

    2015-01-01

    The General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry Knowledge Assessment (GOB-CKA) is a multiple-choice instrument designed to assess students' understanding of the chemistry topics deemed important to clinical nursing practice. This manuscript describes the development process of the individual items along with a psychometric evaluation of the final version of the items and instrument. In developing items for the GOB-CKA, essential topics were identified through a series of expert interviews (with practicing nurses, nurse educators, and GOB chemistry instructors) and confirmed through a national survey. Individual items were tested in qualitative studies with students from the target population for clarity and wording. Data from pilot and beta studies were used to evaluate each item and narrow the total item count to 45. A psychometric analysis performed on data from the 45-item final version was used to provide evidence of validity and reliability. The final version of the instrument has a Cronbach's alpha value of 0.76. Feedback from an expert panel provided evidence of face and content validity. Convergent validity was estimated by comparing the results from the GOB-CKA with the General-Organic-Biochemistry Exam (Form 2007) of the American Chemical Society. Instructors who wish to use the GOB-CKA for teaching and research may contact the corresponding author for a copy of the instrument.

  12. Interprofessional education in the clinical setting: A qualitative look at the preceptor's perspective in training advanced practice nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Angel K; Rivera, Josette; Rotter, Nicole; Green, Emily; Kools, Susan

    2016-11-01

    With the shift towards interprofessional education to promote collaborative practice, clinical preceptors are increasingly working with trainees from various professions to provide patient care. It is unclear whether and how preceptors modify their existing precepting approach when working with trainees from other professions. There is little information on strategies for this type of precepting, and how preceptors may foster or impede interprofessional collaboration. The purpose of this qualitative description pilot study was to identify current methods preceptors use to teach trainees from other professions in the clinical setting, particularly advanced practice nursing and medical trainees, and to identify factors that support or impede this type of precepting. Data collected through observations and interviews were analyzed by the research team using thematic analysis procedures. Three major themes were identified: 1) a variety of teaching approaches and levels of engagement with trainees of different professions, 2) preceptor knowledge gaps related to curricula, goals, and scope of practice of trainees from other professions, and 3) administrative, structural and logistical elements that impact the success of precepting trainees from different professions in the clinical setting. This study has implications for faculty development and evaluation of current precepting practices in clinical settings.

  13. [Nurses' knowledge about Nursing Care Systematization: from theory to practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Elisama Gomes Correia; de Oliveira, Viviane Carla; Neves, Giselda Bezerra Correia; Guimarães, Tânia Maria Rocha

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the knowledge that nurses from a large hospital in Recife, Pernambuco, have about Nursing Care Systematization (NCS). This is a descriptive, exploratory, quantitative study. The study population consisted of 107 clinical nurses, with a sample of 73 (68%). Data collection was performed in June 2008, using a semi-structured questionnaire that was filled out by the subjects. We found that 50 (69%) nurses had no knowledge about NCS, especially about nursing diagnoses. We identified the absence of forms in most hospitalization units. The nurses gave several justifications for their not working with NCS, including work overload and the scarcity of forms. We concluded that there is a need for more incentives by the institution and through policies, so as to permit nurses a greater autonomy in their practice.

  14. Clinical Nursing Records Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    for Sam Houston, Texas MAJ Joanne Burton , AN, Clinical Head Nurse, Psychiatry MAJ Shelby Christian, AN, Clinical Head Nurse, OB/GYN MAJ Melissa Opio...Specify Level) Parenting, Potential Alteration In Decubitus Ulcer Self-Care Deficit, Total (Specify Level) Social Isolation Fluid Volume Deficit. Potential...METABOLIC PATTERN Self-Care Dieficit. Total (Specify Level) SiX alizaticni Alterations ifl Decubitus ulcer S-If-Batingrla.v~qene Oeticit 601?Cif Levet

  15. Is compassion essential to nursing practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hem, Marit Helene; Heggen, Kristin

    2004-01-01

    The Norwegian Nurses' Association recently (2001) approved a new code of ethics that included compassion as one of the basic values in nursing care. This paper examines the idea of compassion in the context of the Bible story of the Good Samaritan using an analysis of qualitative data from nurses' clinical work with psychiatric patients. The aim is to show how the idea of compassion challenges nursing practice. Thereafter, the paper discusses the benefits of and premises for compassion in care work. The results show that nurses tend not to be guided by compassion in their work with patients. The organisation of the day-to-day work in the hospital ward, the division of labour between nurses and doctors, and the nurses' approach to nursing were identified as influencing this tendency. The study shows that compassion is a radical concept with a potential to promote greater respect for patients' dignity.

  16. Nurses' Perceptions and Practices Toward Clinical Alarms in a Transplant Cardiac Intensive Care Unit: Exploring Key Issues Leading to Alarm Fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowan, Azizeh Khaled; Tarriela, Albert Fajardo; Gomez, Tiffany Michelle; Reed, Charles Calhoun; Rapp, Kami Marie

    2015-03-16

    Intensive care units (ICUs) are complex work environments where false alarms occur more frequently than on non-critical care units. The Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goal .06.01.01 targeted improving the safety of clinical alarm systems and required health care facilities to establish alarm systems safety as a hospital priority by July 2014. An important initial step toward this requirement is identifying ICU nurses' perceptions and common clinical practices toward clinical alarms, where little information is available. Our aim was to determine perceptions and practices of transplant/cardiac ICU (TCICU) nurses toward clinical alarms and benchmark the results against the 2011 Healthcare Technology Foundation's (HTF) Clinical Alarms Committee Survey. A quality improvement project was conducted on a 20-bed TCICU with 39 full- and part-time nurses. Nurses were surveyed about their perceptions and attitudes toward and practices on clinical alarms using an adapted HTF clinical alarms survey. Results were compared to the 2011 HTF data. Correlations among variables were examined. All TCICU nurses provided usable responses (N=39, 100%). Almost all nurses (95%-98%) believed that false alarms are frequent, disrupt care, and reduce trust in alarm systems, causing nurses to inappropriately disable them. Unlike the 2011 HTF clinical alarms survey results, a significantly higher percentage of our TCICU nurses believed that existing devices are complex, questioned the ability and adequacy of the new monitoring systems to solve alarm management issues, pointed to the lack of prompt response to alarms, and indicated the lack of clinical policy on alarm management (Palarms and poor usability of the cardiac monitors. A lack of standardized approaches exists in changing patients' electrodes and individualizing parameters. Around 60% of nurses indicated they received insufficient training on bedside and central cardiac monitors. A correlation also showed the need for training

  17. Nurse residency programs and the transition to child health nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delack, Sandi; Martin, Jean; McCarthy, Ann Marie; Sperhac, Arlene M

    2015-06-01

    Nurse residency programs for newly licensed RNs are a critical component in bridging the clinical practice gap between education and practice. In May 2013, the Institute of Pediatric Nursing invited leaders from pediatric nursing organizations and children's hospitals to attend a forum on nurse residency programs for pediatric nurses. This article presents a summary of the discussions that occurred during the forum and makes recommendations for addressing issues related to nurse residency programs.

  18. Effects of video-feedback on the communication, clinical competence and motivational interviewing skills of practice nurses: a pre-test posttest control group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordman, Janneke; van der Weijden, Trudy; van Dulmen, Sandra

    2014-10-01

    To examine the effects of individual video-feedback on the generic communication skills, clinical competence (i.e. adherence to practice guidelines) and motivational interviewing skills of experienced practice nurses working in primary care. Continuing professional education may be necessary to refresh and reflect on the communication and motivational interviewing skills of experienced primary care practice nurses. A video-feedback method was designed to improve these skills. Pre-test/posttest control group design. Seventeen Dutch practice nurses and 325 patients participated between June 2010-June 2011. Nurse-patient consultations were videotaped at two moments (T0 and T1), with an interval of 3-6 months. The videotaped consultations were rated using two protocols: the Maastrichtse Anamnese en Advies Scorelijst met globale items (MAAS-global) and the Behaviour Change Counselling Index. Before the recordings, nurses were allocated to a control or video-feedback group. Nurses allocated to the video-feedback group received video-feedback between T0 and T1. Data were analysed using multilevel linear or logistic regression. Nurses who received video-feedback appeared to pay significantly more attention to patients' request for help, their physical examination and gave significantly more understandable information. With respect to motivational interviewing, nurses who received video-feedback appeared to pay more attention to 'agenda setting and permission seeking' during their consultations. Video-feedback is a potentially effective method to improve practice nurses' generic communication skills. Although a single video-feedback session does not seem sufficient to increase all motivational interviewing skills, significant improvement in some specific skills was found. Nurses' clinical competences were not altered after feedback due to already high standards. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. [Evidence-Based Knowledge Translation: From Scientific Evidence to Clinical Nursing Practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kee-Hsin; Kao, Ching-Chiu; Chen, Chiehfeng

    2016-12-01

    In 1992, Gordon Guyatt coined the term "evidence-based medicine", which has since attracted worldwide attention. In 2007, the Institute of Medicine's Roundtable on Evidence-Based Medicine set the goal that 90% of clinical decisions would be supported by accurate, timely, and up-to-date clinical information and would reflect the best available evidence by 2020. However, the chasm between knowing and doing remains palpable. In 2000, the Canadian Institute of Health Research applied the term "knowledge translation" to describe the bridge that is necessary to cross the gap between research knowledge and clinical practice. The present paper outlines the conceptual framework, barriers, and promotion strategies for evidence-based knowledge translation and shares clinical experience related to overcoming the seven layers of leakage (aware, accepted, applicable, able, acted on, agreed, and adhered to). We hope that this paper can enhance the public well-being and strengthen the future health care system.

  20. Curbing the urge to care: A Bourdieusian analysis of the effect of the caring disposition on nurse middle managers' clinical leadership in patient safety practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalleman, P C B; Smid, G A C; Lagerwey, M D; Shortridge-Baggett, L M; Schuurmans, M J

    2016-11-01

    Nurse managers play an important role in implementing patient safety practices in hospitals. However, the influence of their professional background on their clinical leadership behaviour remains unclear. Research has demonstrated that concepts of Bourdieu (dispositions of habitus, capital and field) help to describe this influence. It revealed various configurations of dispositions of the habitus in which a caring disposition plays a crucial role. We explore how the caring disposition of nurse middle managers' habitus influences their clinical leadership behaviour in patient safety practices. Our paper reports the findings of a Bourdieusian, multi-site, ethnographic case study. Two Dutch and two American acute care, mid-sized, non-profit hospitals. A total of 16 nurse middle managers of adult care units. Observations were made over 560h of shadowing nurse middle managers, semi-structured interviews and member check meetings with the participants. We observed three distinct configurations of dispositions of the habitus which influenced the clinical leadership of nurse middle managers in patient safety practices; they all include a caring disposition: (1) a configuration with a dominant caring disposition that was helpful (via solving urgent matters) and hindering (via ad hoc and reactive actions, leading to quick fixes and 'compensatory modes'); (2) a configuration with an interaction of caring and collegial dispositions that led to an absence of clinical involvement and discouraged patient safety practices; and (3) a configuration with a dominant scientific disposition showing an investigative, non-judging, analytic stance, a focus on evidence-based practice that curbs the ad hoc repertoire of the caring disposition. The dispositions of the nurse middle managers' habitus influenced their clinical leadership in patient safety practices. A dominance of the caring disposition, which meant 'always' answering calls for help and reactive and ad hoc reactions, did not

  1. Effects of video-feedback on the communication, clinical competence and motivational interviewing skills of practice nurses: a pre-test posttest control group study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordman, J.; Weijden, T. van der; Dulmen, S. van

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To examine the effects of individual video-feedback on the generic communication skills, clinical competence (i.e. adherence to practice guidelines) and motivational interviewing skills of experienced practice nurses working in primary care. Background: Continuing professional education may be

  2. Effects of video-feedback on the communication, clinical competence and motivational interviewing skills of practice nurses: a pre-test posttest control group study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordman, J.; Weijden, T.T. van der; Dulmen, S. van

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: To examine the effects of individual video-feedback on the generic communication skills, clinical competence (i.e. adherence to practice guidelines) and motivational interviewing skills of experienced practice nurses working in primary care. BACKGROUND: Continuing professional education may be

  3. Specialty practice entrepreneur: the advanced practice nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowal, N

    1998-01-01

    There are many opportunities in the health care arena to make a difference. The structured sense of change is "old school." New "surfers" of the system will be entrepreneurial in spirit, energy, and flexibility. There is no job description for the perfect person, only a sense of excitement and innovation that gives one the feeling energetic change is about to happen. In nursing, the risk takers are abundant in the APN role. It is the reason why they walk the line of provider/nurse. Making a difference to patients is important. Riding the waves of clinical care is the excitement. The final results are "the big waves" of life--a patient's life. A provider who defines the reality of practice creates a vision and skillfully bridges the road between the two. Design the surfboard--catch the wave.

  4. Perceived stress and physio-psycho-social status of nursing students during their initial period of clinical practice: the effect of coping behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Sheila; Lin, Huey Shyan; Hwang, Shiow Li

    2002-02-01

    Initial clinical practice is stressful. Nursing students entering clinical practice for the first time in a five-year associate degree program in Taiwan are young and have questionable coping skills, all of which can affect their own health. This study examined the following: (1) the degree of stress perceived and types of stressful events; (2) the physio-psycho-social status of nursing students during the practice; (3) the coping behaviors of these students; and (4) the effect of different coping behaviors on their physio-psycho-social health. The subjects were 561 nursing students who had completed their initial clinical practice at the largest nursing school in Taiwan. Three measurements, including Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Physio-Psycho-Social Response Scale (PPSRS), and Coping Behavior Inventory (CBI), were adopted. Results showed that stress for these students came mainly from the lack of professional knowledge and skills as well as caring of patients. The most common response to stress was social behavioral symptoms. Staying optimistic had a positive main effect, which reduced the occurrence of physio-psycho-social symptoms and improved physio-psycho-social status. Finally, problem-solving behavior also had a positive main effect, while avoidance had a negative main effect, which deteriorated physio-psycho-social status. This study has important implications for nursing educators in helping their students to overcome stress during clinical practice.

  5. Mentoring practices benefiting pediatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weese, Meghan M; Jakubik, Louise D; Eliades, Aris B; Huth, Jennifer J

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies examining predictors of pediatric nurse protégé mentoring benefits demonstrated that protégé perception of quality was the single best predictor of mentoring benefits. The ability to identify the mentoring practices that predict specific benefits for individual nurses provides a better understanding of how mentoring relationships can be leveraged within health care organizations promoting mutual mentoring benefits. This descriptive correlational, non-experimental study of nurses at a northeast Ohio, Magnet® recognized, free-standing pediatric hospital advances nursing science by demonstrating how mentoring practices benefit pediatric nurse protégés.

  6. [Implementation of the new clinical practice training model in Andalusia: a qualitative evaluation of the Nursing and Physiotherapy degrees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Sola, Cayetano; Granero-Molina, José; Márquez-Membrive, Josefa; Aguilera-Manrique, Gabriel; Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida M

    2014-01-01

    The design of new Bachelor degree courses, together with the agreement reached between the Regional Government of Andalusia and Andalusian universities shape the new clinical training model for Health Science students. The aim of this project is to present a qualitative evaluation of the implementation of the new model in Nursing and Physiotherapy degrees at the University of Almeria and the Andalusian Public Health System. An exploratory qualitative study using document content analysis techniques, by analyzing 12 reports from teachers and those responsible for Practicum in Nursing and Physiotherapy degrees at the University of Almeria. The reports included opinions and proposals from university and clinical placement teachers, healthcare professionals or clinical placement tutors, students, and those in positions of responsibility as regards clinical placements. Three categories emerged in the data analysis: Health system organization, with sub-categories of disparity between shifts, difficulties with supervisor coordination, feelings of a lack of control, disparities in evaluation criteria and geographic distribution; academic organization, with sub-categories of short rotations, a lack of information received by the clinical placement tutor, and carrying out placements without studying the theory; and management of the work agreement, with sub-categories of being discouraged by what is received in return, extra work for those in charge, and delays in evaluations. The study suggests a need to support and guide clinical tutors, to increase coordination between the university and health services, to organize the students' theoretical and practical training and to provide the management of the model with flexibility and transparency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. Obstetrical staff nurses experiences of clinical learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltri, Linda M

    2015-01-01

    The clinical learning experience is used in nursing programs of study worldwide to prepare nurses for professional practice. This study's purpose was to use Naturalistic Inquiry to understand the experiences of staff nurses in an obstetrical unit with undergraduate nursing students present for clinical learning. A convenience sample of 12 staff nurses, employed on a Family Birth Center, participated in semi-structured interviews. The constant comparative method as modified by Lincoln and Guba was used to analyze data. Five themes related to staff nurses experiences of clinical learning were identified: Giving and Receiving; Advancing Professionally and Personally; Balancing Act; Getting to Know and Working with You; and Past and Present. This research highlights staff nurses' experiences of clinical learning in undergraduate nursing education. Staff nurses exert a powerful, long lasting influence on students. A need exists to prepare and judiciously select nurses to work with students. Clinical agencies and universities can take joint responsibility providing tangible incentives, financial compensation, and recognition to all nurses working with nursing students. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The practical skills of newly qualified nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danbjørg, Dorthe Boe; Birkelund, Regner

    2011-02-01

    This paper reports the findings from a study of newly qualified nurses and which subjects the nurses regarded as the most important in order to be able to live up to the requirements of clinical practice, and how they experience their potential for developing practical and moral skills, after the decrease in practical training. A qualitative approach guided the research process and the analysis of the data. The data was collected by participant observation and qualitative interviews with four nurses as informants. The conclusions made in this study are based on the statements and the observations of the newly qualified nurses. Our findings are discussed in relation to the Aristotelian concept and other relevant literature. The main message is that the newly qualified nurses did not feel equipped when they finished their training. This could be interpreted as a direct consequence of the decrease in practical training. Our study also underlines that the way nursing theory is perceived and taught is problematic. The interviews revealed that the nurses think that nursing theories should be applied directly in practice. This misunderstanding is probably also applicable to the teachers of the theories.

  9. Nurses' Information Seeking Behavior for Clinical Practice: A Case Study in a Developing Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarbaz, Masoumeh; Kimiafar, Khalil; Sheikhtaheri, Abbas; Taherzadeh, Zhila; Eslami, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    We used a valid questionnaire to survey Iranian nurses' seeking information behavior and their confidence on different information sources. The frequently used sources were Internet" and "personal experiences" (54.8% and 48.2% respectively). "English medical journals" (61.9%) and "English textbooks" (41.3%) were the least frequently used sources. Nurses felt high confidence in sources such as "International instructions/guidelines" (58.6%) and "English medical textbooks" (50.4%). The main reasons for selecting sources were easy accessibility, being up to date and reliability. Google, Pubmed and Up to Date were the most used electronic sources. In addition, there were differences in terms of using some of these resources and nurse' age and gender. In developing information sources for nurses, factors such as reliability level, availability, and updatedness of resources should be more emphasized.

  10. A competency-based approach to nurses' continuing education for clinical reasoning and leadership through reflective practice in a care situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudreau, Johanne; Pepin, Jacinthe; Larue, Caroline; Dubois, Sylvie; Descôteaux, Renée; Lavoie, Patrick; Dumont, Katia

    2015-11-01

    Newly graduated nurses need to demonstrate high levels of competencies when they enter the workplace. A competency-based approach to their education is recommended to ensure patients' needs are met. A continuing education intervention consistent with the competency-based approach to education was designed and implemented in eight care units in two teaching hospitals. It consists of a series of 30-min reflective practice groups on clinical events that newly graduated nurses encountered in their practice. It was evaluated using a descriptive longitudinal evaluative research design, combining individual and group interviews with stakeholders, the analysis of facilitators' journal entries, and a research assistant's field notes. The results suggest that issues associated with the implementation of the continuing education intervention revolved around leadership for managers, flexibility for nursing staff, and role shifting for the facilitators. Newly graduated nurses who participated in the study noted that the reflective practice sessions contributed to the development of both clinical reasoning and leadership. Nursing managers stated the advantages of the intervention on nurses' professional development and for the quality and safety of care. Following the end of the study, participants from two units managed to pursue the activity during their work time.

  11. Using Nursing Languages in School Nursing Practice. Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denehy, Janice

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this updated manual is to define and describe standardized nursing languages, highlight how nursing languages are a part of the nursing process, and illustrate through case examples how nursing languages are used in school nursing practice. This manual also summarizes the history and development of three nursing classifications, the…

  12. Nursing Home Work Practices and Nursing Assistants' Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Christine E.; Squillace, Marie R.; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L.; Wiener, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Design and Methods: Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey,…

  13. Promoting Innovation in Global Nursing Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: innovation; nurse; nursing innovations; nursing practice ... take risks within a safe environment, foster learning, ... strategies that can make a huge difference in the lives ... ters, nurses and midwives also teach this programme.

  14. The nursing human resource planning best practice toolkit: creating a best practice resource for nursing managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Leslie; Beduz, Mary Agnes

    2010-05-01

    Evidence of acute nursing shortages in urban hospitals has been surfacing since 2000. Further, new graduate nurses account for more than 50% of total nurse turnover in some hospitals and between 35% and 60% of new graduates change workplace during the first year. Critical to organizational success, first line nurse managers must have the knowledge and skills to ensure the accurate projection of nursing resource requirements and to develop proactive recruitment and retention programs that are effective, promote positive nursing socialization, and provide early exposure to the clinical setting. The Nursing Human Resource Planning Best Practice Toolkit project supported the creation of a network of teaching and community hospitals to develop a best practice toolkit in nursing human resource planning targeted at first line nursing managers. The toolkit includes the development of a framework including the conceptual building blocks of planning tools, manager interventions, retention and recruitment and professional practice models. The development of the toolkit involved conducting a review of the literature for best practices in nursing human resource planning, using a mixed method approach to data collection including a survey and extensive interviews of managers and completing a comprehensive scan of human resource practices in the participating organizations. This paper will provide an overview of the process used to develop the toolkit, a description of the toolkit contents and a reflection on the outcomes of the project.

  15. Designing Clinical Examples To Promote Pattern Recognition: Nursing Education-Based Research and Practical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welk, Dorette Sugg

    2002-01-01

    Sophomore nursing students (n=162) examined scenarios depicting typical and atypical signs of heart attack. Examples were structured to include essential and nonessential symptoms, enabling pattern recognition and improved performance. The method provides a way to prepare students to anticipate and recognize life-threatening situations. (Contains…

  16. Nursing practices and lactation amenorrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, M F; Teas, J; Johnston, J; Bora, C

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that nursing behavior is an independent underlying factor of importance in duration of amenorrhea. Multivariate analysis is applied to information on frequency and duration of nursing practices, maternal age, and nutritional status assessed by weight for height in a sample of 32 middle-class American women with a wide range of nursing behavior. The mothers were followed for 2 years postpartum, data being collected during 8 home visits by interview and by nursing records kept by the mothers. Amenorrhea lasted 1.3 to 27.1 months in the sample as a whole. Those women who nursed frequently (8/day) during exclusive breastfeeding remained amenorrheic longer than infrequent nursers, introduced supplements later, and did not resume menses as promptly thereafter. They continued an hour or more of night nursing during supplemented nursing. Duration of exclusive nursing and night nursing after supplementation were the major influences on duration of amenorrhea. This strong association favors the hypothesis that the underlying factor is nursing behavior. Mother's age, weight-for-height, and nursing frequency before supplementation showed no significant effect. Those women who introduced supplements late and maintained at least an hour of night nursing had a prolonged period of amenorrhea. The median for this group was 6-10 months longer than that for those who started supplements early and/or reduced subsequent night nursing to less than an hour. The recommendation that women must suckle their babies at least 5 times a day with a total suckling duration of more than 65 minutes per day is not sufficient. The findings reported here suggest that if women nurse exclusively for the 1st half year, maintaining night nursing after introducing supplements is important. If they supplement earlier, then they will lose the contraceptive protection of lactation, irrespective of how they nurse.

  17. Using Video Ethnography in Clinical Nurse Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Malene; Sørensen, Erik Elgaard; Raudaskoski, Pirkko Liisa

    2017-01-01

    Training to become a nurse involves education in the clinical practice in hospital wards. It is a multifaceted and complex arena in which the student nurses not only have to learn about medical encounters but also how to interact with colleagues as well as patients and their families. By using...

  18. Responsive Assessment: Assessing Student Nurses' Clinical Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neary, Mary

    2001-01-01

    A study involving 300 nursing students, 155 nurse practitioners, and 80 assessors tested a model of responsive assessment that includes identification of learning needs and potential, assignment to suitable placements, continuous assessment of clinical practice and patient care, and alignment of teaching and assessment with patient needs and…

  19. Leader Influence, the Professional Practice Environment, and Nurse Engagement in Essential Nursing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducharme, Maria P; Bernhardt, Jean M; Padula, Cynthia A; Adams, Jeffrey M

    The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between leaders' perceived influence over professional practice environments (PPEs) and clinical nurses' reported engagement in essential professional nursing practice. There is little empirical evidence identifying impact of nurse leader influence or why nursing leaders are not perceived, nor do they perceive themselves, as influential in healthcare decision making. A nonexperimental method of prediction was used to examine relationships between engagement in professional practice, measured by Essentials of Magnetism II (EOMII) tool, and nurse leaders' perceived influence, measured by Leadership Influence over Professional Practice Environment Scale (LIPPES). A convenience sample of 30 nurse leaders and 169 clinical nurses, employed in a 247-bed acute care Magnet® hospital, participated. Findings indicated that leaders perceived their influence presence from "often" to "always," with mean scores of 3.02 to 3.70 on a 4-point Likert scale, with the lowest subscale as "access to resources" for which a significant relationship was found with clinical nurses' reported presence of adequate staffing (P nurses reported more positive perceptions in adequacy of staffing on the EOMII when nurse leaders perceived themselves to be more influential, as measured by the LIPPES, in collegial administrative approach (P = .014), authority (P = .001), access to resources (P = .004), and leadership expectations of staff (P = .039). Relationships were seen in the outcome measure of the EOMII scale, nurse-assessed quality of patient care (NAQC), where nurse leaders' perception of their authority (P = .003) and access to resources (P = .022) positively impacted and was predictive of NAQC. Findings support assertion that nurse leaders are integral in enhancing PPEs and their influence links structures necessary for an environment that supports outcomes.

  20. Documentation of Nursing Practice Using a Computerized Medical Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Carol

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses a definition of the content of the computerized nursing data base developed by the Nursing Department for the Clinical Center Medical Information System at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. The author describes the theoretical framework for the content and presents a model to describe the organization of the nursing data components in relation to the process of nursing care delivery. Nursing documentation requirements of Nurse Practice Acts, American Nurses Association Standards of Practice and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals are also addressed as they relate to this data base. The advantages and disadvantages of such an approach to computerized documentation are discussed.

  1. Nurses' Use of Race in Clinical Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Sherrill L; Moss, Melissa E; Calzone, Kathleen; Abdallah, Khadijah E; Jenkins, Jean F; Bonham, Vence L

    2016-11-01

    To examine nurses' self-reported use of race in clinical evaluation. This cross-sectional study analyzed data collected from three separate studies using the Genetics and Genomics in Nursing Practice Survey, which includes items about use of race and genomic information in nursing practice. The Racial Attributes in Clinical Evaluation (RACE) scale was used to measure explicit clinical use of race among nurses from across the United States. Multivariate regression analysis was used to examine associations between RACE score and individual-level characteristics and beliefs in 5,733 registered nurses. Analysis revealed significant relationships between RACE score and nurses' race and ethnicity, educational level, and views on the clinical importance of patient demographic characteristics. Asian nurses reported RACE scores 1.41 points higher than White nurses (p nurses reported RACE scores 0.55 points higher than White nurses (p nurses, the baccalaureate-level nurses reported 0.69 points higher RACE scores (p nurses reported 1.63 points higher RACE scores (p nurses reported 1.77 points higher RACE scores (p nurses may be due, in part, to differential levels of racial self-awareness. A relatively linear positive relationship between level of nursing degree nursing education and use of race suggests that a stronger foundation of knowledge about genetic ancestry, population genetics and the concept "race" and genetic ancestry may increase in clinical decision making could allow nurses to more appropriately use of race in clinical care. Integrating patient demographic characteristics into clinical decisions is an important component of nursing practice. Registered nurses provide care for diverse racial and ethnic patient populations and stand on the front line of clinical care, making them essential for reducing racial and ethnic disparities in healthcare delivery. Exploring registered nurses' individual-level characteristics and clinical use of race may provide a more

  2. Ethnographic nexus analysis in clinical nursing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Malene

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/aim(s): Internationally, student nurses' attrition after clinical practice is an increasing problem (Hamshire, Willgoss, & Wibberley, 2012; Pilegård Jensen, 2006). A better understanding of 'becoming a nurse' as situated practice in the hospital wards might help avoid pitfalls...... in the clinical practice. Thus a thorough insight into the field is necessary in order to change it. The purpose of this paper is to show and discuss how it is possible methodologically to do ethnographic research in clinical education and how the field of clinical nursing education in the hospital wards might...... be improved after insights obtained through ethnographic research. Methods: Using nexus analysis (Scollon & Scollon, 2004, 2007) as an ethnographic framework in four Danish hospital wards, a study of the development of a professional identity among student nurses in Denmark was conducted. Scollon and Scollon...

  3. To Analyze the Training Effect on Clinical Nursing Practice of Acquired Immune Deifciency Syndrome for Nursing Staff%分析护理人员艾滋病临床护理实践的培训效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄翠英

    2015-01-01

    目的:分析护理人员艾滋病临床护理实践的培训效果。方法选择我院执业护士80名,对所有护理人员均给予艾滋病临床护理实践培训,比较培训前后的艾滋病相关知识掌握情况。结果培训后护理人员的艾滋病综合知识得分优于培训前,两者比较,P<0.05,差异具有统计学意义。结论通过艾滋病临床护理实践培训,可以让护理人员更好掌握艾滋病的相关知识。%Objective Analysis analyze the training effect on clinical nursing practice of acquired immune deifciency syndrome for nursing staff. Methods Selected 80 cases nurse practitioner in our hospital, all of them were given acquired immune deficiency syndrome training for clinical nursing practice, compared the grasp knowledge situation before and after nursing practice. Results After training nursing staff's comprehensive acquired immune deficiency syndrome knowledge score was better than before the training, P<0.05, had difference statistical significance. Conclusion Nursing staff can grasp acquired immune deifciency syndrome relevant knowledge better with clinical nursing practice of acquired immune deifciency syndrome.

  4. Influence of Clinical Nursing Students' Empathy Ability on Effect of Practice%实习护生共情能力对实习效果的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨敏; 肖丽

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the correlation between the clinical nursing students' empathy ability and practice effect so as to determine the influencing factors of clinical practice to improve their clinical practice effect. Methods Self-designed empathy ability questionnaire and nursing department internship practice effect feedback questionnaire were used to assess the correlation between empathy ability and practice effect among the selected 98 nursing students. Results There is a relatively positive correlation between empathy ability and practice effect (r=0. 924,P0. 05). Conclusion According to the result of this study, empathy ability and practice effect of clinical nursing students are all relatively well. In order to improve the effect of practice, nursing administrators should train and improve the empathy ability of practice nursing students,especially the nursing knowledge and communicative skills.%目的 探讨实习护生共情能力与实习效果之间的关系,为培养护生的共情能力及提高其实习效果提供依据.方法 应用自行设计的共情能力调查问卷和护理部的实习效果反馈表,对98名护生进行调查,对共情能力与实习效果进行相关性分析.结果 实习护生共情能力与实习效果之间呈显著正相关(r=0.924,P<0.01),共情能力与实习效果中的理论知识(r=0.823,P0.05).结论 实习护生的共情能力及实习效果均相对较好,而加强实习护生的共情能力可进一步提高其临床实习质量,尤其是护生的理论知识及沟通能力.

  5. Measuring nursing informatics competencies of practicing nurses in Korea: Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seon Yoon; Staggers, Nancy

    2014-12-01

    Informatics competencies are a necessity for contemporary nurses. However, few researchers have investigated informatics competencies for practicing nurses. A full set of Informatics competencies, an instrument to measure these competencies, and potential influencing factors have yet to be identified for practicing nurses. The Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire was designed, tested for psychometrics, and used to measure beginning and experienced levels of practice. A pilot study using 54 nurses ensured item comprehension and clarity. Internal consistency and face and content validity were established. A cross-sectional survey was then conducted on 230 nurses in Seoul, Korea, to determine construct validity, describe a complete set of informatics competencies, and explore possible influencing factors on existing informatics competencies. Principal components analysis, descriptive statistics, and multiple regression were used for data analysis. Principal components analysis gives support for the Nursing Informatics Competencies Questionnaire construct validity. Survey results indicate that involvement in a managerial position and self-directed informatics-related education may be more influential for improving informatics competencies, whereas general clinical experience and workplace settings are not. This study provides a foundation for understanding how informatics competencies might be integrated throughout nurses' work lives and how to develop appropriate strategies to support nurses in their informatics practice in clinical settings.

  6. 'Seeking authorization': a grounded theory exploration of mentors' experiences of assessing nursing students on the borderline of achievement of competence in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Simon; Coffey, Michael; Murphy, Fiona

    2017-09-01

    To develop a substantive theoretical explanation of how mentors make sense of their experiences where nursing students are on the borderline of achievement of competence in clinical practice. The reluctance of Registered Nurse mentors to fail nursing students in clinical practice despite concerns about competence remains a contemporary issue in international healthcare education. Mentors' assessment decisions have considerable impact for a variety of key stakeholders, not least for students in these circumstances. Grounded theory qualitative study. Phase one involved 20 individual semi-structured interviews with nurse mentors in one United Kingdom National Health Service Health Board (July-October 2009). Phase two included eight individual semi-structured interviews and seven focus groups with mentors and practice educators (n = 38) in four further Health Boards (June 2011-February 2012). Data were analysed using open, axial and selective coding consistent with grounded theory method. Three categories 'the conundrum of practice competence,' 'the intensity of nurturing hopefulness,' and 'managing assessment impasse,' led to the study's substantive theoretical explanation - 'Seeking authorization: Establishing collective accountability for mentorship.' This demonstrates how mentors are dependent on key sources of support and feedback to validate their assessment decision-making, notwithstanding substantial personal, professional and organizational pressures. We conclude that management of borderline assessment situations is considerably developed by recognition of the authorizing effects of a wider community of assessors. Consequently, we identify the personal, professional and organizational implications involved in the preparation, support and regulation of mentors specifically during borderline assessment circumstances. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. An innovative approach to enhance dermatology competencies for advanced practice nurses: service–learning with a migrant farm worker health clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downes, Elizabeth A; Connor, Ann; Howett, Maeve

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a novel service–learning opportunity for graduate nursing students that promotes competency in dermatology. A hybrid service–learning course with online didactic content is described, along with tools for evaluation of dermatology competencies. Student evaluation of the course is discussed, and selected research articles are reviewed. Advanced practice nursing and medical education frequently does not adequately prepare primary care providers to be competent in the assessment and management of dermatologic conditions. Embedding dermatology content in a service–learning program can optimize the provision of care, strengthen competencies in dermatology and inter-professional care, and allow students to gain a deeper understanding of the population with which they work. The innovative service–learning program presented is a model for advanced practice nursing education. Tools for evaluating clinical competency and courses often need validation. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Best practice in nursing: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Antonia M

    2014-11-01

    Since the early 1990s a shift has occurred in the understanding of what constitutes quality healthcare. This is evidenced by the emergence of new concepts in the nursing literature, including best practice. Although authors have analyzed the concept of best practice in the healthcare sector, further analysis is required to distinguish the concept's unique meanings, and significance for the nursing discipline. This paper seeks to clarify use of the concept of best practice in the nursing literature over the last two decades, and contributes to explaining its defining characteristics, applicability, and significance. It also distinguishes the concept's unique meanings and usefulness in comparison to other related terms. An evolutionary concept analysis method was selected for this analysis. First, a representative sample of nursing sources was obtained utilizing the CINAHL database. This database was searched for sources in English, during the years 1993-2013, with both best practice and nursing in the title. Data was then collected from the sample of retrieved literature on attributes of best practice, antecedent and consequential occurrences, variations, and empirical references. The following related concepts were also explored for purposes of comparison and to situate the understanding of best practice in-context: practice development, evidence-based practice, and standard of care. Use of the concept of best practice in the nursing literature may be categorized into four distinct domains: educational, administrative, clinical and theoretical/conceptual. Exploration of defining attributes revealed that best practice may be characterized as: directive, evidence-based, and quality-focused. Antecedent occurrences in the sample sources were most commonly related to identification of a specified need or problem, somewhat defined by the domain. The implied consequential occurrences were ultimately better outcomes. Best practice is more than practice based on evidence

  9. Nursing students’ perspectives on clinical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMAD REZA HEIDARI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The importance of optimal clinical nursing education in professional skills development is undeniable. In clinical education, nursing students are often faced with problems. Recognizing nursing students’ perception on clinical education is the first step to remove the barriers of this challenge. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the nursing students’ perspectives on clinical education. 150 nursing students were selected randomly from nursing and midwifery schools (Tehran. Data collection instrument was a researcher made questionnaire consisting of five domains: objective and curricula, instructor, feedback to student in clinical field, clinical environment, supervision and evaluation. Mean and standard deviation were calculated for each item, using SPSS, ver. 14. Chi-square test was used to compare the nursing students’ perspectives on clinical education based on age, sex and the work experience. The significance level was considered 0.05. Results: Mean age of the students was 21.58±26.97 students (66% were male. 44 students (30.1% had work experience (3.58±6.48 month. Male and female students had different perceptions in domains of clinical education (p<0.05. Nursing student had different perceptions as to objectives and curricula (p=0.039, how to deal with students in the clinical environment (p=0.032, supervision, and evaluation (p<0.001 with respect to their work experience duration. The most positive responses were in clinical instructor (81.5% and the most negative ones were the clinical environment (33.66%, respectively. Conclusion: Providing an optimal clinical environment and improving the supervision and evaluation of student practice should prioritized in schools of nursing and midwifery.

  10. Effect of Clinical Teaching Associate Model on Nursing Students' Clinical Skills and Nurses' Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahnavard, Zahra; Eybpoosh, Sana; Alianmoghaddam, Narges

    2013-10-02

    Abstract Background and Objectives: The credit of the practice nurses in developing countries, due to gap between theory and practice in nursing education and health care delivery has been questioned by nursing professionals. Therefore, the aims of this study were to investigate the effectiveness of the application of the CTA model in nursing students' clinical skills and to assess the participants' (faculty members, staff nurses, and nursing students) level of satisfaction with the CTA model and with achieving the educational goals in Iran, as a developing country. Methods and Materials: In this experimental study, random sampling was used to assess 104 nursing students' clinical skills, and assess 6 faculty members and 6 staff nurses. After obtaining informed consent, the level of satisfaction was evaluated by a questionnaire and clinical skills were evaluated by standard checklists. Data were assessed and analyzed with SPSS version 15. Results: The results showed that the mean scores of all clinical skills of the students were significantly higher after intervention (pskills in nursing students in Iran as a developing country. Therefore, application of the method is recommended in clinical nursing education systems of such counties.

  11. Structures and practices enabling staff nurses to control their practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Marlene; Schmalenberg, Claudia; Maguire, Patricia; Brewer, Barbara B; Burke, Rebecca; Chmielewski, Linda; Cox, Karen; Kishner, Janice; Krugman, Mary; Meeks-Sjostrom, Diana; Waldo, Mary

    2008-08-01

    This mixed-methods study uses interviews, participant observations, and the CWEQII empowerment tool to identify structures and attributes of structures that promote control over nursing practice (CNP). Nearly 3,000 staff nurses completed the Essentials of Magnetism (EOM), an instrument that measures CNP, one of the eight staff nurse-identified essential attributes of a productive work environment. Strategic sampling is used to identify 101 high CNP-scoring clinical units in 8 high-EOM scoring magnet hospitals. In addition to 446 staff nurses, managers, and physicians on these high-scoring units, chief nursing officers, chief operating officers, and representatives from other professional departments are interviewed; participant observations are made of all unit/departmental/hospital council and interdisciplinary meetings held during a 4 to 6 day site visit. Structures and components of viable shared governance structures that enabled CNP are identified through constant comparative analysis of interviews and observations, and through analysis of quantitative measures.

