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Sample records for clinical nuclear medicine

  1. Clinical demands on nuclear medicine in neurology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine techniques can be used which are able to estimate various physiologic variables regionally in the brain. As a disadvantage of these modalities imaging function rather than morphology of brain tissue the coarse spatial resolution inherent to all isotope techniques when compared to CT and magnetic resonance imaging of protons must be accepted. The main demand on nuclear medicine techniques must therefore be the quantitation of physiologic and pathologic processes which are necessary for the understanding of pathophysiology of lesions visualized by modalities imaging morphology. (orig./MG)

  2. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not? by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  3. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  4. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not? by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens

  5. Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive tracers? ... funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that uses ...

  6. Nuclear medicine in clinical neurology: an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope scanning using technetium 99m pertechnetate has fallen into disuse since the advent of x-ray computerized tomography. Regional brain blood flow studies have been pursued on a research basis. Increased regional blood flow during focal seizure activity has been demonstrated and is of use in localizing such foci. Cisternography as a predictive tool in normal pressure hydrocephalus is falling into disuse. Positron tomographic scanning is a potent research tool that can demonstrate both regional glycolysis and blood flow. Unfortunately, it is extremely expensive and complex to apply in a clinical setting. With support from the National Institutes of Health, seven extramural centers have been funded to develop positron tomographic capabilities, and they will greatly advance our knowledge of stroke pathophysiology, seizure disorders, brain tumors, and various degenerative diseases. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging is a potentially valuable tool since it creates tomographic images representing the distribution of brain water. No tissue ionization is produced, and images comparable to second-generation computerized tomographic scans are already being produced in humans

  7. An internet-based teaching file on clinical nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The goal of this project was to develop an internet-based interactive digital teaching file on nuclide imaging in clinical nuclear medicine, with the capability of access to internet. Methods: On the basis of academic teaching contents in nuclear medicine textbook for undergraduates who major in nuclear medicine, Frontpage 2000, HTML language, and JavaScript language in some parts of the contents, were utilized in the internet-based teaching file developed in this study. Results: A practical and comprehensive teaching file was accomplished and may get access with acceptable speed to internet. Besides basic teaching contents of nuclide imagings, a large number of typical and rare clinical cases, questionnaire with answers and update data in the field of nuclear medicine were included in the file. Conclusion: This teaching file meets its goal of providing an easy-to-use and internet-based digital teaching file, characteristically with the contents instant and enriched, and with the modes diversified and colorful

  8. Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of radiation in human health, for both diagnosis and treatment of disease, is an important component of the work of the IAEA. The responsibility for the increasingly technical aspects of this work is undertaken by the medical physicist. To ensure good practice in this vital area, structured clinical training programmes are required to complement academic learning. This publication is intended to be a guide to the practical implementation of such a programme for nuclear medicine. There is a general and growing awareness that radiation medicine is increasingly dependent on well trained medical physicists who are based in a clinical setting. However an analysis of the availability of medical physicists indicates a large shortfall of qualified and capable professionals. This is particularly evident in developing countries. While strategies to increase educational opportunities are critical to such countries, the need for guidance on structured clinical training was recognized by the members of the Regional Cooperative Agreement for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Science and Technology (RCA) for the Asia-Pacific region. Consequently, a technical cooperation regional project (RAS6038) under the RCA programme was formulated to address this need in this region by developing suitable material and establishing its viability. Development of a clinical training guide for medical physicists specialising in nuclear medicine was started in 2009 with the appointment of a core drafting committee of regional and international experts. The publication drew on the experience of clinical training in Australia, Croatia and Sweden and was moderated by physicists working in the Asian region. The present publication follows the approach of earlier IAEA publications in the Training Course Series, specifically Nos 37 and 47, Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Radiation Oncology and Clinical Training of Medical Physicists

  9. Clinical nuclear medicine applications in Turkey and specific renal studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Nuclear cardiology, nuclear oncology, pediatric nuclear medicine and nuclear endocrinology are the main application areas of clinical nuclear medicine in Turkey. Not only imaging studies, but also therapeutic application of radiopharmaceuticals is also performed at many institutes, such as hyperthyroidism treatment with radioiodine, thyroid cancer ablation and metastases treatment with radioiodine, radio synovectomy, metastatic pain therapy, and recently radioimmunotherapy of lymphomas. Almost all radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals are obtained commercially from European countries, except 18-FDG which is obtained from two cyclotrons in Turkey. More than 30.000 renal procedures are performed at the University hospitals in a year. Pediatric age groups is approximately % 55 of patients. 99mTc-DTPA (%44), 99mTc-DMSA (%37), 99mTc-MAG3 (%17) and 99mTc-EC (%2) are the most commonly used radiopharmaceuticals for renal imaging. More than 6.000 vials of several pharmaceuticals are used for renal cortical scintigraphy (%35), dynamic renal imaging (%34), renal scintigraphy with diuretic (%27) and captopril scintigraphy (%4). Most common indication for renal cortical scintigraphy is detection of cortical scarring (%53). In addition, using single plasma sample method or gamma-camera method renal clearance measurements with 99mTc-MAG3 99mTc-DTPA have been used at some institutions

  10. Dictionary/handbook of nuclear medicine and clinical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iturralde, M.P. (Univ. of Pretoria and H.S. Verwoerd Hospital, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (ZA))

    1989-01-01

    This book covers the following topics: Fundamentals of English medical etymology, Abbreviations, acronyms, symbols, denotations, and signs commonly used or defined in the dictionary, Characteristics of the elements, Characteristics of practicable radioisotopes and of selected radionuclides commonly used in nuclear medicine, Properties and production of radionuclides, Radioactive decay, Radiopharmaceuticals, and Radiation dosimetry.

  11. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The task of the Expert Committee was to review the technical development and efficacy of nuclear medicine methods and to recommend the best possible means of establishing nuclear medicine services at various levels of medical care in different countries. After reviewing the contributions which nuclear medicine can make, the various types of medical institutions and hospitals in existence, the requirements, organization and funding of nuclear medicine services, and the cost/effectiveness of nuclear medicine, a number of recommendations were made. IAEA and WHO should make information on existing methods of cost/effectiveness analysis widely available; invite governments to include a description of such analysis methods in training programmes of their health officers; assist in the acquisition of the necessary data; and encourage and eventually support actual applications of such analyses to carefully selected nuclear medicine procedures in varying medicosocial environments. They were further recommended to study possible ways of improving reliability and ease of servicing nuclear medicine equipment, and extent of possible local construction; the possibility of making available supplies of matched characterized reagents for radioimmunoassay and related techniques; and to study the advantages of establishing a network of collaborating centres on an international basis

  12. Fundamentals of nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alazraki, N.P.; Mishkin, F.S.

    1984-01-01

    This guidebook for clinical nuclear medicine is written as a description of how nuclear medicine procedures should be used by clinicians in evaluating their patients. It is designed to assist medical students and physicians in becoming acquainted with nuclear medicine techniques for detecting and evaluating most common disorders. The material provides an introduction to, not a textbook of, nuclear medicine. Each chapter is devoted to a particular organ system or topic relevant to the risks and benefits involved in nuclear medicine studies. The emphasis is on presenting the rationales for ordering the various clinical imaging procedures performed in most nuclear medicine departments. Where appropriate, alternative imaging modalities including ultrasound, computed tomography imaging, and radiographic special procedures are discussed. Comparative data between nuclear medicine imaging and other modalities are presented to help guide the practicing clinician in the selection of the most appropriate procedure for a given problem.

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  14. General Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Nuclear Medicine Nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts of radioactive ... of General Nuclear Medicine? What is General Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  17. Handbook of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging principles and clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Edmund E; Tateishi, Ukihide; Baum, Richard P

    2012-01-01

    This handbook will provide updated information on nuclear medicine and molecular imaging techniques as well as its clinical applications, including radionuclide therapy, to trainees and practitioners of nuclear medicine, radiology and general medicine. Updated information on nuclear medicine and molecular imaging are vitally important and useful to both trainees and existing practitioners. Imaging techniques and agents are advancing and changing so rapidly that concise and pertinent information are absolutely necessary and helpful. It is hoped that this handbook will help readers be better equipped for the utilization of new imaging methods and treatments using radiopharmaceuticals.

  18. Practical nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Gemmell, Howard G; Sharp, Peter F

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear medicine plays a crucial role in patient care, and this book is an essential guide for all practitioners to the many techniques that inform clinical management. The first part covers the scientific basis of nuclear medicine, the rest of the book deals with clinical applications. Diagnostic imaging has an increasingly important role in patient management and, despite advances in other modalities (functional MRI and spiral CT), nuclear medicine continues to make its unique contribution by its ability to demonstrate physiological function. This book is also expanded by covering areas of d

  19. Veterinary nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review is presented of the expanding horizons of nuclear medicine, the equipment necessary for a nuclear medicine laboratory is listed, and the value of this relatively new field to the veterinary clinician is indicated. Although clinical applications to veterinary medicine have not kept pace with those of human medicine, many advances have been made, particularly in the use of in vitro techniques. Areas for expanded applications should include competitive protein binding and other in vitro procedures, particularly in connection with metabolic profile studies. Indicated also is more intensive application by the veterinarian of imaging procedures, which have been found to be of such great value to the physician. (U.S.)

  20. Clinical applications of PET-CT in nuclear medicine to medical specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This regional training course about Clinical Applications of PET-Tc in nuclear medicine include: imaging, pathology, scintigraphy, computed tomography, radiology, endoscopy, magnetic resonance, biopsy, and histology. It also describes pathologies and diseases of organs and bone structures such as: musculoskeletal and osseous damage, tumors, fibroids, metastasize, neoplasm, adenopathies and cancer of liver, brain, glands, kidney, neck, thorax, lungs, uterus, ovaries, craniums, hypophysis etc

  1. What Is Nuclear Medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that is used to diagnose and treat diseases in a safe and painless way. Nuclear medicine procedures permit the determination of medical information ...

  2. Nuclear medicine resources manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past decade many IAEA programmes have significantly enhanced the capabilities of numerous Member States in the field of nuclear medicine. Functional imaging using nuclear medicine procedures has become an indispensable tool for the diagnosis, treatment planning and management of patients. However, due to the heterogeneous growth and development of nuclear medicine in the IAEA's Member States, the operating standards of practice vary considerably from country to country and region to region. This publication is the result of the work of over 30 international professionals who have assisted the IAEA in the process of standardization and harmonization. This manual sets out the prerequisites for the establishment of a nuclear medicine service, including basic infrastructure, suitable premises, reliable supply of electricity, maintenance of a steady temperature, dust exclusion for gamma cameras and radiopharmacy dispensaries. It offers clear guidance on human resources and training needs for medical doctors, technologists, radiopharmaceutical scientists, physicists and specialist nurses in the practice of nuclear medicine. The manual describes the requirements for safe preparation and quality control of radiopharmaceuticals. In addition, it contains essential requirements for maintenance of facilities and instruments, for radiation hygiene and for optimization of nuclear medicine operational performance with the use of working clinical protocols. The result is a comprehensive guide at an international level that contains practical suggestions based on the experience of professionals around the globe. This publication will be of interest to nuclear medicine physicians, radiologists, medical educationalists, diagnostic centre managers, medical physicists, medical technologists, radiopharmacists, specialist nurses, clinical scientists and those engaged in quality assurance and control systems in public health in both developed and developing countries

  3. Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Nuclear Medicine (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of radiation in human health, for both diagnosis and treatment of disease, is an important component of the work of the IAEA. The responsibility for the increasingly technical aspects of this work is undertaken by the medical physicist. To ensure good practice in this vital area, structured clinical training programmes are required to complement academic learning. This publication is intended to be a guide to the practical implementation of such a programme for nuclear medicine. There is a general and growing awareness that radiation medicine is increasingly dependent on well trained medical physicists who are based in a clinical setting. However an analysis of the availability of medical physicists indicates a large shortfall of qualified and capable professionals. This is particularly evident in developing countries. While strategies to increase educational opportunities are critical to such countries, the need for guidance on structured clinical training was recognized by the members of the Regional Cooperative Agreement for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Science and Technology (RCA) for the Asia-Pacific region. Consequently, a technical cooperation regional project (RAS6038) under the RCA programme was formulated to address this need in this region by developing suitable material and establishing its viability. Development of a clinical training guide for medical physicists specialising in nuclear medicine was started in 2009 with the appointment of a core drafting committee of regional and international experts. The publication drew on the experience of clinical training in Australia, Croatia and Sweden and was moderated by physicists working in the Asian region. The present publication follows the approach of earlier IAEA publications in the Training Course Series, specifically Nos 37 and 47, Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Radiation Oncology and Clinical Training of Medical Physicists

  4. Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Nuclear Medicine (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of radiation in human health, for both diagnosis and treatment of disease, is an important component of the work of the IAEA. The responsibility for the increasingly technical aspects of this work is undertaken by the medical physicist. To ensure good practice in this vital area, structured clinical training programmes are required to complement academic learning. This publication is intended to be a guide to the practical implementation of such a programme for nuclear medicine. There is a general and growing awareness that radiation medicine is increasingly dependent on well trained medical physicists who are based in a clinical setting. However an analysis of the availability of medical physicists indicates a large shortfall of qualified and capable professionals. This is particularly evident in developing countries. While strategies to increase educational opportunities are critical to such countries, the need for guidance on structured clinical training was recognized by the members of the Regional Cooperative Agreement for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Science and Technology (RCA) for the Asia-Pacific region. Consequently, a technical cooperation regional project (RAS6038) under the RCA programme was formulated to address this need in this region by developing suitable material and establishing its viability. Development of a clinical training guide for medical physicists specialising in nuclear medicine was started in 2009 with the appointment of a core drafting committee of regional and international experts. The publication drew on the experience of clinical training in Australia, Croatia and Sweden and was moderated by physicists working in the Asian region. The present publication follows the approach of earlier IAEA publications in the Training Course Series, specifically Nos 37 and 47, Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Radiation Oncology and Clinical Training of Medical Physicists

  5. Spatial map dose of nuclear medicine service of the Clinical Hospital of Botucatu, SP, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted to describe levels of occupational and environmental exposure of the Nuclear Medicine Service of the Clinical Hospital of Botucatu. To this end, measurements were made of the radiometric levels of points strategically defined, in all the environments, for a period of six months, sampling different days and times, during operation normal routine of the sector. The results allow to estimate the expected dose for each environment, comparing them to the dose limitation established by the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN), allowing better targeting of occupationally exposed individuals, indicating the points where the occupation should be the minimum required, enabling the reduction of risks to potential exposures. (author)

  6. Pediatric nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This symposium presented the latest techniques and approaches to the proper medical application of radionuclides in pediatrics. An expert faculty, comprised of specialists in the field of pediatric nuclear medicine, discussed the major indications as well as the advantages and potential hazards of nuclear medicine procedures compared to other diagnostic modalities. In recent years, newer radiopharmaceuticals labeled with technetium-99m and other short-lived radionuclides with relatively favorable radiation characteristics have permitted a variety of diagnostic studies that are very useful clinically and carry a substantially lower radiation burden then many comparable X-ray studies. This new battery of nuclear medicine procedures is now widely available for diagnosis and management of pediatric patients. Many recent research studies in children have yielded data concerning the effacacy of these procedures, and current recommendations will be presented by those involved in conducting such studies. Individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base

  7. Pediatric nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    This symposium presented the latest techniques and approaches to the proper medical application of radionuclides in pediatrics. An expert faculty, comprised of specialists in the field of pediatric nuclear medicine, discussed the major indications as well as the advantages and potential hazards of nuclear medicine procedures compared to other diagnostic modalities. In recent years, newer radiopharmaceuticals labeled with technetium-99m and other short-lived radionuclides with relatively favorable radiation characteristics have permitted a variety of diagnostic studies that are very useful clinically and carry a substantially lower radiation burden then many comparable X-ray studies. This new battery of nuclear medicine procedures is now widely available for diagnosis and management of pediatric patients. Many recent research studies in children have yielded data concerning the effacacy of these procedures, and current recommendations will be presented by those involved in conducting such studies. Individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  8. A scheme for the audit of scientific and technological standards in clinical nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: Audit is the process whereby the quality of a service is monitored and optimised. It forms an essential component of the quality assurance process, whether by self-assessment or by external peer review. In the UK the British Nuclear Medicine Society (BNMS) has undertaken external organisational audit of departments providing clinical nuclear medicine services. This work aimed to develop a more thorough and service specific process for the audit of scientific and technological standards in nuclear medicine. Materials and Methods: The audit process has been implemented using written audit documents to facilitate the audit procedure. A questionnaire forms part of the formal documentation for audit of the scientific and technical standards of a clinical service. Scientific and technical standards were derived from a number of sources including legal requirements, regulatory obligations, notes for guidance, peer reviewed publications and accepted good clinical practice (GCP). Results: The audit process graded the standards of an individual department according to legal or safety requirements (Grade A), good practice (Grade B) and desirable aspects of service delivery (Grade C). The standards have been allocated into eight main categories. These are: Instrumentation; Software and data protection; Electrical Safety; Mechanical Safety; Workstation Safety; The Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH); Radiation Protection; Scientific and Technical staffing levels. During the audit visit a detailed inspection of clinical and laboratory areas and department written documentation is also necessary to validate the data obtained. Conclusion: The printed scheme now provides a means for external audit or self-assessment. There should be evidence of a well-organised and safe environment for both patients and staff. Health and Safety legislation requires written local rules and these records should be available to demonstrate the standard of service provision. Other

  9. Traceability in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, B.E. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Ionizing Radiation Div., Gaithersburg MD (United States); Judge, St. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2007-08-15

    Accurate, reproducible measurement of radioactivity in nuclear medicine applications is vital to ensure the safety and effectiveness of disease diagnosis and treatment using unsealed radioactive sources. The need to maintain a high degree of confidence in those measurements requires that they be carried out so as to be traceable to national and international standards. In addition, measurement traceability for radioactivity in medicine helps ensure international consistency in measurement at all levels of practice (national measurement laboratories, research institutions, isotope producers, radiopharmaceutical manufacturers and clinics). This paper explores the importance of radioactivity measurement in nuclear medicine and demonstrates how traceability can be extended from international standards to the quantity of the drug administered to the patient. (authors)

  10. Traceability in nuclear medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Brian E.; Judge, Steven

    2007-08-01

    Accurate, reproducible measurement of radioactivity in nuclear medicine applications is vital to ensure the safety and effectiveness of disease diagnosis and treatment using unsealed radioactive sources. The need to maintain a high degree of confidence in those measurements requires that they be carried out so as to be traceable to national and international standards. In addition, measurement traceability for radioactivity in medicine helps ensure international consistency in measurement at all levels of practice (national measurement laboratories, research institutions, isotope producers, radiopharmaceutical manufacturers and clinics). This paper explores the importance of radioactivity measurement in nuclear medicine and demonstrates how traceability can be extended from international standards to the quantity of the drug administered to the patient.

  11. National comparison of {sup 131}I measurement among nuclear medicine clinics of eight countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsovcova, Veronika, E-mail: volsovcova@cmi.c [Czech Metrology Institute, Radiova 1, Praha 10, 102 00 (Czech Republic); Iwahara, Akira [Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes, Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, Av. Salvador Allende, s/no. Recreio, Rio de Janeiro, CEP 22780-160 Brazil (Brazil); Oropesa, Pilar [Centro de Isotopos, Ave. Monumental y Carretera La Rada, Km 31/2, Guanabacoa, Ciudad Habana (Cuba); Joseph, Leena; Ravindra, Anuradha [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Radiation Safety Systems Division, Trombay, Mumbai-400 085 (India); Ghafoori, Mostafa [SSDL, Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School (AMIRS). Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, AEOI, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Son, Hye-Kyung [Radiation Safety Division, National Institute of Food and Drug Safety Evaluation, Korea Food and Drug Administration, 194 Tongilro, Eunpyung-Gu, Seoul, 122-704 (Korea, Republic of); Sahagia, Maria [Horia Hulubei National Institute of R and D for Physics and Engineering, POB MG-6, 077125 Bucharest (Romania); Tastan, Selma [Ankara University Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cebeci 06100, Ankara (Turkey); Zimmerman, Brian [Dosimetry and Medical Radiation Physics Section, International Atomic Energy Agency, P.O. Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Ionizing Radiation Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8462 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    A generally applicable protocol for organizing comparisons among nuclear medicine clinics created within the IAEA project CRP E2.10.05 was tested in Brazil, Cuba, Czech Republic, India, Iran, Republic of Korea, Romania and Turkey in 2007. Comparisons of measurement of {sup 131}I were organized by local pilot laboratories with different backgrounds and levels of experience in this field. The results and experiences gained were compared and analyzed. A majority of results in each national comparison were within 10% of the reference value.

  12. Nuclear energy and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applications of nuclear energy on medicine, as well as the basic principles of these applications, are presented. The radiological diagnosis, the radiotherapy, the nuclear medicine, the radiological protection and the production of radioisotopes are studied. (M.A.C.)

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tell your doctor about your child’s recent illnesses, medical conditions, medications and allergies. Depending on the type ... Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive material ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... referring physician. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits The information provided by nuclear medicine examinations is ... risk is very low compared with the potential benefits. Nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures have been used for ...

  15. International conference on clinical PET and molecular nuclear medicine (IPET 2007). Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency is organizing its first international conference on 'Clinical PET and Molecular Nuclear Medicine'. Medical imaging technologies have undergone explosive growth over the past two decades. Today, imaging is at a crossroad, with molecular targeted imaging agents expected to broadly expand the capabilities of conventional anatomical imaging methods. Observing molecular interactions in the living body by the radiotracer technique has become known as 'molecular nuclear medicine'. Molecular nuclear medicine techniques analyze cellular biochemistry and its relationship to disease processes expressed in tissue and organ dysfunction, for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. People can often have similar manifestations of disease, but no two patients will be the same. Functional radionuclide imaging and positron emission tomography (PET) provide excellent opportunities to follow the pathology in individual patients and therefore provide a means for tailored clinical management. These also provide the means to assess the response to treatment in a safe and non-invasive manner. Changes at molecular and cellular levels provide vital clues for evaluating the effectiveness of chosen clinical treatment plans. This information is expected to have a major impact on understanding disease, disease detection, individualised treatment, and drug development. Recently, considerable attention has been drawn to nuclear medicine with the visualization of biochemical processes in vivo such as PET studies with 18F-FDG in many different organs and in cancerous tissues. With the arrival of PET/CT systems there is a new era of accurate mapping of disease processes. Today, 18F-FDG is the most useful PET tracer for the detection, staging, treatment planning and management of cancer. There is mounting evidence for its competitive advantage over conventional techniques in major medical areas including oncology, cardiology, and neurology. Nuclear medicine is

  16. Clinical applications of SPECT/CT: New hybrid nuclear medicine imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interest in multimodality imaging shows no sign of subsiding. New tracers are spreading out the spectrum of clinical applications and innovative technological solutions are preparing the way for yet more modality marriages: hybrid imaging. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has enabled the evaluation of disease processes based on functional and metabolic information of organs and cells. Integration of X ray computed tomography (CT) into SPECT has recently emerged as a brilliant diagnostic tool in medical imaging, where anatomical details may delineate functional and metabolic information. SPECT/CT has proven to be valuable in oncology. For example, in the case of a patient with metastatic thyroid cancer, neither SPECT nor CT alone could identify the site of malignancy. SPECT/CT, a hybrid image, precisely identified where the surgeon should operate. However SPECT/CT is not just advantageous in oncology. It may also be used as a one-stop-shop for various diseases. Clinical applications with SPECT/CT have started and expanded in developed countries. It has been reported that moving from SPECT alone to SPECT/CT could change diagnoses in 30% of cases. Large numbers of people could therefore benefit from this shift all over the world. This report presents an overview of clinical applications of SPECT/CT and a relevant source of information for nuclear medicine physicians, radiologists and clinical practitioners. This information may also be useful for decision making when allocating resources dedicated to the health care system, a critical issue that is especially important for the development of nuclear medicine in developing countries. In this regard, the IAEA may be heavily involved in the promotion of programmes aimed at the IAEA's coordinated research projects and Technical Cooperation projects

  17. Nuclear medicine physics

    CERN Document Server

    De Lima, Joao Jose

    2011-01-01

    Edited by a renowned international expert in the field, Nuclear Medicine Physics offers an up-to-date, state-of-the-art account of the physics behind the theoretical foundation and applications of nuclear medicine. It covers important physical aspects of the methods and instruments involved in modern nuclear medicine, along with related biological topics. The book first discusses the physics of and machines for producing radioisotopes suitable for use in conventional nuclear medicine and PET. After focusing on positron physics and the applications of positrons in medicine and biology, it descr

  18. Nuclear medicine. Basic knowledge and clinical applications. 7. rev. and enl. ed.; Nuklearmedizin. Basiswissen und klinische Anwendung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schicha, Harald [Universitaetsklinikum Koeln (Germany). Medizinisches Versorgungszentrum II; Schober, Otmar [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2013-11-01

    The book on basic knowledge and clinical applications of nuclear medicine covers the following issues: The first general part: principles of nuclear medicine; physical fundamentals; radiopharmaceutical chemistry; measuring techniques: gamma detectors, gamma spectrometry, gamma camera, SPECT, PET, PET/CT, PET/NMR, image processing and communication; nuclear medical examinations: metabolic and pharmacological kinetics, scintigraphic methods, criteria for the use; quality assurance; dosimetry and radiation protection, radiation risks and patients exposure, benefit-risk considerations. The second part covers endocrine organs, carcinomas, skeleton and bone joints, inflammations, lymph system, cardiovascular system, lungs, central nervous system, kidneys and urinary system, gastrointestinal tract, other scintigraphic examinations.

  19. Fundamentals of nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alazraki, N.P.; Mishkin, F.S.

    1988-01-01

    The book begins with basic science and statistics relevant to nuclear medicine, and specific organ systems are addressed in separate chapters. A section of the text also covers imaging of groups of disease processes (eg, trauma, cancer). The authors present a comparison between nuclear medicine techniques and other diagnostic imaging studies. A table is given which comments on sensitivities and specificities of common nuclear medicine studies. The sensitivities and specificities are categorized as very high, high, moderate, and so forth.

  20. How well does journal 'impact' work in the assessment of papers on clinical physiology and nuclear medicine?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, HB; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1997-01-01

    This study reports a citation analysis of 217 scientific papers on clinical physiology and nuclear medicine published in 69 different journals during the years 1985-92. The actual citation frequency was compared with the journal 'impact factor' (i.e. the average number of times a paper is cited i...

  1. Evaluating the fundamental qualities of a nuclear medicine radiographer for the provision of an optimal clinical service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, Marc, E-mail: marc.griffiths@uwe.ac.u [Radiography, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of the West of England, Bristol (United Kingdom); King, Simon [University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol (United Kingdom); Stewart, Rob [Diagnostic Imaging, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of the West of England, Bristol (United Kingdom); Dawson, Gary [Nuclear Medicine, Salisbury District Hospital, Salisbury (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15

    The developing nature of nuclear medicine practice highlights the need for an evaluation of the fundamental qualities of a Radiographer working within this discipline. Existing guidelines appear to be in place for clinical technologists working within nuclear medicine. However, limited guidance has been provided for Radiographers practicing within this discipline. This article aims to discuss the fundamental qualities that are considered essential for optimal service delivery, following consultation with various stakeholders. Areas such as technical expertise and knowledge, appropriate use of imaging equipment and current models of safe working practice will be discussed. Patient care and ethical considerations will also be evaluated, along with some core recommendations for future advanced practice.

  2. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org ... I’d like to talk to you about nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine offers the potential to identify ...

  3. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by: Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello! ... d like to talk to you about nuclear medicine. Nuclear medicine offers the potential to identify disease ...

  4. Quality control in Department of Nuclear Medicine, Clinical Center Banja Luka, RS, Bosnia and Herzegovina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete test of publication follows. The aim of this work is to give a review of situations in the Department of Nuclear Medicine in Banja Luka related to quality control. We must perform daily, weekly and monthly control of equipment in the Department of Nuclear Medicine, and we must keep records. In our Department we have equipment from different producers and different year of production: 3 gamma cameras (1973, 1989, 2000); 2 auto gamma counters (2000, 2006); 2 dose calibrators (1973, 2000); 1 thyroid uptake system (2000). Normally procedures for quality control are also different. The situation, according to results of quality control is good. All equipment is working normally and with good performance (except one gamma camera - a problem with hard drive), but we don't have a routine daily control and periodical control for others tests. Keeping a records is another problem. Why? 1. In Bosnia and Herzegovina we don't have Regulatory authority. That means that we don't have legislation, rules, inspection or any other regulatory instruments. 2. There is only school for nurses, we have no special school for medical technician. So, we need an education in that field. 3. Very small number of physicist in hospital, no education for medical and nuclear medicine physicist. Conclusion. Situation in Department of Nuclear Medicine in Banja Luka related to quality control is on the medium level. We are trying to put that on the higher level, but to accomplish that we need additional education for nurses (technicians) and physicist.

  5. Historic images in nuclear medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hess, Søren; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Alavi, Abass

    2014-01-01

    In 1976, 2 major molecular imaging events coincidentally took place: Clinical Nuclear Medicine was first published in June, and in August researchers at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania created the first images in humans with F-FDG. FDG was initially developed as part of an evolution...... set in motion by fundamental research studies with positron-emitting tracers in the 1950s by Michel Ter-Pegossian and coworkers at the Washington University. Today, Clinical Nuclear Medicine is a valued scientific contributor to the molecular imaging community, and FDG PET is considered the backbone...

  6. Nuclear tele medicine; Telemedicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, L.; Hernandez, F.; Fernandez, R. [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Imagenologia Diagnostica, Xalapa, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    The great majority of the digital images of nuclear medicine are susceptible of being sent through internet. This has allowed that the work in diagnosis cabinets by image it can benefit of this modern technology. We have presented in previous congresses works related with tele medicine, however, due to the speed in the evolution of the computer programs and the internet, becomes necessary to make a current position in this modality of work. (Author)

  7. E-film - an interactive clinical teaching tool for nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: With the advent of technology the old fashioned film library used by our Nuclear Medicine staff has been updated and remodelled from 'hard copy learning' with film and light boxes to 'soft-copy learning' using standard PC hardware and software. The new model 'e-film' is a web browser based image viewer written in HTML. It incorporates interesting case studies with interactive questions and answers based on pathology. The easy-to-use design involves selecting a Nuclear Medicine scan e g bone scan, and then the pathology of interest e g osteomyelitis. Each pathology selected has a normal and a number of abnormal cases, which can be viewed as static planar and dynamic images or as movies. The text displayed with each case study is a question with an answer that can be revealed when ready. A general learning tip pertaining to the scan type or particular pathology can also be revealed on request. Many of the case studies incorporate images from other modalities such as CT or MRI for comparison with the Nuclear Medicine images. Pre- and post- treatment scans can also be viewed to assess outcome 'e film' allows staff to search in a specific area of Nuclear Medicine and then test themselves on their understanding of the scan and relevant pathologies. Standard web browsers on PC's allow department-wide user accessibility of e-film via an intranet configuration. In summary, e-film is a convenient, time efficient way of learning with the potential of unlimited data expansion. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... nuclear medicine images can be superimposed with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to produce ... manufacturers are now making single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) and positron emission tomography/ ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... variety of diseases, including many types of cancers, heart disease, gastrointestinal, endocrine, neurological disorders and other abnormalities ... and bladder. bones. liver and gallbladder. gastrointestinal tract. heart. lungs. brain. thyroid. Nuclear medicine scans are typically ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... after leaving the nuclear medicine facility. Through the natural process of radioactive decay, the small amount of radiotracer in your child’s body will lose its radioactivity over time. In many cases, the radioactivity will ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos related to Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Please note ... you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... after the procedure? Except for intravenous injections, most nuclear medicine procedures are painless and are rarely associated with significant discomfort or side effects. If the radiotracer is given intravenously, your child ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits The information provided by nuclear medicine examinations ... diagnosis or to determine appropriate treatment, if any. Risks Because the doses of radiotracer administered are small, ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... leaving the nuclear medicine facility. Through the natural process of radioactive decay, the small amount of radiotracer ... possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... referring physician. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits The information provided by nuclear medicine examinations is ... the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts of radioactive materials called radiotracers, a special camera and a computer ... medical imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive material to diagnose and determine the severity of or ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... not experience any discomfort. When swallowed, the radiotracer has little or no taste. If inhaled, your child ... after the nuclear medicine scan. If the child has been sedated, you will receive specific instructions to ...

  18. Nuclear medicine in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothfeld, B. (ed.)

    1974-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the following main headings: crystal scintillation counting; liquid scintillation counting; activation analysis; the in vitro nuclear medicine laboratory; blood volume in clinical practice B/sub 12/ and folate deficiency; radionuclide studies associated with abnormalities of iron; basic principles of competitive radioassay; plasma cortisol; radioimmunoassays for T/sub 3/ and T/sub 4/; radioimmunoassay of estrogens; determination of androgens in biological fluids; radioimmunoassay of digitalis glycosides; growth hormone; thyrotropin; gonadotropins; radioimmunoassay of gastrin; glucagon; radioisotopic measurements of insulin; radioimmunoassay of the calcium-regulating hormones; the renin-angiotensin system and aldosterone; tumor antigens; fat absorption; protein-losing enteropathy; Australia antigen; bacteriologic cultures and sensitivities; and future pathways. (ERB)

  19. Analysis of the systems for management of radioactive wastes from nuclear medicine clinics of the city of Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear medicine compounds marked with radionuclides, called radiopharmaceuticals, for obtention diagnostic information and for diseases treatment. The physicochemical characteristics of the radiopharmaceuticals determine his fixation at target-organ, and the physical characteristics determine the compound application in diagnostic or therapy. The handling of radiopharmaceuticals generates solid, liquid and gas wastes. The presence of these wastes implies in a adequate management according to regulation standards established by the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). The objective of safe management of radioactive wastes is to protect the human being and the preservation of the environment, limiting possible radiological impacts for the future generation, and comprehend a set of technical and administrative activities involved in the collection, segregation, handling, conditioning, transportation, storage, control and elimination, or the final deposition. This work intends to verify if the radioactive waste management systems from the nuclear medicine clinics at the city of Recife are conformal with te normative regulations issued by the CNEN. The initial obtained results are used to elaboration of conformal verification spreadsheet and its application in six nuclear medicine clinics at Recife

  20. Nuclear medicine applications for the diabetic foot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartshorne, M.F.; Peters, V.

    1987-04-01

    Although not frequently described in the podiatric literature, nuclear medicine imaging may be of great assistance to the clinical podiatrist. This report reviews in detail the use of modern nuclear medicine approaches to the diagnosis and management of the diabetic foot. Nuclear medicine techniques are helpful in evaluating possible osteomyelitis, in determining appropriate amputation levels, and in predicting response to conservative ulcer management. Specific indications for bone, gallium, and perfusion imaging are described.

  1. Nuclear medicine tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this Workshop was to discuss and promote future nuclear medicine applications. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is determined to assist in this role. A major aim of this gathering was to form an interface that was meaningful, representative of the two entities, and above all, on-going. In the opening address, given by Mr. J. Donnelly, President of AECL, this strong commitment was emphasized. In the individual sessions, AECL participants outlined R and D programs and unique expertise that promised to be of interest to members of the nuclear medicine community. The latter group, in turn, described what they saw as some problems and needs of nuclear medicine, especially in the near future. These Proceedings comprise the record of the formal presentations. Additionally, a system of reporting by rapporteurs insured a summary of informal discussions at the sessions and brought to focus pertinent conclusions of the workshop attendees

  2. Nuclear tele medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The great majority of the digital images of nuclear medicine are susceptible of being sent through internet. This has allowed that the work in diagnosis cabinets by image it can benefit of this modern technology. We have presented in previous congresses works related with tele medicine, however, due to the speed in the evolution of the computer programs and the internet, becomes necessary to make a current position in this modality of work. (Author)

  3. Physics in nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Cherry, Simon R; Phelps, Michael E

    2012-01-01

    Physics in Nuclear Medicine - by Drs. Simon R. Cherry, James A. Sorenson, and Michael E. Phelps - provides current, comprehensive guidance on the physics underlying modern nuclear medicine and imaging using radioactively labeled tracers. This revised and updated fourth edition features a new full-color layout, as well as the latest information on instrumentation and technology. Stay current on crucial developments in hybrid imaging (PET/CT and SPECT/CT), and small animal imaging, and benefit from the new section on tracer kinetic modeling in neuroreceptor imaging.

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... like? Special camera or imaging devices used in nuclear medicine include the gamma camera and single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT). The gamma camera, , also called a scintillation camera, detects radioactive energy that is emitted from the patient's body and ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diagnoses. In addition, manufacturers are now making single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) and ... nuclear medicine include the gamma camera and single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT). The gamma camera, , also ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pictures and provides molecular information. In many centers, nuclear medicine images can be superimposed with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to produce special views, a practice known as image fusion or co-registration. These views allow the information ...

  7. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this Site RadiologyInfo.org is produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome ... Recently posted: Focused Ultrasound for Uterine Fibroids Dementia Video: General Ultrasound Video: Pediatric Nuclear Medicine Radiology and ...

  8. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Fibroids Dementia Video: General Ultrasound Video: Pediatric Nuclear Medicine Radiology and You About this Site RadiologyInfo.org ... by: Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello! ...

  9. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Uterine Fibroids Dementia Video: General Ultrasound Video: Pediatric Nuclear Medicine Radiology and You About this Site RadiologyInfo. ... produced by: Image/Video Gallery Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org ...

  10. Nuclear medicine technology study guide

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, Dee

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear Medicine Technology Study Guide presents a comprehensive review of nuclear medicine principles and concepts necessary for technologists to pass board examinations. The practice questions and content follow the guidelines of the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board (NMTCB) and American Registry of Radiological Technologists (ARRT), allowing test takers to maximize their success in passing the examinations. The book is organized by sections of increasing difficulty, with over 600 multiple-choice questions covering all areas of nuclear medicine, including radiation safety; radi

  11. Nuclear medicine at the crossroads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many nuclear medicine procedures, originally developed more than 20 years ago, are now performed with new radiopharmaceuticals or instruments; it is therefore apposite to reappraise what we are doing and why we are doing it. The clinical utility of nuclear medicine is discussed with reference, by way of example, to gated blood pools scans and myocardial perfusion imaging; the importance of the referred population for the outcome of studies is stressed. Attention is drawn to the likelohood that the detection of ischemia would be enhanced by the administration of nitroglycerin prior to rest thallium injection. Emphasis is also placed on the increasing acceptance of dual-tracer studies. The significance of expression of p-glycoprotein by some tumors for sestamibi imaging is discussed, and advances in respect of fluorodeoxyglucose imaging are reviewed. The final section covers issues relating to the development of new procedures, such as the value of nuclear medicine in the detection and characterization of tissue oxygen levels and the possible future role of nuclear medicine in the management of sleeping and eating disorders. (orig.)

  12. Nuclear medicine at the crossroads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, H.W. [Stanford Univ. Hospital, Div. of Nuclear Medicine, CA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Many nuclear medicine procedures, originally developed more than 20 years ago, are now performed with new radiopharmaceuticals or instruments; it is therefore apposite to reappraise what we are doing and why we are doing it. The clinical utility of nuclear medicine is discussed with reference, by way of example, to gated blood pools scans and myocardial perfusion imaging; the importance of the referred population for the outcome of studies is stressed. Attention is drawn to the likelohood that the detection of ischemia would be enhanced by the administration of nitroglycerin prior to rest thallium injection. Emphasis is also placed on the increasing acceptance of dual-tracer studies. The significance of expression of p-glycoprotein by some tumors for sestamibi imaging is discussed, and advances in respect of fluorodeoxyglucose imaging are reviewed. The final section covers issues relating to the development of new procedures, such as the value of nuclear medicine in the detection and characterization of tissue oxygen levels and the possible future role of nuclear medicine in the management of sleeping and eating disorders. (orig.)

  13. Nuclear medicine in sports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine can synergistically contribute to the sports medicine field, in the management of sports-related stress injures. Bone scintigraphy is commonly requested for evaluation of athletes with pain. Three-Phase 99mTc MDP Bone Scan has emerged as the imaging reference standard for diagnosing such injuries. The inherently high-contrast resolution of the bone scan allows early detection of bone trauma and becomes positive within six to seventy-two hours after the onset of symptoms. The bone scan is able to demonstrate stress injuries days to weeks before the radiograph

  14. Prospects in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear medicine, a sequence of revolutioning research up to the simple and efficient application in routine has always then taken place when in an interdisciplinary teamwork new radiochemical tracers and/or new instrumentation had become available. At present we are at the beginning of a phase that means to be in-vivo-biochemistry, the targets of which are molecular interactions in the form of enzymatic reactions, ligand-receptor interactions or immunological reactions. The possibility to use positron-emitting radionuclides of bioelements in biomolecules or drugs to measure their distribution in the living organism by positron-emission tomography (PET) is gaining admittance into the pretentious themes of main directions of medical research. Diagnostic routine application of biochemically oriented nuclear medicine methods are predominantly expected from the transmission of knowledge in PET research to the larger appliable emission tomography with gamma-emitting tracers (SPECT). (author)

  15. Imaging in nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Hoeschen, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    This volume addresses a wide range of issues in the field of nuclear medicine imaging, with an emphasis on the latest research findings. Initial chapters set the scene by considering the role of imaging in nuclear medicine from the medical perspective and discussing the implications of novel agents and applications for imaging. The physics at the basis of the most modern imaging systems is described, and the reader is introduced to the latest advances in image reconstruction and noise correction. Various novel concepts are then discussed, including those developed within the framework of the EURATOM FP7 MADEIRA research project on the optimization of imaging procedures in order to permit a reduction in the radiation dose to healthy tissues. Advances in quality control and quality assurance are covered, and the book concludes by listing rules of thumb for imaging that will be of use to both beginners and experienced researchers.

  16. Nuclear medicine therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Eary, Janet F

    2013-01-01

    One in three of the 30 million Americans who are hospitalized are diagnosed or treated with nuclear medicine techniques. This text provides a succinct overview and detailed set of procedures and considerations for patient therapy with unsealed radioactivity sources.  Serving as a complete literature reference for therapy with radiopharmaceuticals currently utilized in practice, this source covers the role of the physician in radionuclide therapy, and essential procedures and protocols required by health care personnel.

  17. Comparison of 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography Ventilation With Nuclear Medicine Ventilation-Perfusion Imaging: A Clinical Validation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy, E-mail: yevgeniy.vinogradskiy@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Koo, Phillip J. [Department of Radiology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Castillo, Richard [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Castillo, Edward; Guerrero, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Computational and Applied Mathematics, Rice University, Houston, Texas (United States); Gaspar, Laurie E.; Miften, Moyed; Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) ventilation imaging provides lung function information for lung cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy. Before 4DCT-ventilation can be implemented clinically it needs to be validated against an established imaging modality. The purpose of this work was to compare 4DCT-ventilation to nuclear medicine ventilation, using clinically relevant global metrics and radiologist observations. Methods and Materials: Fifteen lung cancer patients with 16 sets of 4DCT and nuclear medicine ventilation-perfusion (VQ) images were used for the study. The VQ-ventilation images were acquired in planar mode using Tc-99m-labeled diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid aerosol inhalation. 4DCT data, spatial registration, and a density-change-based model were used to compute a 4DCT-based ventilation map for each patient. The percent ventilation was calculated in each lung and each lung third for both the 4DCT and VQ-ventilation scans. A nuclear medicine radiologist assessed the VQ and 4DCT scans for the presence of ventilation defects. The VQ and 4DCT-based images were compared using regional percent ventilation and radiologist clinical observations. Results: Individual patient examples demonstrate good qualitative agreement between the 4DCT and VQ-ventilation scans. The correlation coefficients were 0.68 and 0.45, using the percent ventilation in each individual lung and lung third, respectively. Using radiologist-noted presence of ventilation defects and receiver operating characteristic analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the 4DCT-ventilation were 90%, 64%, and 81%, respectively. Conclusions: The current work compared 4DCT with VQ-based ventilation using clinically relevant global metrics and radiologist observations. We found good agreement between the radiologist's assessment of the 4DCT and VQ-ventilation images as well as the percent ventilation in each lung. The agreement lessened when the data were

  18. Comparison of 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography Ventilation With Nuclear Medicine Ventilation-Perfusion Imaging: A Clinical Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Koo, Phillip J.; Castillo, Richard; Castillo, Edward; Guerrero, Thomas; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Miften, Moyed; Kavanagh, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) ventilation imaging provides lung function information for lung cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy. Before 4DCT-ventilation can be implemented clinically it needs to be validated against an established imaging modality. The purpose of this work was to compare 4DCT-ventilation to nuclear medicine ventilation, using clinically relevant global metrics and radiologist observations. Methods and Materials Fifteen lung cancer patients with 16 sets of 4DCT and nuclear medicine ventilation-perfusion (VQ) images were used for the study. The VQ-ventilation images were acquired in planar mode using Tc-99m-labeled diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid aerosol inhalation. 4DCT data, spatial registration, and a density-change-based model were used to compute a 4DCT-based ventilation map for each patient. The percent ventilation was calculated in each lung and each lung third for both the 4DCT and VQ-ventilation scans. A nuclear medicine radiologist assessed the VQ and 4DCT scans for the presence of ventilation defects. The VQ and 4DCT-based images were compared using regional percent ventilation and radiologist clinical observations. Results Individual patient examples demonstrate good qualitative agreement between the 4DCT and VQ-ventilation scans. The correlation coefficients were 0.68 and 0.45, using the percent ventilation in each individual lung and lung third, respectively. Using radiologist-noted presence of ventilation defects and receiver operating characteristic analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the 4DCT-ventilation were 90%, 64%, and 81%, respectively. Conclusions The current work compared 4DCT with VQ-based ventilation using clinically relevant global metrics and radiologist observations. We found good agreement between the radiologist’s assessment of the 4DCT and VQ-ventilation images as well as the percent ventilation in each lung. The agreement lessened when the data were analyzed

  19. Place of the nuclear medicine in the clinical development of the gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although gene therapy has been proposed first for genetic diseases, its concept has been extended to many acquired diseases, owing to a better understanding of pathology at a molecular level. Overall, very few trials have shown to be efficient, and safety concerns have emerged, as a result of several patients deaths. There is a need for new techniques able to improve both the knowledge of the therapeutic gene fate once administered and the early detection of events likely to lead to serious adverse events. In vivo imaging of a reporter gene associated with the therapeutic one is certainly the most promising technique for these goals. Among available imaging modalities, nuclear imaging is the most likely to be applied to patients. This review begins with a summary of current knowledge about the steps that a therapeutic gene has to cross from vector delivery to appropriate expression in target cells. We show how gene imaging could allow to investigate many pitfalls of trials by providing a better understanding of these steps in patients. The reporter genes available for nuclear imaging are presented in the second section, through animal studies. Then, relevant examples of clinical trials are presented. These include cancer (suicide gene therapy and adoptive immunotherapy), ischemic heart diseases and cystic fibrosis. The results are commented with emphasis on the role of nuclear imaging to address the questions raised by these studies, and imaging studies carried out on animals or patients for the corresponding diseases or organs are presented. The results obtained in animal studies warrant the introduction of gene imaging in clinical trials. (authors)

  20. Efficacy of clinical diagnostic procedures utilized in nuclear medicine. Technical progress report, 1 December 1981-30 November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficacy of nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures was measured. Three levels of efficacy were defined. However, two different methods of evaluating efficacy itself were first compared. Using two methods, logistic regression and entropy-minimax pattern detection, substantial agreement was found between them in several clinical observations. (1) There are no attributes that indicate that any grouping of symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings is capable of suggesting that a patient does or does not have a pulmonary embolus. (2) The lung scan test is the only reliable method which indicates that a patient may have a pulmonary embolus or does not have a pulmonary embolus. (3) The validity of these conclusions and the ability to apply them widely to ongoing clinical practice is based on the prospective design of the Study which included an appropriate distribution of institutions by type, size, and geographic location. Also, the only judgement samples was that of the referring physician

  1. Frontiers in nuclear medicine symposium: Nuclear medicine & molecular biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    This document contains the abstracts from the American College of Nuclear Physicians 1993 Fall Meeting entitled, `Frontiers in Nuclear Medicine Symposium: Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Biology`. This meeting was sponsored by the US DOE, Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research. The program chairman was Richard C. Reba, M.D.

  2. Scientific publications from departments of clinical physiology and nuclear medicine in Denmark. A bibliometric analysis of "impact' in the years 1989-1994

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H B; Brinch, K; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    1996-01-01

    This study reports a bibliometric analysis of scientific publications emanating from departments of clinical physiology and nuclear medicine, Denmark, during the years 1989-1994. The total number of publications during this period was 860 (763 scientific journal papers, 71 book/book chapters and 26...... a collaboration between two or more departments of clinical physiology and nuclear medicine, but the collaboration with other medical specialities and institutions was much greater (85%). The 763 papers were published in 239 different scientific journals, 80% in journals with an official 'impact factor...... average (1.10, P papers from a department and its cumulated impact (r = -0.97, P scientific papers from Danish departments of clinical physiology and nuclear medicine fell in the period...

  3. [Nuclear medicine in Europe: education].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellwig, D.; Freudenberg, L.S.; Mottaghy, F.M.; Franzius, C.; Krause, T.; Garai, I.; Biermann, M.; Gruning, T.; Leitha, T.; Gotthardt, M.

    2012-01-01

    The technical developments that have taken place in the preceding years (PET, hybrid imaging) have changed nuclear medicine. The future cooperation with radiologists will be challenging as well as positioning nuclear medicine in an European context. It can also be expected that education in nuclear

  4. Nuclear medicine radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    McParland, Brian J

    2010-01-01

    Complexities of the requirements for accurate radiation dosimetry evaluation in both diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine (including PET) have grown over the past decade. This is due primarily to four factors: growing consideration of accurate patient-specific treatment planning for radionuclide therapy as a means of improving the therapeutic benefit, development of more realistic anthropomorphic phantoms and their use in estimating radiation transport and dosimetry in patients, design and use of advanced Monte Carlo algorithms in calculating the above-mentioned radiation transport and

  5. Scientific publications from departments of clinical physiology and nuclear medicine in Denmark. A bibliometric analysis of "impact' in the years 1989-1994

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, HB; Brinch, K; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1996-01-01

    This study reports a bibliometric analysis of scientific publications emanating from departments of clinical physiology and nuclear medicine, Denmark, during the years 1989-1994. The total number of publications during this period was 860 (763 scientific journal papers, 71 book/book chapters and 26...... theses). Whereas the number of publications per year (188-113) decreased significantly with time (r = -0.94, P ... a collaboration between two or more departments of clinical physiology and nuclear medicine, but the collaboration with other medical specialities and institutions was much greater (85%). The 763 papers were published in 239 different scientific journals, 80% in journals with an official 'impact factor...

  6. Nuclear medicine and AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and its associated illnesses in a relatively young population of patients provides an expanding role for nuclear medicine. The disease enforces a review of each department's infection control procedures. It has also resulted in an increase in the number of patients presenting with diseases such as Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, Kaposi's sarcoma etc. which prior to the HIV epidemic were extremely rare. Thus in high risk patients the interpretation of abnormalities in nuclear medicine scans needs to include the spectrum of opportunistic infections and unusual tumours. The presence of opportunistic infections in the severely immunocompromised patient has led to the development of techniques not normally used, i.e. lung 99Tcm-diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA) transfer/clearance, donor leukocyte scanning to allow rapid diagnosis of an abnormality. Radionuclide techniques are also used to monitor the effect of therapy directed at the HIV itself or against opportunistic infections. This review covers aspects of infection control as well as the use of radionuclides to investigate specific problems related to HIV infection and therapy of the associated disease processes. (author)

  7. White paper of nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document aims at proposing a synthetic presentation of nuclear medicine in France (definition, strengths and weaknesses, key figures about practices and the profession, stakes for years to come), a description of the corresponding education (speciality definition, abilities and responsibilities, diploma content, proposition by the European Society of Radiology and by the CNIPI, demography of the profession), and an overview of characteristics of nuclear medicine (radio-pharmacy, medical physics, paramedical personnel in nuclear medicine, hybrid imagery, therapy, relationships with industries of nuclear medicine, relationships with health authorities)

  8. Neuroimaging, nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter describes radionuclide imaging as it related to neurodegenerative dementias like Alzheimer's disease (AD), idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD), and normal aging, among the various diseases of the elderly. The role of neuroimaging with nuclear medicine is to detect changes in neural activities that are caused by these diseases. Such changes may be indirect phenomena, but the imaging of neural functions provides physicians with useful, objective information regarding pathophysiology in the brain. Brain activities change with age, with the elderly showing decreased brain function in memory, execution, and attention. Age-dependent reduction in the global mean of cerebral blood flow (CBF) has been reported in many studies that have used X-133 and O-15 labeled gas, the spatial resolution of which is low. Partial volume correction (PVC) is available through the segmentation of grey matter from high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Meltzer reported that age-related change disappeared after PVC. The relative distribution of CBF and glucose metabolism has been examined on a voxel-by-voxel basis in many studies. The areas negatively correlated with age are the anterior part of the brain, especially the dorsolateral and medial frontal areas, anterior cingulate cortices, frontolateral and perisylvian cortices, and basal ganglia. The areas positively correlated with age are the occipital lobe, temporal lobe, sensorimotor cortex, and primary visual cortex. It is not easy to define ''normal aging''. Aged people tend to have the potential for diseases like cerebral ischemia caused by arteriosclerosis. Ischemia results in volume loss of the gray matter and CBF. The ApoE e4 gene is a risk factor for AD, and carriers of the ApoE e4 allel show CBF-like AD even at a relatively young age. Hypo-glucose metabolism in the posterior cingulate cortex is seen in 5% of normal people over 50 years of age. This Alzheimer-like CBF/metabolic pattern needs further

  9. Nuclear Medicine Scans for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... My ACS » Your Local Offices Close + - Text Size Nuclear Medicine Scans for Cancer Other names for these ... inflammation, or cancer. Use of monoclonal antibodies in nuclear scans A special type of antibody made in ...

  10. Nuclear power in human medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The public widely associate nuclear power with the megawatt dimensions of nuclear power plants in which nuclear power is released and used for electricity production. While this use of nuclear power for electricity generation is rejected by part of the population adopting the polemic attitude of ''opting out of nuclear,'' the application of nuclear power in medicine is generally accepted. The appreciative, positive term used in this case is nuclear medicine. Both areas, nuclear medicine and environmentally friendly nuclear electricity production, can be traced back to one common origin, i.e. the ''Atoms for Peace'' speech by U.S. President Eisenhower to the U.N. Plenary Assembly on December 8, 1953. The methods of examination and treatment in nuclear medicine are illustrated in a few examples from the perspective of a nuclear engineer. Nuclear medicine is a medical discipline dealing with the use of radionuclides in humans for medical purposes. This is based on 2 principles, namely that the human organism is unable to distinguish among different isotopes in metabolic processes, and the radioactive substances are employed in amounts so small that metabolic processes will not be influenced. As in classical medicine, the application of these principles serves two complementary purposes: diagnosis and therapy. (orig.)

