WorldWideScience

Sample records for clinical medicine

  1. Clinical Service of Chinese Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ The clinical practice of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) faces three major challenges:(1)How to enhance its contribution on overall medical service quality? (2) How to best address the unmet medical needs in the contemporary society? (3)How to guarantee that the traditional perspective for disease diagnosis and treatment not be neglected in clinical practice?

  2. Clinical trials and gender medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariarita Cassese

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Women use more medicines than men because they fall ill more often and suffer more from chronic diseases, but also because women pay more attention to their health and have more consciousness and care about themselves. Although medicines can have different effects on women and men, women still represent a small percentage in the first phases of trials (22% which are essential to verify drugs dosage, side effects, and safety. Even though women are more present in trials, studies results are not presented with a gender approach. This situation is due to educational, social, ethical and economical factors. The scientific research must increase feminine presence in clinical trials in order to be equal and correct, and all the key stakeholder should be involved in this process. We still have a long way to cover and it doesn't concern only women but also children and old people. The aim is to have a medicine not only illness-focused but patient-focused: a medicine able to take into consideration all the patient characteristics and so to produce a really personalized therapy. What above described is part of the reasons why in 2005 was founded the National Observatory for Women's Health (Osservatorio Nazionale sulla Salute della Donna, ONDa which promotes a gender health awareness and culture in Italy, at all the levels of the civil and scientific society.

  3. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Holistic Adolescent Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The holistic medical approach seems to be efficient and can also be used in adolescent medicine. Supporting the teenager to grow and develop is extremely important in order to prevent many of the problems they can carry into adulthood. The simple consciousness-based, holistic medicine — giving love, winning trust, giving holding, and getting permission to help the patient feel, understand, and let go of negative beliefs — is easy for the physician interested in this kind of practice and it requires little previous training for the physician to be able to care for his/her patient. A deeper insight into the principles of holistic treatment and a thorough understanding of our fellow human beings are making it work even better. Holistic medicine is not a miracle cure, but rather a means by which the empathic physician can support the patient in improving his/her future life in respect to quality of life, health, and functional capacity — through coaching the patient to work on him/herself in a hard and disciplined manner. When the patient is young, this work is so much easier. During our lifetime, we have several emotional traumas arranged in the subconscious mind with the smallest at the top, and it is normal for the person to work on a large number of traumatic events that have been processed to varying degrees. Some traumas have been acknowledged, some are still being explored by the person, and yet others are still preconscious, which can be seen for example in the form of muscle tension. Sometimes the young dysfunctional patient carries severe traumas of a violent or sexual nature, but the physician skilled in the holistic medical toolbox can help the patient on his/her way to an excellent quality of life, full self-expression, a love and sex life, and a realization of his/her talents — all that a young patient is typically dreaming about. Biomedicine is not necessary or even recommended when the physical or mental symptoms are caused

  4. Graduate Program Organization in Clinical Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Graduate training in clinical veterinary medicine is discussed. The options available to the student and problems that must be dealt with are presented, along with the requirements to accomplish a finely structured program that satisfies the needs of both the trainee and clinical veterinary medicine. (Author/MLW)

  5. A sports medicine clinic in the community.

    OpenAIRE

    Davison, J.; Ryan, M. P.

    1988-01-01

    We report the attempt to set up a mini sports medicine clinic in a health centre resourced by a Department of Community Medicine. The type of problems seen are similar to those reported by other clinics. On the results of this pilot project, we believe it would be possible to establish similar clinics in health centres elsewhere in the United Kingdom. The National Health Service resources required are minimal, but the benefits to local communities are considerable.

  6. Clinical forensic medicine examination of trafficked victims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alempijević Đorđe M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper certain explanations of health related aspects of human trafficking are discussed together with responsibilities of health care providers to the victims of trafficking. Clinical forensic medicine is outlined, and its role in obtaining of medical evidence has been discussed. Special remarks are made on the application of clinical forensic medicine skills in assessment of victims of human trafficking. Protocol for clinical forensic examination of the victims of human trafficking, which has been developed in the Institute of Forensic Medicine in Belgrade, has been discussed in details.

  7. Evidence Based Studies in Clinical Transfusion Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.G. Jansen (Gerard)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAfter the introduction of blood component therapy in the 1960s, more and more attention is given to clinical transfusion medicine. Although blood transfusion is an important treatment in different clinical settings, there are still lack of much randomized clinical trials. Nowadays bloo

  8. [Clinical trials with advanced therapy medicinal products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüssler-Lenz, M; Schneider, C K

    2010-01-01

    For advanced therapies, the same basic principles for assessment apply as for any other biotechnological medicinal product. Nevertheless, the extent of data for quality, safety, and efficacy can be highly specific. Until recently, advanced therapies were not uniformly regulated across Europe, e.g., tissue engineered products were regulated either as medicinal products or medical devices. Thus, for some products no data from clinical studies are available, e.g., for autologous chondrocyte products. The draft guideline on Good Clinical Practice for clinical trials with advanced therapies describes specific additional requirements, e.g., ensuring traceability. Most clinical studies with advanced therapies in Germany are still in early phase I or II trials with highly divergent types of products and clinical indications. The Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) at the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) has been established to meet the scientific and regulatory challenges with advanced therapies.

  9. The Bottom Line Medicine Clinic.

    OpenAIRE

    Gepner, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    The financial experience of an actual medical practice was used to develop a spreadsheet model of the business of medicine. The model is designed to provide reasonably accurate predictions of the financial outcome of business decisions affecting the practice. It has been used very successfully to teach practice management to senior residents in Family Practice training at the University of Minnesota. Students are placed in the role of a managing partner presented with a financially ailing pra...

  10. Gene therapy in clinical medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Selkirk, S

    2004-01-01

    Although the field of gene therapy has experienced significant setbacks and limited success, it is one of the most promising and active research fields in medicine. Interest in this therapeutic modality is based on the potential for treatment and cure of some of the most malignant and devastating diseases affecting humans. Over the next decade, the relevance of gene therapy to medical practices will increase and it will become important for physicians to understand the basic principles and st...

  11. Medicine and clinical skills laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmohsen H Al-Elq

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the medical curriculum is to provide medical students with knowledge, skills and attitudes required for their practice. A decade ago, the UK Medical Council issued a report called "Tomorrow′s Doctors" [1] which called for the reduction in the factual content of the medical course with the promotion of problem-based and self-dedicated learning. This report was the basis for a move toward an extensive reform of the medical and nursing curricula. The new reformed curricula enhanced the integrated medical teaching and emphasized the teaching and learning of clinical skills. However, there were still concerns about the standards and appropriateness of the skills of new medical graduates. [2] The changes in the teaching and learning methods, the radical changes in the health care delivery and the rapid growth of technology challenged the traditional way of clinical skills development and led to the emergence of clinical skills laboratories (CSLs in the medical education of many medical and nursing schools. With the proliferation of the CSLs, it is important to evaluate and introduce the reader to their applications, bearing in mind the paucity of information on this subject particularly over the last couple of years. This article is based on literature review.

  12. Medicine and clinical skills laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Elq, Abdulmohsen H

    2007-05-01

    The main objective of the medical curriculum is to provide medical students with knowledge, skills and attitudes required for their practice. A decade ago, the UK Medical Council issued a report called "Tomorrow's Doctors"(1) which called for the reduction in the factual content of the medical course with the promotion of problem-based and self-dedicated learning. This report was the basis for a move toward an extensive reform of the medical and nursing curricula. The new reformed curricula enhanced the integrated medical teaching and emphasized the teaching and learning of clinical skills. However, there were still concerns about the standards and appropriateness of the skills of new medical graduates.(2)The changes in the teaching and learning methods, the radical changes in the health care delivery and the rapid growth of technology challenged the traditional way of clinical skills development and led to the emergence of clinical skills laboratories (CSLs) in the medical education of many medical and nursing schools. With the proliferation of the CSLs, it is important to evaluate and introduce the reader to their applications, bearing in mind the paucity of information on this subject particularly over the last couple of years. This article is based on literature review. PMID:23012147

  13. [Brief psychotherapy in clinical medicine patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobel, M

    1992-01-01

    The criteria that "illness is biographical crisis od the individual" and that the only medicine is "personal medicine" is stressed. Clinical medicine, which covers medicine in its entirety, demands conceptual and doctrinal reaffirmations so that gradually the patient can come to be dealt with as a human being fron a holistic point of view, which commences with his complaint and consultation, continues with the interview and semiology, to finish with the diagnosis and therapy which, although in some cases it may be surgical, is still medical and integral. All the steps mentioned are bio-socio-cultural thus, whether in the practice of general clinical medicine or in the most specialized and technologically sophisticated clinical medicine, the animist component is not lacking and demands a minimum degree of "psychosomatic" Knowledge. The use of a psychotherapeutic technique is proposed which, while based on the psychoanalysis theory, is distanced technically from it as a "psychotherapy on limited time and goals", which abbreviates the disease, and is projected not as the "focus" of therapeutic work, but as a re-evaluation of the "life style" of each individual, and tends to help to develop a "project for life" suited to the possible personal, familiar and social well-being of the "patient". Technically speaking, this modality of brief psychotherapy is based on the nonuse of transferential interpretations, on impeding the regression od the patient, on facilitating a cognitice-affective development of his conflicts and thus obtain an internal object mutation which allows the transformation of the "past" into true history, and the "present" into vital perspectives. This technique is within reach of every health professional.

  14. MEDICINAL VESICULATION THERAPY AND ITS CLINICAL APPLICATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; LIU Haijing; SUN Zhanling

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the authors introduce medicinal vesiculation therapy from its origin, points for attention in clinical application, and their individual experiences. In clinical application, the authors advocate: ① avoid using drugs that are over-irritating in the property, and strictly controlling the dose of drugs end the duration of application,②) in selection of drugs, some factors as patients' conditions, the season, the geographic location, etc. should be taken into account. In the present paper, 3 typical cases of bronchial asthma, tonsil swelling and facial paralysis treated with medicinal vesiculation therapy are introduced. Clinical practice demonsetrates that this therapy is economical,simple and convenient and fairly effective in treatment of some chronic diseases.