  12. Music Therapy Clinical Practice in Hospice: Differences Between Home and Nursing Home Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaodi; Burns, Debra S; Hilliard, Russell E; Stump, Timothy E; Unroe, Kathleen T

    2015-01-01

    Hospice music therapy is delivered in both homes and nursing homes (NH). No studies to date have explored differences in music therapy delivery between home and NH hospice patients. To compare music therapy referral reasons and delivery for hospice patients living in NH versus home. A retrospective, electronic medical record review was conducted from a large U.S. hospice of patients receiving music therapy between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2010. Among the 4,804 patients, 2,930 lived in an NH and 1,847 patients lived at home. Compared to home, NH hospice patients were more likely to be female, older, unmarried, and Caucasian. For home hospice patients, the top referral reasons were patient/family emotional and spiritual support, quality of life, and isolation. The most frequent referral reasons for NH hospice patients were isolation, quality of life, and patient/family emotional and spiritual support. Differences in music therapy delivery depended mainly on patients' primary diagnosis and location of care. Results suggest differences in referral reasons and delivery based on an interaction between location of care and patient characteristics. Delivery differences are likely a result of individualized assessment and care plans developed by the music therapist and other interdisciplinary team members to address the unique needs of the patient. Thus, it is important to have professionally trained music therapists assess and provide tailored music-based interventions for patients with different referral reasons and personal characteristics. This study also supports staffing decisions based on patient need rather than average daily census. © the American Music Therapy Association 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Course strategies for clinical nurse leader development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerard, Sally; Grossman, Sheila; Godfrey, Marjorie

    2012-01-01

    The scope of the clinical nurse leader (CNL) is evolving in practice across the country. The preparation of this pivotal role in a complex healthcare environment has prompted the collaboration of nurse academics, nurse administrators, and clinicians to design unique educational experiences to maximize best practice. Knowledge attained regarding healthcare improvement and patient safety must not only be theoretical, but personal and application focused. Utilizing the American Association of Colleges of Nursing's CNL white paper and published resources faculty developed a clinical leadership course focused on active learning and reflection. Students explore concepts of improvement and quality related to business models of high functioning organizations including healthcare. Three key components of the course are described in detail; "quality is personal", executive interviews and the "5P" clinical microsystems assessment. Evaluation outcomes are discussed. Course content and innovative teaching/learning strategies for CNL are shared which may support the growth of CNL program development nationally.

  14. [ANALYSIS USING AN EXPERT PANEL OF ACTIVITIES AND COMPETENCIES WHICH NURSING CLINICAL PRACTICE TUTORS IN THE COMUNIDAD AUTÓNOMA DE MADRID SHOULD POSSESS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüello López, María Teresa; Palmar Santos, Ana María; Sellán Soto, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Although practical training has always been important in Nursing, it has reached a new dimension in the European Higher Education Area. This has involved adapting the syllabus, where one of the new features is considering clinical practice as an independent subject and also including the concept of competence as a result of the students' learning. The figure of the tutor becomes one of the key factors and therefore their activities and competencies must be defined. To enumerate and prioritize, by agreement, the main activities and competences by the tutor of clinical practices in the Comunidad Autónoma de Madrid should posses. METHODOLOGY. Quantitative focus, analysis by group of experts between 2010 and 2013. RESULTS. A total of 510 nurses have participated, 17 panels of experts have met and consensus has been reached on 22 competencies and 12 activities. The description of activities and competencies can be extremely useful for selecting, evaluating and developing nursing clinical practice tutors, becoming a baseline and reducing the subjectivity in the development of tutors according to the new demands of the European Higher Education Area.

  15. An ontological view of advanced practice nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslanian-Engoren, Cynthia; Hicks, Frank D; Whall, Ann L; Algase, Donna L

    2005-01-01

    Identifying, developing, and incorporating nursing's unique ontological and epistemological perspective into advanced practice nursing practice places priority on delivering care based on research-derived knowledge. Without a clear distinction of our metatheoretical space, we risk blindly adopting the practice values of other disciplines, which may not necessarily reflect those of nursing. A lack of focus may lead current advanced practice nursing curricula and emerging doctorate of nursing practice programs to mirror the logical positivist paradigm and perspective of medicine. This article presents an ontological perspective for advanced practice nursing education, practice, and research.

  16. Reflections on clinical practice whilst developing a portfolio of evidence: Perceptions of undergraduate nursing students in the Western Cape, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoire Ticha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: In order to develop clinical judgement, nurses should be encouraged to become analytical and critical thinkers. Development of a portfolio of evidence (PoE of reflection on clinical experiences is one of the strategies that can be used to enhance analytical and critical thinking amongst nursing students. Students’ perceptions of the process are important in order to encourage their reflective practice. PoE compilation at a school of nursing at a university in the Western Cape includes evidence of students’ clinical learning which they present in a portfolio. The students are expected to reflect on their clinical learning experiences and include these reflections in their portfolios.Objective: To describe the perceptions of fourth-year nursing students regarding reflective practice whilst compiling their PoEs.Method: A qualitative design was used to explore the perceptions of registered fourth-year nursing students with regard to their reflective practice whilst compiling their PoEs. Purposive sampling was used for selection of participants. Three focus group discussions were held, each consisting of six to eight participants. Data saturation was reached during the third meeting. Tesch’s method of data analysis was used.Results: Findings revealed that reflection enabled the learners to gain experience and identify challenges related to the expected events and tasks carried out at the hospitals and in the classroom whilst developing their PoE.Conclusion: The compilation of a PoE was a good teaching and learning strategy, and the skills, experience and knowledge that the participants in this study acquired boosted their self-esteem, confidence and critical thinking. Reflection also assisted in self-directed learning.

  17. Nursing practice environment and outcomes for oncology nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Jingjing; Friese, Christopher R; Wu, Evan; Aiken, Linda H

    2013-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that oncology nurses experience high job-related burnout and high turnover because their work involves inherent stressors such as caring for patients with serious and often life-threatening illness. The objectives of this study were to examine the differences in outcomes such as job dissatisfaction and burnout between oncology nurses and medical-surgical nurses, and to identify factors that affect oncology nurse outcomes. A secondary analysis of nurse survey data collected in 2006 including 4047 nurses from 282 hospitals in 3 states was performed; t test and χ2 test compared differences between oncology nurses and medical-surgical nurses in nurse outcomes and their assessments of nurse practice environment, as measured by the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. Logistic regression models estimated the effect of nurse practice environment on 4 nurse-reported outcomes: burnout, job dissatisfaction, intention to leave the current position, and perceived quality of care. Oncology nurses reported favorable practice environments and better outcomes than did medical-surgical nurses. All 4 subscales of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index studied were significantly associated with outcomes. Specifically, nurses who reported favorable nursing foundations for quality of care (eg, active in-service or preceptorship programs) were less likely to report burnout and leave their current position. Better practice environments, including nurse foundations for quality care, can help to achieve optimal nurse outcomes. Improving hospital practice environments holds significant potential to improve nurse well-being, retention, and quality of care. Specifically, hospitals should consider preceptor programs and continuing education and increase nurses' participation in hospital decision making.

  18. Strategic directions and actions for advanced practice nursing in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha N. Hill

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a need and opportunity for China to develop education and practice innovations given that advance practice nurses (APNs improve health care and outcomes. The China Medical Board (CMB China Nursing Network (CCNN began planning for an Advanced Nursing Practice Program for education and career development that will facilitate CCNN's contributions to meeting national nursing policy priorities. This paper presents the discussion, recommendations and action plans developed at the inaugural planning meeting on June 26, 2015 at Fudan University in Shanghai. The recommendations are: Develop standards for advanced nursing practice; Develop Master's level curricula based on the standards; Commence pilot projects across a number of University affiliated hospitals; and Prepare clinical tutors and faculty. The strategic directions and actions are: Develop a clinical career ladder system; Expand the nursing role from hospital to community; and Build a specialty nurse accreditation system.

  19. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Nurse-Focused Computerized Clinical Decision Support on Urinary Catheter Practice Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Robin Lynn Neal

    2012-01-01

    A growing national emphasis has been placed on health information technology (HIT) with robust computerized clinical decision support (CCDS) integration into health care delivery. Catheter-associated urinary tract infection is the most frequent health care-associated infection in the United States and is associated with high cost, high volumes and…

  20. Nursing Practice Environment and Outcomes for Oncology Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Jingjing; Friese, Christopher R.; Wu, Evan; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Background It is commonly assumed that oncology nurses experience high job-related burnout and high turnover because their work involves inherent stressors such as caring for patients with serious and often life-threatening illness. Objectives The objectives of this study were to examine the differences in outcomes such as job dissatisfaction and burnout between oncology nurses and medical-surgical nurses, and to identify factors that affect oncology nurse outcomes. Methods A secondary analysis of nurse survey data collected in 2006 including 4047 nurses from 282 hospitals in 3 states was performed; t test and χ2 test compared differences between oncology nurses and medical-surgical nurses in nurse outcomes and their assessments of nurse practice environment, as measured by the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index. Logistic regression models estimated the effect of nurse practice environment on 4 nurse-reported outcomes: burnout, job dissatisfaction, intention to leave the current position, and perceived quality of care. Results Oncology nurses reported favorable practice environments and better outcomes than did medical-surgical nurses. All 4 subscales of the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index studied were significantly associated with outcomes. Specifically, nurses who reported favorable nursing foundations for quality of care (eg, active in-service or preceptorship programs) were less likely to report burnout and leave their current position. Conclusions Better practice environments, including nurse foundations for quality care, can help to achieve optimal nurse outcomes. Implications for Practice Improving hospital practice environments holds significant potential to improve nurse well-being, retention, and quality of care. Specifically, hospitals should consider preceptor programs and continuing education and increase nurses’ participation in hospital decision making. PMID:22751101

  1. Developing ambulatory care clinics: nurse practitioners as primary providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamper-Linden, C; Goetz-Kulas, J; Lake, R

    1983-12-01

    While hospitals evaluate ambulatory clinics as a revenue-generating service alternative, nursing executives develop new areas for nursing practice in nurse-managed clinics. The authors describe the five-year growth of a nurse-managed ambulatory clinic providing primary health care to those aged 55 and older. The discussion explains nurse practitioner leadership and practice, and accountability between professions. The concept and structure of services and marketing strategies are elated to the people served. Financial feasibility, cost containment, and other factors demonstrate the clinic's contribution to its sponsoring hospital.

  2. Critical theory as a framework for academic nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Martha K

    2014-05-01

    In academic centers of nursing, faculty or academic practice has become more widespread and integrated into the expectations and criteria for appointment and promotion. Yet, the concept of academic practice is not fully embraced among all schools of nursing. Numerous models of academic nursing practice have evolved and vary widely according to the clinical site, the roles of the practitioners, and the systems for generating revenue. Although most models are related to the mission statements of the schools of nursing, few seem to be based on a distinct philosophy of practice. In this article, a consideration of critical theory that provides a framework for practice-based nursing education is presented. By applying the philosophical underpinnings and assumptions of practice that are guided by critical theory, educators may begin to better identify the values of academic nursing practice and incorporate this activity more fully into the educational environment.

  3. Supporting student mental health nurses in clinical placement through virtual in-practice support (VIPS): Innovation uptake and the 'VIPS' project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Sally; Mushore, Manyara; Goddard, Linda

    2016-11-01

    The integration of technology in nurse education has become an essential element of academic practice. Yet innovation uptake between academic institutions across the four countries of the UK and their clinical practice partners has proved problematic, leading to a slow introduction of digitally enhanced teaching and learning innovations, particularly in the area of clinical decision making and leadership. The Virtual in Practice Support (VIPS) project involved two academic institutions working with the same mental health care service partner aiming to maximise student clinical placement learning. Student nurses in their final year of training were invited to take part in testing the viability of distance e-tutoring (via computer access to academic nurse lecturers) for facilitated critical reflection. An evaluation of the use of video linked conference sessions, set up for students to undertake a group based online (i.e. virtual) group tutorial is presented. All participants completed an evaluation data sheet using a five point Likert scale and free text evaluation feedback form completed at the end of each online tutorial session. Students were also invited to a focus group and all tutors were interviewed at the completion of the project. The VIPS project findings highlight; i) the importance of a clear project vision for innovation uptake ii) consequences of working with innovation champions and iii) how technology can be used to maximise student learning across geographical distance through online facilitated group critical discussion. VIPS' participants were able to articulate positive outcomes as a result of engaging in a multi-institutional project that capitalised on the richness of nursing clinical practice learning experience for both the students and the academics involved as innovation champions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. MENTAL HEALTH AND PSYCHIATRIC NURSING IN PRACTICAL NURSE EDUCATION. FINAL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CRAWFORD, ANNIE L.

    THIRTY-ONE PROFESSIONAL NURSE EDUCATORS IN SCHOOLS OF PRACTICAL NURSING IN THE SOUTHEAST ATTENDED A TWO-WEEK CLINICAL WORKSHOP ON PSYCHIATRIC NURSING AT WESTERN STATE HOSPITAL, STAUNTON, VIRGINIA, IN AUGUST 1966. THEY RECONVENED FOR A THREE-DAY FOLLOW-UP CONFERENCE AT ATLANTA, GEORGIA, IN JANUARY 1967. THE PROJECT WAS UNDERTAKEN TO UPDATE THE…

  5. Public Health Interventions for School Nursing Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Marjorie A.; Anderson, Linda J. W.; Rising, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    School nurses (SNs) use public health nursing knowledge and skills to provide nursing services to school populations. The Public Health Intervention Wheel is a practice framework that can be used to explain and guide public health nursing interventions. SNs who were also members of the National Association of School Nurses completed an electronic…

  6. Practical statistics for nursing and health care

    CERN Document Server

    Fowler, Jim; Chevannes, Mel

    2002-01-01

    Nursing is a growing area of higher education, in which an introduction to statistics is an essential component. There is currently a gap in the market for a 'user-friendly' book which is contextulised and targeted for nursing. Practical Statistics for Nursing and Health Care introduces statistical techniques in such a way that readers will easily grasp the fundamentals to enable them to gain the confidence and understanding to perform their own analysis. It also provides sufficient advice in areas such as clinical trials and epidemiology to enable the reader to critically appraise work published in journals such as the Lancet and British Medical Journal. * Covers all basic statistical concepts and tests * Is user-friendly - avoids excessive jargon * Includes relevant examples for nurses, including case studies and data sets * Provides information on further reading * Starts from first principles and progresses step by step * Includes 'advice on' sections for all of the tests described.

  7. Effectiveness of two distinct web-based education tools for bedside nurses on medication administration practice for venous thromboembolism prevention: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Brandyn D; Shaffer, Dauryne L; Hobson, Deborah B; Yenokyan, Gayane; Wang, Jiangxia; Sugar, Elizabeth A; Canner, Joseph K; Bongiovanni, David; Kraus, Peggy S; Popoola, Victor O; Shihab, Hasan M; Farrow, Norma E; Aboagye, Jonathan K; Pronovost, Peter J; Streiff, Michael B; Haut, Elliott R

    2017-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common cause of preventable harm in hospitalized patients. While numerous successful interventions have been implemented to improve prescription of VTE prophylaxis, a substantial proportion of doses of prescribed preventive medications are not administered to hospitalized patients. The purpose of this trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of nurse education on medication administration practice. This was a double-blinded, cluster randomized trial in 21 medical or surgical floors of 933 nurses at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, an academic medical center, from April 1, 2014 -March 31, 2015. Nurses were cluster-randomized by hospital floor to receive either a linear static education (Static) module with voiceover or an interactive learner-centric dynamic scenario-based education (Dynamic) module. The primary and secondary outcomes were non-administration of prescribed VTE prophylaxis medication and nurse-reported satisfaction with education modules, respectively. Overall, non-administration improved significantly following education (12.4% vs. 11.1%, conditional OR: 0.87, 95% CI: 0.80-0.95, p = 0.002) achieving our primary objective. The reduction in non-administration was greater for those randomized to the Dynamic arm (10.8% vs. 9.2%, conditional OR: 0.83, 95% CI: 0.72-0.95) versus the Static arm (14.5% vs. 13.5%, conditional OR: 0.92, 95% CI: 0.81-1.03), although the difference between arms was not statistically significant (p = 0.26). Satisfaction scores were significantly higher (p<0.05) for all survey items for nurses in the Dynamic arm. Education for nurses significantly improves medication administration practice. Dynamic learner-centered education is more effective at engaging nurses. These findings suggest that education should be tailored to the learner. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02301793.

  8. Italian clinical guides' perceptions of their role in student nurses' clinical practicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrin, Rosanna; Zanini, Antonietta; Bulfone, Giampiera; Medves, Antonella; Panariti, Mateo; Brusaferro, Silvio

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this article is an examination of the clinical guides' views and their role in student nurses' learning. The descriptive survey was conducted in July-September 2006. The sample was composed of 120 clinical guides who answered a questionnaire regarding the last student nurses' clinical practice experience during 2006. Clinical guides are nurses working in the wards who are available to supervise the clinical practice of nursing students, similar to preceptors in the United States. Clinical guides used different teaching strategies to stimulate students in various activities. The study revealed that the role of clinical guide is very important for the students as they develop into professional nurses.

  9. Identification of Hypertension Management-related Errors in a Personal Digital Assistant-based Clinical Log for Nurses in Advanced Practice Nurse Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam-Ju Lee, DNSc, RN

    2010-03-01

    Conclusion: The Hypertension Diagnosis and Management Error Taxonomy was useful for identifying errors based on documentation in a clinical log. The results provide an initial understanding of the nature of errors associated with hypertension diagnosis and management of nurses in APN training. The information gained from this study can contribute to educational interventions that promote APN competencies in identification and management of hypertension as well as overall patient safety and informatics competencies.

  10. Correlates of Stress and Coping among Jordanian Nursing Students during Clinical Practice in Psychiatric/Mental Health Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzayyat, Abdulkarim; Al-Gamal, Ekhlas

    2016-10-01

    Training in psychiatric settings is stressful for nursing students. The purpose of this study was to examine the correlations between the students' characteristics, their stress degrees, stressors and types of coping strategies they experience during training in psychiatric course. A descriptive, correlational, longitudinal design was used. Sixty-five undergraduate nursing students were recruited randomly from five Jordanian universities. Self-report questionnaires were administered at the second semester of the 2012-2013 academic year. The findings showed that students who utilized avoidance or transference strategies reported high stress degrees. Moreover, the results showed that those students who were in the fourth year, with a low family income, who avoid extracurricular activities, with a low academic grade or who registered in other clinical course(s) reported high stress degrees. These findings present a worthy data for the clinical instructors that facilitate students training in psychiatric settings and promote their psychosocial well-being. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common physical disability in early childhood. The worldwide prevalence of CP is approximately 2–2.5 per 1,000 live births. It has been clinically defined as a group of motor, cognitive, and perceptive impairments secondary to a non-progressive defect or lesion of the developing brain. Children with CP can have swallowing problems with severe drooling as one of the consequences. Malnutrition and recurrent aspiration pneumonia can increase the risk of morbidity ...

  12. Thinking creatively: from nursing education to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalischuk, Ruth Grant; Thorpe, Karran

    2002-01-01

    Creative thinking is a critical link in the teaching-learning process, one that enhances problem solving in nursing practice. This article describes a conceptualization of creativity based on focus groups with 12 post-RN students and two nurse educators. Inherent within the major theme, striving for balance, were three subthemes-enhancing self-esteem, working within structure, and making time for reflection (i.e., process). When participants achieved balance, both personally and professionally, they experienced increased creative energy that resulted in creative expression, subsequently displayed in educational endeavors and clinical practice (i.e., product). Strategies for fostering creativity and criteria for evaluating creativity are offered, and implications for nurse educators, managers, and practitioners are examined.

  13. Analysis on the differences between teaching of nursing skills and clinical nursing practice%护理技能教学与护理临床实践差异性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆一春; 曾丽华

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To probe into the differences between teaching of nursing skills and clinical nursing practice in five - year vocational nursing education in order to put forward feasible strategies to promote teaching of nursing skills which is more close to clinical nursing practice. Methods: A self - designed questionnaire was used to conduct a cross - sectional survey on 250 five - year vocational nursing students of 3 advanced vocational &technical schools of health. Results: There were statistically significant differences in the comparison of 19 items of nursing skills such as implementation of doctors advice,bed - making,delivery care,etc. between teaching of nursing skills and clinical nursing practice(P<0. 05 );the differences were mainly manifested in the operating scene, materials preparation, nursing object, operation method and operation procedure. Conclusion:The differences between teaching of nursing skills and clinical practice are larger, the degree and aspect of the differences are different. The measures to promote teaching of nursing skills should be enhanced, including optimizing teaching body, reforming teaching methods, strengthening the construction of clinical teaching base and unifying criteria of assessment in nursing technical operation.%目的:探讨五年制高职护理专业护理技能教学与临床护理实践的差异,并进行分析,提出促进护理技能教学贴近临床实践的可行性策略.方法:采用自编调查问卷,对三所五年制高职护理专业学校的250名护生进行横断面调查.结果:护理技能教学与临床护理在医嘱处理、铺备用床、分娩护理等19项常用护理技术比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);差异主要表现在操作场景、用物准备、护理对象、操作方法、操作步骤5个方面,其中操作场景、用物准备和护理对象差异较大.结论:目前护理技能教学与临床实践的差异较大,各项操作差异程度和差异环节不同;建议采

  14. Doctoral education for WOC nurses considering advanced practice nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Barbara; Colwell, Janice

    2012-01-01

    Advanced practice nursing education is at a crossroads. Societal changes, increased health care demands, and leadership nursing organizations have identified the need of a doctor of nursing practice (DNP) degree as the advanced practice degree. WOC nurses need to examine DNP programs when considering returning for an advanced practice degree. This article explores nursing education at the doctorate level and areas the WOC nurse should consider when making a decision about attending a program. The WOC nurse needs to understand the similarities and differences of the doctor of philosophy and the DNP, issues about each program and its completion, personal factors, and the application process. Although selecting a doctoral program is a daunting experience, the education will provide opportunities for the WOC nurse to excel as a scholar, thus influencing the profession and the practice.

  15. Making "cents" of the business side of nurse practitioner practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luster-Tucker, AtNena

    2016-03-15

    Nurse practitioners produce excellent patient outcomes and should be allowed to practice to the full extent of their education and training. In addition to clinical skills, nurse practitioners need to understand the business side of practice in order to ensure fair and equitable compensation.

  16. Effectiveness of asthma principles and practice course in increasing nurse practitioner knowledge and confidence in the use of asthma clinical guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Fishwick, Judith C; Okafor, Maureen; Fletcher, Monica

    2015-04-01

    The Asthma Principle and Practice (APP) course, an evidence-based blended distance-learning educational encounter, was designed to aid in the dissemination of the 2007 asthma clinical guidelines (EPR-3) and priority messages, increase knowledge of content of the guidelines as well as create an environment to enable participants to apply knowledge and skills into clinical practice. Students received a self-study binder 6-week period prior to attendance at an interactive study day. The APP is grounded in adult education principle and practices. A questionnaire was completed before reading the study binder and post study day to measure demographic variables as well as awareness of and changes in knowledge and confidence in key attributes of the clinical guidelines including patient education. The results showed that by taking the APP course confidence levels related to knowledge of asthma and its management increased with specific reference to the asthma clinical guidelines. Confidence in the use of patient education/communication strategies improved as well as the use of pulmonary function tests and the interpretation of test results. Nurse practitioners are an important audience to target in the dissemination of clinical guidelines and benefit from educational materials based on adult education strategies. ©2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  17. Core ethical issues of clinical nursing supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Ingela; Barbosa da Silva, António; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2005-03-01

    Clinical nursing supervision enables supervisees to reflect on ethically difficult caring situations, thereby strengthening their professional identity, integrating nursing theory and practice, and leading to the development of ethical competence. The aim of this study was to develop an understanding of the core ethical issues of clinical nursing supervision, using previous research as well as philosophical analysis of the theories of three moral philosophers: Harald Ofstad, Richard Hare and Carol Gilligan. The ultimate aim of this study was to develop a general model for ethical decision-making and to establish its relevance for clinical nursing supervision. The findings highlight four important values for the development of a basis for ethical decision-making. These values are caring, dignity, responsibility and virtue.

  18. Factors Associated With the Perception of Family Nursing Practice Among Mental Health Nurses in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Chiu-Yueh; Tsai, Yun-Fang

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine factors that influenced the perceptions of mental health nurses about involving families in their nursing practice. A sample of 175 Taiwanese mental health nurses who are employed in both inpatient and community settings completed structured questionnaires designed to measure empathy, attitudes about involving families in care, and perceptions of family nursing practice. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson's product-moment correlation, t test, one-way ANOVA, and a hierarchical multiple regression analysis. Positive perceptions of family nursing practice were correlated with more years of clinical experience in mental health, empathy, supportive attitudes toward the importance of family nursing care, and personal experiences with family members with serious illness in need of professional care. These findings may assist in the development of effective educational programs designed to help nurses integrate family nursing knowledge and skills in the care of patients and families experiencing mental illness. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Strategic collaborative model for evidence-based nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olade, Rosaline A

    2004-01-01

    To describe a model that has been developed to guide nurses and other health professionals in collaborative efforts toward evidence-based nursing practice. A review of literature was conducted using MEDLINE and CINAHL to search for articles on research utilization for evidence-based practice in health care delivery. Empirical studies; reviews; and theoretical, opinion, and information articles were included in the review in order to provide a more comprehensive view of the state of evidence-based nursing internationally. Findings revealed a number of barriers to evidence-based nursing practice, which have persisted over the last two decades, including inadequate knowledge of research among practicing nurses, lack of administrative support for research activities in clinical settings, lack of empowerment of nurses, and lack of needed mentoring from nursing research consultants. Barriers in the areas of nursing education and administrative support appear to be major. A need was identified for a pragmatic model that encourages cooperation and collaboration between educators/researchers in academia and the administrative leaders in the clinical facilities if evidence-based nursing practice is to become the norm. FRAMEWORK OF MODEL: The Tyler Collaborative Model is based on an eclectic approach to planned change for creating evidence-based practice. This model identifies a step-by-step process for change, while allowing for the opportunity to integrate any of the previously available methods of critical appraisal to determine the best evidence for practice in each clinical setting.

  20. From Academic-Practice Partnership to Professional Nursing Practice Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudacek, Sharon Smith; DiMattio, Mary Jane K; Turkel, Marian C

    2017-03-01

    changes in the practice environment that transform the practice of staff nurses working in partnership model clinical units. DISCLOSURE STATEMENT Neither the planners nor the author have any conflicts of interest to disclose. This study used a qualitative descriptive design to examine the role of the expert staff nurse or clinical liaison nurse (CLN) participating in a community-based academic-practice partnership. Little is known about the influence of participation by expert nurses in community hospital settings. Focus groups were conducted with nine CLNs to explicate their experiences in a unit-based leadership practice model. Eight themes were identified: Reciprocal Learning Between Staff Nurses and Students; Reciprocal Learning Between Student and Patient; Working Around the System; Building Relationships; Valuing the CLN Role; Faculty Recognition of CLNs; Transforming Practice; and a variant theme, Recognition That Some Nurses Neither Value nor Enjoy Working With Students. The benefits of developing partnerships in community hospitals can be far reaching and may be of interest to educators and leaders in the profession. When a practice environment focused on evidence and was fueled by student enthusiasm reinvigorates staff nurses, their work world suddenly transforms. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2017;48(3):104-112.

  1. Exploring the information and communication technology competence and confidence of nursing students and their perception of its relevance to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levett-Jones, Tracy; Kenny, Raelene; Van der Riet, Pamela; Hazelton, Michael; Kable, Ashley; Bourgeois, Sharon; Luxford, Yoni

    2009-08-01

    This paper profiles a study that explored nursing students' information and communication technology competence and confidence. It presents selected findings that focus on students' attitudes towards information and communication technology as an educational methodology and their perceptions of its relevance to clinical practice. Information and communication technology is integral to contemporary nursing practice. Development of these skills is important to ensure that graduates are 'work ready' and adequately prepared to practice in increasingly technological healthcare environments. This was a mixed methods study. Students (n=971) from three Australian universities were surveyed using an instrument designed specifically for the study, and 24 students participated in focus groups. The focus group data revealed that a number of students were resistant to the use of information and communication technology as an educational methodology and lacked the requisite skills and confidence to engage successfully with this educational approach. Survey results indicated that 26 per cent of students were unsure about the relevance of information and communication technology to clinical practice and only 50 per cent felt 'very confident' using a computer. While the importance of information and communication technology to student's learning and to their preparedness for practice has been established, it is evident that students' motivation is influenced by their level of confidence and competence, and their understanding of the relevance of information and communication technology to their future careers.

  2. Ethnographic nexus analysis in clinical nursing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Malene

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/aim(s): Internationally, student nurses' attrition after clinical practice is an increasing problem (Hamshire, Willgoss, & Wibberley, 2012; Pilegård Jensen, 2006). A better understanding of 'becoming a nurse' as situated practice in the hospital wards might help avoid pitfalls in the clin......Purpose/aim(s): Internationally, student nurses' attrition after clinical practice is an increasing problem (Hamshire, Willgoss, & Wibberley, 2012; Pilegård Jensen, 2006). A better understanding of 'becoming a nurse' as situated practice in the hospital wards might help avoid pitfalls...... be improved after insights obtained through ethnographic research. Methods: Using nexus analysis (Scollon & Scollon, 2004, 2007) as an ethnographic framework in four Danish hospital wards, a study of the development of a professional identity among student nurses in Denmark was conducted. Scollon and Scollon......’s notions on 'navigate' and 'engage' in the field provided a frame to combine both discourse (Edley, 2014) document (Prior, 2003) and interaction analysis (Jordan & Henderson, 1995) in order to grasp the crucial social actors and their practice. Contribution: The paper contributes with insights...

  3. Practice management skills for the nurse practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sportsman, S; Hawley, L J; Pollock, S; Varnell, G

    2001-01-01

    The faculties of three schools of nursing involved in a collaborative family nurse practitioner (FNP) program designed a study to address issues involved in preparing the nurse practitioner for the challenges of practice management in the clinical environment. The purposes of the study were to (1) identify business concepts necessary to successfully manage a primary care practice; (2) determine which of these concepts should be incorporated into an FNP curriculum; and (3) clarify information to be taught regarding each identified concept. Fifty-four business concepts related to primary care were identified from a literature review. A survey was then developed to assess the extent to which the identified concepts were necessary for an FNP to effectively manage a practice. Seven experts and five FNP faculty responded to the survey. The Content Validity Index (CVI) defined by Lynn (1986) was applied and 20 concepts necessary for an FNP to effectively manage a practice were identified. A focus group that included nurse practitioners (both faculty and nonfaculty) from the three collaborative sites connected by interactive telecommunications determined that all 20 of the identified concepts should be included in an FNP curriculum. Additionally, the focus group clarified relevant information to be taught regarding each identified concept.

  4. Transformational leadership practices of nurse leaders in professional nursing associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Erin J; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Click, Elizabeth R; Krouse, Helene J; Clavelle, Joanne T

    2014-04-01

    This study describes the transformational leadership (TL) practices of nurse leaders in professional nursing associations (PNAs). Professional nursing associations are vehicles to provide educational opportunities for nurses as well as leadership opportunities for members. Little has been published about the leadership practices of PNA members. E-mail surveys of 448 nurse leaders in PNAs were conducted in 2013 using the Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI). The top 2 TL practices of these nurse leaders were enabling others to act and encouraging the heart. Respondents with more leadership training reported higher TL practices. This is the 1st study to describe TL practices of nurse leaders in PNAs. Results of this study show that nurse leaders of PNAs emulate practices of TL. Transformational leaders can mobilize and direct association members in reaching shared values, objectives, and outcomes. Understanding TL practices of nurse leaders in PNAs are important to the future of nursing in order to enable nurses to lead change and advance health through these organizations.

  5. Financial literacy as an essential element in nursing management practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Linda B; Thorgrimson, Diane H; Robinson, Nellie C

    2013-01-01

    Grooming nurses at all levels of the organization to master health care executive skills is critical to the organization's success and the individual's growth. Selecting and executing next steps for nursing leadership team development is critical to success. Leaders must make it their responsibility to provide nurses with increased exposure to quality, safety, and financial data, thereby allowing nurses to translate data while achieving and sustaining successful outcomes. The work of the CNO Dashboard to measure, report, trend, and translate clinical and non-clinical outcomes must be integrated throughout all levels of nursing staff so that nursing practice is positioned to continually strive for best practice. The education and evolution of nurses as business managers is critical to building a strong RN workforce.

  6. 护理操作风险量化表在护生临床带教中的应用%Application of the quantization table of nursing practice risk in clinical teaching of nursing students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡佩源; 郭前祝; 周月琴

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨护理操作风险量化表在护生临床带教中应用的效果.方法 设计护理操作风险量化表,将2008年6月至2009年4月进入我院实习的106名护生作为对照组,实施原有护理操作风险管理办法;将2009年6月至2010年4月进入我院实习的105名护生作为观察组,应用量化表,对护理风险实施量化的管理办法.比较2组护生的风险意识、护理缺陷发生情况等指标.结果 观察组护生在风险意识、操作考核、护理缺陷及血源性暴露发生例数等方面显著优于对照组.结论 量化表的应用有利于提高护生的风险意识,提高教学质量,保障护理安全.%Objective To explore the application effect of the quantization table of nursing practice risk in clinical teaching of nursing students. Methods The quantization table of nursing practice risk was designed.106 intemships were selected as the control group in our hospital from June 2008 to April 2009,the original nursing practice risk management measures were implemented in the control group.105 internships from June 2009 to April 2010 were set as the observation group,the quantization table of nursing practice risk was applied in this group.The risk awareness,nursing defects and other indices were compared between the two groups. Results The risk awareness,operation assessment,percentage of nursing defects and blood- borne occupational exposure were significantly better than the control group. Conclusions Application of the quantization table can improve the risk awareness of nursing students and teaching quality,and safeguard nursing safety.

  7. 临床护理实习组长竞聘上岗的实践%Practice of competition recruitment for team leader of clinical nursing practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向虹静; 唐佳玉; 唐婕; 朱小玲

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨临床护理实习组长的有效管理方法。方法采取整群抽样法,对2013年7月340名实习生采取竞聘法评选出32名实习组长设为观察组,对2012年7月333名实习生采取指定法任命27名实习组长设为对照组。比较老师对两组实习组长、学生对实习组长的满意度和临床实习质量综合评价。结果观察组老师对实习组长的榜样作用、履职情况、沟通协调能力、团队凝聚力和总体满意度分别为92.7%,93.8%,86.5%,90.6%,92.7%,均高于对照组,差异有统计学意义(χ2值分别为19.238,5.256,17.079,17.904,34.122;P<0.05)。观察组实习生对实习组长的榜样作用、履职情况、关心组员学习生活、处理问题能力和总体满意度分别为91.0%,98.2%,87.0%,81.6%,94.3%,均高于对照组,差异有统计学意义(χ2值分别为81.993,170.152,100.410,104.635,130.974;P<0.05)。观察组临床实习综合质量评价均高于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论临床护理实习组长竞聘上岗能充分利用优秀学生资源,对培养学生竞争意识、调动学生学习的积极性有积极意义,提高了临床实习综合质量。%Objective To explore the efficient method of managing team leaders in clinical nursing practice. Methods By cluster sampling, we utilized competition recruitment method to select 32 team leaders out of the 340 interns in July 2013 as observation team;by designated method, we chose 27 team leaders out of the 333 interns in July 2012 as comparison team. Then we compared both teams′ degree of satisfaction from teachers and interns and comprehensive evaluation on the quality of clinical practice. Results In terms of the practice team leaders′ role modeling contribution from teachers, duty fulfillment, communication and coordination ability, team cohesion, the overall degree of satisfaction from the teachers for the observation team were 92. 7%, 93. 8%, 86. 5%, 90. 6%, 92. 7%, which were

  8. The practice role in the academic nursing community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, A B; Delahoussaye, C P; Poirrier, G P

    1996-02-01

    The practice role of nurse educators has emerged as a mechanism to unite practice, research, and education. The long-term outcome of such a synthesis should be an improvement in the quality of nursing care delivered to clients. Clinically focused nursing research designed by nurse educators who maintain a practice role or nurse clinicians who maintain a teaching role has the potential to unify and thus advance the profession. The authors discuss the historical background from which the practice role evolved, and efforts of recent nursing leaders to facilitate the incorporation of the nursing practice role by educators. Models for faculty practice are identified, and advantages of faculty practice are reviewed. The authors also describe barriers to the establishment of faculty practice, contemporary developments impacting faculty practice, and research needed to advance faculty practice. Nurse educators in many academic communities in the 1990s are discovering that not only must they produce scholarly work in addition to their teaching and service to the university and community, but that they may also be under growing pressure to be engaged in clinical practice. This pressure may be self-imposed or may be an expectation of their colleagues in nursing education or the administrators of their nursing programs. The focus of this research brief will be to describe the historical background from which this "new" role evolved, to discuss strategies or models developed to facilitate the faculty practice role, and to identify faculty practice issues that have emerged with the adoption of this role in academia. An additional focus will be to critically review faculty practice-related research performed since Chicadonz' (1987) review.

  9. Exploring nurses' storied accounts of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geanellos, R

    1995-06-01

    The learning opportunities presented in nurses' storied accounts of practice are explored. This exploration is achieved through analysis and discussion of three nurse's stories documented in the literature, and uses Benner's (1991) narratives of learning theme as the conceptual framework. The narrative of learning sub themes: being open to experience, liberation, and disillusionment are examined. This examination suggests nurses stories can be used to: discover nursing knowledge, develop shared understandings of what it is to be a nurse, examine nursing's culture and ethics, document interactions for research, teaching and learning, and identify and preserve the practice of nursing. Whereas edited stories from the literature only begin to demonstrate the possibilities for learning that stories offer, through them alternative ways of learning about nursing, exploring nursing practice and developing nursing knowledge are presented.

  10. Clinical misconduct among South Korean nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Jun; Park, Seungmi; Jang, In-Sun

    2014-12-01

    This study examines the extent and predictors of unethical clinical behaviors among nursing students in South Korea. From survey data of 345 undergraduate nursing students, unethical clinical behaviors were examined with respect to 11 individual characteristics, frequency and perceived seriousness of classroom cheating, two factors of individual attitude, and four contextual factors. Qualitative data from two focus group interviews were analyzed to explore reasons for and contexts of unethical clinical behaviors. About sixty-six percent of the participants engaged in one or more unethical clinical behaviors over a one-semester period. The prevalence of such behaviors varied widely from 1.7% to 40.9% and was related to the type of nursing program, the number of clinical practicum semesters completed, ethical attitudes toward cheating behaviors, the frequency of cheating on assignments, the frequency of cheating on exams, the perceived prevalence of cheating by peers, and prior knowledge of academic integrity. According to the regression analysis, the last four variables explained 29.4% of the variance in the prevalence of unethical clinical behaviors. In addition, multiple reasons and possible interventions for clinical misconduct were reported during the focus group interviews. Unlike cheating in the classroom, clinical misconduct was strongly induced by clinical nurses and poor clinical practice environments. In sum, unethical clinical behaviors were widespread among the participants and need to be corrected.

  11. Being a seasoned nurse in active practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Lisa A; Prasun, Marilyn A; Henderson, Lisa; Taft, Lois

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to discover what rewards and inspires seasoned nurses to continue to practice in acute care after the normal age of nurse retirement, and to identify best practices in retention. An aging population and an aging nursing workforce are twin issues that bring urgency to this issue. Seasoned nurses have much to contribute to the workforce, but very few studies have examined strategies to retain them. A grounded theory approach was used in two phases to explore the meaning of being a seasoned nurse. In phase 1, 13 nurses over the age of 62 years were queried about the meaning of being a seasoned nurse actively engaged in acute care nursing. The second phase included 12 nurses in active practice anticipating retirement (aged 55-62 years). Semi-structured interviews were conducted, audiotaped, transcribed and analysed. A concept map with four major themes emerged from the data. The themes were identified as (1) pre-existing attitudes and experiences, (2) retention factors, (3) important needs, and (4) unique contributions. Seasoned nurses enjoy, and engage in, nursing and derive benefits from continued practice. Further research is needed to determine the relative importance of the factors identified as important to nurses as they anticipate, and experience, retirement. IMPLICATION FOR NURSE MANAGERS: An understanding of these factors can be used to aid nursing leaders to retain seasoned nurses in practice beyond retirement age. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Clinical Scholar Model: providing excellence in clinical supervision of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preheim, Gayle; Casey, Kathy; Krugman, Mary

    2006-01-01

    The Clinical Scholar Model (CSM) is a practice-education partnership focused on improving the outcomes of clinical nursing education by bridging the academic and service settings. An expert clinical nurse serves as a clinical scholar (CS) to coordinate, supervise, and evaluate the clinical education of nursing students in collaboration with school of nursing faculty. This article describes the model's evolution, how the model is differentiated from traditional clinical instruction roles and responsibilities, and the benefits to the collaborating clinical agency and school of nursing.

  13. Application of tacit knowledge in nursing clinical practice teaching%隐性知识在护理临床实习带教中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨淑洁; 华卓君; 葛旭玲

    2011-01-01

    Objective To discuss the application of tacit knowledge in nursing clinical teaching.Methods To select the clinical teaching teacher strictly,nursing tacit knowledge was taught,developed and classified.To establish sharing mechanism of tacit knowledge in department; advocate all kinds of activities,provide communication opportunities to promote the transfer and sharing of tacit knowledge.Results The abilities of the nurse students to analyse and solve problems had been significantly improved,the performances of theories and operation were satisfactory; and the satisfaction degree of patients was improved,excellence rate of two -way assessment was raised year by year in teaching and learning.Conclusions The clinical practice is a main process to transfer and transform nursing tacit knowledge.In nursing teaching,nursing tacit knowledge education plays a important role.The spread of tacit knowledge has the vital significance to improve nursing clinical teaching quality.%目的 探讨护理隐性知识在临床带教工作中的应用.方法 严格选拔临床带教老师;护理隐性知识培训;护理隐性知识开发、整理归类,使其显性化,建立科内隐性知识的共享机制;组织各种活动,提供交流的机会,促使护理隐性知识的传递和共享.结果 护生临床分析问题和解决问题的能力有了明显的提高;理论考试和操作考核成绩令人满意;病人满意度提高;在教与学双向测评中优良率逐年提高.结论 临床实习是护理隐性知识传递和转化的主要过程,在护理教学中护理隐性知识教育占有相当重要的地位,隐性知识的传播对于提高护理临床教学质量具有重要的意义.