  11. Asian School of Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of organisations are involved in the field of nuclear medicine education. These include International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology (WFNMB), Asia-Oceania Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology (AOFNMB), Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM in USA), European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM). Some Universities also have M.Sc courses in Nuclear Medicine. In the Asian Region, an Asian Regional Cooperative Council for Nuclear Medicine (ARCCNM) was formed in 2000, initiated by China, Japan and Korea, with the main aim of fostering the spread of Nuclear Medicine in Asia. The Asian School of Nuclear Medicine (ASNM) was formed in February 2003, with the ARCCNM as the parent body. The Aims of ASNM are: to foster Education in Nuclear Medicine among the Asian countries, particularly the less developed regions; to promote training of Nuclear Medicine Physicians in cooperation with government agencies, IAEA and universities and societies; to assist in national and regional training courses, award continuing medical education (CME) points and provide regional experts for advanced educational programmes; and to work towards awarding of diplomas or degrees in association with recognised universities by distance learning and practical attachments, with examinations. There are 10 to 12 teaching faculty members from each country comprising of physicists, radio pharmacists as well as nuclear medicine physicians. From this list of potential teaching experts, the Vice-Deans and Dean of ASNM would then decide on the 2 appropriate teaching faculty member for a given assignment or a course in a specific country. The educational scheme could be in conjunction with the ARCCNM or with the local participating countries and their nuclear medicine organisations, or it could be a one-off training course in a given country. This teaching faculty is purely voluntary with no major expenses paid by the ASNM; a token contribution could be

  12. Quality Management in Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA has strong Nuclear medicine (NM) programs and the international basic safety standards require that radiation medicine centers establish a comprehensive quality assurance program for medical exposures supported by internal and external audits. Vital for this is the development of all-inclusive IAEA guideline on 'Quality management in Nuclear Medicine' (also referred to as 'QUANUM'). This document consists of 50 pages and each chapter is set out as a series of questions related to a specific component of NM service. It takes into account the diversity of NM practices and the multidisciplinary contributions (i.e. clinical, physics, radiopharmacy). Self appraisal, external audit and continuous improvement are central elements to improving QA in NM practice. The foremost intention of this document is to introduce a culture of annual systematic review processes into the clinical arena. External audit starts with a formal request together with a completed self appraisal. Each IAEA region will have a pool of trained auditors from each NM discipline. The auditing team will be fully aware of the background and practices by interrogation of NUMDAB (NM database) and recent self appraisal. Normally a 3 day external audit starts with a briefing meeting and ends with a debriefing on the finalization of the audit report. During the external audit, a standardized approach is followed which includes service orientation, introduction to key individuals and access to essential data. The audit team will follow representative clinical cases from clinical requests, clinical direction, patient preparation, radiopharmaceutical dispensing, individual scanning, data processing, report and follow-up of the report. In a few cases, discussions with individual referring physicians will establish patient outcome together with the impact of the NM service. The standards of practice will be compared to national, regional or international guidelines (i.e. IAEA Nuclear medicine resources

  13. Future of nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When it comes to setting up nuclear medicine in a developing country, there is a group of people, who feel that such high technology has no place in a developing country. RIA is likely to remain the method of choice for the research laboratory. The use of radioisotopic label has many advantages compared to the use of an enzyme marker. Generally, iodination is simpler than the preparation of an enzyme labelled substance, especially since there has been no agreement as to which enzyme is best for substances as small as steroids or a large as viruses. In addition, there may be some change in the configuration of the enzyme or the substance to be labelled during the conjugation procedure. Monoclonal antibodies can provide virtually unlimited amounts of homogenous antibodies against a specific antigenic site. The heterogeneous antibodies are more likely to provide more sensitive assays than the monoclonal antibodies, although assays employing the latter are likely to be more specific. The optimal choice of the antiserum may depend on whether sensitivity or specificity is required for the assays

  14. Nuclear medicine in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer is increasingly prevalent in our society. There is a life-time risk that 1 in 3 Australian men and 1 in 4 Australian women will get cancer before the age of 75 years. Overall, 27% of the deaths in NSW are currently related to cancer. The common cancers for men are prostate, lung, melanoma, colon, rectum and bladder. For women the common cancers are breast, colon, melanoma, lung and unknown primary. However, overall lung cancer remains the major cause of cancer deaths (20%) followed by colorectal (13%), unknown site (8%), breast and prostate. Breast and lung cancer are the major causes of death in women. Recent information on 5 year survivals reveal good 5 year survival rates for breast (78.6%), prostate (72.4%) and melanoma (92%), while some tumours such as lung cancer (10.7%) have poor survival. Colon cancer has intermediate survival (57.1%). Projections for cancer incidence suggests rates of cancer will increase for colorectal cancer, melanoma, lung cancer in females but decrease for breast, lung in males and prostate cancer. Major strategic directions in cancer research are understanding carcinogenesis, identification of high risk groups, screening and early detection, chemo-prevention, new cancer therapies, combined modality therapy and quality of life issues. Nuclear medicine will play an important part in many of these areas

  15. Therapeutic nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Discusses all aspects of radionuclide therapy, including basic principles, newly available treatments, regulatory requirements, and future trends. Provides the knowledge required to administer radionuclide therapy safely and effectively in the individual patient. Explains the role of the therapeutic nuclear physician in effectively coordinating a diverse multidisciplinary team. Written by leading experts. The recent revolution in molecular biology offers exciting new opportunities for targeted radionuclide therapy. The selective irradiation of tumor cells through molecular biological mechanisms is now permitting the radiopharmaceutical control of tumors that are unresectable and unresponsive to either chemotherapy or conventional radiotherapy. In this up-to-date, comprehensive book, world-renowned experts discuss the basic principles of radionuclide therapy, explore in detail the available treatments, explain the regulatory requirements, and examine likely future developments. The full range of clinical applications is considered, including thyroid cancer, hematological malignancies, brain tumors, liver cancer, bone and joint disease, and neuroendocrine tumors. The combination of theoretical background and practical information will provide the reader with all the knowledge required to administer radionuclide therapy safely and effectively in the individual patient. Careful attention is also paid to the important role of the therapeutic nuclear physician in delivering the effective coordination of a diverse multidisciplinary team that is essential to the safe provision of treatment.

  16. Therapeutic nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, Richard P. (ed.) [ENETS Center of Excellence, Bad Berka (Germany). THERANOSTICS Center for Molecular Radiotherapy and Molecular Imaging

    2014-07-01

    Discusses all aspects of radionuclide therapy, including basic principles, newly available treatments, regulatory requirements, and future trends. Provides the knowledge required to administer radionuclide therapy safely and effectively in the individual patient. Explains the role of the therapeutic nuclear physician in effectively coordinating a diverse multidisciplinary team. Written by leading experts. The recent revolution in molecular biology offers exciting new opportunities for targeted radionuclide therapy. The selective irradiation of tumor cells through molecular biological mechanisms is now permitting the radiopharmaceutical control of tumors that are unresectable and unresponsive to either chemotherapy or conventional radiotherapy. In this up-to-date, comprehensive book, world-renowned experts discuss the basic principles of radionuclide therapy, explore in detail the available treatments, explain the regulatory requirements, and examine likely future developments. The full range of clinical applications is considered, including thyroid cancer, hematological malignancies, brain tumors, liver cancer, bone and joint disease, and neuroendocrine tumors. The combination of theoretical background and practical information will provide the reader with all the knowledge required to administer radionuclide therapy safely and effectively in the individual patient. Careful attention is also paid to the important role of the therapeutic nuclear physician in delivering the effective coordination of a diverse multidisciplinary team that is essential to the safe provision of treatment.

  17. [Costing nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markou, Pavlos

    2005-01-01

    To the Editor: Referring to a recent special report about the cost analysis of twenty-nine nuclear medicine procedures, I would like to clarify some basic aspects for determining costs of nuclear medicine procedure with various costing methodologies. Activity Based Costing (ABC) method, is a new approach in imaging services costing that can provide the most accurate cost data, but is difficult to perform in nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures. That is because ABC requires determining and analyzing all direct and indirect costs of each procedure, according all its activities. Traditional costing methods, like those for estimating incomes and expenses per procedure or fixed and variable costs per procedure, which are widely used in break-even point analysis and the method of ratio-of-costs-to-charges per procedure may be easily performed in nuclear medicine departments, to evaluate the variability and differences between costs and reimbursement - charges. PMID:15886748

  18. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pediatric Ultrasound Video: Angioplasty & vascular stenting Video: Arthrography Radiology and You About this Site RadiologyInfo.org is ... Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org Hello! I’m Dr. Ramji ...

  19. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... before abnormalities can be detected with other diagnostic tests. Nuclear medicine imaging procedures use small amounts of radioactive materials – called radiotracers – that are typically injected into the ...

  20. Development of nuclear medicine in Mongolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    , equipment, space and work load. The department replaced its old Siemens gamma camera with a GE gamma camera in the year 1996, and upgraded its RIA laboratory in the year 1999. In tandem with developments in the field of nuclear medicine, the department acquired its first SPECT Elscint camera in 2000, a single detector device with 40-cm field of view. That year, we introduced for the first time Nuclear Cardiology procedures in Mongolia including Myocardial Perfusion Imaging. To-day, the nuclear medicine department of The First State Central Clinic Hospital is a vibrant set-up offering a spectrum of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures to the people of Mongolia. The current staff strength consists of 4 medical doctors, 1 medical physicist, 1 radiopharmacist, 5 technologists and 2 laboratory assistants. During the past 25 years the department has conducted Radionuclide investigations on more than 80,000 patients. The number of nuclear medicine procedures and investigations have been increasing every year. During 2000 the department had conducted more than 4000 diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures. With regard to Radionuclide therapy, the department has been engaged in the radioiodine treatment of thyrotoxicosis since 1982. The departmental activities in the field of therapeutic nuclear medicine took a big leap forward this year, when it introduced the Radionuclide treatment of Liver Cancer using Re-188 Lipiodol in March, 2002. IAEA's contribution to the growth and development of nuclear medicine in Mongolia has been of immense value. The country in general and the department in particular has benefited significantly from IAEA support through its several technical cooperation and coordinated research projects. Such support has provided opportunities to Mongolia in enhancing its human resources in the field of nuclear medicine, upgrading equipment, introducing new technologies and providing the state of the art medical care to its people using nuclear medicine technology

  1. Feasibility and Merits of Performing Preclinical Imaging on Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Bilgen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Researchers have limited access to systems dedicated to imaging small laboratory animals. This paper aims to investigate the feasibility and merits of performing preclinical imaging on clinical systems. Materials and Methods. Scans were performed on rat and mouse models of diseases or injuries on four radiology systems, tomosynthesis, computed tomography (CT, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, based on the availability at the author’s institute. Results. Tomosysthesis delineated soft tissue anatomy and hard tissue structure with superb contrast and spatial resolution at minimal scan time and effort. CT allowed high resolution volumetric visualization of bones. Molecular imaging with PET was useful for detecting cancerous tissue in mouse but at the expense of poor resolution. MRI depicted abnormal or intervened tissue at quality and resolution sufficient for experimental studies. The paper discussed limitations of the clinical systems in preclinical imaging as well as challenges regarding the need of additional gadgets, modifications, or upgrades required for longitudinally scanning animals under anesthesia while monitoring their vital signs. Conclusion. Clinical imaging technologies can potentially make cost-effective and efficient contributions to preclinical efforts in obtaining anatomical, structural, and functional information from the underlying tissue while minimally compromising the data quality in certain situations.

  2. The state of the art in diagnostic nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent improvements in the understanding of the physiologic and biologic mechanisms of health and disease have led to an expansion of nuclear medicine applications both in clinical studies and research. Advances in radiopharmaceutical development, instrumentation and computer processing have resulted in the implementation of Positron Emission Tomography for clinical studies, and improved treatments with radiopharmaceuticals particularly in cancer patients. There has also been an dramatic increase in the techniques available with nuclear medicine to detect and measure cellular biologic events in-vivo, which have important implications in clinical and basic science research. Nuclear medicine studies provide unique information on human physiology and remain an integral part of clinical medicine practice

  3. The state of the art in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent improvements in the understanding of the physiologic and biologic mechanisms of health and disease have led to an expansion of nuclear medicine applications both in clinical studies and research. Advances in radiopharmaceutical development, instrumentation and computer processing have resulted in the implementation of Positron Emission Tomography for clinical studies, and improved treatments with radiopharmaceuticals particularly in cancer patients. There has also been a dramatic increase in the techniques available with nuclear medicine to detect and measure cellular biologic events in-vivo, which have important implications in clinical and basic science research. Nuclear medicine studies provide unique information on human physiology and remain an integral part of clinical medicine practice

  4. Quality management audits in nuclear medicine practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An effective management system that integrates quality management (QM) is essential in modern nuclear medicine departments in Member States. The IAEA, in its Safety Standards Series, has published a Safety Requirement (GS-R-3) and a Safety Guide (GS-G-3.1) on management systems for all facilities. These publications address the application of an integrated management system approach that is applicable to nuclear medicine organizations as well. Quality management systems are maintained with the intent to continuously improve effectiveness and efficiency, enabling nuclear medicine to achieve the expectations of its quality policy, and to satisfy its customers. The IAEA has a long history of providing assistance in the field of nuclear medicine to its Member States. Regular quality audits and assessments are essential for modern nuclear medicine departments. More importantly, the entire QM and audit process has to be systematic, patient oriented and outcome based. The management of services should also take into account the diversity of nuclear medicine services around the world and multidisciplinary contributions. The latter include clinical, technical, radiopharmaceutical and medical physics procedures. Aspects of radiation safety and patient protection should also be integral to the process. Such an approach ensures consistency in providing safe, quality and superior services to patients. Increasingly standardized clinical protocol and evidence based medicine is used in nuclear medicine services, and some of these are recommended in numerous IAEA publications, for example, the Nuclear Medicine Resources Manual. Reference should also be made to other IAEA publications such as the IAEA Safety Standards Series, which include the regulations for the safe transport of nuclear material and on waste management as all of these have an impact on the provision of nuclear medicine services. The main objective of this publication is to introduce a routine of conducting an

  5. Annual congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine. EANM'14. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-10-15

    The proceedings of the annual congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine EANM'14 contain abstracts on the following issues: nuclear cardiology practices, PET in lymphoma, advances in nuclear cardiology, dosimetry for intra-arterial treatment in the liver, pediatric nuclear medicine, therapeutic nuclear medicine, SPECT/CT, prostate cancer, extended competencies for nuclear medicine technologists, neurosciences - neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation, radionuclide therapy and dosimetry - preclinical studies, physics and instrumentation, clinical molecular imaging, conventional and specialized nuclear medicine.

  6. Nuclear Medicine Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... necesita saber acerca de... Estudios de Imagen de Medicina Nuclear Un procedimiento de medicina nuclear se describe algunas veces como unos rayos- ... través del cuerpo del paciente. Los procedimientos de medicina nuclear utilizan pequeñas cantidades de mate- riales radiactivos, ...

  7. Review: radioprotection applied in Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the potential causes of exposure to ionizing radiation in a nuclear medicine facility, identifying the causes of common errors in the clinical routine, how to avoid these errors and study good radioprotection practices based on the national law and international documents. (author)

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medicine will interpret the images and forward a report to your referring physician. top of page What ... by: Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your physician with specific medical ...

  9. The role of general nuclear medicine in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Lacey R, E-mail: lgreene@csu.edu.au [Faculty of Science, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, New South Wales (Australia); Wilkinson, Deborah [Faculty of Health, Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Faculty of Science, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-03-15

    The rising incidence of breast cancer worldwide has prompted many improvements to current care. Routine nuclear medicine is a major contributor to a full gamut of clinical studies such as early lesion detection and stratification; guiding, monitoring, and predicting response to therapy; and monitoring progression, recurrence or metastases. Developments in instrumentation such as the high-resolution dedicated breast device coupled with the diagnostic versatility of conventional cameras have reinserted nuclear medicine as a valuable tool in the broader clinical setting. This review outlines the role of general nuclear medicine, concluding that targeted radiopharmaceuticals and versatile instrumentation position nuclear medicine as a powerful modality for patients with breast cancer.

  10. The role of general nuclear medicine in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rising incidence of breast cancer worldwide has prompted many improvements to current care. Routine nuclear medicine is a major contributor to a full gamut of clinical studies such as early lesion detection and stratification; guiding, monitoring, and predicting response to therapy; and monitoring progression, recurrence or metastases. Developments in instrumentation such as the high-resolution dedicated breast device coupled with the diagnostic versatility of conventional cameras have reinserted nuclear medicine as a valuable tool in the broader clinical setting. This review outlines the role of general nuclear medicine, concluding that targeted radiopharmaceuticals and versatile instrumentation position nuclear medicine as a powerful modality for patients with breast cancer

  11. Nuclear medicine quality assurance program in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two steps program has been implemented: the first one is the quality control of the equipment and the second one the development of standard procedures for clinical studies of patients. A training program for doctors and technicians of the nuclear medicine laboratories was carried out. Workshops on instrumentation and quality assurance in nuclear medicine have been organized in several parts of the country. A joint program of the CNEA and the University of Buenos Aires has trained medical physicists. A method has been established to evaluate the capability of the laboratories to produce high quality images and to follow up the implementation of the quality control program

  12. European Association of Nuclear Medicine congress. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the exact place of nuclear medicine studies in the clinical environment in consensus with clinicians and radiologists will probably be our most important task during the coming year. Our society cannot afford unnecessary duplication of diagnostic tests but neither should our patients suffer from the failure to use procedures which could change the outcome of their illness or avoid unnecessary pain and costs because of ignorance, or even worse, self defence by larger and thus stronger pressure groups. Defeatism is as inappropriate as remaining in the splendid isolation of our professional and scientific organisations. There is no place for excessive humbleness either, most of the unnecessary procedures performed in modern medicine lie within the domain of other specialists. It is our duty to participate as actors in the thorough reappraisal of the medical, social and economic context of our activity in the interst of our field and our patients. By confronting our ideas and knowledge with those of others, by using our inventiveness to transfer important results from research laboratories to clinical practice and vice versa, by concentrating on the essential rather than pursuing all possible directions, we will be able to influence positively the future of nuclear medicine. There is no better way to develop our speciality than by understanding the clinical issues, by being able to communicate with our clinical partners and by performing common studies on the clinical impact, cost-efficiency and cost-benefit of nuclear medicine procedures. (orig./AJ)

  13. THERAPEUTIC APPLICATIONS IN NUCLEAR MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristofer Alan Costa Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to poor understanding of the role of nuclear medicine in several disease treatments, the aim of this study was to demonstrate the main therapeutic applications of nuclear medicine as well as their characteristics and radiopharmaceuticals usage through scientific literature review. The main therapeutic applications of nuclear medicine are radio-immunotherapy with iodine-131, yttrium-90, lutetium-177 and copper-67, the radiosynovectomy with yttrium-90, rhenium-186 and gold-198 and pain palliation of osseous metastases with samarium-153, strontium-89 and phosphorus-32. The radioiodine therapy with iodine-131 stands out among therapies because it allows a highly selective treatment of thyroid associated with hyperthyroidism and differentiated thyroid cancer with favorable dosimetry to healthy tissues and with great advantage to allow the ablation of disseminated lesions due to metastases, success not achieved by traditional radiotherapy. Thus, the therapeutic nuclear medicine is an alternative tool, and often essential for definitive treatment of various diseases considered incurable once. Thus, therapeutic nuclear medicine is an alternative and often essential tool for definitive treatment of various diseases considered once incurable.

  14. Clinical nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is reported in the following areas of research: radionuclide lung-imaging procedures in the assessment of injury due to ammonia and carbon monoxide inhalation and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; physiological diagnosis of pulmonary embolism; dynamic imaging of the dual circulation of lung cancer; and an intravenous radionuclide method to evaluate hyposemia caused by abnormal alveolar vessels

  15. A nuclear chocolate box: the periodic table of nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blower, Philip J

    2015-03-21

    Radioisotopes of elements from all parts of the periodic table find both clinical and research applications in radionuclide molecular imaging and therapy (nuclear medicine). This article provides an overview of these applications in relation to both the radiological properties of the radionuclides and the chemical properties of the elements, indicating past successes, current applications and future opportunities and challenges for inorganic chemistry. PMID:25406520

  16. Nuclear medicine - no. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bulletin contains seven articles relating to the isotopic applications in medicine. Their subject matter ranges from the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals through their application in scintiscanning to computer codes for evaluation of the results. The individual articles have been indexed separately

  17. Radiation physics for nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Hoeschen, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    The field of nuclear medicine is expanding rapidly, with the development of exciting new diagnostic methods and treatments. This growth is closely associated with significant advances in radiation physics. In this book, acknowledged experts explain the basic principles of radiation physics in relation to nuclear medicine and examine important novel approaches in the field. The first section is devoted to what might be termed the "building blocks" of nuclear medicine, including the mechanisms of interaction between radiation and matter and Monte Carlo codes. In subsequent sections, radiation sources for medical applications, radiopharmaceutical development and production, and radiation detectors are discussed in detail. New frontiers are then explored, including improved algorithms for image reconstruction, biokinetic models, and voxel phantoms for internal dosimetry. Both trainees and experienced practitioners and researchers will find this book to be an invaluable source of up-to-date information.

  18. Nuclear Medicine on the net

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: To gain insight into Internet usage as a potential means of communicating with clinicians. Method: 200 clinicians within the South Western Sydney Health Area were surveyed by mail. Questionnaire details included Internet access, frequency of access, interest in department web site, suitability of content and interest in electronic bookings. The total response rate was 37% (74/200). General Practitioners comprised 46% of the respondents, and specialists 54%. All respondents had access to the Internet (44% from home only, 8% from work, 48% from both locations), with 57% accessing the Web daily. There was a high overall interest by respondents in accessing a Nuclear medicine web site, particularly for information and results, but a relative reluctance to consider electronic bookings. The following table outlines the respondents in detail. Our results indicate that a Nuclear Medicine web site has the potential to be an effective means of communicating with clinicians. Copyright (2003) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  19. Status of nuclear medicine in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M.H. (Seoul National Univ. (Republic of Korea). Coll. of Medicine)

    1982-03-01

    The medical application of nuclear medicine in Korea finds its origin in June, 1959, when radioactive iodine therapy was given to a patient with hyperthyroidism, while the legal background for the medical uses of radioisotopes was provided by the Atomic Energy Law promulgated in 1958. The real active application of radioisotope in clinical medicine, however, was made possible as the Radioisotope Clinic was opened at the Seoul National University Hospital in April, 1960. In the early 1960's four medical institutes had radioisotope facilities including scintiscanners, scintillation counters, detectors and spectrometers some of which were provided by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. And now, radioisotopes were applied in 45 medical institutes. At the beginning, thyroid function tests and ferrokinetic studies were primary clinical applications. Scanning of various organs became generalized with the wide use of the photoscanners from 1964 and scintillation cameras from 1969. A new era in the development of the nuclear medicine has started in March, 1979 with the use of computer system in the dynamic studies including radionuclide cardiac angiography and sequential renal scan. At present 13 gamma cameras and 4 computer systems were used in the field of nuclear medicine. Radioimmunoassay techniques began to be used from 1969 and at present about fifty items of tests are being performed for the research purposes and clinical applications.

  20. The contribution of medical physics to nuclear medicine: a physician's perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Peter J. Ell

    2014-01-01

    This paper is the second in a series of invited perspectives by four pioneers of nuclear medicine imaging and physics. A medical physicist and a nuclear medicine clinical specialist each take a backward look and a forward look at the contributions of physics to nuclear medicine. Here is a backward look from a nuclear medicine physician's perspective.

  1. Your Radiologist Explains Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through the area being examined and gives off energy in the form of gamma rays which are detected by a special camera and computer to create images of the inside of your body. If you’re scheduled for a nuclear medicine exam, there are several things you can ...

  2. Management of radioactive waste generated in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine is a clinical specialty in which radioactive material is used in non-encapsulated form, for the diagnosis and treatment of patients. Nuclear medicine involves administering to a patient a radioactive substance, usually liquid, both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. This process generates solid radioactive waste (syringes, vials, gloves) and liquid (mainly the patient's urine). (Author)

  3. Data resources for nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, M.R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Lemmel, H.D. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria). Nuclear Data Section

    1995-07-01

    The objective of this article is to list data resources needed for nuclear medicine and provide information on how to access them. This list will include publications of data compilations or evaluations, databases, and data processing codes for both nuclear structure and decay, as well as reaction data. Sources of bibliographic and related information on nuclear data are also be listed. The authors of this article have used their judgement in choosing a representative list of data sources; a more complete listing may be found in the references.

  4. History and Perspectives of Nuclear Medicine in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sombut Boonyaprapa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In 1955, the first nuclear medicine division was established in Thailand by Professor Romsai Suwannik in the Department of Radiology, Siriraj Hospil, Mahidol University in Bangkok. In 1959 four years later, the second nuclear medicine division was established in the Department of Radiology, Chulalongkorn Hospital in Bangkok. The third nuclear medicine division was started in Rajvithi Hospital in Bangkok in 1961. The fourth nuclear medicine division was installed in Chiang Mai University which is the first University located outside of Bangkok in 1965 by Professor Dusadee Prabhasavat and Professor Sanan Simarak, ten years after the first nuclear medicine division in Siriraj Hospital. At the present in Thailand, there are twenty-five organizations providing clinical nuclear medicine services. Five medical faculties provide three years nuclear medicine residency training. There are eight companies which supply radiopharmaceuticals and/or nuclear medicine instruments one of these belongs to governmental office of atomic for peace (OAP of Thailand. In conclusion: Nuclear medicine researches and clinical practices in Thailand had been progressed from the past to the present time and will more progress in the near future, which certainly is the part of Asian countries and ARCCNM.

  5. Distribution of nuclear medicine service in Brazil; Distribuicao do servico de medicina nuclear no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Ana Carolina Costa da; Duarte, Alessandro; Santos, Bianca Maciel dos [Faculdade Metodo de Sao Paulo (FAMESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    The Brazil does not posses a good distribution of nuclear medicine service por all his territory. This paper shows the difference among country regions as far the number of clinics of nuclear medicine as is concerning, and also doctors licensed in the area and radioprotection supervisors, both licensed by the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN)

  6. Nuclear medicine physics the basics

    CERN Document Server

    Chandra, Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    For decades this classic reference has been the book to review to master the complexities of nuclear-medicine physics. Part of the renowned The Basics series of medical physics books, Nuclear Medicine Physics has become an essential resource for radiology residents and practitioners, nuclear cardiologists, medical physicists, and radiologic technologists. This thoroughly revised Seventh Edition retains all the features that have made The Basics series a reliable and trusted partner for board review and reference. This handy manual contains key points at the end of each chapter that help to underscore principal concepts. You'll also find review questions at the end of each chapter—with detailed answers at the end of the book—to help you master the material. This edition includes useful appendices that elaborate on specific topics, such as physical characteristics of radionuclides and CGS and SI Units.

  7. Physics and radiobiology of nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Gopal B

    2013-01-01

    The Fourth Edition of Dr. Gopal B. Saha’s Physics and Radiobiology of Nuclear Medicine was prompted by the need to provide up-to-date information to keep pace with the perpetual growth and improvement in the instrumentation and techniques employed in nuclear medicine since the last edition published in 2006. Like previous editions, the book is intended for radiology and nuclear medicine residents to prepare for the American Board of Nuclear Medicine, American Board of Radiology, and American Board of Science in Nuclear Medicine examinations, all of which require a strong physics background. Additionally, the book will serve as a textbook on nuclear medicine physics for nuclear medicine technologists taking the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board examination.

  8. A concise guide to nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Elgazzar, Abdelhamid H

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is an important component of modern medicine. This easy-to-use book is designed to acquaint readers with the basic principles of nuclear medicine, the instrumentation used, the gamut of procedures available, and the basis for selecting specific diagnostic or therapeutic procedures and interpreting results. After an introductory chapter on the history, technical basis, and scope of nuclear medicine, a series of chapters are devoted to the application of nuclear medicine techniques in the different body systems. In addition, the use of nuclear medicine methods within oncology is

  9. Extracts from IAEA's Resources Manual in Nuclear Medicine. Part-3: Establishing Nuclear Medicine Services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past, consideration was given to the categories of nuclear medicine ranging from simple imaging or in-vitro laboratories, to more complex departments performing a full range of in-vitro and in-vivo procedures that are also involved in advanced clinical services, training programmes, research and development. In developing countries, nuclear medicine historically has often been an offshoot of pathology, radiology or radiotherapy services. These origins are currently changing as less radioimmunoassay is performed and fully-fledged, independent departments of nuclear medicine are being set up. The trend appears to be that all assays (radioassay or ELISA) are done in a biochemistry laboratory whereas nuclear medicine departments are involved largely in diagnostic procedures, radionuclide therapy and non-imaging in-vitro tests. The level of nuclear medicine services is categorized according to three levels of need: Level 1: Only one gamma camera is needed for imaging purposes. The radiopharmaceutical supply, physics and radiation protection services are contracted outside the centre. Other requirements include a receptionist and general secretarial assistance. A single imaging room connected to a shared reporting room should be sufficient, with a staff of one nuclear medicine physician and one technologist, with back-up. This level is appropriate for a small private practice. Level 2: This is suitable for a general hospital where there are multiple imaging rooms where in-vitro and other non-imaging studies would generally be performed as well as radionuclide therapy. Level 3: his is appropriate for an academic institution where there is a need for a comprehensive clinical nuclear medicine service, human resource development and research programmes. Radionuclide therapy for in-patients and outpatients is provided

  10. Essentials of nuclear medicine physics and instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Powsner, Rachel A; Powsner, Edward R

    2013-01-01

    An excellent introduction to the basic concepts of nuclear medicine physics This Third Edition of Essentials of Nuclear Medicine Physics and Instrumentation expands the finely developed illustrated review and introductory guide to nuclear medicine physics and instrumentation. Along with simple, progressive, highly illustrated topics, the authors present nuclear medicine-related physics and engineering concepts clearly and concisely. Included in the text are introductory chapters on relevant atomic structure, methods of radionuclide production, and the interaction of radiation with matter. Fu

  11. Neutron use in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidez, J.; May, R.; Moss, R. [HFR-Unit, European Commission, IAM, Petten (Netherlands); Askienazy, S. [Departement Central de Medicine Nucleaire et Biophysique, Saint Antoine Hospital, Paris (France); Hildebrand, J. [Neurology Department, Erasmus Hospital, Brussels (Belgium)

    1999-07-01

    Neutrons produced by research reactors are being used in nuclear medicine and other medical applications in several ways. The High Flux Reactor (HFR) based in Petten (The Netherlands), owned by the European Commission, has been working increasingly in this field of health care for the European citizen. On the basis of this experience, a survey has been carried out on the main possibilities of neutrons used in nuclear medicine. The most important and most well known is the production of radioisotopes for diagnosis and therapy. Ten million patients receive nuclear medicine in Europe each year, with more than 8 million made with the products issued from research reactors. The survey of the market and the techniques (cyclotron, PET) shows that this market will continue to increase in the future. The direct use of reactors in medicine is actually made by the Boron Neutron capture Therapy (BNCT) for the treatment of glioblastoma, which kills about 15.000 people in Europe each year. For this promising technique, HFR is the most advanced for experimental possibilities and treatment studies. Medical research is also made in other promising fields: the use beam tubes for characterizing of prostheses and bio-medical materials, alpha-immuno therapy products, new types of radioisotopes, new types of illness to be treated by BNCT, etc. (author)

  12. Nuclear medicine. 2. rev. and enlarged ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This second edition of the textbook on nuclear medicine is intended as a comprehensive and explanatory source of current theoretical and practical knowledge required for practical application of nuclear medicine techniques for diagnostics and therapy. The first part of the book deals with general aspects such as physical principles, the labelling and quality control of radiopharmaceuticals, and specific kinetics of some preparations, scanning techniques and the relevant equipment including aspects such as equipment handling, functional monitoring, error sources, patent positioning, as well as radiation protection and the handling of radioactive substances at the place of work. This part also explains the organisational framework of a nuclear medicine practice or department and the professional training and tasks of a radiographer in nuclear medicine. The second part is devoted to specific tasks and techniques for diagnostic assessment of the different body organs, illustrated by examples and summarised in tables given at the end of each chapter. Examples of clinical experience explain the criteria for selection of suitable diagnostic technique. (orig.) With 207 figs., 14 tabs

  13. Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine Practices. 2. Ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quality management systems are essential and should be maintained with the intent to continuously improve effectiveness and efficiency, enabling nuclear medicine to achieve the expectations of its quality policy, satisfy its customers and improve professionalism. The quality management (QM) audit methodology in nuclear medicine practice, introduced in this publication, is designed to be applied to a variety of economic circumstances. A key outcome is a culture of reviewing all processes of the clinical service for continuous improvement in nuclear medicine practice. Regular quality audits and assessments are vital for modern nuclear medicine services. More importantly, the entire QM and audit process has to be systematic, patient oriented and outcome based. The management of services should also take into account the diversity of nuclear medicine services around the world and multidisciplinary contributions. The latter include clinical, technical, radiopharmaceutical, medical physics and radiation safety procedures

  14. Asian School of Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Asian School of Nuclear Medicine (ASNM) was formed in February 2003, with the ARCCNM as the parent body. Aims of ASNM: 1. To foster Education in Nuclear Medicine among the Asian countries, particularly the less developed ones. 2. To promote training of Nuclear Medicine Physicians in cooperation with government agencies, IAEA and universities and societies. 3. To assist in national and regional training courses, award continuing medical education (CME) points and provide regional experts for advanced educational programmes. 4. To work towards awarding of diplomas or degrees in association with recognized universities by distance learning and practical attachments, with examinations. The ASNM works toward a formal training courses leading to the award of a certificate in the long term. The most fundamental job of the ASNM remains the transfer of knowledge from the more developed countries to the less developed ones in the Asian region. The ASNM could award credit hours to the participants of training courses conducted in the various countries and conduct electronic courses and examinations. CME programmes may also be conducted as part of the regular ARCCNM meetings and the ASNM will award CME credit points for such activities

  15. Perspectives in nuclear medicine: pulmonary studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the introduction of I-131 labeled macroaggregates in 1964, noninvasive techniques involving injection of radiolabeled agents and remote detection of emitted radiation have become well established in detecting pulmonary disorders in routine clinical medicine. In the past, pulmonary nuclear medicine has been dominated by studies that depict the distribution of pulmonary perfusion and/or ventilation-perfusion balance (e.g., for the detection of pulmonary embolism, obstructive airway disease, lung carcinoma). With the recent development of emission tomography and the potential for new, function-oriented radiopharmaceuticals, however, pulmonary nuclear medicine is entering a new era. The status of contemporary pulmonary nuclear medicine is briefly reviewed in several areas of major interest and applications and focus on areas where new developments are needed and seem feasible in the near future. Several important regional physiological processes measurable by these techniques include: (a) the presence or absence of pulmonary embolism, (b) relative pulmonary blood flow, (c) permeability to specific molecules, (d) lung tissue metabolism, (e) ventilation distribution and (f) the relationship between ventilation and blood flow (perfusion)

  16. Analysis of the systems for management of radioactive wastes from nuclear medicine clinics of the city of Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil; Analise dos sistemas de gerenciamento de rejeitos radioativos de clinicas de medicina nuclear da cidade de Recife, PE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lira, Renata Farias de; Lopes, Ferdinand de Jesus; Passos, Robson Silva; Silva, Valeria Cosma Bento da; Belo, Igor Burgo, E-mail: renatafariasdelira@hotmail.co, E-mail: ferdinand.lopes@oi.com.b, E-mail: robson.passos@hotmail.co, E-mail: Valleria_@hotmail.co, E-mail: Igor.burgo@gmail.co [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Santos, Marcus Aurelio Pereira dos, E-mail: masantos@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    In nuclear medicine compounds marked with radionuclides, called radiopharmaceuticals, for obtention diagnostic information and for diseases treatment. The physicochemical characteristics of the radiopharmaceuticals determine his fixation at target-organ, and the physical characteristics determine the compound application in diagnostic or therapy. The handling of radiopharmaceuticals generates solid, liquid and gas wastes. The presence of these wastes implies in a adequate management according to regulation standards established by the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). The objective of safe management of radioactive wastes is to protect the human being and the preservation of the environment, limiting possible radiological impacts for the future generation, and comprehend a set of technical and administrative activities involved in the collection, segregation, handling, conditioning, transportation, storage, control and elimination, or the final deposition. This work intends to verify if the radioactive waste management systems from the nuclear medicine clinics at the city of Recife are conformal with te normative regulations issued by the CNEN. The initial obtained results are used to elaboration of conformal verification spreadsheet and its application in six nuclear medicine clinics at Recife

  17. Mongolia and nuclear medicine development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Mongolia is a large, landlocked and sparsely populated country in the northern part of Central Asia, located between Russia on the north and China on east, south and west. Its total land area of 1.5 millions square kilometers is about the size if India or large than Alaska, but contains only 2.3 million population or 1.3 person per square kilometer. It is 2400 kilometers long from east to west maximum of 1260 kilometers from north to south.The priority problems in health.Democratic political reforms since 1990 saw a major transformation process, which is aimed at changing the centrally planned economy to one based on market orient principles. Mongolia is in a gradual epidemiological transition from preponderance of infectious diseases towards non-communicable and degenerative diseases. Mean features of this transition are sharp decrease in mortality from infectious and parasitic diseases and sharp increase in mortality from diseases of the circulatory system and neoplasms. Life expectancy at birth was 65.7 year in 1997. Cardiovascular diseases and cancer are among the leading causes of death in Mongolia.Nuclear Medicine in Mongolia-1975-1981 Beginning First Medical Application of radioisotopes in 1972. First Rectilinear scanner. Single and dual scintillation detectors system, Thyroid Uptake Test; 1982-1999 Settlement, IAEA TC Project since 1982, Thematic Program on Health Care (RAS) since 1997, First Gamma Camera since 1997, Radioimmunological Laboratory and first Radioiodine treatment since 1982, Mongolian Society of Nuclear Medicine since 1982, Member of World and Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology since 1994, Member of Asia and Oceania Radionuclide Therapy Council , 2000 Development, First SPECT and Quantitative Measurement in 2000 Second Gamma Camera, New Thyroid Uptake System-Atomlab 950 PC Spectrometer Radioimmunological Laboratory replacement, Myocardial Perfusion Scintigraphy, Liver Cancer Treatment with Re-188, Radiosynovectomy with Re

  18. Coded-aperture imaging in nuclear medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Warren E.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Aarsvold, John N.

    1989-01-01

    Coded-aperture imaging is a technique for imaging sources that emit high-energy radiation. This type of imaging involves shadow casting and not reflection or refraction. High-energy sources exist in x ray and gamma-ray astronomy, nuclear reactor fuel-rod imaging, and nuclear medicine. Of these three areas nuclear medicine is perhaps the most challenging because of the limited amount of radiation available and because a three-dimensional source distribution is to be determined. In nuclear medicine a radioactive pharmaceutical is administered to a patient. The pharmaceutical is designed to be taken up by a particular organ of interest, and its distribution provides clinical information about the function of the organ, or the presence of lesions within the organ. This distribution is determined from spatial measurements of the radiation emitted by the radiopharmaceutical. The principles of imaging radiopharmaceutical distributions with coded apertures are reviewed. Included is a discussion of linear shift-variant projection operators and the associated inverse problem. A system developed at the University of Arizona in Tucson consisting of small modular gamma-ray cameras fitted with coded apertures is described.

  19. Draft report on the national seminar in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings of the seminar on nuclear medicine have been conducted in four main sessions. In the first session a review of the current status of clinical nuclear medicine in India is reviewed. The use of radioisotopes in thyroid function studies, central nervous systems, liver disorders, lung and bone imaging, renal function studies, dynamic function studies, gastroenterology haematology etc. are described. The existing facilities and the future needs for radioimmunoassay and radiotherapy are discussed. In Session 2, the existing facilities in nuclear medicine in different states in India are reviewed. In Session 3, the available resources in nuclear medicine are reviewed. Radiation protection procedures are outlined. Various nuclear instruments developed at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, (BARC), Bombay, for use in nuclear medicine are briefly described. A list of radiopharmaceuticals developed by BARC and in current use, is given. The roles of the physicist, pharmacist and the nuclear medicine technologist in the hospitals having nuclear medicine units, are stressed. The importance of training and education for personnel in nuclear medicine and medical physics is pointed out. (A.K.)

  20. Spatial map dose of nuclear medicine service of the Clinical Hospital of Botucatu, SP, Brazil; Mapa espacial de dose do servico de medicina nuclear do Hospital das Clinicas de Botucatu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Caio V.; Mendonca, Caroline; Silva, Eduardo T.; Moriguchi, Sonia M.; Koga, Katia H., E-mail: caiov_oliveira@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2013-12-15

    This study was conducted to describe levels of occupational and environmental exposure of the Nuclear Medicine Service of the Clinical Hospital of Botucatu. To this end, measurements were made of the radiometric levels of points strategically defined, in all the environments, for a period of six months, sampling different days and times, during operation normal routine of the sector. The results allow to estimate the expected dose for each environment, comparing them to the dose limitation established by the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN), allowing better targeting of occupationally exposed individuals, indicating the points where the occupation should be the minimum required, enabling the reduction of risks to potential exposures. (author)

  1. Clinical Service of Chinese Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ The clinical practice of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) faces three major challenges:(1)How to enhance its contribution on overall medical service quality? (2) How to best address the unmet medical needs in the contemporary society? (3)How to guarantee that the traditional perspective for disease diagnosis and treatment not be neglected in clinical practice?

  2. Radiopharmaceutical activities administered for diagnostic procedures in nuclear medicine in the first six months of the gamma camera use in the Clinical Center of Montenegro - Podgorica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine procedures have carried out in the Clinical Center of Montenegro - Podgorica since 2006 by the dual-headed SPECT and Digital gamma camera NUCLINE Spirit DH-V. In the first six months of the gamma camera use (from September 2006 to March 2007) examinations of skeleton, kidneys, thyroid and lung were performed. For diagnostic skeletal imaging (102 patients) the radiopharmaceutical 99mTc-MDP is used, and administered activities were in the range from 555 to 740 MBq. For thyroid imaging (203 patients) 99mTc-pertechnetate is used, and administered activities were in the range (37-111) MBq. Lung imaging is performed for 3 patients, using 99mTc-MAA and administered activities in the range (111-185) MBq. Renal imaging is carried out for 72 patients: 42 dynamic studies of kidneys were performed with 99mTc-DTPA and administered activities from 207 to 282 MBq, and 30 static kidneys scintigraphies were performed using the radiopharmaceutical 99mTc-DMSA. 6 patients in the last mentioned group were children with year of birth between 2000 and 2006, and administered activities were from 16.6 to 55.5 MBq. In the same group, activities 28.5 MBq, 74.4 MBq and 120 MBq were administered to three patients with age between 6 and 18 years, and in the other cases, administered activities to the patients (adults) were in the range (59.2 to 196) MBq. The administered activities presented here are basis for further estimations of cumulated activity and absorbed dose to the various organs, which is useful for comparison of the average dose to patient organs in various nuclear medicine procedures and calculation of effective dose equivalent and total effective dose, significant for an estimation of potential risk due to the radioactivity administered to a patient during nuclear medicine procedures. It is very important for procedures optimization and improvement of the radiation protection. (author)

  3. Edge tracing for the determination of the left ventricular projection, computer program and application for the clinic. Cardiac nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, A. (Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Iwaki, Y.

    1981-09-01

    RI cardioangiography, especially blood pool scintigram which is made to synchronize with the cycles of electro-cardiogram, has been one of the two prime movers which, together with /sup 201/TlCl (thallium chloride) used in the study of myocardial blood flow, have contributed much to the development of the cardiovascular nuclear medicine, levelling it up to its present day state. Formerly, however, big computers and trained programmers were essential for the data processing of RI cardioangiography. Besides, only universities and research institutes could afford such expensive facilities. Nowadays, the situation has changed, and necessary data processing units have become available at considerably reduced costs. Even in common size city hospitals, cardioangiography has come to be applied for a routine practice in their medical examinations. Recently, Siemens Gammasonics, Inc. has put on sale a new system to replace the formerly introduced data processing unit called ''Scintiview''. It is the Auto Edge Detection System of the Left Ventricular to be used as a means of automatic cardiogram analysis program (ACAP). We have studied and reviewed differences of the setting-up methods of the region of interest which affect results of estimation of the left ventricular ejection fraction (EF).

  4. Nuclear Medicine Imaging in Pediatric Neurology

    OpenAIRE

    Ümit Özgür Akdemir; Lütfiye Özlem; Atay Kapucu

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging can provide important complementary information in the management of pediatric patients with neurological diseases. Pre-surgical localization of the epileptogenic focus in medically refractory epilepsy patients is the most common indication for nuclear medicine imaging in pediatric neurology. In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, nuclear medicine imaging is particularly useful when magnetic resonance imaging findings are normal or its findings are discordant with e...

  5. Dementia and rural nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The rapid increase in dementia is directly related to the growing number of aged people in developed countries, such as Australia. This increase heightens the need for accurate dementia diagnosis to ensure treatment resources are appropriately allocated. However, current diagnostic methods are unable to determine specific dementia types limiting the effectiveness of many care plans. The lack of specialist resources in rural Australian communities presents nuclear medicine with an opportunity to make a significant impact on the management of this disease. This investigation aimed to identify how SPECT perfusion imaging could maximise its role in the management of dementia in a rural New South Wales setting. The study reviewed all Technetium 99m HMPAO SPECT brain studies over a three-year period. This included a medical record audit, review of all diagnostic imaging reports and an analysis of referral patterns. The results of this study provide compelling evidence that, even in a rural setting, brain SPECT, in conjunction with neuropsychological testing, offers high accuracy in determining the presence and type of dementia. In addition, the study found more than 30% of referrers had no training in SPECT, emphasising the importance of ensuring that brain SPECT reports, in a rural setting, educate and specify to referrers the significance and exact disease type found in the study. Copyright (2003) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  6. ICRP 60 and nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galli, G. (Rome Univ. Cattolica del S. Cuore (Italy). Ist. di Medicina Nucleare)

    For that which regards the field of nuclear medicine, the new International Commission on Radiation Protection recommendations (ICRP 60) are highly innovative in that the differentiation between 'controlled' and ' monitored' areas is no longer tied to fractions of annual dose limits, but it is instead established locally on the basis of operational experience and judgement. The most notable feature of the new recommendations, however, concerns the new 20 mSv dose limit for exposed workers, the 1 mSv limit for the public (understood as the 5 year annual average), as well as, the modifications to the annual limits on the intake of radionuclides, e.g., inhalation of I 131 passes from 2*10/sup 6/ to 1*10/sup 6/. This paper assesses the impacts of these new limits on the performance of ' in vivo' medical diagnostics and radio-metabolic therapy with unsealed sources. Attention is given to possible negative consequences on the implementation of nuclear medicine due to the current trend towards lower limits, and to the implications of the new recommendations as regards medical support staff and family members of individuals undergoing radiotherapy.

  7. Nuclear medicine resources in the internet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The internet is a global collection of networked computers linked by a set of protocols which allows the otherwise disperate computer systems to communicate with each other. In contrast to text-only data available previously, the World Wide Web allows multimedia content to be available on the internet. Graphics can now likewise be used as links. The development of World Wide Web client software such as Mosaic, or the currently more popular Netscape Navigator, makes linking from one document to another (colloquially referred to as 'surfing the Net') fast and simple. While these software are commonly called Web browsers their function extends to the other internet services such as e-mail, file transfer protocol, remote login, Gopher and WAIS. A prototype application being developed as a case-based teaching file which could include clinical data and case discussion, aside of course from the nuclear medicine and related images. Contributions from various institutions can be made available on their own servers and linked together through hypertext. Examples of these are websites of the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology and the Joint Program in Nuclear Medicine of the Harvard Medical School. The university of Iowa also has its Virtual Hospital, a collection of clinical cases with radiologic images. Most major universities and medical centers have websites where information on on-going research, facilities and personnel are made available. Links to various special interest discussion groups (e.g. those developing the common image file format) are also accessible and the documents often contain further links to related fields in nuclear technology. The very nature of the hypertext transfer protocol of the World Wide Web makes it a relatively simple matter for a developer of a teaching system to include links to necessary resources. It is envisioned that an internet-based teaching module will be incorporated in some nuclear medicine training programs in the United States

  8. Clinical use of quantitative cardiac perfusion PET: rationale, modalities and possible indications. Position paper of the Cardiovascular Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciagrà, Roberto; Passeri, Alessandro; Bucerius, Jan; Verberne, Hein J; Slart, Riemer H J A; Lindner, Oliver; Gimelli, Alessia; Hyafil, Fabien; Agostini, Denis; Übleis, Christopher; Hacker, Marcus

    2016-07-01

    Until recently, PET was regarded as a luxurious way of performing myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, with excellent image quality and diagnostic capabilities that hardly justified the additional cost and procedural effort. Quantitative perfusion PET was considered a major improvement over standard qualitative imaging, because it allows the measurement of parameters not otherwise available, but for many years its use was confined to academic and research settings. In recent years, however, several factors have contributed to the renewal of interest in quantitative perfusion PET, which has become a much more readily accessible technique due to progress in hardware and the availability of dedicated and user-friendly platforms and programs. In spite of this evolution and of the growing evidence that quantitative perfusion PET can play a role in the clinical setting, there are not yet clear indications for its clinical use. Therefore, the Cardiovascular Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, starting from the experience of its members, decided to examine the current literature on quantitative perfusion PET to (1) evaluate the rationale for its clinical use, (2) identify the main methodological requirements, (3) identify the remaining technical difficulties, (4) define the most reliable interpretation criteria, and finally (5) tentatively delineate currently acceptable and possibly appropriate clinical indications. The present position paper must be considered as a starting point aiming to promote a wider use of quantitative perfusion PET and to encourage the conception and execution of the studies needed to definitely establish its role in clinical practice.

  9. Recommendations on Strengthening the Development of Nuclear Medicine in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shih-chen Wang

    2009-01-01

    @@ This paper outlines briefly the role of nuclear medicine in life sciences and health care. Molecular imaging by using isotopic tracers can noninvasively visualize the chemistry or hidden process in the cells and tissues inside the body, obtaining "functional" images to provide early information of any disease and revealing the secrets of life. The vitality of nuclear medicine is its ability to translate bench into new clinical application that can benefits the patients. Although nuclear medicine community in China has made significant achievement with a great effort since 1950s, there are many obstacles to future development. Recommended measures are proposed here in an attempt to solve our existing problems.

  10. Role of the biomedical engineer in nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llaurado, J G

    1981-01-01

    Throughout the short history of the development of radioactivity applied in the biomedical field, there have been many contributions made by engineers. With the advent of Nuclear Medicine as a well systematized specialty and its mushrooming in hospitals, the opportunities for biomedical engineers have increased. This article is written from the viewpoint of historic perspective in order to display the different aspects and situations where engineers, and particularly biomedical and clinical engineers, can participate in Nuclear Medicine. Finally, a more detailed survey is made of the activities of biomedical engineers in the nuclear medicine department.