  15. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Applied Consciousness-Based Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Consciousness-based medicine is our term for a form of medical treatment that works by direct appeal to the consciousness of the patient, in contrast to modern biomedical treatment where drugs are used to affect body chemistry. With this concept, maybe we are (in a sense turning back to the “old medicine”, where the family physician was the all-concerned “old country doctor” who knew the child, the siblings, the parents, the family, and the village. In a series of papers on clinical holistic medicine, we would like to present the classic art of healing, where the physician works mostly with his hands, then show how the modern biomedical physician performs with biochemistry, and finally introduce consciousness-based medicine. Some of our questions will be: If you improve your quality of life, will you also improve your health? Will learning more about yourself bring more purpose in your life? Will finding someone to live with in a loving and mutually respectful relationship improve your health? Scientists and thinkers like Antonovsky, Frankl, Maslow, and Jung have pointed to love as a unique way to coherence in life, and thus to biological order and a better health. Several scientific studies have also suggested that patients who focus on improving their quality of life usually will not follow the general statistics for survival, since somehow other factors are at play, which sometimes you will find referred to as “exceptional”.

  16. [Challenges for pathologists in clinical laboratory medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezuka, F

    2001-06-01

    The number of pathologists in hospitals has been increasing and they are responsible for both surgical pathology and clinical laboratory medicine. In the future they will also play important roles in the modernized reform of the central laboratory as it establishes its own importance in improving the quality and safety of medical activities. As a pathologist, the author reports on challenges faced since assuming the present directorship of the department of laboratory medicine in 1995 including (a) establishing a decision-making system in collaboration with technologists, (b) improving expertise in the department through joining a variety of seminars, conferences and research activities, (c) publishing an annual department report, and (d) introducing both internal and external quality assessment. In the future, for young pathologists training in both pathology and laboratory medicine will be essential. PMID:11452548

  17. Cryogenic Thermophysical Studies for Clinical Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    华泽钊

    2002-01-01

    Cryogenic technology has been widely used in clinical medicine and in pharmaceutics, so thermophysical studies are extremely important to solve problems during freezing and thawing. This paper reports some recent research in clinical medicine, including cryo-injury, cryosurgery, and cryopreservation of some important cells and tissues. Microscopic images of the freezing process with a cryomicroscope system show that the dendritic ice growth is affected by the solution concentration, the cooling rate, and the number of embryos. An enthalpy method is used for the freeze-thaw analysis of the cryosurgery with a program developed to predict the temperature profile and the interface motion, which compares well with experimental results. A very rapid cooling technique is developed by quenching the samples into subcooled liquid nitrogen for vitrification of cells and tissues. An analytical method developed to prevent the fracture of arteries during freezing has been verified by the electronic microscopic investigation.

  18. Evidence-based integrative medicine in clinical veterinary oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raditic, Donna M; Bartges, Joseph W

    2014-09-01

    Integrative medicine is the combined use of complementary and alternative medicine with conventional or traditional Western medicine systems. The demand for integrative veterinary medicine is growing, but evidence-based research on its efficacy is limited. In veterinary clinical oncology, such research could be translated to human medicine, because veterinary patients with spontaneous tumors are valuable translational models for human cancers. An overview of specific herbs, botanics, dietary supplements, and acupuncture evaluated in dogs, in vitro canine cells, and other relevant species both in vivo and in vitro is presented for their potential use as integrative therapies in veterinary clinical oncology. PMID:25174902

  19. Tasks of research in forensic medicine - different study types in clinical research and forensic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madea, Burkhard; Saukko, Pekka; Musshoff, Frank

    2007-01-17

    In the last years the research output of forensic medicine has sometimes been regarded as insufficient and as of poor quality, especially when parameters as impact factors and external funding were taken into account. However, forensic medicine has different tasks compared to clinical medicine. The main difference between basic subjects, clinical and forensic medicine is not a lack of scientific efficiency in forensic medicine but is a result of the questions asked, the available methods and specific aims. In contrast to natural-scientific research, forensic science has furthermore important intersections with arts and socio-scientific disciplines. Etiologic and pathogenetic research is of only limited relevance in forensic medicine. Thus, forensic medicine is excluded from these research fields, which are mainly supported by external funding. In forensic medicine research mainly means applied research regarding findings, the probative value and reconstruction as well as examination at different points of intersection between medicine and law. Clinical types of research such as controlled randomised, prospective cross-sectional, cohort or case-control studies can only rarely be applied in forensic medicine due to the area specific research fields (e.g. thantatology, violent death, vitality, traffic medicine, analytical toxicology, hemogenetics and stain analysis). The types of studies which are successfully established in forensic medicine are comparison of methods, sensitivity studies, validation of methods, kinetic examinations etc. Tasks of research in forensic medicine and study types, which may be applied will be addressed.

  20. Goal-setting in clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, E H; Bogardus, S T; Tinetti, M E; Inouye, S K

    1999-07-01

    The process of setting goals for medical care in the context of chronic disease has received little attention in the medical literature, despite the importance of goal-setting in the achievement of desired outcomes. Using qualitative research methods, this paper develops a theory of goal-setting in the care of patients with dementia. The theory posits several propositions. First, goals are generated from embedded values but are distinct from values. Goals vary based on specific circumstances and alternatives whereas values are person-specific and relatively stable in the face of changing circumstances. Second, goals are hierarchical in nature, with complex mappings between general and specific goals. Third, there are a number of factors that modify the goal-setting process, by affecting the generation of goals from values or the translation of general goals to specific goals. Modifying factors related to individuals include their degree of risk-taking, perceived self-efficacy, and acceptance of the disease. Disease factors that modify the goal-setting process include the urgency and irreversibility of the medical condition. Pertinent characteristics of the patient-family-clinician interaction include the level of participation, control, and trust among patients, family members, and clinicians. The research suggests that the goal-setting process in clinical medicine is complex, and the potential for disagreements regarding goals substantial. The nature of the goal-setting process suggests that explicit discussion of goals for care may be necessary to promote effective patient-family-clinician communication and adequate care planning.

  1. Herbal Medicine Today: Clinical and Research Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Firenzuoli

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicine is the use of medicinal plants for prevention and treatment of diseases: it ranges from traditional and popular medicines of every country to the use of standardized and tritated herbal extracts. Generally cultural rootedness enduring and widespread use in a Traditional Medical System may indicate safety, but not efficacy of treatments, especially in herbal medicine where tradition is almost completely based on remedies containing active principles at very low and ultra low concentrations, or relying on magical-energetic principles.

  2. Cytokine medicines in clinical practice: current issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Theresa; Moots, Robert J; Goodacre, John

    2005-10-21

    Cytokine medicines have been licensed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis since 2000. The rheumatology community has accrued a large amount of experience in the use of these medications. This experience has led to the development of guidelines for their use that include ongoing vigilance for long term adverse events and efficacy using the Biologics Register. Delivery of these expensive therapies has prompted extensive system developments within rheumatology. The cytokine medicines have provided important tools to probe the pathogenesis of rheumatoid and other inflammatory diseases. Further cytokine medicines, in various stages of development, are on the horizon and continue to stimulate excitement within this fast expanding field.

  3. Cytokine medicines in clinical practice: current issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Theresa; Moots, Robert J; Goodacre, John

    2005-10-21

    Cytokine medicines have been licensed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis since 2000. The rheumatology community has accrued a large amount of experience in the use of these medications. This experience has led to the development of guidelines for their use that include ongoing vigilance for long term adverse events and efficacy using the Biologics Register. Delivery of these expensive therapies has prompted extensive system developments within rheumatology. The cytokine medicines have provided important tools to probe the pathogenesis of rheumatoid and other inflammatory diseases. Further cytokine medicines, in various stages of development, are on the horizon and continue to stimulate excitement within this fast expanding field. PMID:16188452

  4. Significance of Evidence-based Medicine in the Assessment of Chinese Medicine Clinical Efficacy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ji-yao

    2010-01-01

    @@ Evidence-based medicine (EBM) requires the integration of the best research evidence with our clinical expertise and our patient's unique values and circumstances.The best evidence is valid and clinically relevant,especially from patient-centered clinical research.The clinical expertise means the ability to use our clinical skills and past experiences to rapidly identify each patient's unique health state and diagnosis,their individual risks,and the benefits of interventions (1)..

  5. Literature and medicine: contributions to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charon, R; Banks, J T; Connelly, J E; Hawkins, A H; Hunter, K M; Jones, A H; Montello, M; Poirer, S

    1995-04-15

    Introduced to U.S. medical schools in 1972, the field of literature and medicine contributes methods and texts that help physicians develop skills in the human dimensions of medical practice. Five broad goals are met by including the study of literature in medical education: 1) Literary accounts of illness can teach physicians concrete and powerful lessons about the lives of sick people; 2) great works of fiction about medicine enable physicians to recognize the power and implications of what they do; 3) through the study of narrative, the physician can better understand patients' stories of sickness and his or her own personal stake in medical practice; 4) literary study contributes to physicians' expertise in narrative ethics; and 5) literary theory offers new perspectives on the work and the genres of medicine. Particular texts and methods have been found to be well suited to the fulfillment of each of these goals. Chosen from the traditional literary canon and from among the works of contemporary and culturally diverse writers, novels, short stories, poetry, and drama can convey both the concrete particularity and the metaphorical richness of the predicaments of sick people and the challenges and rewards offered to their physicians. In more than 20 years of teaching literature to medical students and physicians, practitioners of literature and medicine have clarified its conceptual frameworks and have identified the means by which its studies strengthen the human competencies of doctoring, which are a central feature of the art of medicine. PMID:7887555

  6. Literature and medicine: contributions to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charon, R; Banks, J T; Connelly, J E; Hawkins, A H; Hunter, K M; Jones, A H; Montello, M; Poirer, S

    1995-04-15

    Introduced to U.S. medical schools in 1972, the field of literature and medicine contributes methods and texts that help physicians develop skills in the human dimensions of medical practice. Five broad goals are met by including the study of literature in medical education: 1) Literary accounts of illness can teach physicians concrete and powerful lessons about the lives of sick people; 2) great works of fiction about medicine enable physicians to recognize the power and implications of what they do; 3) through the study of narrative, the physician can better understand patients' stories of sickness and his or her own personal stake in medical practice; 4) literary study contributes to physicians' expertise in narrative ethics; and 5) literary theory offers new perspectives on the work and the genres of medicine. Particular texts and methods have been found to be well suited to the fulfillment of each of these goals. Chosen from the traditional literary canon and from among the works of contemporary and culturally diverse writers, novels, short stories, poetry, and drama can convey both the concrete particularity and the metaphorical richness of the predicaments of sick people and the challenges and rewards offered to their physicians. In more than 20 years of teaching literature to medical students and physicians, practitioners of literature and medicine have clarified its conceptual frameworks and have identified the means by which its studies strengthen the human competencies of doctoring, which are a central feature of the art of medicine.