  14. Nursing students' experience of practice placements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Kathleen; Paterson, Kirstie; Wallar, Jessica

    2016-11-02

    Clinical practice placements are an essential component of pre-registration nursing programmes. Integration into a new team in an unfamiliar setting, which has its own values, practices, culture and language, can be stressful for nursing students. This article presents and discusses students' reflections on preparing for, entering and leaving practice placements. Ten students who participated in fortnightly group reflective sessions, discussed and analysed their learning experiences while on practice placements in an acute hospital. The challenges the students encountered were deconstructed using a group narrative approach. The students experienced ethical dilemmas around patient dignity, consent and advocacy as well as factors external to the practice setting, such as navigating systems and processes to access information before starting practice placements, managing household duties and academic workloads while working long shifts, and managing fatigue and loneliness. The students devised recommendations for other students to enable them to navigate their practice placements effectively and enhance their learning experience. Raising awareness among academic and practice placement staff of the challenges students encounter before and during their practice placement is essential to assist students to succeed and maximise their learning potential.

  15. Nurse managers describe their practice environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warshawsky, Nora E; Lake, Sharon W; Brandford, Arica

    2013-01-01

    Hospital work environments that support the professional practice of nurses are critical to patient safety. Nurse managers are responsible for creating these professional practice environments for staff nurses, yet little is known about the environments needed to support nurse managers. Domains of nurse managers' practice environment have recently been defined. This is a secondary analysis of 2 cross-sectional studies of organizational characteristics that influence nurse manager practice. Content analysis of the free text comments from 127 nurse managers was used to illustrate the 8 domains of nurse managers' practice environments. Nurse managers valued time spent with their staff; therefore, workloads must permit meaningful interaction. Directors demonstrated trust when they empowered nurse managers to make decisions. Administrative leaders should build patient safety cultures on the basis of shared accountability and mutual respect among the health care team. The expectations of nurse managers have greatly expanded in the volume and complexity of direct reports, patient care areas, and job functions. The nurse managers in this analysis reported characteristics of their practice environments that limit their role effectiveness and may negatively impact organizational performance. Further research is needed to understand the effects of nurse managers' practice environments on staff and patient outcomes.

  16. Scoping the role and education needs of practice nurses in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procter, Susan; Griffiths, Lauren; Fanning, Agnes; Wallman, Lizzie; Loveday, Heather P

    2017-03-27

    Aims To identify education priorities for practice nursing across eight London Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs); to identify the education, training, development and support needs of practice nurses in undertaking current and future roles.

  17. Drug information sources for practicing nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karb, V B

    1989-08-01

    Many printed resources about drugs are available to practicing nurses. In the near future, information will probably by readily accessible via computers. In the interim, it is necessary to rely on other printed materials. As with all purchases, nurses should choose wisely among possible references, and select those meeting the specific needs of the practice setting, as well as complementing the nurses' existing knowledge.

  18. 临床用药护理安全管理的做法与效果%practice and effects of drug safety management in clinical nursing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷泽秋; 何方; 周宁

    2012-01-01

    Objective To discuss the practice and effects of drug safety management in clinical nursing. Methods The management measures included setting up a drug safety management group,finding out clinical drug safety problems,designing and making drug administration cards,standardizing the use of various types of drug labels,perfecting the nursing work system and establishing continuous training system of clinical safe nursing medication. Results Hie incidence of medication errors and defects declined, and the incidence of drug overtime declined, the differences were statistically significant (P < 0.01 or P <0.05 ). Conclusion The implementation of drug safety management can ensure the safety of drugs for clinical nursing.%目的 探讨临床用药护理安全管理的做法与效果.方法 成立临床用药护理安全管理小组;查找临床护理用药安全隐患;设计并制作专门的药品管理卡;规范各类药品标识的使用;完善护理工作制度;建立临床用药护理安全持续培训制度.结果 用药差错及缺陷发生率、药物过期发生率均下降,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.01或P<0.05).结论 实施临床用药护理安全管理可以使临床用药护理安全得到有效保障.

  19. Role of rheumatology clinical nurse specialists in optimizing management of hand osteoarthritis during daily practice in secondary care: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TPM

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Wing-Yee Kwok, Margreet Kloppenburg, Liesbeth JJ Beaart-van de Voorde, Tom WJ Huizinga, Thea PM Vliet VlielandDepartment of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The NetherlandsBackground: The purpose of this study was to describe the effectiveness of a single one-hour consultation by a clinical nurse specialist in patients with hand osteoarthritis during daily rheumatology practice in secondary care.Methods: Consecutive patients diagnosed by rheumatologists to have primary hand osteoarthritis and referred to the clinical nurse specialist were eligible for entry into this study. The standardized 1-hour consultation consisted of assessments and education on hand osteoarthritis by a clinical nurse specialist. Before and 3 months after the consultation, assessments were done to evaluate treatment (use of assistive devices, acetaminophen, health-related quality of life (physical component summary [PCS] score of Short-Form 36, and hand pain/function (Australian/Canadian Osteoarthritis Hand Index [AUSCAN]. Paired t-tests and McNemar tests were used to analyze differences between baseline and follow-up. Satisfaction was measured after consultation at follow-up using a multidimensional questionnaire comprising 13 items (rated on a four-point scale.Results: A total of 439 patients were referred, with follow-up data available for 195 patients, comprising 177 (87% females, and of mean age 59 ± 9.0 years. After consultation, the proportions of patients using assistive devices and/or acetaminophen increased significantly from 30% to 39% and from 35% to 49%, respectively. PCS improved significantly (P = 0.03 whereas AUSCAN hand pain/function showed no significant differences compared with baseline (P values 0.52 and 0.92, respectively. The proportions of patients reporting to be satisfied or fully satisfied ranged from 78% to 99% per item.Conclusion: A single, comprehensive, standardized assessment and education by a clinical nurse

  20. The Perceptions of Nurse Teachers, Student Nurses and Preceptors of the Theory-Practice Gap in Nurse Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlett, Jo

    2000-01-01

    Group interviews with nursing teachers, students, and clinical preceptors identified concerns about the theory-practice gap: shortness of clinical placements, sequencing of theory and practice, lack of clinical-educational collaboration, and lack of clarity regarding teacher roles. Ways to minimize the gap were also identified. (SK)

  1. Is it possible to strengthen psychiatric nursing staff's clinical supervision?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonge, Henrik; Buus, Niels

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To test the effects of a meta-supervision intervention in terms of participation, effectiveness and benefits of clinical supervision of psychiatric nursing staff. BACKGROUND: Clinical supervision is regarded as a central component in developing mental health nursing practices, but the evidence...... on individuals or wards already actively engaged in clinical supervision, which suggested that individuals and wards without well-established supervision practices may require more comprehensive interventions targeting individual and organizational barriers to clinical supervision....

  2. Abstract: Cultural Humility in Nursing Practice | Nkurunziza ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract: Cultural Humility in Nursing Practice. ... In 2012, Human Resources for Health (HRH) Rwanda brought together international nursing ... providers in a globalized world and requires intellectual, attitudinal and behavioral flexibility.

  3. Optimizing Nursing and Midwifery Practice in Rwanda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Historical records show that 983 nurses were qual- ified in Rwanda just ... Table 1 below shows the Nurs- ing and ... Table 1. Nursing and midwifery progress from 1995 to 2015. Education .... and periodic evaluation of the practice environment.

  4. Knowledge sources for evidence-based practice in rheumatology nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neher, Margit; Ståhl, Christian; Ellström, Per-Erik; Nilsen, Per

    2015-12-01

    As rheumatology nursing develops and extends, knowledge about current use of knowledge in rheumatology nursing practice may guide discussions about future knowledge needs. To explore what perceptions rheumatology nurses have about their knowledge sources and about what knowledge they use in their practice, 12 nurses working in specialist rheumatology were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. The data were analyzed using conventional qualitative content analysis. The analysis yielded four types of knowledge sources in clinical practice: interaction with others in the workplace, contacts outside the workplace, written materials, and previous knowledge and experience. Colleagues, and physicians in particular, were important for informal learning in daily rheumatology practice. Evidence from the medical arena was accessed through medical specialists, while nursing research was used less. Facilitating informal learning and continuing formal education is proposed as a way toward a more evidence-based practice in extended roles. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. [Hydration in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maristany, Cleofé Pérez-Portabella; Segurola Gurruchaga, Hegoi

    2011-01-01

    Water is an essential foundation for life, having both a regulatory and structural function. The former results from active and passive participation in all metabolic reactions, and its role in conserving and maintaining body temperature. Structurally speaking it is the major contributer to tissue mass, accounting for 60% of the basis of blood plasma, intracellular and intersticial fluid. Water is also part of the primary structures of life such as genetic material or proteins. Therefore, it is necessary that the nurse makes an early assessment of patients water needs to detect if there are signs of electrolyte imbalance. Dehydration can be a very serious problem, especially in children and the elderly. Dehydrations treatment with oral rehydration solution decreases the risk of developing hydration disorders, but even so, it is recommended to follow preventive measures to reduce the incidence and severity of dehydration. The key to having a proper hydration is prevention. Artificial nutrition encompasses the need for precise calculation of water needs in enteral nutrition as parenteral, so the nurse should be part of this process and use the tools for calculating the patient's requirements. All this helps to ensure an optimal nutritional status in patients at risk. Ethical dilemmas are becoming increasingly common in clinical practice. On the subject of artificial nutrition and hydration, there isn't yet any unanimous agreement regarding hydration as a basic care. It is necessary to take decisions in consensus with the health team, always thinking of the best interests of the patient.

  6. 不同学历护生实习前护理伦理认知水平的调查分析%Investigation on awareness of nursing ethics before clinical practice among nursing students with different educational backgrounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐艳华; 陈海金; 刘晓英; 王洪奇; 桑美丽; 郭丹; 张丽红

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To explore the level of nursing ethics awareness in nursing students with different educational backgrounds before clinical practice and to provide theoretical basis for nursing ethics education. Methods:A self-designed questionnaire was used to investigate 30 secondary school nursing students, 104 junior college nursing students and 220 undergraduate nursing students. Results:The total average score of nursing ethics cognitive was 2.27±0.22 in secondary school nursing students, 2.70±0.26 in junior college nursing students, and 3.11±0.26 in undergraduate nursing students. There were statistically signiifcant differences in the total average score of nursing ethics cognitive and all dimensional scores of informed consent, medical optimization, medical conifdentiality, principle of life among different nursing students in educational levels (P<0.05). Conclusion:There are differences about nursing ethics awareness among nursing students with different educational levels. So it is necessary to carry out different teaching methods for students with different academic qualiifcations in order to improve the level of nursing ethics awareness in nursing.%目的:了解实习前不同学历层次护生的护理伦理认知水平,为针对性地开展护理伦理教育提供理论依据。方法:采用自行设计的护生护理伦理认知问卷对30名中专护生、104名大专护生、220名本科护生进行问卷调查。结果:本科护生护理伦理认知总均分为(3.11±0.26)分、大专护生为(2.70±0.26)分,中专护生为(2.27±0.22)分,实习前不同学历护生护理伦理认知总均分和知情同意、医疗最优化、医疗保密、生命价值原则维度得分差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:不同学历护生的临床护理伦理认知有差异,根据不同学历采取不同的教学方法对提高护生整体的护理伦理认知水平十分必要。

  7. The Reflection of Vocational Education from Nursing Students' Clinical Practice%从护生临床实习反思学校职业教育

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓欣

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the writer has found that the nursing interns have some universal problems in clinical prac-tice during the clinical student nurses' management. The writer deeply feels the clinical practice situation and profes-sional status in the future mostly depends on the cultivation of the professional quality, habit, and skills in school. Voca-tional education differs from basic education, so the teachers should lay stress on vocational features and train, manage the students with clear target.%在近几年对护生临床实习的管理工作中,笔者发现各院校护理专业实习生在临床实习中存在一些普遍性的问题。笔者深感护生临床实习状况的好坏及将来执业状况的好坏,极大程度地取决于在校几年职业素养、职业习惯、职业技能的培养。职业教育不同于基础教育,必须突出职业特点,有针对性地对学生加以训练和培养。

  8. The ethics curriculum for doctor of nursing practice programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirce, Anne Griswold; Smith, Jennifer A

    2008-01-01

    Ethical questions dealt with by nurses who have Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degrees include traditional bioethical questions, but also business and legal ethics. Doctorally prepared nurses are increasingly in positions to make ethical decisions rather than to respond to decisions made by others. The traditional master's-degree advanced practice nursing curriculum does not address the extended expertise and decision-making skills needed by DNP practitioners as they face these new types of ethical dilemmas. We propose that a curricular framework that addresses clinical, research, business, and legal ethics is needed by all DNP students.

  9. Issues surrounding record keeping in district nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, E E

    2000-07-01

    This article examines some aspects of nursing documentation following the publication of the document 'Guidelines for Records and Record Keeping' (UKCC, 1998). The importance of nursing documentation in patient care, in guiding practice and in providing information for members of the interprofessional healthcare team is highlighted. Record keeping forms an important part of the clinical governance initiative in terms of quality improvement and risk management. The issues surrounding the legal requirements of record keeping in district nursing practice are discussed. Suggestions are made for assessing the quality of nursing documentation by audit and research, in order to establish the suitability of using the present systems in the community setting.

  10. Role perceptions of nurse clinical research coordinators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones CT

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Carolynn Thomas Jones, Lynda L Wilson School of Nursing, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA Abstract: Nursing roles in clinical research have evolved in the last 3 decades and include diverse responsibilities and job titles. Nurse clinical research coordinators’ (NCRCs roles include study planning, implementation, participant recruitment and retention, assessment of participants’ responses to clinical protocols, data management, and evaluation. The purpose of this study was to examine NCRCs’ perceptions of 59 specific clinical research activities that have been proposed as a taxonomy of NCRC activities. Participants were asked to check whether each of the 59 activities is being performed, and whether those activities should be performed, by NCRCs. The sample included 61 NCRCs who were attending the annual meeting of the International Association of Clinical Research Nurses. The percentage of respondents who indicated that the 59 activities are being performed by NCRCs at their sites ranged from 55%–98.4%. The percentage of respondents who indicated that the 59 activities should be performed by NCRCs ranged from 61.7%–88.5%. There were eight activities that fewer than 70% of the respondents reported should be performed by NCRCs. Chi-square analyses were conducted to determine whether there was a difference in the distribution of responses to the “are performed” versus “should be performed” responses for each of the 59 activities. There were significant differences in the distributions for 49 of the activities. The percentage of nurses responding “are performed” was higher than the percentage of responses to the “should be performed” items for 41 of these 49 activities. Findings suggest that further research is needed to validate the extent to which the taxonomy of clinical research nurse (CRN roles is a valid reflection of the actual practice of NCRCs, and also to explore reasons for the

  11. Swedish student nurses' perception of peer learning as an educational model during clinical practice in a hospital setting-an evaluation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Marie; Carlson, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Peer learning, a collaborative learning model has no tradition in clinical education for undergraduate student nurses in Sweden, and little is reported of the student experience. An increasing number of students have led to a pressing need for preceptors and clinical placements thus, highlighting the need for a supportive educational model. The objectives for the current study were to explore how student nurses' evaluated peer learning as an educational model during clinical practice in a hospital setting, and to compare perceptions among student nurses from year one and three. A questionnaire developed for the purpose of this study was developed and responded to by 62 (year one) and 73 (year three) student nurses. Data were collected between 2011 and 2013. The questionnaire contained six open- ended and eight closed questions on a four point Likert-scale. Written responses were analysed by content analysis and the closed questions by using descriptive statistics. Mann-Whitney U-test was used to examine differences in relation to students from year one and three. The peer learning experience was evaluated in a positive way. Statistical significance differences were shown for two out of eight closed questions. The peer learning activities were evaluated as supportive and relevant for learning. Three categories emerged from the content analysis: "a feeling of safety", "a sense of competition" and "the learning experience". A feeling of safety seems to be connected to students' perception of increased learning and independence. However, the sense of negative competition needs to be addressed when students are prepared for the teaching and learning activities in the peer learning model. Finally, what needs to be further investigated is what challenges and opportunities the peer learning model presents to preceptors.

  12. Does Faculty Incivility in Nursing Education Affect Emergency Nursing Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, Pamela

    Incivility in nursing education is a complicated problem which causes disruptions in the learning process and negatively affects future nursing practice. This mixed method research study described incivility as well as incivility's effects through extensive literature review and application of a modified Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey. The INE included six demographic items, four quantitative sections, and five open-ended questions. The survey examined emergency nurses' perceptions of incivility and how the experience affected their personal nursing practice. The INE was initially tested in a 2004 pilot study by Dr. Cynthia Clark. For this research study, modifications were made to examine specifically emergency nurse's perceptions of incivility and the effects on their practice. The population was a group of nurses who were members of the emergency nurses association in a Midwestern state. In the quantitative component of the Incivility in Nursing Education (INE) survey, the Likert scale questions indicated that the majority of the participants reported witnessing or experiencing the uncivil behaviors. In the qualitative section of the INE survey, the participants reported that although they have not seen incivility within their own academic career, they had observed faculty incivility with nursing students when the participants were assigned as preceptors as part of their emergency nursing practice.

  13. Advances in the application of action learning in nursing practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Er-Huan Han; Yan Zhang; Jian-Ge Zhang; Bei-Lei Lin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we elucidate the concept and characteristics of action learning as well as summarize the reflexivity, cooperativeness, and subjectivity of this approach. Furthermore, we describe the effects and limitations of action learning when applied in nursing management, nursing education, and clinical practice, among various fields.

  14. The structure, content, and quality of family nurse practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickwell, S M

    1993-01-01

    Relatively little data has been collected documenting the scope of family nurse practitioner (FNP) clinical practice, and virtually no research definitively describes the quality of that practice. Physicians have led the way in quantitative collection of practice content information. The resulting analyses have determined not only the most common diagnoses in primary care but also the content of teaching and research in family practice. Nurse clinicians, educators, and researchers have assumed this content to be pertinent to FNP practice as well. This article describes the major studies of family physician practice and the few studies of nurse practitioner/FNP practice, and advocates intensified review of FNP clinical content as an empirical basis for practice, education, and research.

  15. Loss of clinical nursing expertise: a discussion paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioffi, Jane Marie

    2012-10-01

    There is evidence to suggest that there is a general decline in clinical expertise in nursing as a result of experienced clinicians leaving the profession. The expertise of clinical nursing practice is an important resource and needs to be captured and made available to others as loss of this knowledge and expertise has implications for clinical outcomes. This paper aims to discuss the current nursing workforce, loss of clinical expertise, the nature of expertise and the way it can be captured. Clarification and articulation of clinical knowledge of nursing experts provides the means for knowledge to be transferred to a less experienced workforce and be available in an accessible form in the workplace. Leverage of nursing expertise in this manner has the potential to benefit less experienced staff, hold clinical nursing expertise in the workplace and improve clinical outcomes and satisfaction with performance.

  16. Discussion Based on Medical Nursing Clinical Practice%基于内科护理学临床见习的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张琼; 贺艳宁

    2014-01-01

    临床见习是内科护理学学习过程中非常重要的一部分,通过临床见习,才能使医学生更快更好地理解课本知识,本文就我校学生临床见习情况实行了调查,并对结果进行了分析。%The clinical trainee is a very important part in"Medical Nursing"learning process, through clinical clerkship, medical students can make faster and better understanding of textbook knowledge, this article surveys on our students prac-ticed clinical probation conditions, and analyzes the results.

  17. Nursing home work practices and nursing assistants' job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Christine E; Squillace, Marie R; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L; Wiener, Joshua M

    2009-10-01

    To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey, and county-level data from the Area Resource File. Multinomial logistic regression was used to estimate effects of compensation and working conditions on nursing assistants' overall job satisfaction, controlling for personal characteristics and local labor market characteristics. Wages, benefits, and job demands, measured by the ratio of nursing assistant hours per resident day, were associated with job satisfaction. Consistent with previous studies, job satisfaction was greater when nursing assistants felt respected and valued by their employers and had good relationships with supervisors. Nursing assistants were more satisfied when they had enough time to complete their work, when their work was challenging, when they were not subject to mandatory overtime, and where food was not delivered to residents on trays. This is the first investigation of nursing assistant job satisfaction using a nationally representative sample of nursing assistants matched to information about their employing nursing homes. The findings corroborate results of previous studies in showing that compensation and working conditions that provide respect, good relationships with supervisors, and better staffing levels are important to nursing assistant job satisfaction.

  18. Evolvement of French advanced practice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnel, Galadriel

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this review is to chronicle the development of the advanced practice nurse (APN) in France and compare international APN indictors of quality care with French studies. A review of the literature was performed by accessing the MEDLINE, Science Direct, and Cochrane Databases for studies of quality of care by APNs during 1965-2012. The author's participation on a national task force in collaboration with the French Ministry of Health provided additional information. After applying limits of this search, 36 studies fulfilled inclusion and exclusion criteria. In both the French and international APN nursing literature, the most frequently described quality of care measures were level of patient satisfaction and other patient outcomes (clinical and laboratory measures) according to evidence-based guidelines. In three French studies (nephrology, neuro-oncology, and urology settings), nurses performed direct patient care and were legally permitted to take on some limited responsibilities usually held by French physicians, including clinical examinations, diagnosing, and prescribing. Creation of the APN role in France can respond to public health challenges including the rising incidence of chronic diseases and an impending physician shortage. Future APN research should focus on rigorous, innovative design development including collaborative care models. ©2013 The Author(s) ©2013 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  19. Nursing students’ perspectives on clinical education

    OpenAIRE

    MOHAMMAD REZA HEIDARI; REZA NOROUZADEH

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The importance of optimal clinical nursing education in professional skills development is undeniable. In clinical education, nursing students are often faced with problems. Recognizing nursing students’ perception on clinical education is the first step to remove the barriers of this challenge. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the nursing students’ perspectives on clinical education. 150 nursing students were select...

  20. Academic training and clinical placement problems to achieve nursing competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    RAHMATI SHARGHI, NARJES; ALAMI, ALI; KHOSRAVAN, SHAHLA; MANSOORIAN, MOHAMMAD REZA; EKRAMI, ALI

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: High quality of care is one of the requirements of nursing which depends on the nursing competency. In this connection, the aim of this research was to determine the problems related to the academic training (nursing' educational program) and clinical practice to achieve competency from the viewpoint of nurses, faculty members, and nursing students. Methods: the study was an analytical cross-sectional one. The sample consisted of the academic staff, the third and the fourth year nursing students and nurses in practice. The instrument of the study was a two-part researcher-made questionnaire with 22 questions in the theoretical- clinical realm to assess  problems related to the theoretical and clinical teaching in nursing, and 23 questions to assess the clinical functions. The questionnaire was validated in terms of both face and content validity. Its reliability, using Cronbach's Alpha coefficient, was 0.72 in the theoretical-clinical and 0.73 in the clinical realm. Both descriptive and analytical statistics were used to analyze the data, using SPSS software. Results: The results of this study indicated that from the participants’ viewpoints, the most important problems in the academic education for nursea to acquire competency were as follows: lack of academic research the clinical period (88.9%), no application of theoretical aspects of the nursing process in practice (85.6%), insufficient knowledgeable and professional educators (81.1%), the use of traditional routine-oriented methods on the wards (75.6%); also insufficient time for performance based on knowledge in relation to  the nurse's workload (86.5%), weakness and usefulness of scientific function encouragement systems in clinic (85.2%), and learnt theoretical subjects not coming into practice in clinical fields after graduation (75.6%). Conclusion: Efforts to reduce the gap between the theoretical and practical (clinical function) knowledge in educational and work environment are

  1. Nursing Practice Environment and Registered Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, JiSun; Flynn, Linda; Aiken, Linda H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Recruiting and retaining registered nurses (RNs) in nursing homes is problematic, and little research is available to guide efforts to make nursing homes a more attractive practice environment for RNs. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between aspects of the nursing practice environment and job satisfaction among RNs…

  2. Responsibility and autonomous nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, R J

    1991-04-01

    In this paper, the consequences were there greater autonomy in nursing practice, are considered. Autonomous practice implies accountability which entails both personal and professional responsibility: a personal responsibility to endorse ethical conduct consistent with professional practice; and a professional responsibility to exercise discretionary powers to the ultimate benefit of the patient. In this context, discretionary responsibility implies: recognizing a patient's wants may not be consistent with a patient's needs; abstaining from collusion with noncompliant patients; supporting the patient's right to refuse treatment only after full psychological exploration; understanding the psychological ramifications of informed consent from a practitioner and recipient point of view; maintaining appropriate personal and professional boundaries; and fostering collegiate relationships with the medical fraternity grounded on egalitarian principles. The author provides a philosophical and psychological analysis of responsibility in an effort to achieve a deeper understanding of the relationship this has with the concepts of 'freedom' and 'accountability'.

  3. Nurses in Australian general practice: implications for chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Elizabeth J; Davidson, Patricia M; Salamonson, Yenna; Ollerton, Richard; Griffiths, Rhonda

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the demographic and employment characteristics of Australian practice nurses and explore the relationship between these characteristics and the nurses' role. Nursing in general practice is an integral component of primary care and chronic disease management in the United Kingdom and New Zealand, but in Australia it is an emerging specialty and there is limited data on the workforce and role. National postal survey embedded in a sequential mixed method design. 284 practice nurses completed a postal survey during 2003-2004. Descriptive statistics and factor analysis were utilized to analyse the data. Most participants were female (99%), Registered Nurses (86%), employed part-time in a group practice, with a mean age of 45.8 years, and had a hospital nursing certificate as their highest qualification (63%). The tasks currently undertaken by participants and those requiring further education were inversely related (R2 = -0.779). Conversely, tasks perceived to be appropriate for a practice nurse and those currently undertaken by participants were positively related (R2 = 0.8996). There was a mismatch between the number of participants who perceived that a particular task was appropriate and those who undertook the task. This disparity was not completely explained by demographic or employment characteristics. Extrinsic factors such as legal and funding issues, lack of space and general practitioner attitudes were identified as barriers to role expansion. Practice nurses are a clinically experienced workforce whose skills are not optimally harnessed to improve the care of the growing number of people with chronic and complex conditions. Relevance to clinical practice. Study data reveal a need to overcome the funding, regulatory and interprofessional barriers that currently constrain the practice nurse role. Expansion of the practice nurse role is clearly a useful adjunct to specialist management of chronic and complex disease

  4. The nurse teacher's clinical role now and in the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannides, A P

    1999-04-01

    The role of the nurse teacher in relation to the clinical setting has been debated for 20 years, yet it has been the subject of relatively few large studies. Recent studies led to inconclusive results, hence the nurse lecturer's clinical role remains an area of long-standing dispute. Changes in nurse education United Kingdom Central Council (UKCC) and the amalgamation of nurse education into higher education as part of the Strategy for Nursing, as well as the expansion of supernumerary status for student nurses, gave impetus to the search for a new clinical role for nurse lecturers. Research suggests that nurse teachers wish to maintain clinical contact, but the nature of this contact is vigorously debated at present. Lee, in reviewing the literature, concluded that this topic is highly contentious in terms of its nature, extent and purpose. She goes as far as to suggest that there is a need for empirical research to address the question as to whether there is a role for nurse lecturers in the clinical area. This paper examines some of the factors which influence the development of the clinical aspect of the role of nurse lecturers, explains how the author performed this role and the perceived benefits to students, mentors and the lecturer. It proposes a clinical role model based on the literature and the author's own personal experience as a 'clinical liaison lecturer' since the integration of nursing education into higher education. Key points The clinical role of the nurse teacher remains an area of long standing dispute Nurse lecturers wish to maintain clinical contact and maintain clinical competence, but in reality no consensus exists as to its meaning The mentor's role can be complemented by a clinically competent nurse lecturer who arguably should be able to teach in the classroom and the practice settings Using a triangular approach to reviewing student's experience, lecturers can update their clinical knowledge, demonstrate credibility, promote education-practice

  5. Recognizing and defining clinical nurse leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, David

    This article addresses the issue of clinical leadership and how it is defined. The concepts and definitions of clinical leadership are considered as well as the results of new research that suggests that clinical leaders can be seen as experts in their field, and because they are approachable and are effective communicators, are empowered to act as a role model, motivating others by matching their values and beliefs about nursing and care to their practice. This is supported by a new leadership theory, congruent leadership, proposed as the most appropriate leadership theory to support an understanding of clinical leadership. Congruent leaders (clinical nurse leaders) are followed because there is a match between the leader's values and beliefs and their actions.

  6. Quality measures for nurse practitioner practice evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinpell, Ruth; Kapu, April N

    2017-08-01

    Evaluating the impact of nurse practitioner (NP) practice has become a priority area of focus for demonstrating outcomes. A number of quality measures are available to enable practice-specific evaluation of NP roles and initiatives. This article reviews sources of quality measures that can be used to facilitate quantifying the outcomes of NP practice as part of an overall evaluation agenda. National resources and published literature on NP quality measures were reviewed. Various resources and toolkits exist to assist NPs in identifying outcomes of practice using quality measures. The need to demonstrate outcomes of NP practice remains an ongoing priority area regardless of the clinical practice setting. A variety of sources of quality measures exist that can be used to showcase the effect of NP care. The use of quality measures can be effectively integrated into evaluation of NP role and NP-directed initiatives to demonstrate impact, and enhance the conduct of an NP outcomes assessment. The use of organizational, NP-specific, and national-related quality measures can help to showcase how NP care improves the quality, safety, and costs of health care. ©2017 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  7. Enhancing Patient Safety Using Clinical Nursing Data: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeeyae; Choi, Jeungok E

    2016-01-01

    To enhance patient safety from falls, many hospital information systems have been implemented to collect clinical data from the bedside and have used the information to improve fall prevention care. However, most of them use administrative data not clinical nursing data. This necessitated the development of a web-based Nursing Practice and Research Information Management System (NPRIMS) that processes clinical nursing data to measure nurses' delivery of fall prevention care and its impact on patient outcomes. This pilot study developed computer algorithms based on a falls prevention protocol and programmed the prototype NPRIMS. It successfully measured the performance of nursing care delivered and its impact on patient outcomes using clinical nursing data from the study site. Results of the study revealed that NPRIMS has the potential to pinpoint components of nursing processes that are in need of improvement for preventing patient from falls.

  8. Nursing diagnoses in hospitalized elderly, according to the International Classification of Nursing Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Marina Moralles Caldeira de Andrada; Marlon França; Ângela Maria Alvarez; Karina Silveira de Almeida Hammerschmidt

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to identify the nursing diagnoses characteristic of hospitalized elderly at the Medical Clinic of a university hospital in southern Brazil, according to the International Classification of Nursing Practice, version 1.0. Methods: it is a descriptive, cross-sectional study involving 24 elderly. Results: 158 nursing diagnoses were obtained gathered in 23 groups, grouped into 14 macro-groups presented by similarities: cardiovascular system, impaired self-care, compromised respiratory ...

  9. The Psychiatric Family Nurse Practitioner: A Collaborator in Family Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, Patricia D.

    1999-01-01

    The potential of the psychiatric family nurse practitioner (Psych.F.N.P.) to contribute to family practice through physical care and mental health care exists in the here and now. This role is a synthesis of 2 advanced practice roles, the psychiatric clinical nurse specialist (Psych.C.N.S.) and family nurse practitioner (F.N.P.), both of which continue to have great utility independently. This synthesis is a practical application of concepts that have evolved to meet the changing patterns of ...

  10. The Psychiatric Family Nurse Practitioner: A Collaborator in Family Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, Patricia D.

    1999-01-01

    The potential of the psychiatric family nurse practitioner (Psych.F.N.P.) to contribute to family practice through physical care and mental health care exists in the here and now. This role is a synthesis of 2 advanced practice roles, the psychiatric clinical nurse specialist (Psych.C.N.S.) and family nurse practitioner (F.N.P.), both of which continue to have great utility independently. This synthesis is a practical application of concepts that have evolved to meet the changing patterns of ...

  11. State Regulations for School Nursing Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praeger, Susan; Zimmerman, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present a state-by-state summary of rules and regulations governing school nursing practice in the United States. Official government and agency sites were reviewed to determine providers of services in schools, criteria for becoming a school nurse, protection of titling, mandates for school nursing, and the…

  12. Medication Administration Practices of School Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Ann Marie; Kelly, Michael W.; Reed, David

    2000-01-01

    Assessed medication administration practices among school nurses, surveying members of the National Association of School Nurses. Respondents were extremely concerned about medication administration. Errors in administering medications were reported by 48.5 percent of respondents, with missed doses the most common error. Most nurses followed…

  13. Nursing students’ valuation on their clinical clerkship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana R. Rodríguez Gonzalo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To know how the nursing students evaluate the clinical-practical knowledge appraised at their clinical clerkship, measured through the satisfaction with the nursing staff Teaching Skills, the Perceived Support and their Global Satisfaction. Methodology: Cross-section, descriptive study carried out at the Ramon y Cajal Hospital. The target population were the 2008/09 nursing students at their clinical clerkship in the hospital, with a total number of 459 shifts. Questionnaire was self-designed and self-administered. Analyzed variables were the student academic year, the hospital ward and their relation with: 1. Teaching Skills, 2. Perceived Support, 3. General Satisfaction.Results: 314 questionnaires were filled out and returned, which is 69,41% of the total number of questionnaires. Students at the Operating Rooms and at the Paediatric Wards gave statistically significant lower qualifications (p=0,005 and p=0,003 than the Emergencies students to the nursing staff Teaching Skills. Regarding the Perceived Support, statistically significant higher scores were given to the Paediatrics (p=0,002 and the Surgical Wards (0,001 compared to the Operating Rooms staff. Finally, in General Satisfaction the lowest, but non statistically significant, scores were given also to the Operating Rooms (p>0,05.Conclusions: Nursing staff from the Operating Rooms and the Paediatric Wards should ameliorate their teaching skills, and those at the Operating Rooms, also the support given during the students clinical clerkship. The proposed improvement actions suggest that meetings between supervisors, nursing staff and professors in order to discuss the teaching objectives are necessary, as well as informational sessions between students and nursing staff at the wards.

  14. Academic training and clinical placement problems to achieve nursing competency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NARJES RAHMATI SHARGHI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: High quality of care is one of the requirements of nursing which depends on the nursing competency. In this connection, the aim of this research was to determine the problems related to the academic training (nursing’ educational program and clinical practice to achieve competency from the viewpoint of nurses, faculty members, and nursing students. Methods: The study was an analytical cross-sectional one. The sample consisted of the academic staff, the third and the fourth year nursing students and nurses in practice. The instrument of the study was a two-part researcher-made questionnaire with 22 questions in the theoretical- clinical realm to assess problems related to the theoretical and clinical teaching in nursing, and 23 questions to assess the clinical functions. The questionnaire was validated in terms of both face and content validity. Its reliability, using Cronbach’s Alpha coefficient, was 0.72 in the theoretical-clinical and 0.73 in the clinical realm. Both descriptive and analytical statistics were used to analyze the data, using SPSS software. Results: The results of this study indicated that from the participants’ viewpoints, the most important problems in the academic education for nurses to acquire competency were as follows: lack of academic research during the clinical period (88.9%, no application of theoretical aspects of the nursing process in practice (85.6%, insufficient knowledgeable and professional educators (81.1%, the use of traditional routine-oriented methods on the wards (75.6%; also insufficient time for performance based on knowledge in relation to the nurse’s workload (86.5%, weakness and usefulness of scientific function encouragement systems in clinic (85.2%, and learnt theoretical subjects not coming into practice in clinical fields after graduation (75.6%. Conclusion: Efforts to reduce the gap between the theoretical and practical (clinical function knowledge in educational and work

  15. Enhancing assertiveness in district nurse specialist practice

    OpenAIRE

    Green, J.

    2016-01-01

    District nurse (DN) care delivery has undergone substantial change in recent years due to changing demographics and service delivery demands that have called for a move of care delivery from secondary to primary care. The title District Nurse is recorded with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) on completion of the Specialist Practice Qualification in District Nursing (SPQ DN), which purports to be a 'transformational' course that prepares future caseload holders to manage their team and ...

  16. Practical research of revised anchored instruction in clinical practice teaching of psychiatric nursing%改良式抛锚式教学在精神病护理学见习中的实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    甘照宇; 王继辉; 钟智勇; 程敏锋; 张晋碚

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the feasibility and practical value of revised anchored instruction in clinical practice teaching of psychiatric nursing.Methods Revised anchored instruction was introduced to the clinical practice teaching of psychiatric nursing among 30 senior nursing students from Nursing School of SUN Yat-sen University.Authentic cases along with literal or oral materials,instead of videodisc,were used to present question-embedded situations,clinical practice was organized in small subgroups,discussion was performed all together,anchors' were casted by both teachers and students.Results With the driving of questions,all the students were well motivated and fully devoted to studying with high enthusiasm,autonomic and collaborative learning were advocated and formed.Knowledge imparting and capability fostering were achieved.Conclusions Application of revised anchored instruction in the clinical practice teaching of psychiatric nursing is feasible and valuable.%目的 探讨改良式抛锚式教学在精神病护理学见习教学中的现实可行性和实践价值.方法 选择中山大学护理学院护理学专业30名本科见习生为研究对象,实施改良式抛锚式教学,以真实的案例代替影像技术,同时借助文字或口述资料呈现问题情景,通过分组实践、集中讨论、师生层层“抛锚”,有步骤、有层次地开展教学活动.结果 在问题驱动下,学生的学习动机被激发、学习热情高涨,“自主学习”和“协作学习”的风气初步形成,知识传授以及能力培养的教学目标得以实现.结论 改良式抛锚式教学应用于精神病护理学见习中是可行的而且有益的.

  17. Nursing practice implications of the year of ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Karen T

    2015-01-01

    e 2015 ANA Code of Ethics is foundational to professional nursing practice and is aligned with AWHONN’s core values, standards of care and position statement on ethical decision-making in the clinical setting. Understanding the roles and responsibilities of nurses to ensure an ethical practice environment is critical to perinatal health outcomes and sta engagement and to the prevention of moral distress.

  18. Nurse prescribing as an aspect of future role expansion: the views of Irish clinical nurse specialists.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lockwood, Emily B

    2008-10-01

    AIM: Nurses and midwives are expanding the scope of their professional practice, assuming additional responsibilities including the management and prescribing of medications. The aim of the study was to discover the attitudes of clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) in Ireland to nurse prescribing and to examine perceived barriers to engaging in this aspect of future role expansion. BACKGROUND: The expansion of the nursing role in relation to nurse prescribing is an ongoing process and is subject to incremental iterations of legislation and professional policy. Nurse prescribing as an expanded role function has become a reality in many countries. Ireland has addressed the matter in a formal and systematic way through legislation. METHOD: A questionnaire was administered to a sample of 283 CNSs practising in a variety of care settings in Ireland. Attitudes were measured using Likert-type attitudinal scales, designed specifically for the study. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Findings indicate that the majority of clinical nurse specialists were positively disposed toward nurse prescribing as a future role expansion. The fear of litigation was identified as the most significant barrier to nurse prescribing. The majority of respondents equated nurse prescribing with increased autonomy and holistic care. The findings indicate that there is a need for further examination of the educational requirements of the CNS in relation to nurse prescribing. The legislative implications for nurse prescribing and fear of legal consequences need to be considered prior to any implementation of nurse prescribing. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: While senior clinicians are willing to embrace future role expansion in the area of nurse prescribing, their Nurse Managers should recognize that facilitation of nurse prescribing needs to address the legal and educational requirements for such activity. Failure to address these requirements can represent a barrier to role expansion. This paper offers

  19. Description of practice as an ambulatory care nurse: psychometric properties of a practice-analysis survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghi, Heibatollah; Panniers, Teresa L; Smolenski, Mary C

    2007-01-01

    Changes within nursing demand that a specialty conduct periodic, appropriate practice analyses to continually validate itself against preset standards. This study explicates practice analysis methods using ambulatory care nursing as an exemplar. Data derived from a focus group technique were used to develop a survey that was completed by 499 ambulatory care nurses. The validity of the instrument was assessed using principal components analysis; reliability was estimated using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The focus group with ambulatory care experts produced 34 knowledge and activity statements delineating ambulatory care nursing practice. The survey data produced five factors accounting for 71% of variance in the data. The factors were identified as initial patient assessment, professional nursing issues and standards, client care management skills, technical/clinical skills, and system administrative operations. It was concluded that practice analyses delineate a specialty and provide input for certification examinations aimed at measuring excellence in a field of nursing.

  20. Factors affecting integration of midwifery nursing science theory with clinical practice in Vhembe District, Limpopo Province as perceived by professional midwives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thivhulawi Malwela

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Professional midwives have an important role to play in midwifery training to produce a competent midwife. According to the social learning theory, professional midwives act as role models for students. When allocated for clinical learning experiences in the training hospitals, students will have the opportunity to observe the well-trained, skilled, and experienced professional midwives. The whole process will enable students to integrate theory with practice and they will become competent.Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the factors affecting integration of midwifery nursing science theory with clinical practice as perceived by midwives.Setting: The study was conducted at the training hospitals in Vhembe district of the Limpopo Province, South Africa. These hospitals were: Donald Fraser, Siloam, and Tshidzini.Methods: A qualitative explorative, descriptive and contextual design was used. A Nonprobability, convenient sampling method was used to select 11 midwives from the following hospitals: Donald Fraser, Siloam, and Tshidzini, in Vhembe district. In-depth individual interviews were conducted. Data were analysed through open coding method.Result: One theme and five sub-themes emerged from the analysed data, namely: shortage of midwives, attitudes towards student midwives, reluctance to perform teaching functions, language barriers, and declining midwifery practice standards.Conclusion: Shortage of midwives in the clinical areas led to fewer numbers of mentors whom the students could observe and imitate to acquire clinical skills. Some of the midwives were reluctant to teach students. Recommendations were made for both training institutions and hospitals to employ preceptors for students in the clinical practical.