  11. Closing the gap between theory and practice in Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: The ultimate goal for any clinical teaching program is to have students who demonstrate clinical competence. The Nuclear Medicine Technologist like any health professional should graduate from their course: attaining a defined standard of core knowledge; demonstrating appropriate behaviour for the workplace; and, achieving a predetermined level of clinical skill. In the University of Sydney Nuclear Medicine course, revisions were made to the Clinical Education assessment tools to create a more incremental approach and define competencies that required a higher level of achievement. Nuclear Medicine theory delivery was changed to create a more contextual environment where the student was better prepared for the workplace. The aim of this study is firstly to analyse the relationship between assessment of contextual theory and assessment of clinical practice. A secondary aim is to investigate any relationship between individual clinical assessment tools. Clinical assessment tools include: clinical competencies; observed clinical skills examinations (OSCE); clinical and university supervisor assessments; and assignments. Nuclear Medicine theory assessment tools include: problem oriented teamwork presentations; assignment; and written examination. Method: Correlation of the students' overall marks in the subjects' Nuclear Medicine theory and Clinical Education in the years 2000 and 2001 was undertaken using SPSS. Correlation of the students' scores in the individual clinical assessment tools: Clinical Supervisor to University supervisor; Clinical Supervisor to OSCE; and University Supervisor to OSCE, was completed for the years 2000 and 2001. Results: A statistically significant correlation was found for the students' marks in Nuclear Medicine theory and Clinical Education for the same year. The University and Clinical Supervisors' results significantly correlated for all years. Correlation between the individual assessment tools used in Clinical Education was not

  12. Current Status of The Korean Society of Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the application of nuclear medicine to clinics became generalized and it held an important position, the Korean Society of Nuclear Medicine was founded in 1961, and today it has become known as one of the oldest nuclear medicine societies not only to Asian nations but also to other advanced countries all over the world. Now it has 100 or so regular members composed of students of each medicine filed unlike other medical societies. Only nuclear medicine research workers are eligible for its membership. The Korean Society of Nuclear Medicine holds its regular general meeting and symposium twice per annom respectively in addition to occasional group gatherings and provincial lectures on nuclear medicine. With an eye to exchanging information on symposium, research and know-how, KSNM issued its initial magazine in 1967. Every year two editions are published. Year after year the contents of treatises are getting elevated with researches on each field including the early study on morphology-greatly improved both in quality and quantity. Of late, a minute and fixed quantity of various matters by dynamical research and radioimmunoassay of every kind has become visibly active. In particular, since KSNM, unlike other local societies, keeps close and frequent contact with the nuclear medicine researchers of world-wide fame, monographs by eminent scholars of the world are carried in its magazine now internationally and well received in foreign countries. Now the magazine has been improved to such an extent that foreign authors quote its contents. KSNM invited many a foreign scholar with a view to exchanging the knowledge of nuclear medicine. Sponsored by nuclear energy institute, the nuclear medicine symposium held in Seoul in October of 1966 was a success with Dr. Wagner participating, a great scholar of world wide fame: It was the first international symposium ever held in Korea, and the Korea Japan symposium held in Seoul 1971 was attended by all distinguished nuclear

  13. NCT program at Nuclear Medicine, Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Neutron Capture Therapy program at Nuclear Medicine, Inc. (NMI) is focused on obtaining Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of the treatment for malignant brain tumors. To minimize both the time and expense of the approval process, research efforts have been strictly focused and Orphan Drug sponsorship of the boron compound, Na2B12H11SH, has been obtained. The significance of Orphan Drug sponsorship and NMI's initial meeting with the FDA to discuss preclinical and clinical protocols are discussed. 9 references, 2 figures

  14. [Solid liver mass. Studies with nuclear medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez Gadea, L; Fernández Salazar, L; García Grávalos, R; Rodríguez Eyré, J L

    2000-04-01

    We present the case of a 23 year old female with two incidentally detected hepatic mass that have not clinically o radiologically specific findings. Nuclear medicine tracers, including colloids and hepatobiliary agents showing the characteristic findings of focal nodular hyperplasia: Hypervascularization, normal uptake of colloids, accumulation of hepatobiliary tracer and hot spots due to the retention of this tracer during the clearance fhase. The patient was underwent hepatectomy. The examination of surgical specimen revealed focal nodular hyperplasia. The scintigraphic studies could be an useful tool in the noninvasive diagnosis of liver masses. PMID:10893773

  15. Introduction to hardware for nuclear medicine data systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardware included in a computer-based data system for nuclear medicine imaging studies is discussed. The report is written for the newcomer to computer collection and analysis. Emphasis is placed on the effect of the various portions of the system on the final application in the nuclear medicine clinic. While an attempt is made to familiarize the user with some of the terms he will encounter, no attempt is made to make him a computer expert. 1 figure, 2 tables

  16. Role of nuclear medicine in imaging companion animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of equine nuclear medicine in Australia has been previously described in this journal and more recently, Lyall et al. provided a general overview of demographics of veterinary nuclear medicine departments in Australia. Lyall et al. discuss the main clinical applications of nuclear medicine scintigraphy in companion animals; dogs and cats. The aim of this article is to discuss in brief the applications of commonly performed nuclear medicine procedures in humans with respect to veterinary applications. More detailed discussion will also be offered for investigation of pathologies unique to veterinary nuclear medicine or which are more common in animals than humans. Companion animals are living longer today due to advances in both veterinary and human medicine. The problem is, like humans, longevity brings higher incidence of old age morbidity. As a pet owner, one might be initially motivated to extend life expectancy which is followed by the realisation that one also demands quality of life for pets. Early detection through advanced diagnostic tools, like nuclear medicine scintigraphy, allows greater efficacy in veterinary disease. There are limited veterinary nuclear medicine facilities in Australia due to cost and demand. Not surprisingly then, the growth of veterinary nuclear medicine in Australia, and overseas, has been integrally coupled to evaluation of race horses. While these facilities are generally specifically designed for race horses, racing greyhounds, lame family horses and companion animals are being investigated more frequently. In the USA, the American College of Veterinary Radiology (ACVC) is very active clinically and in research. The ACVC journal, Journal of Veterinary Radiology and Ultrasound, is published quarterly and includes a Nuclear Medicine section. Within the ACVR is the Society of Veterinary Nuclear Medicine. Proliferation of veterinary nuclear medicine centres in the USA has been associated with insurance and lifestyle changes

  17. Structure and Activities of Nuclear Medicine in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgazzar, Abdelhamid H; Owunwanne, Azuwuike; Alenezi, Saud

    2016-07-01

    The practice of nuclear medicine in Kuwait began in 1965 as a clinic for treating thyroid diseases. The practice developed gradually and until 1981 when the Faculty of Medicine established the Division of Nuclear Medicine in the Department of Radiology, which later became a separate department responsible for establishing and managing the practice in all hospitals of Kuwait. In 1987, a nuclear medicine residency program was begun and it is administered by Kuwait Institute for Medical Specializations originally as a 4-year but currently as a 5-year program. Currently there are 11 departments in the ministry of health hospitals staffed by 49 qualified attending physicians, mostly the diplomats of the Kuwait Institute for Medical Specializations nuclear medicine residency program, 4 academic physicians, 2 radiopharmacists, 2 physicists, and 130 technologists. These departments are equipped with 33 dual-head gamma cameras, 10 SPET/CT, 5 PET/CT, 2 cyclotrons, 1 breast-specific gamma imaging, 1 positron-emitting mammography, 10 thyroid uptake units, 8 technegas machines, 7 PET infusion systems, and 8 treadmills. Activities of nuclear medicine in Kuwait include education and training, clinical service, and research. Education includes nuclear medicine technology program in the Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, the 5-year residency program, medical school teaching distributed among different modules of the integrated curriculum with 14 didactic lecture, and other teaching sessions in nuclear medicine MSc program, which run concurrently with the first part of the residency program. The team of Nuclear Medicine in Kuwait has been active in research and has published more than 300 paper, 11 review articles, 12 book chapters, and 17 books in addition to 36 grants and 2 patents. A PhD program approved by Kuwait University Council would begin in 2016. PMID:27237444

  18. Course on internal dosimetry in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This documentation was distributed to the participants in the Course of Internal Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine organised by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) of Argentina and held in Buenos Aires, Argentina, August 9-13, 2004. The course was intended for people from IAEA Member States in the Latin American and Caribbean region, and for professionals and workers in medicine, related with the radiation protection. Spanish and English were the languages of the course. The following subjects were covered: radioprotection of the patient in nuclear medicine; injuries by ionizing radiations; MIRD methodology; radiation dose assessment in nuclear medicine; small scale and microdosimetry; bone and marrow dose modelling; medical internal dose calculations; SPECT and image reconstruction; principles of the gamma camera; scattering and attenuation correction in SPECT; tomography in nuclear medicine

  19. Nuclear Medicine at Charles Sturt University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A distance educational programme for upgrading of Certificate, Associate Diploma and Diploma to a Bachelor of Applied Science degree commenced in second semester of 1997 with approximately 15 Australian students and 15 Canadian students. The first graduation will occur in 1998. Formal links with the Michener Institute in Toronto have allowed Canadian students access to study resources during the course. All students entering the course are accredited or registered with their respective professional societies. The short conversion programme for those with three year diplomas includes Nuclear Medicine Physics and Instrumentation, Imaging Pathology, Clinical Neuroscience and Research Method subjects. An inaugural undergraduate degree programme in Nuclear Medicine Technology commences in first semester of 1998 on the Riverina Campus at Wagga Wagga. An intake of 15 students is anticipated. This small group of rural based students will have the benefits of international expertise. The programme has a strong clinical practice component including time on campus to supplement the practicum in departments. Physiology studies continue through to third year to complement the professional subjects. Active participation is solicited from those departments involved with aspects of the practicum well before students are placed. A fully functional teaching laboratory has been constructed containing a well equipped radiopharmacy, gamma camera room and computer laboratory using modern applications software to provide the students with a solid background in their chosen field

  20. Nuclear Medicine at Charles Sturt University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swan, H. [Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, NSW (Australia); Sinclair, P. [Charles Sturt University, Dubbo, NSW (Australia); Scollard, D. [Michener Institute, Toronto (Canada)

    1998-06-01

    Full text: A distance educational programme for upgrading of Certificate, Associate Diploma and Diploma to a Bachelor of Applied Science degree commenced in second semester of 1997 with approximately 15 Australian students and 15 Canadian students. The first graduation will occur in 1998. Formal links with the Michener Institute in Toronto have allowed Canadian students access to study resources during the course. All students entering the course are accredited or registered with their respective professional societies. The short conversion programme for those with three year diplomas includes Nuclear Medicine Physics and Instrumentation, Imaging Pathology, Clinical Neuroscience and Research Method subjects. An inaugural undergraduate degree programme in Nuclear Medicine Technology commences in first semester of 1998 on the Riverina Campus at Wagga Wagga. An intake of 15 students is anticipated. This small group of rural based students will have the benefits of international expertise. The programme has a strong clinical practice component including time on campus to supplement the practicum in departments. Physiology studies continue through to third year to complement the professional subjects. Active participation is solicited from those departments involved with aspects of the practicum well before students are placed. A fully functional teaching laboratory has been constructed containing a well equipped radiopharmacy, gamma camera room and computer laboratory using modern applications software to provide the students with a solid background in their chosen field

  1. Experience with Nuclear Medicine Information System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilge Volkan-Salanci

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Radiology information system (RIS is basically evolved for the need of radiologists and ignores the vital steps needed for a proper work flow of Nuclear Medicine Department. Moreover, CT/MRI oriented classical PACS systems are far from satisfying Nuclear Physicians like storing dynamic data for reprocessing and quantitative analysis of colored images. Our purpose was to develop a workflow based Nuclear Medicine Information System (NMIS that fulfills the needs of Nuclear Medicine Department and its integration to hospital PACS system. Material and Methods: Workflow in NMIS uses HL7 (health level seven and steps include, patient scheduling and retrieving information from HIS (hospital information system, radiopharmacy, acquisition, digital reporting and approval of the reports using Nuclear Medicine specific diagnostic codes. Images and dynamic data from cameras of are sent to and retrieved from PACS system (Corttex© for reprocessing and quantitative analysis. Results: NMIS has additional functions to the RIS such as radiopharmaceutical management program which includes stock recording of both radioactive and non-radioactive substances, calculation of the radiopharmaceutical dose for individual patient according to body weight and maximum permissible activity, and calculation of radioactivity left per unit volume for each radionuclide according their half lives. Patient scheduling and gamma camera patient work list settings were arranged according to specific Nuclear Medicine procedures. Nuclear Medicine images and reports can be retrieved and viewed from HIS. Conclusion: NMIS provides functionality to standard RIS and PACS system according to the needs of Nuclear Medicine. (MIRT 2012;21:97-102

  2. Emerging applications of radioisotopes in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in the domain of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals has been very noteworthy over the past decade and played a major role in enhancing the Nuclear Medicine practice. A number of them have been employed in the day to day clinical practice and have benefited a large number of patients. For the purpose of systematic discussion, we shall classify into two major heads A. Recent advances in clinical applications of traditional radiotracers. B. Newer Radiopharmaceuticals and their applications. The latter could be further subdivided in to the following: (a) Diagnostic (includes i. PET radiopharmaceuticals and ii. Non-PET radiopharmaceuticals for conventional gamma camera imaging) and (b) Therapeutic advances. In the present communication, we shall explore the major developments emphasizing the country perspective

  3. Tomography in nuclear medicine. Proceedings of an international symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is currently being used universally in clinical practice, while positron emission tomography (PET), originally developed as a technique for research, has also gradually moved from the research laboratory to the clinical environment. However, there are significant differences in nuclear medicine capabilities, especially in tomography, between developed and developing countries. The present status and future prospects of nuclear medicine tomography were the main topics of discussion at this latest international symposium, organized by the IAEA in co-operation with the World Health Organization and held in Vienna from 21 to 25 August 1995. The purpose of the meeting was to share experience and information on new developments and clinical applications of two promising tomographic techniques: SPECT and PET. Eight invited papers and 34 regular papers from 23 countries were presented. In addition, there was a panel discussion on the future and direction of tomography in nuclear medicine for developing countries. Refs, figs, tabs

  4. Clinical trials and gender medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariarita Cassese

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Women use more medicines than men because they fall ill more often and suffer more from chronic diseases, but also because women pay more attention to their health and have more consciousness and care about themselves. Although medicines can have different effects on women and men, women still represent a small percentage in the first phases of trials (22% which are essential to verify drugs dosage, side effects, and safety. Even though women are more present in trials, studies results are not presented with a gender approach. This situation is due to educational, social, ethical and economical factors. The scientific research must increase feminine presence in clinical trials in order to be equal and correct, and all the key stakeholder should be involved in this process. We still have a long way to cover and it doesn't concern only women but also children and old people. The aim is to have a medicine not only illness-focused but patient-focused: a medicine able to take into consideration all the patient characteristics and so to produce a really personalized therapy. What above described is part of the reasons why in 2005 was founded the National Observatory for Women's Health (Osservatorio Nazionale sulla Salute della Donna, ONDa which promotes a gender health awareness and culture in Italy, at all the levels of the civil and scientific society.

  5. E-learning for Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The E-Learning in Nuclear Medicine was developed by the Asian School of Nuclear Medicine (ASNM) through the TC regional project, RAS/0/047 to respond to the need for continuing education of physicians, technologists and other allied professionals working in Nuclear Medicine. ASNM is the collaborating member of the Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT) and is involved in some educational activities of the IAEA. Ten various cases on different types of organ-system were collected from nine member countries (Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Japan, Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippines, and Thailand). About 100 cases covered the following organ-systems: Oncology, Cardiology, Neurology, Gastroenterology/Hepatobiliary, Pulmonary, Endocrinology, Pediatrics, Nephrology/Urology, Infection, Muskulo-skeletal, Ophthalmology. Radiotherapy, dosimetry and nuclear medicine diagnostic techniques including PET and SPECT as well as labelling of tracer and application of radiopharmals are covered in the training modules

  6. IAEA support to medical physics in nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghzifene, Ahmed; Sgouros, George

    2013-05-01

    Through its programmatic efforts and its publications, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has helped define the role and responsibilities of the nuclear medicine physicist in the practice of nuclear medicine. This paper describes the initiatives that the IAEA has undertaken to support medical physics in nuclear medicine. In 1984, the IAEA provided guidance on how to ensure that the equipment used for detecting, imaging, and quantifying radioactivity is functioning properly (Technical Document [TECDOC]-137, "Quality Control of Nuclear Medicine Instruments"). An updated version of IAEA-TECDOC-137 was issued in 1991 as IAEA-TECDOC-602, and this included new chapters on scanner-computer systems and single-photon emission computed tomography systems. Nuclear medicine physics was introduced as a part of a project on radiation imaging and radioactivity measurements in the 2002-2003 IAEA biennium program in Dosimetry and Medical Radiation Physics. Ten years later, IAEA activities in this field have expanded to cover quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) of nuclear medicine equipment, education and clinical training, professional recognition of the role of medical physicists in nuclear medicine physics, and finally, the coordination of research and development activities in internal dosimetry. As a result of these activities, the IAEA has received numerous requests to support the development and implementation of QA or QC programs for radioactivity measurements in nuclear medicine in many Member States. During the last 5 years, support was provided to 20 Member States through the IAEA's technical cooperation programme. The IAEA has also supported education and clinical training of medical physicists. This type of support has been essential for the development and expansion of the Medical Physics profession, especially in low- and middle-income countries. The need for basic as well as specialized clinical training in medical physics was identified as a

  7. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teresinska, Anna [Institute of Cardiology, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warsaw (Poland); Birkenfeld, Bozena [Pomeranian Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Szczecin (Poland); Krolicki, Leszek [Warsaw Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warsaw (Poland); Dziuk, Miroslaw [Military Institute of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-10-15

    In Poland, nuclear medicine (NM) has been an independent specialty since 1988. At the end of 2013, the syllabus for postgraduate specialization in NM has been modified to be in close accordance with the syllabus approved by the European Union of Medical Specialists and is expected to be enforced before the end of 2014. The National Consultant in Nuclear Medicine is responsible for the specialization program in NM. The Medical Center of Postgraduate Training is the administrative body which accepts the specialization programs, supervises the training, organizes the examinations, and awards the specialist title. Specialization in NM for physicians lasts for five years. It consists of 36 months of training in a native nuclear medicine department, 12 months of internship in radiology, 3 months in cardiology, 3 months in endocrinology, 3 months in oncology, and 3 months in two other departments of NM. If a NM trainee is a specialist of a clinical discipline and/or is after a long residency in NM departments, the specialization in NM can be shortened to three years. During the training, there are obligatory courses to be attended which include the elements of anatomy imaging in USG, CT, and MR. Currently, there are about 170 active NM specialists working for 38.5 million inhabitants in Poland. For other professionals working in NM departments, it is possible to get the title of a medical physics specialist after completing 3.5 years of training (for those with a master's in physics, technical physics or biomedical engineering) or the title of a radiopharmacy specialist after completing 3 years of training (for those with a master's in chemistry or biology). At present, the specialization program in NM for nurses is being developed by the Medical Centre of Postgraduate Education. Continuing education and professional development are obligatory for all physicians and governed by the Polish Medical Chamber. The Polish Society of Nuclear Medicine (PTMN) organizes

  8. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Poland, nuclear medicine (NM) has been an independent specialty since 1988. At the end of 2013, the syllabus for postgraduate specialization in NM has been modified to be in close accordance with the syllabus approved by the European Union of Medical Specialists and is expected to be enforced before the end of 2014. The National Consultant in Nuclear Medicine is responsible for the specialization program in NM. The Medical Center of Postgraduate Training is the administrative body which accepts the specialization programs, supervises the training, organizes the examinations, and awards the specialist title. Specialization in NM for physicians lasts for five years. It consists of 36 months of training in a native nuclear medicine department, 12 months of internship in radiology, 3 months in cardiology, 3 months in endocrinology, 3 months in oncology, and 3 months in two other departments of NM. If a NM trainee is a specialist of a clinical discipline and/or is after a long residency in NM departments, the specialization in NM can be shortened to three years. During the training, there are obligatory courses to be attended which include the elements of anatomy imaging in USG, CT, and MR. Currently, there are about 170 active NM specialists working for 38.5 million inhabitants in Poland. For other professionals working in NM departments, it is possible to get the title of a medical physics specialist after completing 3.5 years of training (for those with a master's in physics, technical physics or biomedical engineering) or the title of a radiopharmacy specialist after completing 3 years of training (for those with a master's in chemistry or biology). At present, the specialization program in NM for nurses is being developed by the Medical Centre of Postgraduate Education. Continuing education and professional development are obligatory for all physicians and governed by the Polish Medical Chamber. The Polish Society of Nuclear Medicine (PTMN) organizes regular

  9. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teresińska, Anna; Birkenfeld, Bożena; Królicki, Leszek; Dziuk, Mirosław

    2014-10-01

    In Poland, nuclear medicine (NM) has been an independent specialty since 1988. At the end of 2013, the syllabus for postgraduate specialization in NM has been modified to be in close accordance with the syllabus approved by the European Union of Medical Specialists and is expected to be enforced before the end of 2014. The National Consultant in Nuclear Medicine is responsible for the specialization program in NM. The Medical Center of Postgraduate Training is the administrative body which accepts the specialization programs, supervises the training, organizes the examinations, and awards the specialist title. Specialization in NM for physicians lasts for five years. It consists of 36 months of training in a native nuclear medicine department, 12 months of internship in radiology, 3 months in cardiology, 3 months in endocrinology, 3 months in oncology, and 3 months in two other departments of NM. If a NM trainee is a specialist of a clinical discipline and/or is after a long residency in NM departments, the specialization in NM can be shortened to three years. During the training, there are obligatory courses to be attended which include the elements of anatomy imaging in USG, CT, and MR. Currently, there are about 170 active NM specialists working for 38.5 million inhabitants in Poland. For other professionals working in NM departments, it is possible to get the title of a medical physics specialist after completing 3.5 years of training (for those with a master's in physics, technical physics or biomedical engineering) or the title of a radiopharmacy specialist after completing 3 years of training (for those with a master's in chemistry or biology). At present, the specialization program in NM for nurses is being developed by the Medical Centre of Postgraduate Education. Continuing education and professional development are obligatory for all physicians and governed by the Polish Medical Chamber. The Polish Society of Nuclear Medicine (PTMN) organizes regular

  10. Nuclear medicine training and practice in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teresińska, Anna; Birkenfeld, Bożena; Królicki, Leszek; Dziuk, Mirosław

    2014-10-01

    In Poland, nuclear medicine (NM) has been an independent specialty since 1988. At the end of 2013, the syllabus for postgraduate specialization in NM has been modified to be in close accordance with the syllabus approved by the European Union of Medical Specialists and is expected to be enforced before the end of 2014. The National Consultant in Nuclear Medicine is responsible for the specialization program in NM. The Medical Center of Postgraduate Training is the administrative body which accepts the specialization programs, supervises the training, organizes the examinations, and awards the specialist title. Specialization in NM for physicians lasts for five years. It consists of 36 months of training in a native nuclear medicine department, 12 months of internship in radiology, 3 months in cardiology, 3 months in endocrinology, 3 months in oncology, and 3 months in two other departments of NM. If a NM trainee is a specialist of a clinical discipline and/or is after a long residency in NM departments, the specialization in NM can be shortened to three years. During the training, there are obligatory courses to be attended which include the elements of anatomy imaging in USG, CT, and MR. Currently, there are about 170 active NM specialists working for 38.5 million inhabitants in Poland. For other professionals working in NM departments, it is possible to get the title of a medical physics specialist after completing 3.5 years of training (for those with a master's in physics, technical physics or biomedical engineering) or the title of a radiopharmacy specialist after completing 3 years of training (for those with a master's in chemistry or biology). At present, the specialization program in NM for nurses is being developed by the Medical Centre of Postgraduate Education. Continuing education and professional development are obligatory for all physicians and governed by the Polish Medical Chamber. The Polish Society of Nuclear Medicine (PTMN) organizes regular

  11. Maintenance of nuclear medicine instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maintenance of instruments is generally of two kinds: (a) corrective maintenance, on a non-scheduled basis, to restore equipment to a functional status by repairs; (b) preventive maintenance, to keep equipment in a specified functional condition by providing systematic inspection, quality control, detection and correction of early malfunctions. Most of the instruments used in nuclear medicine are rather complex systems built from mechanical, electrical and electronic parts. Any one of these components is liable to fail at some time or other. Repair could be done only by a specialist who is able to evaluate the condition of the various parts ranging from cables to connectors, from scintillators to photomultipliers, from microprocessors to microswitches. The knowledge of the intricacies of the various electronic components required for their repairs is quite wide and varied. The electronics industry turns out more and more multi-purpose chips which can carry out the functions of many parts used in the instruments of the earlier generation. This provides protection against unauthorized copying of the circuits but it serves another purpose as well of inhibiting repairs by non-factory personnel. These trends of the instrument design should be taken into consideration when a policy has to be developed for the repairs of the hospital based equipment

  12. Quality control of nuclear medicine instruments 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document gives detailed guidance on the quality control of various instruments used in nuclear medicine. A first preliminary document was drawn up in 1979. A revised and extended version, incorporating recommended procedures, test schedules and protocols was prepared in 1982. The first edition of ''Quality Control of Nuclear Medicine Instruments'', IAEA-TECDOC-317, was printed in late 1984. Recent advances in the field of nuclear medicine imaging made it necessary to add a chapter on Camera-Computer Systems and another on SPECT Systems. Figs and tabs

  13. Physics and radiobiology of nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Gopal B

    2010-01-01

    From a distinguished author comes this new edition for technologists, practitioners, residents, and students in radiology and nuclear medicine. Encompassing major topics in nuclear medicine from the basic physics of radioactive decay to instrumentation and radiobiology, it is an ideal review for Board and Registry examinations. The material is well organized and written with clarity. The book is supplemented with tables and illustrations throughout. It provides a quick reference book that is concise but comprehensive, and offers a complete discussion of topics for the nuclear medicine and radi

  14. Quality control of nuclear medicine instruments, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document gives detailed guidance on the quality control of various instruments used in nuclear medicine. A first preliminary document was drawn up in 1979. A revised and extended version, incorporating recommended procedures, test schedules and protocols was prepared in 1982. The first edition of 'Quality Control of Nuclear Medicine Instruments', IAEA-TECDOC-317, was printed in late 1984. Recent advances in the field of nuclear medicine imaging made it necessary to add a chapter on Camera-Computer Systems and another on SPECT Systems

  15. Diagnostic nuclear medicine. 2. rev. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiepers, C. (ed.) [UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, (United States). Dept. of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology

    2006-07-01

    The field of nuclear medicine is undergoing rapid expansion, and is evolving into diagnostic molecular imaging. During recent years, dual-modality imaging with PET/CT has gained acceptance and this is currently the fastest-growing technique for oncological imaging applications. The glucose analogue FDG has held its place in diagnostic oncology, assessment of myocardial viability and diagnosis of neuro-degenerative disorders. Peptides have become even more important as imaging agents. The accuracy of hepatobiliary scintigraphy has been enhanced by cholecystokinin. The use of ACE inhibitors in the evaluation of renovascular hypertension has become the standard in renography. New instrumentation has led to faster scanners, and computer development to better image processing software. Automatic processing is more common, and standardization of protocols can be accomplished easily. The field of gene imaging has progressed, although routine clinical applications are not yet available. The present text, supplemented with many detailed and informative illustrations, represents an adjunct to the standard knowledge of diagnostic nuclear medicine and provides both the student and the professional with an overview of developments during the past decade. (orig.)

  16. Radiation dose assessment in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclides are used in nuclear medicine in a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Recently, interest has grown in therapeutic agents for a number of applications in nuclear medicine. Internal dose models and methods have been in use for many years, are well established and can give radiation doses to stylized models representing reference individuals. Kinetic analyses need to be carefully planned, and dose conversion factors should be chosen that are most similar to the subject in question and that can then be tailored to be more patient specific. Such calculations, however, are currently not relevant in patient management in internal emitter therapy, as they are not sufficiently accurate or detailed to guide clinical decision making. Great strides are being made at many centres regarding the use of patient image data to construct individualized voxel based models for more detailed and patient specific dose calculations.These recent advances make it likely that the relevance will soon change to be more similar to that of external beam treatment planning. (author)

  17. Nuclear medicine applications: Summary of Panel 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine is currently facing a desperate shortage of organic and inorganic chemists and nuclear pharmacists who also have advanced training in nuclear and radiochemistry. Ironically, this shortfall is occurring in the face of rapid growth and technological advances which have made the practice of nuclear medicine an integral part of the modern health care system. This shortage threatens to limit the availability of radiopharmaceuticals required in routine hospital procedures and to impede the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic agents. To redress this need and prevent a similar shortfall in the future, this panel recommends immediate action and a long-term commitment to the following: educating the public on the benefits of nuclear medicine; informing undergraduate and graduate chemistry students about career opportunities in nuclear medicine; offering upper level courses in nuclear and radiochemistry (including laboratory) in universities; establishing training centers and fellowships at the postgraduate level for specialized education in the aspects of nuclear and radiochemistry required by the nuclear medicine profession. 1 tab

  18. VIIth international symposium on nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference proceedings contain abstracts of 100 presented papers, mainly dealing with radioimmunoassays, radiopharmaceuticals, scintiscanning, computer tomography, radionuclide lymphography, ventriculography, angiography, nuclear cardiology, liquid scintillator techniques, radioisotope generators, radiospirometry and various uses of labelled compounds and tracer techniques in nuclear medicine. (M.D.)

  19. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Holistic Adolescent Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The holistic medical approach seems to be efficient and can also be used in adolescent medicine. Supporting the teenager to grow and develop is extremely important in order to prevent many of the problems they can carry into adulthood. The simple consciousness-based, holistic medicine — giving love, winning trust, giving holding, and getting permission to help the patient feel, understand, and let go of negative beliefs — is easy for the physician interested in this kind of practice and it requires little previous training for the physician to be able to care for his/her patient. A deeper insight into the principles of holistic treatment and a thorough understanding of our fellow human beings are making it work even better. Holistic medicine is not a miracle cure, but rather a means by which the empathic physician can support the patient in improving his/her future life in respect to quality of life, health, and functional capacity — through coaching the patient to work on him/herself in a hard and disciplined manner. When the patient is young, this work is so much easier. During our lifetime, we have several emotional traumas arranged in the subconscious mind with the smallest at the top, and it is normal for the person to work on a large number of traumatic events that have been processed to varying degrees. Some traumas have been acknowledged, some are still being explored by the person, and yet others are still preconscious, which can be seen for example in the form of muscle tension. Sometimes the young dysfunctional patient carries severe traumas of a violent or sexual nature, but the physician skilled in the holistic medical toolbox can help the patient on his/her way to an excellent quality of life, full self-expression, a love and sex life, and a realization of his/her talents — all that a young patient is typically dreaming about. Biomedicine is not necessary or even recommended when the physical or mental symptoms are caused

  20. Dynamic functional studies in nuclear medicine in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Proceedings document some of the trials and tribulations involved in setting up nuclear medicine facilities in general and specifically as regards nuclear medicine applications for the diagnosis of the diseases prevalent in the less developed countries. Most of the 51 papers deal with various clinical applications of dynamic functional studies. However, there was also a session on quality control of the equipment used, and a panel discussion critically looked at the problems and potential of dynamic studies in developing countries. This book will be of interest and use not only to those practising nuclear medicine in the developing countries, but it may also bring home to users in developed countries how ''more can be done with less''. Refs, figs and tabs

  1. Management of radioactive waste generated in nuclear medicine; Gestion de los residuos radiactivos generados en medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz Perez, P.

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear medicine is a clinical specialty in which radioactive material is used in non-encapsulated form, for the diagnosis and treatment of patients. Nuclear medicine involves administering to a patient a radioactive substance, usually liquid, both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. This process generates solid radioactive waste (syringes, vials, gloves) and liquid (mainly the patient's urine). (Author)

  2. Quality control of nuclear medicine equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to determine functional status and integrity of installations and equipment used in nuclear medicine in everyday medical practice or in research studies, it is important to maintain and implement quality control program. For this type of installation are required high standards, particularly with regard to qualitative and quantitative analysis of the image, and volume measurements in diagnosis and dosimetry. Given the precarious situation of the economy in transition, nuclear medicine departments in the republic, now, can not be always of service contracts with providers of facilities and equipment for routine maintenance and periodic calibration. Therefore, in this article are at some of the quality control procedures should be performed usually by engineers and physicists from the department of nuclear medicine. (authors)

  3. Nuclear medicine with its interdependencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newly developed nuclear methods and measuring techniques in the diagnosis and therapy of diseases of the blood, heart, vessels, thyroid, gastrointestinal tract, kidneys, skeleton and ophthalmological diseases are described. Occupational radiation exposure is briefly discussed. (AJ)

  4. Graduate Program Organization in Clinical Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Graduate training in clinical veterinary medicine is discussed. The options available to the student and problems that must be dealt with are presented, along with the requirements to accomplish a finely structured program that satisfies the needs of both the trainee and clinical veterinary medicine. (Author/MLW)

  5. Basic requirements of nuclear medicine services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technological progress in nuclear medicine continues, not always to the immediate advantage of the developing world. The capital expense, operational demands and maintenance requirements of ever more complex equipment, the consequent need for highly trained staff, the necessity to assure regular supplies of costly radioactive materials, all present problems to which compromise or alternative solutions must often be sought. This chapter constitutes an attempt to define the basic requirements for thr practice of nuclear medicine with respect to staff, equipment, accommodation, supplies and supporting services with particular reference to the needs of institutions in developing countries

  6. Training and education in nuclear medicine at the Medical Faculty of the University of Zagreb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Training for specialization in nuclear medicine in Yugoslavia includes 12 months of training in departments of clinical medicine and 24 months of training in departments of nuclear medicine. Since 1974 many physicians have passed the specialist examination in Zagreb. A postgraduate study in nuclear medicine began at the Medical Faculty of the University of Zagreb in 1979. It includes four semesters of courses and research on a selected subject leading to the degree of Magister (Master of Science). Most of the training is conducted by the Institute of Nuclear Medicine at the University Hospital, Rebro, in Zagreb, which has the necessary teaching staff, equipment and space. Forty-four students have completed this postgraduate study. Nuclear medicine in a developing country faces several problems. Scarcity of expensive equipment and radiopharmaceuticals calls for modifications of methods, home made products and instrument maintenance. These, mostly economic, factors are given special emphasis during training. Nuclear power generation may solve some of the country's energy problems; therefore, specialists in nuclear medicine must obtain additional knowledge about the medical care and treatment of persons who might be subject to irradiation and contamination in nuclear power plants. Lower economic resources in developing countries require better trained personnel, stressing the need for organized training and education in nuclear medicine. With some support the Institute of Nuclear Medicine will be able to offer various forms of training and education in nuclear medicine for physicians, chemists, physicists, technologists and other personnel from developing countries. (author)

  7. Training of nuclear medicine technical staff by the Brazilian Society of Nuclear Medicine and Biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Nuclear medicine was introduced in Brazil in 1949, at the University of Sao Paulo. Despite being a pioneer in South America and the existence of about 280 clinics of this medical specialty in the whole country serving around 185 million inhabitants, there is not any dedicated course forming its technical staff. Another shortcoming lies in the fact that there are not any basic requirements established for these professionals by an official medical or nuclear entity. As result, one can find persons ranging from university graduates (biomedics, radiology technologists, biologists, pharmacists, chemists, physicists, etc.) to secondary school graduates or radiology technicians working in nuclear medicine centres, preparing patients, labelling and injecting radiopharmaceuticals, obtaining images and processing studies. Due to the high heterogeneity of the technical staff and lack of a formal preparation, the Brazilian Society of Nuclear Medicine and Biology (SBBMN) organized during 2004 and 2005 short courses conducted in different regions of Brazil in order to supply organized basic knowledge and practice on: 1. Quality control of 99Mo-99mTc eluates and labelling and checking of dose calibrators 2. Fundamentals of radiation protection, area monitoring and decontamination 3. Quality control of scintillation cameras. Six courses were given during these two years in four cities in the South Eastern region and two in the North Eastern region. The first two topics were delivered during one weekend and the participants were presented with a lecture in the morning and, in the afternoon, a hands-on practice on the same subject. As QC of eluates and labelling and checking of dose calibrators were less practised in most clinics, this was the first time that the majority of the participants performed these activities. In one course, offered during a national congress, all three topics were included and the practical part was replaced by many examples from routine

  8. A literature review of the cost-effectiveness of nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine is a medical speciality that uses tiny quantities of radioactivity to produce diagnostic images. It also has a role in therapy for some thyroid diseases and certain tumours. Surveys have shown that nuclear medicine procedures are used significantly less in the UK than in many other countries in Europe. One reason may be that there is inadequate information about the clinical utility of these techniques, particularly their cost-effectiveness in clinical management. To establish what evidence was currently available about the cost-effectiveness of nuclear medicine, the British Nuclear Medicine Society commissioned a worldwide literature review in diseases of the heart, kidney, lung, bone, brain, bowel and thyroid. This volume summarises the findings of the independent study and gives details of the background, clinical utility and limitations of the different nuclear medicine procedures used in the diagnosis and treatment of each disease reviewed. (author)

  9. Neuroimaging in nuclear medicine: drug addicted brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Yong-An; Kim, Dae-Jin [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-15

    Addiction to illicit drugs in one of today's most important social issues. Most addictive drugs lead to irreversible parenchymal changes in the human brain. Neuroimaging data bring to light the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of the abused drugs, and demonstrate that addiction is a disease of the brain. Continuous researches better illustrate the neurochemical alterations in brain function, and attempt to discover the links to consequent behavioral changes. Newer hypotheses and theories follow the numerous results, and more rational methods of approaching therapy are being developed. Substance abuse is on the rise in Korea, and social interest in the matter as well. On the other hand, diagnosis and treatment of drug addiction is still very difficult, because how the abused substance acts in the brain, or how it leads to behavioral problems in not widely known. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of drug addiction can improve the process of diagnosing addict patients, planning therapy, and predicting the prognosis . Neuroimaging approaches by nuclear medicine methods are expected to objectively judge behavioral and neurochemical changes, and response to treatment. In addition, as genes associated with addictive behavior are discovered, functional nuclear medicine images will aid in the assessment of individuals. Reviewing published literature on neuroimaging regarding nuclear medicine is expected to be of assistance to the management of drug addict patients. What's more, means of applying nuclear medicine to the care of drug addict patients should be investigated further.

  10. The positron camera in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography is making headway in health care delivery. With improvements in instrumentation and physiologic tracers and with the development of hospital-based compact cyclotrons, 'physiopathologic tomography' is around the corner in nuclear medicine. This paper is a brief review of positron emission tomography: instrumentation and applications

  11. VIIIth international symposium on nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference proceedings contain 92 abstracts of submitted papers dealing with various applications of radioisotopes in diagnosis and therapy. The papers were devoted to scintiscanning, radioimmunoassay, tomography, the applications of nuclear magnetic resonance and electron microscopy in different branches - oncology, cardiology, neurology, histology, gynecology, internal medicine, etc. (M.D.)

  12. Collaborative environment for nuclear medicine training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To validate the proposal for development of a virtual collaborative environment for training of nuclear medicine personnel. Materials and Methods: Organizational assumptions, constraints and functionalities that should be offered to the professionals in this field were raised early in the development of the environment. The prototype was developed in the Moodle environment, including data storage and interaction functionalities. A pilot interaction study was developed with a sample of specialists in nuclear medicine. Users' opinions collected by means of semi-structured questionnaire were submitted to quantitative and content analysis. Results: The proposal of a collaborative environment was validated by a learning courses of nuclear medicine professionals and considered as an aid in the training in this field. Suggestions for improvements and new functionalities were made. There is a need to establish a program for education of moderators specifically for this environment, considering the different interaction characteristics as the online and conventional teaching methods are compared. Conclusion: The collaborative environment will allow the exchange of experiences and case discussions among professionals from institutions located in different regions all over the country, enhancing the collaboration among them. Thus, the environment can contribute in the early and continued education of nuclear medicine professionals. (author)

  13. Neuroimaging in nuclear medicine: drug addicted brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addiction to illicit drugs in one of today's most important social issues. Most addictive drugs lead to irreversible parenchymal changes in the human brain. Neuroimaging data bring to light the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of the abused drugs, and demonstrate that addiction is a disease of the brain. Continuous researches better illustrate the neurochemical alterations in brain function, and attempt to discover the links to consequent behavioral changes. Newer hypotheses and theories follow the numerous results, and more rational methods of approaching therapy are being developed. Substance abuse is on the rise in Korea, and social interest in the matter as well. On the other hand, diagnosis and treatment of drug addiction is still very difficult, because how the abused substance acts in the brain, or how it leads to behavioral problems in not widely known. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of drug addiction can improve the process of diagnosing addict patients, planning therapy, and predicting the prognosis . Neuroimaging approaches by nuclear medicine methods are expected to objectively judge behavioral and neurochemical changes, and response to treatment. In addition, as genes associated with addictive behavior are discovered, functional nuclear medicine images will aid in the assessment of individuals. Reviewing published literature on neuroimaging regarding nuclear medicine is expected to be of assistance to the management of drug addict patients. What's more, means of applying nuclear medicine to the care of drug addict patients should be investigated further

  14. Abstracts of the European nuclear medicine congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    647 abstracts of oral and poster presentations show the results of applied science and research work in diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine. Experiences with new diagnostic techniques, radiopharmaceuticals and instrumentation (e.g. radioimmunoscintigraphy, different dynamic organ function studies) in the fields of cardiology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, hematology, nephrology, oncology, and pediatrics are published as well as dosimetry problems. (TRV)

  15. Collaborative environment for nuclear medicine training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brambilla, Claudia Regio; Dalpiaz, Gabriel Goulart; Giraffa, Lucia Maria, E-mail: claudinharb@gmail.co [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Silva, Ana Maria Marques da [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Silva Junior, Neivo da [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (HSL-PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Hospital Sao Lucas; Ferreto, Tiago Coelho; Rose, Cesar Augusto Fonticielha de [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Informatica; Silva, Vinicius Duval da [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (FAMED/PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Escola de Medicina. Dept. de Patologia e Radiacoes

    2011-05-15

    Objective: To validate the proposal for development of a virtual collaborative environment for training of nuclear medicine personnel. Materials and Methods: Organizational assumptions, constraints and functionalities that should be offered to the professionals in this field were raised early in the development of the environment. The prototype was developed in the Moodle environment, including data storage and interaction functionalities. A pilot interaction study was developed with a sample of specialists in nuclear medicine. Users' opinions collected by means of semi-structured questionnaire were submitted to quantitative and content analysis. Results: The proposal of a collaborative environment was validated by a learning courses of nuclear medicine professionals and considered as an aid in the training in this field. Suggestions for improvements and new functionalities were made. There is a need to establish a program for education of moderators specifically for this environment, considering the different interaction characteristics as the online and conventional teaching methods are compared. Conclusion: The collaborative environment will allow the exchange of experiences and case discussions among professionals from institutions located in different regions all over the country, enhancing the collaboration among them. Thus, the environment can contribute in the early and continued education of nuclear medicine professionals. (author)

  16. Traumatic Brain Injury: Nuclear Medicine Neuroimaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sánchez-Catasús, Carlos A; Vállez Garcia, David; Le Riverend Morales, Eloísa; Galvizu Sánchez, Reinaldo; Dierckx, Rudi; Dierckx, Rudi AJO; Otte, Andreas; de Vries, Erik FJ; van Waarde, Aren; Leenders, Klaus L

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides an up-to-date review of nuclear medicine neuroimaging in traumatic brain injury (TBI). 18F-FDG PET will remain a valuable tool in researching complex mechanisms associated with early metabolic dysfunction in TBI. Although evidence-based imaging studies are needed, 18F-FDG PET i

  17. A sports medicine clinic in the community.

    OpenAIRE

    Davison, J.; Ryan, M. P.

    1988-01-01

    We report the attempt to set up a mini sports medicine clinic in a health centre resourced by a Department of Community Medicine. The type of problems seen are similar to those reported by other clinics. On the results of this pilot project, we believe it would be possible to establish similar clinics in health centres elsewhere in the United Kingdom. The National Health Service resources required are minimal, but the benefits to local communities are considerable.

  18. Radionuclides for nuclear medicine: a nuclear physicists' view

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantone, M.; Haddad, F.; Harissopoulos, S.;

    2013-01-01

    NuPECC (the Nuclear Physics European Collaboration Committee, an expert committee of the European Science Foundation) has the mission to strengthen European Collaboration in nuclear science through the promotion of nuclear physics and its trans-disciplinary use and application. NuPECC is currently...... working on a report on “Nuclear Physics for Medicine” and has set up a working group to review the present status and prospects of radionuclides for nuclear medicine. An interim report will be presented to seek comments and constructive input from EANM members. In particular it is investigated how nuclear...... physics Methods and nuclear physics facilities are supporting the development and supply of medical radionuclides and how this support could be further strengthened in future. Aspects that will be addressed: •In recent years, the reactor-based supply chain of 99Mo/99mTc generators was repeatedly...

  19. [Nuclear medicine for evaluation of liver functions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K

    1994-05-01

    The clinical usefulness of colloid liver scintigraphy to detect space occupying lesions in the liver has been reduced by X-ray CT and ultrasonography. However, scintigraphic examinations have potentials for characteristic diagnosis of liver tumors, such as 99mTc RBC SPECT for hepatic hemangioma, 99mTc PMT for positive imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma and its extrahepatic metastasis, and radioimmunoscintigraphy for metastatic tumors. Moreover, prediction of the prognosis and monitoring therapeutic effect to liver cancer can be made by the use of nuclear medicine techniques. Recently, 99mTc galactosyl serum albumin (GSA), a newly developed radiotracer to evaluate hepatocyte function, has become commercially available. Quantitative parameters of liver functions can be obtained by analysis of time-activity curve in blood and liver after 99mTc-GSA administration. In several cases, 99mTc-GSA study showed intrahepatic unevenness of function, which could not be depicted by other imaging examinations. Positron emission tomography (PET) with 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy glucose (FDG) is useful to detect malignant tumors in the liver. Since PET can provide absolutely quantitative data in better resolution, it is expected that regional true metabolic functions in the liver may be able to be quantitatively evaluated with PET in near future. PMID:8028225

  20. Computer Generated Cardiac Model For Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, John F.; Miller, Tom R.

    1981-07-01

    A computer generated mathematical model of a thallium-201 myocardial image is described which is based on realistic geometric and physiological assumptions. The left ventricle is represented by an ellipsoid truncated by aortic and mitral valve planes. Initially, an image of a motionless left ventricle is calculated with the location, size, and relative activity of perfusion defects selected by the designer. The calculation includes corrections for photon attenuation by overlying structures and the relative distribution of activity within the tissues. Motion of the ventricular walls is simulated either by a weighted sum of images at different stages in the cardiac cycle or by a blurring function whose width varies with position. Camera and collimator blurring are estimated by the MTF of the system measured at a representative depth in a phantom. Statistical noise is added using a Poisson random number generator. The usefulness of this model is due to two factors: the a priori characterization of location and extent of perfusion defects and the strong visual similarity of the images to actual clinical studies. These properties should permit systematic evaluation of image processing algorithms using this model. The principles employed in developing this cardiac image model can readily be applied to the simulation of other nuclear medicine studies and to other medical imaging modalities including computed tomography, ultrasound, and digital radiography.

  1. Quantitative Analysis in Nuclear Medicine Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    This book provides a review of image analysis techniques as they are applied in the field of diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine. Driven in part by the remarkable increase in computing power and its ready and inexpensive availability, this is a relatively new yet rapidly expanding field. Likewise, although the use of radionuclides for diagnosis and therapy has origins dating back almost to the discovery of natural radioactivity itself, radionuclide therapy and, in particular, targeted radionuclide therapy has only recently emerged as a promising approach for therapy of cancer and, to a lesser extent, other diseases. As effort has, therefore, been made to place the reviews provided in this book in a broader context. The effort to do this is reflected by the inclusion of introductory chapters that address basic principles of nuclear medicine imaging, followed by overview of issues that are closely related to quantitative nuclear imaging and its potential role in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. ...

  2. Basic Physics for Nuclear Medicine. Chapter 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technologies used in nuclear medicine for diagnostic imaging have evolved over the last century, starting with Röntgen’s discovery of X rays and Becquerel’s discovery of natural radioactivity. Each decade has brought innovation in the form of new equipment, techniques, radiopharmaceuticals, advances in radionuclide production and, ultimately, better patient care. All such technologies have been developed and can only be practised safely with a clear understanding of the behaviour and principles of radiation sources and radiation detection. These central concepts of basic radiation physics and nuclear physics are described in this chapter and should provide the requisite knowledge for a more in depth understanding of the modern nuclear medicine technology discussed in subsequent chapters

  3. Fourth congress of the South African Society of Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This seminar contains 68 papers. Sixty three papers were indexed. Five papers were considered out of scope for INIS. The implementation of nuclear medicine in the following fields were discussed: neurology, cardiology, monoclonal antibodies, endocrinology, nuclear medicine physics, and radiopharmacy

  4. Clinical forensic medicine examination of trafficked victims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alempijević Đorđe M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper certain explanations of health related aspects of human trafficking are discussed together with responsibilities of health care providers to the victims of trafficking. Clinical forensic medicine is outlined, and its role in obtaining of medical evidence has been discussed. Special remarks are made on the application of clinical forensic medicine skills in assessment of victims of human trafficking. Protocol for clinical forensic examination of the victims of human trafficking, which has been developed in the Institute of Forensic Medicine in Belgrade, has been discussed in details.

  5. Quantitative Nuclear Medicine. Chapter 17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planar imaging is still used in clinical practice although tomographic imaging (single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET)) is becoming more established. In this chapter, quantitative methods for both imaging techniques are presented. Planar imaging is limited to single photon. For both SPECT and PET, the focus is on the quantitative methods that can be applied to reconstructed images

  6. Nuclear medicine and imaging research (quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science). Progress report, January 1, 1984-December 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents progress in the areas of cardiac nuclear medicine, other imaging studies, investigations with biomolecules, and assessment of risks associated with the clinical use of radiopharmaceuticals

  7. Programmatic activities of IAEA in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine is high-tech medicine. Nevertheless, it is essential for addressing important health problems of people living in developing countries also. Not only is it sometimes expensive to start with, it also involves a lot of technical know-how, requiring transfer of technology from developed to the developing countries. The rapid development of nuclear medicine, of sophisticated instrumentation and radiopharmaceuticals has resulted in an enormous increase in costs and in the need for maintaining quality. These constitute a challenge and a venture when promoting nuclear medicine globally and particularly in developing countries. No other international organization except IAEA has any specific mandate for application of nuclear energy in the area of human health. WHO has no specific programin nuclear medicine, hence the importance of IAEA's involvement. The IAEA has, ever since its inception, given high priority to enhancing the awareness and capabilities of developing member states to employ nuclear technology for health care and medical research. Much of the Agency promoted research in nuclear medicine is delivered through the so called co-ordinated research projects (CRPs). The CRPs are normally organised as multi-center, prospective studies so that large volume of scientific data could be generated in a short period of 18-24 months. The research is normally done within an operational frame work, established and co-ordinated by the IAEA. The reason for this is that the results can be compared despite site or country specific differences. The methods and materials used for such studies usually conform to a predetermined standard. The protocols for various investigations, criteria for patient selection, mode of arriving at a final diagnosis and analysis of data from these multi-center studies are normally agreed upon by the Chief Scientific Investigators from each participating institution and the IAEA prior to the start of the actual work programme. The

  8. Evidence Based Studies in Clinical Transfusion Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.G. Jansen (Gerard)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAfter the introduction of blood component therapy in the 1960s, more and more attention is given to clinical transfusion medicine. Although blood transfusion is an important treatment in different clinical settings, there are still lack of much randomized clinical trials. Nowadays bloo

  9. Converting energy to medical progress [nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For over 50 years the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has been investing to advance environmental and biomedical knowledge connected to energy. The BER Medical Sciences program fosters research to develop beneficial applications of nuclear technologies for medical diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. Today, nuclear medicine helps millions of patients annually in the United States. Nearly every nuclear medicine scan or test used today was made possible by past BER-funded research on radiotracers, radiation detection devices, gamma cameras, PET and SPECT scanners, and computer science. The heart of biological research within BER has always been the pursuit of improved human health. The nuclear medicine of tomorrow will depend greatly on today's BER-supported research, particularly in the discovery of radiopharmaceuticals that seek specific molecular and genetic targets, the design of advanced scanners needed to create meaningful images with these future radiotracers, and the promise of new radiopharmaceutical treatments for cancers and genetic diseases

  10. Converting Energy to Medical Progress [Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-04-01

    For over 50 years the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has been investing to advance environmental and biomedical knowledge connected to energy. The BER Medical Sciences program fosters research to develop beneficial applications of nuclear technologies for medical diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. Today, nuclear medicine helps millions of patients annually in the United States. Nearly every nuclear medicine scan or test used today was made possible by past BER-funded research on radiotracers, radiation detection devices, gamma cameras, PET and SPECT scanners, and computer science. The heart of biological research within BER has always been the pursuit of improved human health. The nuclear medicine of tomorrow will depend greatly on today's BER-supported research, particularly in the discovery of radiopharmaceuticals that seek specific molecular and genetic targets, the design of advanced scanners needed to create meaningful images with these future radiotracers, and the promise of new radiopharmaceutical treatments for cancers and genetic diseases.

  11. Converting energy to medical progress [nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-04-01

    For over 50 years the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has been investing to advance environmental and biomedical knowledge connected to energy. The BER Medical Sciences program fosters research to develop beneficial applications of nuclear technologies for medical diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. Today, nuclear medicine helps millions of patients annually in the United States. Nearly every nuclear medicine scan or test used today was made possible by past BER-funded research on radiotracers, radiation detection devices, gamma cameras, PET and SPECT scanners, and computer science. The heart of biological research within BER has always been the pursuit of improved human health. The nuclear medicine of tomorrow will depend greatly on today's BER-supported research, particularly in the discovery of radiopharmaceuticals that seek specific molecular and genetic targets, the design of advanced scanners needed to create meaningful images with these future radiotracers, and the promise of new radiopharmaceutical treatments for cancers and genetic diseases.

  12. Performance of dose calibrators used for nuclear medicine services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work show the results of the quality control tests from two different dose calibrators of a Nuclear Medicine Clinic in Sao Paulo. One of them has an ionization chamber (well type) and the other, Geiger-Mueller detectors (well configuration). As reference sources, Cobalt-57, Barium-133 and Caesium-137 were utilized. Also, an unsealed Technetium-99m source was used in some tests. Finally, the performance of both instruments was compared. (author)

  13. Nuclear Medicine: Use of Thallium 201 in Tumor Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Waxman, Alan D.

    1992-01-01

    The Council on Scientific Affairs of the California Medical Association presents the following inventory of items of progress in nuclear medicine. Each item, in the judgment of a panel of knowledgeable physicians, has recently become reasonably firmly established, both as to scientific fact and important clinical significance. The items are presented in simple epitome, and an authoritative reference, both to the item itself and to the subject as a whole, is generally given for those who may b...

  14. Assessment of OEP health's risk in nuclear medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santacruz-Gomez, K.; Manzano, C.; Melendrez, R.; Castaneda, B.; Barboza-Flores, M.; Pedroza-Montero, M.

    2012-10-01

    The use of ionizing radiation has been increased in recent years within medical applications. Nuclear Medicine Department offers both treatment and diagnosis of diseases using radioisotopes to controlled doses. Despite the great benefits to the patient, there is an inherent risk to workers which remains in contact with radiation sources for long periods. These personnel must be monitored to avoid deterministic effects. In this work, we retrospectively evaluated occupationally exposed personnel (OEP) to ionizing radiation in nuclear medicine during the last five years. We assessed both area and personal dosimetry of this department in a known Clinic in Sonora. Our results show an annual equivalent dose average of 4.49 ± 0.70 mSv in OEP without showing alarming changes in clinical parameters analyzed. These results allow us to conclude that health of OEP in nuclear medicine of this clinic has not been at risk during the evaluated period. However, we may suggest the use of individual profiles based on specific radiosensitivity markers.

  15. Nuclear oncology, a fast growing field of nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivier, Pierre E-mail: p.olivier@chu-nancy.fr

    2004-07-11

    Nuclear Medicine in oncology has been for a long time synonymous with bone scintigraphy, the first ever whole body imaging modality, and with treatment of thyroid cancer with iodine-131. More recently, somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) using peptides such as {sup 111}In-labelled octreotide became a reference imaging method in the detection and staging of neuroendocrine tumors while {sup 131}I- and {sup 123}I-MIBG remain the tracers of reference for pheochromocytomas and neuroblastomas. Lymphoscintigraphic imaging based on peritumoral injection of {sup 99m}Tc-labelled colloids supports, in combination with per operative detection, the procedure of sentinel node identification in breast cancers and melanomas. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is currently experiencing a considerable growth in oncology based on the use of {sup 18}F-FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose), a very sensitive, although non-specific, tumor tracer. Development of instrumentation is crucial in this expansion of PET imaging with new crystals being more sensitive and hybrid imagers that permit to reduce the acquisition time and offer fused PET-CT images. Current developments in therapy can be classified into three categories. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) based on monoclonal antibodies (or fragments) labelled with beta-emitters. This technique has recently made its entrance in clinical practice with a {sup 90}Y-labelled anti-CD20 antibody ({sup 90}Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin{sup [reg]})) approved in US for the treatment of some subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Radionuclide-bone pain palliation has experienced developments with {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP, 186Re-HEDP or {sup 89}Sr, efficient in patients with widespread disease. Last, the same peptides, as those used in SRS, are being developed for therapy, labelled with {sup 90}Y, {sup 111}In or {sup 177}Lu in patients who failed to respond to other treatments. Overall, nuclear oncology is currently a fast growing field thanks to the combined

  16. Nuclear oncology, a fast growing field of nuclear medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Pierre

    2004-07-01

    Nuclear Medicine in oncology has been for a long time synonymous with bone scintigraphy, the first ever whole body imaging modality, and with treatment of thyroid cancer with iodine-131. More recently, somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) using peptides such as 111In-labelled octreotide became a reference imaging method in the detection and staging of neuroendocrine tumors while 131I- and 123I-MIBG remain the tracers of reference for pheochromocytomas and neuroblastomas. Lymphoscintigraphic imaging based on peritumoral injection of 99mTc-labelled colloids supports, in combination with per operative detection, the procedure of sentinel node identification in breast cancers and melanomas. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is currently experiencing a considerable growth in oncology based on the use of 18F-FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose), a very sensitive, although non-specific, tumor tracer. Development of instrumentation is crucial in this expansion of PET imaging with new crystals being more sensitive and hybrid imagers that permit to reduce the acquisition time and offer fused PET-CT images. Current developments in therapy can be classified into three categories. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) based on monoclonal antibodies (or fragments) labelled with beta-emitters. This technique has recently made its entrance in clinical practice with a 90Y-labelled anti-CD20 antibody ( 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin ®)) approved in US for the treatment of some subtypes of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Radionuclide-bone pain palliation has experienced developments with 153Sm-EDTMP, 186Re-HEDP or 89Sr, efficient in patients with widespread disease. Last, the same peptides, as those used in SRS, are being developed for therapy, labelled with 90Y, 111In or 177Lu in patients who failed to respond to other treatments. Overall, nuclear oncology is currently a fast growing field thanks to the combined developments of radiopharmaceuticals and instrumentation.