  7. Hepatitis B vaccination schedules in genitourinary medicine clinics.

    OpenAIRE

    Asboe, D; Rice, P.; Ruiter, A.; Bingham, J S

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare two vaccination schedules in delivering hepatitis B vaccine to at-risk genitourinary medicine clinic attenders. SETTING: Genitourinary medicine clinic of St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK. METHODS: Two vaccination protocols were compared. Between January 1991 and December 1992, individuals had doses of recombinant hepatitis B vaccine at 0, 1 and 6 months (standard). From January until October 1993 doses of vaccine were administered at 0, 1 and 2 months (accelerated), foll...

  8. Application and Exploration of Big Data Mining in Clinical Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Yue Zhang; Shu-Li Guo; Li-Na Han; Tie-Ling Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To review theories and technologies of big data mining and their application in clinical medicine. Data Sources: Literatures published in English or Chinese regarding theories and technologies of big data mining and the concrete applications of data mining technology in clinical medicine were obtained from PubMed and Chinese Hospital Knowledge Database from 1975 to 2015. Study Selection: Original articles regarding big data mining theory/technology and big data mining′s app...

  9. Clinical demands on nuclear medicine in neurology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine techniques can be used which are able to estimate various physiologic variables regionally in the brain. As a disadvantage of these modalities imaging function rather than morphology of brain tissue the coarse spatial resolution inherent to all isotope techniques when compared to CT and magnetic resonance imaging of protons must be accepted. The main demand on nuclear medicine techniques must therefore be the quantitation of physiologic and pathologic processes which are necessary for the understanding of pathophysiology of lesions visualized by modalities imaging morphology. (orig./MG)

  10. Clinical Holistic Medicine: When Biomedicine is Inadequate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The modern physician is using pharmaceuticals as his prime tool. Unfortunately, this tool is much less efficient than you might expect from the biochemical theory. The belief in drugs as the solution to the health problems of mankind, overlooking important existing knowledge on quality of life, personal development, and holistic healing seems to be one good reason why approximately every second citizen of our modern society is chronically ill. The biomedical paradigm and the drugs are certainly useful, because in many situations we could not do without the drugs (like antibiotics, but curing infections or diseases in young age is not without consequences, as the way we perceive health and medicine is influenced by such experiences. When we get a more severe disease in midlife, we also believe drugs will make us healthy again. But at this age, the drugs do not work efficiently anymore, because we have turned older and lost much of the biological coherence that made us heal easily when we were younger. Now we need to assume responsibility, take learning, and improve our quality of life. We need a more holistic medicine that can help us back to life by allowing us to access our hidden resources. The modern physician cannot rely solely on drugs, but must also have holistic tools in his medical toolbox. This is the only way we can improve the general health of our populations. Whenever NNT (Number Needed to Treat is 2 or higher, the likelihood of the drug to cure the patient is less than 50%, which is not satisfying to any physician. In this case, he must ethically try something more in order to cure his patients, which is the crossroads where both traditional manual medicine and the tools of a scientific holistic medicine are helpful.

  11. Capacity for Clinical Research on Herbal Medicines in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Willcox, Merlin; Siegfried, Nandi; Johnson, Quinton

    2012-01-01

    An electronic survey was used to assess the training needs of clinical and public health researchers who have been involved, and/or plan to become involved, in clinical trials of herbal medicines in Africa. Over 90 researchers were contacted through pre-existing networks, of whom 58 (64%) responded, from 35 institutions in 14 African countries. Over half (57%) had already been involved in a clinical trial of an herbal medicine, and gave information about a total of 23 trials that have already...

  12. Application and Exploration of Big Data Mining in Clinical Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Zhang; Shu-Li Guo; Li-Na Han; Tie-Ling Li

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To review theories and technologies of big data mining and their application in clinical medicine.Data Sources:Literatures published in English or Chinese regarding theories and technologies of big data mining and the concrete applications of data mining technology in clinical medicine were obtained from PubMed and Chinese Hospital Knowledge Database from 1975 to 2015.Study Selection:Original articles regarding big data mining theory/technology and big data mining's application in the medical field were selected.Results:This review characterized the basic theories and technologies of big data mining including fuzzy theory,rough set theory,cloud theory,Dempster-Shafer theory,artificial neural network,genetic algorithm,inductive learning theory,Bayesian network,decision tree,pattern recognition,high-performance computing,and statistical analysis.The application of big data mining in clinical medicine was analyzed in the fields of disease risk assessment,clinical decision support,prediction of disease development,guidance of rational use of drugs,medical management,and evidence-based medicine.Conclusion:Big data mining has the potential to play an important role in clinical medicine.

  13. Introducing Advances in Bioscience and Clinical Medicine (ABCmed)

    OpenAIRE

    Samad EJ Golzari; Kamyar Ghabili

    2013-01-01

    We are pleased to announce the launch of the Advances in Bioscience and Clinical Medicine (ABCmed), aninternational open-access, and peer-reviewed journal. Mostly intended to cover all areas of bioscience and medicine, theJournal would provide a unique venue for the scientists from all over the world to publish their scientific works. One ofthe advantages of publishing with us is the rapid yet rigorous review process which is mostly performed by ourdistinguished Editorial and Review Board mem...

  14. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not? by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  15. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  16. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not? by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens

  17. Peer review practicalities in clinical medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Metcalfe

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Matthew J Metcalfe1, MAL Farrant2, JM Farrant31Department of Vascular Surgery, Imperial College NHS Trust, St Mary’s Hospital, London, UK; 2Department of Anaesthesia, Poole Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Poole Hospital, Dorset, UK; 3Department of Radiology, Royal Free Hampstead NHS Trust, Royal Free Hospital, London, UKAbstract: Peer review processes in teaching requires a reviewer to observe a teacher’s practice in a planned manner. Conversation between the two enables the teacher to reflect on their own teaching, promoting self-improvement. Although a central part of the teaching process, and despite its crucial role in continuing professional development, peer review is not widely practiced in hospital settings. This article explains the process and its benefits. Practical implementations of the process in busy clinical settings are suggested. Its evaluation and incorporation into undergraduate learning and postgraduate clinical practice are described. With enthusiastic support for colleagues and allowances for its implementation, it should become part of the regular teaching practice, improving the quality of teaching delivered.Keywords: teaching, education, clinical practice, peer review

  18. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Holistic Treatment of Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We believe a holistic approach to problems in childhood and adolescence will benefit the child, adolescent, and the whole family. As a rule, children have far less to say in the family than their parents. Therefore, it is the parents who set the agenda and decide how things are done at home and in relation to the child. Most often, it is also the parents who have a problem when the child is not thriving. The child thus acts as the thermometer of the family. When children are not feeling well or are sick, the parents are not doing well either. Most problems arising from dysfunctional patterns are almost impossible for the parents to solve on their own, but with help and support from the holistically oriented physician, we believe that many problems can be discovered and solved. Not only can health problems be addressed, but also problems of poor thriving in the family in general. With the physician in the role of a coach, the family can be provided with relevant exercises that will change the patterns of dysfunction. Consciousness-based medicine also seems to be efficient with children and adolescents, who are much more sensitive to the psychosocial dimensions than adults. Five needs seem to be essential for the thriving and health of the child: attention, respect, love, acceptance (touch, and acknowledgment. The physician should be able to see if the child lacks fulfillment in one or more of these needs, and he can then demonstrate to the parents how these needs should be handled. This should be followed by simple instructions and exercises for the parents in the spirit of coaching. This approach is especially relevant when the child is chronically ill.

  19. Toward clinical genomics in everyday medicine: perspectives and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Susan K; Hultner, Michael L; Jacob, Howard J; Ledbetter, David H; McCarthy, Jeanette J; Ball, Michael; Beckman, Kenneth B; Belmont, John W; Bloss, Cinnamon S; Christman, Michael F; Cosgrove, Andy; Damiani, Stephen A; Danis, Timothy; Delledonne, Massimo; Dougherty, Michael J; Dudley, Joel T; Faucett, W Andrew; Friedman, Jennifer R; Haase, David H; Hays, Tom S; Heilsberg, Stu; Huber, Jeff; Kaminsky, Leah; Ledbetter, Nikki; Lee, Warren H; Levin, Elissa; Libiger, Ondrej; Linderman, Michael; Love, Richard L; Magnus, David C; Martland, AnneMarie; McClure, Susan L; Megill, Scott E; Messier, Helen; Nussbaum, Robert L; Palaniappan, Latha; Patay, Bradley A; Popovich, Bradley W; Quackenbush, John; Savant, Mark J; Su, Michael M; Terry, Sharon F; Tucker, Steven; Wong, William T; Green, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Precision or personalized medicine through clinical genome and exome sequencing has been described by some as a revolution that could transform healthcare delivery, yet it is currently used in only a small fraction of patients, principally for the diagnosis of suspected Mendelian conditions and for targeting cancer treatments. Given the burden of illness in our society, it is of interest to ask how clinical genome and exome sequencing can be constructively integrated more broadly into the routine practice of medicine for the betterment of public health. In November 2014, 46 experts from academia, industry, policy and patient advocacy gathered in a conference sponsored by Illumina, Inc. to discuss this question, share viewpoints and propose recommendations. This perspective summarizes that work and identifies some of the obstacles and opportunities that must be considered in translating advances in genomics more widely into the practice of medicine. PMID:26810587