  1. Advanced practice geriatric nursing education. New options in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnel, W B

    1999-01-01

    Knowledgeable practitioners with the skills needed to serve in a variety of clinical settings are the primary objective of the Adult-Geriatric Advanced Nursing Program and the FNP elective, Advanced Practice Nursing Care of the Frail Elderly. The continued blending of long term and acute care settings will further cloud and challenge the school responsible for educating APNs in the care of older adults, particularly the frail elderly. Education needs to provide flexibility for students through new service designs such as interactive computer courses. Nurses with an orientation to the future should consider geriatric nursing education.

  2. Relationship between nursing care quality, nurse staffing, nurse job satisfaction, nurse practice environment, and burnout: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virya Koy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this literature review is to explore the relationship between nurse staffing, nurse job satisfaction, nurse practice environment, burnout, and nursing care quality through a consideration of what is meant by perceptions of nursing care quality. Different people define nursing care quality in many ways. It is complex, multi-faceted and multi-dimensional, and attempts to assess, monitor, evaluate and improve nursing care quality have evolved over a number of years. Of particular interest is the way in which changes in nurse staffing, nurse job satisfaction, nurse practice environment, and burnout may affect the quality of nursing care delivery. A search was conducted using the CINAHL, Medline and Embase databases, HINARI, Science Direct, Google, and PubMed. The terms searched included quality of health care; nursing care quality; nurse job satisfaction; nurse practice environment; burnout; and nurse staffing. Papers were included for their relevance to the field of enquiry. The original search was conducted in 2003 and updated in 2004. Quality of care is a complex, multi-dimensional concept, which presents researchers with a challenge when attempting to evaluate it. Many different tools have assessed nursing care quality. In addition, the review found that there were relationships between nurse staffing, nurse job satisfaction, nurse practice environment, burnout, and nursing care quality. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(8.000: 1825-1831

  3. Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) as an integral part of nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnell, Deborah S; Nowzari, Shahrzad; Reimann, Brie; Fischer, Leigh; Pace, Elizabeth; Goplerud, Eric

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT. Substance use screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) should be an integral part of the scope of nursing practice. This commentary is an appeal for nurses to advance their knowledge and competencies related to SBIRT. The question of how to move SBIRT into the mainstream of nursing practice was posed to several leaders of federal agencies, health care and nursing organizations, nurse educators, and nurse leaders. The authors provide recommendations for moving this set of clinical strategies (i.e., SBIRT) into day-to-day nursing practice.

  4. Influence of scaffolding instruction on clinical communication skills of nursing students in clinical practice%支架式教学对专科实习护生临床沟通能力影响的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任秀红; 韩向东; 石素宁

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of scaffolding instruction on clinical communication skills of nursing students in clinical practice of neurology.Methods A total of 40 undergraduate nursing students of Grade 2011 in Zibo medical colledge taking part in the clinical practice were randomly divided into two groups .Twenty students in hospital A as the intervention group took scaffolding instruction on the basis of routine clinical practice,while the other 20 students in hospital B as the control group took routine clinical practice. After 2 months′clinical practice,clinical communication skills and confidence in communication of two groups were respectively measured by questionnaire.Results After 2 months of clinical practice,the score of clinical communication in intervention group was higher than that in control group(t=4.763,P<0.01).The confidence in communication in intervention group was higher than that in control group (t=2.184,P<0.05). Conclusion Communication skills training based on scaffolding instruction can effectively improve clinical communication and confidence in communication for nursing students in praxis.%目的:探讨神经内科运用支架式教学在实习护生临床沟通能力中的应用效果。方法采用方便抽样法选取淄博市某医学院校在 A医院神经内科实习的20名护生为干预组,实习期间在传统带教基础上采用支架式教学开展沟通技能培训,同时选取同校在 B医院神经内科实习的20名护生为对照组,采用传统带教模式,实习时间为2个月。在干预前后同时进行沟通能力测评和沟通技能自信问卷调查。结果实习2个月后,干预组临床沟通能力明显好于对照组(t=4.763,P<0.01)。干预组沟通自信得分高于对照组(t=2.184,P<0.05)。结论支架式教学模式能有效提高实习护生的临床沟通能力和沟通自信心。

  5. [Reading nursing Literature in English: new inputs for practicing nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Klitzing, Waltraut; Stoll, Hansruedi; Trachsel, Edith; Aldorf, Kurt; Bernhard, Annelis; Eze, Germaine; Spirig, Rebecca

    2007-02-01

    A prerequisite to providing evidence-based care is the ability to comprehend the nursing research literature, most of which is published in English. To facilitate this understanding, a course on "reading the research literature for evidence-based practice in English" was developed by an interdisciplinary team for staff nurses at the University Hospital Basel. The pilot course was offered to nurses who specialized in cancer care. It was led by the oncology Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) from the Department of Medicine. Research articles focusing on the management of chronic illness and cancer pain management were assigned and read. The course consisted of ten 90 minute lessons. The evaluation was designed to address the following questions: 1. Did participation in the course improve the oncology related knowledge of the nurses? 2. Did participation in the course improve the nurses' English language skills? 3. At what level of difficulty did the nurse participants perceive the course to be? 4. Were course participants able to use their newly acquired knowledge to teach their nursing colleagues on the ward? The course evaluation demonstrated that the 15 participants significantly improved their oncology knowledge through this process but that their English skills did not improve. The participants were able to present lectures on their wards based on the course literature, which were positively evaluated by their colleagues and the APN course leader. The participants perceived the course as being sophisticated but also effective at demonstrating the use of English-language research literature for one's own nursing practice.

  6. The Importance of Reflective Practice in Nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Caldwell

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reflection is an essential attribute for the development of autonomous, critical, and advanced practitioners (Mantzoukas & Jasper, 2004. According to Chong (2009, “Reflective practice should be a continuous cycle in which experience and reflection on experiences are inter-related” (p. 112. Studies have shown that nurses who take the time to reflect on their daily experiences provide enhanced nursing care, have a better understanding of theiractions, which in return develops their professional skills (Hansebo & Kihlgren, 2001. Reflective practice is the ability to examine ones actions and experiences with the outcome of developing their practice and enhancing clinicalknowledge. Reflective practice affects all levels of nursing, from students, to advanced practice nursing students, aswell as practicing nurses. Reflective practice is an important component of the nursing curriculum. Research has shown the relationship between student nurses and their mentors is vital. In order for reflection to be effective open-mindedness, courage, and a willingness to accept, and act on, criticism must be present (Bulmam, Lathlean, & Gobbi, 2012. This paper will explore the current literature and implications related to reflective practice in nursing.

  7. Competencies in nursing students for organized forms of clinical moral deliberation and decision-making

    OpenAIRE

    Uil-Westerlaken, Jeanette den; Cusveller, Bart

    2013-01-01

    Bachelor-prepared nurses are expected to be competent in moral deliberation and decision-making (MDD) in clinical practice. It is unclear, however, how this competence develops in nursing students. This study explores the development of nursing students’ competence for participating in organized forms of MDD in clinical practice, with an eye to improve nursing education. A cross-sectional descriptive survey was conducted by a questionnaire among first and fourth year bachelor nursing students...

  8. Nursing Students' Perceptions of Satisfaction and Self-Confidence with Clinical Simulation Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omer, Tagwa

    2016-01-01

    Nursing and other health professionals are increasingly using simulation as a strategy and a tool for teaching and learning at all levels that need clinical training. Nursing education for decades used simulation as an integral part of nursing education. Recent studies indicated that simulation improves nursing knowledge, clinical practice,…

  9. Taking personal responsibility: Nurses' and assistant nurses' experiences of good nursing practice in psychiatric inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsson, Sebastian; Sävenstedt, Stefan; Olsson, Malin

    2016-10-01

    Therapeutic nurse-patient relationships are considered essential for good nursing practice in psychiatric inpatient care. Previous research suggests that inpatient care fails to fulfil patients' expectations in this regard, and that nurses might experience the reality of inpatient care as an obstruction. The aim of the present study was to explore nurses' and assistant nurses' experiences of good nursing practice in the specific context of psychiatric inpatient care. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 12 skilled, relationship-oriented nurses and assistant nurses in order to explore their experiences with nursing practice related to psychiatric inpatient care. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using an interpretive descriptive approach. Findings describe good nursing practice as a matter of nurses and assistant nurses taking personal responsibility for their actions and for the individual patient as a person. Difficulties in providing dignified nursing care and taking personal responsibility cause them to experience feelings of distress and frustration. Shared values and nursing leadership supports being moral and treating patients with respect, having enough time supports being present and connecting with patients, and working as a part of a competent team with critical daily discussions and diversity supports being confident and building trust. The findings suggest that taking personal responsibility is integral to good nursing practice. If unable to improve poor circumstances, nurses might be forced to promote their own survival by refuting or redefining their responsibility. Nurses need to prioritize being with patients and gain support in shaping their own nursing practice. Nursing leadership should provide moral direction and defend humanistic values. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  10. Community nurses and their collaboration with clinical nurse consultants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannings, W; Maynard, C

    A survey was undertaken of 129 community nurses who had chosen to utilise a clinical nurse consultant for education and/or patient care at home. Accessibility, efficiency, usefulness of the consultation and the educative role of the clinical nurse consultant were examined. The responses indicated that the community nurses had positive perceptions regarding their collaboration with the clinical nurse consultants. It is recommended that an objective tool be developed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the collaboration, for data collection purposes, when measuring patient outcomes and evaluating specialist resources.

  11. Nurses' clinical decision-making for preserving nursing home residents' remaining abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Ju; Choi, Jung Eun; Kim, Mi So; Kim, Su Jin; Chang, Sung Ok

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to clarify and conceptualise nurses' clinical decision-making for preserving the remaining abilities of nursing home residents suffering from physical-cognitive functional decline. Older adults experience physical, psychological and social changes, but their remaining abilities differ across individuals. This study used a qualitative research to gain a deeper understanding of nursing homes nurses' clinical decision-making. In-depth interviews with 32 experienced nurses were undertaken. The data were analysed using conventional content analysis. Six categories and 58 subcategories of nursing practice related to managing the remaining abilities of residents with physical-cognitive functional decline were generated. The results of this study revealed five themes: (1) seeing residents' potential, (2) physical, emotional and psychosocial care in daily routines, (3) keeping personalised charts, (4) encouraging, promoting and physical and emotional support and (5) preparing residents for more independent living. The results were categorised into nurses' personal strategies based on their experience, practical nursing knowledge, nursing interventions and nursing evaluation criteria. The themes reflected positive views on the residents' functional abilities and the nursing homes nurses' perception that their goal was to help residents achieve their highest level of independence. Preserving nursing home residents' remaining abilities represents nurses' optimistic view of residents' functional status. Routine care tailored for preserving the remaining abilities of individual nursing home residents with physical-cognitive functional decline is needed. Preserving the remaining abilities of nursing home resident is supported by therapeutic interactions including close contact as well as physical and emotional support. Nurses' main goal in working with residents with remaining abilities is improving their independence. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Value of wireless personal digital assistants for practice: perceptions of advanced practice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Bernard; Klein, Gerri

    2008-08-01

    The aims were to explore advanced practice nurses' perceptions on wireless Personal Digital Assistant technologies, to establish the type and range of tools that would be useful to support their practice and to identify any requirements and limitations that may impact the implementation of wireless Personal Digital Assistants in practice. The wireless Personal Digital Assistant is becoming established as a hand-held computing tool for healthcare professionals. The reflections of advanced practice nurses' about the value of wireless Personal Digital Assistants and its potential to contribute to improved patient care has not been investigated. A qualitative interpretivist design was used to explore advanced practice nurses' perceptions on the value of wireless Personal Digital Assistant technologies to support their practice. The data were collected using survey questionnaires and individual and focus group interviews with nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists and information technology managers based in British Columbia, Canada. An open-coding content analysis was performed using qualitative data analysis software. Wireless Personal Digital Assistant's use supports the principles of pervasivity and is a technology rapidly being adopted by advanced practice nurses. Some nurses indicated a reluctance to integrate wireless Personal Digital Assistant technologies into their practices because of the cost and the short technological life cycle of these devices. Many of the barriers which precluded the use of wireless networks within facilities are being removed. Nurses demonstrated a complex understanding of wireless Personal Digital Assistant technologies and gave good rationales for its integration in their practice. Nurses identified improved client care as the major benefit of this technology in practice and the type and range of tools they identified included clinical reference tools such as drug and diagnostic/laboratory reference applications and wireless

  13. Negotiating clinical knowledge: a field study of psychiatric nurses' everyday communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels

    2008-01-01

    Nursing practices at psychiatric hospitals have changed significantly over the last decades. In this paper, everyday nursing practices were interpreted in light of these institutional changes. The objective was to examine how mental health nurses' production of clinical knowledge was influenced b...... knowledge influenced processes of clinical decision-making among the nurses as the game added to a distorted widening of a 'fictional distance' between patients and the representations produced by the nurses.......Nursing practices at psychiatric hospitals have changed significantly over the last decades. In this paper, everyday nursing practices were interpreted in light of these institutional changes. The objective was to examine how mental health nurses' production of clinical knowledge was influenced...... by the particular social relations on hospital wards. Empirical data stemming from an extended fieldwork at two Danish psychiatric hospital wards were interpreted using interactionistic theory and the metaphor: 'the game of clinical knowledge'. The results indicated that the nurses' production of clinical knowledge...

  14. Exploring the opinions of registered nurses working in a clinical transfusion environment on the contribution of e-learning to personal learning and clinical practice: results of a small scale educational research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Susan; Donaldson, Jayne H

    2013-05-01

    To explore the opinions of registered nurses on the Learnbloodtransfusion Module 1: Safe Transfusion Practice e-learning programme to meeting personal learning styles and learning needs. A qualitative research methodology was applied based on the principles of phenomenology. Adopting a convenience sampling plan supported the recruitment of participants who had successfully completed the e-learning course. Thematic analysis from the semi-structured interviews identified common emerging themes through application of Colaizzis framework. Seven participants of total sample population (89) volunteered to participate in the study. Five themes emerged which included learning preferences, interactive learning, course design, patient safety and future learning needs. Findings positively show the e-learning programme captures the learning styles and needs of learners. In particular, learning styles of a reflector, theorist and activist as well as a visual learner can actively engage in the online learning experience. In an attempt to bridge the knowledge practice gap, further opinions are offered on the course design and the application of knowledge to practice following completion of the course. The findings of the small scale research study have shown that the e-learning course does meet the diverse learning styles and needs of nurses working in a clinical transfusion environment. However, technology alone is not sufficient and a blended approach to learning must be adopted to meet bridging the theory practice gap supporting the integration of knowledge to clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical decision making of nurses working in hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørk, Ida Torunn; Hamilton, Glenys A

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed nurses' perceptions of clinical decision making (CDM) in their clinical practice and compared differences in decision making related to nurse demographic and contextual variables. A cross-sectional survey was carried out with 2095 nurses in four hospitals in Norway. A 24-item Nursing Decision Making Instrument based on cognitive continuum theory was used to explore how nurses perceived their CDM when meeting an elective patient for the first time. Data were analyzed with descriptive frequencies, t-tests, Chi-Square test, and linear regression. Nurses' decision making was categorized into analytic-systematic, intuitive-interpretive, and quasi-rational models of CDM. Most nurses reported the use of quasi-rational models during CDM thereby supporting the tenet that cognition most often includes properties of both analysis and intuition. Increased use of intuitive-interpretive models of CDM was associated with years in present job, further education, male gender, higher age, and working in predominantly surgical units.

  16. Assisting undergraduate nursing students to learn evidence-based practice through self-directed learning and workshop strategies during clinical practicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Zeng, Tieying; Chen, Ying; Li, Xiaopan

    2012-07-01

    To equip undergraduate nursing students with basic knowledge and skills and foster positive attitudes toward evidence-based practice (EBP), a pilot learning program during their clinical practicum was developed in a teaching hospital in China. This article describes the specific learning process through which self-directed learning and workshop strategies were used, and a pre- and post-intervention survey were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the learning strategies. The findings show a significant improvement in their perceptions of EBP knowledge, attitudes and beliefs, and behavior levels. Beginning competencies in EBP were achieved. Participants reported great satisfaction and have found this program helpful in promoting their analytical and problem-solving abilities, independent learning ability, and cooperative and communication abilities as well.

  17. Attaching More Importance on Clinical Ethical Practice Teaching in the Nursing Ethics Course%护理伦理学课程注重临床伦理实践教学的探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建华

    2012-01-01

    By using various teaching methods and means in full time teachers and part -time teachers, and guiding the nursing students to carry out clinical ethics practice activities, can improve the positive enthusiasm of nursing students to involve in the teaching of ethical practice. Therefore, the measures, such as solving the ethical practice of clinical leaching faculty, implementing clinical teaching funding and focus on mobilization of students involved in the practice of education, are conducive to the practice of clinical nurse ethics teaching, not only ensure the quality of teaching but also enhance the professional ethics of nursing students.%通过专兼职教师综合运用多种方法与手段授课、指导护生开展临床伦理实践活动,提高了护生参与伦理实践教学的主动性.认为解决好临床伦理实践的带教师资、落实临床带教经费和注重做好学生参与实践的动员教育等问题,有利于开展临床伦理实践的护理伦理学课程教学;其不仅保证了课程教学质量,而且提升了护生的职业道德素养.

  18. Building an innovation electronic nursing record pilot structure with nursing clinical pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Angelica Te-Hui; Huang, Li-Fang; Wu, Li-Bin; Kao, Ching-Chiu; Lu, Mei-Show; Jian, Wen-Shan; Chang, Her-Kung; Hsu, Chien-Yeh

    2006-01-01

    The nursing process consists of five interrelated steps: assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementation, and evaluation. In the nursing process, the nurse confronts a great deal of data and information. The amount of data and information may exceed the amount the nurse can process efficiently and correctly. Thus, the nurse needs assistance to become proficient in the planning of nursing care, due to the difficulty of simultaneously processing a large set of information. Thus, some form of assistance will be needed to help nurses to become more proficient in planning nursing care. Using computer technology to support clinicians' decision making may provide high-quality, patient-centered, and efficient healthcare. Although some existing nursing information systems aid in the nursing process, they only provide the most rudimentary decision support--i.e., standard care plans associated with common nursing diagnoses. Such a computerized decision support system helps the nurse develop a care plan step-by-step. But it does not assist the nurse in the decision-making process. The decision process about how to derive nursing diagnoses from data and how to individualize the care plans still remains in the mind of the nurse. The purpose of this study is to develop a pilot structure in an electronic nursing record system integrated with international nursing standards for improving the proficiency and accuracy of the plan of care in the clinical pathway process. The pilot system has shown promise in assisting both student nurses and beginner nurses. It also shows promise in helping experts who need to work in a practice area that is outside of their immediate domain.

  19. A stairway to Confidence in Nursing: Thai Male Nursing Students’ Caring Experience of First Nursing Practice

    OpenAIRE

    khunkaew, Saneh

    2011-01-01

    Learning to care and first encounter to care patients for male nursing students introduce a unique set of dilemmas to the predominantly female nursing educational process. The purpose of this study was to describe the experience male nursing students learning to care and first encounter care patients in their first nursing practice. A purposive sampling of seven male nursing students were interviewed by internet interview and analyzed by Qualitative content analysis. The results show that the...

  20. Perception of nursing students face clinical supervision: literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Certo, Ana; Galvão, Ana Maria; Louçano, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Currently, without theoretical clinical training is not possible for the nursing student adequately meet their clinical practices.In this regard, clinical supervision plays a key role monitoring and development of the same. However,so that the student can be supervised, requires evidence of nurse supervisor competence in this context. In contemporary literature, this issue has been much debated, as the target of numerous different scientific studies. Aim of the study was, under...

  1. Recognising advancing nursing practice: evidence from two observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Barnett, J; Barriball, K L; Reynolds, H; Jowett, S; Ryrie, I

    2000-10-01

    Debates over title, grades and relationships across the profession has tended to dominate the literature in advancing nursing practice. Fewer research projects have attempted to study the activities of nurses who are designated as undertaking advancing nursing roles. One study evaluating Masters courses for Clinical Nursing Practice and a second addressing the impact of the 'Scope of Professional Practice' (United Kingdom Central Council for Nursing, Midwifery & Health Visiting, 1992) document by this team of authors afforded these research opportunities. In this paper empirical data from 'reflective' observation with 19 nurses (including midwives and health visitors) are presented to illustrate the range and type of functions undertaken by a small group of practitioners developing their practice. A number of characteristic features emerged. Assessment of individual and group needs, positive motivation to constantly improve practice, inter-disciplinary and cross agency working for planned change and an ability to identify and prioritize service requirements were recognised in these nurses' roles. Certain personal attributes were seen to be essential for successful role development such as confidence, commitment and problem solving powers combined with a positive working environment and supportive managers.

  2. Nursing students’ experiences of clinical education setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahnama M

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Appropriate clinical environment has an important role in preparing students to use learned knowledge in practice through providing learning opportunities. Since the students’ experiences in the clinical setting affect on quality of their learning, the current study aimed to explain the experiences of nursing students concerning clinical education setting. Materials and Method: The current study was conducted based on conventional content analysis. Sampling was done purposively and the participants were 13 last year nursing students in Zabol Nursing and Midwifery School in 2013-2014. Data collection was done through in-depth semi-structured interviews. Data analysis was conducted through qualitative content analysis approach. Results: Based on the results, five major categories including threats, vision, dual forces, mindset and students’ action to clinical education and also10 subcategorie were identified. Conclusion: Since the formation of students’ experiences in these environments is one of the predictive factors in achieving their learning and in facilitating the professionalization process, thus the attention of managers in clinical settings is very important for decreasing the threats and concerns for students. In this way, the marred prospects of profession can be recovered through the meeting students’ expectations, attractiveness of the profession can be increased and the positive belief, actions and feelings can be created in students.

  3. CE: Incorporating Acupressure into Nursing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Judy

    2015-12-01

    Rooted in traditional Chinese medicine, the use of acupressure to alleviate symptoms, support the healing process, promote relaxation, and improve overall health has grown considerably in the West. The effects of acupressure--like those of acupuncture, with which it shares a theoretical framework--cannot always be explained in terms of Western anatomical and physiologic concepts, but this noninvasive practice involves minimal risk, can be easily integrated into nursing practice, and has been shown to be effective in treating nausea as well as low back, neck, labor, and menstrual pain. The author discusses potential clinical indications for the use of acupressure, describes the technique, explains how to evaluate patient outcomes, and suggests how future research into this integrative intervention might be improved.

  4. Development of clinical assessment criteria for postgraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolhurst, B G; Bonner, A

    2000-04-01

    This paper explores the development and implementation of specific criteria to determine the level of clinical performance of postgraduate nursing students during the first year of a Master of Nursing course. The authors describe two commonly used clinical skill assessment tools and identify limitations of these tools for postgraduate nursing students. As a result of these limitations, Clinical Assessment Criteria (CAC) utilising the framework of Benner (1984) was developed. Inherent within the CAC is four levels of clinical nursing performance, which enable the nurse teacher and student to monitor the progression from novice to proficient levels of practice within a specialty area. Following a successful pilot study, the CAC was incorporated into clinical assessments in nine specialty postgraduate courses. Furthermore, the framework developed for the CAC can also be integrated into a variety of professional development domains.

  5. Clinical leadership development and education for nurses: prospects and opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph ML

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available M Lindell Joseph, Diane L Huber College of Nursing, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA Abstract: With the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, elevated roles for nurses of care coordinator, clinical nurse leader, and advanced practice registered nurse have come to the forefront. Because change occurs so fast, matching development and education to job requirements is a challenging forecasting endeavor. The purpose of this article is to envision clinical leadership development and education opportunities for three emerging roles. The adoption of a common framework for intentional leadership development is proposed for clinical leadership development across the continuum of care. Solutions of innovation and interdependency are framed as core concepts that serve as an opportunity to better inform clinical leadership development and education. Additionally, strategies are proposed to advance knowledge, skills, and abilities for crucial implementation of improvements and new solutions at the point of care. Keywords: clinical leadership, nursing leadership, CNL, care coordination, innovation, interdependency

  6. The International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Randi A.; Nielsen, Gunnar Haase

    2001-01-01

    and confidentiality, telecare service for nurses, data analysis methods and classification methods. The last section of this book deals with the organizational impact of health informatics. Major topics are: impacts of communications, information and technology on organizations, impact in nursing environment, quality......This publication deals with the general field of health informatics and some issues particular to nursing. It starts with an introduction to health care, discussing the ‘classification and management in nursing information technology’ and the ‘nursing minimum data set’, health concepts......, an introduction to nursing science and the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP). The textbook continues with an information technology aspects’ section. in this section important aspects of health informatics and hospital information systems are discussed, like data protection...

  7. Professional nurses' understanding of clinical judgement: A contextual inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna C. van Graan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Higher cognitive skills are essential competencies for nurses joining the technologically and increasingly complex health care environment to provide safe and effective nursing care. Educators and clinical facilitators have recognised that newly qualified nurses do not meet the expectations for entry level clinical judgement and are held accountable for finding adequate learning experiences as preparation for such practice demands. An explorative and descriptive qualitative design was followed in this study to reach an understanding of clinical judgement in the clinical nursing environment from the perspective of professional nurses. Eleven professional nurses (n = 11 working at primary health care clinics, public and private hospitals participated voluntarily. Data was collected by means of the “World Café” method, incorporating a combination of techniques such as interviewing, discussions, drawings, narratives and reflection. The focus was on professional nurses' knowledge of the meaning of clinical judgement and factors influencing the development of clinical judgement in the clinical environment. Qualitative thematic content analysis principles were applied during data analysis. The findings were integrated with the relevant literature to culminate in conclusions that should add to the knowledge base of clinical judgement as an essential skill for improving autonomous and accountable nursing care.

  8. Orthopaedic nurses' attitudes towards clinical nursing research - A cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2015-05-01

    The call for evidence-based knowledge in clinical nursing practice has increased during recent decades and research in orthopaedic nursing is needed to improve patients' conditions, care and treatment. A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted to determine the self-perceived theoretical knowledge and practical research competencies among orthopaedic nurses and their interest and motivation to increase these in everyday practice. A newly developed questionnaire was given to a convenience sample of 87 orthopaedic nurses. Forty three orthopaedic nurses (49.4%) completed the questionnaire. The results indicated that despite the majority of orthopaedic nurses having low self-perceived theoretical knowledge and practical research competencies, their interest and motivation to improve these were high, especially their inner motivation. However, the nurses' inner motivation was inhibited by a lack of acceptance from colleagues and section head nurses and a shortage of time. This study forms a baseline as a part of a larger study and contributes knowledge useful to other orthopaedic departments with an interest in optimizing nursing research to improve orthopaedic nursing care quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Phenomenological study on the stress of undergraduate nursing students during mid-term of clinical practice%护理本科生实习中期压力的现象学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜余竹; 周颖清

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨护理本科生实习中期对实习压力的体验,了解其价值观念、情感感受及就业意向,为护理教育者引导护理本科生缓解实习压力提供依据.方法 采用半结构式深入访谈法,了解12名护理本科实习学生对实习压力的体验.采用阅读、分析、反思、分类、提炼5个步骤分析访谈资料,并提炼主题.结果 护理本科生实习压力源包括4个主题:工作负荷、工作性质、人际关系及个人前途.结论护理本科生实习期间存在较大压力,护理教育者应探索积极有效的方式,指导其缓解实习压力.%Objective To understand the stress experience of undergraduate nursing students during mid-term of clinical practice, and describe their values, emotional feelings and employment intentions, so as to provide references for nursing educators to guide nurse students to relieve the stress. Methods Phenomenological method was used in the study. Twelve nurse students were interviewed by a semi-structured questionnaire. The themes were abstracted by the steps of reading, analysis, reflection,classification and refining. Results Workload, nature of nursing work,relationships and personal development were the main stress of undergraduate nurse students during mid-term of clinical practice. Conclusion Undergraduate nurse students suffer from heavy pressure in clinical practice. Nursing educators should explore positive and effective methods to relieve the students' stress.

  10. Nursing: Licensed Practical and Licensed Vocational Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Projected Employment, 2024 Change, 2014-24 Employment by Industry Percent Numeric SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program Licensed practical and licensed vocational ...

  11. Rheumatology outpatient nurse clinics: a valuable addition?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temmink, Denise; Hutten, Jack B.F.; Francke, Anneke L.; Rasker, Hans J.; Abu-Saad, Huda Huijer

    2001-01-01

    Objectives: Transmural rheumatology nurse clinics, where nursing care is provided under the joint responsibility of a home care organization and a hospital, were recently introduced into Dutch health care. This article gives insight into outcomes of the transmural rheumatology nurse clinics. - Metho

  12. Rheumatology outpatient nurse clinics: a valuable addition?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temmink, D.; Hutten, J.B.F.; Francke, A.L.; Rasker, J.J.; Huijer Abu-Saad, H.; Zee, J. van der

    2001-01-01

    Objectives: "Transmural rheumatology nurse clinics," where nursing care is provided under the joint responsibility of a home care organization and a hospital, were recently introduced into Dutch health care. This article gives insight into outcomes of the transmural rheumatology nurse clinics. Metho

  13. Promoting leadership and management in Australian general practice nursing: what will it take?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcomb, Elizabeth J; Davidson, Patricia M; Patterson, Elizabeth

    2008-10-01

    This paper outlines the current state of Australian practice nursing, describes the context of general practice and establishes the importance of promoting leadership and management in this setting. Australian general practice nurses have emerged as key stakeholders in primary health care. However, their role in leadership and management has been largely invisible. The reasons for this are multifactorial, including the delay to establish a strong professional organization, their negative power relationships with general medical practitioners, limited nursing leadership and poorly defined roles. To date, the impetus for practice nurse growth has been largely external to the nursing profession. Growth has been driven by the increasing burden of chronic disease and workforce shortages. This has further weakened the control of nurse leaders over the development of the specialty. The Australian practice nurse role is at a crossroads. While the practice nurse role is a viable force to improve health outcomes, the growing strength of the practice nurse challenges traditional professional roles and practice patterns. There is an urgent need to develop practice nurse leaders and managers to not only embrace the challenges of Australian general practice from an operational perspective, but also undertake a clinical leadership role. As clinical leaders, these nurses will need to develop a culture that not only optimizes health outcomes but also advances the status of the nursing profession.

  14. A comparative study of teaching clinical guideline for prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia in two ways: face-to-face and workshop training on the knowledge and practice of nurses in the intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    YAZDANI, MAJID; SABETIAN, GOLNAR; RA'OFI, SHAHIN; ROUDGARI, AMIR; FEIZI, MONIREH

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is one of the most popular nosocomial infections in the intensive care units and the nurse's role in preventing it is very important. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of two methods of face to face training and work- shop clinical guidelines in prevention of VAP. Methods In this experimental randomized clinical trial, the knowledge and practice of nurses in ICUs were studied in two groups: face to face training (35 nurses) and workshops (40 nurses) by using clinical guidelines in prevention of VAP in one of the hospitals of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. The level of knowledge and practice in each group was assessed by self-report questionnaire, knowledge questionnaire and also direct observation of practice, before and after training. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, paired t-test, independent t-test, McNemar test, Fisher’s exact, sign and Chi-square test, using SPSS 14. Results This study demonstrated that both methods of face to face training and workshop were very effective. The incidence of inappropriate pressure of cuff in the tracheal tubes and tracheostomy tubes was significantly reduced after training (p=0.001). But, by comparison of these two methods and the relationship between the variables revealed that no significant difference was found between the two groups of face to face training and workshop. Conclusion Training the nurses is highly effective in preventing VAP, particularly for appropriate cuff pressure, suctioning and disinfecting hands. PMID:25927070

  15. Nursing control over practice and teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castner, Jessica; Ceravolo, Diane J; Foltz-Ramos, Kelly; Wu, Yow-Wu

    2013-05-31

    Nurses' control over practice is essential to nursing care quality and fosters teamwork at the point of care delivery. This article describes a study to measure the impact of nurses' control over their practice from the perspective of teamwork. The purpose of this study was to measure the relationship of control over practice to the five following dimensions of teamwork: team structure, leadership, situation monitoring, mutual support, and communication. The study method was a secondary analysis of 456 surveys from registered nurses working in a five-hospital system. Study results demonstrated that the global measure of teamwork correlated with control over practice and nursing experience, but not with teamwork training. All five individual dimensions of teamwork were perceived as better for those who had a high level of control over practice compared to those who did not. In the discussion section, we consider situation monitoring since this dimension demonstrated an interaction effect between teamwork training and control over practice. Nursing control over practice demonstrates a positive relationship with teamwork and should be considered in future education, policy, and research efforts. Further study is needed to understand control over practice as a potential moderator or mediator of other predecessors of effective teamwork.

  16. Legal issues in neonatal nursing: considerations for staff nurses and advanced practice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzman Hagedorn, M I; Gardner, S L

    1999-01-01

    A neonatal nurse is a professional with special training, skill, and knowledge in the care of newborns and their families. The neonatal nurse is accountable to the patient, profession, and employer. Failure of the neonatal nurse to meet these obligations can result in liability in the profession, liability in the employment, a civil suit, or a criminal conviction. Regardless of the health care setting, professional nurses, whether at the bedside or in advanced practice, are morally, ethically, and legally accountable for their nursing judgments and actions. Although most nurses assume they will never be named in a lawsuit, and it is true that few are, their professional actions can be the focus of a suit. An overview of the legal implications found within neonatal nursing practice is presented. Two recent legal cases are presented and discussed to illustrate neonatal nursing and advanced practice liability.

  17. Another Discussion on How to Shorten the Adaptation Pe-riod of Clinical Nursing Students' Practice%再谈如何缩短护理学生临床实习适应期

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨鑫

    2014-01-01

    Clinical nursing practice teaching is a very important part in nursing education, and it is the transition stage of nursing students from school to clinical work. To help nursing interns successfully complete their tasks of internship, improve the qual-ity of clinical practice, and adapt to clinical work quickly, it is of great significance to shorten the adaptation period of clinical practice.%护理临床实习是护理教育中非常重要的教学环节,是护理学生由学校到临床工作的过渡阶段,要想使护理实习生圆满地完成实习任务,提高临床实习质量,快速适应医院的临床工作,缩短临床实习的适应期有着非常重要的意义。

  18. Nursing students' responses to ethical dilemmas in nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierckx de Casterlé, B; Grypdonck, M; Vuylsteke-Wauters, M; Janssen, P J

    1997-01-01

    In literature as well as in nursing practice a growing concern about nurses' ethical competence can be observed. Based on the cognitive theory of moral development by Kohlberg, this research examined nursing students' ethical behaviour in five nursing dilemmas. Ethical behaviour refers not only to the ethical reasoning of nursing students but also to the relationship between reasoning and behaviour. Kohlberg's definition of morality was refined by adding a care perspective. The results show that the majority of students can be located in the fourth moral stage according to Kohlberg's theory, that is, the conventional level of moral development. This finding implies that students are still guided by professional rules, norms and duties, and have not (yet) succeeded in making personal ethical decisions on the basis of their own principles and acting according to such decisions.

  19. The research potential of practice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Jacqueline; Heyman, Bob; Bryar, Rosamund; Graffy, Jonathan; Gunnell, Caroline; Lamb, Bryony; Morris, Lana

    2002-09-01

    Little is known about the research aspirations and experiences of practice nurses. The study discussed in the present paper had three main aims: (1) to assess the level of research interest among practice nurses working in Essex and East London, UK; (2) to identify practice nurses' research priorities; and (3) to explore factors which facilitate and impede the development of practice nursing research. All practice nurses (n = 1,054) in the above areas were sent a questionnaire, and a total of 40% (n = 426) responded after two follow-up letters. Fifty-five respondents who volunteered for further participation were interviewed, either individually or in focus groups. About half (n = 207) of the survey respondents expressed an interest in undertaking research. One-third (n = 145) reported previous participation in research, and 20% (n = 85) had initiated their own research. Logistic regression showed that practice nurses educated to graduate level, and those working in practices with nurse training or participation in external research, were most likely to want to undertake research. Working in a medical training practice was found to be a negative predictor of research interest. Respondents prioritised research into long-term health problems with a high prevalence in the local population; for example, diabetes. Their reasons for wishing to engage in research included improving the service, career development, making work more interesting and reducing isolation. The main barriers identified were lack of time, lack of support from some general practitioners and poor access to higher education resources outside formal courses. The development of practice nurse research would provide a distinctive perspective on health need and service provision. It would contribute to the achievement of the national strategic objective of improving the quality of primary care, enhance the status of the profession, utilise the enthusiasm of individuals, increase job satisfaction and

  20. Interpersonal communication: It's relevance to nursing practice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Interpersonal communication: It's relevance to nursing practice. ... of the dynamic relationship between clients' potentiality to perceive and be understood ... understanding the needs of the patients and planning effective intervention for meeting ...

  1. Creating a Healthy Practice Environment: A Call to Action for Oncology Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacovara, Jane E

    2015-09-01

    When nurse researcher Marlene Kramer published Reality Shock: Why Nurses Leave Nursing in 1974, her seminal work launched a national discussion related to the distress felt by many baccalaureate-prepared novice nurses about leaving the academic setting and transitioning to the clinical setting. In particular, Kramer (1974) highlighted conflict between the values these new nurses had been taught in school and the reality of practicing as a professional nurse in a clinical setting. For example, in an educational setting, nursing students may focus on one or two patients at a time, whereas in the clinical setting, nurses must practice simultaneously with multiple patients with varied and numerous health deficits. This conflict is felt acutely by novice and experienced oncology nurses who are tasked with providing quality physical care, as well as emotional care and support to patients with cancer and their families
.

  2. Qualitative study on the factors of sense of belonging among undergraduate nursing students during clinical practice%护理本科生临床实习期间归属感影响因素的质性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘春蕾; 王琦

    2015-01-01

    Objective To understand the sense of belonging undergraduate nursing students during clinical practice and the related factors,in order to provide references for nursing educators to improve the quality of clinical practice among undergraduate nursing students.Methods Semi-structured interviews and non-participating observation method had been carried out among 11 students to explore their sense of experience and the related factors.Results Through processing and analyzing the obtained data,five themes were extracted,i.e.the nursing teachers,the attention and recognition of nursing manager,the atmosphere of practice department,the duration of clinical practice,and self influencing factors of nursing students.Conclusions Nursing students strong demand for the sense of belongings during clinical practice,which directly affect the quality of clinical practice.Nursing educators should explore positive and effective methods to help them to get the sense of belonging.%目的 了解护理本科生实习期间影响归属感的相关因素,为护理教育者提高护理本科生的实习效果提供依据.方法 采用半结构式访谈法和非参与性观察法,了解11名护理本科实习生归属感的真实体验并探讨其影响因素.结果 整理形成11份完整的访谈资料,经过仔细分析,归纳、提炼出影响归属感的5个主题:带教老师、科室管理者的重视与认可、实习科室的氛围、实习时间的长短、和护生自身的因素.结论 护理本科生实习期间对于归属感的需求强烈,直接影响临床实习的质量,护理教育者应探索积极有效的方式,帮助其获得归属感.

  3. The role of nurses and nurse leaders on realizing the clinical, social, and economic return on investment of nursing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamian, Judith; Ellen, Moriah E

    2016-05-01

    There is a limited understanding of the significance and the potential contribution that nursing can make through practice, policy, science, and profession to the global health agenda. In this article, we present some of the evidence to demonstrate the clinical, social, and economic returns on investment in nursing. We conclude by addressing the issues that nurse and system leaders need to address in order to achieve these returns on investments, and unless nurses get involved at the leadership level, these returns on investment will not be attained.

  4. Partners in research: building academic-practice partnerships to educate and mentor advanced practice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbman, Patricia; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Carter, Nancy; Covell, Christine L; Donald, Faith; Gibbins, Sharyn; Kilpatrick, Kelley; McKinlay, James; Rawson, Krista; Sherifali, Diana; Tranmer, Joan; Valaitis, Ruta

    2017-04-01

    Clinical practice is the primary focus of advanced practice nursing (APN) roles. However, with unprecedented needs for health care reform and quality improvement (QI), health care administrators are seeking new ways to utilize all dimensions of APN expertise, especially related to research and evidence-based practice. International studies reveal research as the most underdeveloped and underutilized aspect of these roles. To improve patient care by strengthening the capacity of advanced practice nurses to integrate research and evidence-based practice activities into their day-to-day practice. An academic-practice partnership was created among hospital-based advanced practice nurses, nurse administrators, and APN researchers to create an innovative approach to educate and mentor advanced practice nurses in conducting point-of-care research, QI, or evidence-based practice projects to improve patient, provider, and/or system outcomes. A practice-based research course was delivered to 2 cohorts of advanced practice nurses using a range of teaching strategies including 1-to-1 academic mentorship. All participants completed self-report surveys before and after course delivery. Through participation in this initiative, advanced practice nurses enhanced their knowledge, skills, and confidence in the design, implementation, and/or evaluation of research, QI, and evidence-based practice activities. Evaluation of this initiative provides evidence of the acceptability and feasibility of academic-practice partnerships to educate and mentor point-of-care providers on how to lead, implement, and integrate research, QI and evidence-based activities into their practices. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. [AHNA Standards of Holistic Nursing Practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrai, Francesco; Cenerelli, Danilo; Calamandrei, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    Gli AHNA Standards of Holistic Nursing Practice produced by the American Holistic Nurses Association are acknowledged as the most advanced holistic document governing nursing care. The result is a document that isn ot only scientifically and culturally important for world nursing, but also represents a scientific attempt to return to the true, historically holistic, nature of nursing. The AHNA standards reject the mechanical-reductive model in favor of a holistic, multidisciplinary model and an anthropological view of man as an entire being and not separate anatomical parts, with a body-mind-spirit axis connected to the surrounding environment in a circular exchange. The results of holistic nursing and multidisciplinary research coupled with a new vision of man, are extremely important.