  17. Formulary: Pharmacologic interventions in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this formulary is to provide the practitioner with a readily available reference addressed specifically at the pharmacology (i.e., chemistry, mechanism(s) of action, cautions, dosage, and available preparation(s)) of interventional drugs commonly used in nuclear medicine practice. Although the majority of these agents are intended for alternate therapeutic indications, the formulary is directed at and limited to information pertinent to their interventional use. In this regard, the majority of the presented material has been extrapolated from standard drug formularies or product inserts. Specific material related to published interventional nuclear medicine studies is referenced in the bibliography and/or can be found in the associated chapters of this book. The reader is advised to note not only the information related to the interventional drug, but also the statements regarding appropriate treatment or avoidance of associated side effects. To facilitate utilization, the interventional drugs are listed in alphabetical order, rather than by therapeutic class

  18. Genomics and proteomics in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results obtained from basic science deliver more information about many new molecular structures, which may serve as potential new diagnostic or even therapeutic targets. The selection and evaluation of these targets needs information concerning physiology, biochemistry and pharmacology. These data can be obtained at least in part by nuclear medicine technology. Nuclear medicine procedures can be applied for the assessment of the function and regulation of genes. This can be achieved by use of radiolabeled antisense molecules or reporter gene technology. New therapeutic approaches necessitate biodistribution studies at preclinical stages and methods delivering data about their effectiveness. Finally, procedures from biotechnology such as phagen display may be used for the development of new biomolecules for the isotope-based diagnostics and treatment. (orig.)

  19. Directory of computer users in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Directory of Computer Users in Nuclear Medicine consists primarily of detailed descriptions and indexes to these descriptions. A typical Installation Description contains the name, address, type, and size of the institution and the names of persons within the institution who can be contacted for further information. If the department has access to a central computer facility for data analysis or timesharing, the type of equipment available and the method of access to that central computer is included. The dedicated data processing equipment used by the department in its nuclear medicine studies is described, including the peripherals, languages used, modes of data collection, and other pertinent information. Following the hardware descriptions are listed the types of studies for which the data processing equipment is used, including the language(s) used, the method of output, and an estimate of the frequency of the particular study. An Installation Index and an Organ Studies Index are also included

  20. Directory of computer users in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, J.J.; Gurney, J.; McClain, W.J. (eds.)

    1979-09-01

    The Directory of Computer Users in Nuclear Medicine consists primarily of detailed descriptions and indexes to these descriptions. A typical Installation Description contains the name, address, type, and size of the institution and the names of persons within the institution who can be contacted for further information. If the department has access to a central computer facility for data analysis or timesharing, the type of equipment available and the method of access to that central computer is included. The dedicated data processing equipment used by the department in its nuclear medicine studies is described, including the peripherals, languages used, modes of data collection, and other pertinent information. Following the hardware descriptions are listed the types of studies for which the data processing equipment is used, including the language(s) used, the method of output, and an estimate of the frequency of the particular study. An Installation Index and an Organ Studies Index are also included. (PCS)

  1. Medical isotopes and emerging nuclear medicine technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation discusses medical isotopes and the emerging nuclear medicine technologies as well as the impact of Chalk River reactor shutdown on patient management and diseases. It outlines the chain of supply of isotopes across the globe and isotope shortage impact. It recommends the following mitigating strategies: modifications of scanning techniques, adjustment of patient scheduling, optimization of Tc-99m generator use, patient prioritization, alternate procedures and PET scanning.

  2. Nuclear Medicine Imaging in the Pediatric Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Loveless, Vivian

    2006-01-01

    Pediatric nuclear medicine provides a wealth of information on a variety of disease states; however, precautions on dosing have to be taken into consideration. Also, expertise in conducting procedures and interpreting the results in pediatric patients is necessary. Emphasis is placed on diagnostic studies involving the central nervous system, musculoskeletal system, genitourinary system, gastrointestinal system, endocrine system, pulmonary system, and cardiovascular system along with a brief ...

  3. [Clinical trials with advanced therapy medicinal products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüssler-Lenz, M; Schneider, C K

    2010-01-01

    For advanced therapies, the same basic principles for assessment apply as for any other biotechnological medicinal product. Nevertheless, the extent of data for quality, safety, and efficacy can be highly specific. Until recently, advanced therapies were not uniformly regulated across Europe, e.g., tissue engineered products were regulated either as medicinal products or medical devices. Thus, for some products no data from clinical studies are available, e.g., for autologous chondrocyte products. The draft guideline on Good Clinical Practice for clinical trials with advanced therapies describes specific additional requirements, e.g., ensuring traceability. Most clinical studies with advanced therapies in Germany are still in early phase I or II trials with highly divergent types of products and clinical indications. The Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) at the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) has been established to meet the scientific and regulatory challenges with advanced therapies.

  4. Nuclear medicine therapy of neuroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefnagel, C.A. [Amsterdam The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    1999-12-01

    Specific targeting of radionuclides to neuroblastoma, a neural crest tumor occurring predominantly in young children and associated with a relatively poor prognosis, may be achieved via the metabolic route (Mibg), receptor binding (peptides) or immunological approach (antibodies). The clinical role of {sup 1}31{sup I}-Mibg therapy and radioimmunotherapy in neuroblastoma is discussed. In recurrent or progressive metastatic disease after conventional treatment modalities have failed, {sup 1}31{sup I}-Mibg therapy, with an overall objective response rate of 35%, is probably the best palliative treatment, as the invasiveness and toxicity of this therapy compare favourably with that of chemotherapy, immunotherapy and external beam radiotherapy. In patients presenting with inoperable stage III and IV neuroblastoma, {sup 1}31{sup I}-Mibg therapy at diagnosis is at least as effective as combination chemotherapy but is associated with much less toxicity. In patients with recurrent disease {sup 1}31{sup I}-Mibg therapy in combination with hyperbaric oxygen therapy proved feasible and encouraging effects on survival have ben observed. Attempts to intensify the treatment in relapsed patients by combination of {sup 1}31{sup I}-Mibg therapy with high dose chemotherapy and/or total body irradiation have met with considerable toxicity. Developments in Mibg therapy aiming at improving the therapeutic index are mentioned. Early results of radioimmunotherapy using {sup 1}31{sup I}-UJ13A or {sup 1}31{sup I}-3F8 monoclonal antibodies have shown moderate objective response and considerable side effects in patients with stage IV neuroblastoma, who had relapsed or failed conventional therapy. New developments in radioimmunotherapy of neuroblastoma include the use of chimeric antibodies, the enhancement of tumor uptake by modulation of antigen expression or by increasing the tumor perfusion/vascularity/permeability, the use of other labels and multistep targeting techniques, e.g. using

  5. Basic science of nuclear medicine the bare bone essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Kai H

    2015-01-01

    Through concise, straightforward explanations and supporting graphics that bring abstract concepts to life, the new Basic Science of Nuclear Medicine—the Bare Bone Essentials is an ideal tool for nuclear medicine technologist students and nuclear cardiology fellows looking for an introduction to the fundamentals of the physics and technologies of modern day nuclear medicine.

  6. Nuclear medicine solutions in winter sports problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The diagnostic workup of acute Winter Sports injuries is done by Conventional X Ray, CT and MRI. Chronic injuries as stress reactions are best investigated by Nuclear Medicine procedures: Snow Boarding: In Snow-Boarding chronic injuries are mostly seen as local increased uptake laterally in the lower third of the Fibula of the front leg together with Tibial increase medially in the other leg. Skiing: Chronic Skiing injuries are less asymmetrical and mostly seen on the apex of the patella. Chronic Feet Problems: A different chronic problem is the reduced blood perfusion in the feet if hard, tightened boots are used for longer time by professional ski instructors and racers. Flow difference between the foot in the boot and the other without boot are dramatic as measured by Nuclear Medicine Procedures and MRI. Pulmonary Embolism: Acute pulmonary embolism caused by thrombi originating at the site of constant pressure on the back rim of ski boots is not uncommon in older skiers (seek and you will find), but never seen in the younger group of Snow-Boarders. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  7. Hand exposure in nuclear medicine workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result of the gamma radiation emitted by radioactive elements (e.g. 99mTc and 131I) used in nuclear medicine laboratories for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes, nuclear medicine workers are exposed to whole-body doses. These doses are usually measured by using individual film dosemeters. Lead or lead glass shields used during the handling of radioisotope minimise the whole-body dose received. Nevertheless, part of the job has to be performed manually, hence the hands are more exposed to radiation. This paper presents the results of measuring the equivalent dose to the hands of workers employed in five selected nuclear medicine laboratories where technetium and iodine radioisotopes are in common use. Sixty workers, including physicians, nurses, radiopharmacists and technicians, were included in the study. Doses were measured at 1 month intervals. The study indicated that, in some instances, the danger of radiation dose to the hand may be significant. Monthly doses exceed 50 mSv, which may suggest that an annual dose may be higher than 500 mSv. (author)

  8. Impact of Obesity on Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obesity with its alarming increase in number among adults and children represents a significant health problem with serious medical, social, psychological and economical reverberations. The burden that is put upon the medical care system due to this problem has a significant effect on the medical services provided including radiological imaging. The effect of obesity on nuclear medicine services includes many aspects starting with problems with patient preparation prior to imaging, while radiotracer administration and during patient imaging. In addition, altered imaging techniques, including timing, imaging duration, and protocol alteration. Furthermore, obtaining suboptimal images brought by artifacts due to soft tissue attenuation and incomplete whole body coverage during image acquisition and performing sub optimal quantification, especially in positron emission tomography. Finally, dealing with mechanical problems such as weight limits of the imaging table and bore size in PET or SPECT/CT. These issues are discussed in this review clarifying the impact of this epidemic health problem on the nuclear medicine services and possible solutions to overcome the difficulties encountered in the nuclear medicine department. (author)

  9. Nuclear Medicine Physics: A Handbook for Teachers and Students. Endorsed by: American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), Asia–Oceania Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics (AFOMP), Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine (ACPSEM), European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics (EFOMP), Federation of African Medical Physics Organisations (FAMPO), World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology (WFNMB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication provides the basis for the education of medical physicists initiating their university studies in the field of nuclear medicine. The handbook includes 20 chapters and covers topics relevant to nuclear medicine physics, including basic physics for nuclear medicine, radionuclide production, imaging and non-imaging detectors, quantitative nuclear medicine, internal dosimetry in clinical practice and radionuclide therapy. It provides, in the form of a syllabus, a comprehensive overview of the basic medical physics knowledge required for the practice of medical physics in modern nuclear medicine

  10. Handbook of nuclear medicine practice in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This ''Handbook of Nuclear Medicine Practices in the Developing Countries'' is meant primarily for those, who intend to install and practice nuclear medicine in a developing country. By and large, the conventional Textbooks of nuclear medicine do note cater to the special problems and needs of these countries. The Handbook is not trying to replace these textbooks, but supplement them with special information and guidance, necessary for making nuclear medicine cost-effective and useful in a hospital of a developing country. It is written mostly by those, who have made success in their careers in nuclear medicine, in one of these countries. One way to describe this Handbook will be that it represents the ways, in which, nuclear medicine is practised in the developing countries, described by those, who have a long and authentic experience of practising nuclear medicine in a developing country

  11. Radiopharmaceuticals in Nuclear Medicine: Evolution and Role in Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Vani, Chappidi; Nagalaxmi, V.; Singh, Anshul; Zardi, Faisal Taiyebali; Lalitha, CH

    2013-01-01

    NUCLEAR MEDICINE is the branch of medicine and medical imaging that uses radiation emitted by a radio-pharmaceutical to provide information about both the structure and function of organ systems within the body thereby aiding in the diagnosis and treatment of a disease. This unparalleled branch of radiology concerns with the diagnostic and therapeutic use of radionuclides. The most striking feature that distinguishes Nuclear Medicine from other Imaging Modalities is that Nuclear Medicine aids...

  12. The Current Status and Future Perspectives of Nuclear Medicine in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Myung Chul; Oh, So Won; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Dong Soo

    2010-01-01

    Since the introduction of nuclear medicine in 1959, Korea accomplished a brilliant development in terms of both clinical practice and research activities, which was mainly due to the dedication of nuclear medicine specialists, consisting of physicians, technicians, and scientists, and strong support from the Korean Government. Now, Korea has 150 medical institutes, performing approximately 561,000 nuclear imaging procedures and 11.6 million in vitro studies in 2008, and ranked fourth in the n...

  13. The Bottom Line Medicine Clinic.

    OpenAIRE

    Gepner, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    The financial experience of an actual medical practice was used to develop a spreadsheet model of the business of medicine. The model is designed to provide reasonably accurate predictions of the financial outcome of business decisions affecting the practice. It has been used very successfully to teach practice management to senior residents in Family Practice training at the University of Minnesota. Students are placed in the role of a managing partner presented with a financially ailing pra...

  14. Gene therapy in clinical medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Selkirk, S

    2004-01-01

    Although the field of gene therapy has experienced significant setbacks and limited success, it is one of the most promising and active research fields in medicine. Interest in this therapeutic modality is based on the potential for treatment and cure of some of the most malignant and devastating diseases affecting humans. Over the next decade, the relevance of gene therapy to medical practices will increase and it will become important for physicians to understand the basic principles and st...

  15. Role of nuclear medicine in ischemic heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashida, Kohei; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Uehara, Toshiisa; Naito, Hiroaki; Omine, Hiromi; Kozuka, Takahiro (National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan))

    1982-08-01

    With the progress in gamma camera and computer system, nuclear medicine has been applied for diagnostic tool in ischemic heart disease. There are two devices for cardiac images; (1) Radionuclide angiocardiography (RNA) by in vivo sup(99m)Tc-RBC labeling (2) Myocardial imaging by /sup 201/Tlcl. RNA can evaluate the kinesis of wall motion of left ventricle with gated pool scan and also detect reserve of cardiac function with exercise study. Myocardial imaging at rest can identify myocardial necrosis and the imaging in exercise can detect myocardial ischemia. The elaborateness and reproducibility of cardiac image in nuclear medicine will play the great role to evaluate clinical stage of ischemic heart disease by not only imaging but also functional diagnosis.

  16. The role of commercial nuclear pharmacy in the future practice of nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, R J

    1996-04-01

    It has been estimated that today 70% to 80% of all radiopharmaceutical doses are dispensed through commercial nuclear pharmacy channels. These services are provided by the approximately 250 facilities in the United States, with some multisite corporations dispensing in excess of 20,000 unit-dose prescriptions per day. As pressures mount within health care institutions to reduce manpower, increase cost-effectiveness, increase participation in managed care contracts, and to seek outside vendors for many services that were previously provided in-house, the future role of the commercial nuclear pharmacy in the practice of nuclear medicine will only continue to increase. The essence of nuclear pharmacy practice is the dispensing of a full range of high quality radiopharmaceuticals in patient-specific unit doses. These doses must be delivered in a timely and cost effective manner, without compromising quality or patient safety. Commercial nuclear pharmacies have expanded to provide such varied functions as radiation safety and waste management, as well as consultative and marketing activities directed towards clinicians within a nuclear medicine practitioners own facility. In-service continuing education programs directed towards physicians and technologists are frequently offered by many commercial nuclear pharmacies. Changes in health care economics, merging and down-sizing in the hospital industry, and the overall impact of managed care on the viability of hospitals in general has resulted in slow growth, or even a small decline in the number of institutionally based nuclear pharmacists. As a result, nuclear medicine practitioners will be looking to the commercial nuclear pharmacies to meet a larger portion of their radiopharmaceutical needs, as well as to value added services, such as education and research and development. Specialized practice settings, such as nuclear cardiology and free-standing nuclear medicine clinics, are especially well suited to the services

  17. The integral formation of the university technologists in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Nuclear medicine has contributed to notable benefits to the human health from the very beginning. The Radioisotopes techniques, as well as the ionizing radiation used, have evolved providing functional and anatomical information of the patient, through non-invasive methods. With reference to Radiological Protection, the justification of each one of these practices and its perfect execution is intimately related to the benefit provided to the patients. The National Atomic Energy Commission apart from favouring the scientific and technological development, considers indispensable to work thoroughly on the professional training of the prospective technologists. Our over twenty-year experience in organizing and delivering courses of Technologists in Nuclear Medicine, although based on a much simpler program, have allowed the Institute of Nuclear Studies of the Ezeiza Atomic Center to acquire the capacity of developing a program to train highly qualified Technologists in that field. This project represents a step forward of great importance to the graduates qualification, since they will have the endorsement of CNEA and of the Faculty of Medicine of the Maimonides University. These are the three outstanding characteristics agreed on: 1.- General Education, carried out by subjects closely related to the optimisation of the relation Technologist - Patient - Environment and represented by: Radiological Protection and Hospital Security, Psychology, Ethics and Professional Medical Ethics, Nursing, English, Hygiene and Hospital Security and Management of the Quality in Services of Health. 2.- Diagnostic Procedures: planned according to organs, apparatuses or systems which are horizontally crossed by the anatomy, physiology and physiopathology Preparation of the patient, indications, main counter indications, radiopharmaceuticals, mechanisms of incorporation, pathologies, clinical protocols, instrumentation, post radiopharmaceuticals administration imaging

  18. Place of the nuclear medicine in the clinical development of the gene therapy; Place de la medecine nucleaire dans le developpement clinique de la therapie genique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crochet, T. [Montpellier-1 Univ., 34 (France); Vis, J. de [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Hopital Saint Eloi, Institut de Recherche en Biotherapie, 34 - Montpellier (France); Vincent, D. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nimes, Service de Medecine Interne, Hopital Caremeau, 30 - Nimes (France); Zanca, M. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Hopital Guy de Chauliac, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 34 - Montpellier (France)

    2006-10-15

    Although gene therapy has been proposed first for genetic diseases, its concept has been extended to many acquired diseases, owing to a better understanding of pathology at a molecular level. Overall, very few trials have shown to be efficient, and safety concerns have emerged, as a result of several patients deaths. There is a need for new techniques able to improve both the knowledge of the therapeutic gene fate once administered and the early detection of events likely to lead to serious adverse events. In vivo imaging of a reporter gene associated with the therapeutic one is certainly the most promising technique for these goals. Among available imaging modalities, nuclear imaging is the most likely to be applied to patients. This review begins with a summary of current knowledge about the steps that a therapeutic gene has to cross from vector delivery to appropriate expression in target cells. We show how gene imaging could allow to investigate many pitfalls of trials by providing a better understanding of these steps in patients. The reporter genes available for nuclear imaging are presented in the second section, through animal studies. Then, relevant examples of clinical trials are presented. These include cancer (suicide gene therapy and adoptive immunotherapy), ischemic heart diseases and cystic fibrosis. The results are commented with emphasis on the role of nuclear imaging to address the questions raised by these studies, and imaging studies carried out on animals or patients for the corresponding diseases or organs are presented. The results obtained in animal studies warrant the introduction of gene imaging in clinical trials. (authors)

  19. Development of Scintillators in Nuclear Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshakhlagh, Mohammad; Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh; Abedi, Seyed Mohammad; Mahmoudian, Babak

    2015-01-01

    High-quality image is necessary for accurate diagnosis in nuclear medicine. There are many factors in creating a good image and detector is the most important one. In recent years, several detectors are studied to get a better picture. The aim of this paper is comparison of some type of these detectors such as thallium activated sodium iodide bismuth germinate cesium activated yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG: Ce) YAP: Ce "lutetium aluminum garnet activated by cerium" CRY018 "CRY019" lanthanum bromide and cadmium zinc telluride. We studied different properties of these crystals including density, energy resolution and decay times that are more important factors affecting the image quality. PMID:26420984

  20. Development of Scintillators in Nuclear Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Khoshakhlagh, Mohammad; Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh; Abedi, Seyed Mohammad; Mahmoudian, Babak

    2015-01-01

    High-quality image is necessary for accurate diagnosis in nuclear medicine. There are many factors in creating a good image and detector is the most important one. In recent years, several detectors are studied to get a better picture. The aim of this paper is comparison of some type of these detectors such as thallium activated sodium iodide bismuth germinate cesium activated yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG: Ce) YAP: Ce “lutetium aluminum garnet activated by cerium” CRY018 “CRY019” lanthanum br...

  1. Artificial neural networks in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of the accessible literature on the diagnostic applicability of artificial neural networks in coronary artery disease and pulmonary embolism appears to be comparative to the diagnosis of experienced doctors dealing with nuclear medicine. Differences in the employed models of artificial neural networks indicate a constant search for the most optimal parameters, which could guarantee the ultimate accuracy in neural network activity. The diagnostic potential within systems containing artificial neural networks proves this calculation tool to be an independent or/and an additional device for supporting a doctor's diagnosis of artery disease and pulmonary embolism. (author)

  2. Nuclear medicine: dosimetric considerations: pregnancy and lactation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation exposure of pregnant woman in nuclear medicine is important from the point of view of radiological protection. In this report are presented the most relevant considerations for the internal dosimetry during pregnancy and lactation. The dose estimation to the mother and fetus during pregnancy can be made based in MIRD methodology with specific phantoms of the pregnant woman allowing the dose calculation in the first, second and third month of pregnancy, through the MIRDOSE software. The effective doses in infants and recommendations are also explained in this report

  3. Security in the nuclear medicine department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current threat from terrorism highlights the need for awareness of adequate security of radioactive sources by health bodies to prevent the opportunistic access to, theft of. or accidental loss of sources, together with stringent security measures in place to prevent the international misuse of radioactive sources as a weapon by unauthorised access. This presentation discusses the processes undertaken to ensure the safety and security of radioactive materials within the nuclear medicine department in line with current regulations and guidelines. These include risk assessments, security systems, audit trails, restricted access and personnel background checks

  4. Nuclear medicine applications and their mathematical basis

    CERN Document Server

    Goris, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This book reviews some principal applications of nuclear medicine, specifically from the viewpoint of the mathematical and physical analyses that support the interpretation. In contradistinction to other approaches, the mathematics does not precede the applications in introductory chapters, but is presented in the application chapters with various degrees of granularity. More details on mathematical derivations are illustrated in the last chapter for interested readers. A more detailed review of Bayes theorem can be found (in Chapter 7) explaining how the literature results were retabulated

  5. Energy-coded processing in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for processing image data which takes into account the energy of each detected gamma-ray photon. Weighted spatial averaging of local detected count densities in radionuclide images can increase the visual detectability of abnormalities. In principle, the benefits of image processing in nuclear medicine can be increased by processing the image data in each interval of the detected photon spectrum using a procedure that is appropriate for the spatial resolution and statistical quality associated with that energy interval, and by combining energy-coded processed image components using generally energy-dependent weights. The potential gains in detection performance by implementation of such an approach are examined

  6. Quality management system in Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Establishing Management Systems (QMS) in services Nuclear Medicine (NM) is a prerequisite for optimizing the efficacy and safety of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures of this specialty and increase steadily the quality of the services provide patients. Several international organizations such as the IAEA and scientific specialty societies (SNM, EBNM, etc) and national bodies stimulate and enhance their introduction; in our country is also a requirement of the National Nuclear Safety Centre (CNSN). Are presented in this paper, the main experiences of our country related to the implementation of QMS and developed tools for achieving this goal, such as: The QNUMED automated web environment for managing indicators and documentation format digital; b) The development of prototypes and models for the implementation of the documentation system; d) requirements applying QUANUM in conducting audits of quality management in local services including QUANUMTool tool; and f) human resource development issues in Quality Management. (author)

  7. What does the gastro-enterologist expect from nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claasen, M.

    1987-04-01

    The close cooperation between the specialists in nuclear medicine and gastroenterology is illustrated by several examples: The rate of bleeding sources within the small intestine, as detected by endoscopy, X-ray contrast studies of the (intestinal) lumen, and angiography, is not sufficiently high, but has been reported to be in a range of 50-100 per cent if labelled autologous erythrocytes are used, provided a bleeding rate of 1 ml/min. at least. Inflammatory areas in cases of Morbus Crohn (skip lesions) are of importance for the evaluation of functional impairments and thus for therapy. Modern studies using labelled granulocytes show a good correlation to endoscopic and histologic findings, both with regard to their spatial distribution and activity. Additional comparisons to the 'gold standard' endoscopy would be desirable. Treatment with monoclonal antibodies, which would act as a radiant 'destroyer' to exclusively destroy the tumour cells, could provide an important approach to therapy of inoperable tumours of the digestive tract. Nuclear medicine also is expected to provide valuable contributions to investigations of the bacterial flora of the small intestine and to coagulation studies in cases of liver failure. AT III-labelling has enabled the intrahepatic AT III-consumption to be detected in cases of liver failure. The gastro-enterologist expects nuclear medicine to cooperate in the solution of clinical and research problems of digestive diseases.

  8. Specification and acceptance testing of nuclear medicine equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purchase of nuclear medicine equipment is of prime importance in the operation of a clinical service. Failure to properly evaluate the potential uses of the instrumentation and the various operational characteristics of the equipment can often result in the purchase of inappropriate or inferior instruments. The magnitude of the purchase in terms of time and financial investments make it imperative that the purchase be approached in a systematic manner. Consideration of both the intended clinical functions and personnel requirements is important. It is necessary also to evaluate the ability of the equipment vendor to support the instrumentation after the purchase has been completed and the equipment installed in the clinical site. The desired specifications of the instrument characteristics should be stated in terms that can be verified by acceptance testing. The complexity of modern instrumentation and the sensitivity of it to the environment require the buyer to take into account the potential problems of controlling the temperature, humidity, and electrical power of the installation site. If properly and systematically approached, the purchase of new nuclear medicine instrumentation can result in the acquisition of a powerful diagnostic tool which will have a useful lifetime of many years. If not so approached, it may result in the expenditure of a large amount of money and personnel time without the concomitant return in useful clinical service. (author)

  9. Medicine and clinical skills laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmohsen H Al-Elq

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the medical curriculum is to provide medical students with knowledge, skills and attitudes required for their practice. A decade ago, the UK Medical Council issued a report called "Tomorrow′s Doctors" [1] which called for the reduction in the factual content of the medical course with the promotion of problem-based and self-dedicated learning. This report was the basis for a move toward an extensive reform of the medical and nursing curricula. The new reformed curricula enhanced the integrated medical teaching and emphasized the teaching and learning of clinical skills. However, there were still concerns about the standards and appropriateness of the skills of new medical graduates. [2] The changes in the teaching and learning methods, the radical changes in the health care delivery and the rapid growth of technology challenged the traditional way of clinical skills development and led to the emergence of clinical skills laboratories (CSLs in the medical education of many medical and nursing schools. With the proliferation of the CSLs, it is important to evaluate and introduce the reader to their applications, bearing in mind the paucity of information on this subject particularly over the last couple of years. This article is based on literature review.

  10. Medicine and clinical skills laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Elq, Abdulmohsen H

    2007-05-01

    The main objective of the medical curriculum is to provide medical students with knowledge, skills and attitudes required for their practice. A decade ago, the UK Medical Council issued a report called "Tomorrow's Doctors"(1) which called for the reduction in the factual content of the medical course with the promotion of problem-based and self-dedicated learning. This report was the basis for a move toward an extensive reform of the medical and nursing curricula. The new reformed curricula enhanced the integrated medical teaching and emphasized the teaching and learning of clinical skills. However, there were still concerns about the standards and appropriateness of the skills of new medical graduates.(2)The changes in the teaching and learning methods, the radical changes in the health care delivery and the rapid growth of technology challenged the traditional way of clinical skills development and led to the emergence of clinical skills laboratories (CSLs) in the medical education of many medical and nursing schools. With the proliferation of the CSLs, it is important to evaluate and introduce the reader to their applications, bearing in mind the paucity of information on this subject particularly over the last couple of years. This article is based on literature review. PMID:23012147

  11. The contribution of pulmonary nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contribution of pulmonary nuclear medicine was evaluated in 115 patients with interstitial pulmonary diseases (IPD). Ventilation study (V) with 81mKr or 133Xe, distribution of compliance in thoraco-pulmonary system (C) by 81mKr gas bolus inhalation method, perfusion study (Q) with 99mTc-MAA, 67Ga scintigraphy and an assessment of pulmonary epithelial permeability with 99mTc-DTPA aerosol were performed as nuclear medicine procedures. Pulmonary function test (%DLco, vital capacity, and functional residual capacity) and blood gas analysis were also examined. Abnormalities in V were larger than that in Q, which was high V/Q mismatch finding, in interstitial pneumonia. Correlation between V/Q mismatch and PaO2 was, therefore, not significant. %DLco was decreased in cases with larger V/Q mismatches. 67Ga accumulated in the early stage of interstitial pneumonia when CT or chest X-ray did not show any finding. %DLco was decreased in cases with strong accumulation of 67Ga. 67Ga might be useful to evaluate activity of the disease. Pulmonary epithelial permeability was assessed by 99mTc-DTPA inhalation study. This permeability became accelerated in idiopathic interstitial fibrosis and sarcoidosis. Pulmonary epithelial permeability may be useful as an indicator for epithelial cell injury. (author)

  12. Fetal dose in radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy; Dosis fetal en radiodiagnostico, medicina nuclear y radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosales, F. J.; Martinez, L. C.; Candela, C.

    2015-07-01

    Sometimes irradiation of the fetus in the mother's womb is inevitable in the field of diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy, either through ignorance a priori status of this pregnancy, either because for clinical reasons it is necessary to perform the radiological study or treatment. In the first cases, know the dose at which it has exposed the fetus is essential when assessing the associated risk, while in the second it is when assessing the justification of the test. (Author)

  13. Recent developments and future trends in nuclear medicine instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Habib

    2006-01-01

    Molecular imaging using high-resolution single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) has advanced elegantly and has steadily gained importance in the clinical and research arenas. Continuous efforts to integrate recent research findings for the design of different geometries and various detector technologies of SPECT and PET cameras have become the goal of both the academic comcameras have become the goal of both the academic community and nuclear medicine industry. As PET has recently become of more interest for clinical practice, several different design trends seem to have developed. Systems are being designed for "low cost" clinical applications, very high-resolution research applications (including small-animal imaging), and just about everywhere in-between. The development of dual-modality imaging systems has revolutionized the practice of nuclear medicine. The major advantage being that SPECT/PET data are intrinsically aligned to anatomical information from the X-ray computed tomography (CT), without the use of external markers or internal landmarks. On the other hand, combining PET with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technology is scientifically more challenging owing to the strong magnetic fields. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made resulting in the design of a prototype small animal PET scanner coupled to three multichannel photomultipliers via optical fibers, so that the PET detector can be operated within a conventional MR system. Thus, many different design paths are being pursued--which ones are likely to be the main stream of future commercial systems? It will be interesting, indeed, to see which technologies become the most popular in the future. This paper briefly summarizes state-of-the art developments in nuclear medicine instrumentation. Future prospects will also be discussed. PMID:16696367

  14. Recent developments and future trends in nuclear medicine instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular imaging using high-resolution single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) has advanced elegantly and has steadily gained importance in the clinical and research arenas. Continuous efforts to integrate recent research findings for the design of different geometries and various detector technologies of SPECT and PET cameras have become the goal of both the academic community and nuclear medicine industry. As PET has recently become of more interest for clinical practice, several different design trends seem to have developed. Systems are being designed for ''low cost'' clinical applications, very high-resolution research applications (including small-animal imaging), and just about everywhere in-between. The development of dual-modality imaging systems has revolutionized the practice of nuclear medicine. The major advantage being that SPECT/PET data are intrinsically aligned to anatomical information from the X-ray computed tomography (CT), without the use of external markers or internal landmarks. On the other hand, combining PET with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology is scientifically more challenging owing to the strong magnetic fields. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made resulting in the design of a prototype small animal PET scanner coupled to three multichannel photomultipliers via optical fibers, so that the PET detector can be operated within a conventional MR system. Thus, many different design paths are being pursued - which ones are likely to be the main stream of future commercial systems? It will be interesting, indeed, to see which technologies become the most popular in the future. This paper briefly summarizes state-of-the art developments in nuclear medicine instrumentation. Future prospects will also be discussed. (orig.)

  15. Discuss the Clinical Value About Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis of Primary Parathyroid Function%探讨核医学诊断原发性甲状旁腺功能亢进症的临床价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张洋

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical value of diagnosis about the application of nuclear medicine in primary parathyroid function (PHPT). Methods The clinical diagnosis data of 9 patients in our hospital with PHPT were analyzed retrospectively. Results All patients with bone scintigraphy were present a metabolic bone disease, mtc 04-99, 99 MTC thyroid imaging-MIBI in two-phase nuclide imaging abnormal image part existed. Conclusion The application of nuclear medical imaging has important value for clinical diagnosis of PHPT.%目的:分析应用核医学对原发性甲状旁腺功能亢进症(PHPT)进行诊断的临床价值。方法选择我院收治的9例PHPT患者的临床诊断资料进行回顾性分析。结果所有患者的骨显像均呈现出代谢性骨病,99mTc04-甲状腺显像、99mTc-MIBI双时相核素显像部分有异常影像存在。结论应用核医学影像对PHPT进行临床诊断具有重要价值。

  16. Nuclear medicine for diagnostic evaluation of osteomyelitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although skeletal scintiscanning has yielded results allowing an early diagnosis of osteomyelitis in children already at a stage prior to detection by X-ray radiography, reports have been published showing that there is quite a number of false negative findings obtained by nuclear medicine techniques, especially in newborns. The article here therefore reports a study on clinical validation of skeletal scintigraphy in case of suspected osteomyelitis in children. The results show that scintiscanning is a very sensitive method of detecting osteomyelitis in children, and also can be a very useful diagnostic tool for examination of newborns, provided the different anatomy of the skeleton in newborns is taken into account. (orig./MG)

  17. Nuclear Medicine in Pediatric and Adolescent Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiratli, Pınar Özgen; Tuncel, Murat; Bar-Sever, Zvi

    2016-07-01

    Nuclear medicine has an important role in the management of many cancers in pediatric age group with multiple imaging modalities and radiopharmaceuticals targeting various biological uptake mechanisms. 18-Flourodeoxyglucose is the radiotracer of choice especially in patients with sarcoma and lymphoma. (18)FDG-PET, for sarcoma and lymphomas, is proved to be superior to conventional imaging in staging and therapy response. Although studies are limited in pediatric population, (18)FDG-PET/CT has found its way through international guidelines. Limitations and strengths of PET imaging must be noticed before adapting PET imaging in clinical protocols. Established new response criteria using multiple parameters derived from (18)FDG-PET would increase the accuracy and repeatability of response evaluation. Current data suggest that I-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) remains the tracer of choice in the evaluation of neuroblastoma (NB) because of its high sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy, and prognostic value. It is valuable in determining the response to therapy, surveillance for disease recurrence, and in selecting patients for I-131 therapy. SPECT/CT improves the diagnostic accuracy and the interpretation confidence of MIBG scans. (18)FDG-PET/CT is an important complementary to MIBG imaging despite its lack of specificity to NB. It is valuable in cases of negative or inconclusive MIBG scans and when MIBG findings underestimate the disease status as determined from clinical and radiological findings. F-18 DOPA is promising tracer that reflects catecholamine metabolism and is both sensitive and specific. F-18 DOPA scintigraphy provides the advantages of PET/CT imaging with early and short imaging times, high spatial resolution, inherent morphologic correlation with CT, and quantitation. Regulatory and production issues currently limit the tracer's availability. PET/CT with Ga-68 DOTA appears to be useful in NB imaging and may have a unique role in selecting

  18. Impact of nuclear medicine on the diagnosis and management of cardiovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in the methods of diagnostic cardiology have brought a change in emphasis toward noninvasive patient study. Nuclear Medicine techniques play an important part among noninvasive methods which enable diagnostic and therapeutic evaluation in the majority of patients with cardiac problems, without resorting to dangerous, painful and costly cardiac catheterization. Discussed are only a few of the myriad clinical applications which are rapidly making nuclear medicine techniques an integral part of the cardiologic diagnostic armamentarium

  19. Summary results of an assessment of research projects in the Nuclear Medicine Research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In May 1987, OHER management requested the Office of Program Analysis (OPA) to conduct a peer review of the projects of the DOE Nuclear Medicine Research program. This was done using procedures and a quantitative methodology OPA developed for assessing DOE research programs. Sixty-three individual nuclear medicine projects were reviewed by seven panels; one panel on isotopes and radioisotopes, three on radiopharmacology, two on clinical feasibility, and one on instrumentation. Each panel consisted of five to ten knowledgeable reviewers. 5 figs

  20. Radiological Justification for and Optimization of Nuclear Medicine Practices in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Byung Il

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is a rapidly growing discipline that employs advanced novel hybrid techniques that provide unique anatomical and functional information, as well as targets for molecular therapy. Concomitantly, there has been an increase in the attention paid to medical radiation exposure. A radiological justification for the practice of nuclear medicine has been implemented mainly through referral guidelines based on research results such as prospective randomized clinical trials. The Intern...

  1. Standardization of Administered Activities in Pediatric Nuclear Medicine: A Report of the First Nuclear Medicine Global Initiative Project, Part 2-Current Standards and the Path Toward Global Standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Frederic H; Bom, Henry Hee-Seung; Chiti, Arturo; Choi, Yun Young; Huang, Gang; Lassmann, Michael; Laurin, Norman; Mut, Fernando; Nuñez-Miller, Rodolfo; O'Keeffe, Darin; Pradhan, Prasanta; Scott, Andrew M; Song, Shaoli; Soni, Nischal; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Vargas, Luis

    2016-07-01

    The Nuclear Medicine Global Initiative (NMGI) was formed in 2012 and consists of 13 international organizations with direct involvement in nuclear medicine. The underlying objectives of the NMGI are to promote human health by advancing the field of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging, encourage global collaboration in education, and harmonize procedure guidelines and other policies that ultimately lead to improvements in quality and safety in the field throughout the world. For its first project, the NMGI decided to consider the issues involved in the standardization of administered activities in pediatric nuclear medicine. It was decided to divide the final report of this project into 2 parts. Part 1 was published in this journal in the spring of 2015. This article presents part 2 of the final report. It discusses current standards for administered activities in children and adolescents that have been developed by various professional organizations. It also presents an evaluation of the current practice of pediatric nuclear medicine specifically with regard to administered activities as determined by an international survey of 313 nuclear medicine clinics and centers from 29 countries. Lastly, it provides recommendations for a path toward global standardization of the administration of radiopharmaceuticals in children. PMID:27033894

  2. [Brief psychotherapy in clinical medicine patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobel, M

    1992-01-01

    The criteria that "illness is biographical crisis od the individual" and that the only medicine is "personal medicine" is stressed. Clinical medicine, which covers medicine in its entirety, demands conceptual and doctrinal reaffirmations so that gradually the patient can come to be dealt with as a human being fron a holistic point of view, which commences with his complaint and consultation, continues with the interview and semiology, to finish with the diagnosis and therapy which, although in some cases it may be surgical, is still medical and integral. All the steps mentioned are bio-socio-cultural thus, whether in the practice of general clinical medicine or in the most specialized and technologically sophisticated clinical medicine, the animist component is not lacking and demands a minimum degree of "psychosomatic" Knowledge. The use of a psychotherapeutic technique is proposed which, while based on the psychoanalysis theory, is distanced technically from it as a "psychotherapy on limited time and goals", which abbreviates the disease, and is projected not as the "focus" of therapeutic work, but as a re-evaluation of the "life style" of each individual, and tends to help to develop a "project for life" suited to the possible personal, familiar and social well-being of the "patient". Technically speaking, this modality of brief psychotherapy is based on the nonuse of transferential interpretations, on impeding the regression od the patient, on facilitating a cognitice-affective development of his conflicts and thus obtain an internal object mutation which allows the transformation of the "past" into true history, and the "present" into vital perspectives. This technique is within reach of every health professional.

  3. MEDICINAL VESICULATION THERAPY AND ITS CLINICAL APPLICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; LIU Haijing; SUN Zhanling

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the authors introduce medicinal vesiculation therapy from its origin, points for attention in clinical application, and their individual experiences. In clinical application, the authors advocate: ① avoid using drugs that are over-irritating in the property, and strictly controlling the dose of drugs end the duration of application,②) in selection of drugs, some factors as patients' conditions, the season, the geographic location, etc. should be taken into account. In the present paper, 3 typical cases of bronchial asthma, tonsil swelling and facial paralysis treated with medicinal vesiculation therapy are introduced. Clinical practice demonsetrates that this therapy is economical,simple and convenient and fairly effective in treatment of some chronic diseases.

  4. Aspects on caring in pediatric nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During nuclear medicine examinations, the child is exposed to more or less distressful and/or painful procedures. Many children find it difficult to understand why they have to go through a specific examination. In addition, the surrounding is unfamiliar with heavy technical equipment. The first experience is crucial for the child's future attitudes towards hospitals in general and diagnostic procedures in particular. Apart from having child-focused personnel, there are many ways to improve the situation, and I will focus on four corner-stones. 1. Information; 2. Pain relief; 3. Diversion; 4. Sedation. 1. Information should be addressed directly to the child as well as to the parents. Today, children use the computer already from an early age, and we have initiated the use of Internet as a medium for child-adapted information. With texts, photos and multimedia on an interactive site we are able to reach also quite young children as well as children with difficulties to understand only written parts. Pain relief for vein puncture should always be considered. We use the topical anaesthetic EMLA cream in newborns (> 2.800 g) as well as in teenagers. Trained staff is another condition for high success rate in performing vein punctures, and continuous education vouches for that. 3. Diversion (distraction) is a general term for directing the child's attention from the procedures or to make time pass faster. Age adapted diversions should be readily available for every child. Apart from soap bubbles, toys, books, music and videos there are other possibilities, such as 'Guided imagery', a way of day-dreaming initiated by personnel trained in this method. 4. Sedation should be used when other options are not sufficient. For conscious sedation we use midazolam, administered either iv, intranasal, rectally or orally. The nurses/technologists handle the routines. In nuclear medicine, 4-5 % of the children, mostly between 1-3 years old, are sedated either for fear of vein

  5. Stereoscopic full aperture imaging in nuclear medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio G. Strocovsky

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Images of planar scintigraphy and single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT used in nuclear medicine are often low quality. They usually appear to be blurred and noisy. This problem is due to the low spatial resolution and poor sensitivity of the acquisition technique with the gamma camera (GC. Other techniques, such as coded aperture imaging (CAI reach higher spatial resolutions than GC. However, CAI is not frequently used for imaging in nuclear medicine, due to the decoding complexity of some images and the difficulty in controlling the noise magnitude. Summing up, the images obtained through GC are low quality and it is still difficult to implement CAI technique. A novel technique, full aperture Imaging (FAI, also uses gamma ray-encoding to obtain images, but the coding system and the method of images reconstruction are simpler than those used in CAI. In addition, FAI also reaches higher spatial resolution than GC. In this work, the principles of FAI technique and the method of images reconstruction are explained in detail. The FAI technique is tested by means of Monte Carlo simulations with filiform and spherical sources. Spatial resolution tests of GC versus FAI were performed using two different source-detector distances. First, simulations were made without interposing any material between the sources and the detector. Then, other more realistic simulations were made. In these, the sources were placed in the centre of a rectangular prismatic region, filled with water. A rigorous comparison was made between GC and FAI images of the linear filiform sources, by means of two methods: mean fluence profile graphs and correlation tests. Finally, three-dimensional capacity of FAI was tested with two spherical sources. The results show that FAI technique has greater sensitivity (>100 times and greater spatial resolution (>2.6 times than that of GC with LEHR collimator, in both cases, with and without attenuating material and long and

  6. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Applied Consciousness-Based Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Consciousness-based medicine is our term for a form of medical treatment that works by direct appeal to the consciousness of the patient, in contrast to modern biomedical treatment where drugs are used to affect body chemistry. With this concept, maybe we are (in a sense turning back to the “old medicine”, where the family physician was the all-concerned “old country doctor” who knew the child, the siblings, the parents, the family, and the village. In a series of papers on clinical holistic medicine, we would like to present the classic art of healing, where the physician works mostly with his hands, then show how the modern biomedical physician performs with biochemistry, and finally introduce consciousness-based medicine. Some of our questions will be: If you improve your quality of life, will you also improve your health? Will learning more about yourself bring more purpose in your life? Will finding someone to live with in a loving and mutually respectful relationship improve your health? Scientists and thinkers like Antonovsky, Frankl, Maslow, and Jung have pointed to love as a unique way to coherence in life, and thus to biological order and a better health. Several scientific studies have also suggested that patients who focus on improving their quality of life usually will not follow the general statistics for survival, since somehow other factors are at play, which sometimes you will find referred to as “exceptional”.

  7. Limits of Tumor Detectability in Nuclear Medicine and PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Emre Erdi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Nuclear medicine is becoming increasingly important in the early detection of malignancy. The advantage of nuclear medicine over other imaging modalities is the high sensitivity of the gamma camera. Nuclear medicine counting equipment has the capability of detecting levels of radioactivity which exceed background levels by as little as 2.4 to 1. This translates to only a few hundred counts per minute on a regular gamma camera or as few as 3 counts per minute when using coincidence detection on a positron emission tomography (PET camera. Material and Methods: We have experimentally measured the limits of detectability using a set of hollow spheres in a Jaszczak phantom at various tumor-to-background ratios. Imaging modalities for this work were (1 planar, (2 SPECT, (3 PET, and (4 planar camera with coincidence detection capability (MCD. Results: When there is no background (infinite contrast activity present, the detectability of tumors is similar for PET and planar imaging. With the presence of the background activity , PET can detect objects in an order of magnitude smaller in size than that can be seen by conventional planar imaging especially in the typical clinical low (3:1 T/B ratios. The detection capability of the MCD camera lies between a conventional nuclear medicine (planar / SPECT scans and the detection capability of a dedicated PET scanner Conclusion: Among nuclear medicine’s armamentarium, PET is the closest modality to CT or MR imaging in terms of limits of detection. Modern clinical PET scanners have a resolution limit of 4 mm, corresponding to the detection of tumors with a volume of 0.2 ml (7 mm diameter in 5:1 T/B ratio. It is also possible to obtain better resolution limits with dedicated brain and animal scanners. The future holds promise in development of new detector materials, improved camera design, and new reconstruction algorithms which will improve sensitivity, resolution, contrast, and thereby further

  8. [Challenges for pathologists in clinical laboratory medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezuka, F

    2001-06-01

    The number of pathologists in hospitals has been increasing and they are responsible for both surgical pathology and clinical laboratory medicine. In the future they will also play important roles in the modernized reform of the central laboratory as it establishes its own importance in improving the quality and safety of medical activities. As a pathologist, the author reports on challenges faced since assuming the present directorship of the department of laboratory medicine in 1995 including (a) establishing a decision-making system in collaboration with technologists, (b) improving expertise in the department through joining a variety of seminars, conferences and research activities, (c) publishing an annual department report, and (d) introducing both internal and external quality assessment. In the future, for young pathologists training in both pathology and laboratory medicine will be essential. PMID:11452548

  9. Directory of computer users in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henne, R.L.; Erickson, J.J.; McClain, W.J.; Kirch, D.L.

    1977-01-01

    The directory is composed of two major divisions, a Users' section and a Vendors' section. The Users' section consists of detailed installation descriptions and indexes to these descriptions. A typical description contains the name, address, type, and size of the institution as well as names of persons to contact. Following the hardware descriptions are listed the type of studies for which the computers are utilized, including the languages used, the method of output and an estimate of how often the study is performed. The Vendors' section contains short descriptions of current commercially available nuclear medicine systems as supplied by the vendors themselves. In order to reduce the amount of obsolete data and to include new institutions in future updates of the directory, a user questionnaire is included. (HLW)

  10. The impact of nuclear science on medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Kraft, G

    1999-01-01

    From the very beginning, i.e. from the discovery of the natural radioactivity by H. Becquerel and the production of radium by M. Curie, nuclear physics had a strong impact on medicine: Radioactive sources were immediately made use of in tumor therapy long before the action mechanisms of ionizing radiation were understood. The invention of the tracer technique by G. Hevesy opened a new field for the study of chemokinetics as well as for the in-vivo measurement of various organ functions. In the percutane tumor therapy hadrons like neutrons, pions, protons and heavier ions were tested. Presently, proton therapy is a great success and is spreading all over the world. The new techniques of target-conform treatment using heavy ions for an improved tumor targeting and control represent the latest great improvement of radiation tumor therapy.

  11. Nuclear medicine training and practice in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamínek, Milan; Koranda, Pavel

    2014-08-01

    Nuclear medicine in the Czech Republic is a full specialty with an exclusive practice. Since the training program was organized and structured in recent years, residents have had access to the specialty of nuclear medicine, starting with a two-year general internship (in internal medicine or radiology). At present, nuclear medicine services are provided in 45 departments. In total, 119 nuclear medicine specialists are currently registered. In order to obtain the title of Nuclear Medicine Specialist, five years of training are necessary; the first two years consist of a general internship in internal medicine or radiology. The remaining three years consist of training in the nuclear medicine specialty itself, but includes three months of practice in radiology. Twenty-one physicians are currently in nuclear medicine training and a mean of three specialists pass the final exam per year. The syllabus is very similar to that of the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS), namely concerning the minimum recommended numbers for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. In principle, the Czech law requires continuous medical education for all practicing doctors. The Czech Medical Chamber has provided a continuing medical education (CME) system. Other national CMEs are not accepted in Czech Republic. PMID:24867257

  12. Nuclear medicine training and practice in the Czech Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminek, Milan; Koranda, Pavel [University Hospital Olomouc, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2014-08-15

    Nuclear medicine in the Czech Republic is a full specialty with an exclusive practice. Since the training program was organized and structured in recent years, residents have had access to the specialty of nuclear medicine, starting with a two-year general internship (in internal medicine or radiology). At present, nuclear medicine services are provided in 45 departments. In total, 119 nuclear medicine specialists are currently registered. In order to obtain the title of Nuclear Medicine Specialist, five years of training are necessary; the first two years consist of a general internship in internal medicine or radiology. The remaining three years consist of training in the nuclear medicine specialty itself, but includes three months of practice in radiology. Twenty-one physicians are currently in nuclear medicine training and a mean of three specialists pass the final exam per year. The syllabus is very similar to that of the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS), namely concerning the minimum recommended numbers for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. In principle, the Czech law requires continuous medical education for all practicing doctors. The Czech Medical Chamber has provided a continuing medical education (CME) system. Other national CMEs are not accepted in Czech Republic. (orig.)

  13. Source Book of Educational Materials for Nuclear Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijar, Mary Lou, Comp.; Lewis, Jeannine T., Comp.

    The contents of this sourcebook of educational materials are divided into the following sections: Anatomy and Physiology; Medical Terminology; Medical Ethics and Department Management; Patient Care and Medical Decision-Making; Basic Nuclear Medicine; Diagnostic in Vivo; Diagnostic in Vitro; Pediatric Nuclear Medicine; Radiation Detection and…

  14. Nuclear medicine and articulation prosthesis of the lower limbs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several nuclear medicine procedures can help the surgeons in the diagnosis of the complications of articulations prosthesis of the lower limbs, in particular in case of torpid infection. Even if the diagnosis remains uncertain, the indications and the interpretation of these procedures benefit of a close collaboration between nuclear medicine specialist and clinicians. (author)

  15. Special monitoring in nuclear medicine; Monitoreo especial en medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, C.C.; Puerta, J.A.; Morales, J. [Asociacion Colombiana de Proteccion Radiologica (Colombia)]. e-mail: ccbeltra@gmail.com

    2006-07-01

    Colombia counts with around 56 centers of Nuclear Medicine, 70 Nuclear Doctors and more of 100 Technologists in this area. The radioisotopes more used are the {sup 131} I and the {sup 99m} Tc. The radiological surveillance singular in the country is carried out for external dosimetry, being the surveillance by incorporation of radioactive materials very sporadic in our media. Given the necessity to implement monitoring programs in the incorporation of radionuclides of the occupationally exposed personnel, in the routine practice them routine of Nuclear Medicine, it was implemented a pilot program of Special Monitoring with two centers of importance in the city of Medellin. This program it was carried out with the purpose of educating, to stimulate and to establish a program of reference monitoring with base in the National Program of Monitoring in the radionuclides Incorporation that serves like base for its application at level of all the services of Nuclear Medicine in the country. This monitoring type was carried out with the purpose of obtaining information on the work routine in these centers, form of manipulation and dosage of the radionuclides, as well as the administration to the patient. The application of the program was carried out to define the frequency of Monitoring and analysis technique for the implementation of a program of routine monitoring, following the recommendations of the International Commission of Radiological Protection. For their application methods of activity evaluation were used in urine and in 7 workers thyroid, of those which only two deserve an analysis because they presented important activities. The measures were carried out during one month, every day by means in urine samples and to the most critic case is practiced two thyroid measures, one in the middle of the period and another when concluding the monitoring. To the other guy is practiced an activity count in thyroid when concluding the monitoring period. The obtained

  16. Career prospects for graduating nuclear medicine residents: survey of nuclear medicine program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A; Guiberteau, Milton J; Metter, Darlene F; Oates, M Elizabeth

    2013-08-01

    There has been much consternation in the nuclear medicine (NM) community in recent years regarding the difficulty many NM graduates experience in securing initial employment. A survey designed to determine the extent and root causes behind the paucity of career opportunities was sent to all 2010-2011 NM residency program directors. The results of that survey and its implications for NM trainees and the profession are presented and discussed in this article. PMID:23763875

  17. Cryogenic Thermophysical Studies for Clinical Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    华泽钊

    2002-01-01

    Cryogenic technology has been widely used in clinical medicine and in pharmaceutics, so thermophysical studies are extremely important to solve problems during freezing and thawing. This paper reports some recent research in clinical medicine, including cryo-injury, cryosurgery, and cryopreservation of some important cells and tissues. Microscopic images of the freezing process with a cryomicroscope system show that the dendritic ice growth is affected by the solution concentration, the cooling rate, and the number of embryos. An enthalpy method is used for the freeze-thaw analysis of the cryosurgery with a program developed to predict the temperature profile and the interface motion, which compares well with experimental results. A very rapid cooling technique is developed by quenching the samples into subcooled liquid nitrogen for vitrification of cells and tissues. An analytical method developed to prevent the fracture of arteries during freezing has been verified by the electronic microscopic investigation.