  20. Toward clinical genomics in everyday medicine: perspectives and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Susan K; Hultner, Michael L; Jacob, Howard J; Ledbetter, David H; McCarthy, Jeanette J; Ball, Michael; Beckman, Kenneth B; Belmont, John W; Bloss, Cinnamon S; Christman, Michael F; Cosgrove, Andy; Damiani, Stephen A; Danis, Timothy; Delledonne, Massimo; Dougherty, Michael J; Dudley, Joel T; Faucett, W Andrew; Friedman, Jennifer R; Haase, David H; Hays, Tom S; Heilsberg, Stu; Huber, Jeff; Kaminsky, Leah; Ledbetter, Nikki; Lee, Warren H; Levin, Elissa; Libiger, Ondrej; Linderman, Michael; Love, Richard L; Magnus, David C; Martland, AnneMarie; McClure, Susan L; Megill, Scott E; Messier, Helen; Nussbaum, Robert L; Palaniappan, Latha; Patay, Bradley A; Popovich, Bradley W; Quackenbush, John; Savant, Mark J; Su, Michael M; Terry, Sharon F; Tucker, Steven; Wong, William T; Green, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Precision or personalized medicine through clinical genome and exome sequencing has been described by some as a revolution that could transform healthcare delivery, yet it is currently used in only a small fraction of patients, principally for the diagnosis of suspected Mendelian conditions and for targeting cancer treatments. Given the burden of illness in our society, it is of interest to ask how clinical genome and exome sequencing can be constructively integrated more broadly into the routine practice of medicine for the betterment of public health. In November 2014, 46 experts from academia, industry, policy and patient advocacy gathered in a conference sponsored by Illumina, Inc. to discuss this question, share viewpoints and propose recommendations. This perspective summarizes that work and identifies some of the obstacles and opportunities that must be considered in translating advances in genomics more widely into the practice of medicine.

  1. Clinical Next Generation Sequencing for Precision Medicine in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Ling; Wang, Wanheng; Li, Alvin; Kansal, Rina; Chen, Yuhan; Hong CHEN; Li, Xinmin

    2015-01-01

    Rapid adoption of next generation sequencing (NGS) in genomic medicine has been driven by low cost, high throughput sequencing and rapid advances in our understanding of the genetic bases of human diseases. Today, the NGS method has dominated sequencing space in genomic research, and quickly entered clinical practice. Because unique features of NGS perfectly meet the clinical reality (need to do more with less), the NGS technology is becoming a driving force to realize the dream of precision ...

  2. Trends in clinical reproductive medicine research : 10 years of growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleixandre-Benavent, Rafael; Simon, Carlos; Fauser, Bart C J M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the most important metrics of publication in the field of reproductive medicine over the decade 2003-2012 to aid in discerning the clinical, social, and epidemiologic implications of this relatively new but rapidly emerging area in medical sciences. Design Bibliometric analysis of

  3. Methodology guideline for clinical studies investigating traditional Chinese medicine and integrative medicine: executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian-Ping; Chen, Ke-Ji

    2015-10-01

    This guideline aims to provide a methodological guidance for clinical studies in TCM and integrative medicine in terms of study design, execution, and reporting. The commonly used methods including experimental and observational methods were introduced in this guideline such as randomized clinical trials, cohort study, case-control study, case series, and qualitative method which can be incorporated into above quantitative methods. The guideline can be used for the evaluation of therapeutic effect of TCM therapies or their combination with conventional therapy. TCM therapy refers to one of the followings or their combination: herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, cupping, Taichi/Qigong, and Guasha,Tuina (therapeutic massage). It is also suitable for research and development of ethnopharmaceuticals or folk medicine.

  4. Nuclear medicine in clinical neurology: an update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope scanning using technetium 99m pertechnetate has fallen into disuse since the advent of x-ray computerized tomography. Regional brain blood flow studies have been pursued on a research basis. Increased regional blood flow during focal seizure activity has been demonstrated and is of use in localizing such foci. Cisternography as a predictive tool in normal pressure hydrocephalus is falling into disuse. Positron tomographic scanning is a potent research tool that can demonstrate both regional glycolysis and blood flow. Unfortunately, it is extremely expensive and complex to apply in a clinical setting. With support from the National Institutes of Health, seven extramural centers have been funded to develop positron tomographic capabilities, and they will greatly advance our knowledge of stroke pathophysiology, seizure disorders, brain tumors, and various degenerative diseases. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging is a potentially valuable tool since it creates tomographic images representing the distribution of brain water. No tissue ionization is produced, and images comparable to second-generation computerized tomographic scans are already being produced in humans

  5. Review of splanchnic oximetry in clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sean M; Mally, Pradeep V

    2016-09-01

    Global tissue perfusion and oxygenation are important indicators of physiologic function in humans. The monitoring of splanchnic oximetry through the use of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is an emerging method used to assess tissue oxygenation status. Splanchnic tissue oxygenation (SrSO2) is thought to be potentially of high value in critically ill patients because gastrointestinal organs can often be the first to suffer ischemic injury. During conditions of hypovolemia, cardiac dysfunction, or decreased oxygen-carrying capacity, blood flow is diverted toward vital organs, such as the brain and the heart at the expense of the splanchnic circulation. While monitoring SrSO2 has great potential benefit, there are limitations to the technology and techniques. SrSO2 has been found to have a relatively high degree of variability that can potentially make it difficult to interpret. In addition, because splanchnic organs only lie near the skin surface in children and infants, and energy from currently available sensors only penetrates a few centimeters deep, it can be difficult to use clinically in a noninvasive manner in adults. Research thus far is showing that splanchnic oximetry holds great promise in the ability to monitor patient oxygenation status and detect disease states in humans, especially in pediatric populations.

  6. Challenges of Identifying Clinically Actionable Genetic Variants for Precision Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonia C. Carter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in genomic medicine have the potential to change the way we treat human disease, but translating these advances into reality for improving healthcare outcomes depends essentially on our ability to discover disease- and/or drug-associated clinically actionable genetic mutations. Integration and manipulation of diverse genomic data and comprehensive electronic health records (EHRs on a big data infrastructure can provide an efficient and effective way to identify clinically actionable genetic variants for personalized treatments and reduce healthcare costs. We review bioinformatics processing of next-generation sequencing (NGS data, bioinformatics infrastructures for implementing precision medicine, and bioinformatics approaches for identifying clinically actionable genetic variants using high-throughput NGS data and EHRs.

  7. An eMERGE Clinical Center at Partners Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan W. Smoller

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The integration of electronic medical records (EMRs and genomic research has become a major component of efforts to advance personalized and precision medicine. The Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE network, initiated in 2007, is an NIH-funded consortium devoted to genomic discovery and implementation research by leveraging biorepositories linked to EMRs. In its most recent phase, eMERGE III, the network is focused on facilitating implementation of genomic medicine by detecting and disclosing rare pathogenic variants in clinically relevant genes. Partners Personalized Medicine (PPM is a center dedicated to translating personalized medicine into clinical practice within Partners HealthCare. One component of the PPM is the Partners Healthcare Biobank, a biorepository comprising broadly consented DNA samples linked to the Partners longitudinal EMR. In 2015, PPM joined the eMERGE Phase III network. Here we describe the elements of the eMERGE clinical center at PPM, including plans for genomic discovery using EMR phenotypes, evaluation of rare variant penetrance and pleiotropy, and a novel randomized trial of the impact of returning genetic results to patients and clinicians.

  8. Notes on "Clinical and Internal Medicine. Past, Present and Future”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Hodelín Tablada

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available "Clinical and Internal Medicine. Past, Present and Future" is a book written by Professor Alfredo Darío Espinosa Brito and published by Medical Sciences in 2011. It was awarded the prize of the Cuban Academy of Sciences. This article aims to encourage reading this book, a veritable compendium of the past, present and future of internal medicine. It outlines the issues addressed, from the structure designed for them to a fairly comprehensive assessment of the elements that define the scientific and literary value of this work.

  9. Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of radiation in human health, for both diagnosis and treatment of disease, is an important component of the work of the IAEA. The responsibility for the increasingly technical aspects of this work is undertaken by the medical physicist. To ensure good practice in this vital area, structured clinical training programmes are required to complement academic learning. This publication is intended to be a guide to the practical implementation of such a programme for nuclear medicine. There is a general and growing awareness that radiation medicine is increasingly dependent on well trained medical physicists who are based in a clinical setting. However an analysis of the availability of medical physicists indicates a large shortfall of qualified and capable professionals. This is particularly evident in developing countries. While strategies to increase educational opportunities are critical to such countries, the need for guidance on structured clinical training was recognized by the members of the Regional Cooperative Agreement for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Science and Technology (RCA) for the Asia-Pacific region. Consequently, a technical cooperation regional project (RAS6038) under the RCA programme was formulated to address this need in this region by developing suitable material and establishing its viability. Development of a clinical training guide for medical physicists specialising in nuclear medicine was started in 2009 with the appointment of a core drafting committee of regional and international experts. The publication drew on the experience of clinical training in Australia, Croatia and Sweden and was moderated by physicists working in the Asian region. The present publication follows the approach of earlier IAEA publications in the Training Course Series, specifically Nos 37 and 47, Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Radiation Oncology and Clinical Training of Medical Physicists

  10. An internet-based teaching file on clinical nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The goal of this project was to develop an internet-based interactive digital teaching file on nuclide imaging in clinical nuclear medicine, with the capability of access to internet. Methods: On the basis of academic teaching contents in nuclear medicine textbook for undergraduates who major in nuclear medicine, Frontpage 2000, HTML language, and JavaScript language in some parts of the contents, were utilized in the internet-based teaching file developed in this study. Results: A practical and comprehensive teaching file was accomplished and may get access with acceptable speed to internet. Besides basic teaching contents of nuclide imagings, a large number of typical and rare clinical cases, questionnaire with answers and update data in the field of nuclear medicine were included in the file. Conclusion: This teaching file meets its goal of providing an easy-to-use and internet-based digital teaching file, characteristically with the contents instant and enriched, and with the modes diversified and colorful