  6. 乌鲁木齐市实习护生对临床护理师资带教能力的评价调查%Investigation of the practice nursing students'evaluation of teaching ability of clinical nursing teachers in clinical practice in Urumqi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫合德斯・斯依提; 阿衣古丽・衣明江

    2013-01-01

    teaching ability of clinical nursing teachers in clinical practice in Urumqi , and to provide the basis for improving Objective To investigate the different ethnic and degree of nursing students'evaluation of the effect of clinical practice.Methods Seventy-five undergraduate nursing students who entered school in 2009 and one hundred and four junior college nursing students who entered school in 2010 were surveyed six months after clinical practice, and the teaching ability of clinical nursing teachers in clinical practice were evaluated . The investigating contents involved in six aspects including the professional quality , professional attitude, professional ability, teaching ability, interpersonal coordination ability, personality characteristics of clinical nursing teachers.Results The average score of comprehensive teaching ability of clinical nursing teachers was 3.75, and the clinical professional ability got the highest score (3.79 ±0.92), and the teaching ability got the lowest score (3.71 ±0.88 ).The scores of professional quality, professional attitude, professional ability, teaching ability, interpersonal coordination ability, personality characteristics and total teaching ability of clinical nursing teachers evaluated by nursing students from Uygur were respectively (3.79 ±1.08), (3.84 ±0.99), (3.87 ±0.90), (3.78 ±0.87), (3.85 ±0.89), (3.87 ±0.87), (3.83 ±0.85), and higher than (3.21 ± 0.92), (3.14 ±0.70), (3.10 ±0.81), (3.12 ±0.74), (3.07 ±0.69), (2.99 ±0.87), (3.10 ±0.68) from Han, and the differences were statistically significant (t =-2.24, -2.98, -3.57,-3.18, -3.68,-4.18,-3.62, respectively;P0.05).Conclusions The level of the comprehensive ability of clinical nursing teachers were at moderate level in Urumqi , and the professional ability of clinical nursing teachers were relatively higher , but teaching ability still needs to improve .The clinical nursing teachers should improve teaching ability according to the comprehensive

  7. Revealing higher levels of nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, C

    1999-04-01

    The following discussion describes the early findings of a doctoral study, due for completion in 2001. The findings represent data collected in the USA, Australia, New Zealand and the UK, from nurses deemed to be engaged in advanced nursing practice. The paper will review the need for the study and provide a brief overview of the methodology employed. The current status of the findings, utilizing open coding, is presented. Major categories identified thus far are enhancing patient stay, improving patient outcome, promoting the role, trustworthiness, tenacity and survival in the role. The categories identified clarify current understanding of the concept, advanced nursing practice.

  8. Results of an Oncology Clinical Trial Nurse Role Delineation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdom, Michelle A; Petersen, Sandra; Haas, Barbara K

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the relevance of a five-dimensional model of clinical trial nursing practice in an oncology clinical trial nurse population. 
. Web-based cross-sectional survey.
. Online via Qualtrics.
. 167 oncology nurses throughout the United States, including 41 study coordinators, 35 direct care providers, and 91 dual-role nurses who provide direct patient care and trial coordination.
. Principal components analysis was used to determine the dimensions of oncology clinical trial nursing practice.
. Self-reported frequency of 59 activities.
. The results did not support the original five-dimensional model of nursing care but revealed a more multidimensional model.
. An analysis of frequency data revealed an eight-dimensional model of oncology research nursing, including care, manage study, expert, lead, prepare, data, advance science, and ethics.
. This evidence-based model expands understanding of the multidimensional roles of oncology nurses caring for patients with cancer enrolled in clinical trials.

  9. Practicing Self-Care for Nurses: A Nursing Program Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Cynthia A

    2014-09-01

    Self-care is imperative to personal health, sustenance to continue to care for others, and professional growth. This article briefly reviews stressors common to students and nurses and the importance of practicing self-care to combat stress and promote health in practice. Florida Atlantic University offers a course for all levels of undergraduate nursing students called Caring for Self. The course, supported by principles of Adult Learning Theory, focuses on guiding the nurse to practice and model self-care. The author describes the evolution of this self-care initiative by discussing the needs assessment, course description and strategies, examples of course activities, and an exemplar of student impact. The conclusion offers discussion of challenges and lessons noted by faculty and students.

  10. Factors influencing nurses' participation in clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Ann F; Warner, Andrea M; Fleming, Eileen; Schmidt, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Clinical research is necessary for developing nursing's body of knowledge and improving the quality of gastroenterology nursing care. The support and participation of nursing staff are crucial to conducting interventional research. Identification of characteristics of nurses and their work settings that facilitate or impede participation in research is needed. The purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to examine the effect of personal and professional characteristics and attitudes about nursing research on staff nurses' participation in a clinical nursing research project. A questionnaire measuring nurses' attitudes, perceptions of availability of support, and research use was distributed to staff nurses working on an endoscopy lab and two same-day surgery units where a nursing research study had recently been conducted. Investigator-developed items measured nurses' attitudes about the utility and feasibility of the interventions tested in the original study. A total of 36 usable questionnaires comprised the sample. Factor analysis of the two questionnaires resulted in three-factor (Importance of Research, Interest in Research, and Environment Support of Research) and two-factor (Value of Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions [CBIs] and Participation in Study) solutions, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in mean scores for the five factors between nurses who did (n = 19) and those who did not (n = 17) participate in the original study. The Participation in Research Factor was significantly negatively correlated with years in nursing (r = -.336, p body of knowledge about factors that facilitate or impede staff nurses' involvement in research. This knowledge will be useful for nurse researchers planning intervention studies to forecast and foster staff nurse involvement in their projects. Findings may also be useful to nurse managers, nurse educators, and staff development personnel in assessing and promoting staff nurses

  11. Doctor of Nursing Practice programs: opportunities for faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Juliann G; White Delaney, Connie

    2013-08-01

    This article examines development opportunities for faculty teaching in Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) programs. Although faculty development for DNP programs is similar to that of other academic programs, faculty may need different strategies for teaching, scholarship, and service because DNP programs focus on translation of science into practice, systems-level changes, clinical scholarship, and the highest levels of advanced nursing practice. Faculty and student collaboration across DNP and PhD programs provide new approaches for translating research into practice and generating practice questions in need of further scientific development. Specific faculty development strategies for facilitating this collaboration are essential. Capstone projects pose special opportunities for faculty development due to the integration of these projects within diverse practice environments, with differing expectations, regulations, and pacing compared with research. Linking new care delivery models with health informatics is expected to facilitate rapid translation of research and development of improvements in practice. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Leadership Practices in Hospital Nursing: A Self of Manager Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vânea Lúcia dos Santos Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To assess the frequency of the leadership practices performed by the manager nurses of hospital institutions and their association with the variables of the socioprofessional profile. METHOD Cross-sectional, descriptive, correlational study conducted in four hospitals in a city of the state of São Paulo. A sociodemographic questionnaire and the instrument Leadership Practices Inventory were used. Data collection and analysis were based on an exemplary Leadership Practices Model. RESULTS Eighty-four manager nurses participated in the study. The mean values of the leadership practices used by the nurses were: enable others to act (50.6; encourage the heart (48.2; model the way (46.7; challenge the process (43.3; and inspire a shared vision (43.1. Data analysis also evidenced a correlation between the practice encourage the heart and the variables time of care and employment relationship. Conclusion The study evidenced the presence of manager nurses exercising moderate leadership, and promoting teamwork, an environment of trust, and a horizontal vision. However, moderate values also reveal managerial aspects to be improved by the leaders by means of organizational strategies and/or tools aimed at best leadership practices.

  13. Competence of novice nurses: role of clinical work during studying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoochehri, H; Imani, E; Atashzadeh-Shoorideh, F; Alavi-Majd, A

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Clinical competence is to carry out the tasks with excellent results in a different of adjustments. According to various studies, one of the factors influencing clinical competence is work experience. This experience affects the integrity of students' learning experience and their practical skills. Many nursing students practice clinical work during their full-time studying. The aim of this qualitative research was to clarify the role of clinical work during studying in novice nurses' clinical competence. Methods: This qualitative content analysis performed with the conventional approach. All teaching hospitals of Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences selected as the research environment. To collect data, deep and semi-structured interviews, presence in the scene and manuscripts used. To provide feedback for the next release and the capacity of the data, interviews were transcribed verbatim immediately. Results: 45 newly-graduated nurses and head nurses between 23 and 40 with 1 to 18 years of experience participated in the study. After coding all interviews, 1250 original codes were derived. The themes extracted included: task rearing, personality rearing, knowledge rearing, and profession rearing roles of clinical work during studying. Conclusion: Working during studying can affect performance, personality, knowledge, and professional perspectives of novice nurses. Given the differences that may exist in clinical competencies of novice nurses with and without clinical work experience, it is important to pay more attention to this issue and emphasize on their learning in this period.

  14. A cognitive learning model of clinical nursing leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Jacinthe; Dubois, Sylvie; Girard, Francine; Tardif, Jacques; Ha, Laurence

    2011-04-01

    Cognitive modeling of competencies is important to facilitate learning and evaluation. Clinical nursing leadership is considered a competency, as it is a "complex know-act" that students and nurses develop for the quality of care of patients and their families. Previous research on clinical leadership describes the attributes and characteristics of leaders and leadership, but, to our knowledge, a cognitive learning model (CLM) has yet to be developed. The purpose of our research was to develop a CLM of the clinical nursing leadership competency, from the beginning of a nursing program to expertise. An interpretative phenomenological study design was used 1) to document the experience of learning and practicing clinical leadership, and 2) to identify critical-learning turning points. Data was gathered from interviews with 32 baccalaureate students and 21 nurses from two clinical settings. An inductive analysis of data was conducted to determine the learning stages experienced: awareness of clinical leadership in nursing; integration of clinical leadership in actions; active leadership with patient/family; active leadership with the team; and, embedded clinical leadership extended to organizational level and beyond. The resulting CLM could have significant impact on both basic and continuing nursing education. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. New graduate nurses as knowledge brokers in general practice in New Zealand: a constructivist grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoare, Karen J; Mills, Jane; Francis, Karen

    2013-07-01

    Practice nursing in New Zealand is not well described in the literature. One survey illustrated that most of the New Zealand practice nurses sampled did not know of the country's two premier evidence-based health websites. A recent review compared general practice in the UK, New Zealand and Australia and found that whereas there had been significant developments in empowering the practice nurse workforce to run nurse-led clinics in the UK, New Zealand and Australia lagged behind. The aim of this reported constructivist grounded theory study was to investigate practice nurses' use of information. Conducted in Auckland, New Zealand, data were collected through ethnographic techniques in one general practice between September 2009 and January 2010 to enhance theoretical sensitivity to the area of information use. Subsequently, six experienced practice nurses (one twice after moving jobs) and five new graduate nurses from five different general practices were interviewed, using open-ended questions, between January 2010 and August 2011. Concurrent data collection and analysis occurred throughout the study period. The use of memos, the constant comparative method, data categorisation and finally, data abstraction resulted in the final theory of reciprocal role modelling. Experienced practice nurses role modelled clinical skills to new graduate nurses. Unexpectedly, new graduate nurses were unconscious experts at sourcing information and role modelled this skill to experienced practice nurses. Once this attribute was acknowledged by the experienced practice nurse, mutual learning occurred that enabled both groups of nurses to become better practitioners. Graduate nurses of the millennial generation were identified as a resource for experienced practice nurses who belong to the baby boomer generation and generation X. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. El sistema sanitario: efecto sobre la práctica clínica de las enfermeras The Health System: Effects in clinical practice of nursing professional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Molina Mula

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Existen multitud de estudios sobre el sistema sanitario pero pocos se refieren al impacto de los diferentes modelos de gestión en la práctica clínica de los profesionales de enfermería. En este aspecto y dada la repercusión en los cuidados de enfermería se hace necesario el análisis de los recursos del sistema sanitario que viene determinado por los modelos de gestión, el carácter de las organizaciones y las organizaciones sanitarias públicas versus privadas. Estos modelos de gestión tendrán una repercusión directa en la atención proporcionada a los pacientes y su familia, lo que propone una reflexión sobre los retos de las organizaciones sanitarias que indican una reducción de la complejidad burocrática de las instituciones sanitarias y el manejo de las expectativas de mercado de las mismas para que puede emerger un sistema sanitario más humanizado.There are many studies on the health system but few talk about the impact of different management models in the clinical practice of nurses. In this regard, and given the impact on nursing care is necessary to the analysis of health system resources that is determined by the management models, the nature of organizations and the private versus public health organizations. These management models will have a direct impact on the care provided to patients and their families, which reflects on the challenges of healthcare organizations that indicate a reduction of bureaucratic complexity of the health institutions and managing of market expectations so it can emerge a more humane health care system.

  17. Nursing students' perceptions of learning in practice environments: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Amanda; Cooke, Marie; Creedy, Debra K; Walker, Rachel

    2012-04-01

    Effective clinical learning requires integration of nursing students into ward activities, staff engagement to address individual student learning needs, and innovative teaching approaches. Assessing characteristics of practice environments can provide useful insights for development. This study identified predominant features of clinical learning environments from nursing students' perspectives across studies using the same measure in different countries over the last decade. Six studies, from three different countries, using the Clinical Leaning Environment Inventory (CLEI) were reviewed. Studies explored consistent trends about learning environment. Students rated sense of task accomplishment high. Affiliation also rated highly though was influenced by models of care. Feedback measuring whether students' individual needs and views were accommodated consistently rated lower. Across different countries students report similar perceptions about learning environments. Clinical learning environments are most effective in promoting safe practice and are inclusive of student learners, but not readily open to innovation and challenges to routine practices.

  18. Clinical placements and nursing students' career planning: a qualitative exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Lisa; McCall, Louise; Wray, Natalie

    2010-04-01

    Many nursing students enter undergraduate programmes with preconceived ideas about their future nursing careers, and intend to practice in particular areas such as midwifery or paediatrics. Through clinical placements, students are exposed to different clinical areas and professional socialization is facilitated. However, little is known about the influence of clinical placements on students' career intentions. This paper reports nursing findings drawn from a large qualitative study conducted in Victoria, Australia that sought to explore the influence of health professional students' clinical placements on their future career intentions. Participants were invited to be involved in either face-to-face or focus group interviews depending upon their own preference. Thematic data analysis revealed three main themes: 're-affirming career choice', 'working in a particular area' and 'work location'. Findings from the study add to our understanding of factors influencing nursing students' planning for their future careers including the impact of clinical placements.

  19. Motivation in nurse education practice: a case study approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Fiona

    "There are three things to remember about education. The first is motivation. The second one is motivation. The third one is motivation" (Maehr and Meyer, 1997 p372). It is important to understand motivation and the reasons why nurses, including educators and clinicians, need to continually motivate their students both in the classroom and within clinical practice. Using relevant literature, the following case study explores the significant issues pertinent in motivating a student undertaking a Postgraduate Diploma in Specialist Nursing. A combination of motivational and learning theories are used in the process of assisting this student to learn from her recent assessment failure and to become re-motivated. There is a discussion of the significance of this case and the key issues drawn from it, which may assist nursing staff in supporting student nurses to remain motivated within the clinical area.

  20. The understanding of theory and practice in nursing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dau, Susanne; Nielsen, Gitte

    2010-01-01

    focus group interviews. The informants are nursing students, teachers from a university college and clinical instructors from a university hospital. The three focus group interviews are conducted from a theoretical frame of reference regarding the matter of theory and practice. The method of data...... of this project is to investigate the understandings of clinical as well as theoretical training in nursing education, and to discuss which implications and problems these opinions can have for the nursing students’ competences to develop the profession. The method of this project consists of three qualitative...... analysis and interpretations takes place through the three folded mimesis as presented in Ricæurs critical hermeneutic. The result of this project’s analysis are discussed in the light of implication for the curriculum and the consequences for the students’ competences to develop the nursing profession....

  1. Exploring ward nurses' perceptions of continuing education in clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govranos, Melissa; Newton, Jennifer M

    2014-04-01

    Health care systems demand that nurses are flexible skilful workers who maintain currency and competency in order to deliver safe effective patient centered care. Nurses must continually build best practice into their care and acquire lifelong learning. Often this learning is acquired within the work environment and is facilitated by the clinical nurse educator. Understanding clinical nurses' values and needs of continuing education is necessary to ensure appropriate education service delivery and thus enhance patient care. To explore clinical ward-based nurses' values and perceptions towards continuing education and what factors impact on continuing education in the ward. A case study approach was utilized. A major teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia. A range of clinical nursing staff (n=23). Four focus groups and six semi-structured individual interviews were undertaken. Focus group interviews explored participants' values and perceptions on continuing education through a values clarification tool. Thematic analysis of interviews was undertaken to identify themes and cluster data. Three central themes: 'culture and attitudes', 'what is learning?' and 'being there-being seen', emerged reflecting staffs' values and perceptions of education and learning in the workplace. Multiple factors influence ward nurses' ability and motivation to incorporate lifelong learning into their practice. Despite variance in nurses' values and perceptions of CE in clinical environments, CE was perceived as important. Nurses yearned for changes to facilitate lifelong learning and cultivate a learning culture. Clinical nurse educators need to be cognizant of adult learners' characteristics such as values, beliefs, needs and potential barriers, to effectively facilitate support in a challenging and complex learning environment. Organizational support is essential so ward managers in conjunction with educational departments can promote and sustain continuing education, lifelong

  2. The application and effects of the basic nursing skills group in clinical practice%基础护理技能小组在临床的应用及效果

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭淑华; 孙燕; 朱肖

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨基础护理技能小组在临床应用及效果.方法 成立基础护理技能小组,明确职责,实施岗位培训.结果 基础护理技能小组成立后,基础护理合格率、护士基础护理操作考核成绩及住院患者满意度均提高(P<0.01或P<0.05).结论 基础护理技能小组的成立,推动基础护理工作的落实,有效保证了基础护理质量的提高.%Objective To explore the effects of the basic nursing skills group in clinical practice. Methods A basic nursing skills group was founded and the responsibility was identified to carry out in-service training. Results The basic nursing qualification rate,the average score of basic nursing examination,and the inpaatients satisfaction were all increased ( P < 0.01 or P < 0.05 ). Conclusion The basic: nursing skills group is helpful to promote the implementation of basic nursing worts and improve the quality of basic nursing.

  3. Transformation of admission interview to documentation for nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Højskov, Ida E; Glasdam, Stinne

    2014-09-01

    The admission interview is usually the first structured meeting between patient and nurse. The interview serves as the basis for personalised nursing and care planning and is the starting point for the clinic's documentation of the patient and his course of treatment. In this way, admission interviews constitute a basis for reporting by each nurse on the patient to nursing colleagues. This study examined how, by means of the admission interview, nurses constructed written documentation of the patient and his course of treatment for use by fellow nurses. A qualitative case study inspired by Ricoeur was conducted and consisted of five taped admission interviews, along with the written patient documentation subsequently worked out by the nurse. The findings were presented in four constructed themes: Admission interviews are the nurse's room rather than the patient's; Information on a surgical object; The insignificant but necessary contact; and Abnormalities must be medicated. It is shown how the nurse's documentation was based on the admission interview, the medical record details on the patient (facts that are essential to know in relation to disease and treatment), as well as the nurse's preconception of how to live a good life, with or without disease. Often, the patient tended to become an object in the nurse's report. It is concluded that in practice, the applied documentation system, VIPS, comes to act as the framework for what is important to the nurse to document rather than a tool that enables her to document what is important to the individual patient and his special circumstances and encounter with the health system. © 2013 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  4. Differentiating between a consultant nurse and a clinical nurse specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maylor, Miles

    With the introduction of nurse consultants, and regulation of the use of the designation 'specialist nurse', experienced practitioners such as clinical nurse specialists have seen their position eroded. Nurse consultants are a new NHS-employment category, and are expected to be at the top rank of the profession both in status and in salary. However, this article argues that nurses at various levels have the same core functions, and that these do not differ for nurse consultants. Distinguishing between practitioners that might have the same job description could be better done by measuring outcomes. More care needs to be taken over the use of words such as 'expert', which is used differently in different contexts, and it is suggested that competencies be developed by which to measure the effects of expertise. Although nurse consultant appointments are often driven by various political directives and they are employed to meet local and national priorities, difficult issues need to be faced. First, if nurse consultant jobs are the top of the clinical career ladder, will clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) need to accept a lower rung on it? Further, perhaps the title CNS should become obsolete or be regulated? Can CNSs claim parity of pay using the 'Agenda for Change' framework?

  5. Clinical nurses' perceptions and expectations of the role of doctorally-prepared nurses: a qualitative study in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheraghi, Mohammad-Ali; Jasper, Melanie; Vaismoradi, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    Nurses with doctorates are increasing in number throughout the world, yet the multitude of roles they play following graduation is unclear. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe clinical nurses' perceptions and expectations of the role of doctorally-prepared nurses in Iran. A qualitative study, using a content analysis approach was conducted with 43 clinical nurses chosen using a purposive sampling strategy. Oral, semi-structured and written interviews were used to generate data. During data analysis, three main themes emerged; "advantages of the doctoral degree", "clarification of doctorally-prepared nurses' role in clinical practice", and "unmet expectations of doctorally-prepared nurses". An understanding of the expectations of nurses on the role of doctorally-prepared nurses is needed to improve the collaboration between clinical nurses and doctorally-prepared nurses; remove misunderstandings on the abilities and skills of doctorally-prepared nurses; incorporate the expectations into doctoral education in order to facilitate their collaboration; and also remove the theory and practice gap through the utilisation of doctorally-prepared nurses' knowledge and skills in practice.

  6. Model documentation of assessment and nursing diagnosis in the practice of nursing care management for nursing students

    OpenAIRE

    A. Aziz Alimul Hidayat; M. Kes

    2015-01-01

    Model documentation of assessment and nursing diagnosis in the practice of nursing care management is an integration model in nursing care records, especially records nursing assessment and diagnosis in one format. This model can reduce the duration of the recording in nursing care, and make it easier for students to understand the nursing diagnosis, so that nursing interventions more effective. The purpose of this paper was to describes the form integration documentation of nursing assessmen...

  7. Eportfolio and learning styles in clinical nursing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten; Pedersen, Birthe D.; Helms, Niels Henrik

    2015-01-01

    on practice and one´s own learning process. The principal initiators were emotional involvement in clinical nursing, consciousness of learning through writing; ponder over practice, and a confident and constructive student-preceptor relationship. Inhibitors were vulnerability, a preconception that one learns...

  8. 实习护生临床实践的心理健康状况调查分析%Analysis on Psychological Health Conditions Investigation of Nursing Students in Clinical Practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李莉; 颜萍; 潘蓉; 董正惠

    2016-01-01

    为探讨实习护生临床实践2周后的心理健康状况,文章对实习护生在临床实践2周后进行了一般资料及SCL-90量表问卷调查。结果显示:实习护生SCL-90各因子分均高于中国常模,均有统计学差异(p<0.05)。说明实习护生在临床实习过程中应注重心理调适,提高护生的实习效果及工作成就认同感,为成为一名合格护士做好积极的心理准备。%In order to study the nursing students’ mental health status in two-week clinical practice, the paper uses questionnaire of SCL-90 scale to investigate the nursing students in two-week clinical practice. The results show that the nursing students get scores higher than the norm in China, and the significant statistical difference exists (p<0.05). The paper makes the following conclusions:in the process of clinical practice nursing students should pay attention to psychological adjustment, improve the effect of nursing students internship and working achievement identity so as to make preparations for becoming a qualified nurse.

  9. Reflective practice groups for nurses: a consultation liaison psychiatry nursing initiative: part 1--The model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawber, Chris

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, we outline the evolution of a process-focused reflective practice group (RPG) model for nurses working in clinical settings. The groups were initiated at Redcliffe and Caboolture hospitals by the consultation liaison psychiatry nurse and author. An associated article provides an evaluation of these RPG. The literature review identifies the key themes and theories on which the model is based, and the article outlines the process and practicalities of facilitating RPG in critical care, midwifery, and oncology specialties over a 3-year period. The model proposes that the effectiveness and sustainability of RPG arises from adequate preparation and engagement with prospective participants. Group rules, based on principles of confidentially, supportiveness, and diversity, were collaboratively developed for each group. Facilitation utilized a group-as-a-whole approach to manage process and stimulate reflection. While the purpose of RPG was a reflection on interpersonal aspects of nursing, contextual workplace issues were frequently raised in groups. Acknowledgement and containment of such issues were necessary to maintain clinical focus. The literature highlights facilitator credibility and style as crucial factors in the overall success of RPG, and it is proposed that reflective practice as a process-focused model for groups succeeds when nurse facilitators are trained in group process and receive concurrent supervision. © 2012 The Author; International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2012 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  10. Understanding dyslexia and nurse education in the clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson-Mann, Jo; McCandless, Fiona

    2006-05-01

    Clinical practice and dyslexia is becoming an important topic with the introduction of disability legislation and changes in nursing school entrance requirements. This paper considers the issues surrounding nursing and dyslexia, drawing on the available evidence. Firstly, the strengths dyslexics can bring to nursing are considered, along with difficulties they can experience, although the evidence is limited, with papers being anecdotal or speculative at times. The attitudes of institutions and healthcare professionals towards dyslexia are also addressed, along with what they can do to support dyslexic nurses and student nurses. Strategies for individual students are also suggested, which nursing educators could encourage students to use. Finally, the issue of disclosure is discussed, and suggested reasons why some dyslexic students choose not to disclose.

  11. Using advanced mobile devices in nursing practice--the views of nurses and nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Pauline; Petersson, Göran; Saveman, Britt-Inger; Nilsson, Gunilla

    2014-09-01

    Advanced mobile devices allow registered nurses and nursing students to keep up-to-date with expanding health-related knowledge but are rarely used in nursing in Sweden. This study aims at describing registered nurses' and nursing students' views regarding the use of advanced mobile devices in nursing practice. A cross-sectional study was completed in 2012; a total of 398 participants replied to a questionnaire, and descriptive statistics were applied. Results showed that the majority of the participants regarded an advanced mobile device to be useful, giving access to necessary information and also being useful in making notes, planning their work and saving time. Furthermore, the advanced mobile device was regarded to improve patient safety and the quality of care and to increase confidence. In order to continuously improve the safety and quality of health care, advanced mobile devices adjusted for nursing practice should be further developed, implemented and evaluated in research.

  12. Practical strategies for nursing education program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewallen, Lynne Porter

    2015-01-01

    Self-evaluation is required for institutions of higher learning and the nursing programs within them. The literature provides information on evaluation models and instruments, and descriptions of how specific nursing education programs are evaluated. However, there are few discussions in the nursing education literature of the practical aspects of nursing education program evaluation: how to get started, how to keep track of data, who to involve in data collection, and how to manage challenging criteria. This article discusses the importance of program evaluation in the academic setting and provides information on practical ways to organize the evaluation process and aggregate data, and strategies for gathering data from students, graduates, alumni, and employers of graduates.

  13. Handicaps for Evidence-based Practice and Its Influencing Factors in Clinical Nurses in Zhejiang Province%浙江省临床护士循证实践障碍及影响因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李春燕; 黄丽华; 叶向红; 叶旭琴

    2013-01-01

    Objective To fully understand the handicaps for evidence-based practice and its influencing factors and to provide evidence for intervention. Methods With Chinese version of Handicap Inventory Short Form about Evaluation of Evidence-Based Nursing Practice developed by LIU Xiao-hua, a cross-sectional survey was conducted among 831 clinical nurses in Zhejiang Province. Results Though with well knowledge of evidence-based practice in nursing, 70.7%of the nurses proposed there existed handicaps in evidence-based practice. Insufficient resources of implementing evidence-based practice and low quality of nursing search report scored higher. There were less handicaps among nurses after training of evidence-based practice in nursing, those with senior positions and those in department of nursing administration, emergency and ICU (P<0.05). Conclusion There are many handicaps for evidence-based practice in nursing. Great emphasis should be laid to scientific research of nursing. Sufficient evidence-based practice resources and various evidence-based practice in nursing education for nurses would contribute to the development of evidence-based nursing practice.%  目的全面了解浙江省临床护士的循证实践障碍现状,并分析其影响因素,为护理管理者实施干预提供可靠的参考依据.方法采用刘晓华等研制的中文版循证护理实践障碍量表,对浙江全省11个行政区22所医院共831名临床护士进行横断面调查.结果70.7%的临床护士认为自己循证实践存在障碍,但对循证护理的认识较好,得分较高的是开展循证护理的资源条件不足和护理研究报道的质量不高.参加过循证护理培训、职务较高和在护理部、急诊室、ICU等部门工作的护士循证实践障碍较小(P<0.05).结论浙江省临床护士循证实践障碍较严重,管理者应重视护理科研,营造良好的科研氛围;提供简单有效的循证资源,完善图书馆、数据库

  14. Factors Influencing Theoretical Knowledge and Practical Skill Acquisition in Student Nurses: An Empirical Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlett, Jo; Palfreyman, J. W.; Staines, H. J.; Marr, H.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of the following on bridging the theory-practice gap in nursing education was examined: (1) theory taught by preceptors or nurse educators; (2) nurse educator/preceptor collaboration on content; and (3) immediate clinical placements following theory learning. Preceptors were more effective, collaboration was ineffective, and delay was…

  15. Effective communication skills in nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramhall, Elaine

    2014-12-09

    This article highlights the importance of effective communication skills for nurses. It focuses on core communication skills, their definitions and the positive outcomes that result when applied to practice. Effective communication is central to the provision of compassionate, high-quality nursing care. The article aims to refresh and develop existing knowledge and understanding of effective communication skills. Nurses reading this article will be encouraged to develop a more conscious style of communicating with patients and carers, with the aim of improving health outcomes and patient satisfaction.

  16. How narratives can change nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Holly; Maw, Heather; Mee, Steve; Buckley, Alison; Corless, Louise

    This series has explored the value of patient narratives in enabling nurses to reflect on how their practice is perceived by, and affects, patients and their families. This article describes how two student learning disability nurses used patient and carer narratives to highlight the effect of a hospital trust's lack of toilet provision for people with physical impairments, using the stories to persuade the trust to develop appropriate facilities.

  17. Current Continuing Professional Education Practice among Malaysian Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Mei Chan; Francis, Karen; Cooper, Simon; Abdullah, Khatijah Lim

    2014-01-01

    Nurses need to participate in CPE to update their knowledge and increase their competencies. This research was carried out to explore their current practice and the future general needs for CPE. This cross-sectional descriptive study involved registered nurses from government hospitals and health clinics from Peninsular Malaysia. Multistage cluster sampling was used to recruit 1000 nurses from four states of Malaysia. Self-explanatory questionnaires were used to collect the data, which were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Seven hundred and ninety-two nurses participated in this survey. Only 80% (562) of the nurses had engaged in CPE activities during the past 12 months. All attendance for the various activities was below 50%. Workshops were the most popular CPE activity (345, 43.6%) and tertiary education was the most unpopular activity (10, 1.3%). The respondents did perceive the importance of future CPE activities for career development. Mandatory continuing professional education (MCPE) is a key measure to ensure that nurses upgrade their knowledge and skills; however, it is recommended that policy makers and nurse leaders in the continuing professional development unit of health service facilities plan CPE activities to meet registered nurses' (RNs) needs and not simply organizational requirements.

  18. Students' Assessment and Self-assessment of Nursing Clinical Faculty Competencies: Important Feedback in Clinical Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovrić, Robert; Prlić, Nada; Zec, Davor; Pušeljić, Silvija; Žvanut, Boštjan

    2015-01-01

    The students' assessment of clinical faculty competencies and the faculty members' self-assessment can provide important information about nursing clinical education. The aim of this study was to identify the differences between the students' assessment of the clinical faculty member's competencies and the faculty member's self-assessment. These differences can reveal interesting insights relevant for improving clinical practice.

  19. Beyond competencies: using a capability framework in developing practice standards for advanced practice nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Jane; Gardner, Glenn; Coyer, Fiona

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a discussion on the application of a capability framework for advanced practice nursing standards/competencies. There is acceptance that competencies are useful and necessary for definition and education of practice-based professions. Competencies have been described as appropriate for practice in stable environments with familiar problems. Increasingly competencies are being designed for use in the health sector for advanced practice such as the nurse practitioner role. Nurse practitioners work in environments and roles that are dynamic and unpredictable necessitating attributes and skills to practice at advanced and extended levels in both familiar and unfamiliar clinical situations. Capability has been described as the combination of skills, knowledge, values and self-esteem which enables individuals to manage change, be flexible and move beyond competency. A discussion paper exploring 'capability' as a framework for advanced nursing practice standards. Data were sourced from electronic databases as described in the background section. As advanced practice nursing becomes more established and formalized, novel ways of teaching and assessing the practice of experienced clinicians beyond competency are imperative for the changing context of health services. Leading researchers into capability in health care state that traditional education and training in health disciplines concentrates mainly on developing competence. To ensure that healthcare delivery keeps pace with increasing demand and a continuously changing context there is a need to embrace capability as a framework for advanced practice and education. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Investigation and Analysis on Mental Situations of Nursing Students before Clinical Practice%三年制高职护生实习前心理状态调查及分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓媛; 黄薇; 吴超

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To understand and analyze the mental situations of three-year system's nursing students before clinical practice,explore the countermeasures.Methods: A survey by questionnaire was conducted among 163 nursing students from a vocational school,the questionnaires were collected on the spot and the results were analyzed statistically.Results: Nursing students are not prepared for clinical practice.They worry about lack of clinic operation techniques,worry about don't adapt to the new environment,worry about difficulties in communication with doctors and nurses and patients.Conclusion: Take some measures before clinical practice of nursing students,such as technique intensive training,mental education,experiences sharing and so on,can well alleviate the mental situations.%目的了解三年制高职护理实习生实习前的心理状态,给予相关的对策应对实习前不良心理状态。方法对163名护生以不记名方式进行问卷调查,当场发放问卷并收回,进行统计分析。结果护生对实习没有较好的心理准备,担心临床操作技能欠缺,不适应新环境,害怕与医护人员、患者接触沟通等问题。结论在护生临床实习前,采取进行操作技能强化训练、进行心理辅导、组织经验交流等方式缓解护生临床前的不良心理状态。

  1. Computerizing clinical practice guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Karen Marie

    It is well described that hospitals have problems with sustaining high quality of care and expedient introduction of new medical knowledge. Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been promoted as a remedy to deal with these problems. It is, however, also well described that application and comp......It is well described that hospitals have problems with sustaining high quality of care and expedient introduction of new medical knowledge. Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been promoted as a remedy to deal with these problems. It is, however, also well described that application...... and compliance with CPGs in most areas of clinical practice are deficient. Computerization of CPGs has been brought forward as a method to disseminate and to support application of CPGs. Until now, CPG-computerization has focused on development of formal expressions of CPGs. The developed systems have, however......, not gained any extensive application in clinical practice. The basic assumption in this thesis is that the scanty penetration is due to an inappropriate design process when designing computerized CPGs for clinical work practice. This thesis examines the application of guidance within areas where CPG...

  2. A clinical internship model for the nurse practitioner programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Geraldine A; Fitzgerald, Les

    2008-11-01

    Nurse practitioners in Victoria, Australia must be prepared to Masters level before seeking nurse practitioner (NP) endorsement. The challenge from a university curriculum development perspective was to develop a programme that prepares the NP theoretically and clinically for their advanced practice role. The aim of this discussion paper is to outline how the internship model was developed and report the students' opinions on the model. The NP students complete the internship with a suitably qualified mentor which requires them to work together to develop and maintain a clinical learning plan, keep a log of the weekly meetings that shows how the objectives have been achieved. The internship includes advanced clinical assessment, prescribing, diagnostic and treatment skills and knowledge related to the nurse's specialty. The clinical assessment tool incorporates the National Competency Standards for the Nurse Practitioner and allows students and mentors to identify the level of practice and set clinical objectives. Students were asked to give feedback on the clinical internship and overall their comments were favourable, reporting benefits of a clinical mentor in their work and the clinical case presentations. The clinical internship allows the acquisition of knowledge and clinical skills in the clinical specialty with an expert clinical mentor in this innovative programme.

  3. Application of clinical pathway management mode in clinical nursing practice teaching of oncology%临床路径管理模式在肿瘤科护理实践教学中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦艳玲

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of clinical pathway management mode in nursing practice teaching of oncology.Methods Totals of 120 nursing students between September 2010 and June 2012 from oncology department,were randomly divided into the clinical pathway group (n =60) and control group (n =60) with 8 weeks practice.Control group used the traditional mentoring teaching method,while clinical pathway group according to the clinical pathway nursing teaching mode,developed teaching approach.Two days before the practice ended,all nursing students' knowledge and skills and satisfaction on practice teaching were assessed.Results The study showed that the scores of theoretical basis,the operating skills and the practical ability of nurses in the clinical pathway group were (93.75 ± 3.82),(92.36 ± 2.93),(90.31 ± 3.62),respectively,and those in the control group were (80.23 ± 3.06),(74.09 ± 5.35) and (78.25 ± 6.74),and the results of the clinical pathway group were significantly better than those of control group (t =10.25,11.94,8.24,respectively ;P < 0.05).Teaching quality satisfaction of nursing students in the clinical pathway group was significantly higher than that of the control group (93.33% vs 81.67%),and the difference was statistically significant (x2 =5.839,P < 0.05).Conclusions The clinical pathway is a kind of advanced management mode.If the management concept is introduced into oncology nursing practice teaching,the teaching goal,teaching method,and teaching quality will be improved.%目的 探讨临床路径管理模式在肿瘤科护理实践教学中的应用效果.方法 采用整群抽样法选择2010年9月至2012年6月在肿瘤科实习的护生120名,按照随机数字表法随机分为临床路径组和传统对照组各60名,实习时间均为8周.传统对照组采用传统“传帮带”的教学方法,临床路径组按照临床路径护理教学模式进行带教,首先制定教学路径,带教教师按照“肿瘤科护生临床

  4. Current status of clinical nursing specialists and the demands of osteoporosis specialized nurses in Mainland China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Tian

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The clinical nursing specialist (CNS is an expert who applies an expanded range of practical, theoretical, and research-based competencies to the care of patients within in a specialty clinical area within the larger discipline of nursing. A large number of studies consistently conclude that the CNS is a valuable healthcare resource that provides high-quality clinical and evidence-based nursing practice and improves patient outcome. The CNS has been involved in healthcare practices for many years, with an increasingly diverse role. However, the training for the CNS in China is only in a preliminary developmental stage. The aim of this article is to review the history and development of the CNS role. Furthermore, the epidemiologic status of osteoporosis, as well as the feasibility and necessity of developing training programs in China for the osteoporosis CNS, will be discussed.

  5. Clinical Trials and the Role of the Oncology Clinical Trials Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Elizabeth A; Royce, Cheryl

    2017-03-01

    Clinical trials are paramount to improving human health. New trial designs and informed consent issues are emerging as a result of genomic profiling and the development of molecularly targeted agents. Many groups and individuals are responsible for ensuring the protection of research participants and the quality of the data produced. The specialty role of the clinical trials nurse (CTN) is critical to clinical trials. Oncology CTNs have competencies that can help guide their practice; however, not all oncology clinical trials are supervised by a nurse. Using the process of engagement, one organization has restructured oncology CTNs under a nurse-supervised model.

  6. The Staff Nurse Clinical Leader at the Bedside: Swedish Registered Nurses' Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Inga E; Sahlsten, Monika J M

    2016-01-01

    Registered nurses at the bedside are accountable for and oversee completion of patient care as well as directly leading and managing the provision of safe patient care. These nurses have an informal leadership role that is not associated with any given position. Leadership is a complex and multifaceted concept and its meaning is unclear, especially in the staff nurse context. The aim was to describe registered nurses' perceptions of what it entails to be the leader at the bedside in inpatient physical care. A phenomenographic approach was employed. Interviews were performed with Swedish registered nurses (n = 15). Five descriptive categories were identified: demonstrating clinical knowledge, establishing a good atmosphere of collaboration, consciously structuring the work in order to ensure patients' best possible nursing care, customized presence in the practical work with patients according to predetermined prerequisites, and monitoring coworkers' professional practice. Registered nurses informal role as leader necessitates a social process of deliberate effort to attain and maintain leader status and authority. Participants used deliberate communicative approaches and interactive procedures. Leader principles grounded in the core values of the nursing profession that ensure nursing values and person-centered attributes were a key aspect.