  18. Assessing and Reducing Exposures to Nuclear Medicine Staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine involves the handling of unsealed radiation sources. Occupational monitoring in nuclear medicine, thus, includes assessment of both external irradiation of the body and internal exposure due to inhalation or ingestion of radioactive substances. When appropriate radiation protection measures are applied, the annual effective dose to nuclear medicine staff is low (around 2–3 mSv). However, hand doses can be very high and can even exceed the regulatory limit for skin equivalent dose, without workers being aware of it. The paper presents the main results of the European Atomic Energy Community’s Seventh Framework Programme project, Optimization of Radiation Protection of Medical Staff (ORAMED), within the field of extremity dosimetry of nuclear medicine staff, and proposes recommendations to improve radiation protection in occupational exposure in nuclear medicine. (author)

  19. Instrumentation and procedural problems in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter, the nuclear instrumentation problems, procedural errors, and resultant scintiphoto artifacts that might be encountered before, during, and after a nuclear medicine scan are discussed. In practice, whenever a scintiphoto is of unacceptable quality or contains an evident artifact, it generally is discarded, corrective actions are taken and, if possible the study is repeated. Instead of discarding the unacceptable scan, however, a notebook of all of these imaging artifacts could be compiled and made accessible to all personnel in the department. This artifact identification notebook is especially useful in a teaching institution in which technologists or residents are being trained. There is no better learning axion than that ''you learn by your mistakes.'' It is much easier on a department for rookies to learn from the mistakes of others, as cited in the artifact notebook, than for each individual to repeat all the common mistakes made by those who came before. It also becomes easier to identify or recognize the cause of many artifacts by referencing the manual or notebook

  20. Scintigraphic instruments and techniques in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of new radiopharmaceuticals, cyclotron-produced radionuclides and improvement of detector, scanner and gamma camera characteristics have enable a remarkable recent progress in scintigraphic techniques for organ visualization and functional studies. Using a variety of techniques, positron cameras, section scanners, gamma holography, tomographic imaging appear to be playing an increasing important role. Data processing techniques, for example image processing and three dimensional reconstruction have significantly increased their impact. The principal research work and advances in technique achieved up to 1972 are summarized and the subjects which have been further exploited are outlined. The main section comprises references and abstracts of articles from scientific journals and conference proceedings (191 articles and 221 papers mentioned) for the period 1972-1975 to illustrate advances in this domain: Excerpta Medica (Nuclear Medicine) Abstract Journals and Nuclear Science Abstracts (1972-1975) were used as abstracting publications. This survey is completed with an index of authors and subject-matters. Eleven thesis are mentionned in an appendix

  1. IAEA programs in empowering the nuclear medicine profession through online educational resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Thomas Nb; Dondi, Maurizio; Paez, Diana; Kashyap, Ravi; Nunez-Miller, Rodolfo

    2013-05-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) programme in human health aims to enhance the capabilities in Member States to address needs related to the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases through the application of nuclear techniques. It has the specific mission of fostering the application of nuclear medicine techniques as part of the clinical management of certain types of diseases. Attuned to the continuous evolution of this specialty as well as to the advancement and diversity of methods in delivering capacity building efforts in this digital age, the section of nuclear medicine of the IAEA has enhanced its program by incorporating online educational resources for nuclear medicine professionals into its repertoire of projects to further its commitment in addressing the needs of its Member States in the field of nuclear medicine. Through online educational resources such as the Human Health Campus website, e-learning modules, and scheduled interactive webinars, a validation of the commitment by the IAEA in addressing the needs of its Member States in the field of nuclear medicine is strengthened while utilizing the advanced internet and communications technology which is progressively becoming available worldwide. The Human Health Campus (www.humanhealth.iaea.org) is the online educational resources initiative of the Division of Human Health of the IAEA geared toward enhancing professional knowledge of health professionals in radiation medicine (nuclear medicine and diagnostic imaging, radiation oncology, and medical radiation physics), and nutrition. E-learning modules provide an interactive learning environment to its users while providing immediate feedback for each task accomplished. Webinars, unlike webcasts, offer the opportunity of enhanced interaction with the learners facilitated through slide shows where the presenter guides and engages the audience using video and live streaming. This paper explores the IAEA's available online

  2. Characterization of iodinated adrenomedullin derivatives suitable for lung nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu Yan; Letourneau, Myriam; Chatenet, David [Laboratoire d' etudes moleculaires et pharmacologiques des peptides, INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, Ville de Laval, Qc, H7V 1B7 (Canada); Dupuis, Jocelyn [Research Center, Montreal Heart Institute, Montreal, Qc (Canada); Department of Medicine, University of Montreal, Montreal, Qc (Canada); Fournier, Alain, E-mail: alain.fournier@iaf.inrs.ca [Laboratoire d' etudes moleculaires et pharmacologiques des peptides, INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, Ville de Laval, Qc, H7V 1B7 (Canada)

    2011-08-15

    Introduction: We have recently demonstrated the effectiveness of 99m-technetium adrenomedullin (AM) as a new molecular lung imaging agent that could provide significant advantages for the diagnosis and follow-up of disorders affecting the pulmonary circulation such as pulmonary embolism and pulmonary hypertension. Having the possibility to conjugate the targeting molecule with different radionuclides would offer more flexibility and potential advantages depending on clinical situations. Since various iodine isotopes are currently used in nuclear medicine and in pharmacological studies, we have evaluated which iodination method should be privileged in order to produce a good iodinated AM-derived nuclear medicine agent. Methods: Synthetic AM was labeled with iodine through chemical and lactoperoxidase oxidation methods. Position of the iodine atom on the peptide was determined by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis following cyanogen bromide cleavage and carboxypeptidase Y digestion. Binding affinity of iodinated AM analogues was evaluated by competition and saturation binding experiments on dog lung preparations. Results: In this study, we demonstrated that, upon lactoperoxidase oxidation, iodination occurred at Tyr{sup 1} and that this radioligand retained higher binding affinity and specificity over preparations obtained through chemical oxidation. Conclusions: These results emphasize the fact that even a small chemical modification, i.e. iodination, might deeply modify the pharmacological profile of a compound and support observations that the C-terminal tail of human AM plays an important role in the AM receptor binding process. Consequently, incorporation of a radionuclide to produce an AM-based nuclear medicine agent should privilege the N-terminus of the molecule.

  3. Nuclear medicine and radiopharmacy; Medicina nuclear y radiofarmacia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon A, M. C. [Sociedad Mexicana de Seguridad Radiologica A. C., Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2008-12-15

    In the areas of Nuclear Medicine and Radiopharmacy frequently happens that the personnel that is incorporated as a candidate to serve as personnel occupationally exposed have varied skills, not necessarily have an ingrained culture of safety and radiation protection, some are resistant to adoption a work discipline and have very limited notions of normalization, including the safety basic standards. In fact, referring to the safety basic standards, concepts such as practice justification, protection optimization and dose limitation, can be very abstract concepts for such personnel. In regard to training strategies, it was noted that training in the work is an effective tool although it is very demanding for the learner but mainly for the teaches. The experts number that can occur in this manner is limited because it is an individualized system; however those from the process usually acquire a good preparation, which certainly includes theoretical aspects. For greater efficiency it is necessary that hospitals account facilities, procedures and personnel that might have an exclusive dedication to education and training of human resources. This would create a safety culture, alleviating the burdens of the already existing expertise and improves the training conditions. The Mexican Society of Radiological Safety (SMSR) can help in these efforts through the publication of guides aimed at work training, coordination and articulation of the possible courses already on the market and own the courses organization, workshops and conferences with more frequency. It would also serves that the SMSR acts as speaker with political actors, advocating for the courses validation offered by higher learning institutions, coordinating and promoting postgraduates in Nuclear Medicine and Radiopharmacy. (Author)

  4. The current status and future perspectives of nuclear medicine in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung Chul; Oh, So Won; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Dong Soo

    2010-06-01

    Since the introduction of nuclear medicine in 1959, Korea accomplished a brilliant development in terms of both clinical practice and research activities, which was mainly due to the dedication of nuclear medicine specialists, consisting of physicians, technicians, and scientists, and strong support from the Korean Government. Now, Korea has 150 medical institutes, performing approximately 561,000 nuclear imaging procedures and 11.6 million in vitro studies in 2008, and ranked fourth in the number of presentations at the Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) in 2008. The successful progress in this field has allowed Korea to focus on the international promotion of nuclear medicine, especially in the developing and underdeveloped countries. In consequence, the Asian Regional Cooperative Council for Nuclear Medicine (ARCCNM) was established in 2001, and Seoul hosted the 9th Congress of the World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology (WFNMB) in 2006. In the future, Korea will strive to sustain its rate of advancement in the field and make every effort to share its progress and promote the exchange of scientific information at the international level. PMID:25013521

  5. Specific filters applied in nuclear medicine services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Vitor S.; Crispim, Verginia R., E-mail: verginia@con.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Brandao, Luis E.B. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ) Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In Nuclear Medicine, radioiodine, in various chemical forms, is a key tracer used in diagnostic practices and/or therapy. Due to its high volatility, medical professionals may incorporate radioactive iodine during the preparation of the dose to be administered to the patient. In radioactive iodine therapy doses ranging from 3.7 to 7.4 GBq per patient are employed. Thus, aiming at reducing the risk of occupational contamination, we developed a low cost filter to be installed at the exit of the exhaust system where doses of radioactive iodine are fractionated, using domestic technology. The effectiveness of radioactive iodine retention by silver impregnated silica [10%] crystals and natural activated carbon was verified using radiotracer techniques. The results showed that natural activated carbon is effective for I{sub 2} capture for a large or small amount of substrate but its use is restricted due to its low flash point (150 deg C). Besides, when poisoned by organic solvents, this flash point may become lower, causing explosions if absorbing large amounts of nitrates. To hold the CH{sub 3}I gas, it was necessary to increase the volume of natural activated carbon since it was not absorbed by SiO{sub 2} + Ag crystals. We concluded that, for an exhaust flow range of (306 {+-} 4) m{sup 3}/h, a double stage filter using SiO{sub 2} + Ag in the first stage and natural activated carbon in the second is sufficient to meet radiological safety requirements. (author)

  6. Contemporary nuclear medicine imaging of neuroendocrine tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are rare, heterogeneous, and often hormonally active neoplasms. Nuclear medicine (NM) imaging using single photon- and positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals allows sensitive and highly specific molecular imaging of NETs, complementary to anatomy-based techniques, such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Somatostatin-receptor scintigraphy is a whole-body imaging technique widely used for diagnosis, staging and restaging of NETs. The increasing availability of hybrid single-photon emission CT (SPECT)/CT cameras now offers superior accuracy for localization and functional characterization of NETs compared to traditional planar and SPECT imaging. The potential role of positron-emission tomography (PET) tracers in the functional imaging of NETs is also being increasingly recognized. In addition to 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG), newer positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals such as 18F-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) and 68Ga-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) peptides, show promise for the future. This article will summarize the role of current and emerging radiopharmaceuticals in NM imaging of this rare but important group of tumours.

  7. Nuclear medicine and the nursing mother

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coakley, A.J.; Mountford, P.J. (Kent and Canterbury Hospital (UK))

    1985-07-20

    Many radiopharmaceuticals may be detected in breast milk, but differ from other drugs in that for diagnostic purposes they are used in tracer quantities and do not produce demonstrable pharmacological changes in mother or infant. Patients may also be given non-radioactive drugs to induce changes in the distribution of the radiopharmaceuticals and some of these, too, appear in milk (e.g. frusemide, potassium perchlorate, iodides, and cholecystokinin). Iodides are selectively concentrated in breast milk, and some consider them contra-indicated during lactation. A period of interruption of breast feeding, expression of milk, and reduction of close contact with the infant is usually recommended for mothers who have a nuclear medicine investigation. The inconvenience and disadvantages of interrupting breast feeding have to be balanced against the potential risk to the infant: the prolonged interruption of feeding advocated for some agents is often impracticable. Interruption for 24 hours for sup(99m)Tc compounds is excessive for doses used in Britain. Twelve hours leaves a wide range of safety for pertechnetate. No interruption is needed for sup(99m)Tc-macroaggregated albumin and sup(99m)Tc-diethylenetriamine-penta-acetic acid in order to remain below one tenth of the annual limit of intake.

  8. History and Perspectives of Nuclear Medicine in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Raihan Hussain

    2016-01-01

    Bangladesh is one of the smaller states in Asia. But it has a long and rich history of nuclear medicine for over sixty years. The progress in science and technology is always challenging in a developing country. In 1958, work for the first Nuclear Medicine facility was commenced in Dhaka in a tin-shed known as ‘Radioisotope Centre’ and was officially inaugurated in 1962. Since the late 50s of the last century nuclear medicine in Bangladesh has significantly progressed through the years in its...

  9. Metabolic radiopharmaceutical therapy in nuclear medicine; Terapia metabolica mediante radiofarmacos en medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reguera, L.; Lozano, M. L.; Alonso, J. C.

    2016-08-01

    In 1986 the National Board of Medical Specialties defined the specialty of nuclear medicine as a medical specialty that uses radioisotopes for prevention, diagnosis, therapy and medical research. Nowadays, treatment with radiopharmaceuticals has reached a major importance within of nuclear medicine. The ability to treat tumors with radiopharmaceutical, Radiation selective therapy has become a first line alternative. In this paper, the current situation of the different therapies that are sued in nuclear medicine, is reviewed. (Author)

  10. Proceedings of the 6.Brazilian Meeting on Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several subjects on nuclear medicine are presented. The use of scintiscanning in heart diseases, neoplasms, etc. is emphasized. Radioisotope preparation techniques and labelling of compounds used in radioassays are described. (M.A.C.)

  11. Proceedings of the 7. Brazilian Meeting on Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subjects about nuclear medicine are discussed. Researchs concerning the use of radioisotopes as tracers in several diseases are presented. The use of radioisotopes in diagnosis are emphasized. (M.A.C.)

  12. Requirements of radiation protection and safety for nuclear medicine services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The requirements of radiation protection and safety for nuclear medicine services are established. The norms is applied to activities related to the radiopharmaceuticals for therapeutics and 'in vivo' diagnostics purposes. (M.C.K.)

  13. Ninth Argentine congress on biology and nuclear medicine; fourth Southernmost sessions of ALASBIMN (Latin-American Association of Biology and Nuclear Medicine); first Spanish-Argentine congress on nuclear medicine; first Argentine sessions on nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with all the papers presented at the 9. Argentine congress on biology and nuclear medicine; IV Southernmost sessions of ALASBIMN; I Spanish-Argentine congress on nuclear medicine and I Sessions Argentine sessions on nuclear cardiology held in Buenos Aires, Argentina, from October 14 - 18, 1991

  14. Training in nuclear medicine: Based on the recommendations of IAEA/WHO Seminar, 8-12 August 1988, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Medicine is defined as a clinical specialty that utilizes the radionuclides for diagnosis, therapy and medical research. The radionuclides are used as unsealed sources of radioactivity. The diagnostic applications include both in vivo and in vitro uses of radioisotopes. There is hardly any medical research which does not use radioactive compounds. Only clinical research is considered within the purview of nuclear medicine. The Recommendations of IAEA/WHO seminar reviewed the needs of training in nuclear medicine mainly for the physicians with special emphasis on the needs of the developing countries

  15. Occupational exposure in nuclear medicine in Portugal in the 1999-2003 period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual doses received by the staff of nuclear medicine departments from public hospitals and private clinics and evaluated by the Individual Monitoring Service of the Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety Dept. (DPRSN) of the Nuclear and Technological Inst. (ITN) in Portugal, in the 5 y period from 1999 to 2003, are analysed and presented in this paper. In the 1999-2003 period, ITN-DPRSN monitored on an average 462 workers from nuclear medicine departments, which represents 6% of the 8000 workers of the medical field (approximately). The medical sector represents 80-85% of all the monitored population in Portugal. The professions of the monitored workers at nuclear medicine departments were identified by the respective departments as administrative, auxiliary, medical doctor, nuclear medicine technician, nurse, pharmacist and physicist. This information was collected at the onset of the monitoring and was updated over the last 3 y. The annual whole-body doses evaluated in the period 1999-2003 were used to derive the distribution of workers by dose intervals for every profession. The respective annual average doses and annual collective doses, as well as, the total average and total collective doses for the nuclear medicine sector were also determined and are presented. Internal radiation hasn't been monitored. (authors)

  16. Computers in Nuclear Medicine. Chapter 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1965, Gordon Moore, a co-founder of Intel, said that new memory chips have twice the capacity of prior chips, and that new chips are released every 18 to 24 months. This statement has become known as Moore’s law. Moore’s law means that memory size increases exponentially. More generally, the exponential growth of computers has applied not only to memory size, but also to many computer capabilities, and since 1965, Moore’s law has remained remarkably accurate. Further, this remarkable growth in capabilities has occurred with a steady decrease in price. Anyone who has even a little appreciation of exponential growth realizes that exponential growth cannot continue indefinitely. However, the history of computers is littered with ‘experts’ who have prematurely declared the end of Moore’s law. The quotation at the beginning of this section indicates that future growth of computers has often been underestimated. The exponential growth of computer capabilities has a very important implication for the management of a nuclear medicine department. The growth in productivity of the staff of a department is slow, especially when compared to the growth in capabilities of a computer. This means that whatever decision was made in the past about the balance between staff and computers is now out of date. A good heuristic is: always apply more computer capacity and less people to a new task. Or stated more simply, hardware is ‘cheap’, at least with respect to what you learned in training or what you decided last time you considered the balance between hardware and ‘peopleware’

  17. Role of Nuclear Medicine in the cardiac resinchronization therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Simone Cristina Soares, E-mail: simonecordis@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Giorgi, Maria Clementina Pinto; D' Orio, Silvana Angelina; Meneghetti, Jose Claudio [Instituto do Coracao (InCor/FM/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-15

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) emerged as one of the most promising approaches in the treatment of cardiac dyssynchrony in heart failure patients' refractory to medical treatment. However, despite very promising clinical and functional results, individual response analyses show that a significant number of patients do not respond to treatment. The role of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging in the selection of CRT candidates by the assessment of cardiac dyssynchrony, myocardial viability, myocardial perfusion and blood flow and sympathetic cardiac activity has been discussed in this review. The potential utilization of this tool to improve the comprehension of detrimental effects of dyssynchrony on cardiac function and the evaluation and monitoring of the response to CRT were also considered. Other molecular targets that characterize glucose and fatty acid metabolism, apoptosis, angiotensin converting enzyme activity and angiogenesis that can be evaluated with this technique were described. (author)

  18. Role of Nuclear Medicine in the cardiac resinchronization therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) emerged as one of the most promising approaches in the treatment of cardiac dyssynchrony in heart failure patients' refractory to medical treatment. However, despite very promising clinical and functional results, individual response analyses show that a significant number of patients do not respond to treatment. The role of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging in the selection of CRT candidates by the assessment of cardiac dyssynchrony, myocardial viability, myocardial perfusion and blood flow and sympathetic cardiac activity has been discussed in this review. The potential utilization of this tool to improve the comprehension of detrimental effects of dyssynchrony on cardiac function and the evaluation and monitoring of the response to CRT were also considered. Other molecular targets that characterize glucose and fatty acid metabolism, apoptosis, angiotensin converting enzyme activity and angiogenesis that can be evaluated with this technique were described. (author)

  19. Evaluations of Molecular Nuclear Medicine in pediatric urgencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several diagnostic procedures of Molecular Nuclear Medicine are considered in first choice in clinical evaluation of patients with different illnesses. So, the gammagraphy is the diagnostic form more sensitive to detect alterations of the perfusion on organs and systems such as bones, heart, brain, lungs or kidneys. Also is possible to identify, localize, evaluate the activity of inflammatory processes such as cellulitis, arthritis, osteomyelitis, the abscesses and several primary or metastatic tumours before each other diagnostic technique. In this work is treated about the importance of treatments with radioactive materials have been an important reappearance in last years since with the present capacity to localize specifically intracellular processes (for example, synthesis of DNA) new gateways are opened to research which in coming years would be of great utility. (Author)

  20. Radiation safety audit of a high volume Nuclear Medicine Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Professional radiation exposure cannot be avoided in nuclear medicine practices. It can only be minimized up to some extent by implementing good work practices. The aim of our study was to audit the professional radiation exposure and exposure rate of radiation worker working in and around Department of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging, Tata Memorial Hospital. We calculated the total number of nuclear medicine and positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) procedures performed in our department and the radiation exposure to the radiation professionals from year 2009 to 2012. We performed an average of 6478 PET/CT scans and 3856 nuclear medicine scans/year from January 2009 to December 2012. The average annual whole body radiation exposure to nuclear medicine physician, technologist and nursing staff are 1.74 mSv, 2.93 mSv and 4.03 mSv respectively. Efficient management and deployment of personnel is of utmost importance to optimize radiation exposure in a high volume nuclear medicine setup in order to work without anxiety of high radiation exposure

  1. History and Perspectives of Nuclear Medicine in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raihan Hussain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bangladesh is one of the smaller states in Asia. But it has a long and rich history of nuclear medicine for over sixty years. The progress in science and technology is always challenging in a developing country. In 1958, work for the first Nuclear Medicine facility was commenced in Dhaka in a tin-shed known as ‘Radioisotope Centre’ and was officially inaugurated in 1962. Since the late 50s of the last century nuclear medicine in Bangladesh has significantly progressed through the years in its course of development, but still the facilities are inadequate. At present there are 20 nuclear medicine establishments with 3 PET-CTs, 42 gamma camera/SPECTs with 95 physicians, 20 physicists, 10 radiochemists and 150 technologists. The Society of Nuclear Medicine, Bangladesh (SNMB was formed in 1993 and publishing its official journal since 1997. Bangladesh also has close relationships with many international organizations like IAEA, ARCCNM, AOFNMB, ASNM, WFNMB and WARMTH. The history and the present scenario of the status of nuclear medicine in Bangladesh are being described here.

  2. Nuclear medicine techniques for the study of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In conclusion, the currently available data, which have mainly been obtained in th last 5 years at various centres including our own, seem to favour the introduction of nuclear medine techniques in clinical practice for the diagnostic and prognostic evaluation of breast carcinoma. However, to fully define the role of these techniques we believe good-quality studies should be conducted on selected, homogeneous case series and be aimed at the solution of precise diagnostic problems (small tumours, early stages, diagnostic suspicion without a palpable breast mass, etc.). Only then will it be possible to obtain a concrete idea of the diagnostic reliability of these methods in clinical situations, where more accurate diagnostic tools are urgently awaited. With regard to the radiopharmaceuticals that might be proposed and employed, we would recommend curbing the proliferation of new agents and devoting more attention to the validation of those of proven utility, taking into account the problem of cost. In our opinion the currently available gamma-emitting tracers have satisfactory characteristics for nuclear medicine studies and merit further, more detailed evaluation. PET centres will have the opportunity, and the task, to fulfil the expectations aroused by the encouraging preliminary results. (orig./AJ). With 3 figs

  3. Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine Practices. 2. Ed. Companion CD-ROM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quality management systems are essential and should be maintained with the intent to continuously improve effectiveness and efficiency, enabling nuclear medicine to achieve the expectations of its quality policy, satisfy its customers and improve professionalism. The quality management (QM) audit methodology in nuclear medicine practice, introduced in this publication, is designed to be applied to a variety of economic circumstances. A key outcome is a culture of reviewing all processes of the clinical service for continuous improvement in nuclear medicine practice. Regular quality audits and assessments are vital for modern nuclear medicine services. More importantly, the entire QM and audit process has to be systematic, patient oriented and outcome based. The management of services should also take into account the diversity of nuclear medicine services around the world and multidisciplinary contributions. The latter include clinical, technical, radiopharmaceutical, medical physics and radiation safety procedures. This companion CD-ROM is attached to the printed STI/PUB/1683 and contains the full-text of STI/PUB/1683 as well as checklists in PDF and Excel format and a table with the contents of a standardized audit report

  4. Radiological Justification for and Optimization of Nuclear Medicine Practices in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung Il

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear medicine is a rapidly growing discipline that employs advanced novel hybrid techniques that provide unique anatomical and functional information, as well as targets for molecular therapy. Concomitantly, there has been an increase in the attention paid to medical radiation exposure. A radiological justification for the practice of nuclear medicine has been implemented mainly through referral guidelines based on research results such as prospective randomized clinical trials. The International Commission on Radiological Protection recommends diagnostic reference levels as a practical mechanism to optimize medical radiation exposure in order to be commensurate with the medical purpose. The Korean Society of Nuclear Medicine has been implementing radiological optimization through a survey of the protocols on how each hospital determines the dose of administration of each radiopharmaceutical. In the case of nuclear medicine, radiation exposure of caregivers and comforters of patients discharged after administration of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals can occur; therefore, optimization has been implemented through written instructions for patients, based on international recommendations. The development of patient-radiation-dose monitoring software, and a national registry and management system of patient-radiation-dose is needed to implement radiological optimization through diagnostic reference levels. This management system must work in agreement with the "Institute for Quality Management of Nuclear Medicine", and must take into account the medical reality of Korea, such as low medicine fee, in order to implement reasonable radiological justification and optimization. PMID:26908990

  5. Applications of CdTe to nuclear medicine. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uses of cadmium telluride (CdTe) nuclear detectors in medicine are briefly described. They include surgical probes and a system for measuring cerebral blood flow in the intensive care unit. Other uses include nuclear dentistry, x-ray exposure control, cardiology, diabetes, and the testing of new pharmaceuticals

  6. Nuclear medicine imaging of bone infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, C; Palestro, C J

    2016-07-01

    Osteomyelitis is a broad group of infectious diseases that involve the bone and/or bone marrow. It can arise haematogenously, via extension from a contiguous infection, or by direct inoculation during surgery or trauma. The diagnosis is not always obvious and imaging tests are frequently performed as part of the diagnostic work-up. Commonly performed radionuclide tests include technetium-99m ((99m)Tc)-diphosphonate bone scintigraphy (bone), and gallium-67 ((67)Ga) and in vitro labelled leukocyte (white blood cell; WBC) imaging. Although they are useful, each of these tests has limitations. Bone scintigraphy is sensitive but not specific, especially when underlying osseous abnormalities are present. (67)Ga accumulates in tumour, trauma, and in aseptic inflammation; furthermore, there is typically an interval of 1-3 days between radiopharmaceutical injection of and imaging. Currently, this agent is used primarily for spinal infections. Except for the spine, WBC imaging is the nuclear medicine test of choice for diagnosing complicating osteomyelitis. The in vitro leukocyte labelling process requires skilled personnel, is laborious, and is not always available. Complementary marrow imaging is usually required to maximise accuracy. Not surprisingly, alternative radiopharmaceuticals are continuously being investigated. Radiolabelled anti-granulocyte antibodies and antibody fragments, investigated as in vivo leukocyte labelling agents, have their own limitations and are not widely available. (111)In-biotin is useful for diagnosing spinal infections. Radiolabelled synthetic fragments of ubiquicidin, a naturally occurring human antimicrobial peptide that targets bacteria, have shown promise as infection specific radiopharmaceuticals. 2-[(18)F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) positron-emission tomography (PET) with or without computed tomography (CT) is very useful in musculoskeletal infection. Sensitivities of more than 95% and specificities ranging from 75-99% have been

  7. Nuclear medicine in dentistry revisited: New avenues to explore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinita Boloor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear medicine and radioactive tracers have considerable application in dental research, because they provide one of the few practical methods for studying the limited metabolic activities of bones and teeth. The ease with which minute amounts of these radioactive materials may be accurately measured and distinguished from the mass of inert element in the tooth is particularly valuable. They are useful in studying many problems of calcification and mineral exchange. There are also opportunities of their use in investigating fluorosis, caries protection, periodontal disease, micro leakage studies of dental materials, root resorption, nutritional, and endocrine effects, as well as numerous other dental problems. Other usages of nuclear medicine in dentistry are listed below: Age written in teeth by nuclear tests, scintigraphic evaluation of osteoblastic activity, and evaluation of osteoblastic activity around dental implants using bone scintigraphy. Nuclear medicine can be an indicator of "active" alveolar bone loss. Nuclear medicine techniques are used as an adjunct for the diagnosis of oral diseases (benign tumors and carcinomas and temporomandibular joint disease. This review article discusses these indications of nuclear medicine.

  8. Therapeutic radionuclides in nuclear medicine: current and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeong, Chai-Hong; Cheng, Mu-hua; Ng, Kwan-Hoong

    2014-10-01

    The potential use of radionuclides in therapy has been recognized for many decades. A number of radionuclides, such as iodine-131 ((131)I), phosphorous-32 ((32)P), strontium-90 ((90)Sr), and yttrium-90 ((90)Y), have been used successfully for the treatment of many benign and malignant disorders. Recently, the rapid growth of this branch of nuclear medicine has been stimulated by the introduction of a number of new radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of metastatic bone pain and neuroendocrine and other malignant or non-malignant tumours. Today, the field of radionuclide therapy is enjoying an exciting phase and is poised for greater growth and development in the coming years. For example, in Asia, the high prevalence of thyroid and liver diseases has prompted many novel developments and clinical trials using targeted radionuclide therapy. This paper reviews the characteristics and clinical applications of the commonly available therapeutic radionuclides, as well as the problems and issues involved in translating novel radionuclides into clinical therapies.

  9. Extract from IAEA's Resources Manual in Nuclear Medicine - Part 2. - Human Resources Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Medicine Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency is now engaged in finalizing a reference manual in nuclear medicine, entitled, 'Resources Manual in Nuclear Medicine'. Several renowned professionals from all over the world, from virtually all fields of nuclear medicine have contributed to this manual. The World Journal of Nuclear Medicine will publish a series of extracts from this manual as previews. This is the second extract from the Resources Manual, Part-2 of the chapter on Human Resources Development. (author)

  10. Extracts from IAEA's Resources Manual in Nuclear Medicine - Part 1 - Human Resource Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Medicine Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency is now engaged in finalizing a reference manual in nuclear medicine, entitled, 'Resources Manual in Nuclear Medicine'. Several renowned professionals from all over the world, from virtually all fields of nuclear medicine have contributed to this manual. The World Journal of Nuclear Medicine will publish a series of extracts from this manual as previews. This is the first extract from the Resources Manual, Part-1 of the chapter on Human Resources Development. (author)

  11. Application of medical psychology in the reception of nuclear medicine department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reception of nuclear medicine department is often ignored. In fact, it is an important part of clinical work. If the patient's psychological status is understood, and the psychological knowledge is handles and applied in practice, the quality of work can be improved. The personnel in nuclear medicine should recognize the significance of humanity in medical practice and acquire the communication skill between doctors and patients. They should also understand the four aspects of psychological need of patients: The need of being understood and respected; the need of being greeted, accepted and a sense of belonging; the need of being informed; the need of feeling safe and rehabilitated

  12. Quality assurance for radioactive measurement in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    interrelated or interacting elements for establishing policies and objectives and enabling the objectives to be achieved in a safe and efficient way. The management system is designed to fulfil requirements that integrate elements related to safety, health, the environment, security, quality and economics. Safety is the fundamental principle upon which the management system is based. It is also recognized in GS-R-3 that QC and QA are important components of the management system. While QC is a means of applying controls to ensure that the product or service consistently meets specifications, QA is an interdisciplinary management tool that provides a means for ensuring that all work is adequately planned, correctly performed and assessed. A QA programme is designed primarily to ensure the quality of a product for a customer and may be appropriate to control the activities in radioactivity measurement in nuclear medicine. However, it would be more effective if these QA controls were integrated into a single management system. There are numerous processes that review and assess financial and technical performance, the achievement of goals and the effectiveness of an organization's processes. It is necessary to integrate the results of all assessment activities to focus decision making on the needs of the business strategy. It is important to understand how assessments enable managers to achieve higher standards of performance. The principles in this publication are based on those described in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-3 and in the General Requirements for the Competence of Testing and Calibration Laboratories (ISO/IEC 17025:1999), which set requirements that testing and calibration laboratories must meet to demonstrate that they have a management system in place and are technically competent. The present report provides information specific to implementing these standards at both the end user (clinic) and the secondary standards radioactivity laboratory levels. If

  13. Evidence-based integrative medicine in clinical veterinary oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raditic, Donna M; Bartges, Joseph W

    2014-09-01

    Integrative medicine is the combined use of complementary and alternative medicine with conventional or traditional Western medicine systems. The demand for integrative veterinary medicine is growing, but evidence-based research on its efficacy is limited. In veterinary clinical oncology, such research could be translated to human medicine, because veterinary patients with spontaneous tumors are valuable translational models for human cancers. An overview of specific herbs, botanics, dietary supplements, and acupuncture evaluated in dogs, in vitro canine cells, and other relevant species both in vivo and in vitro is presented for their potential use as integrative therapies in veterinary clinical oncology. PMID:25174902

  14. Diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities of modern nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Nuclear medicine activity began to expand in the latter half of 1970 in worldwide. In 1980, many countries experienced a rapid increase in the number of medical facilities with nuclear medicine modalities. Nuclear imagining procedures serve as effective diagnostic tools due to their unique ability to provide information that is function-specific and to gather detailed information from radiological exams and other treatment methods. In-vivo studies using SPECT and PET modalities have shown a trend of significant increase throughout the past two decades. Looking at the nuclear neurologic application, there is a rapid increase in last decade. Brain perfusion SPECT and brain PET were making it the most commonly and the most widely performed nuclear neuroimaging study. Since 1990s, conventional nuclear cardiology studies (MUGA and single pass study) declined in number. But myocardial SPECT only increased dramatically using thallium and Tc-99m-MIBI. MIBG imaging plays a prominent role in diagnosing pheochromocytomas/paragangliomas (including nonfunctional paragangliomas) and neuroblastomas. It may be regarded as a first-choice imaging technique, as it presents a wide range of clinical advantages in both the diagnosis and follow-up of these tumors. Regarding to the radioisotope treatment, only radioiodine therapy was used more clinically. But recently, some new treatment is being tried, for example Ho-166 and rhenium-188. I-131 MIBG therapy is an effective treatment for several neural crest tumors, with can be delivered safely, even in children, provided that the bone marrow is free of tumor cells. I-131 MIBG therapy is probably the best palliative treatment for patients with advanced disease, as the invasiveness and toxicity of this therapy compare favorably with that of chemotherapy, immunotherapy and external beam radiotherapy. In general, PET has been primarily used to evaluate ischemic heart disease and to perform diagnostic imaging of malignant tumor

  15. Tasks of research in forensic medicine - different study types in clinical research and forensic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madea, Burkhard; Saukko, Pekka; Musshoff, Frank

    2007-01-17

    In the last years the research output of forensic medicine has sometimes been regarded as insufficient and as of poor quality, especially when parameters as impact factors and external funding were taken into account. However, forensic medicine has different tasks compared to clinical medicine. The main difference between basic subjects, clinical and forensic medicine is not a lack of scientific efficiency in forensic medicine but is a result of the questions asked, the available methods and specific aims. In contrast to natural-scientific research, forensic science has furthermore important intersections with arts and socio-scientific disciplines. Etiologic and pathogenetic research is of only limited relevance in forensic medicine. Thus, forensic medicine is excluded from these research fields, which are mainly supported by external funding. In forensic medicine research mainly means applied research regarding findings, the probative value and reconstruction as well as examination at different points of intersection between medicine and law. Clinical types of research such as controlled randomised, prospective cross-sectional, cohort or case-control studies can only rarely be applied in forensic medicine due to the area specific research fields (e.g. thantatology, violent death, vitality, traffic medicine, analytical toxicology, hemogenetics and stain analysis). The types of studies which are successfully established in forensic medicine are comparison of methods, sensitivity studies, validation of methods, kinetic examinations etc. Tasks of research in forensic medicine and study types, which may be applied will be addressed.

  16. Comparative analysis of dosimetry parameters for nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toohey, R.E.; Stabin, M.G. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

    1999-01-01

    For years many have employed the concept of ``total-body dose`` or ``whole-body dose,`` i.e., the total energy deposited in the body divided by the mass of the body, when evaluating the risks of different nuclear medicine procedures. The effective dose equivalent (H{sub E}), first described in ICRP Publication 26, has been accepted by some as a better quantity to use in evaluating the total risk of a procedure, but its use has been criticized by others primarily because the tissue weighting factors were intended for use in the radiation worker, rather than the nuclear medicine patient population. Nevertheless, in ICRP Publication 52, the ICRP has suggested that the H{sub E} may be used in nuclear medicine. The ICRP also has published a compendium of dose estimates, including H{sub E} values, for various nuclear medicine procedures at various ages in ICRP Publication 53. The effective dose (E) of ICRP Publication 60 is perhaps more suitable for use in nuclear medicine, with tissue weighting factors based on the entire population. Other comparisons of H{sub E} and E have been published. The authors have used the program MIRDOSE 3.1 to compute total-body dose, H{sub E}, and E for 62 radiopharmaceutical procedures, based on the best current biokinetic data available.

  17. Nuclear medicine procedures in the postgenomic era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessment of gene function following the completion of human genome sequencing may be done using radionuclide imaging procedures. These procedures are needed for the evaluation of genetically manipulated animals or newly designed biomolecules which requires a thorough understanding of physiology, biochemistry and pharmacology. The experimental approaches will involve many new technologies including in vivo imaging with SPECT and PET. Nuclear medicine procedures may be applied for the determination of gene function and regulation using established and new tracers or using in vivo reporter genes such as genes encoding enzymes, receptors, antigens or transporters. Visualization of in vivo reporter gene expression can be done using radiolabelled substrates, antibodies or ligands. Combinations of specific promoters and in vivo reporter genes may deliver information about the regulation of the corresponding genes. Furthermore, protein-protein interactions and activation of signal transduction pathways may be visualized non-invasively. The role of radiolabelled antisense molecules for the analysis of mRNA content has to be investigated. However, possible applications are therapeutic intervention using triplex oligonucleotides with therapeutic isotopes which can be brought near to specific DNA sequences to induce DNA strand breaks at selected loci. Imaging of labelled siRNA's makes sense if these are used for therapeutic purposes in order to assess the delivery of these new drugs to their target tissue. In gene therapy based on the transfer and expression of suicide genes, usually gene coding for the non-mammalian enzymes, the Herpes Simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) or the yeast and bacterial cytosine deaminase (CD), have been used. After infection of the tumour with the recombinant virus, a non-toxic prodrug is applied systemically, which is subsequently converted to a toxic metabolite by the recombinant gene product. Employing a radiolabelled prodrug and

  18. Study of metrologic characteristics in activimeters used in Nuclear Medicine Centers in Colombia; Estudio de caracteristicas metrologicas en activimetros utilizados en centros de Medicina Nuclear de Colombia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davila, Hernan Olaya; Flores, Guillermo, E-mail: holayadavila@gmail.com [Instituto Colombiano de Geologia y Mineria (INGEOMINAS), Bogota, D.C. (Colombia). Laboratorio de Metrologia de las Radiaciones del Servicio Geologico Colombiano; Cantillo, Juliana I.P., E-mail: julianacantillo5@gmail.com [Universidad Pedagogica y Tecnologica de Colombia, Boyaca (Colombia)

    2013-07-01

    In our country currently there is a legislation that regulated de Nuclear Medicine practice, that establish the criteria about quality assurance in Nuclear Medicine and the justification to imparted to medical exposures. In this work includes some tests to the clinical approval in this type of instruments before to be used. The type of tests are linearity, geometric dependence and the energetic response and moreover to evaluate the total uncertainty during the work the physician using this equipment with radioactive sources. (author)

  19. Highlights of the Annual Congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, Istanbul, 2005: the incremental value of nuclear medicine for patient management and care

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuocolo, Alberto; Acampa, Wanda; Varrone, Andrea; Salvatore, Marco [University of Naples Federico II, Department of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences, Napoli (Italy); Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages of the National Council of Research, Naples (Italy)

    2006-03-15

    The 2005 Annual Congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) took place in Istanbul on October 15-19, under the chairmanship of Professor Hatice Durak. The programme was of excellent quality and represented a further step towards the achievement of a standardized EANM congress structure. A large industrial exhibition demonstrated the latest technological innovations and developments within the field. The congress was a great success: there were more than 4,000 participants, and 1,670 abstracts were received. Of these, 1,399 were accepted for oral or poster presentations, with a rejection rate of 16.2%. The original investigations presented were related to different areas of nuclear medicine, and addressed particularly advances in instrumentation and data processing, progress in radiochemistry and pharmacy, novel diagnostics and therapeutics, and new insights in well-established areas of clinical application, such as oncology, cardiology, neurology, psychiatry, endocrinology, paediatrics, nephrology, and infection and inflammation. It is noteworthy that a number of studies presented at this congress focussed on the quantitative interpretation of the imaging data and on pragmatic endpoints, such as adverse outcomes, and identified when nuclear medicine procedures achieved clinical effectiveness for patient care and management. These and many other studies presented at the congress demonstrate once more the crucial role that nuclear medicine has to play in contemporary medicine. This highlights lecture is only a brief summary of the large amount of data presented and discussed, which can be found in much greater detail in the congress proceedings book, published as volume 32, supplement 1 of the Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging in September 2005. (orig.)

  20. Highlights of the Annual Congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, Istanbul, 2005: the incremental value of nuclear medicine for patient management and care

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 2005 Annual Congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) took place in Istanbul on October 15-19, under the chairmanship of Professor Hatice Durak. The programme was of excellent quality and represented a further step towards the achievement of a standardized EANM congress structure. A large industrial exhibition demonstrated the latest technological innovations and developments within the field. The congress was a great success: there were more than 4,000 participants, and 1,670 abstracts were received. Of these, 1,399 were accepted for oral or poster presentations, with a rejection rate of 16.2%. The original investigations presented were related to different areas of nuclear medicine, and addressed particularly advances in instrumentation and data processing, progress in radiochemistry and pharmacy, novel diagnostics and therapeutics, and new insights in well-established areas of clinical application, such as oncology, cardiology, neurology, psychiatry, endocrinology, paediatrics, nephrology, and infection and inflammation. It is noteworthy that a number of studies presented at this congress focussed on the quantitative interpretation of the imaging data and on pragmatic endpoints, such as adverse outcomes, and identified when nuclear medicine procedures achieved clinical effectiveness for patient care and management. These and many other studies presented at the congress demonstrate once more the crucial role that nuclear medicine has to play in contemporary medicine. This highlights lecture is only a brief summary of the large amount of data presented and discussed, which can be found in much greater detail in the congress proceedings book, published as volume 32, supplement 1 of the Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging in September 2005. (orig.)

  1. Imaging technologies for nuclear medicine offering superior functional diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear medicine examination is a diagnostic procedure in which organ functions, such as metabolism, blood flow, and neurotransmission, are visualized utilizing radioisotope (RI) tracers. It is a type of molecular imaging, in which RI tracers reflect biological functions on a molecular level. To obtain images with high diagnostic accuracy, Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation has developed the following sophisticated technologies for nuclear medicine: a radiation measurement technology with a high time resolution of several hundred picoseconds, a quantification method that can compensate for Compton scattering and photoelectric effects, and an image reconstruction technology. We are supplying proprietary nuclear medicine systems incorporating these technologies with the objectives of decreasing the patient burden and contributing to hospital management efficiency through reduction of radiation doses and shortening of examination times. (author)

  2. Occupational exposure in nuclear medicine in Portugal in the 1999-2003 period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The annual doses received by the staff of nuclear medicine departments from public hospitals and private clinics and evaluated by the Individual Monitoring Service of the Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety Department (DPRSN) of the Nuclear and Technological Institute (ITN) in Portugal, in the 5-year period from 1999 to 2003, are analyzed and presented in this paper. In 2003, ITN-DPRSN monitored 400 workers from nuclear medicine departments, which represents 5 % of the 8,000 workers of the medical field (approximately). In the period from 1999 to 2003, the workers from the medical sector represented 80 to 85 % of the monitored population in Portugal. The professions of the monitored workers at nuclear medicine departments were identified by the respective departments as administrative, auxiliary, medical doctor, nurse, pharmacist, physicist and technician, performing diagnostic, therapy and both. This information was collected at the onset of the monitoring and was updated over the last three years. The annual whole body doses evaluated in the period 1999 to 2003 were used to derive the distribution of workers by dose intervals for every category and practice. The respective annual average doses and annual collective doses, as well as the total average and total collective doses for the nuclear medicine sector were also determined and are presented. (author)

  3. Establishment of a national programme for QC of nuclear medicine instruments in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    persons in this activity in all the nuclear medicine departments. The course was held at the National College of Health and it is going to be conducted every two years. Forty hours of theoretical and practical sessions were planned, 20 hours of lectures and 20 hours of laboratory activities. Two pilot courses have already been delivered during 2002 and 2004. More than 45 students from the whole country attended these educational activities. A database of phantoms and accessories for quality control of nuclear medicine instruments was organized and published on the internet. Firstly, all the interested institutions provided the description and technical information of the phantoms and also their formal agreements to share these resources. A methodology for the exchange mechanism was promoted and headed by the CCEEM. Finally, a website was created with the details of the available resources, which included clinical phantoms (anthropomorphic torso phantom, cardiac inserts, dynamic cardiac phantom, etc), total performance phantoms (Carlson and Jaszczak phantoms), calibrated flood and point radiation sources, linearity and contrast/resolution phantoms, etc. The current state of the Cuban nuclear medicine instruments was evaluated. Firstly, a survey was organized and performed by the CCEEM on all the national nuclear medicine services, in order to collect specific data about the equipment and the institutional quality control programmes. Later on, in situ measurements were performed in the majority of the services using a selected set of quality control tests. All the gamma cameras and SPECT systems were evaluated as well as the complementary equipment. The processing and evaluation of the measurements were performed by the expert group and the results were discussed with the local staff and authorities. Abnormal outcomes and the suggestions to fix them were reported in a formal report. Finally, an audit service headed by the CCEEM was organized, which was licensed and

  4. Goal-setting in clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, E H; Bogardus, S T; Tinetti, M E; Inouye, S K

    1999-07-01

    The process of setting goals for medical care in the context of chronic disease has received little attention in the medical literature, despite the importance of goal-setting in the achievement of desired outcomes. Using qualitative research methods, this paper develops a theory of goal-setting in the care of patients with dementia. The theory posits several propositions. First, goals are generated from embedded values but are distinct from values. Goals vary based on specific circumstances and alternatives whereas values are person-specific and relatively stable in the face of changing circumstances. Second, goals are hierarchical in nature, with complex mappings between general and specific goals. Third, there are a number of factors that modify the goal-setting process, by affecting the generation of goals from values or the translation of general goals to specific goals. Modifying factors related to individuals include their degree of risk-taking, perceived self-efficacy, and acceptance of the disease. Disease factors that modify the goal-setting process include the urgency and irreversibility of the medical condition. Pertinent characteristics of the patient-family-clinician interaction include the level of participation, control, and trust among patients, family members, and clinicians. The research suggests that the goal-setting process in clinical medicine is complex, and the potential for disagreements regarding goals substantial. The nature of the goal-setting process suggests that explicit discussion of goals for care may be necessary to promote effective patient-family-clinician communication and adequate care planning.

  5. Survival and development of nuclear medicine in Western China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This essay discusses how to develop departments of nuclear medicine in mountainous areas in West China. The developments need the leaders' supports, doctors' understanding and patients' trust. And it is also very important to improve doctors' skills of diagnosis and treatment, and the management of medical quality, and overcome inconveniences in transportation and communication. At the same time, more projects such as radionuclide imaging, radioimmunoassay, radionuclide treatment and personnel training should be also key contents in the development of departments of nuclear medicine in these areas

  6. Radiation dose due to nuclear medicine practice in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ghanaian population who underwent nuclear medicine procedures within the period 1990-1993 has been characterized by age and sex. Males received 40% of the procedures while females received 60%. About two-thirds of the procedures annually were performed on patients over the age of thirty years. The mean annual collective dose was found to be 2.7 man-Sv during the four-year period examined. This translated into a per capita dose of 0.2μSv per year for nuclear medicine procedures over the period. (author). 4 refs.; 6 tabs

  7. Benefit/risk considerations in diagnostic nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential radiation risk carried out by diagnostic nuclear medicine has to be compared with the potential diagnostic and/or therapeutic benefit. An undifferentiated consideration of collective doses and risks is inappropriate. On the contrary, several factors have to be considered: The age of the patients, the prevalence of pathological test results, and the potential benefit from the diagnosis. This paper presents statistical data and individual examples. In many cases benefit exceeds risk substantially. On the other hand in some cases restrictions of diagnostic radiology or nuclear medicine should be considered. (orig.)

  8. Pioneers of nuclear medicine, Madame Curie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammaticos, Philip C

    2004-01-01

    Among those who have made important discoveries in the field of radioactivity and thus helped in the development of nuclear medicine as an identical entity are: Heinrich Hertz who in 1886 demonstrated the existence of radiowaves. In 1895 Wilhelm Röntgen discovered the X-rays. In 1896 H. Becquerel described the phenomenon of radioactivity. He showed that a radioactive uranium salt was emitting radioactivity which passing through a metal foil darkened a photographic plate. An analogous experiment performed by S.Thomson in London was announced to the president of the Royal Society of London before the time H.Becquerel announced his discovery but Thomson never claimed priority for his discovery. Muarie Sklodowska Curie (1867-1934) was undoubtedly the most important person to attribute to the discovery of radioactivity. In 1898 she discovered radium as a natural radioactive element. This is how she describes the hard time she had, working with her husband Pierre Curie (1859-1906) for the discovery of radium and polonium: "During the first year we did not go to the theater or to a concert or visited friends. I miss my relatives, my father and my daughter that I see every morning and only for a little while. But I do not complain...". In presenting her discovery of radium, Madame Curie said: " ...in the hands of a criminal, radium is very dangerous. So we must often ask ourselves: will humanity earn or lose from this discovery? I, myself belong to those who believe the former...". The notebooks that Madame Curie had when she was working with radium and other radioactive elements like polonium, thorium and uranium are now kept in Paris. They are contaminated with radioactive materials having very long half-lives and for this reason anyone who wishes to have access to these notes should sign that he takes full responsibility. There are some more interesting points in Madame Curie's life which may not be widely known like: Although her full name is Maria Sklodowska

  9. Economic evaluation studies in nuclear medicine: the need for standardization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Cologne (Germany); Knapp, W.H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Hanover (Germany); Lauterbach, K.W. [Institute of Public Health, University of Cologne (Germany)

    1999-06-01

    The guidelines for publishing economic evaluations require a statement of the economic importance of the analysis and the viewpoint from which it has been carried out, as well as specification of at least two alternative programmes or interventions, the form of economic evaluation, the outcome measure, the method of costing, the time horizon and adjustment for timing of costs and benefits (e.g. by a discount factor), and the allowance for uncertainties (e.g. by implementation of a sensitivity analysis). The decision analysis can be based on clinical trial data, on retrospective or administrative databases, or on modelling. The choice of outcome measures is the key issue in an economic evaluation. In cost-effectiveness analysis, benefits are usually measured in natural units. This is the form of economic evaluation most frequently used in nuclear medicine. Endpoints of effectiveness applied in studies in this field have been procedures avoided, procedures initiated, cardiac events, survival probability, morbidity, quality of life and protracted or failed surgical procedures. In other instances, surrogate endpoints have been used such as metastases detected, staging, viability or tumour response. This, however, limits comparability of cost-effectiveness considerably, as proof of a change in the health outcome cannot be obtained. Measures of utility such as QALYs (quality-adjusted life years) have so far only been applied for decision tree analysis. Useful examples of economic evaluation studies in nuclear medicine are presented here for fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in the preoperative staging of non-small cell lung cancer, for FDG-PET in differentiating indeterminate solitary pulmonary nodules, for somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in detecting metastases of carcinoid tumours, for routine preoperative scintigraphy with sestamibi in patients with parathyroid adenoma, for periodic measurement of thyroid-stimulating hormone in detecting

  10. Assessment of knowledge of general practitioners about nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine is an important department in most of scientific hospitals in the world. Rapid improvement in the filed of nuclear medicine needs continuing education of medical students. We tried to evaluate the knowledge of general practitioners in the flied of nuclear medicine, hoping that this study help mangers in accurate planning of teaching programs. Methods and materials: We prepared a questionnaire with 14 questions regarding applications of nuclear medicine techniques in different specialities of medicine. We selected questions as simple as possible with considering the most common techniques and best imaging modality in some disease. One question in nuclear cardiology, one in lung disease, two questions in thyroid therapy, another two in gastrointestinal system, two in genitourinary system and the last two in nuclear oncology. Also 4 questions were about general aspects of nuclear medicine. We have another 4 questions regarding the necessity of having a nuclear medicine subject during medical study, the best method of teaching of nuclear medicine and the preferred method of continuing education. Also age, sex, graduation date and university of education of all subjects were recorded. Results: One hundred (General practitioners) were studied. including, 58 male and 42 female with age range of 27-45 years did . About 60% of cases were 27-30 years old and 40 cases were older than 40. Seventy two cases were graduated in the last 5 years. Mashad University was the main university of education 52 cases with Tehran University (16 cases) and Tabriz University (6 cases) in the next ranks. Also 26 cases were graduated from other universities. From four questions in the field of general nuclear nedione 27% were correctly answered to all questions, 37% correctly answered two questions and 10% had correct answered only one question. No correct answer was noted in 26% . correct answer was noted in 80% the held of nuclear cardiology and in 72% in the field of lung

  11. Herbal Medicine Today: Clinical and Research Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Firenzuoli

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicine is the use of medicinal plants for prevention and treatment of diseases: it ranges from traditional and popular medicines of every country to the use of standardized and tritated herbal extracts. Generally cultural rootedness enduring and widespread use in a Traditional Medical System may indicate safety, but not efficacy of treatments, especially in herbal medicine where tradition is almost completely based on remedies containing active principles at very low and ultra low concentrations, or relying on magical-energetic principles.