  11. The development of precision medicine in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mingyan; Xia, Jinglin; Shehab, Mohamed; Wang, Xiangdong

    2015-12-01

    Precision medicine allows a dramatic expansion of biological data, while there is still an urgent need to understand and insight the exact meaning of those data to human health and disease. This has led to an increasing wealth of data unanalyzed. The concept of precision medicine is about the customization of healthcare, with decisions and practices tailored to an individual patient based on their intrinsic biology in addition to clinical "signs and symptoms". Construction of a standardized model for the integration of data from various platforms is the central mission of the 'New Disease Management Model'. The model is helpful for the development of new taxonomy of diseases and subtypes, to personalize therapy based on patient genetic profiles. A rapid progression of precision therapy has been made recently. Clinical trials have shown the therapeutic efficacy of discovered and developed therapeutic agents has improved. However, next-generation drugs would be designed for disease subtypes with more specificity, efficacy and lower toxicity. PMID:26302883

  12. Clinical uses of the medicinal leech: A practical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B S Porshinsky

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The medicinal leech, Hirudo medicinalis, is an excellent example of the use of invertebrates in the treatment of human disease. Utilized for various medical indications since the ancient times, the medicinal leech is currently being used in a narrow range of well-defined and scientifically-grounded clinical applications. Hirudotherapy is most commonly used in the setting of venous congestion associated with soft tissue replantations and free flap-based reconstructive surgery. This is a comprehensive review of current clinical applications of hirudotherapy, featuring a comprehensive search of all major medical search engines (i.e. PubMed, Google Scholar, ScientificCommons and other cross-referenced sources. The authors focus on indications, contraindications, practical application/handling of the leech, and therapy-related complications.

  13. Monitoring medicines use: the role of the clinical pharmacologist

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, David

    2012-01-01

    Appreciation of the potential of newly marketed medicines to produce both benefit and harm has increased the role of the clinical pharmacologist. Pharmacoepidemiology applies epidemiological reasoning, methods and knowledge to the study of the uses and effects of drugs in human populations. Pharmacovigilence identifies and then responds to safety issues about marketed drugs. Whilst adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting systems can identify potential problems with drugs, determination of causa...

  14. Andragogy in clinical medicine: implications for medical educators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Geetha Mani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In Medical education, the final desired outcome is to prepare the students to meet the challenges in delivering health care to individuals and the community in the most competent and professional manner. Application of Andragogy in medical education especially clinical medicine will enrich the learning experience of students with respect to diagnosing their needs, acquiring knowledge, skills and appropriate attitudes. Various strategies such as problem based learning, clinically associated teaching, critical reflection, role modeling and constructive feedback can be used to enhance the students’ competence and inculcate professionalism among the students.

  15. Clinical research of traditional Chinese medicine in big data era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junhua; Zhang, Boli

    2014-09-01

    With the advent of big data era, our thinking, technology and methodology are being transformed. Data-intensive scientific discovery based on big data, named "The Fourth Paradigm," has become a new paradigm of scientific research. Along with the development and application of the Internet information technology in the field of healthcare, individual health records, clinical data of diagnosis and treatment, and genomic data have been accumulated dramatically, which generates big data in medical field for clinical research and assessment. With the support of big data, the defects and weakness may be overcome in the methodology of the conventional clinical evaluation based on sampling. Our research target shifts from the "causality inference" to "correlativity analysis." This not only facilitates the evaluation of individualized treatment, disease prediction, prevention and prognosis, but also is suitable for the practice of preventive healthcare and symptom pattern differentiation for treatment in terms of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), and for the post-marketing evaluation of Chinese patent medicines. To conduct clinical studies involved in big data in TCM domain, top level design is needed and should be performed orderly. The fundamental construction and innovation studies should be strengthened in the sections of data platform creation, data analysis technology and big-data professionals fostering and training.

  16. Clinical research of traditional Chinese medicine in big data era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junhua; Zhang, Boli

    2014-09-01

    With the advent of big data era, our thinking, technology and methodology are being transformed. Data-intensive scientific discovery based on big data, named "The Fourth Paradigm," has become a new paradigm of scientific research. Along with the development and application of the Internet information technology in the field of healthcare, individual health records, clinical data of diagnosis and treatment, and genomic data have been accumulated dramatically, which generates big data in medical field for clinical research and assessment. With the support of big data, the defects and weakness may be overcome in the methodology of the conventional clinical evaluation based on sampling. Our research target shifts from the "causality inference" to "correlativity analysis." This not only facilitates the evaluation of individualized treatment, disease prediction, prevention and prognosis, but also is suitable for the practice of preventive healthcare and symptom pattern differentiation for treatment in terms of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), and for the post-marketing evaluation of Chinese patent medicines. To conduct clinical studies involved in big data in TCM domain, top level design is needed and should be performed orderly. The fundamental construction and innovation studies should be strengthened in the sections of data platform creation, data analysis technology and big-data professionals fostering and training. PMID:25217972

  17. Booklet of the Research Institute of Clinical Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research Institute of Clinical Medicine is one of the biggest university diagnostic and treatment centre in Georgia with unique modern diagnostic and treatment apparatus. The institute is acknowledged as a leader in various trends of radiology and surgery. The Research Institute of Clinical Medicine was founded in 1991. It is the leading scientific establishment in the field of medicine. The scientific-research work of the Institute is coordinated by the National Academy of Sciences of Georgia. The main scientific trend of the Institute is the Early Complex Diagnostics and Treatment. The scientific activity of the Institute is led by the Scientific Council. Institute achieved remarkable success since its foundation: It has been defended 56 theses for Candidate of Medical Sciences and 16 for Doctor of Medical Sciences; About 30 post-graduate students and more than 200 radiologists have taken training courses in radiology. Nowadays they work in different regions of Georgia, 21 inventions took out patents. It has been published 2000 scientific works and 9 monographs. (authors)

  18. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Chronic Pain in Internal Organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Holistic medicine seems to be efficient in the treatment of chronic pain in internal organs, especially when the pain has no known cause. It is quite surprising that while chronic pain can be one of the toughest challenges in the biomedical clinic, it is often one of the simplest things to alleviate in the holistic clinic. These pains are regarded as being caused by repressed emotions and are explained as psychosomatic reactions. Using holistic medicine, the patients can often be cured of their suffering when they assume responsibility for the repressed feelings. The holistic process theory of healing states that the return to the natural (pain free state of being is possible whenever the person obtains the resources needed for existential healing. This shift is explained by the related quality of life and life mission theories. The resources needed are “holding” or genuine care in the dimensions of awareness, respect, care, acknowledgment, and acceptance with support and processing in the dimensions of feeling, understanding, and letting go of negative attitudes and beliefs. The preconditions for the holistic healing to take place are “love” and trust. Obtaining the full trust of the patient, therefore, seems to be the biggest challenge of holistic medicine, especially when dealing with a patient in pain.

  19. Protected clinical teaching time and a bedside clinical evaluation instrument in an emergency medicine training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayne, Philip; Heilpern, Katherine; Ander, Douglas; Palmer-Smith, Victoria

    2002-11-01

    In a process that has evolved over the last four years, the Emory University Emergency Medicine Education Committee has developed an "academic attending" teaching shift incorporating a formatted lecture series with a clinical evaluation exercise (CEE). The program structures the approach to clinical teaching at the bedside, provides an objective clinical evaluation tool specific to emergency medicine residents, and provides targeted learning for medical students and residents rotating in the emergency department (ED). The CEE instrument was designed to be quick and efficient, satisfy requirements of assessment of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) general competencies, and incorporate the language of the "Model of the Clinical Practice of Emergency Medicine." The original program called for unstructured bedside teaching three days a week, by faculty freed from clinical duties, combined with a limited series of introductory emergency medicine lectures. The program proved more successful when concentrated in a once weekly structured educational program. The prepared, repeating lecture series has been expanded to include many of the most common ED presenting chief complaints and has significantly advanced a curriculum for medical students and visiting interns. A CEE was developed to evaluate and provide immediate feedback to residents on many of the core ACGME competencies. The CEE has been successfully used to structure the bedside educational encounter. This dedicated non-clinical "teaching" shift appears effective in meeting the educational goals of the authors' academic ED. This is a description of the program and its evolution; the program has not been formally evaluated. PMID:12414493

  20. Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annesley, Thomas M.; Cooks, Robert G.; Herold, David A.; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.