  7. Philosophic analysis of a theory of clinical nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, P J

    1987-01-01

    Knowledge in nursing requires development of theories that address both the science and art of the professional practice discipline. "A Theory of Clinical Nursing" was analyzed to explicate the epistemologic dimensions within an historic perspective. Epistemologic dimensions defined by the philosophy of science--approaches to theory development, sources of knowledge, and methodology--were characterized from two perspectives, scientific inquiry and historicism. The major perspectives in the scientific mode, namely, mechanism, empiricism, logical positivism, and logical empiricism, were analyzed along the three dimensions of theory development, sources of knowledge, and methodology. Trends in theoretical developments in nursing were related to the scientific and historic perspectives and to the epistemologic dimensions. Juxtaposing the diversity of knowledge required for nursing science and practice, and the values systems of the practitioners, revealed the inadequacy of the scientific model. Nursing knowledge explication required several modes of inquiry to articulate the scientific basis of the discipline and the art of delivery of the practice. The historicist approach framed scientific work with the prevailing World View. The Rubin theory was located within the matrix of approaches to inquiry and perspectives in nursing science. Labeled by the theorist as both a nursing research and a nursing care model, "A Theory of Clinical Nursing" represented a transition model of nursing, undergirded by the major conceptualizations and methodologies of field, psychoanalytic, and social behaviorist traditions, but implicitly coalescing the art with the science of nursing. The theory addressed core concepts of person, situation, and nursing care, as well as major process themes of change and interaction. Nursing theories of a more narrow range, such as maternal role attainment and maternal identity, nested within the theory, while subsequent theoretical clarifications and

  8. Computerizing clinical practice guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Karen Marie

    . The analysis focuses on the emergence of general clinical work practice demands on guidance • An analysis of guidance demands from clinical work practice and business strategy, focusing on implications for the design of computerised CPGs. In my research, I have applied observation studies, interviews...... is comprised by fieldwork in three oncology departments and a case study of advanced life support. Although close to all patients within oncology are treated according to a CPG, I found limited application of physical CPGs and web-based CPG portals. However, I found comprehensive application of activity...... feasible • Designed in a way that provides room for local adaptations of guidance • Designed with focus on specific business strategic aims Further, based on my findings, I will suggest that design of computerized CPGs should be based on: 1) scrutinization of the clinical work practice, 2) articulation...

  9. Nursing students' views of clinical competence assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Carmel; O'Connor, Maureen; Egan, Geraldine; Tierney, Katie; Butler, Mary Pat; Fahy, Anne; Tuohy, Dympna; Cassidy, Irene; Quillinan, Bernie; McNamara, Mary C

    This paper reports on some outcomes of a research study evaluating a new assessment framework of clinical competence used in undergraduate nursing programmes in the Mid West Region of Ireland. First, this paper presents both the strengths and weaknesses of the present model, as articulated by student nurses. Second, it generates a broader critical debate around the concept of competency assessment. The model of competence in question was developed by the Irish Nursing Board then elaborated on by the University of Limerick in partnership with local health service providers in 2002. Methodology involved a triangulated approach, comprising a series of focus group interviews with students (n=13) and preceptors (n=16) followed by a survey of students (n=232) and preceptors (n=837). Findings from the student focus groups are reported here. Themes identified using Burnard's (1991) framework for analysis are preparation for competency assessment, competency documentation, supporting assessment in practice, organisational and resource factors and the competency assessment structure and process. Results from this research have implications for refinement and revision of the present competency assessment framework, for student and staff preparation and for collaboration between stakeholders.

  10. A Leadership Education and Development Program for Clinical Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Modic, Mary Beth; Van Dyk, Jennifer; Hancock, K Kelly

    2016-11-01

    The Leadership Education and Development (LEAD) Program was designed to transform care at the bedside by empowering clinical nurses as leaders. The heart of LEAD was enhancing communication skills of clinical nurses with clinical colleagues and, most importantly, patients and families. Key concepts of leadership/management were included: personal awareness, personal leadership skills/abilities, leading change, leading others individually and in teams, enhancing the patient/provider experience, and the leadership role in outcomes management. A quantitative, longitudinal, survey design was used with 2 cohorts. The program consisted of six 4-hour sessions for 3 to 6 months. Leadership practices were measured before program implementation, at the end of the program, and 3 months after program completion. There were significant increases in leadership practices sustained 3 months after program completion. A range of other outcome measures was included. There is a need for additional leadership development programs for clinical nurses.

  11. The Comparison of the effectiveness of Two Education Methods video and lecture on Knowledge, Belief and Practice of Hand Hygiene in Nursing Students: Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvan Kobra

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Using educational methods among nursing students is very important, as they increase knowledge and affect their attitude and ultimately their performance. The use of an effective training method leads to reform and change in bad habits and replacement of correct hygiene habits. This issue is also very important element for providing, maintaining and improving the health of patients.The general purpose of this study was to compare the effect of two educational methods of film displaying and lecture on knowledge, attitude and performance of hand hygiene in nursing-midwifery students of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. In this study, the research population included 5th and 6th semester nursing students of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, School of Nursing and Midwifery, which are randomly selected based on inclusion criteria.This research is a clinical trial study. The data collection tool consists of 4 parts. In both group, demographic questionnaire, and questionnaire of knowledge, attitude and performance of hand hygiene before and after intervention were conducted. Collected data were analyzed using SPSS 17 software and they were analyzed using descriptive indices of mean, standard deviation and inferential statistics (paired t-test and (independent t. The results of this study showed that there is difference between knowledge and belief of nursing students before and after training using film displaying method (p <0.05, while that is no significant difference between the performance of nursing students before and after training by displaying method. In addition, there is no significant difference between knowledge, belief, and the performance of nursing students before and after the training by lecture method.

  12. Legal issues in clinical nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Carla Wheeler; Lewallen, Lynne Porter

    2015-01-01

    Nurse educators are concerned about legal implications of teaching students in clinical settings. Although literature is available about legal issues in working with students in the classroom, there is little recent information on clinical nursing faculty's legal liability when working with students and ways to reduce the risk of becoming involved in a lawsuit. This article discusses the major issues in clinical settings that contribute to lawsuits against faculty and offers suggestions to reduce legal liability with students in clinical settings.

  13. [Nurses' autonomy and vulnerability in the Nursing Assistance Systematization practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Silvia Regina Tamae; Priel, Margareth Rose; Pereira, Luciane Lucio

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to recognize the autonomy and vulnerability of nurses in the implementation of the Sistema da Assistência de Enfermagem (SAE) Nursing Care System through an integrative literature review, using content analysis. A survey was conducted, and 40 articles published between 1998 and 2008 were selected based on their relevance. Results showed two main categories of meaning: Benefits associated to the SAE practice (to patients, to the profession and to the institution) and Determinants for the Implementation of SAE (nurse's competence, training and education, record-instruments, infrastructure and collective sharing-construction). From the integration of the two categories, the highlights were the autonomy in acting with freedom and responsibility, science-based decision-making, and being valued for their social work, as well as the vulnerability expressed by interpersonal relationships, the wear generated by professional stress and the risk inherent to the service.

  14. [Clinical nursing manpower: development and future prospects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiou-Fen; Kao, Ching-Chiu

    2014-04-01

    The significant changes in nursing manpower utilization in Taiwan over the past two decades are due in large part to the implementation of the National Health Insurance program and the rising need for long-term care. The changes have impacted clinical nursing manpower utilization in two important ways. Firstly, there has been a substantial increase in overall demand for nursing manpower. In particular, the need for clinical nurses has nearly quadrupled during this time period. Secondly, the level of difficulty involved in patient care has risen dramatically, with factors including increased disease severity and increased care quality expectations, among others. These changes, coupled with demands on nursing manpower imposed from other sectors, underpin and further exacerbate the problem of nursing manpower shortages throughout the healthcare system. To raise the quality of the nursing work environment, the Ministry of Health and Welfare (MOHW) brought together Taiwan's key professional nursing organizations to promote 10 care-reform strategies, establish the nursing-aid manpower system, and create the nursing classification system as an approach to effectively attract nurses to take positions in the medical system.

  15. Transformational leadership in nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doody, Owen; Doody, Catriona M

    Traditionally, nurses have been over-managed and led inadequately, yet today they face unprecedented challenges and opportunities. Organisations constantly face changes that require an increasingly adaptive and flexible leadership. This type of adaptive leadership is referred to as 'transformational'; under it, environments of shared responsibilities that influence new ways of knowing are created. Transformational leadership motivates followers by appealing to higher ideas and moral values, where the leader has a deep set of internal values and ideas. This leads to followers acting to sustain the greater good, rather than their own interests, and supportive environments where responsibility is shared. This article focuses on transformational leadership and its application to nursing through the four components of transformational leadership. These are: idealised influence; inspirational motivation; intellectual stimulation; and individual consideration.

  16. Reflection in and on nursing practices- how nurses reflect and develop knowledge and skills during their nursing practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Bertero

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This paper present some theoretical foundations for reflection and also present some findingsfrom some studies including nurses’ reflections in and on nursing practice in various areas of nursing care.Aims: The aim of this paper was to critically discuss and analyze the application of reflection to nursing practiceand how it could become visible and understandable.Method: A secondary analysis was performed on some studies whereas the author had been involved in. Thissecondary analysis on all data focused on identifying reflection in nursing practice.Results: Data was abstracted and analyzed in order to making reflection in nursing practice visible. The resultsshow that reflection in nursing practice could be identified as reflection on action, reflection in action andreflection as self-discovering. Sometimes the nurses made good caring activities by intuition; they made someactions that they by experiences knew will function, but they had difficulties to verbalize this, in other words;they have what we call silent knowledge.Conclusion: Using reflections can access our theories in use so enabling others to learn. In this way the risk oftaking practice for granted has the potential to be reduced. So what nurses’ do- can be explored and shared –nurses can share and develop knowledge and experiences- nurses will be able to learn from each other as well asfrom ourselves.

  17. Exploring risk in professional nursing practice: an analysis of work refusal and professional risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beardwood, Barbara A; Kainer, Jan M

    2015-03-01

    This article explores risk in professional nursing practice. Professional risk refers to the threat of professional discipline if it is found that a registered nurse has violated professional nursing practice standards. We argue professional risk is socially constructed and understood differently by nurse regulatory bodies, unions, professional associations and frontline nurses. Regulatory bodies emphasize professional accountability of nurses; professional associations focus on system problems in health-care; unions undertake protecting nurses' right to health and safety; and frontline nurses experience fear and uncertainty in their attempt to interpret practice standards to avoid professional discipline. Perspectives of professional risk are investigated by analyzing three professional nursing bodies' views of professional codes governing the right of nurses to refuse unsafe work assignments. The workplace dynamics surrounding work refusal experienced by frontline nurses are illustrated primarily through the lens of the 2003 SARS influenza outbreak in Ontario, Canada. We conclude that frontline nurses in Ontario are required to manage risk by following professional protocols prioritizing patient care and professional accountability which disregard the systemic, unpredictable and hazardous circumstances in their everyday practice. Moreover, we argue professional protocols cannot anticipate every eventuality in clinical practice creating the fear of professional discipline for nurses. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Malaysian nurses' skin care practices of preterm infants: experience vs. knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Zainah; Newton, Jennifer Margaret; Lau, Rosalind

    2014-04-01

    This study sought to explore the impact of Malaysian nurses' perceptions, knowledge and experiences in preterm infant skin care practices using a descriptive approach. Questionnaires were distributed to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) nurses in one teaching hospital in Malaysia. A knowledge gap was revealed among nurses in both theoretical and practical knowledge of preterm infant skin. Nurses working for more than 5 years in NICU or having a Neonatal Nursing Certificate (NNC) were not predictors of having adequate knowledge of preterm infants' skin care. The results highlight the complex issue of providing effective skin care to preterm infants. However, a specific finding related to nurses' confidence provides some direction for future practice and research initiatives. Clear clinical evidence-based guidelines and Continuing Nursing Education on relevant topics of preterm infants' care may provide the required knowledge for the nurses.

  19. Professional Development Strategies to Enhance Nurses' Knowledge and Maintain Safe Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindon, Susan L

    2017-08-01

    Maintaining competence is a professional responsibility for nurses. Individual nurses are accountable for their practice, as outlined in the American Nurses Association's Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice. Nurses across clinical settings face the sometimes daunting challenge of staying abreast of regulatory mandates, practice changes, equipment updates, and other workplace expectations. In the complex, evolving perioperative setting, professional development is a priority, and the need for ongoing education is critical. However, nurses' efforts to engage in their own development can be hampered by a lack of time, limited access to educational resources, or cost concerns. This article provides an overview of nursing professional development and offers some resources to help individual nurses maintain or enhance their knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Copyright © 2017 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Present Investigation About Lateral Violence which Clinical Practice Nursing Students Encountered%临床实习护生遭遇横向暴力的现状调查及研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方杰; 卢茸; 范红梅; 何佳孟

    2014-01-01

    目的:通过了解临床实习护生遭受横向暴力情况,探讨临床实习护生群体中,横向暴力发生的因素及应对策略。方法:采用问卷调查法。结果:横向暴力主要以隐性暴力形式存在;不同学历层次的护生中,本科护生遭受横向暴力发生率明显高于大专、中专护生;临床实习护生遭遇横向暴力时,消极应对者明显多于积极应对者。结论:横向暴力普遍存在于临床实习护生群体中,需采取有效措施进行干预。%Objective :To investigate the causes of clinical practice nursing students meet with lateral violence and cop-ing strategies by understanding the situation of lateral violence they encountered .Methods :Questionnaire investigation . Results :Lateral violence mainly exists in the form of the recessive violence ;undergraduate nursing students were signifi-cantly higher than colleges and technical secondary nursing students at the incidence of encountered lateral violence ;when clinical practice nursing students confronted with lateral violence ,negative coping is significantly more than the positive response .Conclusion:Lateral violence is widespread in the clinical practice nursing students ,it need to take ef-fective measures to intervene .

  1. Enhancing assertiveness in district nurse specialist practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Julie

    2016-08-02

    District nurse (DN) care delivery has undergone substantial change in recent years due to changing demographics and service delivery demands that have called for a move of care delivery from secondary to primary care. The title District Nurse is recorded with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) on completion of the Specialist Practice Qualification in District Nursing (SPQ DN), which purports to be a 'transformational' course that prepares future caseload holders to manage their team and prioritise care delivery effectively. This article explores the need for assertiveness skills in this role in response to Australian research, and outlines the pedagogic interventions implemented during the SPQ DN course to enhance this skill. Assertiveness scores were monitored for the duration of the course and demonstrated a significant increase-a topic that is now the subject of a future, funded study.

  2. A Trial of Nursing Cost Accounting using Nursing Practice Data on a Hospital Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahira, Akiko; Tada, Kazuko; Ishima, Masatoshi; Nagao, Hidenori; Miyamoto, Tadashi; Nakagawa, Yoshiaki; Takemura, Tadamasa

    2015-01-01

    Hospital administration is very important and many hospitals carry out activity-based costing under comprehensive medicine. However, nursing cost is unclear, because nursing practice is expanding both quantitatively and qualitatively and it is difficult to grasp all nursing practices, and nursing cost is calculated in many cases comprehensively. On the other hand, a nursing information system (NIS) is implemented in many hospitals in Japan and we are beginning to get nursing practical data. In this paper, we propose a nursing cost accounting model and we simulate a cost by nursing contribution using NIS data.

  3. Optimal qualifications, staffing and scope of practice for first responder nurses in disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Huahua; He, Haiyan; Arbon, Paul; Zhu, Jingci; Tan, Jing; Zhang, Limei

    2012-01-01

    To explore: the selection criteria for first responder nurses during disaster; scope of practice for disaster relief nurses; appropriate nurse - medical practitioner ratio at the disaster site. Nurses are key members of disaster response medical teams. A scarcity of literature exists relating to nurses attending disasters, their qualifications, experience, scope of practice and appropriate staffing ratios. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected via survey using self-developed questionnaires. Participants were 95 medical workers, who participated in emergency rescue teams following the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake in China. A response rate of 93·7% achieved. The questionnaire included questions relating to nurses: previous experience in disaster relief; scope of practice at the disaster site; optimal ratio of medical practitioners to nurses in disaster relief teams. Following a disaster, first responder nurses considered most suitable were those with at least three years clinical experience, particularly in the emergency department or having emergency rescue skills training. The scope of practice for disaster relief nurses was different to that of nurses working in a hospital. The majority of participants reported insufficient nurses during the relief effort, concluding the optimal ratio of medical practitioner to nurse should range between 1:1-1:2 depending on the task and situation. At the scene of disaster, the preferred first responder nurses were nurses: with emergency rescue training; experienced in the emergency department; with at least three years clinical experience. The scope of practice for first responder nurses needs to be extended. Appropriate nurse - medical practitioner ratios in responding medical teams is dependant on the specific medical requirements of the disaster. The recommendations made by this study provide a guide to ensure that nurses can contribute effectively as essential members of first responder emergency disaster relief teams

  4. Status and influencing factors of nursing students' professional identification during clinical practice%临床实习护生职业认同现状调查及其影响因素研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙焕芹; 李国英; 平春霞

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the status of nursing students'professional identification during clinical practice,and to analyze the influencing factors.Methods Ninety-eight nursing students during clinical practice were investigated with the general information questionnaire and the professional identification questionnaire.Results The total score of professional identification was 23~34 (28.45±5.44).The application choice was the influencing factor.Conclusion The professional identification of nursing students differs according to the personal characters,nursing administrators should provide career guidance according to the students'characters.%目的 调查临床实习护生的职业认同现状,并分析其影响因素.方法 采用实习护生一般资料调查表和职业认同感问卷对98名实习护生进行调查.结果 实习护生职业认同感得分为23~34(28.45±5.44)分.职业认同感的影响因素为报考志愿.结论 不同特征的实习护生职业认同感不同,护理管理者应根据实习护生的自身特点对其进行针对性的职业引导.

  5. Current Continuing Professional Education Practice among Malaysian Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Chan Chong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nurses need to participate in CPE to update their knowledge and increase their competencies. This research was carried out to explore their current practice and the future general needs for CPE. This cross-sectional descriptive study involved registered nurses from government hospitals and health clinics from Peninsular Malaysia. Multistage cluster sampling was used to recruit 1000 nurses from four states of Malaysia. Self-explanatory questionnaires were used to collect the data, which were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Seven hundred and ninety-two nurses participated in this survey. Only 80% (562 of the nurses had engaged in CPE activities during the past 12 months. All attendance for the various activities was below 50%. Workshops were the most popular CPE activity (345, 43.6% and tertiary education was the most unpopular activity (10, 1.3%. The respondents did perceive the importance of future CPE activities for career development. Mandatory continuing professional education (MCPE is a key measure to ensure that nurses upgrade their knowledge and skills; however, it is recommended that policy makers and nurse leaders in the continuing professional development unit of health service facilities plan CPE activities to meet registered nurses’ (RNs needs and not simply organizational requirements.

  6. Information literacy during entry to practice: information-seeking behaviors in student nurses and recent nurse graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahoush, Olive; Banfield, Laura

    2014-02-01

    The ability to locate information pertinent to guide clinical practice is important for quality nursing care and patient safety. To date, little is known about the transfer of information literacy skills as student nurses transition to clinical practice as new graduates. This study begins to address this gap from the perspective of student nurses, recent nurse graduates (RNs), nurse leaders and library staff. To describe the information-seeking behaviors of student nurses and RNs within their clinical settings. This is a descriptive study that included both cross-sectional surveys and key informant interviews. Participants were senior-level undergraduate students and recently graduated RNs (graduated since 2008), and nurse leaders and library staff employed in one of the clinical sites accepting undergraduate students from the McMaster Mohawk and Conestoga BScN program. The study was completed in two large hospital corporations in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Student nurses and RNs were invited to complete online surveys to assess their access to and use of information sources and resources within clinical practice. Students completed a survey comprised of five open-ended questions, while RNs completed a survey comprised of 13 fixed choice and open-ended questions. Nurse leaders and library staff participated in qualitative interviews to verify the extent and availability of information resources. Eighteen RNs and 62 students completed their respective surveys. Three categories of information sources and resources were identified: electronic, print and interpersonal. Electronic sources of information were the most used resource by both students and RNs. More RNs reported using interpersonal sources, while students reported using more print sources of information. Recent RN graduates meet the Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing performance indicators related to information access for the entry to practice Nursing Informatics competencies. Crown Copyright

  7. Hiring and incorporating doctor of nursing practice-prepared nurse faculty into academic nursing programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agger, Charlotte A; Oermann, Marilyn H; Lynn, Mary R

    2014-08-01

    Semistructured interviews were conducted with 15 deans and directors of nursing programs across the United States to gain an understanding of how Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP)-prepared nurses seeking academic positions are hired and used in schools of nursing. Interviews sought to gain information regarding (a) differences and similarities in the roles and responsibilities of DNP- and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)-prepared faculty, (b) educational advancement and mentoring of DNP-prepared nurse faculty, (c) recruitment of doctorally prepared nurse faculty, and (d) shortages of nursing faculty. DNP- and PhD-prepared nurse faculty are hired for varying roles in baccalaureate and higher degree schools of nursing, some similar to other faculty with master's degrees and others similar to those with PhDs; in associate degree in nursing programs, they are largely hired for the same type of work as nurse faculty with master's degrees. Regardless of program or degree type, the main role of DNP-prepared faculty is teaching. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Clinical teachers as caring mothers from the perspectives of Jordanian nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Violeta

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this transcultural qualitative study was to discover, describe and explain the meaning of a caring student-teacher encounter within the context of clinical education. Clinical teachers are registered nurses who have completed a university undergraduate nursing degree program and at least 1 year of post-registration clinical experience. They are employed as full-time staff of the faculty of nursing. Among the 19 Jordanian undergraduate nursing students interviewed, "clinical nurse teachers as caring mothers," emerged as an important theme. This paper describes the clinical teachers in their mothering roles, such as supporting, negotiating, reinforcing, transforming and releasing nursing students throughout their clinical practice. Understanding students' cultural beliefs and values provides possible predictors that could facilitate positive student-teacher relationships that could be used to plan the clinical education for nursing students. There is also a need to develop workshops in clinical teaching that would incorporate cultural awareness, especially in a multicultural student-teacher groups.

  9. Integrating practice into theory in the new nursing curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Paul; Doyle, Carol; Hunt, Louise A

    2003-12-01

    This article examines the progress made by the University of Central England (UCE) over the last 18 months in implementing Health Service Circular 1999/219; the government document that contains guidance on the main points that had to be included in new pre-registration nursing curricula. Sixteen pilot sites were chosen to implement the new curriculum and UCE was one of these. The key focus of the curriculum being implemented is to draw practice and theory more closely together. Achievement of strong collaboration between practitioners and University staff is a necessary element of such a venture and the resultant empowerment of clinical assessors is highlighted. The article explores the methods employed to ensure that the practical assessment process mirrors the rigour of academic assessment and that there is equity of assessment across all four branches of nursing. A considered discussion of the use of modular assessment, focussed practical assessment documents and assessment of practical nursing skills provide insight into how practice and theory can be equally valued in a pre-registration nursing courses.

  10. Investing in nursing research in practice settings: a blueprint for building capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffs, Lianne; Smith, Orla; Beswick, Susan; Maoine, Maria; Ferris, Ella

    2013-12-01

    Engaging clinical nurses in practice-based research is a cornerstone of professional nursing practice and a critical element in the delivery of high-quality patient care. Practising staff nurses are well suited to identify the phenomena and issues that are clinically relevant and appropriate for research. In response to the need to invest in and build capacity in nursing research, hospitals have developed creative approaches to spark interest in nursing research and to equip clinical nurses with research competencies. This paper outlines a Canadian hospital's efforts to build research capacity as a key strategy to foster efficacious, safe and cost-effective patient care practices. Within a multi-pronged framework, several strategies are described that collectively resulted in enhanced research and knowledge translation productivity aimed at improving the delivery of safe and high-quality patient care.

  11. Walking the bridge: Nursing students' learning in clinical skill laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewertsson, Mona; Allvin, Renée; Holmström, Inger K; Blomberg, Karin

    2015-07-01

    Despite an increasing focus on simulation as a learning strategy in nursing education, there is limited evidence on the transfer of simulated skills into clinical practice. Therefore it's important to increase knowledge of how clinical skills laboratories (CSL) can optimize students' learning for development of professional knowledge and skills, necessary for quality nursing practice and for patient safety. Thus, the aim was to describe nursing students' experiences of learning in the CSL as a preparation for their clinical practice. Interviews with 16 students were analysed with content analysis. An overall theme was identified - walking the bridge - in which the CSL formed a bridge between the university and clinical settings, allowing students to integrate theory and practice and develop a reflective stance. The theme was based on categories: conditions for learning, strategies for learning, tension between learning in the skills laboratory and clinical settings, and development of professional and personal competence. The CSL prepared the students for clinical practice, but a negative tension between learning in CSL and clinical settings was experienced. However, this tension may create reflection. This provides a new perspective that can be used as a pedagogical approach to create opportunities for students to develop their critical thinking.

  12. An innovative clinical practicum to teach evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancato, Vera C

    2006-01-01

    A clinical practicum was successfully implemented for RN to BSN students to apply evidence-based practice to actual clinical problems affecting nursing practice. The author describes how this practicum was implemented and the requisite resources and support systems. This senior-level capstone course enabled students to understand and value a lifelong learning approach to evidence-based practice.

  13. The importance of practice guidelines in clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciarra, Erica

    2012-01-01

    This position paper is a brief review of the importance of practice guidelines in clinical use. Emphasis is placed on evidence-based practice guidelines and research. This position paper attests to the importance of the use of guidelines that direct clinical nursing practice.

  14. Audit in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modayil, Prince Cheriyan; Panchikkeel, Ragesh Kuyyattil; Alex, Nisha

    2009-06-01

    Audit dates back to as early as 1750 BC when king Hammurabi of Babylon instigated audit for clinicians with regard to outcome. Clinical audit is a way of fi nding out whether we are doing what we should be doing. It also verifi es whether we are applying the best practice. An audit cycle involves setting-up of standards, measuring current practice, comparing results with standards (criteria), changing practice and re-auditing to make sure practice has improved A 'clinical audit' is a quality improvement process that seeks to improve patient care and clinical outcomes through a systematic review of care against explicit criteria, and the implementation of change. Changes are implemented at an individual, team or service level and a subsequent re-audit is done to confi rm improvement in health care delivery. The importance of audit in healthcare sector needs to be appreciated by the relevant authorities. The most frequently cited barrier to successful audit is the failure of organizations to provide suffi cient fund and protected time for healthcare teams.

  15. Factors influencing advanced practice nurses' ability to promote evidence-based practice among frontline nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrish, Kate; Nolan, Mike; McDonnell, Ann; Tod, Angela; Kirshbaum, Marilyn; Guillaume, Louise

    2012-02-01

    Advanced practice nurses (APNs) have an important role in promoting evidence-based practice (EBP) among frontline nurses (FLNs). Factors influencing FLNs' engagement with EBP are well documented but little is known about factors that affect APNs' ability to facilitate evidence in practice. To identify factors that influence APNs' ability to promote EBP among FLNs. A multiple case study of 23 APNs from hospital and primary care settings across seven English health authorities was undertaken. Data collection comprised interviews and observation of APNs and interviews with FLNs and other healthcare professionals. Data were analysed using the Framework approach. Four groups of influencing factors were identified: (1) Personal attributes of APNs included knowledge and skills in EBP, clinical credibility with frontline staff and leadership style. (2) Relationships with stakeholders included APNs' interactions with FLNs and the level of support from managers and medical colleagues. (3) Aspects of the APN role included their sphere of responsibility and workload. (4) Organisational context included the organisational culture, FLNs' workload, professional networks and available resources. Educational preparation for APNs should enable them to develop expertise in EBP plus interpersonal and leadership skills to manage relational dynamics in clinical settings. APN role specifications should provide the opportunity to promote EBP. The organisational culture should be conducive to enabling EBP with managers supportive of this aspect of the APNs' role. APNs need to be supported to address the individual, interpersonal and organisational factors, which influence their ability to promote EBP. Organisational commitment at the highest level is key to APNs' ability to fulfil this aspect of their role. ©2011 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  16. Clinical judgement within the South African clinical nursing environment: A concept analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna C. van Graan

    2016-12-01

    The findings emphasized clinical judgement as skill within the clinical nursing environment, thereby improving autonomous and accountable nursing care. These findings will assist nurse leaders and clinical nurse educators in developing a teaching-learning strategy to promote clinical judgement in undergraduate nursing students, thereby contributing to the quality of nursing care.

  17. Moral distress and moral courage in everyday nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Ann

    2011-03-21

    In this article the author examines the concepts of moral distress and moral courage within the context of nursing practice. Examples of challenging healthcare situations from the United Kingdom and Ireland are discussed in the light of the examination of these two concepts. The examples illuminate features of healthcare situations that need to be considered in relation to different organisational and cultural contexts. This requires an understanding of the complexity of clinical contexts and an appreciation of the fallibility and vulnerability of nurses and other practitioners. The goal of this article is to encourage healthcare organisations to create supportive structures and sensitive leadership that will enhance moral courage in the work setting.

  18. Constructing monsters: correctional discourse and nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Dave; Federman, Cary

    2003-05-01

    This article presents the results of a nursing research that aimed at describing the practice of nursing in an extreme environment where social control and psychiatric nursing care are inextricably enmeshed with one another. The study results indicate that the Correctional Psychiatric Centre (CPC) is a site where two antagonistic discourses (that of the hospital and that of the prison) are contending for the human resources in place. Given that the asylum and the prison are as such two distinct institutions, the correctional psychiatric centre constitutes an ideological space that results from the fusion of both the psychiatric and penal apparatuses. However, characteristics commonly attributed to prisoners, such as 'lying', 'dangerous', 'monstrous' and 'manipulative' are superimposed on the nurses' common theoretical representation that a patient is a person to whom care is provided. Monstrosity was a term regularly employed to describe particular types of inmates. The literature on monsters in quite informative in order to understand the impact of such a representation of forensic psychiatric nursing practice.

  19. Effects of concept mapping on critical thinking abilities of nursing students in clinical practice%临床教学中应用概念图对提高学生评判性思维能力的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳(韦华); 孙铮; 薛雅卓; 高丹凤; 陈松兰; 朝霞; 赵云霞

    2009-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of concept mapping on improving critical thinking abilities and clinical deci-sion-ranking skills of nursing students in clinical practice. Methods Concept mapping was used as teaching strategies in the ease nursing in classroom. Thirty nursing students were asked to map out the congestive heart failure patient's main health problems,key assessment findings,appropriate nursing diagnoses and interventions at the beginning and at the end of the nursing clinical teaching program. The effectiveness of concept mapping in developing and assessing critical thinking in the nursing students was evaluated using examination of differences between pre-and post-concept maps. The instrument of the grading tools developed by Schuster was used to evaluate the concept mappings in this study. Results There were significant differences in the scores of the physiological problems,education needs,treatment and nursing interventions between pre- and post-concept mappings (P<0.01). Conclusions Concept mapping is an effective clinical teaching strategy in nursing for developing and improving critical thinking abilities and clinical decision-making skills.%目的 研究概念图用于护理临床教学对培养学生评判性思维能力和临床护理决策能力的价值.方法 概念图在课堂中用作个案护理教学策略,要求即将毕业的30名学生对心力衰竭患者的主要健康问题、重要的评估发现、恰当的护理诊断和干预措施建立初始和修正的概念图,并对每名学生初始和修正的概念图采用Schuster的概念图量化评分工具进行评分.结果 用Microsoft Word制作某一同学绘制的最佳初始和修正概念图,初始和修正概念图的得分在生理问题、教育需求和治疗或护理干预方法等方面差异有显著性统计学意义(P<0.01).结论 概念图是一种有效的临床护理教学策略,可有效提高学生的评判性思维和临床护理决策能力.

  20. 美学原理在护理临床见习带教中的应用%Application of aesthetic principles in the teaching of clinical nursing practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡曼波; 胡丽; 何平平; 廖如意; 吴艳平

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨美学原理在护理临床见习带教中的应用效果.方法:将南华大学护理学院2007级130名护理本科学生设为实验组,进行1个学期护理美学的培训,教材以为蓝本,由教师结合临床做适当调整,并在临床护理见习带教中加入美学带教;2006级130名护理本科生设为对照组,采用传统教学方法.在两组护生见习末期,采取问卷调查进行带教老师对学生满意度评价、患者对学生满意度评价、学生自我评价等方式评估护理见习改革后的效果.结果:实验组患者对学生满意度和老师对学生满意度较对照组明显提高(P<0.05);护生对美学价值取向的自我评价较对照组显著提高(P<0.05).结论:将美学原理引入临床见习带教中,能有效提高护生的美学素养,促进护生非语言沟通能力,构建和谐的护患关系.%Objective: To explore the application of aesthetic principles in the teaching of clinical nursing practice. Methods: 130 nursing undergraduates, enrolled in 2007, of Nursing Faculty of Nanhua University were taken as experimental group and the students received aesthetic training of a whole semester. The teachers taught them with " Nursing Aesthetics" and made appropriate adjustments in their teaching of clinical nursing practice; other 130 nursing undergraduates who were enrolled in 2006 were taken as control group and the teachers used the traditional teaching method in the teaching of clinical nursing practice. The questionnaire survey was conducted at the end of nursing practice. The teaching results were assessed through the evaluation of the teachers, patients and the students themselves. Results: The teachers and patient's satisfaction with the students was significantly higher in the experimental group than the control group ( P < 0. 05 ); the self - evaluation of the students on their aesthetic value orientation was markedly higher in the experimental group than the control group ( P < 0

  1. Clinical Decision Making of Rural Novice Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seright, Teresa J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop substantive theory regarding decision making by the novice nurse in a rural hospital setting. Interviews were guided by the following research questions: What cues were used by novice rural registered nurses in order to make clinical decisions? What were the sources of feedback which influenced subsequent…

  2. Evidence-based nursing practice: are we there yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervin, Naomi E

    2002-01-01

    The volume of evidence for nursing practice has increased as a result of research and scientific discoveries. Yet we are still struggling with the dilemma of how to get evidence into nursing practice. Estimates are that it takes 20 years before innovations are fully put into use. Research is one type of knowledge to be used in practice. Nursing and patient care would benefit from moving more toward knowledge based on research and evidence. This article reviews barriers to and facilitators of using evidence in nursing practice and discusses a model for promoting the systematic use of evidence in practice. The author also offers suggestions for increasing the evidence base of nursing practice. Using evidence in nursing practice is important for all nurses, but requires more that the attention of the individual nurse.

  3. Moral instability: the upsides for nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Joan

    2010-04-01

    This article briefly outlines some of the key problems with the way in which the moral realm has traditionally been understood and analysed. I propose two alternative views of what is morally interesting and applicable to nursing practice and I indicate that instability has its upsides. I begin with a moral tale - a 'Good Samaritan' story - which raises fairly usual questions about the nature of morality but also the more philosophically fundamental question about the relationship between subjectivity and moral agency. I then consider this relationship from the perspectives of two twentieth century philosophers: Emmanuel Levinas and Michel Foucault. Levinas' basic point is that the experience of ethical subjectivity is made possible through others: the demand to respond to the existence of others is the basic social structure that precedes individual freedom. If Levinas posits intersubjectivity as a fundamental or primitive feature of the moral realm, Foucault poses an even more basic question: how have moral subjects and relations of obligation been constituted? The aim of ethical inquiry, for Foucault, is to describe the network of discourses, institutions, relations, and practices through which certain kinds of subjects are constituted and constitute themselves, e.g. as a kind of person who can act morally. Finally, I consider some recent research in philosophy of nursing which illustrates how Levinasian and/or Foucauldian perspectives can deepen understanding of nurses' moral practices, specifically, the work of Norwegian public health nurses, Canadian pediatric nurses, and Irish midwives. I suggest that in spite of the instability of morality in general and the particular ethical challenges that face nurses, there are grounds for hope and possible strategies for living in unstable times.

  4. Application of OSCE in appraisal of undergraduate nursing students' performance during clinical practice%OSCE在本科护生临床实习评价中的应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈英; 陈淳; 曾凡; 朱莉; 曾铁英

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨客观临床能力结构考试(OSCE)在本科护生临床实习评价中应用的可行性.方法 选取毕业实习的本科护生141名为研究对象,在完成内科和外科实习后分别组织OSCE测试,对各项考试成绩、考试难度、信度和效度进行评价,并通过问卷调查护生对OSCE的评价及对自身能力的影响.结果 OSCE平均成绩为(86.98±4.74)分,呈正态分布.难度系数0.81,显示OSCE难度适中.护生问卷调查结果显示,87.7%认为OSCE能客观评价自身的临床综合能力,比传统考试全面和客观.结论 OSCE能较真实地反映本科护生能力,得到大多数本科护生的认同,可为护生临床综合能力评价提供参考.%Objective To investigate the feasibility of OSCE in appraisal of undergraduate nursing students' performance during clinical practice. Methods A total of 141 undergraduate nursing students at the stage of clinical practice were selected. OSCE were organized after internal medicine and surgical practice. The results of the examinations, the difficulty of the test, the reliability and validity were computed. The nursing students were also surveyed with regard to their appraisal of OSCE and its impact of their own ability. Results Being normally distributed, the scoreof OSCE averaged 86.98±4.74. The difficulty coefficient was 0. 81, indicating moderate level of difficulty. Survey of nursing students showed that 87.7 % thought OSCE could evaluate their clinical ability objectively, being more comprehensive and objective than traditional examination. Conclusion OSCE, positively appraised by undergraduate nursing students can evaluate their clinical comprehensive ability scientifically, objectively and effectively. Therefore the method can serve as a tool to evaluate nursing students' clinical comprehensive ability.

  5. 护理学专业教育课堂教学与临床实践结合的教学策略%Teaching strategy of classroom teaching and clinical practice for nursing professional education.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱桂红

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, nursing classroom teaching is not always consistent with clinical practice. The article discussed some possible strategies to deal with the problem , such as enforcing the reform of classroom teaching content and model, enforcing the innovation of experiment teaching model, strengthening the manage of noviciate and practice, realizing the deep link between medical school and hospital, and so on. Summqrized the teaching strategies of classroom teaching and clinical practice for nursing professional education, and to supply consultation for workres with nursing education.%针对目前护理专业教育与临床实践存在脱节的问题,本文从课堂教学内容和方式的改革、实验教学模式的改革、加强见习和实习管理、实现院校深度结合等方面进行探讨和实践,综述了护理学专业教育课堂教学与临床实践结合的教学策略,为广大护理教育工作者提供参考.

  6. [Consensus on competencies for advanced nursing practice in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre-Fullana, Pedro; De Pedro-Gómez, Joan E; Bennasar-Veny, Miquel; Fernández-Domínguez, Juan C; Sesé-Abad, Albert J; Morales-Asencio, José M

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of international consensus on the exact definition and core competencies of advanced practice nursing (APN) roles, a problem particularly acute in our national context due to the lack of APN role development, which has a significantly short history in our country. The main objective of this paper was the delineation of the competence framework for Advanced Practice Nurses in our national context based on expert consensus through the Delphi method Based on a preliminary literature review process, a conglomerate of 17 domains of competence (clusters of related competencies) were identified. This initial set was revised, refined and validated by a group of expert panellists on the subject (clinicians, researchers, managers, and teachers) through successive rounds in search of a suitable consensus on each of the various proposed items The results helped to establish a solid foundation in the form of a skills map that could identify those sets of more specific competencies for advanced practice roles, regardless of regulatory and professional practice context, identifying domains such as Research and Evidence Based Practice, Clinical and Professional Leadership, or Care Management This set of skills related to advanced practice roles in our environment can delineate competency standards common to this level of nursing practice, and serve as a reference for policy development, a review of roles, or the establishment of academic profiles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Developing voluntary standards for district nurse education and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Mary

    2016-05-01

    This article charts the development of a project, funded by the Queen's Nursing Institute and Queen's Nursing Institute Scotland, to develop voluntary standards that reflect the contemporary and future practice of district nurses. The standards are designed to enhance, but not replace, the Nursing and Midwifery Council standards for district nurse specialist practice. The project encompassed the four UK countries and gathered data from a wide range of sources to inform the new standards that were launched in September 2015.

  8. How many research nurses for how many clinical trials in an oncology setting? Definition of the Nursing Time Required by Clinical Trial-Assessment Tool (NTRCT-AT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Alessandra; Mazzocco, Ketti; Stucchi, Sara; Magon, Giorgio; Pravettoni, Gabriella; Passoni, Claudia; Ciccarelli, Chiara; Tonali, Alessandra; Profeta, Teresa; Saiani, Luisa

    2017-02-01

    Few resources are available to quantify clinical trial-associated workload, needed to guide staffing and budgetary planning. The aim of the study is to describe a tool to measure clinical trials nurses' workload expressed in time spent to complete core activities. Clinical trials nurses drew up a list of nursing core activities, integrating results from literature searches with personal experience. The final 30 core activities were timed for each research nurse by an outside observer during daily practice in May and June 2014. Average times spent by nurses for each activity were calculated. The "Nursing Time Required by Clinical Trial-Assessment Tool" was created as an electronic sheet that combines the average times per specified activities and mathematic functions to return the total estimated time required by a research nurse for each specific trial. The tool was tested retrospectively on 141 clinical trials. The increasing complexity of clinical research requires structured approaches to determine workforce requirements. This study provides a tool to describe the activities of a clinical trials nurse and to estimate the associated time required to deliver individual trials. The application of the proposed tool in clinical research practice could provide a consistent structure for clinical trials nursing workload estimation internationally.