  12. Veterinary nuclear medicine again - commentary and remarks on: Krzeminski M., et al. Veterinary nuclear medicine - a review. NMR 2004;7: 177 - 182

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veterinary nuclear medicine is somehow similar to its roots, Human Nuclear Medicine, but certainly there are a few basic differences. Patients sent by veterinary clinicians could be members of exotic species (birds, reptiles, rodents) and even the most often treated dog, cat, and horse patients vary in a pretty wide scale in weight, size and anatomical, physiological features. As there are no veterinary radiopharmaceuticals in the market, vets use human registered products, therefore applied radioactive doses are often calculated on an empirical manner. As opposed to humans, animal subjects almost always need to be sedated or anaesthetised for scintigraphical protocols. We vets, frequently perform bone and thyroid scintigraphy in the everyday clinical routine and oncological applications are more and more common in the veterinary field as well. But in contrast with human practice, our animal patients suffer very rarely from cardiovascular diseases, so heart and brain perfusion studies are less frequently performed at veterinary clinics. (author)Veterinary nuclear medicine is somehow similar to its roots,

  13. Evaluations of Molecular Nuclear Medicine in pediatric urgencies; Evaluaciones de Medicina Nuclear Molecular en urgencias pediatricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Duncker R, C. [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear Molecular, Hospital Infantil de Mexico, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    Several diagnostic procedures of Molecular Nuclear Medicine are considered in first choice in clinical evaluation of patients with different illnesses. So, the gammagraphy is the diagnostic form more sensitive to detect alterations of the perfusion on organs and systems such as bones, heart, brain, lungs or kidneys. Also is possible to identify, localize, evaluate the activity of inflammatory processes such as cellulitis, arthritis, osteomyelitis, the abscesses and several primary or metastatic tumours before each other diagnostic technique. In this work is treated about the importance of treatments with radioactive materials have been an important reappearance in last years since with the present capacity to localize specifically intracellular processes (for example, synthesis of DNA) new gateways are opened to research which in coming years would be of great utility. (Author)

  14. Education in nuclear physics, medical physics and radiation protection in medicine and veterinary medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Education in Nuclear Physics, Medical Physics and Radiation Protection in medicine and veterinary medicine studies on Belgrade University is an integral part of the curriculum, incorporated in different courses of graduate and post-graduate studies. During graduate studies students get basic elements of Nuclear Physics through Physics and/or Biophysics courses in the 1st year, while basic knowledge in Medical Physics and Radiation Protection is implemented in the courses of Radiology, Physical Therapy, Radiation Hygiene, Diagnostic Radiology and Radiation Therapy in the 4th or 5th year. Postgraduate studies offer MSc degree in Radiology, Physical Therapy, while courses in Nuclear Physics, Nuclear Instrumentation, Radiation Protection and Radiology are core or optional. On the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine graduated students may continue their professional education and obtain specialization degree in Radiology, Physical Therapy or Radiation Protection. On the Faculty of Medicine there are specialization degrees in Medical Nuclear Physics. Still, a closer analysis reveals a number of problems both from methodological and cognitive point of view. They are related mostly to graduate students ability to apply their knowledge in practise and with the qualifications of the educators, as those engaged in graduate studies lack basic knowledge in biological and medical sciences, while those engaged in post graduate studies mostly lack basic education in physics. Therefore, a reformed curricula resulting from much closer collaboration among educators, universities and professional societies at the national level should be considered. (author)

  15. Radiopharmacy contamination in nuclear medicine - a survey report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To conduct the radiation survey of the category IV Nuclear Medicine department and to further measure and compare the level of loose contamination in areas with high levels of exposure at two different time points (morning and evening) using wipe test

  16. Code of practice for radiation protection in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In aim of this study was to develop a draft for a new code practice for radiation protection in nuclear medicine that meets the current relevant international recommendation. The draft includes the following main fields: methods of radiation protection for workers, patients and public. Also, the principles of safe design of nuclear medicine departments, quality assurance program, proper manipulation of radiation sources including radioactive waste and emergency preparedness and response. The practical part of this study includes inspections of three nuclear medicine departments available in Sudan so as to assess the degree of compliance of those departments with what is stated in this code. The inspection missions have been conducted using a checklist that addresses all items that may affect radiation raincoat issues in addition to per formin area radiation monitoring around the installation of the radioactive sources. The results of this revealed that most of the departments do not have effective radiation protection program which in turn could lead to unnecessary exposure to patients, public and workers. Finally, some recommendations are given that - if implemented - could improve the status of radiation protection in nuclear medicine department. (Author)

  17. Past, current and future aspects of nuclear medicine in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Medicine in Malaysia began initially with the use of radioiodine and radiophosphorous for the investigation and treatment of thyroid and blood disorders around 1960. Following this we went through a phase of organ imaging using radioiodine and radiogold using an early generation Phillips Scanner. In terms of Medical usefulness this proved a big step forward in Malaysian Medicine, basic though the techniques were. The third phase of this speciality came on in the 1970s with the availability of generator scanners. A tremendous spurt in Nuclear Imaging and thyroid function studies took place. We have now together with the University Hospital Gamma Cameras which have considerably widened the scope of Nuclear Medicine especially in the field of cardiovascular studies. Further advances are expected in the future with the availability of medical cyclotrons, positron cameras and emission tomography. However yesterdays problems have not disappeared completely and the training of personnel and provision of up to date Nuclear Medicine laboratories with the latest equipment should be given top priority so as to assure progress in this speciality. (author)

  18. 20. Brazilian congress on biology and nuclear medicine. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several aspects concerning the use of nuclear medicine in cardiology, oncology, neurology, endocrinology among other areas are studied. Various topics related to diagnosis and treatment of diseases are presented, e.g. radiotracers use, radiopharmaceuticals (mainly associated with technetium 99), development and standardization of radionuclides, structural chemical analysis, metabolism, biological functions. The scintiscanning is the most reported diagnostic technique

  19. Population effective collective dose from nuclear medicine examination in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an attempt to estimate the effective collective dose imparted to the population of Camagueey-Ciego de Avila territory (Cuba)), we have made use of the statistics from nuclear medicine examinations given to a population of 1.1 million inhabitants for the years 1995-1999. The average annual frequency of examinations was estimated to be 3.82 per 1000 population. The results show that nuclear medicine techniques of thyroid imaging with 43.73% and thyroid uptake with 43.36% are the main techniques implicated in the relative contribution to the total annual effective collective dose, which averaged 54.43 man Sv for the studied period. Radiation risks for the Camagueey-Ciego de Avila population caused by nuclear medicine examinations in the period studied were calculated: the total number of fatal and non-fatal cancers was 16.33 and the number of serious hereditary disturbance was 3.54 as a result of 21,073 nuclear medicine procedures, corresponding to a total detriment of one case per thousand examinations. (authors)

  20. Is there a place for music in nuclear medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannouli, Vaitsa; Lytras, Nikolaos; Syrmos, Nikolaos

    2012-01-01

    Music, since the time of ancient Greek Asclepieia is well-known for its influence on men's behavior. Nuclear Medicine can study the effect of music in humans' brain. Positron emission tomography (PET) studies have shown brain areas to be activated after colored hearing vs after hearing to words. Furthermore, PET studies gave evidence that visual imagery of a musical stave is used by some musically untrained subjects in a pitch discrimination task. Listening to music combines intellect and emotion by intimate anatomical and functional connexions between temporal lobe, hippocampus and limbic system. Mozart's music is considered the best for bringing favorable music effects to men. This is called "the Mozart's effect" and by some is attributed to the fact that this kind of music's sequences tend to repeat regularly every 20-30sec, which is about the same length of time as brain-wave patterns. It may be useful to suggest that a certain kind of music played in the waiting room and/or in the examining room of a Nuclear Medicine Department may support patients ' cooperation with their physicians, especially in cardiac nuclear medicine. Furthermore, patients should be calm and not afraid of radioactivity. A long DVD program to be played during working hours can be decided between a music therapist and the Nuclear Medicine physician. PMID:23227458

  1. Nuclear medicine and radiologic imaging in sports injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This comprehensive book describes in detail how nuclear medicine and radiology can meet the needs of the sports medicine physician by assisting in precise diagnosis, clarification of pathophysiology, imaging of treatment outcome and monitoring of rehabilitation. Individual sections focus on nuclear medicine and radiologic imaging of injuries to the head and face, spine, chest, shoulder, elbow and forearm, wrist and hand, pelvic region, knee, lower leg, ankle and foot. The pathophysiology of sports injuries frequently encountered in different regions of the body is described from the perspective of each specialty, and the potential diagnostic and management benefits offered by the new hybrid imaging modalities - SPECT/CT, PET/CT, and PET/MRI - are explained. In addition, a range of basic and general issues are addressed, including imaging of the injuries characteristic of specific sports. It is hoped that this book will promote interdisciplinary awareness and communication and improve the management of injured recreational or elite athletes.

  2. Nuclear medicine and radiologic imaging in sports injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaudermans, Andor W.J.M. [Groningen Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [Groningen Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Ghent Univ. (Belgium); Gielen, Jan L.M.A. [Antwerp Univ. Hospital, Edegem (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology; Antwerp Univ. Hospital, Edegem (Belgium). Dept. of Sports Medicine; Antwerp Univ. Hospital, Edegem (Belgium). Dept. of Medicine; Zwerver, Johannes (ed.) [Groningen Univ. (Netherlands). Center for Sports Medicine

    2015-10-01

    This comprehensive book describes in detail how nuclear medicine and radiology can meet the needs of the sports medicine physician by assisting in precise diagnosis, clarification of pathophysiology, imaging of treatment outcome and monitoring of rehabilitation. Individual sections focus on nuclear medicine and radiologic imaging of injuries to the head and face, spine, chest, shoulder, elbow and forearm, wrist and hand, pelvic region, knee, lower leg, ankle and foot. The pathophysiology of sports injuries frequently encountered in different regions of the body is described from the perspective of each specialty, and the potential diagnostic and management benefits offered by the new hybrid imaging modalities - SPECT/CT, PET/CT, and PET/MRI - are explained. In addition, a range of basic and general issues are addressed, including imaging of the injuries characteristic of specific sports. It is hoped that this book will promote interdisciplinary awareness and communication and improve the management of injured recreational or elite athletes.

  3. Cytokine medicines in clinical practice: current issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Theresa; Moots, Robert J; Goodacre, John

    2005-10-21

    Cytokine medicines have been licensed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis since 2000. The rheumatology community has accrued a large amount of experience in the use of these medications. This experience has led to the development of guidelines for their use that include ongoing vigilance for long term adverse events and efficacy using the Biologics Register. Delivery of these expensive therapies has prompted extensive system developments within rheumatology. The cytokine medicines have provided important tools to probe the pathogenesis of rheumatoid and other inflammatory diseases. Further cytokine medicines, in various stages of development, are on the horizon and continue to stimulate excitement within this fast expanding field.

  4. Cytokine medicines in clinical practice: current issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Theresa; Moots, Robert J; Goodacre, John

    2005-10-21

    Cytokine medicines have been licensed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis since 2000. The rheumatology community has accrued a large amount of experience in the use of these medications. This experience has led to the development of guidelines for their use that include ongoing vigilance for long term adverse events and efficacy using the Biologics Register. Delivery of these expensive therapies has prompted extensive system developments within rheumatology. The cytokine medicines have provided important tools to probe the pathogenesis of rheumatoid and other inflammatory diseases. Further cytokine medicines, in various stages of development, are on the horizon and continue to stimulate excitement within this fast expanding field. PMID:16188452

  5. Initial report back of the audit of nuclear medicine units in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA is actively involved in all activities related to the peaceful applications of nuclear energy. The regional clinical project on nuclear medicine is called RAF/6/26. One of the important activities performed under RAF/6/26 is the auditing of all the nuclear medicine facilities in Africa. The decision to audit NM units has been taken at a project coordinators meeting in Harare, Zimbabwe in 1998. The objectives for the audit missions were: 1) to carry out a technical and managerial audit of all aspects of nuclear medicine practice in the country; including infrastructure, clinical and managerial aspects of nuclear medicine practice using the AFRA format for auditing wherever possible; 2) to advise authorities on strengths and weaknesses in patient care related to nuclear medicine; 3) to recommend realistic and achievable improvements taking into consideration the country's plans for future expansion. Units to be audited had to complete a questionnaire compiled by the IAEA, supplying information on all the activities of the unit. These included personnel details, and information regarding imaging, therapy and in vitro activities. These completed questionnaires were sent to the audit teams before the audit missions, to assist with preparation for the audit visits. In the case of South Africa, with several nuclear medicine units, two periods of two weeks each were scheduled with visits of 2-3 days duration to each department. During the missions, nuclear medicine facilities including imaging, in vitro and therapeutic facilities were visited. In most cases, discussions also took place with the management of the hospital, the dean and other representatives of the related medical schools, officials of the radiation control authorities and other role players. The programme for the visits was compiled by the local counterpart, and on the first day adapted after discussion with the audit team. At the end of the visit a report back session with all the staff of the NM

  6. Quality control of techetium 99m radiopharmacentical in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gel chromatography column scanning (GCS) is a new method for radiochemical quality control. GCS techniques for Technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine have been developed for use in both research and routine clinical work. The dependence on several of the parameters of the GCS method have been investigated, e.g. type of gel, column dimensions, eluent, equilibration, elution volume, flow rate and resolution of the recording system (radiochromatographic scanner or scintillation camera). The GCS method has been compared with conventional gel filtration, thinlayer cromatography (TLC) and paper cromatography (PC). The GCS method is to be preferred due to few artifacts, much information, good reproducibility, rapidity, simplicity and the convenience of the test. The GCS method has been applied to the development of labelling techniques for the new radiopharmaceuticals Tc-99m plasmin and Tc-99m unithiol (2.3 dimercaptopropane sodiumsulphonate), use for investigating deep vein thrombosis and renal cortical morphology respectively. The GCS method has also been applied for studying some labelling parameters, the radiochemical purity and the labelling of Tc-99m macroaggregated albumin, Tc-99m pyrophosphate, Tc-99m methylenedisphosphate, in addition to Tc-99m plasmin and Tc-99m unithiol. (Author)

  7. Optimal smoothing of poisson degraded nuclear medicine image data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of a method that removes Poisson noise from nuclear medicine studies will have significant impact on the quantitative analysis and clinical reliability of these data. The primary objective of the work described in this thesis was to develop a linear, non-stationary optimal filter to reduce Poisson noise. The derived filter is automatically calculated from a large group (library) of similar patient studies representing all similarly acquired studies (the ensemble). The filter design was evaluated under controlled conditions using two computer simulated ensembles, devised to represent selected properties of real patient gated blood pool studies. Fortran programs were developed to generate libraries of Poisson degraded simulated studies for each ensemble. These libraries then were used to estimate optimal filters specific to the ensemble. Libraries of previously acquired patient gated blood pool studies then were used to estimate the optimal filters for an ensemble of similarly acquired gated blood pool studies. These filters were applied to studies of 13 patients who received multiple repeat studies at one time. Comparisons of both the filtered and raw data to averages of the repeat studies demonstrated that the optimal filters, calculated from a library of 800 studies, reduce the mean square error in the patient data by 60%. It is expected that optimally filtered gated blood pool studies will improve quantitative analysis of the data

  8. Proceedings of a workshop on molecular nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of the Department of Energy (DOE) has increased the emphasis on research in structural biology and molecular biology. The Department has increased support substantially in the area of basic molecular and structural biology research. To exploit the advances in these fields, OHER has sought to apply those advances in their other areas of responsibility, e.g., health effects research, environmental biology, and, in particular, nuclear medicine. The applications of biotechnology have contributed greatly to the productive research efforts of molecular biology. These techniques include gene manipulation for targeted gene delivery; characterization of molecular probes for hormone, tumor, and neuroreceptors; the receptor-agonist/antagonist binding interactions; studies of mechanisms of cellular communication; and the development of in vitro diagnostics such as molecular probes for studying the aging process and patients with mental disorders, cancer, and atherosclerosis. The importance of this work is the reasonable expectation that mainly, through an appreciation of the molecular basis of disease, will the most effective and rapid progress be made toward understanding, identifying, solving, and preventing specific disease processes. Critical questions arising before and during the Workshop are how the following technologies can be applied in a practical clinical research or patient management setting: the recombinant DNA methodology, the technology of engineered monoclonal antibodies, the new methods for protein production and purification, and the production of transgenic animals

  9. High Performance Organ-Specific Nuclear Medicine Imagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stan

    2006-04-01

    One of the exciting applications of nuclear science is nuclear medicine. Well-known diagnostic imaging tools such as PET and SPECT (as well as MRI) were developed as spin-offs of basic scientific research in atomic and nuclear physics. Development of modern instrumentation for applications in particle physics experiments offers an opportunity to contribute to development of improved nuclear medicine (gamma and positron) imagers, complementing the present set of standard imaging tools (PET, SPECT, MRI, ultrasound, fMRI, MEG, etc). Several examples of new high performance imagers developed in national laboratories in collaboration with academia will be given to demonstrate this spin-off activity. These imagers are designed to specifically image organs such as breast, heart, head (brain), or prostate. The remaining and potentially most important challenging application field for dedicated nuclear medicine imagers is to assist with cancer radiation treatments. Better control of radiation dose delivery requires development of new compact in-situ imagers becoming integral parts of the radiation delivery systems using either external beams or based on radiation delivery by inserting or injecting radioactive sources (gamma, beta or alpha emitters) into tumors.

  10. Therapeutic Applications of Monte Carlo Calculations in Nuclear Medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Sgouros, George

    2003-01-01

    This book examines the applications of Monte Carlo (MC) calculations in therapeutic nuclear medicine, from basic principles to computer implementations of software packages and their applications in radiation dosimetry and treatment planning. It is written for nuclear medicine physicists and physicians as well as radiation oncologists, and can serve as a supplementary text for medical imaging, radiation dosimetry and nuclear engineering graduate courses in science, medical and engineering faculties. With chapters is written by recognised authorities in that particular field, the book covers the entire range of MC applications in therapeutic medical and health physics, from its use in imaging prior to therapy to dose distribution modelling targeted radiotherapy. The contributions discuss the fundamental concepts of radiation dosimetry, radiobiological aspects of targeted radionuclide therapy and the various components and steps required for implementing a dose calculation and treatment planning methodology in ...

  11. Society of Nuclear Medicine--57th annual meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, Ben

    2010-08-01

    The 57th Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine, held in Salt Lake City, UT, USA, included topics covering new developments in imaging agents and radiopharmaceutical therapies in the field of nuclear medicine. This conference report highlights selected presentations related to imaging of the brain, the prediction of heart disease, and the detection and treatment of various cancers. Investigational drugs discussed include TF-2 plus [68Ga]IMP-288 and TF-2 plus [111In]IMP-288 (both Immunomedics Inc), [11C]PBR-170 (Royal Prince Alfred Hospital/Australian Nuclear Science & Technology Organization), [11C]LY-2795050 (Eli Lilly & Co), yttrium (90Y) clivatuzumab tetraxetan (Garden State Cancer Center/Immunomedics Inc), [18F]LMI-1195 (Lantheus Medical Imaging Inc), fluciclovine (18F) (GE Healthcare/Nihon Medi-Physics Co Ltd), [99mTc]MIP-1340 and [99mTc]MIP-1407 (both Molecular Insight Pharmaceuticals Inc). PMID:20721816

  12. A European network for nuclear medicine and radiotherapy. EMIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine and radiotherapy make a vital contribution to the diagnosis and treatment of major disease. This role is likely to expand with new developments including availability of new medical isotopes. A European network (EMIR) was initiated in 2001 by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission, to identify and solve difficulties that constrain nuclear medicine and radiotherapy development in Europe and facilitate closer interdisciplinary collaboration. Participating organisations include the main European associations of medical radiation specialists, radiopharmaceutical/radioisotope producers, nuclear research reactor institutions, research organizations and the JRC. The steering committee established task groups focusing on eight key areas for development. Liaison with non-European organizations will be encouraged. (author)

  13. Methods and clinical applications in nuclear cardiology: a position statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear cardiological procedures have paved the way for non-invasive diagnostics of various partial functions of the heart. Many of these functions cannot be visualised for diagnosis by any other method (e.g. innervation). These techniques supplement morphological diagnosis with regard to treatment planning and monitoring. Furthermore, they possess considerable prognostic relevance, an increasingly important issue in clinical medicine today, not least in view of the cost-benefit ratio. Our current understanding shows that effective, targeted nuclear cardiology diagnosis - in particular for high-risk patients - can contribute toward cost savings while improving the quality of diagnostic and therapeutic measures. In the future, nuclear cardiology will have to withstand mounting competition from other imaging techniques (magnetic resonance imaging, electron beam tomography, multislice computed tomography). The continuing development of these methods increasingly enables measurement of functional aspects of the heart. Nuclear radiology methods will probably develop in the direction of molecular imaging. (orig.)

  14. Nuclear data for medicine and electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomp, S.; Blomgren, J.; Bergenwall, B.; Hildebrand, A.; Johansson, C.; Klug, J.; Mermod, P.; Nilsson, L.; Oesterlund, M. [Dept. of Neutron Research, Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden); Dangtip, S.; Tippawan, U. [Dept. of Neutron Research, Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden)]|[Fast Neutron Research Facility, Chiang Mai Univ. (Thailand); Olsson, N. [Dept. of Neutron Research, Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden)]|[Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI), Stockholm (Sweden); Prokofiev, A.V.; Renberg, P.U. [The Svedberg Lab., Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    2003-07-01

    Fast-neutron cancer therapy is now routinely performed at about a dozen facilities worldwide. Typical neutron energies for treatment are up to 70 MeV. Lately, it has been recognized that cosmic-ray neutrons, with energies up to many GeV, give significant dose contributions to airplane personnel. In fact, airplane personnel are the category, which receives the largest doses in civil work. These cosmic-ray neutrons also create a reliability problem in modern electronics. A neutron can cause a nuclear reaction inside or near a chip, thus releasing free charge, which in turn could, e.g., flip the memory content or change the result of a logical operation. For all these applications, improved knowledge of the underlying nuclear physics is of major importance. The MEDLEY setup, which has been extensively used for ADS related work, has been used for measurements of cross sections related to biomedicine and electronics reliability. Simulations of single-event upsets are described as well as accelerated device testing activities at neutron beams. (orig.)

  15. The earlier the better: An evaluation of changes to teaching year 1 Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Changes were made to the content and mode of delivery of the Year 1 Nuclear Medicine degree program at The University of Sydney in 1996. Changes included increased study of skeletal, respiratory and cardiac Nuclear Medicine and the use of problem based learning to increase independent learning and clinical reasoning skills. Learning outcomes were qualitatively assessed to determine the educational value of the changes. The project aimed to evaluate whether changes made to the Year 1 program in 1996 raised clinical abilities of students entering their first clinical placement in Year 2. Retrospective surveys were conducted on both the 1995 and 1996 Year 1 students after completion of their first Year 2 clinical placement. Surveys were designed to assess the students perception of how well Year 1 had prepared them for both understanding and application of content studied in Year 1. Clinical Supervisors who assessed both cohorts of students were surveyed to determine if 1996 students presented with any appreciable difference in understanding and application to areas studied in Year 1. Results of the student survey indicated the 1996 students were more positive than the 1995 students about their clinical readiness. Clinical Supervisor survey results showed a positive response to the level of understanding and application of skills by the 1996 students. In conclusion, the 1996 Year 1 students were perceived to have a higher level of clinical abilities at the commencement of their Year 2 clinical placement. This result demonstrated worthwhile learning outcomes for the changes to content and mode of delivery in the Year 1 Nuclear Medicine degree program

  16. Significance of Evidence-based Medicine in the Assessment of Chinese Medicine Clinical Efficacy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ji-yao

    2010-01-01

    @@ Evidence-based medicine (EBM) requires the integration of the best research evidence with our clinical expertise and our patient's unique values and circumstances.The best evidence is valid and clinically relevant,especially from patient-centered clinical research.The clinical expertise means the ability to use our clinical skills and past experiences to rapidly identify each patient's unique health state and diagnosis,their individual risks,and the benefits of interventions (1)..

  17. Literature and medicine: contributions to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charon, R; Banks, J T; Connelly, J E; Hawkins, A H; Hunter, K M; Jones, A H; Montello, M; Poirer, S

    1995-04-15

    Introduced to U.S. medical schools in 1972, the field of literature and medicine contributes methods and texts that help physicians develop skills in the human dimensions of medical practice. Five broad goals are met by including the study of literature in medical education: 1) Literary accounts of illness can teach physicians concrete and powerful lessons about the lives of sick people; 2) great works of fiction about medicine enable physicians to recognize the power and implications of what they do; 3) through the study of narrative, the physician can better understand patients' stories of sickness and his or her own personal stake in medical practice; 4) literary study contributes to physicians' expertise in narrative ethics; and 5) literary theory offers new perspectives on the work and the genres of medicine. Particular texts and methods have been found to be well suited to the fulfillment of each of these goals. Chosen from the traditional literary canon and from among the works of contemporary and culturally diverse writers, novels, short stories, poetry, and drama can convey both the concrete particularity and the metaphorical richness of the predicaments of sick people and the challenges and rewards offered to their physicians. In more than 20 years of teaching literature to medical students and physicians, practitioners of literature and medicine have clarified its conceptual frameworks and have identified the means by which its studies strengthen the human competencies of doctoring, which are a central feature of the art of medicine. PMID:7887555

  18. Literature and medicine: contributions to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charon, R; Banks, J T; Connelly, J E; Hawkins, A H; Hunter, K M; Jones, A H; Montello, M; Poirer, S

    1995-04-15

    Introduced to U.S. medical schools in 1972, the field of literature and medicine contributes methods and texts that help physicians develop skills in the human dimensions of medical practice. Five broad goals are met by including the study of literature in medical education: 1) Literary accounts of illness can teach physicians concrete and powerful lessons about the lives of sick people; 2) great works of fiction about medicine enable physicians to recognize the power and implications of what they do; 3) through the study of narrative, the physician can better understand patients' stories of sickness and his or her own personal stake in medical practice; 4) literary study contributes to physicians' expertise in narrative ethics; and 5) literary theory offers new perspectives on the work and the genres of medicine. Particular texts and methods have been found to be well suited to the fulfillment of each of these goals. Chosen from the traditional literary canon and from among the works of contemporary and culturally diverse writers, novels, short stories, poetry, and drama can convey both the concrete particularity and the metaphorical richness of the predicaments of sick people and the challenges and rewards offered to their physicians. In more than 20 years of teaching literature to medical students and physicians, practitioners of literature and medicine have clarified its conceptual frameworks and have identified the means by which its studies strengthen the human competencies of doctoring, which are a central feature of the art of medicine.

  19. Hepatitis B vaccination schedules in genitourinary medicine clinics.

    OpenAIRE

    Asboe, D; Rice, P.; Ruiter, A.; Bingham, J S

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare two vaccination schedules in delivering hepatitis B vaccine to at-risk genitourinary medicine clinic attenders. SETTING: Genitourinary medicine clinic of St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK. METHODS: Two vaccination protocols were compared. Between January 1991 and December 1992, individuals had doses of recombinant hepatitis B vaccine at 0, 1 and 6 months (standard). From January until October 1993 doses of vaccine were administered at 0, 1 and 2 months (accelerated), foll...

  20. Application and Exploration of Big Data Mining in Clinical Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Yue Zhang; Shu-Li Guo; Li-Na Han; Tie-Ling Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To review theories and technologies of big data mining and their application in clinical medicine. Data Sources: Literatures published in English or Chinese regarding theories and technologies of big data mining and the concrete applications of data mining technology in clinical medicine were obtained from PubMed and Chinese Hospital Knowledge Database from 1975 to 2015. Study Selection: Original articles regarding big data mining theory/technology and big data mining′s app...

  1. Nuclear medicine imaging in podiatric disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karl, R.D. Jr.; Hammes, C.S.

    1988-10-01

    Radionuclide scanning is a valuable diagnostic tool based on metabolic and anatomic imaging. When used in the appropriate clinical setting, radionuclide imaging is a sensitive, minimally invasive imaging modality that detects and differentiates skeletal from nonskeletal pathology in the painful foot. Isotopic scanning is of particular value in the evaluation of the diabetic foot and in the subsequent follow-up of response to therapy.72 references.

  2. Radiation exposure and dosimetry in transplant patients due to Nuclear Medicine studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Maghraby, T. A. F. [Leiden Univ., Leiden (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology, Div. of Nuclear Medicine; Cairo Univ., Cairo (Egypt). Faculty of Medicine, Dept. of Oncology and Nuclear Medicine; Camps, J. A. J.; Geleyns, J.; Pauwels, E. K. J. [Leiden Univ., Leiden (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiology, Div. of Nuclear Medicine

    2000-12-01

    Organ transplantation is now an accepted method of therapy for treating patients with end stage failure of kidneys, liver, heart or lung. Nuclear Medicine may provide functional data and semi-quantitative parameters. However, one serious factor that hampers the use of nuclear medicine procedures in transplant patients is the general clinical concern about radiation exposure to the patient. This lead the researcher to discuss the effective doses and radiation dosimetry associated with radionuclide procedures used in the management and follow-up of transplant patients. A simple way to place the risk associated with Nuclear Medicine studies in an appropriate context is to compare the dose with that received from more familiar source of exposure such as from a diagnostic X-ray procedure. The radiation dose for the different radiopharmaceuticals used to study transplant organ function ranges between 0.1 and 5.3 mSv which is comparable to X-ray procedures with the exception of {sup 201}Tl and {sup 111}In-antimyosin. Thus Nuclear Medicine studies do not bear a higher radiation risk than the often used X-ray studies in transplant patients.

  3. A nuclear medicine information system that allows reporting and sending images through intranet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear medicine information system that allows reporting and sending images through intranet. Aim: This system was developed in order to improve the processes of typing, correcting, verifying and distribution of the reports and images, improving the efficiency of the personnel in the nuclear medicine department and reducing the time between the creation of the report and its reading by the referring physician. Materials and Methods: The system runs a web server (Personal Web Server, Microsoft) which serves web pages written in hypertext markup language (HTML) and active server pages (ASP). The database utilized is Microsoft Access 97. The whole communication between the web server and the database is performed by the programs written in ASP. Integrating the images from the patients is done through a 486 ibm-pc running Red Hat Linux, which serves as an intermediary between the isolated nuclear medicine network and the hospital's network. Results: The time from report verification and referring physician reading has decreased from approximately 24 hours to 12 hours. It is possible to run queries in the system in order to get productivity reports or clinical research. Imaging storage allows for correlation of current and previous studies. Conclusion: Bureaucratic processes have diminished to a certain extent in the department. Reports are now online as soon as they are verified by the nuclear medicine physician. There is no need to install dedicated software in the viewing stations since the whole system runs in the server

  4. Nuclear medicine methods in the assessment of acupuncture effects: a short review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Deise Elisabete; Rebello, Bernardo Machado; Agostinho, Raquel Terra [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes. Lab. de Radiofarmacia Experimental; Academia Brasileira de Arte e Ciencia Oriental, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); E-mail: deise_desouza@yahoo.com.br; Silva Filho, Reginaldo de Carvalho [Escola Brasileira de Medicina Chinesa, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro Avancado de Pesquisas em Ciencias Orientais; Bastos, Sohaku R.C. [Academia Brasileira de Arte e Ciencia Oriental, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Bernardo-Filho, Mario [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisa Basica

    2007-09-15

    The mechanisms of acupuncture are poorly understood. In consequence, numerous investigators have conducted clinical trials to test the efficacy of acupuncture in various conditions. We have used PubMed database system to evaluate the number of publications in acupuncture and nuclear medicine procedures in the period from 1964 to 2007, using the keywords: 'nuclear medicine and acupuncture', 'SPECT and acupuncture, 'PET and acupuncture', 'scintigraphy and acupuncture, 'radionuclide and acupuncture', 'radiopharmaceutical and acupuncture', 'radioisotope and acupuncture' and {sup 99m}Tc and acupuncture'. Some papers published in English language were selected and a short review is presented The analysis of the number of publications shows that when a method is well accepted by the scientific community, as the methods used in nuclear medicine, the interest in the development of research increases. Moreover, important findings are presented when the nuclear medicine image is used to evaluate the effect of the acupuncture. (author)

  5. 42 CFR 482.53 - Condition of participation: Nuclear medicine services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Nuclear medicine... HOSPITALS Optional Hospital Services § 482.53 Condition of participation: Nuclear medicine services. If the hospital provides nuclear medicine services, those services must meet the needs of the patients...

  6. ER-E3 regulation. Minimal instrumentation that must operate nuclear medicine in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this regulation is to define the instrumentation that must exist in any institution conducting the practice of nuclear medicine in Cuba. This regulation emphasizes two aspects: The minimum equipment necessary to operate a nuclear medicine laboratory for use 'in vitro' and the minimum equipment required to operate a Nuclear Medicine use 'in vivo'

  7. American College of Nuclear Physics 1991 DOE day symposium: Aids and nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-12-31

    Since first described in 1981, the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) has become the medical dilemma of the century. AIDS retrovirus, and the economic consequences of this exposure are staggering. AIDS has been the topic of conferences and symposia worldwide. This symposium, to be held on January 25, 1991, at the 17th Annual Meeting and Scientific Sessions of the American College of Nuclear Physicians, will expose the Nuclear Medicine Physicians/Radiologists to their role in the diagnosis of AIDS, and will educate them on the socio-economic and ethical issues related to this problem. In addition, the Nuclear Medicine Physicians/Radiologists must be aware of their role in the management of their departments in order to adequately protect the health care professionals working in their laboratories. Strategies are currently being developed to control the spread of bloodborne diseases within the health care setting, and it is incumbent upon the Nuclear Medicine community to be aware of such strategies.

  8. Radiation exposure to personnel in diagnostic nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations under routine conditions concerning the following points; were undertaken. External radiation exposure by Tc-99m to the whole body and to the hands or finger tips of nuclear technicians, physicians and radiochemists; external exposure by Tc-99m to whole body and gonads of nurses in a neurologic intensive care unit with a high frequency of patients who undergo nuclear medicine investigations; the risk to incorporate I-125 in a radioimmunoassay laboratory and in a labelling laboratory. The data show that external radiation exposure from Tc-99m to personnel working in diagnostic nuclear medicine where a total dose of 50 Ci of Tc-99m is applied per year remains far below the maximum permissible doses if the following measures are strictly fullfilled: - Elution, labelling and filling of Tc-99m radiopharmaceuticals only in shielded vials and using long distance working tools. - Application of Tc-99m radiopharmaceuticals using exclusively shielded syringes. - Time of staying next to Tc-99m containing patients as short as possible. Under these conditions, it is unnecessary that personnel who nurses patients with diagnostic nuclear medicine procedure in an intensive care unit are put under radiation control by personnel radiation dosimetry. The internal radiation exposure by inhalation of I-125 which evaporates from radioimmunoassay test tubes is negligible. But there is a risk of external and internal radiation exposure from labelling procedures with radionuclides of iodine, if special protective measures are not carefully considered

  9. Radioactive waste management of the nuclear medicine services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotope applications in nuclear medicine services, for diagnosis and therapy, generate radioactive wastes. The general characteristics and the amount of wastes that are generated in each facility are function of the number of patients treated, the procedures adopted, and the radioisotopes used. The management of these wastes embraces every technical and administrative activity necessary to handle the wastes, from the moment of their generation, till their final disposal, must be planned before the nuclear medicine facility is commissioned, and aims at assuring people safety and environmental protection. The regulatory framework was established in 1985, when the National Commission on Nuclear Energy issued the regulation CNEN-NE-6.05 'Radioactive waste management in radioactive facilities'. Although the objective of that regulation was to set up the rules for the operation of a radioactive waste management system, many requirements were broadly or vaguely defined making it difficult to ascertain compliance in specific facilities. The objective of the present dissertation is to describe the radioactive waste management system in a nuclear medicine facility and provide guidance on how to comply with regulatory requirements. (author)

  10. The development and use of radionuclide generators in nuclear medicine -- recent advances and future perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1998-03-01

    Although the trend in radionuclide generator research has declined, radionuclide generator systems continue to play an important role in nuclear medicine. Technetium-99m obtained from the molybdenum-99/technetium-99m generator system is used in over 80% of all diagnostic clinical studies and there is increasing interest and use of therapeutic radioisotopes obtained from generator systems. This paper focuses on a discussion of the major current areas of radionuclide generator research, and the expected areas of future research and applications.

  11. Nuclear medicine in pediatric kidney diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauer, O.; Langhammer, H.; Reidel, G.; Pabst, H.W.; Heidenreich, P.; Fendel, H.; Helmig, F.J.; Belohradsky, B.

    1981-03-01

    Renal dynamic scintigraphy and quantitative determination of the total, the divided and - if necessary - the regional clearance (principle of OBERHAUSEN) using I-123-OIH (ortho-iodo-hippurate) were performed simultaneously in 156 children suffering from various renal or urological diseases. Results were compared to X-ray investigations and in the case of nephrectomy to histological findings. The clinical diagnoses and questions before and the therapeutic consequences after clearance studies were analyzed in order to deduce the most important indications for quantitative dynamic scintigraphy in pediatric kidney disease. In patients with unequal renal size the relationship between kidney length-ratio, as shown by urography, and the corresponding ratio of individual clearances, indicated that the radiographical estimate of kidney size is not a reliable index for split renal function. In many cases the dynamic scintigraphy combined with renal clearance determination contributed clinically important additional information to the predominantly morphological aspects of radiology. It proved as a valuable help in decision making with regard to surgical problems, especially in cases of unilaterally small kidneys, obstructive uropathy, duplication of the urinary tract and radiographically undetectable kidneys. In nonsurgical renal diseases the radionuclide study served as a long term follow up of renal function thereby reducing repeat urograms.

  12. Assessment of OEP health's risk in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santacruz-Gomez, K.; Manzano, C.; Melendrez, R.; Castaneda, B.; Barboza-Flores, M.; Pedroza-Montero, M. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A.P. 1626 Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico and Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados CIMAV, A.C. Chihuahua, Chihuahua (Mexico); Centro de Diagnostico Integral del Noroeste, Luis Donaldo Colosio 23 83000 Centro Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A. P. 5-088 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A.P. 1626 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Departamento de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora. A. P. 5-088 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2012-10-23

    The use of ionizing radiation has been increased in recent years within medical applications. Nuclear Medicine Department offers both treatment and diagnosis of diseases using radioisotopes to controlled doses. Despite the great benefits to the patient, there is an inherent risk to workers which remains in contact with radiation sources for long periods. These personnel must be monitored to avoid deterministic effects. In this work, we retrospectively evaluated occupationally exposed personnel (OEP) to ionizing radiation in nuclear medicine during the last five years. We assessed both area and personal dosimetry of this department in a known Clinic in Sonora. Our results show an annual equivalent dose average of 4.49 {+-} 0.70 mSv in OEP without showing alarming changes in clinical parameters analyzed. These results allow us to conclude that health of OEP in nuclear medicine of this clinic has not been at risk during the evaluated period. However, we may suggest the use of individual profiles based on specific radiosensitivity markers.

  13. Scintigraphic instruments and techniques in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliographical supplement brings out the importance assumed from now on by comparative studies on various imagery systems: radioisotopic scintigraphy, computerized tomography and ultra sonography. Another aspect to emerge is the anxiety of the medical world faced with ethical and economic problems in weighing up as accurately as possible the justifiability and consequences of clinical decisions, hence the value of visual observations and interpretations of images, as well as the quality of the instruments used. Four lists of bibliographical notices with abstracts covering the period late 1976-early 1979 mention 258 articles from journals, 67 conference lectures, 13 reports, 3 theses and 44 invention patents respectively. To these lists are attached the author, inventor and subject indices

  14. Report on the second Congress of the Russian nuclear medicine society and on International conference Current problems of nuclear medicine and radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information on the work of Second Congress of Russian Nuclear Medicine Society and International Conference - Current problems of nuclear medicine and radiopharmaceuticals, - held in Obninsk in October, 2000, is adduced. Reports presented in the conference are dedicated to various aspects of application of radionuclide methods to cardiology, angiology, oncology, surgery, hematology, endocrinology, pediatrics and neurology. Problems in the development of radiopharmaceutical, training and skill advancement of experts, dosimetry and radiation safety in nuclear medicine were discussed. Congress considered the organizational problems in Russian nuclear medicine

  15. New aspects regarding to radiation protection in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction and objectives: The society has been concerned about nuclear energy usage and nuclear environment pollution for ages. The necessity of using radiation and its applications in modern life especially in medicine is undeniable. Some interesting properties such as the potential for non-destructive tests, detection simplicity, and penetrability into substances and having reactions with them cause radiation to be known as a useful tool for peace purposes. Nuclear weapons' experiments (1945-1973) and nuclear accidents in Three-Mile Island in USA, Goiania in Brazil and Chernobyl in Ukraine Republic have enhanced man's worries towards nuclear radiation and radioactivity in environment, and founding associations and groups which are against nuclear energy, such as green peace society, can be related with above mentioned concerns. Today, nuclear medicine has rapidly been developed so that in some cases plays a unique role in diagnosis but unfortunately in spite of diagnostic and therapeutic advantages, the term NUCLEARcan induce worries in patients and society. In this article, base on new documents we intend to show that this worries has no scientific basis. Material and Methods: To produce a realistic view, regarding to radiation protection we used several ways such as natural origin of radiation, high natural background radiation areas' data non-linear dose-effect model, risk versus benefit, use of arbitrary unit for measurement of radiation, radio adaptive response and radiation hormesis. Discussion and conclusion: Harmful effects of radiation on biologic systems has obviously been shown, but most of related documents are based on receiving high doses in nuclear and atomic accidents and explosions and radiation protection regulations are based on this observations. So, it sometimes causes patients are afraid of low doses of radiation in medical diagnostic procedures so that some of them even resist against performing this procedures. Thus, being aware of

  16. Search of new scintillation materials for nuclear medicine application

    CERN Document Server

    Korzhik, M V

    2000-01-01

    Oxide crystals have a great potential to develop new advanced scintillation materials which are dense, fast, and bright. This combination of parameters, when combined to affordable price, gives a prospect for materials to be applied in nuclear medicine devices. Some of them have been developed for the last two decades along the line of rear-earth (RE) garnet (RE/sub 3/Al/sub 5/O/sub 12/) oxiorthosilicate (RE/sub 2/SiO/sub 5/) and perovskite (REAlO/sub 3/) crystals doped with Ce ions. Among recently developed oxide materials the lead tungstate scintillator (PWO) becomes the most used scintillation material in high energy physics experiments due to its application in CMS and ALICE experiments at LHC. In this paper we discuss scintillation properties of some new heavy compounds doped with Ce as well as light yield improvement of PWO crystals to apply them in low energy physics and nuclear medicine. (18 refs).

  17. Radiation doses to staff on a department of nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of data concerning radiation protection of staff working in the Nuclear Medicine Department and associated sections of the Physics Department at the Royal Marsden Hospital (Surrey Branch) is given for the period 1972 to 1975 inclusive. Results of routine film monitoring and whole-body counting are presented. Additional film monitors were used to check working areas, finger doses and any discrepancies between doses to the upper and lower trunk of personnel. In general, exposure to staff in the Nuclear Medicine Department is below 220 mrad per person per year, and below 1,000 mrad per person per year in the Radioisotope Dispensary. The dose received by radiographers is primarily due to spending time close to patients. Since about 5,000 intravenous injections of radionuclides are given each year in this department, the resulting finger doses to the staff involved may give rise to concern unless the task is shared. (author)

  18. Sensitometry in diagnostic radiology, radiation therapy, and nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haus, A.G.; Rossmann, K.; Vyborny, C.; Hoffer, P.B.; Doi, K.

    The purpose of this paper is to present a tutorial discussion on the sensitometric methods employed for determining the characteristic curve of interest in diagnostic radiology, radiation therapy, and nuclear medicine. These methods are based on the way in which various recording systems are exposed in practice. In diagnostic radiology, an inverse-square sensitometer is used for measurements of the characteristic curves of conventional film and screen-film systems. In radiation therapy, a sensitometric technique can be used for the determination of the proper characteristic curve for a film which can be placed beneath the patient before radiation treatment and removed afterwards so that an image of the anatomy actually irradiated is obtained. In nuclear medicine, a sensitometric study served as a means of evaluating several radiographic films for imaging of the light output on an oscilloscope when the Anger camera is used.

  19. Authentication of Medicines Using Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng; Zhang, Fengchao; Barras, Jamie; Althoefer, Kaspar; Bhunia, Swarup; Mandal, Soumyajit

    2016-01-01

    The production and sale of counterfeit and substandard pharmaceutical products, such as essential medicines, is an important global public health problem. We describe a chemometric passport-based approach to improve the security of the pharmaceutical supply chain. Our method is based on applying nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) spectroscopy to authenticate the contents of medicine packets. NQR is a non-invasive, non-destructive, and quantitative radio frequency (RF) spectroscopic technique. It is sensitive to subtle features of the solid-state chemical environment and thus generates unique chemical fingerprints that are intrinsically difficult to replicate. We describe several advanced NQR techniques, including two-dimensional measurements, polarization enhancement, and spin density imaging, that further improve the security of our authentication approach. We also present experimental results that confirm the specificity and sensitivity of NQR and its ability to detect counterfeit medicines.

  20. Image interface in Java for tomographic reconstruction in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to implement a software for tomographic reconstruction of SPECT data from Nuclear Medicine with a flexible interface design, cross-platform, written in Java. Validation tests were performed based on SPECT simulated data. The results showed that the implemented algorithms and filters agree with the theoretical context. We intend to extend the system by implementing additional tomographic reconstruction techniques and Java threads, in order to provide simultaneously image processing. (author)

  1. Forensic Medicine: Age Written in Teeth by Nuclear Bomb Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2005-05-04

    Establishing the age of individuals is an important step in identification and a frequent challenge in forensic medicine. This can be done with high precision up to adolescence by analysis of dentition, but establishing the age of adults has remained difficult. Here we show that measuring {sup 14}C from nuclear bomb tests in tooth enamel provides a sensitive way to establish when a person was born.

  2. Some current aspects of the staff protection in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper discusses some specific questions of irradiation of workers in various professions on typical nuclear medicine workplace in connection with the performance of their specific tasks. There are also given the results of the monitoring of individual doses, which show the significant differences in exposure of personnel groups. Special attention is paid to the protection of workers and others who come into contact with patients who received high-level radiopharmaceuticals for therapeutic purposes. (authors)

  3. Clinical Holistic Medicine: When Biomedicine is Inadequate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The modern physician is using pharmaceuticals as his prime tool. Unfortunately, this tool is much less efficient than you might expect from the biochemical theory. The belief in drugs as the solution to the health problems of mankind, overlooking important existing knowledge on quality of life, personal development, and holistic healing seems to be one good reason why approximately every second citizen of our modern society is chronically ill. The biomedical paradigm and the drugs are certainly useful, because in many situations we could not do without the drugs (like antibiotics, but curing infections or diseases in young age is not without consequences, as the way we perceive health and medicine is influenced by such experiences. When we get a more severe disease in midlife, we also believe drugs will make us healthy again. But at this age, the drugs do not work efficiently anymore, because we have turned older and lost much of the biological coherence that made us heal easily when we were younger. Now we need to assume responsibility, take learning, and improve our quality of life. We need a more holistic medicine that can help us back to life by allowing us to access our hidden resources. The modern physician cannot rely solely on drugs, but must also have holistic tools in his medical toolbox. This is the only way we can improve the general health of our populations. Whenever NNT (Number Needed to Treat is 2 or higher, the likelihood of the drug to cure the patient is less than 50%, which is not satisfying to any physician. In this case, he must ethically try something more in order to cure his patients, which is the crossroads where both traditional manual medicine and the tools of a scientific holistic medicine are helpful.

  4. [Nuclear medicine diagnosis of pheochromocytoma with metaiodobenzylguanidine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucar, Dragan; Marković, Stevan

    2002-07-01

    Excess secretion of any of the adrenal cortical or medullary hormones contributes to a number of well-known clinical syndromes.. They may result from benign or malignant adrenal tumours, adrenal hyperplasia or, least frequently, from extra-adrenal disease. Differentiation among these possibilities is often impossible on clinical or biochemical grounds alone. Location of the site(s) of excess hormone production in the past depended on relatively insensitive or invasive radiological methods. The non-invasive evaluation began with X-ray computed tomography but the functional significance of anatomical abnormalities cannot be determined from CT scan. Incorporation of specific radiopharmaceuticals into the abnormal tissues allows scintigraphic localization of functional abnormalities with a high degree of efficacy. The combination of adrenal scintigraphy and kompjuterizovanom tomografijom CT or magnetskom rezonancijom MRI should in most cases obviatc the need for more invasive procedures. Phaeochromocytoma is rare in hypertensive population, affecting only an estimated of 0.1%. However, a high index of suspicion is essential, since these tumours have potentially life-threatening cardiovascular effects and their successful resection is curative. Important clinical clues include the presence of orthostatic hypotension in an untreated hypertensive, resistance of hypertension to standard therapy (including possible exacerbation by (beta-blockers). In most cases, the diagnosis can be established by demonstrating high levels of free catecholamines and their metabolites (metanephrines and Vanillylmandelic acid). Clonidine test may be important in some cases. The purpose of this study is to point that metaiodobenzylguanidine (mlBG) has proved to be a safe, sensitive and highly specific agent for the location of phaeochromocytoma. The first successful schinigraphic demonstration of phaeochromocytomas in man was reported in 1981, using a new radiopharmaceutical, 131l

  5. Digital nuclear medicine department: Is a filmless environment conceivable?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent hardware improvements, the installation and development of fast networks and new technologies for storage of large data volumes all contribute to the propagation of digital reading and reporting of nuclear medicine studies. Thus, the vision of a fully digitized nuclear medicine department becomes reality. The high costs of purchasing hardware- and software-components are compensated by saving costs of films and by the improvement of the work flow in the long run. Independently from these issues, filmless reporting proves to be advantageous over conventional film reading in many facts that justify to switch to a digital department. Problems that occur in the process of becoming film-free are mainly based on compatibility issues and demand strong cooperation between the user and the manufacturer of the imaging devices in order to integrate all systems into one reading and reporting tool. The departments of nuclear medicine and radiology of the University of Munich, Innenstadt, now are reviewing a one-year process of being film-free, which makes a return to conventional film reading unconceivable. (orig.)

  6. Nuclear medicine pulmonary diagnosis; Nuklearmedizinische Diagnostik der Lunge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuemichen, C. [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Klinik und Poliklinik

    2000-10-01

    Scintigraphic recording of regional ventilation and perfusion with {sup 99m}Tc-Aerosol and {sup 99m}Tc-MAA remain in the foreground of nuclear medicine pulmonary diagnostics. The most important indication for ventilation scintigraphy is the prediction of postoperative pulmonary function, which is still performed in many hospitals with perfusion scintigraphy, and with which, in turn, intrapulmonary right-left shunts can be simply and also semiquantitatively recorded. Combined ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy offers a very high degree of sensitivity in the proof of acute pulmonary embolism, is therefore exceptionally well suited for exclusion diagnostics, while specificity compared to pulmonary angiography and spiral CT still needs some clarification. The self-cleaning mechanism of the lung can be quantitatively examined using mucociliary and resorptive clearance. The clinical areas of application are limited for methodical reasons. Primary diagnostics of bronchial carcinoma and dignity differentiation of solitary pulmonary nodules, preferably with {sup 18}F-FDG PET are gaining steadily in importance. (orig.) [German] Im Vordergrund der nuklearmedizinischen Lungendiagnostik steht nach wie vor die szintigraphische Abbildung der regionalen Ventilation und Perfusion mit {sup 99m}Tc-Aerosol und {sup 99m}Tc-MAA. Wichtigste Indikation fuer die Ventilationsszintigraphie ist die Voraussage der postoperativen Lungenfunktion, die vielerorts noch mit der Perfusionsszintigraphie durchgefuehrt wird, mit der sich wiederum intrapulmonale Rechts-links-Shunts einfach und auch semiquantitativ erfassen lassen. Die kombinierte Ventilations-/Perfusionsszintigraphie bietet ein Hoechstmass an Sensitivitaet beim Nachweis der akuten Lungenembolie, ist deshalb fuer die Ausschlussdiagnostik hervorragend geeignet, die Spezifitaet im Vergleich zur Pulmonalisangiographie und Spiral-CT ist weiterhin klaerungsbeduerftig. Die Selbstreinigungsmechanismen der Lunge lassen sich mit der mukoziliaeren

  7. Production of iodine-124 and its applications in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until recently, iodine-124 was not considered to be an attractive isotope for medical applications owing to its complex radioactive decay scheme, which includes several high-energy gamma rays. However, its unique chemical properties, and convenient half-life of 4.2 days indicated it would be only a matter of time for its frequent application to become a reality. The development of new medical imaging techniques, especially improvements in the technology of positron emission tomography (PET), such as the development of new detectors and signal processing electronics, has opened up new prospects for its application. With the increasing use of PET in medical oncology, pharmacokinetics, and drug metabolism, 124I-labeled radiopharmaceuticals are now becoming one of the most useful tools for PET imaging, and owing to the convenient half-life of I-124, they can be used in PET scanners far away from the radionuclide production site. Thus far, the limited availability of this radionuclide has been an impediment to its wider application in clinical use. For example, sodium [124I]-iodide is potentially useful for diagnosis and dosimetry in thyroid disease and [124I]-M-iodobenzylguanidine ([124I]-MIBG) has enormous potential for use in cardiovascular imaging, diagnosis, and dosimetry of malignant diseases such as neuroblastoma, paraganglioma, pheochromocytoma, and carcinoids. However, despite that potential, both are still not widely used. This is a typical scenario of a rising new star among the new PET tracers. - Highlights: • Improve the discussion and disseminate the knowledge of recent advances in nuclear medicine. • Stimulate the offer of alternative ways using the recent developed positron emitters. • Contribute to democratize the use of radiopharmaceuticals in developing countries. • Promote social benefit, starting a new era in diagnostic imaging in developing countries

  8. Capacity for Clinical Research on Herbal Medicines in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Willcox, Merlin; Siegfried, Nandi; Johnson, Quinton

    2012-01-01

    An electronic survey was used to assess the training needs of clinical and public health researchers who have been involved, and/or plan to become involved, in clinical trials of herbal medicines in Africa. Over 90 researchers were contacted through pre-existing networks, of whom 58 (64%) responded, from 35 institutions in 14 African countries. Over half (57%) had already been involved in a clinical trial of an herbal medicine, and gave information about a total of 23 trials that have already...

  9. Application and Exploration of Big Data Mining in Clinical Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Zhang; Shu-Li Guo; Li-Na Han; Tie-Ling Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To review theories and technologies of big data mining and their application in clinical medicine.Data Sources:Literatures published in English or Chinese regarding theories and technologies of big data mining and the concrete applications of data mining technology in clinical medicine were obtained from PubMed and Chinese Hospital Knowledge Database from 1975 to 2015.Study Selection:Original articles regarding big data mining theory/technology and big data mining's application in the medical field were selected.Results:This review characterized the basic theories and technologies of big data mining including fuzzy theory,rough set theory,cloud theory,Dempster-Shafer theory,artificial neural network,genetic algorithm,inductive learning theory,Bayesian network,decision tree,pattern recognition,high-performance computing,and statistical analysis.The application of big data mining in clinical medicine was analyzed in the fields of disease risk assessment,clinical decision support,prediction of disease development,guidance of rational use of drugs,medical management,and evidence-based medicine.Conclusion:Big data mining has the potential to play an important role in clinical medicine.

  10. Nuclear medicine program progress report for quarter ending December 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Beets, A.L.; Boll, R.; Luo, H.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.

    1997-03-20

    In this report the authors describe the use of an effective method for concentration of the rhenium-188 bolus and the results of the first Phase 1 clinical studies for bone pain palliation with rhenium-188 obtained from the tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generator. Initial studies with therapeutic levels of Re-188-HEDP at the Clinic for Nuclear Medicine at the University of Bonn, Germany, have demonstrated the expected good metastatic uptake of Re-188-HEDP in four patients who presented with skeletal metastases from disseminated prostatic cancer with good pain palliation and minimal marrow suppression. In addition, skeletal metastatic targeting of tracer doses of Re-188(V)-DMSA has been evaluated in several patients with metastases from prostatic cancer at the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the Canterbury and Kent Hospital in Canterbury, England. In this report the authors also describe further studies with the E-(R,R)-IQNP ligand developed in the ORNL Nuclear Medicine Program as a potential imaging agent for detection of changes which may occur in the cerebral muscarinic-cholinergic receptors (mAChR) in Alzheimer`s and other diseases.

  11. Introducing Advances in Bioscience and Clinical Medicine (ABCmed)

    OpenAIRE

    Samad EJ Golzari; Kamyar Ghabili

    2013-01-01

    We are pleased to announce the launch of the Advances in Bioscience and Clinical Medicine (ABCmed), aninternational open-access, and peer-reviewed journal. Mostly intended to cover all areas of bioscience and medicine, theJournal would provide a unique venue for the scientists from all over the world to publish their scientific works. One ofthe advantages of publishing with us is the rapid yet rigorous review process which is mostly performed by ourdistinguished Editorial and Review Board mem...

  12. Some Applications of Nuclear Physics in Medicine and Dentistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some applications of nuclear physics, to solve problems in dentistry and medicine are presented. The following two topics are going to be discussed: A. Nuclear Analytical Methods For Trace Element Studies In Teeth Various nuclear analytical methods have been developed and applied to determine the elemental composition of teeth. Fluorine was determined by prompt gamma activation analysis through the 19F (p, a v)16O reaction. Carbon was measured by activation analysis with He-3 ions, and the technique of Proton-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) was applied to simultaneously determine Ca, P, and trace elements in well-documented teeth. Dental hard tissues: enamel, dentine, cement, and their junctions, as well as different parts of the same tissue, were examined separately.