    2016-01-04

    Each year the journal Clinical Chemistry publishes a January special issue on a topic that is relevant to the laboratory medicine community. In January 2016 the topic is mass spectrometry, and the issue is entitled “Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine”. One popular feature in our issues is a Q&A on a topic, clearly in this case mass spectrometry. The journal is assembling a panel of 5-6 experts from various areas of mass spectrometry ranging from instrument manufacturing to practicing clinical chemists. Dick Smith is one of the scientist requested to participate in this special issue Q&A on Mass Spectrometry. The Q&A Transcript is attached

  1. [Gender medicine. Sex- and gender-specific aspects of clinical medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautzky-Willer, A

    2014-09-01

    Gender medicine studies sex- and gender-based differences in the development and prevention of diseases, the awareness and presentation of symptoms, and the effectiveness of therapy. Gender medicine is part of personalized medicine, considering differences in biological and psychosocial factors individually. There are differences in genes, chromosomes, hormones, and metabolism as well as differences in culture, environment, and society. Lifelong interactions between physical and psychosocial factors will influence the health and ill-health of men and women in different ways. Epigenetic modifications provide evidence of the impact of environment and lifestyle during vulnerable phases on biological processes, effecting future generations. Maternal lifestyle and environmental factors during pregnancy can impact the health of offspring in later life already in utero in a sex-specific way. Pain, stress, and coping styles differ between men and women. Women experience more dramatic physical changes during their lifetime, which are associated with specific burdens and psychosocial alterations. Women with multiple roles and responsibilities suffering from stress develop depression more frequently. However, men are often not diagnosed and treated appropriately in cases of depression or osteoporosis, diseases that are typically considered "female." There are prominent differences between men and women in medicine regarding the immune system, inflammation, and noncommunicable diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. Women experience more often autoimmune diseases and suffer more frequently from (chronic) pain, neurodegenerative changes, and functional disabilities. Men have shorter life expectancy but relatively more healthy years of life, which is in greater part ascribed to psychosocial determinants. State-of-the-art clinical medicine comprises individual risk factors based on sex- and gender-sensitive health programs in order to

  2. Clinical Observation on Treatment of Tourette Syndrome by Integrative Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李安源; 丛珊; 吕红; 李继君; 赵林

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To explore the clinical efficacy of integrative Chinese and Western medicine in treating Tourette syndrome(TS).Methods:Ninety children with TS were randomized into two groups by randomizing digital table method:the 60 patients in the treated group were treated by Ningdong Granule(宁动颗粒,NDG) plus haloperidol,and the 30 in the control group treated by haloperidol alone.The course for both groups was 6 months.Conditions of the patients were estimated before and after treatment with Yale Global Tic ...

  3. Prime time to resuscitate clinical medicine and kill diagnostic greed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasoorya, C

    2016-09-01

    Modern healthcare faces the challenges of rising costs, increasing expectations of patients and changing disease patterns. Physicians practise medicine in an era of easy availability and access to a plethora of modern and sometimes expensive diagnostic aids. The powerful utility of clinical skills cannot be underestimated nor lost. The physician has a powerful platform to encourage the rational use of tests, prevent wasteful overutilisation and ensure that tests do not cause more harm than benefit in physical, emotional or financial terms. Diagnostic skills should not be substituted by diagnostic greed. It is possible to do more for the patient rather than to the patient. PMID:27664173

  4. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Classic Art of Healingor the Therapeutic Touch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Touching is often a forgotten part of medicine. The manual medicine or therapeutic touch (TT is much more powerful than many modern, biomedically oriented physicians think. Pain and discomfort can be alleviated just by touching the sick area and in this way help the patient to be in better contact with the tissue and organs of their body. Lack of presence in the body seems to be connected with many symptoms that can be readily reversed simply by sensitive touch. When touch is combined with therapeutic work on mind and feelings, holistic healing seems to be facilitated and many problems can be solved in a direct and easy way in the clinic without drugs. This paper gives examples of the strength of manual medicine or therapeutic touch in its most simple form, and points to the power of physical contact between physician and his patient in the context of the theory and practice of holistic healing. Intimacy seems highly beneficial for the process of healing and it is very important to distinguish clearly between intimacy and sexuality for the physician and his patent to be able to give and receive touch without fear and without holding back emotionally.

  5. Study of regenerative medicine in China: demands and clinical translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-bing FU

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The repair and regeneration of tissue is a well-discussed topic. Over the past 20 years, with the development of genetics, auxology, stem cell biology, and tissue engineering, tissue repair and regeneration have rapidly developed as emerging "Regenerative Medicine". Regenerative medicine has significant market demand in China. Based on national statistics, injury and poisoning patients rank third in afflictions in city hospitals (accounting for 9.13% and rank second in afflictions in county hospitals (accounting for 14.07%. Totally, approximately one hundred million patients suffered from traumatic, genetic and metabolic diseases in China and demand reparative and regenerative medical treatment each year. The Chinese government and its related departments have always attached great importance and support to the development of regenerative medicine, and the Chinese academic circle is involved in a very wide range of diseases and injuries including regenerative medical theory and technology. Stem cell biology, organ engineering and duplication, tissue engineering research and production have developed rapidly, and great portion of these studies have started to appear in applications, which have aroused extensive concerns in international professional circle. In the next 10 years, the Chinese regenerative medical system will be further improved, in both statute and rules, clinical translation will be further accelerated. Breakthroughs are expected in induced differentiation of stem cells and synchronous repair and regeneration of multiple organs, construction of major organs by tissue engineering, large-scale applications of tissue engineering products, and other aspects.

  6. Cannabinoid-based medicines for neurological disorders--clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Stephen

    2007-08-01

    Whereas the cannabis plant has a long history of medicinal use, it is only in recent years that a sufficient understanding of the pharmacology of the main plant constituents has allowed for a better understanding of the most rational therapeutic targets. The distribution of cannabinoid receptors, both within the nervous system and without, and the development of pharmacological tools to investigate their function has lead to a substantial increase in efforts to develop cannabinoids as therapeutic agents. Concomitant with these efforts, the understanding of the pharmacology of plant cannabinoids at receptor and other systems distinct from the cannabinoid receptors suggests that the therapeutic applications of plant-derived cannabinoids (and presumably their synthetic derivatives also) may be diverse. This review aims to discuss the clinical evidence investigating the use of medicines derived, directly or indirectly, from plant cannabinoids with special reference to neurological disorders. Published studies suggest that the oral administration of cannabinoids may not be the preferred route of administration and that plant extracts show greater evidence of efficacy than synthetic compounds. One of these, Sativex (GW Pharmaceuticals), was approved as a prescription medicine in Canada in 2005 and is currently under regulatory review in the EU. PMID:17952657

  7. Nano medicine in Action: An Overview of Cancer Nano medicine on the Market and in Clinical Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nano medicine, defined as the application of nano technology in the medical field, has the potential to significantly change the course of diagnostics and treatment of life-threatening diseases, such as cancer. In comparison with traditional cancer diagnostics and therapy, cancer nano medicine provides sensitive cancer detection and/or enhances treatment efficacy with significantly minimized adverse effects associated with standard therapeutics. Cancer nano medicine has been increasingly applied in areas including nano drug delivery systems, nano pharmaceuticals, and nano analytical contrast reagents in laboratory and animal model research. In recent years, the successful introduction of several novel nano medicine products into clinical trials and even onto the commercial market has shown successful outcomes of fundamental research into clinics. This paper is intended to examine several nano medicines for cancer therapeutics and/or diagnostics-related applications, to analyze the trend of nano medicine development, future opportunities, and challenges of this fast-growing area.

  8. A systematic review of clinical audit in companion animal veterinary medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Rose, Nicole; Toews, Lorraine; Daniel S J Pang

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical audit is a quality improvement process with the goal of continuously improving quality of patient care as assessed by explicit criteria. In human medicine clinical audit has become an integral and required component of the standard of care. In contrast, in veterinary medicine there appear to have been a limited number of clinical audits published, indicating that while clinical audit is recognised, its adoption in veterinary medicine is still in its infancy. A systematic r...

  9. The emergence of trust in clinics of alternative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Inge Kryger; Hansen, Vibeke Holm; Grünenberg, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Demands for alternative medicine have increased since the 1970s in nations in which western scientific evidence has become the basis for health care. This paradox has been the impetus to examine how trust emerges in clinics of alternative medicine. Alternative practitioners are self-regulated and the clients pay out of their own pockets to attend non-authorised treatments with very limited scientific evidence of their effects. Trust is a key issue in this context. However, only a few studies have dealt with the ways in which alternative practitioners win their clients' trust. Drawing on three qualitative studies and informing the empirical findings with a sociological concept of trust, this article provides new empirical insights on how trust emerges in Danish clinics of acupuncture, reflexology and homeopathy. The analysis demonstrates how trust is situational and emerges through both clients' susceptibility and practitioners' individual skill development and strategies, as well as from objects, place and space. Trust is developed on relational and bodily as well as material grounds. It is argued that the dynamics and elements of trust identified do not only minimalise uncertainties but sometimes convert these uncertainties into productive new ways for clients to address their ailments, life circumstances and perspectives. PMID:26403077

  10. Clinical tumor sequencing: opportunities and challenges for precision cancer medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodaran, Senthilkumar; Berger, Michael F; Roychowdhury, Sameek

    2015-01-01

    Advances in tumor genome sequencing have enabled discovery of actionable alterations leading to novel therapies. Currently, there are approved targeted therapies across various tumors that can be matched to genomic alterations, such as point mutations, gene amplification, and translocations. Tools to detect these genomic alterations have emerged as a result of decreasing costs and improved throughput enabled by next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. NGS has been successfully utilized for developing biomarkers to assess susceptibility, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of cancers. However, clinical application presents some potential challenges in terms of tumor specimen acquisition, analysis, privacy, interpretation, and drug development in rare cancer subsets. Although whole-genome sequencing offers the most complete strategy for tumor analysis, its present utility in clinical care is limited. Consequently, targeted gene capture panels are more commonly employed by academic institutions and commercial vendors for clinical grade cancer genomic testing to assess molecular eligibility for matching therapies, whereas whole-exome and transcriptome (RNASeq) sequencing are being utilized for discovery research. This review discusses the strategies, clinical challenges, and opportunities associated with the application of cancer genomic testing for precision cancer medicine. PMID:25993170

  11. Complementary and alternative medicine use by visitors to rural Japanese family medicine clinics: results from the international complementary and alternative medicine survey

    OpenAIRE

    Shumer, Gregory; Warber, Sara; Motohara, Satoko; Yajima, Ayaka; Plegue, Melissa; Bialko, Matthew; Iida, Tomoko; Sano, Kiyoshi; Amenomori, Masaki; Tsuda, Tsukasa; Fetters, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) throughout the world, however previous research done in Japan has focused primarily on CAM use in major cities. The purpose of this study was to develop and distribute a Japanese version of the International Complementary and Alternative Medicine Questionnaire (I-CAM-Q) to assess the use of CAM among people who visit rural Japanese family medicine clinics. Methods Using a Japanese version of the In...