  9. Competencies in nursing students for organized forms of clinical moral deliberation and decision-making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uil-Westerlaken, Jeanette den; Cusveller, Bart

    2013-01-01

    Bachelor-prepared nurses are expected to be competent in moral deliberation and decision-making (MDD) in clinical practice. It is unclear, however, how this competence develops in nursing students. This study explores the development of nursing students’ competence for participating in organized for

  10. Competencies in nursing students for organized forms of clinical moral deliberation and decision-making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeanette den Uil-Westerlaken; dr. Bart Cusveller

    2013-01-01

    Bachelor-prepared nurses are expected to be competent in moral deliberation and decision-making (MDD) in clinical practice. It is unclear, however, how this competence develops in nursing students. This study explores the development of nursing students’ competence for participating in organized

  11. Registered nurses' perceptions of new nursing graduates' clinical competence: A systematic integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missen, Karen; McKenna, Lisa; Beauchamp, Alison

    2016-06-01

    Over the past decade, many questions have been raised about graduates' clinical competence and fitness for practice upon completion of their undergraduate education. Despite the significance of this issue, the perspectives of registered nurses have rarely been examined. This systematic review explores the perceptions of experienced registered nurses regarding the clinical competence of new nursing graduates. Original research studies published between 2004-2014 were identified using electronic databases, reference lists, and by searching "grey literature." Papers were critically reviewed and relevant data extracted and synthesized using an approach based on Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis. From 153 studies initially identified, 15 original research papers were included. Four main research themes were identified: clinical/technical skills, critical thinking, interaction/communication, and overall readiness for practice. Areas of concern in relation to the clinical competence of new nursing graduates specifically related to two themes: critical thinking and clinical/technical skills. Further research is required on strategies identified within the literature with the ultimate aim of ensuring new nursing graduates are safe and competent practitioners.

  12. Nursing with prisoners: the practice of caring, forensic nursing or penal harm nursing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeve, M K; Vaughn, M S

    2001-12-01

    The number of incarcerated persons in the United States has been increasing dramatically over the last two decades. Incarcerated men and women have increased rates of serious and chronic physical and mental illnesses and therefore require substantial health care efforts. Caring for prisoners is a difficult and often unrewarding experience for health care providers, particularly within a social climate that encourages noncaring behaviors. This article critically analyzes three philosophic stances toward nursing care with prisoners and suggests their philosophic commensurability within traditional nursing practice. Implications for nursing practice, research, and education are discussed.

  13. [Guidelines for clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vleugels, A M

    1997-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are systematically developed statements that are intended to support medical decision making in well-defined clinical situations. Essentially, their object is to reduce the variability in medical practice, to improve quality, and to make appropriated control of the financial resources possible. Internationally, ever more organisations, associations, and institutions are concerned with the development of guidelines in many different areas of care. Making implicit knowledge explicit is one of the associated advantages of guidelines: they have a potential utility in training, in process evaluation, and in the reevaluation of outcome studies. In liability issues, their existence has a double effect: they can be used to justify medical behaviour, and they constitute a generally accepted reference point. A derivative problem is the legal liability of the compilers of the guidelines. The principle of the guideline approach can be challenged academically: science cannot give a definition of optimal care with absolute certainty. What is called objectivity often rests on methodologically disputable analyses; also the opinion of opinion leaders is not always a guarantee for scientific soundness. Moreover, patients are not all identical: biological variability, situational factors, patient expectations, and other elements play a role in this differentiation. Clinicians are often hesitant with respect to clinical guidelines: they are afraid of cookbook medicine and curtailment of their professional autonomy. Patients fear reduction of individualization of care and the use of guidelines as a rationing instrument. The effects of the introduction of clinical practice guidelines on medical practice, on the results and on the cost of care vary but are generally considered to be favourable. The choice of appropriate strategies in development, dissemination, and implementation turns out to be of critical importance. The article ends with concrete

  14. [Neuroethics in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, H

    2009-08-01

    In recent years the ability of neuroscience to identify and intervene in mental functions has progressed immensely, which raises several anthropologic and ethical questions. Meanwhile neuroethics arose as a new interdisciplinary field for critical analysis of neuroscientific actions and ethical reflection on the increasing knowledge of the human brain, with regard to society and politics. This article provides a survey of neuroethical implications for clinical practice.

  15. The incidence of burnout in nursing practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondriová Iveta

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The burnout syndrome is significantly associated with nursing profession. Individuals suffering from the syndrome manifest important health problems. More information about prevalence and risk factors for burnout is needed to prevent the syndrome and to determine the most appropriate clinical interventions when the disorder appears.

  16. A comparative study of teaching clinical guideline for prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia in two ways: face-to-face and workshop training on the knowledge and practice of nurses in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAJID YAZDANI

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP is one of the most popular nosocomial infections in the intensive care units and the nurse’s role in preventing it is very important. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of two methods of face to face training and work- shop clinical guidelines in prevention of VAP. Methods: In this experimental randomized clinical trial, the knowledge and practice of nurses in ICUs were studied in two groups: face to face training (35 nurses and workshops (40 nurses by using clinical guidelines in prevention of VAP in one of the hospitals of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. The level of knowledge and practice in each group was assessed by selfreport questionnaire, knowledge questionnaire and also direct observation of practice, before and after training. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, paired t-test, independent t-test, McNemar test, Fisher’s exact, sign and Chi-square test, using SPSS 14. Results: This study demonstrated that both methods of face to face training and workshop were very effective. The incidence of inappropriate pressure of cuff in the tracheal tubes and tracheostomy tubes was significantly reduced after training (p=0.001. But, by comparison of these two methods and the relationship between the variables revealed that no significant difference was found between the two groups of face to face training and workshop. Conclusion: Training the nurses is highly effective in preventing VAP, particularly for appropriate cuff pressure, suctioning and disinfecting hands.

  17. 手术室专科护士临床实践能力指标体系的构建%Study on the clinical practice competence index system of operating room nurse specialist

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘锐; 石秀杰; 宋艳; 谷晓丽; 吴琼; 宋知宁

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To formulate the clinical practice competence index system of operating room nurse specialist. Methods: Delphi technique was used to consult 40 experts. Results: Authority coefifcients of experts was 0.87. Return rates of two rounds were 95.00% and 92.10%, respectively. Coordination coefifcients of the ifrst and the second indexes were 0.38 and 0.31, respectively. The clinical practice competence index system of operating room nurse specialist included 6 ifrst-level indicators and 25 second-level indicators. Conclusion: The clinical practice competence index system of operating room nurse specialist could provide reference for employment, training and evaluation of operating room nurse specialist.%目的:构建科学、全面的手术室专科护士临床实践能力指标体系。方法:采用德尔菲法从全国范围内选取专家40名进行两轮函询。结果:专家函询的群体权威系数为0.87,两轮函询问卷回收率分别为95.00%、92.10%,一级指标和二级指标的协调系数分别为0.38、0.31。最终形成的手术室专科护士临床实践能力指标体系包含6个一级指标及25个二级指标。结论:初步确定手术室专科护士临床实践能力指标体系,为手术室专科护士的培训、评价提供科学依据。

  18. Professional nurses as reflective clinical learning facilitators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Chabell

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid changes taking place in the country, including the education system in general and nursing education in particular, the role of professional nurses as reflective clinical learning facilitators need to be re-visited in order to meet the changing health needs of the communtiy and to facilitate outcome- based nursing education and evidence-based quality nursing care. The purpose of this paper is to explore and describe the perceptions of professional nurses as reflective clinical learning facilitators in the clinical learning units, within the context of a specific health-care service in Gauteng. A phenomenological method using descriptive naïve sketches was used to collect data from twenty professional nurses complying with certain inclusion criteria. A content analysis was performed and eight categories (main concepts were identified in order of priority as follows: communication/collaboration; role-modelling; continuous assessment and evaluation; up-to-date knowledge; scientific approach; clinical teaching; management and professionalism. After a literature control was conducted, these main concepts were confirmed. It is recommended that a model to facilitate reflective thinking in clinical nursing education be developed, using these concepts as basis for the provisional conceptual framework.

  19. An Interactive Diagnosis Approach for Supporting Clinical Nursing Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chun-Wang; Lin, Yi-Chun; Lin, Yen-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Clinical resources in nursing schools are always insufficient for satisfying the practice requirements of each student at the same time during a formal course session. Although several studies have applied information and communication technology to develop computer-based learning tools for addressing this problem, most of these developments lack…

  20. An Interactive Diagnosis Approach for Supporting Clinical Nursing Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chun-Wang; Lin, Yi-Chun; Lin, Yen-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Clinical resources in nursing schools are always insufficient for satisfying the practice requirements of each student at the same time during a formal course session. Although several studies have applied information and communication technology to develop computer-based learning tools for addressing this problem, most of these developments lack…

  1. Perioperative nurses' perceptions of caring practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, S A

    1995-02-01

    This study was designed to determine how caring is practiced in perioperative nursing. The theory of nursing by M. Jean Watson, RN, PhD, FAAN, provided the conceptual framework for the study. The researcher used a qualitative, descriptive methodology to analyze data collected in audiotaped interviews with five perioperative nurses and used standard qualitative research procedures for transcribing and analyzing the interview data. The five study participants identified their perceptions of caring behaviors with conscious and unconscious patients in the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative periods. They described the essential structure of caring as the establishment of a human care relationship and provision of a supportive, protective, and/or corrective psychological, physical, and spiritual environment.

  2. Clinical update on nursing home medicine: 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinger-Rapport, Barbara J; Gammack, Julie K; Thomas, David R; Morley, John E

    2013-12-01

    This is the seventh article in the series of Clinical Updates on Nursing Home Care. The topics covered are antiresorptive drugs, hip fracture, hypertension, orthostatic hypotension, depression, undernutrition, anorexia, cachexia, sarcopenia, exercise, pain, and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia.

  3. 临床实习带教过程对男护生职业角色认同感的影响%Effect of clinical practice teaching on professional role-identity in male nursing interns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周桂菊

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨临床实习带教过程对男护生职业角色认同感的影响。方法采用自制量表对58名男护生职业角色认同感进行调查,参与临床实习带教过程前后职业角色认同感的结果作自身对照进行比较。结果临床实习带教前,男护生的职业角色认同感较差,有41名(70.7%)男护生表示将来毕业后不会选择从事护理工作,主要影响因素是家人不支持、护士地位低、没有成就感、患者及家属对男护士的接受率低、人际关系交往时较为尴尬等。通过8个月的临床实习,男护生们对职业认同感的认识有所改变。37.9%的调查对象表示会从事护理工作,32.8%明确表示不会从事护理工作,低于临床实习前。临床实习后,男护生愿意从事护理工作的比例增加,与实习前比较差异有统计学意义(χ2=16.76, P<0.05)。81%的调查者对护理工作有了更全面的认识,意识到护理工作是一项技术性和专业性很强的行业。实习过程中自我成就感较高、某些特定科室男护生更受欢迎与实习所在科室的护理团队气氛融洽是增加男护生职业角色认同感的前3个主要因素。结论实习过程中,带教老师应积极引导和帮助男护生,且管理优秀、气氛融洽的护理团队能够提升男护生职业角色认同感。%Objective To explore the effects of clinical practice teaching on professional role-identity in male nursing students .Methods The professional role-identity of fifty eight male nursing students were investigated by questionnaire , and the differences of professional role-identity degree before and after clinical practice teaching were compared .Results Prior to internship , the professional role-identity of male nursing students was low, in which 41 cases (70.7%) respondents would not engage in nursing care after graduate , and the major factors were discouraged by family , low

  4. Clinical practice guideline: screening and diagnosing autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, J

    2001-12-01

    The clinical practice guideline (CPG) reviewed in this month's column concerns the screening and diagnosis of autism. Autism is the third most common developmental disability and affects more than 1 in 500 children, or nearly 400,000 people in the United States, in some form. Primary care providers of children, including pediatric nurse practitioners (PNPs) and family nurse practitioners (FNPs), should reasonably expect to care for at least one child with autism (CWA). The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) has therefore developed guidelines to help healthcare providers facilitate the early identification of children with autism.

  5. Cognitive maturity and readiness for evidence-based nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Carolyn J; Thurkettle, Mary Ann

    2013-01-01

    Individual factors are known to influence engagement in research utilization and evidence-based practice (EBP). Cognitive maturity is one factor that may enhance interest in and willingness to engage in clinical inquiry, research utilization, and EBP. Adult cognitive development theory explains why research training alone may not suffice to prepare nurses for EBP. Epistemic assumptions held by pre-reflective and quasireflective thinkers interfere with openness to uncertainty and ambiguity in practice and accurate understanding of the value of research for practice. Nurses may use good formal logic, but they also believe in authority, or revealed truth, as the criterion for knowledge and sometimes fail to perceive the need to evaluate evidence. Developmentally oriented educational efforts informed by the reflective judgment model have the potential to foster the cognitive development required in students of EBP. Further inquiry into the relationship between cognitive maturity and EBP will enhance these educational efforts.

  6. Enhancing nursing education via academic–clinical partnership: An integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thokozani Bvumbwe

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A competent nursing workforce is important for an effective healthcare system. However, concerns on the poor quality of nursing care and poor competencies among nursing students, nurses, and midwives are increasing in Malawi. Anecdotal notes from stakeholders show shortfalls in nursing education. Furthermore, a large gap between theory and practice exists. This study described the role of academic–clinical partnership in strengthening nursing education. A search of ScienceDirect, PubMed, Medline, and PsychINFO on EBCSOhost and Google Scholar was conducted using the following key words: academic–clinical collaboration, academic–clinical partnership, academic practitioner gap, and college hospital partnership or/and nursing. Furthermore, peer reviewed reports on academic–clinical partnership in nursing were included in the search. Thirty-three records from 2002 to 2016 were reviewed. Six themes emerged from the review: mutual and shared goals, evidence-based practice, resource sharing and collaboration, capacity building, partnership elements, and challenges of academic clinical partnership. The review highlighted that academic–practice partnerships promote shared goal development for the healthcare system. The gap between theory and practice is reduced by the sharing of expertise and by increasing evidence-based practice. Academic clinical partnership improves competencies among students and the safety and health outcomes of patients. The study concluded that the nursing education implemented within an academic clinical partnership becomes relevant to the needs and demands of the healthcare system.

  7. Person-centred care: Principle of Nursing Practice D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, Kim; Hills, Val; Marriot, Sheila

    This is the fifth article in a nine-part series describing the Principles of Nursing Practice developed by the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) in collaboration with patient and service organisations, the Department of Health, the Nursing and Midwifery Council, nurses and other healthcare professionals. This article discusses Principle D, the provision of person-centred care.

  8. Predictors of NCLEX-PN Success for Practical Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eickhoff, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    There is currently a nursing shortage in the United States. By 2022, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) expects, the number of job openings for Practical Nurses (PN) will be 168,500, an increase of 25% over 2012 (BLS, 2014). Nursing education does not currently meet present, much less future needs. Nursing programs have limited space; according…

  9. The Quad Council practice competencies for public health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swider, Susan M; Krothe, Joyce; Reyes, David; Cravetz, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the most recent efforts by the Quad Council of Public Health Nursing organizations to review and revise the competencies for PHN practice, and highlights the implications of these competencies for practice, education, and research. The Quad Council is a coalition of four nursing organizations with a focus on public health nursing and includes the Association of Community Health Nursing Educators; the Association of Public Health Nursing (known prior to July 1, 2012 as the Association of State and Territorial Directors of Nursing); the Public Health Nursing section of the American Public Health Association; and the Council on Economics and Practice of the American Nurses' Association. The Quad Council competencies are based on the Council on Linkages competencies for public health professionals and were designed to ensure that public health nursing fits in the domain of public health science and practice.

  10. Consultant pharmacists, advanced practice nurses, and the interdisciplinary team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Barbara

    2014-03-01

    Although in geriatrics we are better than many other clinical disciplines in terms of providing interdisciplinary care to older adults, I hope that we will continue to recognize how much more could actually be done. Before addressing the relationship between advanced practice nurses (APNs) and consultant pharmacists in real world settings, I want to review teamwork in geriatrics in general. It is critical to define what we mean by team, what type of team, and what the goals are of this teamwork.

  11. [Narrative Pedagogy in Nursing Education: The Essence of Clinical Nursing Process Recording].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yu-Mei Y; Chiang, Hsien-Hsien

    2017-02-01

    Clinical nursing process recording (CNPR) has been shown to be an effective tool for facilitating student-centered teaching and learning in nursing education. Yet, the essence and process of this tool have yet to be sufficiently explored and clarified. To explore the essence of CNPR in the contexts of clinical teaching and learning. Reflective analysis was used as the phenomenological approach to analyze the qualitative data, which were transcribed from the oral responses of the six participants who were attending the Clinical Nursing Education Forum. A total of five sessions of the Clinical Nursing Education Forums were conducted. The content of the Clinical Nursing Education Forums consisted of a series of 12 narrative writings of CNPR that were written by a senior student and read and commented on by the student's clinical instructor. Three groups of the essence and process of clinical teaching and learning were inductively identified as: (a) mobilizing autonomous, self-directed learning behavior from self-writing and re-storying; (b) establishing the student-instructor dialogical relationship from mutual localization; and (c) co-creating a learning environment in education and in clinical practice. When used as an interactive teaching and learning tool, CNPR promotes mutual understanding by re-locating the self in the coexisting roles of student nurse, instructor, and patient in a series of nursing care situations. This re-location facilitates students' self-directed learning, enhances the abilities of asking question, waiting for and accompany with the instructor; and promotes the self-care capabilities of patients.

  12. Enabling professional development in mental health nursing: the role of clinical leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, G; Happell, B; Reid-Searl, K

    2015-10-01

    Clinical leadership is acknowledged as important to the nursing profession. While studies continue to identify its significance in contributing to positive outcomes for consumers, the role that clinical leadership has in enabling and supporting professional development in mental health nursing is poorly understood. This study utilized a grounded theory methodology to explore the characteristics clinicians consider important for clinical leadership and its significance for mental health nursing in day-to-day clinical practice. Individual face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were conducted with nurses working in mental health settings. Participants described the important role that clinical leaders play in enabling professional development of others through role modelling and clinical teaching. They describe how nurses, whom they perceive as clinical leaders, use role modelling and clinical teaching to influence the professional development of nursing staff and undergraduate nursing students. Attributes such as professionalism and honesty were seen, by participants, as enablers for clinical leaders in effectively and positively supporting the professional development of junior staff and undergraduate nurses in mental health nursing. This paper examines clinical leadership from the perspective of mental health nurses delivering care, and highlights the important role of clinical leaders in supporting professional development in mental health nursing. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Forms of Knowledge Incorporated in Clinical Decision-making among Newly-Graduated Nurses: A Metasynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voldbjerg, Siri; Elgaard Sørensen, Erik; Grønkjær, Mette

    2013-01-01

    the knowledge that informs clinical decision-making among newly-graduated nurses. Qualitative studies were retrieved from CINAHL, PubMed, SCOPE, ERIC and GOOGLE-Scholar and subsequently selected by pre-defined inclusion criteria and critically appraised using CASP. Metaphors identified in the analytical process......Clinical-decision-making is of decisive importance to how evidence-based practice is put into practice. Schools of Nursing have a responsibility to teach and train nursing students to make clinical decisions within a frame of evidence-based practice. Clinical decision-making among nurses has been...... explored from numerous angles using a diversity of methodologies. Existing research has mainly focused on promoting and inhibiting factors for implementation of evidence-based practice and incorporation of research evidence in the clinical-decision. Little attention has been given to the nurses' behavior...

  14. [Chronic diseases and complexity: new roles in nursing. Advanced practice nurses and chronic patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Martín, C Inmaculada

    2014-01-01

    The increase in chronic diseases and the progressive ageing of the population is a source of concern for the different agencies with responsibility for health care. This has led to the creation of many documents focused on the analysis of the current situation and care of chronic diseases, including the WHO recommendations intended to assist countries and health services design and implement strategies that will address the existing demand, control and prevention of chronic diseases. In addition, there is a need to respond to the demand generated by chronic diseases in every sense, and from the different systems it is becoming more difficult to get enough support from multidisciplinary teams where the nurse has a central importance. While chronic diseases are becoming a threat due to the costs they generate, it is also an opportunity for nursing to be at the forefront for advanced care requirements, performed by professionals with recognized advanced clinical skills and ability for case management while monitoring and controlling complex chronic patients. The different services of the National Health System have introduced nurses that play different roles (cases managers, liaison nurses, advanced practice nurses and so on). However, it could be argued that they are not being trained to a desirable development level. It is therefore time for health care authorities to determine the role of the advanced practice nurse in relation to functional positions, and allow them to make an advance in the development of unified skills for the whole National Health System. From our experience we have learned that the advanced practice nurse is a resource that helps in the sustainability of services, thanks to the efficiency shown in the results obtained from the care given to both chronic and complex chronic patients.

  15. Clinical Decision Making of Nurses Working in Hospital Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Torunn Bjørk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed nurses' perceptions of clinical decision making (CDM in their clinical practice and compared differences in decision making related to nurse demographic and contextual variables. A cross-sectional survey was carried out with 2095 nurses in four hospitals in Norway. A 24-item Nursing Decision Making Instrument based on cognitive continuum theory was used to explore how nurses perceived their CDM when meeting an elective patient for the first time. Data were analyzed with descriptive frequencies, t-tests, Chi-Square test, and linear regression. Nurses' decision making was categorized into analytic-systematic, intuitive-interpretive, and quasi-rational models of CDM. Most nurses reported the use of quasi-rational models during CDM thereby supporting the tenet that cognition most often includes properties of both analysis and intuition. Increased use of intuitive-interpretive models of CDM was associated with years in present job, further education, male gender, higher age, and working in predominantly surgical units.

  16. Family nurse practitioner clinical competencies in alcohol and substance use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talashek, M L; Gerace, L M; Miller, A G; Lindsey, M

    1995-02-01

    The prevalence of substance use among patients presenting to primary health care settings mandates clinical competency in the area for nurse practitioners (NPs). An educational intervention with an evaluation component is described. The effect of incorporating substance use content into a Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) curriculum was tested with a convenience sample of 16 FNP students and 8 practicing NPs. Students' knowledge increased significantly; however, differences in students' and practicing NPs' knowledge did not reach significance. Students' clinical competency increased significantly, as demonstrated by standardized patient clinical evaluations, and was significantly better than the practicing NPs in the skill domains of evaluation and record keeping. Educational intervention can improve NP identification of substance-abusing patients in primary health care settings.

  17. Matching purpose with practice: revolutionising nurse education with mita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Margaret; Weber, Ellen F; Wells, John; Stokes, Olga Redmond; Lane, Paula; Denieffe, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    Multiple intelligences have only recently entered the teaching dialogue in nurse education and research. It is argued that despite the rhetoric of a student centred approach nurse education remains wedded to conventional teaching approaches that fail to engage with the individual and unwittingly silence the student's voice. This paper will examine the concept of multiple intelligences (MI) and outline Gardner's contention that the brain functions using eight intelligences which can be employed to improve learning at an individual level. It will then outline the use of MI using a five phase model, developed by Weber, known as a multiple intelligence teaching approach (MITA). It is contended that MITA has great potential in nurse education, particularly in terms of reinforcing learning beyond the educational domain and into the individual's professional development and clinical practice.

  18. [Job satisfaction of nurses in the clinical management units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Lara, Concepción; Praena Fernández, Juan Manuel; Gil García, Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    Clinical Management Unit (CMU) is currently set in the Andalusian health institutions as the model reference management. This management model aims to make all healthcare professionals a powerful idea: the best performance of health resources is performed to drive clinical practice using the least number of diagnostic and therapeutic resources. The CMU not only aims at saving money, in the Clinical Management Agreement [1] are measured all the dimensions that make up the UGC: research, training, clinical process, the portfolio of services, objectives, financial management and indicators to control and security. The CMU is to transfer more responsibilities to Health Care Professionals, involving them in the management of the Unit. The CMU sets new approaches that directly affect health professionals and presents advantages and disadvantages for the Doctors and the Nurses, involved in achieving excellence in care work. Nurse Practitioners shows expectant before the changes are generated in health institutions and appears a discussion of skills derived from the CMU. Some Nurses believe that the bur, den of care to which they are subjected in public institutions has increased since the onset of the CMU and yet others believe that they are motivated and rewarded for the results obtained with this model of management. In health institutions, some professionals are more motivated than others and this is found in the outcome of health care activity [2]. Given the positive and negative perceptions that arise in the CMU Professional Nurses, it is considered appropriate to focus the objective of this work in the search for factors that influence job satisfaction of nurses in the CMU. There are few studies about the CMU [3] but are absent when linked with nursing, so the pursuit of scientific knowledge related to nursing management model based on Clinical and Quality Care can lead to establish new concepts around the nursing profession, a profession in which major changes are

  19. Curriculum Revolution: Reconceptualizing Clinical Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeman, Carol A.

    1989-01-01

    While the clinical competence of the nurse is taking on greater importance, the clinical laboratory settings are changing in ways that detract from their suitability for use in entry-level programs. Initial consideration of the health care setting reveals several paradoxes that must be resolved if clinical education is to be affected. (JOW)

  20. Myocarditis in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinagra, Gianfranco; Anzini, Marco; Pereira, Naveen L; Bussani, Rossana; Finocchiaro, Gherardo; Bartunek, Jozef; Merlo, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Myocarditis is a polymorphic disease characterized by great variability in clinical presentation and evolution. Patients presenting with severe left ventricular dysfunction and life-threatening arrhythmias represent a demanding challenge for the clinician. Modern techniques of cardiovascular imaging and the exhaustive molecular evaluation of the myocardium with endomyocardial biopsy have provided valuable insight into the pathophysiology of this disease, and several clinical registries have unraveled the disease's long-term evolution and prognosis. However, uncertainties persist in crucial practical issues in the management of patients. This article critically reviews current information for evidence-based management, offering a rational and practical approach to patients with myocarditis. For this review, we searched the PubMed and MEDLINE databases for articles published from January 1, 1980, through December 31, 2015, using the following terms: myocarditis, inflammatory cardiomyopathy, and endomyocardial biopsy. Articles were selected for inclusion if they represented primary data or were review articles published in high-impact journals. In particular, a risk-oriented approach is proposed. The different patterns of presentation of myocarditis are classified as low-, intermediate-, and high-risk syndromes according to the most recent evidence on prognosis, clinical findings, and both invasive and noninvasive testing, and appropriate management strategies are proposed for each risk class.

  1. 以教学检查为契机提高护理临床实习质量%Teaching inspection as an opportunity to improve quality of clinical nursing practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾芬莲; 吴芳; 覃小龙; 陈凌云; 幸姝丹; 张咏梅

    2014-01-01

    为进一步加强对毕业实习的监控和管理,遵义医学院每年都要组织专家组对实习医院进行教学检查,压力和动力促使我院护理部将如何提高护理临床实习质量作为一项首要任务来抓,并针对临床实习过程中存在的问题采取了一系列有效的措施,包括规范护理教学管理制度、重视职业素质和护理核心能力培养、加强护生管理、严格出科考核程序及建立并完善多维教学管理评价体系等,获得了良好的教学效果,并顺利通过了教学检查。%To further strengthen the monitoring and management of gradu-ation practice,the experts group is organized and to inspect the internship teaching hospitals in Zunyi medical college in every year.Pressure and power led the nursing department in our hospital to take that how to im-prove the quality of nursing clinical practice as a primary task.A series of effective measures were taken aiming at the problems exiting in clinical practice,including standardizing nursing teaching management system, thinking highly of professional quality and care core competency training, strengthening the management of nursing students,stricting departmental rotation examination procedures and establishing and improving the multi dimensional teaching management and evaluation system.At the end,good teaching effect was gained and passed the teaching examination.

  2. The impact on nurses and nurse managers of introducing PEPFAR clinical services in urban government clinics in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyegombe Nambusi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improving provider performance is central to strengthening health services in developing countries. Because of critical shortages of physicians, many clinics in sub-Saharan Africa are led by nurses. In addition to clinical skills, nurse managers need practical managerial skills and adequate resources to ensure procurement of essential supplies, quality assurance implementation, and productive work environment. Giving nurses more autonomy in their work empowers them in the workplace and has shown to create positive influence on work attitudes and behaviors. The Infectious Disease Institute, an affiliate of Makerere University College of Health Science, in an effort to expand the needed HIV services in the Ugandan capital, established a community-university partnership with the Ministry of Health to implement an innovative model to build capacity in HIV service delivery. This paper evaluates the impact on the nurses from this innovative program to provide more health care in six nurse managed Kampala City Council (KCC Clinics. Methods A mixed method approach was used. The descriptive study collected key informant interviews from the six nurse managers, and administered a questionnaire to 20 staff nurses between September and December 2009. Key themes were manually identified from the interviews, and the questionnaire data were analyzed using SPSS. Results Introducing new HIV services into six KCC clinics was positive for the nurses. They identified the project as successful because of perceived improved environment, increase in useful in-service training, new competence to manage patients and staff, improved physical infrastructure, provision of more direct patient care, motivation to improve the clinic because the project acted on their suggestions, and involvement in role expansion. All of these helped empower the nurses, improving quality of care and increasing job satisfaction. Conclusions This community-university HIV

  3. Practice nurses' workload, career intentions and the impact of professional isolation: A cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watt Graham CM

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Practice nurses have a key role within UK general practice, especially since the 2004 GMS contract. This study aimed to describe that role, identify how professionally supported they felt and their career intentions. An additional aim was to explore whether they felt isolated and identify contributory factors. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire survey in one large urban Scottish Health Board, targeted all practice nurses (n = 329. Domains included demographics, workload, training and professional support. Following univariate descriptive statistics, associations between categorical variables were tested using the chi-square test or chi-square test for trend; associations between dichotomous variables were tested using Fisher's Exact test. Variables significantly associated with isolation were entered into a binary logistic regression model using backwards elimination. Results There were 200 responses (61.0% response rate. Most respondents were aged 40 or over and were practice nurses for a median of 10 years. Commonest clinical activities were coronary heart disease management, cervical cytology, diabetes and the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Although most had a Personal Development Plan and a recent appraisal, 103 (52.3% felt isolated at least sometimes; 30 (15.5% intended leaving practice nursing within 5 years. Isolated nurses worked in practices with smaller list sizes (p = 0.024 and nursing teams (p = 0.003; were less likely to have someone they could discuss a clinical/professional (p = 0.002 or personal (p Conclusions A significant proportion of practice nurses reported feeling isolated, at least some of the time. They were more likely to be in small practices and more likely to be considering leaving practice nursing. Factors contributing to their isolation were generally located within the practice environment. Providing support to these nurses within their practice setting may help

  4. A Study of the Practical Nursing Programs in Vermont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Ruby C.

    The purpose of the study was to review the entire practical nursing program and to make recommendations for its long-term organization and objectives. Relevant information concerned (1) the history of practical nursing, (2) purpose, membership, and related information on four professional nursing organizations, (3) state and federal legislation…

  5. The private practice of nursing: the gift of entrepreneurialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter-O'Grady, T

    1997-01-01

    The demands of the entrepreneur extend the opportunities and creativity of the nurse. The characteristics of independent practice are now the expectations of the role of every nurse. Understanding the gifts of the entrepreneurial experience helps facilitate the growth of nurses and their practice.

  6. The diversity of Iranian nursing students' clinical learning styles: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraz, Shahram; Memarian, Robabeh; Vanaki, Zohreh

    2014-09-01

    Numerous factors, including learning styles, affect the learning process of nursing students. Having insights about students' learning styles helps promoting the quality of education. The aim of this study was to explore the Iranian baccalaureate nursing students' learning styles in clinical settings. A qualitative design using a content analysis approach was used to collect and analyze data. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with fifteen Iranian baccalaureate nursing students selected using a purposive sample method. During data analysis, it was found that nursing students employed different clinical learning styles such as 'thoughtful observation,' 'learning by thinking,' and 'learning by doing'. Students adopt different learning strategies in clinical practice. Designing teaching strategies based on students' learning styles can promote students' learning and maximize their academic and clinical practice success. Nursing educators, curriculum designers, and students can use the findings of this study to improve the quality of nursing education in both the classroom and clinical settings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A DNP nurse-managed Hepatitis C Clinic, improving quality of life for those in a rural area

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krebbeks, Virginia P; Cunningham, Vivian M

    2013-01-01

    .... Improving access to care through the development of a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) nurse-managed clinic in a rural setting will improve health outcomes and quality of life for those treated outside the traditional setting...

  8. Optimizing clinical environments for knowledge translation: strategies for nursing leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Shannon D; VandenBeld, Brenda; Cummings, Greta G

    2011-10-01

    Using findings from our recent study that found that a context of uncertainty in the work environment hindered nurses' research utilization, we suggest strategies for nurse managers and leaders to optimize clinical environments and support efforts to put research into clinical practice (knowledge translation). Two important sources of uncertainty were the complexity of teamwork and inconsistency in management and leadership styles. To reduce the uncertainty arising from teamwork, we propose (a) clarifying nurses' scopes of practice, (b) increasing knowledge sharing through supporting journal clubs and enhanced computer access and (c) creating safe venues for multidisciplinary dialogue. To reduce uncertainty arising from variations in management and leadership, we propose (a) developing policies that enhance the consistency of leadership and clarify the strategic direction of the management team, (b) clearly communicating those policies to nurses and (c) providing explicit rationales for treatment changes. Small, incremental steps can be taken to realize substantive changes in clinical environments in order to optimize nursing work environments for knowledge translation.

  9. Nursing faculty preparedness for clinical teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suplee, Patricia Dunphy; Gardner, Marcia; Jerome-D'Emilia, Bonnie

    2014-03-01

    Nursing faculty who teach in clinical settings face complex situations requiring evidence-based educational and evaluative strategies, yet many have had limited preparation for these tasks. A convenience sample of 74 nursing faculty participated in a survey about clinical teaching in prelicensure nursing programs. Most faculty developed teaching skills through conferences (57%), orientation at their educational institution (53%), or exposure in graduate school (38%). Thirty-one percent reported having no preparation for clinical teaching. Faculty felt least prepared to manage students with learning, physical, or emotional disabilities and incivility. Twenty-six percent had no preparation for evaluating students in the clinical setting, and only 17% had worked with a faculty mentor. Few evidence-based teaching strategies were used by the faculty. These findings indicate gaps exist in the preparation of clinical faculty. Graduate education, comprehensive orientation programs, and continuing professional development may help to ensure faculty are effective in managing and evaluating student learning. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Relationship between Stressor and Self-efficacy of Nursing Undergraduates in Initial Stage of Clinical Practice%本科护生实习初期压力源与自我效能感的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷慧; 王燕

    2011-01-01

    目的 了解本科护生临床实习初期压力源与自我效能感现状及两者的相关性.方法 采用自制的本科护生临床实习压力源问卷及一般自我效能感量表对170名本科护生进行问卷调查.结果 本科护生临床实习初期压力源依次为:自身知识与技能、工作性质与内容、自身及就业、病人护理、教学组织与管理、医院环境与人际关系;一般自我效能感总均分为(2.57±0.46)分,高于中间分2.5水平;各压力源得分与自我效能感均呈负相关( r=-0.61~-0.30,P<0.001).结论 本科护生临床实习初期压力源与自我效能感呈负相关.护理教育工作者应重视培养临床实习本科护生的自我效能感,加强本科护生实习前护士职业素质及护理操作技能培训,实习中尤其是实习初期的心理支持,提高本科护生的自我效能感,以减轻临床实习压力,提高实习质量.%Objective To probe into the relation between stressors and self-efficacy of nursing undergraduates during their initial stage of clinical practice. Methods A total of 170 nursing undergraduates were surveyed with General Self-efficacy Scale (GSES)and a self-designed stressors questionnaire. Results The stressors in their initial stage of clinical practice included the followings in sequence: knowledge and skill, jobs, employment, patient nursing, teaching organization and management environment of hospital and interpersonal relationship. The score of GSES of nursing students was (2.57 ±0.46) which was above the moderate level of 2.5. There was negative correlation between each stressor and self-efficacy of nursing students (r=-0.61 ~-0.30, P<0.001). Conclusion There is negative correlation between stressors and self-efficacy of nursing undergraduates during their initial stage of clinical practice.Importance should be attached to enhance self-efficacy and professional quality of nursing of nursing students. Psychological support is expected during

  11. Nurse managers' strategies for the integration of newly graduated nurses into clinical units in Japan: a qualitative exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Misuzu F; Wakisaka, Toyomi; Hayashi, Chifuyu

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the strategies used by nurse managers in Japan to facilitate the integration of newly graduate nurses (NGNs) into their clinical units. The integration of NGNs into clinical units is an important issue for both NGNs and nurse managers because the first year of practice plays a vital role in a NGN's career. Data were generated through semi-structured interviews with 9 nurse managers in 9 acute care hospitals. Data analysis was conducted using a qualitative content analysis method. Nurse managers used a total of 6 strategies: understanding the circumstances of NGNs, providing opportunities for experience and learning, supporting nurses who teach NGNs, facilitating self-learning, promoting awareness of being a nurse in the clinical unit, and strengthening the sense of comradeship in clinical units. Three of these strategies were particularly important for NGNs' integration into clinical units: facilitating self-learning, promoting awareness of being a nurse in the clinical unit, and strengthening the sense of comradeship in clinical units. These strategies were described in this study. The strategies adopted by nurse managers should be aimed at all nurses, not just NGNs, in order to strengthen the sense of comradeship in clinical units. This approach would create a supportive environment for the integration of NGNs into clinical units. The strategies presented in this study can be utilized not just by nurse managers but all senior nurses in the unit. NGNs can use these strategies to help them understand what they need to do to become a full member of their unit.

  12. Using career nurse mentors to support minority nursing students and facilitate their transition to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banister, Gaurdia; Bowen-Brady, Helene M; Winfrey, Marion E

    2014-01-01

    The Clinical Leadership Collaborative for Diversity in Nursing was developed through an academe-service partnership focused on supporting minority nursing students and facilitating transition to practice. A key program element is mentoring. Students are paired with an experienced, minority clinical nurse or nurse leader from one of the partnering agencies, who helps guide the student throughout the junior and senior year of school and first year of employment. The mentoring component was evaluated through surveys in which mentors and mentees rated one another and offered open-ended comments on the program's impact. Aspects of mentees rated highest by mentors include manner (courteous and professional), ability to communicate and get along with others, preparation for meetings, and fully utilizing their time with mentors. Aspects of mentors rated highest by mentees include warmth, encouragement, and willingness to listen; enthusiasm for nursing and how they sparked the mentee's interest; and clarity regarding expectations for mentees and how they pushed mentees to achieve high standards. In the open-ended comments, mentees consistently identified mentoring as the program's strongest component. Sixty-four minority students have participated to date with a zero rate of attrition and very low job turnover among graduates.

  13. Educational silos in nursing education: a critical review of practical nurse education in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Diane L; MacKinnon, Karen A

    2015-09-01

    Changes to practical nurse education (with expanded scopes of practice) align with the increasing need for nurses and assistive personnel in global acute care contexts. A case in point is this critical exploration of Canadian practical nursing literature, undertaken to reveal predominating discourses and relationships to nursing disciplinary knowledge. The objectives of this poststructural critical review were to identify dominant discourses in practical nurse education literature and to analyze these discourses to uncover underlying beliefs, constructed truths, assumptions, ambiguities and sources of knowledge within the discursive landscape. Predominant themes in the discourses surrounding practical nurse education included conversations about the nurse shortage, expanded roles, collaboration, evidence-based practice, role confusion, cost/efficiency, the history of practical nurse education and employer interests. The complex relationships between practical nursing and the disciplinary landscape of nursing are revealed in the analysis of discourses related to the purpose(s) of practical nurse education, curricula/educational programming, relationships between RN and PN education and the role of nursing knowledge. Power dynamics related to employer needs and interests, as well as educational silos and the nature of women's work, are also revealed within the intersection of various discourses.

  14. Clinical decision-making of rural novice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seright, T J

    2011-01-01

    Nurses in rural settings are often the first to assess and interpret the patient's clinical presentations. Therefore, an understanding of how nurses experience decision-making is important in terms of educational preparation, resource allocation to rural areas, institutional cultures, and patient outcomes. Theory development was based on the in-depth investigation of 12 novice nurses practicing in rural critical access hospitals in a north central state. This grounded theory study consisted of face-to-face interviews with 12 registered nurses, nine of whom were observed during their work day. The participants were interviewed a second time, as a method of member checking, and during this interview they reviewed their transcripts, the emerging themes and categories. Directors of nursing from both the research sites and rural hospitals not involved in the study, experienced researchers, and nurse educators facilitated triangulation of the findings. 'Sociocentric rationalizing' emerged as the central phenomenon and referred to the sense of belonging and agency which impacted the decision-making in this small group of novice nurses in rural critical access hospitals. The observed consequences, which were conceptualized during the axial coding process and were derived from observations and interviews of the 12 novice nurses in this study include: (1) gathering information before making a decision included assessment of: the credibility of co-workers, patients' subjective and objective data, and one's own past and current experiences; (2) conferring with co-workers as a direct method of confirming/denying decisions being made was considered more realistic and expedient than policy books and decision trees; (3) rural practicum clinical experiences, along with support after orientation, provide for transition to the rural nurse role; (4) involved directors of nursing served as both models and protectors of novice nurses placed in high accountability positions early in

  15. The nature of nursing practice in rural and remote areas of Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, Lise; Jensen, A.B.; Præst Wilche, J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The Greenlandic Healthcare Reform (2010) required improved quality of services for health promotion, prevention of infectious and lifestyle diseases, family nursing and evidence-based clinical nursing. Aim To investigate current nursing practice in Greenland and to identify whether......, and subsequently interviewed. Interviews included in-depth questioning, based on emerging outcomes from observation. Interviews were recorded and transcribed; they were analysed within a phenomenological–hermeneutic approach. Results Nurses in rural and remote areas navigate their health promotion and preventive...... nursing, medical and social work. Conclusion The nature of nursing practice in rural and remote Greenland is characterised by a high degree of variability and complexity, with a requirement for a wide range of knowledge and skills. Nurses need to be better prepared with regard to acute medical care...