  13. Medicine and ionizing rays: a help sheet in analysing risks in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document first proposes the various applicable legal and regulatory texts concerning radioprotection in the medical sector (European directives, institutions in charge of radioprotection, general arrangements, regulatory texts concerning worker protection against ionizing radiations, personnel specialized in medical radio-physics, electro-radiology operators, quality control of medical devices, and nuclear medicine and radiology). The second part proposes a synthesis of useful knowledge for radioprotection in the case of nuclear medicine when performing in vivo diagnosis, positron emission tomography or PET being excluded. Several aspects are considered: the concerned personnel, the course of treatment procedures, the hazards, the identification of the risk associated with ionizing radiation, the risk assessment and the determination of exposure levels, the strategy to control the risks (reduction of risks, technical measures concerning the installation or the personnel, teaching and information, prevention and medical monitoring), and risk control assessment. The next parts present the same kind of information but for positron emission tomography or PET with Fluorine 18, for therapeutic practice without hospitalization (activity of iodine 137 less than 740 MBq), for therapeutic practice in case of hospitalization (iodine 137 activity greater than 740 MBq), and when taking patients into care after treatment in a nuclear medicine (in this last case, legal and regulatory information focus on patients)

  14. Auditing program for nuclear medicine services in Brazil; Programa de fiscalizacao em servicos de medicina nuclear no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Leopoldino; Ney, Cesar L.V.; Franca, Walter F.L.; Alves, Carlos E.G.R.; Farias, Claudio; Souza, Luiz A. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Radioprotecao em Medicina Nuclear

    2001-07-01

    In this work we intend to discuss the dynamics of the auditing program undertaken by CNEN/IRD, as well as to draw a panorama of the conditions of radioprotection of nuclear medicine installation in the country. The sophistication level and the quality of the used equipment is now uniform around the country, unlike what was observed one decade ago. It demonstrates a progress of the specialty in the country. At the same time was verified, that the implementation of specific norms leads to an improvement of our radioprotection standards. The optimization of clinical formation, through the improvement of the medical residence programs, has been observed altogether during last years. (author)

  15. Absorbed Doses to Patients in Nuclear Medicine; Doskatalogen foer nukleaermedicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leide-Svegborn, Sigrid; Mattsson, Soeren; Nosslin, Bertil [Universitetssjukhuset MAS, Malmoe (Sweden). Avd. foer radiofysik; Johansson, Lennart [Norrlands Universitetssjukhus, Umeaa (Sweden). Avd. foer radiofysik

    2004-09-01

    The work with a Swedish catalogue of radiation absorbed doses to patients undergoing nuclear medicine investigations has continued. After the previous report in 1999, biokinetic data and dose estimates (mean absorbed dose to various organs and tissues and effective dose) have been produced for a number of substances: {sup 11}C- acetate, {sup 11}C- methionine, {sup 18}F-DOPA, whole antibody labelled with either {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In, {sup 123}I or {sup 131}I, fragment of antibody, F(ab'){sub 2} labelled with either {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In, {sup 123}I or {sup 131}I and fragment of antibody, Fab' labelled with either {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In, {sup 123}I or {sup 131}I. The absorbed dose estimates for these substances have been made from published biokinetic information. For other substances of interest, e.g. {sup 14}C-urea (children age 3-6 years), {sup 14}C-glycocholic acid, {sup 14}C-xylose and {sup 14}C-triolein, sufficient literature data have not been available. Therefore, a large number of measurements on patients and volunteers have been carried out, in order to determine the biokinetics and dosimetry for these substances. Samples of breast milk from 50 mothers, who had been subject to nuclear medicine investigations, have been collected at various times after administration of the radiopharmaceutical to the mother. The activity concentration in the breast milk samples has been measured. The absorbed dose to various organs and tissues and the effective dose to the child who ingests the milk have been determined for 17 different radiopharmaceuticals. Based on these results revised recommendations for interruption of breast-feeding after nuclear medicine investigations are suggested.

  16. Peer review practicalities in clinical medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Metcalfe

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Matthew J Metcalfe1, MAL Farrant2, JM Farrant31Department of Vascular Surgery, Imperial College NHS Trust, St Mary’s Hospital, London, UK; 2Department of Anaesthesia, Poole Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Poole Hospital, Dorset, UK; 3Department of Radiology, Royal Free Hampstead NHS Trust, Royal Free Hospital, London, UKAbstract: Peer review processes in teaching requires a reviewer to observe a teacher’s practice in a planned manner. Conversation between the two enables the teacher to reflect on their own teaching, promoting self-improvement. Although a central part of the teaching process, and despite its crucial role in continuing professional development, peer review is not widely practiced in hospital settings. This article explains the process and its benefits. Practical implementations of the process in busy clinical settings are suggested. Its evaluation and incorporation into undergraduate learning and postgraduate clinical practice are described. With enthusiastic support for colleagues and allowances for its implementation, it should become part of the regular teaching practice, improving the quality of teaching delivered.Keywords: teaching, education, clinical practice, peer review

  17. Canadian Centre for Nuclear Innovation: medicine, materials, energy and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper outlines the establishment of the Canadian Centre for Nuclear Innovation Inc for medicine, materials, energy and the environment. Its objectives are to capture the full potential of the uranium value chain in Saskatchewan, create an R&D network for nuclear science and launch a new centre for research in nuclear medicine and materials science.

  18. Radiation protection under debate among French specialists in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper is a synthesis of the communications presented at the 4-th ACOMEN - The Group for Concerted Action in Nuclear Medicine held at the Grenoble, France on 5-7 May, 1993. The main subjects of the conference were: the low dose irradiation, the establishment of the limits for individual doses and the reception by the public of the information on the radiation risks. The conference reassumed the differentiation of the individual accepted dose among professional people (20 mSv/y or 1 Sv for the whole life), taking into account the additive effect, and the limited number of working years, and non professional people (1 mSv/y) dose

  19. Handbook on care, handling and protection of nuclear medicine instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Instruments are fundamental to successful nuclear medicine practice. They must be properly installed in an environment in which they can give accurate and uninterrupted service. They have to be properly and carefully operated and supported throughout their life by regular care and maintenance. If something is wrong with a key instrument all well trained staff members are idle and all purchased radiopharmaceuticals become useless. Overall responsibility for instrumentation rests with the directors of nuclear medicine centres. They should support their electronic engineers, medical physicists, technologists and physicians to plan and implement the care and protection of nuclear medicine instruments, see that they are properly maintained, and kept in optimum working condition by regular checks. Protection should be considered, and provided for, before installing any new instrument. The protective devices are part of the new installation and should be well maintained along with the instrument throughout its life. Thus protection needs careful planning, particularly at the beginning of a new instrumentation programme. It can affect selection, procurement, acceptance testing, and the design of quality control and maintenance routines. These activities should be considered as important in their own right. They should not be mixed in with other functions or left to take care of themselves in the daily rush to get through routine work. Experience suggests that more than half of all failures of electronic equipment are due to damage by external electrical disturbances. Section 2 of this handbook aims to help instrument users in nuclear medicine centres to understand the nature of the various types of disturbance, and to protect against them. Section 3 shows how air conditioning can help to protect instrumentation. Section 4 lists some practical tips to avoid accidental damage due to mishandling. A computer program for use with Personal Computers, ''EPC Expert'' is described

  20. Denoising of Nuclear Medicine images using Wavelet Transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diagnosis using images is widely used in Nuclear Medicine. However, in the case of planar images some problems can appear related to low detectability of small lesions, due to noise contamination. This phenomenon is emphasized because of the impossibility of increasing the radiopharmaceutical dose or the exposure time above the established levels. An algorithm to reduce the random Gaussian noise in planar images using the Wavelet Transform is described in this paper. Results are compared among a set of filters designed by this procedure, in order to select those that offer the best images considering the evaluation of the image quality through quantitative metrics (au)

  1. General comments on radiological patient protection in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper an observation series about different aspects of the radiological protection of the patient in nuclear medicine is provided. It includes: The specific legislation contribution, the justification and, especially, optimization, as a fundamental base of the quality guarantee program, the importance of the fulfillment of the program and the importance of getting done the corresponding internal audits of the pursuit, the communication between the different groups of professionals implicated and between these and the patient, the volunteers who collaborate in the patient's care and the people in the patient's environment, knowing that the patient is a source of external radiation and contamination. (author)

  2. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Holistic Treatment of Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We believe a holistic approach to problems in childhood and adolescence will benefit the child, adolescent, and the whole family. As a rule, children have far less to say in the family than their parents. Therefore, it is the parents who set the agenda and decide how things are done at home and in relation to the child. Most often, it is also the parents who have a problem when the child is not thriving. The child thus acts as the thermometer of the family. When children are not feeling well or are sick, the parents are not doing well either. Most problems arising from dysfunctional patterns are almost impossible for the parents to solve on their own, but with help and support from the holistically oriented physician, we believe that many problems can be discovered and solved. Not only can health problems be addressed, but also problems of poor thriving in the family in general. With the physician in the role of a coach, the family can be provided with relevant exercises that will change the patterns of dysfunction. Consciousness-based medicine also seems to be efficient with children and adolescents, who are much more sensitive to the psychosocial dimensions than adults. Five needs seem to be essential for the thriving and health of the child: attention, respect, love, acceptance (touch, and acknowledgment. The physician should be able to see if the child lacks fulfillment in one or more of these needs, and he can then demonstrate to the parents how these needs should be handled. This should be followed by simple instructions and exercises for the parents in the spirit of coaching. This approach is especially relevant when the child is chronically ill.

  3. Development of program for the study of pulmonary and myocardial function with quantitative analysis of nuclear medicine image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, J. Y.; Lee, H. K.; Seo, T. S.; Choi, B. Y. [Catholic Univ. of Korea, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-05-01

    In this study, we developed a tool for the analysis of pulmonary function and myocardial function with a quantitative analysis of nuclear medicine image. We could produce the clinical parameters for the judgements of pulmonary embolism with planar images of ventilation and perfusion. We also developed a SPECT analysis tool for the analysis of pulmonary function in three dimensional point of view. The program for myocardial SPECT analysis was developed and polar map could be obtained to analyze the myocardial function quantitatively. All the program was developed with IDL5.5 and this program will be improved as a part of the completed quantitative analysis tool for nuclear medicine image.

  4. Toward clinical genomics in everyday medicine: perspectives and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Susan K; Hultner, Michael L; Jacob, Howard J; Ledbetter, David H; McCarthy, Jeanette J; Ball, Michael; Beckman, Kenneth B; Belmont, John W; Bloss, Cinnamon S; Christman, Michael F; Cosgrove, Andy; Damiani, Stephen A; Danis, Timothy; Delledonne, Massimo; Dougherty, Michael J; Dudley, Joel T; Faucett, W Andrew; Friedman, Jennifer R; Haase, David H; Hays, Tom S; Heilsberg, Stu; Huber, Jeff; Kaminsky, Leah; Ledbetter, Nikki; Lee, Warren H; Levin, Elissa; Libiger, Ondrej; Linderman, Michael; Love, Richard L; Magnus, David C; Martland, AnneMarie; McClure, Susan L; Megill, Scott E; Messier, Helen; Nussbaum, Robert L; Palaniappan, Latha; Patay, Bradley A; Popovich, Bradley W; Quackenbush, John; Savant, Mark J; Su, Michael M; Terry, Sharon F; Tucker, Steven; Wong, William T; Green, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Precision or personalized medicine through clinical genome and exome sequencing has been described by some as a revolution that could transform healthcare delivery, yet it is currently used in only a small fraction of patients, principally for the diagnosis of suspected Mendelian conditions and for targeting cancer treatments. Given the burden of illness in our society, it is of interest to ask how clinical genome and exome sequencing can be constructively integrated more broadly into the routine practice of medicine for the betterment of public health. In November 2014, 46 experts from academia, industry, policy and patient advocacy gathered in a conference sponsored by Illumina, Inc. to discuss this question, share viewpoints and propose recommendations. This perspective summarizes that work and identifies some of the obstacles and opportunities that must be considered in translating advances in genomics more widely into the practice of medicine. PMID:26810587

  5. Toward clinical genomics in everyday medicine: perspectives and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Susan K; Hultner, Michael L; Jacob, Howard J; Ledbetter, David H; McCarthy, Jeanette J; Ball, Michael; Beckman, Kenneth B; Belmont, John W; Bloss, Cinnamon S; Christman, Michael F; Cosgrove, Andy; Damiani, Stephen A; Danis, Timothy; Delledonne, Massimo; Dougherty, Michael J; Dudley, Joel T; Faucett, W Andrew; Friedman, Jennifer R; Haase, David H; Hays, Tom S; Heilsberg, Stu; Huber, Jeff; Kaminsky, Leah; Ledbetter, Nikki; Lee, Warren H; Levin, Elissa; Libiger, Ondrej; Linderman, Michael; Love, Richard L; Magnus, David C; Martland, AnneMarie; McClure, Susan L; Megill, Scott E; Messier, Helen; Nussbaum, Robert L; Palaniappan, Latha; Patay, Bradley A; Popovich, Bradley W; Quackenbush, John; Savant, Mark J; Su, Michael M; Terry, Sharon F; Tucker, Steven; Wong, William T; Green, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Precision or personalized medicine through clinical genome and exome sequencing has been described by some as a revolution that could transform healthcare delivery, yet it is currently used in only a small fraction of patients, principally for the diagnosis of suspected Mendelian conditions and for targeting cancer treatments. Given the burden of illness in our society, it is of interest to ask how clinical genome and exome sequencing can be constructively integrated more broadly into the routine practice of medicine for the betterment of public health. In November 2014, 46 experts from academia, industry, policy and patient advocacy gathered in a conference sponsored by Illumina, Inc. to discuss this question, share viewpoints and propose recommendations. This perspective summarizes that work and identifies some of the obstacles and opportunities that must be considered in translating advances in genomics more widely into the practice of medicine.

  6. Clinical Next Generation Sequencing for Precision Medicine in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Ling; Wang, Wanheng; Li, Alvin; Kansal, Rina; Chen, Yuhan; Hong CHEN; Li, Xinmin

    2015-01-01

    Rapid adoption of next generation sequencing (NGS) in genomic medicine has been driven by low cost, high throughput sequencing and rapid advances in our understanding of the genetic bases of human diseases. Today, the NGS method has dominated sequencing space in genomic research, and quickly entered clinical practice. Because unique features of NGS perfectly meet the clinical reality (need to do more with less), the NGS technology is becoming a driving force to realize the dream of precision ...

  7. Establishment of the Auditing National Service of quality to the instrumentation of Nuclear medicine in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Next to the vertiginous development of the technology in the Nuclear Medicine field, the possibility of early diagnosis of pathological processes without anatomical alterations, as well as its application with therapeutic purposes in the cancer treatment has grown. To assure a diagnosis and adapted therapy, it is vital to establish quality guarantee programs to the instrumentation. The State Medical Equipment Control Center (CCEEM), as regulator organ attributed to the Public Health Ministry of Cuba, it has licensed the Service of Quality Audits to the Nuclear medicine services, fulfilling all the technical and legal requirements to such effect. As base of these, the National Protocol for the Quality Control of the Instrumentation in Nuclear Medicine has been implemented, put out in vigour 2 national regulations, and an inter-institutional and multidisciplinary auditor equipment has been licensed. The different followed steps, as well as the realization of the first quality audits, its show not only a better execution of the tests and bigger professionalism of the involved specialists, but an increment in the taking of conscience to apply adequately the quality concepts for achieving a better service to the patient. On the other hand, the necessity of incorporating the clinical aspects to the audits, fomenting an integral harmonized advance of the quality guarantee programs is evidenced. (Author)

  8. Application for internal dosimetry using biokinetic distribution of photons based on nuclear medicine images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal Neto, Viriato, E-mail: viriatoleal@yahoo.com.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, Jose Wilson [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    Objective: this article presents a way to obtain estimates of dose in patients submitted to radiotherapy with basis on the analysis of regions of interest on nuclear medicine images. Materials and methods: a software called DoRadIo (Dosimetria das Radiacoes Ionizantes [Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry]) was developed to receive information about source organs and target organs, generating graphical and numerical results. The nuclear medicine images utilized in the present study were obtained from catalogs provided by medical physicists. The simulations were performed with computational exposure models consisting of voxel phantoms coupled with the Monte Carlo EGSnrc code. The software was developed with the Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Service Pack and the project template Windows Presentation Foundation for C ⧣ programming language. Results: with the mentioned tools, the authors obtained the file for optimization of Monte Carlo simulations using the EGSnrc; organization and compaction of dosimetry results with all radioactive sources; selection of regions of interest; evaluation of grayscale intensity in regions of interest; the file of weighted sources; and, finally, all the charts and numerical results. Conclusion: the user interface may be adapted for use in clinical nuclear medicine as a computer-aided tool to estimate the administered activity. (author)

  9. Avoidable challenges of a nuclear medicine facility in a developing nation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of nuclear medicine in disease management in a developing nation is as impactful as it is in other regions of the world. However, in the developing world, the practice of nuclear medicine is faced with a myriad of challenges, which can be easily avoided. In this review, we examine the many avoidable challenges to the practice of nuclear medicine in a developing nation. The review is largely based on personal experiences of the authors who are the pioneers and current practitioners of nuclear medicine in a typical developing nation. If the challenges examined in this review are avoided, the practice of nuclear medicine in such a nation will be more effective and practitioners will be more efficient in service delivery. Hence, the huge benefits of nuclear medicine will be made available to patients in such a developing nation

  10. Necessity of Internal Monitoring for Nuclear Medicine Staff in a Large Specialized Chinese Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Qing-Zhao; Zhang, Zhen; Hou, Chang-Song; Li, Wen-Liang; Yang, Hui; Sun, Quan-Fu

    2016-04-12

    This work intends to quantify the risk of internal contaminations in the nuclear medicine staff of one hospital in Henan province, China. For this purpose, the criteria proposed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to determine whether it is necessary to conduct internal individual monitoring was applied to all of the 18 nuclear medicine staff members who handled radionuclides. The activity of different radionuclides used during a whole calendar year and the protection measures adopted were collected for each staff member, and the decision as to whether nuclear medicine staff in the hospital should be subjected to internal monitoring was made on the basis of the criteria proposed by IAEA. It is concluded that for all 18 members of the nuclear medicine staff in the hospital, internal monitoring is required. Internal exposure received by nuclear medicine staff should not be ignored, and it is necessary to implement internal monitoring for nuclear medicine staff routinely.

  11. Trends in clinical reproductive medicine research : 10 years of growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleixandre-Benavent, Rafael; Simon, Carlos; Fauser, Bart C J M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the most important metrics of publication in the field of reproductive medicine over the decade 2003-2012 to aid in discerning the clinical, social, and epidemiologic implications of this relatively new but rapidly emerging area in medical sciences. Design Bibliometric analysis of

  12. Methodology guideline for clinical studies investigating traditional Chinese medicine and integrative medicine: executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian-Ping; Chen, Ke-Ji

    2015-10-01

    This guideline aims to provide a methodological guidance for clinical studies in TCM and integrative medicine in terms of study design, execution, and reporting. The commonly used methods including experimental and observational methods were introduced in this guideline such as randomized clinical trials, cohort study, case-control study, case series, and qualitative method which can be incorporated into above quantitative methods. The guideline can be used for the evaluation of therapeutic effect of TCM therapies or their combination with conventional therapy. TCM therapy refers to one of the followings or their combination: herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, cupping, Taichi/Qigong, and Guasha,Tuina (therapeutic massage). It is also suitable for research and development of ethnopharmaceuticals or folk medicine.

  13. Level of occupational exposure during daily work in a Nuclear Medicine Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarcke, Marcelo, E-mail: mschwarcke@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica e Matematica; Ferreira, Nadya [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Cardoso, Domingos [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Workers of the Nuclear Medicine Department have a very complex geometric exposition. The source of irradiation is not collimated and irradiated for all direction, the interaction with many structural tissue is inside the body before could be detected outside. The professional who works in a Nuclear Medicine Department is exposed to this condition and different energies. This work proposes a good approach to estimate the mensal dose level according to the dose rate during their daily routine. To measure the dose rate, a Babyline 81 ionization chamber was used, and the most frequent exams using {sup 99m}Tc were chosen. A previous study was conducted to determine the most frequent exams made in the Nuclear Medicine Department at the Central Army Hospital in Rio de Janeiro, and previous environment monitoring determine the places with higher exposure that could interfere in the measurement of this paper. The Renal scintigraphy with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) had an average dose rate of (2.50{+-}0.25) {mu}Sv/h; for the Renal scintigraphy with dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), it was of (1.20{+-}0.25) {mu}Sv/h; for Bone scintigraphy using two different protocols, it was (2.63{+-}0.30) {mu}Sv/h and (3.09{+-}0.30) {mu}Sv/h. Exposition during elution, dose preparing and clinical procedure was considered a critical moment in the daily routine of the employee. The dose rate obtained in this study demonstrated that the professional cannot exceed the public dose limit in one day of his work routine. Therefore, for the Radioprotection Department, this is a good approach to make a radioprotection plan in the Nuclear Medicine Department. (author)

  14. Nuclear Medicine in the Philippines: A Glance at the Past, a Gaze at the Present, and a Glimpse of the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Patricia A; Luis, Teofilo O L San

    2016-01-01

    While the introduction of radioactive tracers in the study of metabolic pathways has been well-documented in clinical thyroidology as early as 1924, the widespread utilization in other clinical specialties has been hampered by slow developments in radiation-detecting devices and in the production of appropriate radiopharmaceuticals, in addition to the morbid fear of radiation. In the Philippines, the first radioisotope laboratory was established in 1956. Ten years later, the Philippine Society of Nuclear Medicine was formed. Through the years, challenges were overcome, foundations were laid down, growth was encouraged, friendships with other organizations were built, adjustments were made, and rules were enforced. To date, there are approximately 58 nuclear medicine centers randomly distributed from north to south of the Philippines, 7 accredited nuclear medicine training institutions, 95 board-certified nuclear medicine physicians (a few of whom are also internationally recognized), and a regionally-indexed Philippine Journal of Nuclear Medicine. Qualifying examinations for technologists were also recently instated. International relations are constantly strengthened by sending trainees abroad and accepting foreign trainees here, as well as participating in conferences and other endeavors. While the cost of putting up nuclear medicine centers in the Philippines is still prohibitive, it should not pose too much of a constraint as there are foreign and local parties willing to help. With appropriate instrumentation, targeting radiopharmaceuticals and trained human resources, nuclear medicine can indeed contribute much to health care delivery. PMID:27408901

  15. Dosimetry of upper extremities of personnel in nuclear medicine hot labs

    OpenAIRE

    Παπαδόγιαννης, Παναγιώτης

    2012-01-01

    The specific nature of work in nuclear medicine departments involves the use of isotopes and handling procedures, which contribute to the considerable value of the equivalent dose received, in particular, by the fingertips. Workers of nuclear medicine units who label radiopharmaceuticals are exposed to ionizing radiation. The doses of nuclear medicine workers determined by individual dosimeters, which supply data on the magnitude of personal dose equivalent. The dosimetry pointing to a con...

  16. Individual monitoring in nuclear medicine considering incorporation frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The monitoring by internal contamination of 12 workers occupationally exposed from nuclear medicine in Colombia and from a Laboratory of Radio-pharmacy, where ware made dosimeters for the centers of Nuclear Medicine in the country. This monitoring was carried out by means of the determination of the radionuclides activity measured on samples of daily urine of the individuals occupationally exposed. For the analysis of the radionuclides incorporation it was used the biokinetic model of respiratory tract proposed by the International Commission of Radiological Safety, ICRP Publication 66, the simulation of gases and steam and the biokinetic model of iodine recommended by the same commission. The results were compared with the ones obtained using the model of the lung of ICRP 30. In both cases the incorporation frequency was considered, specifically of 131I in agreement with the scheme of work of each person. It was possible to establish with greater approach the incorporated activity and to obtain an estimation of equivalent dose and effective dose. Those results showed the validity that has the simulation of the frequency of incorporation in the data processing of Bioassay

  17. Use and maintenance of nuclear medicine instruments in Southeast Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine instruments are rather sophisticated. They are difficult to maintain in effective working condition, especially in developing countries. The present document describes a survey conducted in Bangladesh, India, Malaysia, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka and Thailand from October 1977 to March 1978, on the use and maintenance of nuclear medicine equipment. The survey evaluated the existing problems of instrument maintenance in the 8 countries visited. The major instruments in use were (1) scintillation probe counters, (2) well scintillation counters and (3) rectilinear cameras. Gamma camera was not widely available in the region at the time of the survey. Most of the surveyed instruments were kept in a detrimental environment resulting in a high failure rate, that caused the relatively high instrument unavailability of 11%. Insufficient bureaucratic handling of repair cases, difficulties with the supply of spare- and replacement parts and lack of training proved to be the main reasons for long periods of instrument inoperation. Remedial actions, based on the survey data, have been initiated

  18. Nuclear medicine and multimodality imaging of pediatric neuroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Wolfgang Peter; Pfluger, Thomas [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Coppenrath, Eva [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    Neuroblastoma is an embryonic tumor of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system and is metastatic or high risk for relapse in nearly 50% of cases. Therefore, exact staging with radiological and nuclear medicine imaging methods is crucial for defining the adequate therapeutic choice. Tumor cells express the norepinephrine transporter, which makes metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), an analogue of norepinephrine, an ideal tumor specific agent for imaging. MIBG imaging has several disadvantages, such as limited spatial resolution, limited sensitivity in small lesions and the need for two or even more acquisition sessions. Most of these limitations can be overcome with positron emission tomography (PET) using [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose [FDG]. Furthermore, new tracers, such as fluorodopa or somatostatin receptor agonists, have been tested for imaging neuroblastoma recently. However, MIBG scintigraphy and PET alone are not sufficient for operative or biopsy planning. In this regard, a combination with morphological imaging is indispensable. This article will discuss strategies for primary and follow-up diagnosis in neuroblastoma using different nuclear medicine and radiological imaging methods as well as multimodality imaging. (orig.)

  19. Nuclear medicine and multimodality imaging of pediatric neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuroblastoma is an embryonic tumor of the peripheral sympathetic nervous system and is metastatic or high risk for relapse in nearly 50% of cases. Therefore, exact staging with radiological and nuclear medicine imaging methods is crucial for defining the adequate therapeutic choice. Tumor cells express the norepinephrine transporter, which makes metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), an analogue of norepinephrine, an ideal tumor specific agent for imaging. MIBG imaging has several disadvantages, such as limited spatial resolution, limited sensitivity in small lesions and the need for two or even more acquisition sessions. Most of these limitations can be overcome with positron emission tomography (PET) using [F-18]2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose [FDG]. Furthermore, new tracers, such as fluorodopa or somatostatin receptor agonists, have been tested for imaging neuroblastoma recently. However, MIBG scintigraphy and PET alone are not sufficient for operative or biopsy planning. In this regard, a combination with morphological imaging is indispensable. This article will discuss strategies for primary and follow-up diagnosis in neuroblastoma using different nuclear medicine and radiological imaging methods as well as multimodality imaging. (orig.)

  20. Nuclear medicine in thyroid cancer management: A practical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyroid cancers are now being diagnosed at an earlier stage and treatments together with follow-up strategies are more effective. However this is not consistent throughout the world. The practice does differ considerably from country to country and region to region. Many International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Members States can benefit from the lessons learned and improve overall patient management of thyroid cancers. The IAEA has significantly enhanced the capabilities of many Member States in the field of nuclear medicine. Functional imaging using nuclear medicine procedures has become an indispensable tool for the diagnosis, treatment planning and management of patients. In terms of treatment, the use of radioiodine (131I) has been central to thyroid cancer and has been successfully used for over six decades. Over the years the IAEA has also assisted many Member States to develop indigenous manufacturing of radioiodine therefore reducing the barriers for the care of patients. This publication is a culmination of efforts by more than twenty international experts in the field to produce a global perspective on the subject. Views expressed are those of individual experts involved and are intended to assist national or regional authorities in decisions regarding the frameworks for effective treatment of thyroid cancer

  1. The medical physicist in a nuclear medicine department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnostic studies and therapeutic treatments carried out in a Nuclear Medicine department make use of radioactive material. For such a reason it becomes necessary to take a strict control in the reception, use and waste that are generated of the typical works inside the department. Also, work related with the quality control of the equipment dedicated to produce images and of those not image formers, need to carry out to guarantee its maximum performance; as well as quality of the diagnostic and of the therapy imparted in patients. Additionally its are needed to make originated works of the individual procedures to patient and of the acquisition of radioactive materials and removal of the waste or radioactive contaminations. Presently work the recommendations of the American College of Radiology (ACR), the European Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics (EFOMP) and of the Mexican Official Standards relating to the functions that should be observed in a Nuclear Medicine Department are exposed. The ACR and the EFOMP, conclude in their recommendations that the medical physicist fulfills with the suitable profile and likewise they describe in detail the actions and functions that he should supervise, to carry out, to document and to inform. (Author)

  2. Technetium-99m in nuclear medicine and radiation protection experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ninkovic, M. M.; Raicevic, J. J.; Pavlovic, S.; Glisic, R. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade, Yugoslavia (Yugoslavia)

    2002-07-01

    The one of the major contributors to personnel exposure whithin nuclear medicine laboratories is primarily now ubiquitous {sup 99}Mo-{sup 99m}Tc generators. These generators, first available about more than forthy years ago, are now providing large quantities of {sup 99m} Tc radioactive source daily in the most laboratories, both for direct injection, as a per-technetate ion, and through the utilization of the kits for the preparation of dipherent radiopharmaceuticals. The safe and efficient utilization of technetium-99m in nuclear medicine, as other radionuclides, begin with the design, construction and operation of the 'Hot'Laboratory area, where radionuclide are stored and patient doses are prepared. Regardless of the specific physical configuration, suitable facilities need to be provided and good working practices established in order to get these principal objectives: (a) keep radiation exposure to personnel at ALARA levels; (b) prevent contamination of personnel; (c) prevent contamination of measuring instruments (including imaging devices such as gamma cameras and rectilinear scanners), and (d) prevent spread of contamination to places or persons outside the laboratory.

  3. Developing a programme on molecular nuclear medicine. Proceedings of a technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last decades, new methodologies have emerged in the molecular nuclear medicine field developed to contribute to the detection, diagnosis, staging and treatment follow-up of human diseases. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) are two examples of this methodology that enabled the study of molecular alterations of cell metabolism in the living subject with non-invasive approaches. 18-fluorine fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) is used for many disease diagnoses, differential diagnosis and treatment follow-up. Like FDG, new molecules are also being identified and are promising candidates to be used. Molecular imaging studies the expression of genes involved in the evolution of different diseases. This data has been shown to be a reliable prognostic marker, for accurate diagnosis or for predicting response to treatment in certain cases. The use of molecular imaging in the evaluation of exogenous gene therapy and the study of endogenous gene expression in genetic, neurological, cardiovascular and neoplastic diseases will be of significant importance worldwide in the near future. The use of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging for the study of a disease assures the determination of integral parameters for prognosis and diagnosis. The improvement of the therapeutic decisions involved with the stage and prognosis of a disease will certainly add to the clinical studies that are designed for patient care, treatment and survival improvement. Many efforts have been made and will continue in the future to demonstrate the potential of the association of molecular nuclear technology and nuclear medicine imaging, since it has been shown to be useful and applicable to many important diseases. In addition, molecular biology techniques, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and differential gene expression have added important findings to the study of disease pathogenesis. These techniques have

  4. Nuclear medicine methods in the assessment of acupuncture effects: a short review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deise Elisabete Souza

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of acupuncture are poorly understood. In consequence, numerous investigators have conducted clinical trials to test the efficacy of acupuncture in various conditions. We have used PubMed database system to evaluate the number of publications in acupuncture and nuclear medicine procedures in the period from 1964 to 2007, using the keywords: "nuclear medicine and acupuncture", "SPECT and acupuncture", "PET and acupuncture", "scintigraphy and acupuncture", "radionuclide and acupuncture", "radiopharmaceutical and acupuncture", "radioisotope and acupuncture" and "99mTc and acupuncture". Some papers published in English language were selected and a short review is presented The analysis of the number of publications shows that when a method is well accepted by the scientific community, as the methods used in nuclear medicine, the interest in the development of research increases. Moreover, important findings are presented when the nuclear medicine image is used to evaluate the effect of the acupuncture.Os mecanismos de ação da acupuntura ainda não são completamente esclarecidos. Em conseqüência, diversos pesquisadores têm conduzido testes clínicos para verificar a eficiência da acupuntura em condições diversas. Nós utilizamos o sistema de base de dados PubMed para avaliar o número de publicações em acupuntura e procedimentos em medicina nuclear no período de 1964 até 2007, usando as palavras-chaves: "medicina nuclear e acupuntura", "SPECT e acupuntura", "PET e acupuntura", "cintilografia e acupuntura", "radionuclídeo e acupuntura", "radiofármaco e acupuntura", "radioisótopo e acupuntura" e "99mTc e acupuntura". Alguns artigos publicados em inglês foram selecionados e uma pequena revisão é apresentada. A análise do número de publicações mostra que quando um método é bem aceito pela comunidade científica, como os métodos utilizados em medicina nuclear, o interesse em desenvolver novos estudos aumenta. Al

  5. Review of splanchnic oximetry in clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sean M; Mally, Pradeep V

    2016-09-01

    Global tissue perfusion and oxygenation are important indicators of physiologic function in humans. The monitoring of splanchnic oximetry through the use of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is an emerging method used to assess tissue oxygenation status. Splanchnic tissue oxygenation (SrSO2) is thought to be potentially of high value in critically ill patients because gastrointestinal organs can often be the first to suffer ischemic injury. During conditions of hypovolemia, cardiac dysfunction, or decreased oxygen-carrying capacity, blood flow is diverted toward vital organs, such as the brain and the heart at the expense of the splanchnic circulation. While monitoring SrSO2 has great potential benefit, there are limitations to the technology and techniques. SrSO2 has been found to have a relatively high degree of variability that can potentially make it difficult to interpret. In addition, because splanchnic organs only lie near the skin surface in children and infants, and energy from currently available sensors only penetrates a few centimeters deep, it can be difficult to use clinically in a noninvasive manner in adults. Research thus far is showing that splanchnic oximetry holds great promise in the ability to monitor patient oxygenation status and detect disease states in humans, especially in pediatric populations.

  6. Current Status of Nuclear Medicine Practice in the Middle East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez, Diana; Becic, Tarik; Bhonsle, Uday; Jalilian, Amir R; Nuñez-Miller, Rodolfo; Osso, Joao Alberto

    2016-07-01

    The practice of nuclear medicine (NM) in the Middle East region has experienced an important growth in the last 2 decades and has become crucial in providing healthcare to the region's population of about 395 million people. Even though there are some countries in which the services provided are limited to basic coverage of studies with (99m)Tc and (131)I, most have well-established practices covering most of the available studies in this medical specialty; this is the case in for example, Iran, Israel, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, and Turkey. According to data provided by the NM professionals in the 17 countries included in the present publication, which was collected by the International Atomic Energy Agency in 2015, the total number of gamma cameras in the region is 910 with an average of 2.3 gamma cameras per million inhabitants. Out of these, 107 cameras, or 12%, are SPECT/CT cameras. There are 194 operating PET/CT scanners, translating to one PET/CT scanner for 2.04 million people on average. The availability of PET/CT scanners in relation to population is the highest in Lebanon and Kuwait, with 2.2 and 1.7 scanners per million people, respectively. There is a total of 628 NM centers in the 17 countries, whereas most NM centers belong to the public healthcare system and in most of the countries are widely spread and not confined exclusively to capital cities. As for the radionuclide therapies, (131)I is used regularly in diagnostic workup as well as in therapeutic applications in all the countries included in this analysis. Only five countries have the capability of assembling (99)Mo-(99m)Tc generators (Egypt, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Israel, and Turkey), and cold kits are produced in several countries. Although there are no capabilities in the region to produce (99)Mo from nuclear reactors, a total of 46 cyclotrons are operated for production of PET radionuclides. The most widely used PET tracer in the region is (18)F-FDG followed by (18)F-NaF; concomitantly, the

  7. Current Status of Nuclear Medicine Practice in the Middle East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez, Diana; Becic, Tarik; Bhonsle, Uday; Jalilian, Amir R; Nuñez-Miller, Rodolfo; Osso, Joao Alberto

    2016-07-01

    The practice of nuclear medicine (NM) in the Middle East region has experienced an important growth in the last 2 decades and has become crucial in providing healthcare to the region's population of about 395 million people. Even though there are some countries in which the services provided are limited to basic coverage of studies with (99m)Tc and (131)I, most have well-established practices covering most of the available studies in this medical specialty; this is the case in for example, Iran, Israel, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, and Turkey. According to data provided by the NM professionals in the 17 countries included in the present publication, which was collected by the International Atomic Energy Agency in 2015, the total number of gamma cameras in the region is 910 with an average of 2.3 gamma cameras per million inhabitants. Out of these, 107 cameras, or 12%, are SPECT/CT cameras. There are 194 operating PET/CT scanners, translating to one PET/CT scanner for 2.04 million people on average. The availability of PET/CT scanners in relation to population is the highest in Lebanon and Kuwait, with 2.2 and 1.7 scanners per million people, respectively. There is a total of 628 NM centers in the 17 countries, whereas most NM centers belong to the public healthcare system and in most of the countries are widely spread and not confined exclusively to capital cities. As for the radionuclide therapies, (131)I is used regularly in diagnostic workup as well as in therapeutic applications in all the countries included in this analysis. Only five countries have the capability of assembling (99)Mo-(99m)Tc generators (Egypt, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Israel, and Turkey), and cold kits are produced in several countries. Although there are no capabilities in the region to produce (99)Mo from nuclear reactors, a total of 46 cyclotrons are operated for production of PET radionuclides. The most widely used PET tracer in the region is (18)F-FDG followed by (18)F-NaF; concomitantly, the

  8. ARRONAX, a high-energy and high-intensity cyclotron for nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, Ferid; Guertin, Arnaud; Michel, Nathalie [SUBATECH, Universite de Nantes, Ecole des Mines de Nantes, CNRS/IN2P3, La Chantrerie, 4, rue A. Kastler, BP 20722, Nantes (France); Ferrer, Ludovic [Universite de Nantes, Departement de Recherche en Cancerologie, Inserm, Nantes (France); Rene Gauducheau Cancer Center, Nantes (France); Carlier, Thomas; Barbet, Jacques; Chatal, Jean-Francois [Universite de Nantes, Departement de Recherche en Cancerologie, Inserm, Nantes (France)

    2008-07-15

    This study was aimed at establishing a list of radionuclides of interest for nuclear medicine that can be produced in a high-intensity and high-energy cyclotron. We have considered both therapeutic and positron emission tomography radionuclides that can be produced using a high-energy and a high-intensity cyclotron such as ARRONAX, which will be operating in Nantes (France) by the end of 2008. Novel radionuclides or radionuclides of current limited availability have been selected according to the following criteria: emission of positrons, low-energy beta or alpha particles, stable or short half-life daughters, half-life between 3 h and 10 days or generator-produced, favourable dosimetry, production from stable isotopes with reasonable cross sections. Three radionuclides appear well suited to targeted radionuclide therapy using beta ({sup 67}Cu, {sup 47}Sc) or alpha ({sup 211}At) particles. Positron emitters allowing dosimetry studies prior to radionuclide therapy ({sup 64}Cu, {sup 124}I, {sup 44}Sc), or that can be generator-produced ({sup 82}Rb, {sup 68}Ga) or providing the opportunity of a new imaging modality ({sup 44}Sc) are considered to have a great interest at short term whereas {sup 86}Y, {sup 52}Fe, {sup 55}Co, {sup 76}Br or {sup 89}Zr are considered to have a potential interest at middle term. Several radionuclides not currently used in routine nuclear medicine or not available in sufficient amount for clinical research have been selected for future production. High-energy, high-intensity cyclotrons are necessary to produce some of the selected radionuclides and make possible future clinical developments in nuclear medicine. Associated with appropriate carriers, these radionuclides will respond to a maximum of unmet clinical needs. (orig.)

  9. Challenges of Identifying Clinically Actionable Genetic Variants for Precision Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonia C. Carter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in genomic medicine have the potential to change the way we treat human disease, but translating these advances into reality for improving healthcare outcomes depends essentially on our ability to discover disease- and/or drug-associated clinically actionable genetic mutations. Integration and manipulation of diverse genomic data and comprehensive electronic health records (EHRs on a big data infrastructure can provide an efficient and effective way to identify clinically actionable genetic variants for personalized treatments and reduce healthcare costs. We review bioinformatics processing of next-generation sequencing (NGS data, bioinformatics infrastructures for implementing precision medicine, and bioinformatics approaches for identifying clinically actionable genetic variants using high-throughput NGS data and EHRs.

  10. An eMERGE Clinical Center at Partners Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan W. Smoller

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The integration of electronic medical records (EMRs and genomic research has become a major component of efforts to advance personalized and precision medicine. The Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE network, initiated in 2007, is an NIH-funded consortium devoted to genomic discovery and implementation research by leveraging biorepositories linked to EMRs. In its most recent phase, eMERGE III, the network is focused on facilitating implementation of genomic medicine by detecting and disclosing rare pathogenic variants in clinically relevant genes. Partners Personalized Medicine (PPM is a center dedicated to translating personalized medicine into clinical practice within Partners HealthCare. One component of the PPM is the Partners Healthcare Biobank, a biorepository comprising broadly consented DNA samples linked to the Partners longitudinal EMR. In 2015, PPM joined the eMERGE Phase III network. Here we describe the elements of the eMERGE clinical center at PPM, including plans for genomic discovery using EMR phenotypes, evaluation of rare variant penetrance and pleiotropy, and a novel randomized trial of the impact of returning genetic results to patients and clinicians.

  11. Notes on "Clinical and Internal Medicine. Past, Present and Future”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Hodelín Tablada

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available "Clinical and Internal Medicine. Past, Present and Future" is a book written by Professor Alfredo Darío Espinosa Brito and published by Medical Sciences in 2011. It was awarded the prize of the Cuban Academy of Sciences. This article aims to encourage reading this book, a veritable compendium of the past, present and future of internal medicine. It outlines the issues addressed, from the structure designed for them to a fairly comprehensive assessment of the elements that define the scientific and literary value of this work.

  12. Optimization of the radioprotection for nuclear medicine services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine (NM) is a medical specialty which uses small amounts of radioactive material combined with drugs, to make either therapeutic treatments or form diagnostic images of the organ and tissue. Follow the nuclear regulations any activity involving ionizing radiation should be justified and it must have their procedures of work to be optimized. Thus, the aim of the study is to determine the need and the importance of optimization of radiation protection in NM services and reduce occupationally exposed individuals (OEI) doses in order to avoid possible contamination or accidents and reduce the costs of protection. Optimization for a NM service that makes use of ionizing radiation can be performed using different techniques such as the expanded cost-benefit analysis. Such technique introduces one or two attributes associated to the detriment cost, Y, and the protection costs, X. This work was conducted in the year 2011, where it was analyzed data of 56 employees from 2002 to 2010. The value of the cost of protection was R$ 147.645,95, including accessories, courses, training and maintenance costs. On the other hand, the cost of the expense ranged from R$ 1.065.750, 00 up to R$ 28.890.351, 00 and the parameter responsible for this variation is the collective dose. The increasing of these dose values causes the increasing of the total costs, and one can conclude that there really is an importance of applying the optimization technique to improve the safety of OEI at the nuclear medicine service and reducing costs of protection. (author)

  13. Gallium and Indium: which to use when 2. Nuclear medicine imaging of osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine studies have become increasingly clinically utilized in the diagnostic approach to suspected osteomyelitis. The technetium-99m phosphonate bone scan, with the three- or four-phase modification designed to distinguish between osteomyelitis and cellulitis, the gallium-67 citrate scan, and the indium-111 leukocyte scan. have demonstrated utility in diagnosing acute osteomyelitis or exacerbation of chronic osteomyelitis and monitoring the response to therapy in those patients. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of suspected osteomyelitis continue to be evaluated, but available data indicate that these modalities play a supporting role to radionuclide studies. 34 refs., 3 figs

  14. New Help from cellular medicine to surgery; Nuevas ayudas de la medicina nuclear a la cirugia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreras Delgado, J. L.

    2009-07-01

    New Nuclear Medicine techniques to help the surgeon in the operation room are now being introduced. They aim to get a better location of the objective or a shorter duration of the surgical process. The selective radio guided biopsy of the sentinel node included in the clinical practise guidelines for the surgery of tumours as breast cancer and malignant melanoma is the paradigm of this new techniques. Other techniques are intraoperatory detection with probes or portable gamma cameras of tumour lesions as parathyroid adenomas, metastatic neuroendocrine tumours and other tumours. (Author) 16 refs.

  15. The new radiation protection ordinance from the viewpoint of the nuclear medicine technologist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new radiation protection ordinance for the first time acknowledges the role of the nuclear medicine technologists for the technical assistance in the use of radiopharmaceuticals and radiation with human beings in medicine. Therefore changes are required for the technologists in terms of their qualification and continuing education during their professional life and in the daily routine in a nuclear medicine department. The new ordinance clearly defines which group of people is allowed to work as nuclear medicine technologists and also which special knowledge in radiation protection is mandatory to make sure that nobody without this certified education is performing the work of a nuclear medicine technologist. The new effective dose limit for people working with radiation will not change the daily work, but new regulations for pregnant women or breastfeeding mothers working in nuclear medicine will bring dramatic changes. (orig.)

  16. IBA-Europhysics Prize in Applied Nuclear Science and Nuclear Methods in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, I. J. Douglas

    2014-03-01

    The Nuclear Physics Board of the European Physical Society is pleased to announce that the 2013 IBA-Europhysics Prize in Applied Nuclear Science and Nuclear Methods in Medicine is awarded to Prof. Marco Durante, Director of the Biophysics Department at GSI Helmholtz Center (Darmstadt, Germany); Professor at the Technical University of Darmstadt (Germany) and Adjunct Professor at the Temple University, Philadelphia, USA. The prize was presented in the closing Session of the INPC 2013 conference by Mr. Thomas Servais, R&D Manager for Accelerator Development at the IBA group, who sponsor the IBA Europhysics Prize. The Prize Diploma was presented by Dr. I J Douglas MacGregor, Chair-elect of the EPS Nuclear Physics Division and Chair of the IBA Prize committee.

  17. Proceedings of the 1. National Forum of Science and Technology on Health; 13. Brazilian Congress on Biomedical Engineering; 4. Brazilian Congress of Physicists on Medicine; Brazilian Meeting on Biology and Nuclear Medicine; Brazilian Meeting on Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This 1. National Forum of Science and Technology on Health presents works of several scientific institutions, including topics on bioengineering; modelling and simulation; sensors and transducers; ultrasonic on medicine; instrumentation processing of signs and medical images; biomedical informatics and clinical software; engineering of rehabilitation; bio-materials and bio-mechanical; clinical engineering; in vivo and in vitro nuclear medicine; radioisotope production and utilization; radiology; radiology protection and dosimetry; radiotherapy; evaluation of technology on health and education. (C.G.C.)

  18. Nuclear medicine in diagnosis and therapy of inflammatory diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The actually available scintigraphic methods for localization of inflammatory diseases were presented. The clinical applications of these techniques (for surgery, intensive care, orthopedic surgery, internal medicine, ENT diseases, maxillofacial surgery, dermatology and pediatrics) were discussed as well as the results of MRI. There was a consensus that all these methods -when applied appropriately - can be essential for diagnosis of inflammation, frequently in conditions in which other diagnostic techniques fail to provide adequate information. Cardiac monitoring with a compact detector in patients with septicemia was presented also. Therapy of rheumatic arthritis by intraarticular application of radiocolloids (synoviorthesis) has maintained its value. (orig.)

  19. Measurement of doses to the extremities of nuclear medicine staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shousha, Hany A.; Farag, Hamed; Hassan, Ramadan A.

    2010-01-01

    Medical uses of ionizing radiation now represent>95% of all man-made radiation exposure, and is the largest single radiation source after natural background radiation. Therefore, it is important to quantify the amount of radiation received by occupational individuals to optimize the working conditions for staff, and further, to compare doses in different departments to ensure compatibility with the recommended standards. For some groups working with unsealed sources in nuclear medicine units, the hands are more heavily exposed to ionizing radiation than the rest of the body. A personal dosimetry service runs extensively in Egypt. But doses to extremities have not been measured to a wide extent. The purpose of this study was to investigate the equivalent radiation doses to the fingers for five different nuclear medicine staff occupational groups for which heavy irradiation of the hands was suspected. Finger doses were measured for (1) nuclear medicine physicians, (2) technologists, (3) nurses and (4) physicists. The fifth group contains three technicians handling 131I, while the others handled 99mTc. Each staff member working with the radioactive material wore two thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) during the whole testing period, which lasted from 1 to 4 weeks. Staff performed their work on a regular basis throughout the month, and mean annual doses were calculated for these groups. Results showed that the mean equivalent doses to the fingers of technologist, nurse and physicist groups were 30.24±14.5, 30.37±17.5 and 16.3±7.7 μSv/GBq, respectively. Equivalent doses for the physicians could not be calculated per unit of activity because they did not handle the radiopharmaceuticals directly. Their doses were reported in millisieverts (mSv) that accumulated in one week. Similarly, the dose to the fingers of individuals in Group 5 was estimated to be 126.13±38.2 μSv/GBq. The maximum average finger dose, in this study, was noted in the technologists who handled

  20. Generation of complete electronic nuclear medicine reports including static, dynamic and gated images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To develop a procedure for the creation of nuclear medicine reports containing static and dynamic images. The reason for implementing this technique is the lack of adequate solutions for an electronic format of nuclear medicine results allowing for rapid transmission via e-mail, specially in the case of dynamic and gated SPECT studies, since functional data is best presented in dynamic mode. Material and Methods: Clinical images were acquired in static, whole body, dynamic and gated mode, corresponding to bone studies, diuretic renogram, radionuclide cystography and gated perfusion SPECT, as well as respective time-activity curves. Image files were imported from a dedicated nuclear medicine computer system (Elscint XPert) to a Windows-based PC through a standard ethernet network with TCP-IP communications protocol, using a software developed by us which permits the conversion from the manufacturer's original format into a bitmap format (.bmp) compatible with commercially available PC software. For cardiac perfusion studies, background was subtracted prior to transferring to reduce the amount of information in the file; this was not done for other type of studies because useful data could be eliminated. Dynamic images were then processed using commercial software to create animated files and stored in .gif format. Static images were re-sized and stored in .jpg format. Original color or gray scale was always preserved. All the graphic material was then merged with a previously prepared report text using HTML format. The report also contained reference diagrams to facilitate interpretation. The whole report was then compressed into a self-extractable file, ready to be sent by electronic mail. Reception of the material was visually checked for data integrity including image quality by two experienced nuclear medicine physicians. Results: The report presented allows for simultaneous visualization of the text, diagrams and images either static, dynamic, gated or

  1. The development of precision medicine in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mingyan; Xia, Jinglin; Shehab, Mohamed; Wang, Xiangdong

    2015-12-01

    Precision medicine allows a dramatic expansion of biological data, while there is still an urgent need to understand and insight the exact meaning of those data to human health and disease. This has led to an increasing wealth of data unanalyzed. The concept of precision medicine is about the customization of healthcare, with decisions and practices tailored to an individual patient based on their intrinsic biology in addition to clinical "signs and symptoms". Construction of a standardized model for the integration of data from various platforms is the central mission of the 'New Disease Management Model'. The model is helpful for the development of new taxonomy of diseases and subtypes, to personalize therapy based on patient genetic profiles. A rapid progression of precision therapy has been made recently. Clinical trials have shown the therapeutic efficacy of discovered and developed therapeutic agents has improved. However, next-generation drugs would be designed for disease subtypes with more specificity, efficacy and lower toxicity. PMID:26302883

  2. Clinical uses of the medicinal leech: A practical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B S Porshinsky

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The medicinal leech, Hirudo medicinalis, is an excellent example of the use of invertebrates in the treatment of human disease. Utilized for various medical indications since the ancient times, the medicinal leech is currently being used in a narrow range of well-defined and scientifically-grounded clinical applications. Hirudotherapy is most commonly used in the setting of venous congestion associated with soft tissue replantations and free flap-based reconstructive surgery. This is a comprehensive review of current clinical applications of hirudotherapy, featuring a comprehensive search of all major medical search engines (i.e. PubMed, Google Scholar, ScientificCommons and other cross-referenced sources. The authors focus on indications, contraindications, practical application/handling of the leech, and therapy-related complications.

  3. Guidance for nuclear medicine staff on radiopharmaceuticals drug interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Santos-Oliveira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerous drug interactions related to radiopharmaceuticals take place every day in hospitals many of which are not reported or detected. Information concerning this kind of reaction is not abundant, and nuclear medicine staff are usually overwhelmed by this information. To better understand this type of reaction, and to help nuclear medicine staff deal with it, a review of the literature was conducted. The results show that almost all of radiopharmaceuticals marketed around the world present drug interactions with a large variety of compounds. This suggests that a logical framework to make decisions based on reviews incorporating adverse reactions must be created. The review also showed that researchers undertaking a review of literature, or even a systematic review that incorporates drug interactions, must understand the rationale for the suggested methods and be able to implement them in their review. Additionally, a global effort should be made to report as many cases of drug interaction with radiopharmaceuticals as possible. With this, a complete picture of drug interactions with radiopharmaceuticals can be drawn.Diversos casos de interações medicamentosas com radiofármacos ocorrem diariamente na rotina hospitalar, contudo muitos deles não são notificados ou mesmo percebidos. Informações a respeito desse tipo de reação não é abundante e os profissionais da medicina nuclear muitas vezes estão assoberbados por essas informações. De modo a entender esse tipo de reação e auxiliar a medicina nuclear a lidar com essa situação uma revisão da literatura foi realizada. Os resultados mostraram que a totalidade dos radiofármacos comercializados no mundo apresentam interação medicamentosa com uma enorme variedade de outros medicamentos. Dessa forma sugere-se que revisões sobre radiofármacos inclua um capítulo sobre efeitos adversos. Além disso, um esforço mundial para notificar efeitos adversos deve ser realizado, pois somente

  4. Diffusion processes in tumors: A nuclear medicine approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Helman

    2016-07-01

    The number of counts used in nuclear medicine imaging techniques, only provides physical information about the desintegration of the nucleus present in the the radiotracer molecules that were uptaken in a particular anatomical region, but that information is not a real metabolic information. For this reason a mathematical method was used to find a correlation between number of counts and 18F-FDG mass concentration. This correlation allows a better interpretation of the results obtained in the study of diffusive processes in an agar phantom, and based on it, an image from the PETCETIX DICOM sample image set from OsiriX-viewer software was processed. PET-CT gradient magnitude and Laplacian images could show direct information on diffusive processes for radiopharmaceuticals that enter into the cells by simple diffusion. In the case of the radiopharmaceutical 18F-FDG is necessary to include pharmacokinetic models, to make a correct interpretation of the gradient magnitude and Laplacian of counts images.