  12. Introducing Advances in Bioscience and Clinical Medicine (ABCmed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samad EJ Golzari

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We are pleased to announce the launch of the Advances in Bioscience and Clinical Medicine (ABCmed, aninternational open-access, and peer-reviewed journal. Mostly intended to cover all areas of bioscience and medicine, theJournal would provide a unique venue for the scientists from all over the world to publish their scientific works. One ofthe advantages of publishing with us is the rapid yet rigorous review process which is mostly performed by ourdistinguished Editorial and Review Board members; this obviously hard-to-achieve goal would not be realized withouttheir continuous support and advice.Another distinguishing characteristic of ABCmed is the diversity of published items in each issue. The editorial team ofthe Journal has devoted separate sections to rather unknown yet interesting fields of the science for instance hypotheses,history of medicine, etc. In the first issue of ABCmed, the readers might refer to the two published hypotheseshighlighting the possible role of chamomile in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, and also the preventive effects oftadalafil together with nimodipine in subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced cerebral vasospasm.Letters to the Editor are one of the major sectors in the ABCmed providing not only further on the already publisheddata in the Journal, but also personal comments on the major public health concerns and medical issues. In the firstissue of the Journal, a very important cancer surgery complication is debated, introducing different strategies in the painmanagement of breast cancer patients.We hope that ABCmed will provide a basis to bring together the scientists from all over the globe with the same goal ofpromoting science.

  13. Clinical nuclear medicine applications in Turkey and specific renal studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Nuclear cardiology, nuclear oncology, pediatric nuclear medicine and nuclear endocrinology are the main application areas of clinical nuclear medicine in Turkey. Not only imaging studies, but also therapeutic application of radiopharmaceuticals is also performed at many institutes, such as hyperthyroidism treatment with radioiodine, thyroid cancer ablation and metastases treatment with radioiodine, radio synovectomy, metastatic pain therapy, and recently radioimmunotherapy of lymphomas. Almost all radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals are obtained commercially from European countries, except 18-FDG which is obtained from two cyclotrons in Turkey. More than 30.000 renal procedures are performed at the University hospitals in a year. Pediatric age groups is approximately % 55 of patients. 99mTc-DTPA (%44), 99mTc-DMSA (%37), 99mTc-MAG3 (%17) and 99mTc-EC (%2) are the most commonly used radiopharmaceuticals for renal imaging. More than 6.000 vials of several pharmaceuticals are used for renal cortical scintigraphy (%35), dynamic renal imaging (%34), renal scintigraphy with diuretic (%27) and captopril scintigraphy (%4). Most common indication for renal cortical scintigraphy is detection of cortical scarring (%53). In addition, using single plasma sample method or gamma-camera method renal clearance measurements with 99mTc-MAG3 99mTc-DTPA have been used at some institutions

  14. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Holistic Treatment of Mental Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We believe that holistic medicine can be used for patient's with mental health disorders. With holistic psychiatry, it is possible to help the mentally ill patient to heal existentially. As in holistic medicine, the methods are love or intense care, winning the trust of the patient, getting permission to give support and holding, and daring to be fully at the patient's service. Our clinical experiences have led us to believe that mental health patient's can heal if only you can make him or her feel the existential pain at its full depth, understand what the message of the suffering is, and let go of all the negative attitudes and beliefs connected with the disease. Many mentally ill young people would benefit from a few hours of existential holistic processing in order to confront the core existential pains. To help the mentally ill patient, you must understand the level of responsibility and help process the old traumas that made the patient escape responsibility for his or her own life and destiny. To guide the work, we have developed a responsibility scale going from (1 free perception over (2 emotional pain to (3 psychic death (denial of life purpose further down to (4 escape and (5 denial to (6 destruction of own perception and (7 hallucination further down to (8 coma, suicide, and unconsciousness. This scale seems to be a valuable tool to understand the state of consciousness and the nature of the process of healing that the patient must go through.

  15. [Artificial intelligence to assist clinical diagnosis in medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo-Reyes, Saúl Oswaldo; Maldonado-Colín, Guadalupe; Murata, Chiharu

    2014-01-01

    Medicine is one of the fields of knowledge that would most benefit from a closer interaction with Computer studies and Mathematics by optimizing complex, imperfect processes such as differential diagnosis; this is the domain of Machine Learning, a branch of Artificial Intelligence that builds and studies systems capable of learning from a set of training data, in order to optimize classification and prediction processes. In Mexico during the last few years, progress has been made on the implementation of electronic clinical records, so that the National Institutes of Health already have accumulated a wealth of stored data. For those data to become knowledge, they need to be processed and analyzed through complex statistical methods, as it is already being done in other countries, employing: case-based reasoning, artificial neural networks, Bayesian classifiers, multivariate logistic regression, or support vector machines, among other methodologies; to assist the clinical diagnosis of acute appendicitis, breast cancer and chronic liver disease, among a wide array of maladies. In this review we shift through concepts, antecedents, current examples and methodologies of machine learning-assisted clinical diagnosis.

  16. Monitoring medicines use: the role of the clinical pharmacologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David

    2012-10-01

    Appreciation of the potential of newly marketed medicines to produce both benefit and harm has increased the role of the clinical pharmacologist. Pharmacoepidemiology applies epidemiological reasoning, methods and knowledge to the study of the uses and effects of drugs in human populations. Pharmacovigilence identifies and then responds to safety issues about marketed drugs. Whilst adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting systems can identify potential problems with drugs, determination of causation requires population-based studies of adverse events (including information from large clinical trials), which attempt to link unequivocally the adverse outcome to the drug in question. Pharmacovigilance is closely linked to postmarketing surveillance and is important for determining issues such as the long-term effects of drugs, identification of low-frequency ADRs, the effectiveness of drugs for their licensed indications or in new indications and other factors which may modify the efficacy and effectiveness of the drug in question. The related field of drug utilization developed in parallel with the study of adverse drug reactions, in recognition of the dramatic increase in the marketing of new drugs, the wide variations in the patterns and extent of drug prescribing, the growing concern about ADRs and the increasing costs of drugs. With the ever increasing number of recognized adverse effects of drugs, prescribing errors, patients' expectations concerning drug safety and the need for appropriate new drug appraisal, the clinical pharmacologist will play an important role both in the introduction of new drugs and in improving the safe and effective use of established drugs. PMID:22554404

  17. Monitoring medicines use: the role of the clinical pharmacologist.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Williams, David

    2012-10-01

    Appreciation of the potential of newly marketed medicines to produce both benefit and harm has increased the role of the clinical pharmacologist. Pharmacoepidemiology applies epidemiological reasoning, methods and knowledge to the study of the uses and effects of drugs in human populations. Pharmacovigilence identifies and then responds to safety issues about marketed drugs. Whilst adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting systems can identify potential problems with drugs, determination of causation requires population-based studies of adverse events (including information from large clinical trials), which attempt to link unequivocally the adverse outcome to the drug in question. Pharmacovigilance is closely linked to postmarketing surveillance and is important for determining issues such as the long-term effects of drugs, identification of low-frequency ADRs, the effectiveness of drugs for their licensed indications or in new indications and other factors which may modify the efficacy and effectiveness of the drug in question. The related field of drug utilization developed in parallel with the study of adverse drug reactions, in recognition of the dramatic increase in the marketing of new drugs, the wide variations in the patterns and extent of drug prescribing, the growing concern about ADRs and the increasing costs of drugs. With the ever increasing number of recognized adverse effects of drugs, prescribing errors, patients\\' expectations concerning drug safety and the need for appropriate new drug appraisal, the clinical pharmacologist will play an important role both in the introduction of new drugs and in improving the safe and effective use of established drugs.

  18. Clinical Study on Treatment of Depression with Combined Acupuncture & Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Hong; WANG Qiao-chu; HAN Chou-ping

    2003-01-01

    Purpose To observe and compare the curative effects of combined acupuncture and medicine with simple herbal medicine on treatment of depression. Method Altogether 63 cases were enrolled according to the determination of internationally accepted self-evaluation depression scales (SDS), among them 33 cases were treated with combination of acupuncture and herbal medicine (acupuncture-medicine group) and the other 30 cases were in treated with herbal medicine alone (herbal medicine group) Results The total effective rate of acupuncture-medicine group was 90.9% and that of herbal group was 80.0%. And there was significant statistics difference between the curative effects of two groups (P <0.05) without obvious adverse reaction. Conclusion Combination of acupuncture and medicine has better effect in treating depression than herbal medicine group.

  19. Objective Structured Clinical Examinations Provide Valid Clinical Skills Assessment in Emergency Medicine Education

    OpenAIRE

    Wallenstein, Joshua; Ander, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Evaluation of emergency medicine (EM) learners based on observed performance in the emergency department (ED) is limited by factors such as reproducibility and patient safety. EM educators depend on standardized and reproducible assessments such as the objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). The validity of the OSCE as an evaluation tool in EM education has not been previously studied. The objective was to assess the validity of a novel management-focused OSCE as an ev...

  20. Advancing Medication Reconciliation in an Outpatient Internal Medicine Clinic through a Pharmacist-Led Educational Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah M. Westberg, Pharm.D.; Kathrine Beeksma, R.N.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To develop and deliver an effective pharmacist-led educational initiative to clinic staff to advance medication reconciliation in the electronic medical record of an outpatient internal medicine clinic.Methods: An educational initiative designed to improve the ability of nursing staff in medication reconciliation was launched in the outpatient internal medicine clinic of a regional healthcare system. The education was provided by the pharmacist to clinic nursing staff, includ...

  1. Review and Updates in Regenerative and Personalized Medicine, Preclinical Animal Models, and Clinical Care in Cardiovascular Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbato, Emanuele; Barton, Paul J; Bartunek, Jozef; Huber, Sally; Ibanez, Borja; Judge, Daniel P; Lara-Pezzi, Enrique; Stolen, Craig M; Taylor, Angela; Hall, Jennifer L

    2015-11-01

    The goal of this paper is to provide an updated review for scientists and clinicians on the major areas in cardiovascular medicine published in the Journal. Leading topics in regenerative and personalized medicine are presented along with a critical overview of the field. New standards in large preclinical animal models of pulmonary hypertension and left bundle branch block are highlighted. Finally, clinical care in the areas of atherosclerosis, the aortic valve, platelet biology, and myocarditis is discussed as well as autonomic modulation therapies.