  16. IT support for administrative planning of clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florin, Jan; Joustra-Enquist, Ingrid; Hedberg, Lars

    2006-01-01

    The administration of clinical practice placements for nursing students is a highly complex and information driven task. This demonstration is intended to give insight into the web based system KliPP (a Swedish acronym for Clinical Practice Planning) and to discuss the possibilities for further development and use.

  17. The Prevalence of Allergic Contact Sensitization of Practicing and Student Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Kocabaş

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Contact dermatitis (CD is a significant problem among nurses. Although there are reports about the prevalence of CD from different parts of the world, data about its frequency in Turkey and about allergic contact sensitization among nurses is insufficient.Objective: To define the frequency and patterns of allergic contact sensitization and related symptoms in practicing and student nurses.Methods: There were 123 nurses in our hospital practicing in the in-patient clinics. All were invited to participate in the study. 69 working-in nurses and 79 student nurses participated in the study. The main reason for refusal of nurses was that they were usually having a shower daily after a hard working day and they had to postpone having a bath for 3 days if they had a patch test on their back. A ready-to-use patch test system (TRUE test® with 29 standardized test substances was applied to all of the participants. History about symptoms of CD and allergic diseases was investigated by questionnaire.Results: While 34.8% (24/69 of practicing nurses had symptoms of CD, 19% (15/79 of student nurses reported the symptoms (p=0.039. The most prevalent positive reaction was to nickel sulfate followed by thimerosal. There was no difference for positive reaction rates between practicing and student nurses. Nurses who had symptoms of CD were older than those without symptoms (p=0.003. The participants with symptoms of CD were more frequently from practicing nurses (p=0.047.Conclusion: CD is more frequent in practicing nurses than student nurses; allergic contact sensitization is not. This may be attributed to the length of occupation that is also correlated well with the length of exposure to the occupational irritants.

  18. Nursing Practice, Research and Education in the West: The Best Is Yet to Come.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Heather M; Bakewell-Sachs, Susan; Sarna, Linda

    This paper celebrates the 60th anniversary of the Western Institute of Nursing, the nursing organization representing 13 states in the Western United States, and envisions a preferred future for nursing practice, research, and education. Three landmark calls to action contribute to transforming nursing and healthcare: the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010; the Institute of Medicine report Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health; and the report Advancing Healthcare Transformation: A New Era for Academic Nursing. Challenges abound: U.S. healthcare remains expensive, with poorer outcomes than other developed countries; costs of higher education are high; our profession does not reflect the diversity of the population; and health disparities persist. Pressing health issues, such as increases in chronic disease and mental health conditions and substance abuse, coupled with aging of the population, pose new priorities for nursing and healthcare. Changes are needed in practice, research, and education. In practice, innovative, cocreated, evidence-based models of care can open new roles for registered nurses and advanced practice registered nurses who have knowledge, leadership, and team skills to improve quality and address system change. In research, data can provide a foundation for clinical practice and expand our knowledge base in symptom science, wellness, self-management, and end-of-life/palliative care, as well as behavioral health, to demonstrate the value of nursing care and reduce health disparities. In education, personalized, integrative, and technology-enabled teaching and learning can lead to creative and critical thinking/decision-making, ethical and culturally inclusive foundations for practice, ensure team and communication skills, quality and system improvements, and lifelong learning. The role of the Western Institute of Nursing is more relevant than ever as we collectively advance nursing, health, and healthcare through

  19. Developing a Web-Based Nursing Practice and Research Information Management System: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeeyae; Lapp, Cathi; Hagle, Mary E

    2015-09-01

    Many hospital information systems have been developed and implemented to collect clinical data from the bedside and have used the information to improve patient care. Because of a growing awareness that the use of clinical information improves quality of care and patient outcomes, measuring tools (electronic and paper based) have been developed, but most of them require multiple steps of data collection and analysis. This necessitated the development of a Web-based Nursing Practice and Research Information Management System that processes clinical nursing data to measure nurses' delivery of care and its impact on patient outcomes and provides useful information to clinicians, administrators, researchers, and policy makers at the point of care. This pilot study developed a computer algorithm based on a falls prevention protocol and programmed the prototype Web-based Nursing Practice and Research Information Management System. It successfully measured performance of nursing care delivered and its impact on patient outcomes successfully using clinical nursing data from the study site. Although Nursing Practice and Research Information Management System was tested with small data sets, results of study revealed that it has the potential to measure nurses' delivery of care and its impact on patient outcomes, while pinpointing components of nursing process in need of improvement.

  20. Soft Skills of Nursing Students in Clinical Practice%385名实习护生护理职业软技能的调查与分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟美浓; 陈瑜

    2014-01-01

    目的:通过调查实习护生护理软技能水平,根据现状提出改善方案,为护理院校及实习医院培训护生软技能提供参考依据。方法采用付艳芬设计的护理软技能测评量表,便利抽取广东省某医科大学385名实习护生进行问卷调查。结果本组实习护生护理软技能总分为(220.03±21.89)分,高于全国新护士护理软技能常模。各维度均分比较显示,自我管理技能得分最高(3.89±0.19)分,组织管理技能得分最低(3.69±0.16)分。不同学历、父母文化程度、是否为班团干部的实习护生护理软技能总均分得分比较差异均具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论实习护生具有较高的护理软技能水平,但在组织管理技能和职业情操方面偏低,护理院校及实习医院应进一步提高护生职业情操,采取有效措施培养护生的组织管理能力,以全面提高护生的护理软技能水平。%Objective To explore soft skills of nursing students and its influence factors, to put forward effective measures to improve their soft skills and its practical application. Methods With Nursing Soft Skills Assessment Scale designed by Fu Yanfen, 385 nursing students in Southern Medical University were investigated. Results The total average score of soft skills was 220.03 ± 21.89, which was higher than that of national norm; the highest score and the lowest were from the interpersonal skills and organization and management skills, which were 3.89 ±0.19 and 3.69 ±0.16 respectively; education background, parents ’ educational background and whether class cadre or not were the influence factors of soft skills of nursing students ( P<0.05). Conclusion Nursing students hold a relatively high level of nursing soft skills, but still lack management skill and professional awareness. More training opportunities on improving nursing soft skills are needed from hospitals and schools, especially for

  1. Lifestyle practices and the health promoting environment of hospital nurses.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hope, A

    1998-08-01

    Lifestyle practices and the health promoting environment of hospital nurses This paper examined the lifestyle practices of hospital nurses and the impact of specific interventions in the hospital environment. The perception of nurse as health promoter and as carer of AIDS patients was also examined. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data at two different time periods. The sample represented 729 nurses (at pre- and post-time periods), both qualified and student nurses. Qualified nurses reported the highest stress levels while student nurses reported more negative lifestyle practices such as smoking, alcohol consumption and drug use. A greater number of current smokers (29%) consumed alcohol and used drugs than non-smokers. The impact of intervention strategies around compliance with smoking policy and work-site walk routes reduced exposure to passive smoking at work for qualified nurses and increased exercise participation for both groups of nurses. Workplace was identified as the main source of stress which included relationships at work and demands of the job. Hospital nurses experiencing high work stress were more likely to use professional support and personal coping (discuss problems with friends\\/family, have a good cry and eat more) than others. Nurses believed in the importance of health promotion as part of their work; however, qualified nurses felt more confident and gave more health related information than student nurses. Student nurses perceived a lower risk of contacting AIDS through work and a higher concern\\/worry in caring for AIDS patients than qualified nurses.

  2. Mobile technology and its use in clinical nursing education: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Siobhan; Andrews, Tom

    2015-03-01

    Nursing students face a variety of challenges to learning in clinical practice, from the theory-practice gap, to a lack of clinical supervision and the ad hoc nature of learning in clinical environments. Mobile technology is proposed as one way to address these challenges. This article comprehensively summarizes and critically reviews the available literature on mobile technology used in undergraduate clinical nursing education. It identifies the lack of clear definitions and theory in the current body of evidence; the variety of mobile devices and applications used; the benefits of mobile platforms in nursing education; and the complexity of sociotechnical factors, such as the cost, usability, portability, and quality of mobile tools, that affect their use in undergraduate clinical nursing education. Implications for nursing education and practice are outlined, and recommendations for future research are discussed.

  3. Towards anti-oppressive practice in mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopton, J

    Working in Partnership, the Department of Health's report on the 1994 review of mental health nursing, implies that mental health nurses should develop anti-oppressive approaches to nursing practice. There is a notable absence of articles within the nursing literature which specifically address this issue. This is possibly because the historical and ideological issues which have informed the development of mental health nursing are complex and difficult to unravel. However, an integration of the theories of David Cooper and Frantz Fanon may provide an appropriate starting point for the development of a theory of anti-oppressive practice which addresses some of the issues specific to mental health nursing.

  4. 护理本科生成就目标定向与临床实践行为关系研究%Study on Correlation between Nursing Undergraduates’ Achievement Goal Orientation and Clinical Practice ;Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李璐良; 赵琳琳; 王成林; 孙铮

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To know about nursing undergraduates’ achievement goal orientation and clinical practice behavior,so as to probe into the relationship between them.Method:Stratified cluster sampling method was used,BNS’s Clinical Evaluation Tool(CET)and the Achievement Goal Orientation Scale were used for investigation of 180 nursing undergraduates,related data were analyzed by stepwise regression analysis.Result:The total average score of CET was(3.738±0.469). The four scale score of achievement goals orientation were :mastery approach(3.58±0.56), mastery avoidance(3.25±0.72),performance avoidance(2.48±0.76),performance approach(3.53±0.68). The goal orientation of mastery approach was positively correlated with clinical practice behavior. The goal orientation of performance avoidance was negative correlated with clinical practice behavior.Conclusion:Nursing undergraduates’ achievement goal orientation is associated with clinical practice behavior,the achievement goals can forecast clinic practice. In the clinical nursing teaching,teachers should train students’ mastery approach and performance approach goal orientation. And to help nursing students to enhance study motivation,increase learning efficiency and improve their ability of clinical practice.%目的:了解护理本科生成就目标定向与临床实践行为现状,探讨两者之间的关系。方法:采用方便抽样的方法,运用《护理本科生临床实践行为量表》和《成就目标定向量表》对180名护理本科生进行问卷调查,对数据进行相关分析和逐步回归分析。结果:护理本科生临床实践行为总均分为(3.738±0.469)分,成就目标定向的四个量表的得分为:掌握接近(3.58±0.56)分,掌握回避(3.25±0.72)分,成绩接近(3.53±0.68)分,成绩回避(2.48±0.76)分。掌握接近目标定向与临床实践行为呈正相关关系,成绩回避目标与其为负相关关系。结论:护理本

  5. Computers in Hospitals Nursing Practice Defined and Validated

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Janet B.

    1983-01-01

    Computers in hospitals offer Nursing a unique challenge to define and validate its own practice. This definition will begin first within those hospitals implementing computer systems with nursing applications. These first pioneers must take great care to develop application content that reflects valid nursing roles and to communicate to each practitioner the standards of practice which will guide the planning and delivery of quality nursing care.

  6. Problem solving in nursing practice: application, process, skill acquisition and measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J D; While, A E; Fitzpatrick, J M

    1993-06-01

    This paper analyses the role of problem solving in nursing practice including the process, acquisition and measurement of problem-solving skills. It is argued that while problem-solving ability is acknowledged as critical if today's nurse practitioner is to maintain effective clinical practice, to date it retains a marginal place in nurse education curricula. Further, it has attracted limited empirical study. Such an omission, it is argued, requires urgent redress if the nursing profession is to meet effectively the challenges of the next decade and beyond.

  7. Embedding evidence-based practice among nursing undergraduates: Results from a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Beate; Aune, Anne G; Brænd, Jorunn A

    2016-05-01

    Evidence-based practice is currently one of the most important developments in health care. Research in nursing science is rapidly growing; however, translating the knowledge based on this research into clinical practice is often hampered, and may be dependent on reflective skills. The aim of this study was to see how undergraduate nursing students in nursing should increase their skills and knowledge related to evidence-based practice through participation in clinical research projects. A qualitative approach was used in collecting and analyzing the data. Students participated in a pilot clinical research project and a received guidance related to their bachelor thesis. After the project was completed, all students filled in a questionnaire. The students' motivation to participate in this study was reported to be high, but they reported low knowledge related to evidence-based practice. All students reported that their attitude towards evidence-based practice changed in a positive direction during their participation in the project. Evidence-based practice influenced nursing practices by putting more focus on critical thinking, increasing pride and giving a sense of ownership in the clinical field. The curricula and the pedagogical perspectives in nursing education can influence the attitude towards evidence-based practice and skills among nursing bachelor students.

  8. Leadership Practices in Hospital Nursing: A Self of Manager Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Vânea Lúcia Dos Santos; Camelo, Silvia Helena Henriques; Soares, Mirelle Inácio; Resck, Zélia Marilda Rodrigues; Chaves, Lucieli Dias Pedreschi; Santos, Fabiana Cristina Dos; Leal, Laura Andrian

    2017-04-03

    To assess the frequency of the leadership practices performed by the manager nurses of hospital institutions and their association with the variables of the socioprofessional profile. Cross-sectional, descriptive, correlational study conducted in four hospitals in a city of the state of São Paulo. A sociodemographic questionnaire and the instrument Leadership Practices Inventory were used. Data collection and analysis were based on an exemplary Leadership Practices Model. Eighty-four manager nurses participated in the study. The mean values of the leadership practices used by the nurses were: enable others to act (50.6); encourage the heart (48.2); model the way (46.7); challenge the process (43.3); and inspire a shared vision (43.1). Data analysis also evidenced a correlation between the practice encourage the heart and the variables time of care and employment relationship. The study evidenced the presence of manager nurses exercising moderate leadership, and promoting teamwork, an environment of trust, and a horizontal vision. However, moderate values also reveal managerial aspects to be improved by the leaders by means of organizational strategies and/or tools aimed at best leadership practices. Avaliar a frequência das práticas de liderança executadas pelos enfermeiros gerentes de instituições hospitalares e sua associação às variáveis do perfil socioprofissional. Estudo transversal, descritivo e correlacional, realizado em quatro hospitaisde um município do interior paulista. Utilizou-se de questionário sociodemográfico e do instrumento Leadership Practices Inventory. A coleta e a análise de dados foram fundamentadas em um Modelo de Práticas para Liderança exemplar. Participaram 84 enfermeiros gerentes. As médias das práticas de liderança utilizadas pelos enfermeiros foram: capacitar os outros a agir (50,6), encorajar o coração (48,2), traçar o caminho (46,7), desafiar o processo (43,3) e inspirar uma visão compartilhada (43,1). Na an

  9. Obesity Prevention Practices of Elementary School Nurses in Minnesota: Findings from Interviews with Licensed School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison-Sandberg, Leslie F.; Kubik, Martha Y.; Johnson, Karen E.

    2011-01-01

    Elementary schools are an optimal setting to provide obesity prevention interventions, yet little is known about the obesity prevention practices of elementary school nurses. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into current obesity-related school nursing practice in elementary schools in Minnesota, opinions regarding school nurse-led…

  10. Obesity Prevention Practices of Elementary School Nurses in Minnesota: Findings from Interviews with Licensed School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison-Sandberg, Leslie F.; Kubik, Martha Y.; Johnson, Karen E.

    2011-01-01

    Elementary schools are an optimal setting to provide obesity prevention interventions, yet little is known about the obesity prevention practices of elementary school nurses. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into current obesity-related school nursing practice in elementary schools in Minnesota, opinions regarding school nurse-led…

  11. Professional dignity in nursing in clinical and community workplaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stievano, Alessandro; Marinis, Maria Grazia De; Russo, Maria Teresa; Rocco, Gennaro; Alvaro, Rosaria

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to analyse nurses' professional dignity in their everyday working lives. We explored the factors that affect nursing professional dignity in practice that emerge in relationships with health professionals, among clinical nurses working in hospitals and in community settings in central Italy. The main themes identified were: (i) nursing professional dignity perceived as an achievement; (ii) recognition of dignity beyond professional roles. These two concepts are interconnected. This study provides insights into professional dignity in nursing being perceived as an achievement linked to the intrinsic dignity of every human being. The 'nursing professional dignity perceived as an achievement' was perceived as having declined in different social factors. Some factors of nursing professional dignity perceived as an achievement were attained more easily in community settings. 'Recognition of dignity beyond professional roles' underpins the intrinsic dignity as an expression of humanity, embedded in persons regardless of any profession, and values, such as: respect, moral integrity, humility, working conscientiously and kindness.

  12. Anxiety and surplus in nursing practice: lessons from Lacan and Bataille.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Alicia M; Glass, Nel; Traynor, Michael

    2014-07-01

    It is well established, following Menzies' work, that nursing practice produces considerable anxiety. Like Menzies, we bring a psychoanalytic perspective to a theorization of anxiety in nursing and do so in order to consider nursing practice in the light of psychoanalytic theory, although from a Lacanian perspective. We also draw on Bataille's notion of 'surplus'. These concepts provide the theoretical framework for a study investigating how some clinical nurses are able to remain in clinical practice rather than leave the profession or seek work at a distance from the bedside. We conducted focus groups and present here an analysis of two fragments of nurses' speech. We found the nurses responded from one of two positions. In the first position, the nurses focus on doctors, complain about the surplus afforded them, and call for it to be eliminated. In this way, the nursing group is similar to other groups, considered by Bataille, who also attempt to get rid of a surplus. However, in the second position, the nurses stay with the surplus, tolerating it as they nurse the patient. This latter position is one where the nurse practises with a focus on the patient rather than being distracted by their dispute over the doctor's privilege. The importance of this paper is in its illustration of two distinct positions from which the nurse can practise: one that is not optimal because the nurse is distracted and the other that is more focused on practice, and thus the nurse is in a position to provide the best care possible to patients.

  13. Understanding the use of standardized nursing terminology and classification systems in published research: A case study using the International Classification for Nursing Practice(®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strudwick, Gillian; Hardiker, Nicholas R

    2016-10-01

    In the era of evidenced based healthcare, nursing is required to demonstrate that care provided by nurses is associated with optimal patient outcomes, and a high degree of quality and safety. The use of standardized nursing terminologies and classification systems are a way that nursing documentation can be leveraged to generate evidence related to nursing practice. Several widely-reported nursing specific terminologies and classifications systems currently exist including the Clinical Care Classification System, International Classification for Nursing Practice(®), Nursing Intervention Classification, Nursing Outcome Classification, Omaha System, Perioperative Nursing Data Set and NANDA International. However, the influence of these systems on demonstrating the value of nursing and the professions' impact on quality, safety and patient outcomes in published research is relatively unknown. This paper seeks to understand the use of standardized nursing terminology and classification systems in published research, using the International Classification for Nursing Practice(®) as a case study. A systematic review of international published empirical studies on, or using, the International Classification for Nursing Practice(®) were completed using Medline and the Cumulative Index for Nursing and Allied Health Literature. Since 2006, 38 studies have been published on the International Classification for Nursing Practice(®). The main objectives of the published studies have been to validate the appropriateness of the classification system for particular care areas or populations, further develop the classification system, or utilize it to support the generation of new nursing knowledge. To date, most studies have focused on the classification system itself, and a lesser number of studies have used the system to generate information about the outcomes of nursing practice. Based on the published literature that features the International Classification for Nursing

  14. Implementation of Clinical Supervision: educational preparation and subsequent diary accounts of the practicalities involved, from an Australian mental health [corrected] nursing innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, E; Winstanley, J

    2009-12-01

    Set against the backdrop of several inquiry reports about mental health service provision in Australia, the privately experienced cost of working and coping in contemporary mental health settings, remains poorly understood. Clinical Supervision, a structured staff support arrangement, has shown promise as a positive contribution to the clinical governance agenda and is now found reflected in central policy themes elsewhere in the world. However, the concept of Clinical Supervision remains underdeveloped in Australia. The background to a novel randomized controlled trial, currently in progress in Queensland, Australia, is reported elsewhere. This paper reports on the educational preparation for, and subsequent first-hand testimony of the issues faced by, front-line mental health nursing staff engaged in the implementation of Clinical Supervision, under the auspices of the randomized controlled trial. It is argued here that, in advance of quantitative findings becoming available, several challenges emerge from their supplementary and contemporaneous diary accounts of their experience that may confront Clinical Supervision policy makers, educators, managers and clinicians, anywhere in the world, with immediate effect.

  15. 安徽省高职高专院校护理专职教师临床实践现状调查分析%Status Quo of Full-time Nursing Teachers' Clinical Practice in Higher Vocational Colleges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘莉; 张秀军; 汪洪杰

    2012-01-01

    Objective To understand status quo of full-time nursing teachers' clinical practice in higher vocational colleges in Anhui province and to provide scientific basis for enhancing quality of teachers' clinical practice. Methods A self-designed questionnaire was applied to survey 124 full-time nursing teachers from 12 higher vocational colleges in Anhui province. Results Of the total, 97 (78.2%)full-time nursing teachers had participated in clinical practice in recent two years. Teachers' cumulative clinical practice time in different age groups in recent two years indicated statistical significance (P=0.010) and they expected to participate in much more clinical practice such as medical treatment, professional study, clinical teaching, nursing management and scientific research besides clinical nursing. Though 90.7% of the teachers were engaged in clinical practice for several months without undertaking teaching task at present, only 43.5% of the teachers preferred this approach. Most teachers expected more factors would be taken into consideration as for practical place. While 94 (96.9%) teachers believed that clinical practice was beneficial to teaching, 123(99.2%) interviewees recognized the necessity of clinical practice, however, only 42 (33.9%) actively participated in the practice. Conclusion There are still many problems existing in clinical practice of full-time nursing teachers in higher vocational colleges. It is important to arrange clinical practice reasonably and scientifically and enhance the teachers ' enthusiasm and initiative so as to ensure the quality of clinical practice.%目的 了解安徽省高职高专院校护理专职教师临床实践现状,为提高教师临床实践质量提供依据.方法 采取自行设计的调查问卷,对安徽省12 所高职高专院校124 名护理专职教师进行调查.结果 近2 年已参加过临床实践的教师有97 名(78.2%).在近2 年临床实践的累计时间上,不同年龄段教师实践时

  16. Clinical instructors' knowledge and perceptions about nursing care of older people: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbusch, Jennifer; Dahlke, Sherry; Phinney, Alison

    2014-08-01

    With an aging population, the majority of nurses will spend their careers working with older people. Currently, there is scant research about clinical instructors' knowledge and perceptions about nursing care of older people despite their instrumental role in preparing nurses for practice. The purpose of this study was to explore clinical instructors' knowledge and perceptions about nursing care of older people. A mixed methods approach was used. Fifteen clinical instructors and 15 nurse educators employed on specialized units for older people completed questionnaires. Independent t-tests were administered. Five of the clinical instructors also participated in semi-structured interviews, which were analyzed using thematic analysis. Findings indicated that clinical instructors had significantly lower scores on knowledge and perceptions about nursing care of older people than practice-based nurse educators. Further, clinical instructors found it difficult to integrate specialized knowledge about nursing care of older people along with other aspects of their teaching. They also reported that it was challenging to support learning about best practices for older people within the current clinical context, which was complex and fast-paced. This study reinforces the need for professional development opportunities for clinical instructors to support their instrumental role in preparing students for practice with older people.

  17. Case study and case-based research in emergency nursing and care: Theoretical foundations and practical application in paramedic pre-hospital clinical judgment and decision-making of patients with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaban, Ramon Z; Considine, Julie; Fry, Margaret; Curtis, Kate

    2017-02-01

    Generating knowledge through quality research is fundamental to the advancement of professional practice in emergency nursing and care. There are multiple paradigms, designs and methods available to researchers to respond to challenges in clinical practice. Systematic reviews, randomised control trials and other forms of experimental research are deemed the gold standard of evidence, but there are comparatively few such trials in emergency care. In some instances it is not possible or appropriate to undertake experimental research. When exploring new or emerging problems where there is limited evidence available, non-experimental methods are required and appropriate. This paper provides the theoretical foundations and an exemplar of the use of case study and case-based research to explore a new and emerging problem in the context of emergency care. It examines pre-hospital clinical judgement and decision-making of mental illness by paramedics. Using an exemplar the paper explores the theoretical foundations and conceptual frameworks of case study, it explains how cases are defined and the role researcher in this form of inquiry, it details important principles and the procedures for data gathering and analysis, and it demonstrates techniques to enhance trustworthiness and credibility of the research. Moreover, it provides theoretically and practical insights into using case study in emergency care. Copyright © 2017 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Design and Implementation of Authentic Learning with Mobile Technology in Vocational Nursing Practice Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Ying-Hung; Wu, Ting-Ting; Chiu, Po-Sheng; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, along with the development of mobile technology, vocational nursing education has improved greatly. In light of this emerging mobile technology, it brings the clinical practice of vocational nursing education closer to authentic learning than ever. In fact, some studies revealed that learners' learn states and learning outcomes…

  19. 浅谈中职护理专职教师临床实践的意义%A Brief Discussion on the Significance of Secondary Vo-cational Nursing Professional Teachers' Clinical Practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张昕

    2012-01-01

      中职护理教育是国家培养应用型护理人才的重要组成部分,它强调学生技能的应用。中职护理专职教师利用假期或课余时间进行临床实践不仅有利于自身专业知识和专业技能的提高,及时发现教材知识与临床实际的脱节,提高自身教学能力,培养爱伤观念,还有利于实习生的管理教育和校内实践基地的建设。%  Secondary vocational nursing education is an important component of the nation's cultivation of applied nursing talents, and it stresses on the application of students' skills.Nursing pro-fessional teachers should use holidays and part time to carry out clinical practice,which is helpful for the improvement of their professional knowledge and skills,so as to improve their teaching ability. Besides, it is also helpful for the management of interns and the construction of school practice base.

  20. Integrative Nursing: Application of Principles Across Clinical Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Jo Kreitzer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available While the essence of nursing has long been whole person (body, mind, and spirit and whole system-focused, in reality the contemporary practice of nursing in many settings around the globe has become increasingly fragmented and de-stabilized. Nursing shortages in many parts of the world are significant, and hierarchies and bureaucracies often remove nurses from the point of care, be that the bedside, home, or clinic, replacing them with less skilled workers and filling their time with documentation and other administrative tasks. Integrative nursing is a framework for providing whole person/whole system care that is relationship-based and person-centered and focuses on improving the health and wellbeing of caregivers as well as those they serve. It is aligned with what is being called the “triple aim” in the United States—an effort focused on improving the patient experience (quality and satisfaction, improving the health of populations, and reducing the cost of care. The principles of integrative nursing offer clear and specific guidance that can shape and impact patient care in all clinical settings.

  1. Integrative nursing: application of principles across clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitzer, Mary Jo

    2015-04-01

    While the essence of nursing has long been whole person (body, mind, and spirit) and whole system-focused, in reality the contemporary practice of nursing in many settings around the globe has become increasingly fragmented and de-stabilized. Nursing shortages in many parts of the world are significant, and hierarchies and bureaucracies often remove nurses from the point of care, be that the bedside, home, or clinic, replacing them with less skilled workers and filling their time with documentation and other administrative tasks. Integrative nursing is a framework for providing whole person/whole system care that is relationship-based and person-centered and focuses on improving the health and wellbeing of caregivers as well as those they serve. It is aligned with what is being called the "triple aim" in the United States-an effort focused on improving the patient experience (quality and satisfaction), improving the health of populations, and reducing the cost of care. The principles of integrative nursing offer clear and specific guidance that can shape and impact patient care in all clinical settings.

  2. Woman-Centered Maternity Nursing Education and Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Giarratano, Gloria

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this Heideggerian phenomenological study was to uncover the meanings of the clinical experiences of registered nurses working in maternity settings after they studied maternity nursing from a woman-centered, feminist perspective in a generic baccalaureate nursing program. Purposeful sampling was conducted to locate and recruit nurses who had graduated from this nursing program between the December 1996 and December 1998 semesters and were currently working in a maternal-newborn...

  3. [The use of a Nursing Model (NM) for nursing administration offers direct and indirect benefits for patients as for nurses. Depending the chosen NM, the concepts of person, health, nursing and environment are very different. Each NM has its special vision of the practice of nursing. The study investigated whether the Chief Nursing Officers (CNO) of the bilingual and French speaking Belgian hospitals integrate Nursing Models in the politics of their department. A quantitative descriptive and correlational survey was conducted. 97.5 % of the concerned CNO (78/80) participated to the research. It appears that a Nursing Model underlies the action of the nursing department in only 38 % of the departments (30/78). Where a Nursing Model is used, it is explicitly communicated to staff (26/30). Among the Models used, that of Virginia Henderson dominates (26/30). The seniority of the CNO in its function as well as variables related to educational courses and clinical context appear to influence the results. The Nursing Models of the paradigm of transformation remain rarely used. A qualitative research would be relevant to deepen the understanding of the experience of CNO related to Nursing Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecocq, Dan; Lefebvre, Hélène; Bachelet, Lucie; Berrabah, Ouassinia; Dyikpanu, David; Martin, Daniel; Siddu, Damien; Mengal, Yves; Pirson, Magali

    2017-08-17

    The use of a Nursing Model (NM) for nursing administration offers direct and indirect benefits for patients as for nurses. Depending the chosen NM, the concepts of person, health, nursing and environment are very different. Each NM has its special vision of the practice of nursing. The study investigated whether the Chief Nursing Officers (CNO) of the bilingual and French speaking Belgian hospitals integrate Nursing Models in the politics of their department. A quantitative descriptive and correlational survey was conducted. 97.5 % of the concerned CNO (78/80) participated to the research. It appears that a Nursing Model underlies the action of the nursing department in only 38 % of the departments (30/78). Where a Nursing Model is used, it is explicitly communicated to staff (26/30). Among the Models used, that of Virginia Henderson dominates (26/30). The seniority of the CNO in its function as well as variables related to educational courses and clinical context appear to influence the results. The Nursing Models of the paradigm of transformation remain rarely used. A qualitative research would be relevant to deepen the understanding of the experience of CNO related to Nursing Models.

  4. Contributions of Public Health to nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Káren Mendes Jorge de; Seixas, Clarissa Terenzi; David, Helena Maria Scherlowski Leal; Costa, Aline Queiroz da

    2017-01-01

    Analyze the perceptions of undergraduate nursing students about the contributions of public health to nursing practice in the Unified Health System. Qualitative Descriptive Study. Data collection was carried out through semi-directed interviews with 15 students. The language material was analyzed according to content and thematic analysis. Thematic categories were established, namely: "Perceptions about Public Health" and "Contribution of Public Health to nursing practice in the Unified Health System". Perceptions about Public Health are diversified, but converge to the recognition of this field as the basis for training nurses qualified to work in the SUS with technical competence, autonomy and focusing on the integrality in health care. Analisar as percepções de alunos do curso de bacharelado em Enfermagem acerca das contribuições da Saúde Coletiva para o trabalho de enfermeiros no Sistema Único de Saúde. Estudo descritivo, com abordagem qualitativa. A coleta de dados foi realizada mediante a técnica da entrevista semidirigida com 15 alunos. O material de linguagem foi analisado segundo a técnica de análise de conteúdo temático-categorial. Foram produzidas as categorias temáticas "Percepções acerca da Saúde Coletiva" e "Contribuição da Saúde Coletiva ao trabalho do enfermeiro no Sistema Único de Saúde". As percepções sobre a Saúde Coletiva são plurais, mas convergem para o reconhecimento desse campo como base de sustentação da formação de enfermeiros habilitados a trabalhar no SUS com competência técnica, autonomia e com foco na integralidade do cuidado em saúde.

  5. Nurses' views about returning to practice after a career break.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Mary Alison; Randhawa, Gurch

    Shortages in nursing staff have led to recruitment campaigns targeting nurses who have left the profession. The present study explored reasons why career-break nurses decide for or against a return to practice, as well as perceptions of nursing following return. Semistructured interview were conducted with 24 nurses who had returned recently to the profession and 28 nurses on a "career break". Findings revealed that those who returned did so when their personal circumstances allowed, and half returned as bank nurses in order to work flexible, family-friendly hours. Some non-returners reported that they could not afford to return because of childcare costs. Although still a caring one, the nurse's role is seen by returners as becoming increasingly technologically and administratively demanding. Flexibility with regard to working practices, increased salaries and demonstrating that it values its staff, were highlighted by interviewees generally as priority issues for the NHS if it wishes to recruit career-break nurses.

  6. Examining pedagogical practices in family systems nursing: intentionality, complexity, and doing well by families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moules, Nancy J; Bell, Janice M; Paton, Brenda I; Morck, Angela C

    2012-05-01

    Teaching graduate family nursing students the important and delicate practice of entering into and mitigating families' illness suffering signifies an educational practice that is rigorous, intense, and contextual, yet not articulated as expounded knowledge. This study examined the pedagogical practices of the advanced practice of Family Systems Nursing (FSN) as taught to master's and doctoral nursing students at the Family Nursing Unit, University of Calgary, using observation of expert and novice clinical practice, live supervision, videotape review, presession hypothesizing, clinical documentation, and the writing of therapeutic letters to families. A triangulation of research methods and data collection strategies, interpretive ethnography, autoethnography, and hermeneutics, were used. Students reported an intensity of learning that had both useful and limiting consequences as they developed skills in therapeutic conversations with families experiencing illness. Faculty used an intentional pedagogical process to encourage growth in perceptual, conceptual, and executive knowledge and skills of working with families.

  7. 本科实习护生实习早期职业生涯规划的现状调查%Investigation of career planning status of undergraduate nursing students during the early clinical practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胥碧芬; 崔丽君

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the current career planning status and its influencing factors of undergraduate nursing students during the early clinical practice.Methods Totally,144 undergraduate nursing students were investigated by general information questionnaire and career planning questionnaire.Results The total score of career planning questionnaire was (155.75 ± 23.71).The differences among the undergraduate nursing students with different characteristics were statistically significant in three dimensions,which were whether nursing was first choice,major decision maker and reasona to choose nursing (P < 0.01 or P < 0.05).Conclusion The career planning education for undergraduate nursing students should be strengthened,which can help to stabilize nursing talents and improve the quality of nursing team.%目的 调查本科护生实习早期职业生涯规划的现状及其影响因素.方法 采用一般情况调查问卷、职业生涯规划调查量表对144名本科实习护生进行调查.结果 本科护生实习早期的职业生涯规划总分为(155.75±23.71)分.不同特征的本科实习护生在“护理专业是否为第一志愿”“专业选择的决策者”及“选择护理专业的依据”3个方面比较差异具有统计学意义(P<0.01或P<0.05).结论 学校应加强本科护生的早期职业生涯规划教育,有利于稳定护理人才,提高护理队伍的整体素质水平.

  8. Social and professional status of nurses in a context of innovative reforms in nursing practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrijanova Е.А.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The article states the results of sociological research of basic medical and social factors that influence the formation of social and professional status of nurses in a context of innovative reforms in nursing practice

  9. Advanced practice nursing in Latin America and the Caribbean: regulation, education and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keri Elizabeth Zug

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: to identify the current state of advanced practice nursing regulation, education and practice in Latin America and the Caribbean and the perception of nursing leaders in the region toward an advanced practice nursing role in primary health care to support Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage initiatives. Method: a descriptive cross-sectional design utilizing a web-based survey of 173 nursing leaders about their perceptions of the state of nursing practice and potential development of advanced practice nursing in their countries, including definition, work environment, regulation, education, nursing practice, nursing culture, and perceived receptiveness to an expanded role in primary health care. Result: the participants were largely familiar with the advanced practice nursing role, but most were unaware of or reported no current existing legislation for the advanced practice nursing role in their countries. Participants reported the need for increased faculty preparation and promotion of curricula reforms to emphasize primary health care programs to train advanced practice nurses. The vast majority of participants believed their countries' populations could benefit from an advanced practice nursing role in primary health care. Conclusion: strong legislative support and a solid educational framework are critical to the successful development of advanced practice nursing programs and practitioners to support Universal Access to Health and Universal Health Coverage initiatives.

  10. Graduate nurses' experiences of mental health services in their first year of practice: An integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Mary-Ellen; Browne, Graeme; O'Brien, Anthony Paul

    2016-08-01

    New graduate nurses have reported negative experiences in mental health settings, particularly during the transitional period of practice. Previous research has focused on addressing the undergraduate preparation of nurses for practice instead of the experiences and outcomes of the transitional period. Recently, there has been growing interest in exploring the experiences of graduate nurses in transition and the implementation of promising interventions to facilitate new graduates' assimilation to practice. Despite these initiatives, the overall shortage of mental health nurses continues to rise, and graduates still report negative experiences in the mental health setting. The purpose of this study was to identify and explore the experiences of new graduate nurses in mental health services in their first year of clinical practice. An integrative review was conducted with 22 studies sourced from the CINAHL, PubMed, Scopus, and PsychINFO electronic databases, as well as through hand-searching the literature. Literature review findings have highlighted negative clinical experiences and increased attrition from mental health services for graduate nurses. These experiences were closely linked with the changes in the training of mental health nurses, role ambiguity, inadequate clinical preceptorship, encountering the reality of mental health services, and the role of health services in transitioning graduate nurses into clinical practice. Established research into organizational cultures demonstrates that negative organizational outcomes result from negative workplace experiences. Therefore, further research into new graduate nurses' experiences of mental health nursing and its culture might clarify the reasons why they might not be attracted to the discipline and/or are leaving early in their career. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  11. Participating in a community of practice as a prerequisite for becoming a nurse - Trajectories as final year nursing students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, Lise; Thrysøe, L.; Dohn, N. B.

    2010-01-01

    P, depending on what both the students and the members of the staff did to make participation possible. The conclusion is that the students' participation is strengthened by the students and nurses showing interest in getting to know each other professionally and socially and by the students having......Participating in a community of practice (CoP) is essential for final year nursing students. The article describes the opportunities of student nurses to participate as members of a CoP, and how these opportunities were exploited. Ten students in their final clinical practice were included...... on the extent to which these aspects are present, participation can become an essential factor in the clinical phase of nursing education....

  12. Activities and interactions of baccalaureate nursing students in clinical practica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polifroni, E C; Packard, S A; Shah, H S; MacAvoy, S

    1995-01-01

    Basic nursing education is governed by individual state rules and regulations lacking in uniformity across the United States and based on unstated and perhaps mistaken assumptions. At the same time, there is increasing evidence of problems and difficulties with the current traditional model of nursing education. Before proposing changes in said model, the authors chose to examine what it is that a nursing student does in a clinical area. The perspective of activities and interactions was chosen to illustrate, through a nonparticipant observation study, the patterns and utilization of time during a scheduled clinical experience for baccalaureate nursing students. The goal of the study was to determine who, other than the client/patient, influences the student learning at the clinical site and how learning time is spent. Two schools (one private and one public) and nine clinical sites with 37 observations were used to collect the data for this study. Findings are best summarized in four (overlapping) categories of school time, registered nurse (RN) staff time, hospital staff time, and supervised time. School time, or time spent interacting with the instructor, another student, and/or the student on his/her own in the practice setting (time exclusive of staff input) constituted 84 per cent of all time. RN staff time that was time spent with either the primary nurse or other RNs on the unit used 10 per cent of the student time, Fourteen per cent of student time was spent in hospital staff time, which includes interactions with any nursing staff or other hospital personnel.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Alliances of cooperation: negotiating New Hampshire nurse practitioners' prescribing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Deborah A

    2009-01-01

    Nurse practitioner legislation varies among states, particularly in relation to practice without physician oversight, altering the legal environment within which nurse practitioners can use knowledge and skills to meet patient needs. Using New Hampshire as a case study, this historical analysis of nurse practitioners' negotiations over time for independent practice, defined in state practice acts, illuminates the complex social and economic factors affecting nurses' struggle to gain legal rights over their own professional practice without supervision and intervention from another profession. In New Hampshire, not only did organized medicine oppose nurses rights to practice, but pharmacists demanded the right to control all aspects of medication management, including who could prescribe and under what circumstances prescribing could occur. Shifting social and political terrain as well as changes in legislative and state professional board leadership affected the environment and negotiations of a small group of nurses who were ultimately successful in obtaining the right to define their own professional practice.

  14. Succession planning for the future through an academic-practice partnership: a nursing administration master's program for emerging nurse leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Rose; Dyess, Susan; Hannah, Ed; Prestia, Angela

    2013-01-01

    A global nursing leadership shortage is projected by the end of this decade. There is an urgent need to begin developing emerging nurse leaders now. This article describes the work of an academic-practice partnership collaborative of nurse leaders. The goal of the partnership is to devel