  5. Health physics considerations in intrainstitutional mobile nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of a mobile scintillation camera within a hospital enables imaging procedures to be used on patients such as those in critical care units, who cannot be transported to the central nuclear medicine laboratory. Transport throughout the hospital of the radiopharmaceuticals for use with the mobile system and the associated radiation safety precautions are discussed. The nuclides most frequently used are sup(99m)Tc and 133Xe. It is shown that radiation exposure to hospital personnel can be kept well below recognised guidelines when using sizeable quantities of radionuclides remote from the controlled environment of the central laboratory. Special care is needed in disposing of radioactive waste, particularly 133Xe gas, which must be collected and returned to the laboratory. There is a need for education and reassurance of nurses concerning the use of ionizing radiation and hazards to them from patients containing radioactive material. (author)

  6. Patient dose assessment in different diagnostic procedures in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effective doses have been estimated for 314 patients under diagnostic procedures in a Nuclear Medicine Department using data reported in ICRP-80 and RIDIC (Radiation Internal Dose Information Center). Data on administered activity, radiopharmaceutical and administration route, age and sex of the patients have been collected. Doses in the most exposed critical organ for every protocol, doses in uterus, doses in fetus versus the stage of pregnancy (in case the female patient was pregnant) and doses for nursing infants have been also estimated. Ga-67 studies give the highest effective doses per protocol followed by cardiac SPECT procedures using Tl-201 chloride. Ga-67 studies also give the highest absorbed doses in uterus. Due to not administering different activities, depending on height and weight of adults, women receive doses about 20% higher than men. This would be a practice to modify in the future in order to optimise doses. (author)

  7. Development of thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms for use in nuclear medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, R. A. D.; Maia, A. F.

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms to be used in control tests of medical images in scintillation cameras. The main difference among the phantoms was the neck shape: in the first, called OSCT, it was geometrically shaped, while in the second, called OSAP, it was anthropomorphically shaped. In both phantoms, thyroid gland prototypes, which were made of acrylic and anthropomorphically shaped, were constructed to allow the simulation of a healthy thyroid and of thyroids with hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Images of these thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms were obtained using iodine 131 with an activity of 8.695 MBq. The iodine 131 was chosen because it is widely used in studies of thyroid scintigraphy. The images obtained proved the effectiveness of the phantoms to simulate normal or abnormal thyroids function. These phantoms can be used in medical imaging quality control programs and, also in the training of professionals involved in the analysis of images in nuclear medicine centers.

  8. Monitoring medicines use: the role of the clinical pharmacologist

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, David

    2012-01-01

    Appreciation of the potential of newly marketed medicines to produce both benefit and harm has increased the role of the clinical pharmacologist. Pharmacoepidemiology applies epidemiological reasoning, methods and knowledge to the study of the uses and effects of drugs in human populations. Pharmacovigilence identifies and then responds to safety issues about marketed drugs. Whilst adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting systems can identify potential problems with drugs, determination of causa...

  9. Nuclear medicine external individual occupational doses in Rio de Janeiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauricio, Claudia L.P.; Lima, Ana Luiza S.; Silva, Herica L.R. da; Santos, Denison Souza [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: claudia@ird.gov.br, e-mail: analuslima@yahoo.com.br, e-mail: herica@ird.gov.br, e-mail: santosd@ird.gov.br; Silva, Claudio Ribeiro da [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao Geral de Ciencia e Tecnologia da Informacao (CGTI)(Brazil)], e-mail: claudio@cnen.gov.br

    2009-07-01

    According to the Brazilian National Database there are about 300 Nuclear Medicine Services (NMS) in Brazil, 44 of them located in the State of Rio de Janeiro (RJ). Individual dose measurements are an important input for the evaluation of occupational exposure in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of radioprotection implementation and to keep individual doses as low as possible. In Brazil, most nuclear medicine (NM) staff is routinely monitored for external dose. The internal committed dose is estimated only in abnormal conditions. This paper makes a statistics analysis of all the RJ NMS annual external occupational doses in year 2005. A study of the evolution of monthly external individual doses higher than 4.00 mSv from 2004 to 2008 is also presented. The number of registered thorax monthly dose higher than 4.0 mSv is increasing, as its value. In this period the highest dose measured reaches 56.9 mSv, in one month, in 2008. About 50% of the annual doses are smaller than the monthly record level of 0.20 mSv. In 2005, around 100 professionals of RJ NMS received annual doses higher than 4.0 mSv, considering only external doses, but no one receives doses higher than 20.0 mSv. Extremities dosimeters are used by about 15% of the staff. In some cases, these doses are more than 10 times higher than the dose in thorax. This study shows the importance to improve radiation protection procedures in NM. (author)

  10. Human resource development in nuclear medicine in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An organization, an enterprise or a movement is only as good as the people in it and these cannot be conceived without considering the people that make it, in other words its human resources (HR). The definition of HR includes the total knowledge, skills, creative abilities, talents and aptitudes of the work-force. Equally important it includes the values, attitudes and benefits of each of the individuals concerned. No development is possible without proper planning. HR planning is therefore a prerequisite for HRD in NM and no planning can be made without defining the objectives of Nuclear Medicine (NM) in developing countries (DC). It is also essential to forecast the future needs of NM in DC keeping in mind the stated objectives before laying out the strategies of the HRD. HRD in NM is best achieved when all the partners in the game play their part with commitment and sincerity of purpose. At the national level the partners are the government (ministries of health and education), professional bodies (national societies of NM) and academic bodies (colleges of NM physicians, physicists and technologists etc.). In the implementation of the HRD systems and processes, involvement of all the partners is essential for success. Creation of task forces to implement, monitor and evaluate HRD tools ensures the quality of these tools. The operation of some of these tools may have to be centralized, and others decentralized depending upon the exigencies of need, propriety and practicality. In summary, the aim of HRD should be to ensure the right people at the right time for the right job and in doing so nuclear medicine achieves its objectives and the individuals in the workforce realize their full potentials, and benefits in full

  11. National audit of radioactivity measurements in Nuclear Medicine Centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Routine activity measurements of radiopharmaceutical solutions in Nuclear Medicine Centres (NMC) are carried out with the help of radionuclide calibrators (RC). These solutions are either ingested or injected to the patient for diagnosis or therapy. However, for the realization of an optimized examination, the activity of these radiopharmaceuticals must be determined accurately before administering it to patients. The primary standards are maintained by Radiation Standards Section, Radiological Physics and Advisory Division. National audit programmes of Iodine -131 activity measurements with RCs are conducted biannually to establish traceability to national standards and to check the status of nuclear medicine practice followed at the NMC. The results of fifteenth audit of 131I activity measurements with RC are presented in this paper. Questionnaires were sent to two hundred and thirty three NMCs in-the country. One hundred and nine NMC's agreed for participation and accordingly, glass vials containing radioactive 131I solution of nominal activity of 100 MBq were procured from Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology, Mumbai. The radioactivity in each vial was determined with high pressure re-entrant gamma ionisation chamber (GIC), a secondary standard maintained by this laboratory. The sensitivity coefficient of GIC is traceable to the primary standard. The standardized radioactive solution of 131I in glass vial was sent to each participant. Measurements results were reported in the reporting form sent. This audit was conducted in four schedules in Jan 2013. One hundred and sixty six results were received from one hundred and nine participants as many participants took measurements on more than one isotope calibrator

  12. Radioactive isotopes in clinical medicine and research. Final Programme and Abstracts Book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 25th symposium offers again a representative cross-section through the current topics of nuclear medicine of scientific interest. The general theme of research in nuclear medicine has shifted from the spectacular new developments which were so often reported in the first symposia to a less spectacular, nevertheless equally fruitful, consolidation period. The topics of the symposium reflect the major trends in nuclear medicine, witnessing the firm place which PET procedures have occupied in clinical practice. Standardization and validation is another area which has remained as a major task for the development of our specialty and which in spite of the enormous progress that has been made during the past two years still is far from a general solution. Networking, even between heterogeneous systems, has become less of a problem than it used to be a few years ago. However, new and more complex acquisition technology such as needed for quantitation in scintigraphy and for multi-modality imaging, is still a challenge for integration and for PACS systems. (author)

  13. [In vivo mutagenicity and clastogenicity of ionizing radiation in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall goals of our research remains to investigate the mutagenic and clastogenic effects of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation in human lymphocytes. We are studying hospital patients referred to a nuclear medicine department for diagnostic cardiac imaging and nuclear medicine technologists who administer radionuclides

  14. Radioisotope production for using in nuclear medicine, in the IPEN-CNEN/SP - Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of radioisotopes used in nuclear medicine is shown. The performance of the cyclotrons model CV-28 and studies about production of 123I are evaluated. The irradiation of mercury target as well as radioelements for using in nuclear medicine are studied. (M.J.C.)

  15. Papers of All-Polish Conference on Nuclear Techniques in Industry, Medicine, Agriculture and Environmental Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These proceedings comprise papers presented at All-Polish Conference on nuclear techniques in industry, medicine, agriculture and environmental protection. Most of the papers are in the field of uses of radiation sources and particle beams in industry, radiation chemistry, nuclear medicine and dosimetry, environmental sciences

  16. Manual of use and accounting of radioactive material and procedures of radiological protection for nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This manual of use and accounting of material radioactive and procedures of radiological safety tries to facilitate workings of protection of material radioactive in services of medicine nuclear, during diagnosis (examinations with x-rays, or those that are made in nuclear medicine), or during the processing of diseases, mainly of the carcinomas (x-ray)

  17. Andragogy in clinical medicine: implications for medical educators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Geetha Mani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In Medical education, the final desired outcome is to prepare the students to meet the challenges in delivering health care to individuals and the community in the most competent and professional manner. Application of Andragogy in medical education especially clinical medicine will enrich the learning experience of students with respect to diagnosing their needs, acquiring knowledge, skills and appropriate attitudes. Various strategies such as problem based learning, clinically associated teaching, critical reflection, role modeling and constructive feedback can be used to enhance the students’ competence and inculcate professionalism among the students.

  18. ACR-SNM Task Force on Nuclear Medicine Training: report of the task force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiberteau, Milton J; Graham, Michael M

    2011-06-01

    The expansion of knowledge and technological advances in nuclear medicine and radiology require physicians to have more expertise in functional and anatomic imaging. The convergence of these two specialties into the new discipline of molecular imaging has also begun to place demands on residency training programs for additional instruction in physiology and molecular biology. These changes have unmasked weaknesses in current nuclear medicine and radiology training programs. Adding to the impetus for change are the attendant realities of the job market and uncertain employment prospects for physicians trained in nuclear medicine but not also trained in diagnostic radiology. With this background, the ACR and the Society of Nuclear Medicine convened the Task Force on Nuclear Medicine Training to define the issues and develop recommendations for resident training.

  19. Evaluation of Radiation Protection in Nuclear Medicine Department in Namazi Hospital According to Global Accepted Standards

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Mehdi Movahedi; Alireza Mehdizadeh

    2013-01-01

    Background & Objective: In the recent years, nuclear medicine has enjoyed remarkable growth thanks to such novel technologies as SPECT-CT and PET, which are utilized for the recognition of new detectable molecules and radiopharmaceutical medicines. Therefore, the current regulations on radiation protection require revision. Namazi Hospital of Shiraz is one of the first nuclear medicine centers in Iran. Many patients visit this hospital every year; consequently, radiation protection must b...

  20. Fractal analysis in radiological and nuclear medicine perfusion imaging: a systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michallek, Florian; Dewey, Marc [Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Medical School, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    To provide an overview of recent research in fractal analysis of tissue perfusion imaging, using standard radiological and nuclear medicine imaging techniques including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and to discuss implications for different fields of application. A systematic review of fractal analysis for tissue perfusion imaging was performed by searching the databases MEDLINE (via PubMed), EMBASE (via Ovid) and ISI Web of Science. Thirty-seven eligible studies were identified. Fractal analysis was performed on perfusion imaging of tumours, lung, myocardium, kidney, skeletal muscle and cerebral diseases. Clinically, different aspects of tumour perfusion and cerebral diseases were successfully evaluated including detection and classification. In physiological settings, it was shown that perfusion under different conditions and in various organs can be properly described using fractal analysis. Fractal analysis is a suitable method for quantifying heterogeneity from radiological and nuclear medicine perfusion images under a variety of conditions and in different organs. Further research is required to exploit physiologically proven fractal behaviour in the clinical setting. (orig.)

  1. Highlights lecture EANM 2015: the search for nuclear medicine's superheroes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Andreas; Decristoforo, Clemens

    2016-09-01

    The EANM 2015 Annual Congress, held from October 10th to 14th in Hamburg, Germany, was outstanding in many respects. With 5550 participants, this was by far the largest European congress concerning nuclear medicine. More than 1750 scientific presentations were submitted, with more than 250 abstracts from young scientists, indicating that the future success of our discipline is fuelled by a high number of young individuals becoming involved in a multitude of scientific activities. Significant improvements have been made in molecular imaging of cancer, particularly in prostate cancer. PSMA-directed PET/CT appears to become a new gold standard for staging and restaging purposes. Novel tumour specific compounds have shown their potential for target identification also in other solid neoplasms and further our understanding of tumour biology and heterogeneity. In addition, a variety of nuclear imaging techniques guiding surgical interventions have been introduced. A particular focus of the congress was put on targeted, radionuclide based therapies. Novel theranostic concepts addressing also tumour entities with high incidence rates such as prostate cancer, melanoma, and lymphoma, have shown effective anti-tumour activity. Strategies have been presented to improve further already established therapeutic regimens such as somatostatin receptor based radio receptor therapy for treating advanced neuroendocrine tumours. Significant contributions were presented also in the neurosciences track. An increasing number of target structures of high interest in neurology and psychiatry are now available for PET and SPECT imaging, facilitating specific imaging of different subtypes of dementia and movement disorders as well as neuroinflammation. Major contributions in the cardiovascular track focused on further optimization of cardiac perfusion imaging by reducing radiation exposure, reducing scanning time, and improving motion correction. Besides coronary artery disease, many

  2. Highlights lecture EANM 2015: the search for nuclear medicine's superheroes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Andreas; Decristoforo, Clemens

    2016-09-01

    The EANM 2015 Annual Congress, held from October 10th to 14th in Hamburg, Germany, was outstanding in many respects. With 5550 participants, this was by far the largest European congress concerning nuclear medicine. More than 1750 scientific presentations were submitted, with more than 250 abstracts from young scientists, indicating that the future success of our discipline is fuelled by a high number of young individuals becoming involved in a multitude of scientific activities. Significant improvements have been made in molecular imaging of cancer, particularly in prostate cancer. PSMA-directed PET/CT appears to become a new gold standard for staging and restaging purposes. Novel tumour specific compounds have shown their potential for target identification also in other solid neoplasms and further our understanding of tumour biology and heterogeneity. In addition, a variety of nuclear imaging techniques guiding surgical interventions have been introduced. A particular focus of the congress was put on targeted, radionuclide based therapies. Novel theranostic concepts addressing also tumour entities with high incidence rates such as prostate cancer, melanoma, and lymphoma, have shown effective anti-tumour activity. Strategies have been presented to improve further already established therapeutic regimens such as somatostatin receptor based radio receptor therapy for treating advanced neuroendocrine tumours. Significant contributions were presented also in the neurosciences track. An increasing number of target structures of high interest in neurology and psychiatry are now available for PET and SPECT imaging, facilitating specific imaging of different subtypes of dementia and movement disorders as well as neuroinflammation. Major contributions in the cardiovascular track focused on further optimization of cardiac perfusion imaging by reducing radiation exposure, reducing scanning time, and improving motion correction. Besides coronary artery disease, many

  3. Clinical research of traditional Chinese medicine in big data era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junhua; Zhang, Boli

    2014-09-01

    With the advent of big data era, our thinking, technology and methodology are being transformed. Data-intensive scientific discovery based on big data, named "The Fourth Paradigm," has become a new paradigm of scientific research. Along with the development and application of the Internet information technology in the field of healthcare, individual health records, clinical data of diagnosis and treatment, and genomic data have been accumulated dramatically, which generates big data in medical field for clinical research and assessment. With the support of big data, the defects and weakness may be overcome in the methodology of the conventional clinical evaluation based on sampling. Our research target shifts from the "causality inference" to "correlativity analysis." This not only facilitates the evaluation of individualized treatment, disease prediction, prevention and prognosis, but also is suitable for the practice of preventive healthcare and symptom pattern differentiation for treatment in terms of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), and for the post-marketing evaluation of Chinese patent medicines. To conduct clinical studies involved in big data in TCM domain, top level design is needed and should be performed orderly. The fundamental construction and innovation studies should be strengthened in the sections of data platform creation, data analysis technology and big-data professionals fostering and training.

  4. Clinical research of traditional Chinese medicine in big data era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junhua; Zhang, Boli

    2014-09-01

    With the advent of big data era, our thinking, technology and methodology are being transformed. Data-intensive scientific discovery based on big data, named "The Fourth Paradigm," has become a new paradigm of scientific research. Along with the development and application of the Internet information technology in the field of healthcare, individual health records, clinical data of diagnosis and treatment, and genomic data have been accumulated dramatically, which generates big data in medical field for clinical research and assessment. With the support of big data, the defects and weakness may be overcome in the methodology of the conventional clinical evaluation based on sampling. Our research target shifts from the "causality inference" to "correlativity analysis." This not only facilitates the evaluation of individualized treatment, disease prediction, prevention and prognosis, but also is suitable for the practice of preventive healthcare and symptom pattern differentiation for treatment in terms of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), and for the post-marketing evaluation of Chinese patent medicines. To conduct clinical studies involved in big data in TCM domain, top level design is needed and should be performed orderly. The fundamental construction and innovation studies should be strengthened in the sections of data platform creation, data analysis technology and big-data professionals fostering and training. PMID:25217972

  5. Booklet of the Research Institute of Clinical Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research Institute of Clinical Medicine is one of the biggest university diagnostic and treatment centre in Georgia with unique modern diagnostic and treatment apparatus. The institute is acknowledged as a leader in various trends of radiology and surgery. The Research Institute of Clinical Medicine was founded in 1991. It is the leading scientific establishment in the field of medicine. The scientific-research work of the Institute is coordinated by the National Academy of Sciences of Georgia. The main scientific trend of the Institute is the Early Complex Diagnostics and Treatment. The scientific activity of the Institute is led by the Scientific Council. Institute achieved remarkable success since its foundation: It has been defended 56 theses for Candidate of Medical Sciences and 16 for Doctor of Medical Sciences; About 30 post-graduate students and more than 200 radiologists have taken training courses in radiology. Nowadays they work in different regions of Georgia, 21 inventions took out patents. It has been published 2000 scientific works and 9 monographs. (authors)

  6. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Chronic Pain in Internal Organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Holistic medicine seems to be efficient in the treatment of chronic pain in internal organs, especially when the pain has no known cause. It is quite surprising that while chronic pain can be one of the toughest challenges in the biomedical clinic, it is often one of the simplest things to alleviate in the holistic clinic. These pains are regarded as being caused by repressed emotions and are explained as psychosomatic reactions. Using holistic medicine, the patients can often be cured of their suffering when they assume responsibility for the repressed feelings. The holistic process theory of healing states that the return to the natural (pain free state of being is possible whenever the person obtains the resources needed for existential healing. This shift is explained by the related quality of life and life mission theories. The resources needed are “holding” or genuine care in the dimensions of awareness, respect, care, acknowledgment, and acceptance with support and processing in the dimensions of feeling, understanding, and letting go of negative attitudes and beliefs. The preconditions for the holistic healing to take place are “love” and trust. Obtaining the full trust of the patient, therefore, seems to be the biggest challenge of holistic medicine, especially when dealing with a patient in pain.

  7. Protected clinical teaching time and a bedside clinical evaluation instrument in an emergency medicine training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayne, Philip; Heilpern, Katherine; Ander, Douglas; Palmer-Smith, Victoria

    2002-11-01

    In a process that has evolved over the last four years, the Emory University Emergency Medicine Education Committee has developed an "academic attending" teaching shift incorporating a formatted lecture series with a clinical evaluation exercise (CEE). The program structures the approach to clinical teaching at the bedside, provides an objective clinical evaluation tool specific to emergency medicine residents, and provides targeted learning for medical students and residents rotating in the emergency department (ED). The CEE instrument was designed to be quick and efficient, satisfy requirements of assessment of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) general competencies, and incorporate the language of the "Model of the Clinical Practice of Emergency Medicine." The original program called for unstructured bedside teaching three days a week, by faculty freed from clinical duties, combined with a limited series of introductory emergency medicine lectures. The program proved more successful when concentrated in a once weekly structured educational program. The prepared, repeating lecture series has been expanded to include many of the most common ED presenting chief complaints and has significantly advanced a curriculum for medical students and visiting interns. A CEE was developed to evaluate and provide immediate feedback to residents on many of the core ACGME competencies. The CEE has been successfully used to structure the bedside educational encounter. This dedicated non-clinical "teaching" shift appears effective in meeting the educational goals of the authors' academic ED. This is a description of the program and its evolution; the program has not been formally evaluated. PMID:12414493

  8. Compartmental analysis of dynamic nuclear medicine data: regularization procedure and application to physiology

    CERN Document Server

    Fabrice, Delbary

    2016-01-01

    Compartmental models based on tracer mass balance are extensively used in clinical and pre-clinical nuclear medicine in order to obtain quantitative information on tracer metabolism in the biological tissue. This paper is the second of a series of two that deal with the problem of tracer coefficient estimation via compartmental modelling in an inverse problem framework. While the previous work was devoted to the discussion of identifiability issues for 2, 3 and n-dimension compartmental systems, here we discuss the problem of numerically determining the tracer coefficients by means of a general regularized Multivariate Gauss Newton scheme. In this paper, applications concerning cerebral, hepatic and renal functions are considered, involving experimental measurements on FDG-PET data on different set of murine models.

  9. Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annesley, Thomas M.; Cooks, Robert G.; Herold, David A.; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.

    2016-01-04

    Each year the journal Clinical Chemistry publishes a January special issue on a topic that is relevant to the laboratory medicine community. In January 2016 the topic is mass spectrometry, and the issue is entitled “Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine”. One popular feature in our issues is a Q&A on a topic, clearly in this case mass spectrometry. The journal is assembling a panel of 5-6 experts from various areas of mass spectrometry ranging from instrument manufacturing to practicing clinical chemists. Dick Smith is one of the scientist requested to participate in this special issue Q&A on Mass Spectrometry. The Q&A Transcript is attached

  10. [Gender medicine. Sex- and gender-specific aspects of clinical medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautzky-Willer, A

    2014-09-01

    Gender medicine studies sex- and gender-based differences in the development and prevention of diseases, the awareness and presentation of symptoms, and the effectiveness of therapy. Gender medicine is part of personalized medicine, considering differences in biological and psychosocial factors individually. There are differences in genes, chromosomes, hormones, and metabolism as well as differences in culture, environment, and society. Lifelong interactions between physical and psychosocial factors will influence the health and ill-health of men and women in different ways. Epigenetic modifications provide evidence of the impact of environment and lifestyle during vulnerable phases on biological processes, effecting future generations. Maternal lifestyle and environmental factors during pregnancy can impact the health of offspring in later life already in utero in a sex-specific way. Pain, stress, and coping styles differ between men and women. Women experience more dramatic physical changes during their lifetime, which are associated with specific burdens and psychosocial alterations. Women with multiple roles and responsibilities suffering from stress develop depression more frequently. However, men are often not diagnosed and treated appropriately in cases of depression or osteoporosis, diseases that are typically considered "female." There are prominent differences between men and women in medicine regarding the immune system, inflammation, and noncommunicable diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. Women experience more often autoimmune diseases and suffer more frequently from (chronic) pain, neurodegenerative changes, and functional disabilities. Men have shorter life expectancy but relatively more healthy years of life, which is in greater part ascribed to psychosocial determinants. State-of-the-art clinical medicine comprises individual risk factors based on sex- and gender-sensitive health programs in order to

  11. Aspects and progresses of the Program for Regulatory Inspection of Nuclear Medicine in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work aims to show the advances in the Nuclear Medicine auditing field performed by the Nuclear Medicine Group of the Division of Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine of the Inst. of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry. The main aspects observed during the auditing are presented as well as the evolution of the non-conformities. It is shown that the occurrence of these non-conformities decreases year by year, primarily as a function of the severity of the auditing and the consciousness of the personal of Nuclear Medicine Services. Results point clearly to the importance of the coercion actions to guarantee a radiation protection level in compliance with the standards established by the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission. (author)

  12. Examining Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine Practice as a lifelong learning process: opportunities and challenges to the nuclear medicine professional and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Thomas N B

    2016-08-01

    This essay will explore the critical issues and challenges surrounding lifelong learning for professionals, initially exploring within the profession and organizational context of nuclear medicine practice. It will critically examine how the peer-review process called Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine Practice (QUANUM) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) can be considered a lifelong learning opportunity to instill a culture of quality to improve patient care and elevate the status of the nuclear medicine profession and practice within the demands of social changes, policy, and globalization. This will be explored initially by providing contextual background to the identity of the IAEA as an organization responsible for nuclear medicine professionals, followed by the benefits that QUANUM can offer. Further key debates surrounding lifelong learning, such as compulsification of lifelong learning and impact on professional change, will then be weaved through the discussion using theoretical grounding through a qualitative review of the literature. Keeping in mind that there is very limited literature focusing on the implications of QUANUM as a lifelong learning process for nuclear medicine professionals, this essay uses select narratives and observations of QUANUM as a lifelong learning process from an auditor's perspective and will further provide a comparative perspective of QUANUM on the basis of other lifelong learning opportunities such as continuing professional development activities and observe parallelisms on its benefits and challenges that it will offer to other professionals in other medical speciality fields and in the teaching profession. PMID:27195385

  13. Examining Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine Practice as a lifelong learning process: opportunities and challenges to the nuclear medicine professional and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Thomas N B

    2016-08-01

    This essay will explore the critical issues and challenges surrounding lifelong learning for professionals, initially exploring within the profession and organizational context of nuclear medicine practice. It will critically examine how the peer-review process called Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine Practice (QUANUM) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) can be considered a lifelong learning opportunity to instill a culture of quality to improve patient care and elevate the status of the nuclear medicine profession and practice within the demands of social changes, policy, and globalization. This will be explored initially by providing contextual background to the identity of the IAEA as an organization responsible for nuclear medicine professionals, followed by the benefits that QUANUM can offer. Further key debates surrounding lifelong learning, such as compulsification of lifelong learning and impact on professional change, will then be weaved through the discussion using theoretical grounding through a qualitative review of the literature. Keeping in mind that there is very limited literature focusing on the implications of QUANUM as a lifelong learning process for nuclear medicine professionals, this essay uses select narratives and observations of QUANUM as a lifelong learning process from an auditor's perspective and will further provide a comparative perspective of QUANUM on the basis of other lifelong learning opportunities such as continuing professional development activities and observe parallelisms on its benefits and challenges that it will offer to other professionals in other medical speciality fields and in the teaching profession.

  14. Clinical Observation on Treatment of Tourette Syndrome by Integrative Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李安源; 丛珊; 吕红; 李继君; 赵林

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To explore the clinical efficacy of integrative Chinese and Western medicine in treating Tourette syndrome(TS).Methods:Ninety children with TS were randomized into two groups by randomizing digital table method:the 60 patients in the treated group were treated by Ningdong Granule(宁动颗粒,NDG) plus haloperidol,and the 30 in the control group treated by haloperidol alone.The course for both groups was 6 months.Conditions of the patients were estimated before and after treatment with Yale Global Tic ...

  15. Prime time to resuscitate clinical medicine and kill diagnostic greed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasoorya, C

    2016-09-01

    Modern healthcare faces the challenges of rising costs, increasing expectations of patients and changing disease patterns. Physicians practise medicine in an era of easy availability and access to a plethora of modern and sometimes expensive diagnostic aids. The powerful utility of clinical skills cannot be underestimated nor lost. The physician has a powerful platform to encourage the rational use of tests, prevent wasteful overutilisation and ensure that tests do not cause more harm than benefit in physical, emotional or financial terms. Diagnostic skills should not be substituted by diagnostic greed. It is possible to do more for the patient rather than to the patient. PMID:27664173

  16. Current situation of the facilities, equipments and human resources in nuclear medicine in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current situation of nuclear medicine in Argentina, taking into account the facilities, their equipment and human resources available is presented in this paper. A review and analysis of the equipment, including technical characteristics and a survey of the professionals and technicians of the area, was carried out. In Argentina, there are 266 centers of nuclear medicine distributed all over the country. The operating licenses are granted by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear - ARN). Forty four percent of the installed equipment are SPECT of 1 or 2 heads and 39,4 % are gamma camera. Besides, there are eleven PET operating in Argentina. There are 416 nuclear medicine physicians with individual permit for diagnostic purposes and 50% of them has also individual permit for treatment purposes. With the purpose of analyzing the regional distribution of the available resources in nuclear medicine, the country was divided into 7 geographical regions: City of Buenos Aires, Province of Buenos Aires, Pampa, Cuyo, Northeast, Northwest and Patagonia. From the analysis of the gathered information it is possible to conclude that the nuclear medicine equipment as well as the personnel present an irregular distribution, with a major concentration in the City of Buenos Aires and Province of Buenos Aires. The Northeast region presents the lowest number of Nuclear Medicine centers and the Patagonia region has the lowest number of medicine nuclear physicians with individual permits. The number of SPECT and gamma cameras is 7,3 per million of inhabitants. The information about the available resources in nuclear medicine presented in this paper and its comparison with the international information available provide elements for a better planning of the future activities in the area not only for the operators but also from the regulatory point of view. (author)

  17. Diagnostic and therapeutic perspectives in nuclear medicine: radiolabelled biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From their beginning, the radiopharmaceuticals chemistry has gone to the study of the molecular chemistry. The radiopharmaceuticals are only in their capacity to detect such specific biochemical places as the receivers and the enzymes. With the recent obtaining of the complete structural sequence of the genome, it doesn't fit doubt of the importance that they have acquired the molecular images for the study from the genetic information to the alterations phenotypic in the chemistry of the human body. So, the future of the diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine, practically is based in the study of protein fragments, peptide structures and chains of DNA radiolabelled for the study of the metabolism In vivo. These investigations represent a substantial change in those paradigms of the pharmaceutical development, when using the own organic capacities as source of medications, instead of considering to the organism like a simple assay tube where molecules act, like they are most of the traditional medications. The investigation of new techniques to design complex stable of Tc-99m, Re-188, Lu-177, Y-90 and Dy-166/Ho-l66 with biomolecules that don't alter the specificity and in general the molecular properties of the same ones. it is a topic of world interest in the environment of the radiopharmaceutical chemistry. In this work some achievements and perspectives are presented on those main diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals of third generation. (Author)

  18. Applying activity-based costing to the nuclear medicine unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthummanon, Sakesun; Omachonu, Vincent K; Akcin, Mehmet

    2005-08-01

    Previous studies have shown the feasibility of using activity-based costing (ABC) in hospital environments. However, many of these studies discuss the general applications of ABC in health-care organizations. This research explores the potential application of ABC to the nuclear medicine unit (NMU) at a teaching hospital. The finding indicates that the current cost averages 236.11 US dollars for all procedures, which is quite different from the costs computed by using ABC. The difference is most significant with positron emission tomography scan, 463 US dollars (an increase of 96%), as well as bone scan and thyroid scan, 114 US dollars (a decrease of 52%). The result of ABC analysis demonstrates that the operational time (machine time and direct labour time) and the cost of drugs have the most influence on cost per procedure. Clearly, to reduce the cost per procedure for the NMU, the reduction in operational time and cost of drugs should be analysed. The result also indicates that ABC can be used to improve resource allocation and management. It can be an important aid in making management decisions, particularly for improving pricing practices by making costing more accurate. It also facilitates the identification of underutilized resources and related costs, leading to cost reduction. The ABC system will also help hospitals control costs, improve the quality and efficiency of the care they provide, and manage their resources better. PMID:16102243

  19. Extremity dosimetry in nuclear medicine services using thermoluminescent detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiation Protection and Safety Centre in Algiers provides two types of dosemeters, one for monitoring doses to the whole body and skin and the other one for monitoring doses to the extremities of the body. In nuclear medicine services and radiopharmaceutical laboratories, hands and arms are often closer to a given radiation source than the main part of the body and therefore receive greater doses. In this context, extremity doses have been measured by a ring dosemeter and by a fingertip ultra-thin dosemeter. The ring dosemeter consists of a metallic ring with a circular indentation to hold a LiF chip which is covered with a 10 mg.cm-2 shrinkable black polyamide layer. The ultra-thin dosemeter contains a 5 mg.cm-2 LiF element for measuring doses at a depth of 7 mg.cm-2. These extremity dosemeters have been characterised before their use in the field. They have also been tested using radioisotopes of various energies. The doses received by the monitored workers were correlated with the amount of the handled activity. The doses obtained using the fingertip and the ring dosemeters are presented and discussed from a radiological point of view. (author)

  20. Development of thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms for use in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to develop thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms to be used in control tests of medical images in scintillation cameras. The main difference among the phantoms was the neck shape: in the first, called OSCT, it was geometrically shaped, while in the second, called OSAP, it was anthropomorphically shaped. In both phantoms, thyroid gland prototypes, which were made of acrylic and anthropomorphically shaped, were constructed to allow the simulation of a healthy thyroid and of thyroids with hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Images of these thyroid anthropomorphic phantoms were obtained using iodine 131 with an activity of 8.695 MBq. The iodine 131 was chosen because it is widely used in studies of thyroid scintigraphy. The images obtained proved the effectiveness of the phantoms to simulate normal or abnormal thyroids function. These phantoms can be used in medical imaging quality control programs and, also in the training of professionals involved in the analysis of images in nuclear medicine centers. - Highlights: ► Two thyroid phantoms were developed (OSCT and OSAP) with different types of acrylics. ► Thyroid glands were represented anthropomorphically in the both phantoms. ► Different prototypes of thyroid were built of simulate healthy or unhealthy glands. ► Images indicate that anthropomorphic phantoms correctly simulate the thyroid gland

  1. The role of nuclear medicine in acute gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, P. (Saint James' s Hospital, Leeds (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology)

    1993-10-01

    In most patients with upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, endoscopy will locate the site and cause of bleeding, and also provide an opportunity for local therapy. The cause of lower GI bleeding is often difficult to attribute, even when pathology is found by colonoscopy or barium enema. Nuclear medicine techniques can be used to identify the site of bleeding in those patients in whom the initial diagnostic procedures are negative or inconclusive. Methods using transient labelling of blood (e.g. [sup 99]Tc[sup m]-sulphur colloid) produce a high target-to-background ratio in positive cases, give quick results and localize bleeding sites accurately, but depend upon bleeding being active at the time of injection. Techniques using stable blood labelling (e.g. [sup 99]Tc[sup m]-labelled red blood cells) may be positive even with intermittent bleeding but may take several hours to produce a result and are less precise in localization. The most useful application is in patients with recurrent or prolonged bleeding, those with inconclusive endoscopy or barium studies, and those who are high-risk surgical candidates. (author).

  2. Applying activity-based costing to the nuclear medicine unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthummanon, Sakesun; Omachonu, Vincent K; Akcin, Mehmet

    2005-08-01

    Previous studies have shown the feasibility of using activity-based costing (ABC) in hospital environments. However, many of these studies discuss the general applications of ABC in health-care organizations. This research explores the potential application of ABC to the nuclear medicine unit (NMU) at a teaching hospital. The finding indicates that the current cost averages 236.11 US dollars for all procedures, which is quite different from the costs computed by using ABC. The difference is most significant with positron emission tomography scan, 463 US dollars (an increase of 96%), as well as bone scan and thyroid scan, 114 US dollars (a decrease of 52%). The result of ABC analysis demonstrates that the operational time (machine time and direct labour time) and the cost of drugs have the most influence on cost per procedure. Clearly, to reduce the cost per procedure for the NMU, the reduction in operational time and cost of drugs should be analysed. The result also indicates that ABC can be used to improve resource allocation and management. It can be an important aid in making management decisions, particularly for improving pricing practices by making costing more accurate. It also facilitates the identification of underutilized resources and related costs, leading to cost reduction. The ABC system will also help hospitals control costs, improve the quality and efficiency of the care they provide, and manage their resources better.

  3. Absorbed Doses to Patients in Nuclear Medicine; Doskatalogen foer nukleaermedicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leide-Svegborn, Sigrid; Mattsson, Soeren; Johansson, Lennart; Fernlund, Per; Nosslin, Bertil

    2007-04-15

    The Swedish radiation protection authority, (SSI), has supported work on estimates of radiation doses to patients from nuclear medicine examinations since more than 20 years. A number of projects have been reported. The results are put together and published under the name 'Doskatalogen' which contains data on doses to different organs and tissues from radiopharmaceuticals used for diagnostics and research. This new report contains data on: {sup 11}C-labelled substances (realistic maximum model), amino acids labelled with {sup 11}C, {sup 18}F or {sup 75}Se, {sup 99m}Tc-apcitide, {sup 123}I-labelled fatty acids ({sup 123}I- BMIPP and {sup 123}I-IPPA) and revised models for previously reported {sup 15}O-labelled water, {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin (rest as well as exercise) and {sup 201}Tl-ion Data for almost 200 substances and radionuclides are included in the 'Doskatalogen' today. Since the year 2001 the 'Doskatalogen' is available on the authority's home page (www.ssi.se)

  4. Radiation exposures to technologists from nuclear medicine imaging procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation exposures incurred by nuclear medicine technologists during diagnostic imaging and gamma camera quality control (QC) were measured on a procedural basis over a three-month period using a portable, low-range, self-reading ion chamber. A total of more than 400 measurements were made for 15 selected procedures. From these, mean procedural exposures and standard deviations were calculated. The results show that daily flood phantom QC, at 0.58 mR, and gated cardiac studies, at 0.45 mR, were the two greatest sources of exposure. Other procedures resulted in exposures varying roughly from 0.10 to 0.20 mR. Difficult patients were responsible for a doubling of technologist exposure for many procedures. Standard deviations were large for all procedures, averaging 65% of the mean values. Comparison of technologist exposure inferred from the procedural measurements with the time coincident collective dose equivalent recorded by the TLD service of the Radiation Protection Bureau indicates that approximately half of the collective technologist exposure arose from patient handling and flood QC

  5. Noise removal in nuclear medicine images by using multi resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel flexible and dynamic algorithm for noise removal in nuclear medicine images is proposed. The images have a very low signal-to-noise ratio and the total number of registered photons is relatively small. The algorithm removes the noise from both the images original spatial domain and from the wavelet transform domain. In the spatial domain it uses both the autocorrelation technique in order to remove the noise that appears in a from of isolated pixels around the objects of interest and the information that each image contains about the signal in its neighbouring images. In the transform domain the wavelet coefficients filtration is carried out with a filter bank which meets the near-perfect reconstruction condition and is adapted to the signal. In addition, the coefficients that correspond to noise and are about to be discarded are selected by using a non uniform threshold which is adapted to the spatial varying noise level. Criteria for selection of an optimal decomposition level for the NM images are defined. In order to suppress the noise, multi resolution characteristics of both the signal and noise are used.(Author)

  6. On the safety of persons accompanying nuclear medicine patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of caretakers/comforters during nuclear medicine examinations is relatively common. These caretakers receive higher doses than the general public, who receive only environmental/background exposure. The aim of this research was to know about the doses received by two significant groups of caretakers: comforters of cancer patients (Group I) and mothers of small children (Group II). The patients were scheduled to undergo two different diagnostic studies: Immuno-Scintigraphy using a monoclonal antibody bound to 99mTc (for adults) and Renal Scintigraphy using 99mTc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (for children). The average effective doses were 0.27 and 0.29 mSv for Groups I and II, respectively. Additionally, environmental monitoring was performed in the waiting room for injected patients (Room I) and inside the procedure room (Room II). Equivalent environmental doses of 0.28 and 0.24 mSv for Rooms 1 and II, respectively, were found, which are similar to values reported by other authors. (authors)

  7. [The psychodynamics of work with iodine-131 in nuclear medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silveira, Leila Cunha; Guilam, Maria Cristina Rodrigues; de Oliveira, Sergio Ricardo

    2013-11-01

    This paper seeks to demonstrate to what extent alternative forms adopted in the working process of professionals with iodine-131 in nuclear medicine can assist in managing risks of ionizing radiation. The design is based on the main theoretical concepts of the psychodynamics of work in relation to workers' health. In the case study, data were gathered from 15 workers of a public health institution in the city of Rio de Janeiro by means of semi-structured individual interviews and non-systematic direct observation. Bardin's content analysis method was used for the data analysis. When comparing the results obtained with standard prescribed models, it was found that the respondents had changed their approach. They developed individual defense mechanisms, such as denial of risk, and collective defensive strategies, leading them to tackle the greatest danger as a form of defense. The defensive role of ideologies of the profession are manifest. On the contrary, the acquired knowledge derived from prudence proved effective in minimizing the risks of radiation exposure. The authors discuss the limitations of security management that does not consider the workers' subjectivity and inherent knowledge. PMID:24196882

  8. Implementation of a quality control program in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rectilinear scanners and dose calibrators were tested for a variety of operating conditions and performance.The tests for rectilinear scanners were based on image quality obtained with phantoms of the brain, liver and thyroid. The parameters investigated for rectilinear scanners included the direct control of the operator, such as the proper setting of the focal distance, the velocity, the photopeak calibration, contrast, correct collimator, line spacing and back ground count.The accuracy of dose calibrators was checked with sources of Cs-137, Co-57 and Co-60. The linearity of dose calibrators was checked with sources of technetium-99m and geometry was likewise checked with variable volumes of technetium-99m.The evaluation of the proper setting for rectilinear scanners was made by determining the number of hot and cold areas in the phantom before and after corrective adjustments of physical parameters.The results obtained on rectilinear scanners indicated efficiencies in the operating conditions. The results found on dose calibrators shown that geometry effect was minimal; the reproducibility and stability was satisfactory. However,more than a half(60%)of the dose calibrators tested for accuracy and linearity were performed without acceptable limits. We can conclude that is very useful and important the implementation of quality control programme to entire diagnostic process in nuclear medicine. (author)

  9. Exposure of critical groups to nuclear medicine patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mountford, P.J. [Division of Medical Physics, North Staffordshire Hospital (Royal Infirmary), Princes Road, Hartshill, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire (United Kingdom); O' Doherty, M.J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kent and Canterbury Hospital, Ethelbert Road, Canterbury, Kent (United Kingdom)

    1999-01-01

    When a radiopharmaceutical has been administered to a patient, assessment of the risk to critical groups from emitted photon radiation is by measurement of the integral dose received by an individual, or by measurements of the dose rate external to the patient coupled with appropriate occupancy factors. Estimations have been made from the available data of the dose to critical groups exposed to patients who have undergone diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. These dose estimations can be used to assess the impact of the proposed changes in statutory requirements, and to allow appropriate recommendations to be formulated. Two areas for consideration are that pregnant staff exposed to nuclear medicine patients will require an abdominal surface dose limit lower than 2 mSv to restrict their foetal dose to 1 mSv, and the current UK restrictions for the behaviour of patients who have undergone {sup 131}I treatment are either already adequate or can even be relaxed in order to restrict the exposure of members of the public to the proposed lower dose limits. Agreement is needed on the value (e.g. 95th percentile) from a study of the dose to a number of individuals which should serve as the basis for radiation protection recommendations.

  10. Importance of Bladder Radioactivity for Radiation Safety in Nuclear Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salih Sinan Gültekin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Most of the radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine are excreted via the urinary system. This study evaluated the importance of a reduction in bladder radioactivity for radiation safety. Methods: The study group of 135 patients underwent several organ scintigraphies [40/135; thyroid scintigraphy (TS, 30/135; whole body bone scintigraphy (WBS, 35/135; myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS and 30/135; renal scintigraphy (RS] by a technologist within 1 month. In full and empty conditions, static bladder images and external dose rate measurements at 0.25, 0.50, 1, 1.5 and 2 m distances were obtained and decline ratios were calculated from these two data sets. Results: External radiation dose rates were highest in patients undergoing MPS. External dose rates at 0.25 m distance for TS, TKS, MPS and BS were measured to be 56, 106, 191 and 72 μSv h-1 for full bladder and 29, 55, 103 and 37 μSv h-1 for empty bladder, respectively. For TS, WBS, MPS and RS, respectively, average decline ratios were calculated to be 52%, 55%, 53% and 54% in the scintigraphic assessment and 49%, 51%, 49%, 50% and 50% in the assessment with Geiger counter. Conclusion: Decline in bladder radioactivity is important in terms of radiation safety. Patients should be encouraged for micturition after each scintigraphic test. Spending time together with radioactive patients at distances less than 1 m should be kept to a minimum where possible.

  11. New imaging systems in nuclear medicine: Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Physics Research Laboratory of the Massachusetts General Hospital has been in the forefront of the field of nuclear medicine instrumentation for the past thirty-six years, particularly in the area of instrumentation dealing with the application of short-lived cyclotron-produced isotopes. We continue to improve the operation of PCR-I, a single ring demonstration system employing analog coding to achieve high resolution (4 to 5 mm), high sensitivity (45,000 c/s/ Ci/cc) and high sampling frequency without interpolative motion. This device is designed for brain imaging in humans and for animal studies. An intensive program of software development was carried out concurrently with hardware development and led to the PL/S computer system used for PCI and PCII. Subsequently, more powerful systems were developed using a Data General Eclipse computer and, more recently, an IBM PC/AT computer with array processor. Our laboratory is now engaged in a design study of a cylindrical positron tomograph (PCR-II). 136 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  12. Exposure of the lens of the eye in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dose threshold for the lens of the eye for occupationally radiation-exposed personnel will be reduced from 150 mSv to 20 mSv per year. Publications addressing the expected eye lens doses of personnel in nuclear medicine are only barely known. In this work, dose rate constants for the quantity Hp(3) were determined and corresponding dose estimations were calculated. Therefore dosimeters measuring Hp(3) were exposed at the surface of an Alderson head phantom. The exposure of the dosimeters with frequently used radionuclides (F-18, Ga-68, Y-90, Tc-99m, In-111, I-123, I-131 and Ra-223+) was performed under varying source-dosimeter distances from 20 cm to 50 cm. The dose rate constants were determined to be 0.021 mSv.m2/(GBq.h) for Tc-99m (10 ml syringe) and 2.161 mSv.m2/(GBq.h) for Y-90-spheres (5 ml syringe). The other results take values between these ranges. Using the determined dose rate constants, prospective doses to the eye lens could be calculated.

  13. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Classic Art of Healingor the Therapeutic Touch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Touching is often a forgotten part of medicine. The manual medicine or therapeutic touch (TT is much more powerful than many modern, biomedically oriented physicians think. Pain and discomfort can be alleviated just by touching the sick area and in this way help the patient to be in better contact with the tissue and organs of their body. Lack of presence in the body seems to be connected with many symptoms that can be readily reversed simply by sensitive touch. When touch is combined with therapeutic work on mind and feelings, holistic healing seems to be facilitated and many problems can be solved in a direct and easy way in the clinic without drugs. This paper gives examples of the strength of manual medicine or therapeutic touch in its most simple form, and points to the power of physical contact between physician and his patient in the context of the theory and practice of holistic healing. Intimacy seems highly beneficial for the process of healing and it is very important to distinguish clearly between intimacy and sexuality for the physician and his patent to be able to give and receive touch without fear and without holding back emotionally.

  14. Study of regenerative medicine in China: demands and clinical translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-bing FU

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The repair and regeneration of tissue is a well-discussed topic. Over the past 20 years, with the development of genetics, auxology, stem cell biology, and tissue engineering, tissue repair and regeneration have rapidly developed as emerging "Regenerative Medicine". Regenerative medicine has significant market demand in China. Based on national statistics, injury and poisoning patients rank third in afflictions in city hospitals (accounting for 9.13% and rank second in afflictions in county hospitals (accounting for 14.07%. Totally, approximately one hundred million patients suffered from traumatic, genetic and metabolic diseases in China and demand reparative and regenerative medical treatment each year. The Chinese government and its related departments have always attached great importance and support to the development of regenerative medicine, and the Chinese academic circle is involved in a very wide range of diseases and injuries including regenerative medical theory and technology. Stem cell biology, organ engineering and duplication, tissue engineering research and production have developed rapidly, and great portion of these studies have started to appear in applications, which have aroused extensive concerns in international professional circle. In the next 10 years, the Chinese regenerative medical system will be further improved, in both statute and rules, clinical translation will be further accelerated. Breakthroughs are expected in induced differentiation of stem cells and synchronous repair and regeneration of multiple organs, construction of major organs by tissue engineering, large-scale applications of tissue engineering products, and other aspects.

  15. Cannabinoid-based medicines for neurological disorders--clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Stephen

    2007-08-01

    Whereas the cannabis plant has a long history of medicinal use, it is only in recent years that a sufficient understanding of the pharmacology of the main plant constituents has allowed for a better understanding of the most rational therapeutic targets. The distribution of cannabinoid receptors, both within the nervous system and without, and the development of pharmacological tools to investigate their function has lead to a substantial increase in efforts to develop cannabinoids as therapeutic agents. Concomitant with these efforts, the understanding of the pharmacology of plant cannabinoids at receptor and other systems distinct from the cannabinoid receptors suggests that the therapeutic applications of plant-derived cannabinoids (and presumably their synthetic derivatives also) may be diverse. This review aims to discuss the clinical evidence investigating the use of medicines derived, directly or indirectly, from plant cannabinoids with special reference to neurological disorders. Published studies suggest that the oral administration of cannabinoids may not be the preferred route of administration and that plant extracts show greater evidence of efficacy than synthetic compounds. One of these, Sativex (GW Pharmaceuticals), was approved as a prescription medicine in Canada in 2005 and is currently under regulatory review in the EU. PMID:17952657

  16. [Development of the software package of the nuclear medicine data processor for education and research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Hisato; Yamaki, Noriyasu; Azuma, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a personal computer-based nuclear medicine data processor for education and research in the field of nuclear medicine. We call this software package "Prominence Processor" (PP). Windows of Microsoft Corporation was used as the operating system of this PP, which have 1024 × 768 image resolution and various 63 applications classified into 6 groups. The accuracy was examined for a lot of applications of the PP. For example, in the FBP reconstruction application, there was visually no difference in the image quality as a result of comparing two SPECT images obtained from the PP and GMS-5500A (Toshiba). Moreover, Normalized MSE between both images showed 0.0003. Therefore the high processing accuracy of the FBP reconstruction application was proven as well as other applications. The PP can be used in an arbitrary place if the software package is installed in note PC. Therefore the PP is used to lecture and to practice on an educational site and used for the purpose of the research of the radiological technologist on a clinical site etc. widely now. PMID:22449907

  17. A review of the scientific highlights at the European Association of Nuclear Medicine congress, Vienna 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1991 congress of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine took place in Vienna at the Austria Center from September 1 through 5, 1991. President, spiritus rector and organizer of the event was Prof. Dr. Rudolf Hoefer. The international scientific committee consisted of O. Schober, (chairperson), K.E. Britton, D. Comar, F. Fazio, G.F. Fueger, E. Ogris., E.K.J. Pauwels, G. Riccabona and A. Todd-Pokropek. The organization was carried out the Vienna Academy of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research. The meeting was attended by just over 2000 scientific participants, 330 accompanying persons, 820 exhibitors and 30 visitors to the industrial exhibition. The attendees had come from 46 countries in Europe, the Near East, Africa and Asia. The programme consisted of a prolific series of scientific sessions of 227 oral presentations, a multitude of poster presentations (429), a continuing education series for technologists and a successful social programme to which Vienna and its surroundings served as a magnificent backdrop. The scientific content consisted of 69% clinical nuclear medicine, 15% radiopharmaceuticals and 16% physical science contributions; of the 1263 abstracts originally submitted, 583 could not be accommodated for presentation by the international scientific committee. (orig.)

  18. Automated motion correction based on target tracking for dynamic nuclear medicine studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xinhua; Tetrault, Tracy; Fahey, Fred; Treves, Ted

    2008-03-01

    Nuclear medicine dynamic studies of kidneys, bladder and stomach are important diagnostic tools. Accurate generation of time-activity curves from regions of interest (ROIs) requires that the patient remains motionless for the duration of the study. This is not always possible since some dynamic studies may last from several minutes to one hour. Several motion correction solutions have been explored. Motion correction using external point sources is inconvenient and not accurate especially when motion results from breathing, organ motion or feeding rather than from body motion alone. Centroid-based motion correction assumes that activity distribution is only inside the single organ (without background) and uniform, but this approach is impractical in most clinical studies. In this paper, we present a novel technique of motion correction that first tracks the organ of interest in a dynamic series then aligns the organ. The implementation algorithm for target tracking-based motion correction consists of image preprocessing, target detection, target positioning, motion estimation and prediction, tracking (new search region generation) and target alignment. The targeted organ is tracked from the first frame to the last one in the dynamic series to generate a moving trajectory of the organ. Motion correction is implemented by aligning the organ ROIs in the image series to the location of the organ in the first image. The proposed method of motion correction has been applied to several dynamic nuclear medicine studies including radionuclide cystography, dynamic renal scintigraphy, diuretic renography and gastric emptying scintigraphy.

  19. Nano medicine in Action: An Overview of Cancer Nano medicine on the Market and in Clinical Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nano medicine, defined as the application of nano technology in the medical field, has the potential to significantly change the course of diagnostics and treatment of life-threatening diseases, such as cancer. In comparison with traditional cancer diagnostics and therapy, cancer nano medicine provides sensitive cancer detection and/or enhances treatment efficacy with significantly minimized adverse effects associated with standard therapeutics. Cancer nano medicine has been increasingly applied in areas including nano drug delivery systems, nano pharmaceuticals, and nano analytical contrast reagents in laboratory and animal model research. In recent years, the successful introduction of several novel nano medicine products into clinical trials and even onto the commercial market has shown successful outcomes of fundamental research into clinics. This paper is intended to examine several nano medicines for cancer therapeutics and/or diagnostics-related applications, to analyze the trend of nano medicine development, future opportunities, and challenges of this fast-growing area.

  20. PREFACE: International Conference on Image Optimisation in Nuclear Medicine (OptiNM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofides, Stelios; Parpottas, Yiannis

    2011-09-01

    Conference logo The International Conference on Image Optimisation in Nuclear Medicine was held at the Atlantica Aeneas Resort in Ayia Napa, Cyprus between 23-26 March 2011. It was organised in the framework of the research project "Optimising Diagnostic Value in SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging" (YΓΕΙΑ/ΔYΓΕΙΑ/0308/11), funded by the Cyprus Research Promotion Foundation and the European Regional Development Fund, to present the highlights of the project, discuss the progress and results, and define future related goals. The aim of this International Conference was to concentrate on image optimization approaches in Nuclear Medicine. Experts in the field of nuclear medicine presented their latest research results, exchanged experiences and set future goals for image optimisation while balancing patient dose and diagnostic value. The conference was jointly organized by the Frederick Research Centre in Cyprus, the Department of Medical and Public Health Services of the Cyprus Ministry of Health, the Biomedical Research Foundation in Cyprus and the AGH University of Science and Technology in Poland. It was supported by the Cyprus Association of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, and the Cyprus Society of Nuclear Medicine. The conference was held under the auspices of the European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics and the European Association of Nuclear Medicine. The conference scientific programme covered several important topics such as functional imaging; image optimization; quantification for diagnosis; justification; simulations; patient dosimetry, staff exposures and radiation risks; quality assurance and clinical audit; education, training and radiation protection culture; hybrid systems and image registration; and new and competing technologies. The programme consisted of 13 invited and keynote presentations as well as workshops, round table discussions and a number of scientific sessions. A total of 51 speakers presented their