  2. Risk of discontinuation of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Eve; Rémuzat, Cecile; Auquier, Pascal; Toumi, Mondher

    2016-01-01

    Objective Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) constitute a class of innovative products that encompasses gene therapy, somatic cell therapy, and tissue-engineered products (TEP). There is an increased investment of commercial and non-commercial sponsors in this field and a growing number of ATMPs randomized clinical trials (RCT) and patients enrolled in such trials. RCT generate data to prove the efficacy of a new therapy, but the discontinuation of RCTs wastes scarce resources. Our objective is to identify the number and characteristics of discontinued ATMPs trials in order to evaluate the rate of discontinuation. Methods We searched for ATMPs trials conducted between 1999 to June 2015 using three databases, which are Clinicaltrials.gov, the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), and the EU Drug Regulating Authorities Clinical Trials (EudraCT). We selected the ATMPs trials after elimination of the duplicates. We identified the disease areas and the sponsors as commercial or non-commercial organizations. We classified ATMPs by type and trial status, that is, ongoing, completed, terminated, discontinued, and prematurely ended. Then, we calculated the rate of discontinuation. Results Between 1999 and June 2015, 143 withdrawn, terminated, or prematurely ended ATMPs clinical trials were identified. Between 1999 and June 2013, 474 ongoing and completed clinical trials were identified. Therefore, the rate of discontinuation of ATMPs trials is 23.18%, similar to that for non-ATMPs drugs in development. The probability of discontinuation is, respectively, 27.35, 16.28, and 16.34% for cell therapies, gene therapies, and TEP. The highest discontinuation rate is for oncology (43%), followed by cardiology (19.2%). It is almost the same for commercial and non-commercial sponsors; therefore, the discontinuation reason may not be financially driven. Conclusion No failure risk rate per development phase is available for ATMPs. The discontinuation rate may

  3. A clinically meaningful theory of outcome measures in rehabilitation medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massof, Robert W

    2010-01-01

    Comparative effectiveness research in rehabilitation medicine requires the development and validation of clinically meaningful and scientifically rigorous measurements of patient states and theories that explain and predict outcomes of intervention. Patient traits are latent (unobservable) variables that can be measured only by inference from observations of surrogate manifest (observable) variables. In the behavioral sciences, latent variables are analogous to intensive physical variables such as temperature and manifest variables are analogous to extensive physical variables such as distance. Although only one variable at a time can be measured, the variable can have a multidimensional structure that must be understood in order to explain disagreements among different measures of the same variable. The use of Rasch theory to measure latent trait variables can be illustrated with a balance scale metaphor that has randomly added variability in the weights of the objects being measured. Knowledge of the distribution of the randomly added variability provides the theoretical structure for estimating measures from ordinal observation scores (e.g., performance measures or rating scales) using statistical inference. In rehabilitation medicine, the latent variable of primary interest is the patient's functional ability. Functional ability can be estimated from observations of surrogate performance measures (e.g., speed and accuracy) or self-report of the difficulty the patient experiences performing specific activities. A theoretical framework borrowed from project management, called the Activity Breakdown Structure (ABS), guides the choice of activities for assessment, based on the patient's value judgments, to make the observations clinically meaningful. In the case of low vision, the functional ability measure estimated from Rasch analysis of activity difficulty ratings was discovered to be a two-dimensional variable. The two visual function dimensions are independent

  4. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Chronic Pain in the Locomotor System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Most pains from the locomotor system arise due to involuntary, chronic tensions in the muscles or other tissues. When the patient is motivated, the pain is easily cured in most of the cases by using the tools of consciousness-based medicine, primarily therapeutic touch, conversation, and coaching the patient in a positive philosophy of life. The pains are often caused by “blockages” that may cause problems other than just pain. Often it turns out that the blocked areas develop actual physical damage over time: a slipped disk in the back, articular degeneration, or osteoarthritis when the cartilage is affected, can often be explained in this way. Apparently, the exact areas where the blockage is situated cause cellular problems, disrupting cellular order. The holistic process theory of healing and the related quality of life theories state that return to the natural state of being is possible, whenever the person gets the resources needed for existential healing. The resources needed are “holding” in the dimensions of awareness, respect, care, acknowledgment, and acceptance with support and processing in the dimensions of feeling, understanding, and letting go of negative attitudes and beliefs. The preconditions for holistic healing are trust and the intention for the healing to take place. Case stories of holistic treatment of patients with chronic back pain, low back pain, muscle problems, knee pain, and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis are discussed with exercises relevant for patients with these conditions in the holistic clinic.

  5. Personalized medicine. Closing the gap between knowledge and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Duarte-Rey, Carolina; Sarmiento-Monroy, Juan C; Bardey, David; Castiblanco, John; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana

    2016-08-01

    Personalized medicine encompasses a broad and evolving field informed by a patient distinctive information and biomarker profile. Although terminology is evolving and some semantic interpretations exist (e.g., personalized, individualized, precision), in a broad sense personalized medicine can be coined as: "To practice medicine as it once used to be in the past using the current biotechnological tools." A humanized approach to personalized medicine would offer the possibility of exploiting systems biology and its concept of P5 medicine, where predictive factors for developing a disease should be examined within populations in order to establish preventive measures on at-risk individuals, for whom healthcare should be personalized and participatory. Herein, the process of personalized medicine is presented together with the options that can be offered in health care systems with limited resources for diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and type 1 diabetes.

  6. Evidence-based medicine: the design and interpretation of noninferiority clinical trials in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freise, K J; Lin, T-L; Fan, T M; Recta, V; Clark, T P

    2013-01-01

    Noninferiority trials are clinical studies designed to demonstrate that an investigational drug is at least as effective as an established treatment within a predetermined margin. They are conducted, in part, because of ethical concerns of administering a placebo to veterinary patients when an established effective treatment exists. The use of noninferiority trial designs has become more common in veterinary medicine with the increasing number of established veterinary therapeutics and the desire to eliminate potential pain or distress in a placebo-controlled study. Selecting the appropriate active control and an a priori noninferiority margin between the investigational and active control drug are unique and critical design factors for noninferiority studies. Without reliable historical knowledge of the disease response in the absence of treatment and of the response to the selected active control drug, proper design and interpretation of a noninferiority trial is not possible. Despite the appeal of conducting noninferiority trials to eliminate ethical concerns of placebo-controlled studies, there are real limitations and possible ethical conundrums associated with noninferiority trials. The consequences of incorrect study conclusions because of poor noninferiority trial design need careful attention. Alternative trial designs to typical noninferiority studies exist, but these too have limitations and must also be carefully considered.

  7. Practice of clinical forensic medicine in Sri Lanka: does it need a new era?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodikara, Sarathchandra

    2012-07-01

    Clinical forensic medicine is a sub-specialty of forensic medicine and is intimately associated with the justice system of a country. Practice of clinical forensic medicine is evolving, but deviates from one jurisdiction to another. Most English-speaking countries practice clinical forensic medicine and forensic pathology separately while most non-English-speaking countries practice forensic medicine which includes clinical forensic medicine and forensic pathology. Unlike the practice of forensic pathology, several countries have informal arrangements to deal with forensic patients and there are no international standards of practice or training in this discipline. Besides, this is rarely a topic of discussion. In the adversarial justice system in Sri Lanka, the designated Government Medical Officers practice both clinical forensic medicine and forensic pathology. Practice of clinical forensic medicine, and its teaching and training in Sri Lanka depicts unique features. However, this system has not undergone a significant revision for many decades. In this communication, the existing legal framework, current procedure of practice, examination for drunkenness, investigations, structure of referrals, reports, subsequent legal procedures, undergraduate, in-service, and postgraduate training are discussed with suggestions for reforms.

  8. Clinical trials with herbal medicinal products in children: a literature analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, Peter; Kaft, Karin; Nieber, Karen

    2015-06-01

    Herbal medicinal products have been used since several decades for the health care of children. Nevertheless, well-controlled clinical studies with herbal medicinal products for children are rare. The authors' objective therefore was to evaluate clinical trials with herbal medicinal products in children, based on a literature search in PubMed and Web of Science. A total of 133 trials were identified. 90 studies were randomized, 32.2% were randomized and double-blinded. Most studies were performed in China, in the age group 6-12 years, and in children with respiratory diseases, most often herbal medicinal products with Hedera helix were tested. The analysis revealed that studies on herbal medicinal products were feasible in children. Although clinical trials have been found, this literature search have limitations and did not cover all studies performed. However, only few clinical trials of high quality were identified. Further studies therefore are urgently needed to support the good empirical findings. PMID:26183729

  9. Advancing medicine one research note at a time: the educational value in clinical case reports

    OpenAIRE

    Cabán-Martinez Alberto J; Beltrán Wilfredo F

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A case report—a brief written note that describes unique aspects of a clinical case—provides a significant function in medicine given its rapid, succinct, and educational contributions to scientific literature and clinical practice. Despite the growth of, and emphasis on, randomized clinical trials and evidenced-based medicine, case reports continue to provide novel and exceptional knowledge in medical education. The journal BMC Research Notes introduces a new “case reports” section ...

  10. Regulatory acceptance of animal models of disease to support clinical trials of medicines and advanced therapy medicinal products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavagnaro, Joy; Silva Lima, Beatriz

    2015-07-15

    The utility of animal models of disease for assessing the safety of novel therapeutic modalities has become an increasingly important topic of discussion as research and development efforts focus on improving the predictive value of animal studies to support accelerated clinical development. Medicines are approved for marketing based upon a determination that their benefits outweigh foreseeable risks in specific indications, specific populations, and at specific dosages and regimens. No medicine is 100% safe. A medicine is less safe if the actual risks are greater than the predicted risks. The purpose of preclinical safety assessment is to understand the potential risks to aid clinical decision-making. Ideally preclinical studies should identify potential adverse effects and design clinical studies that will minimize their occurrence. Most regulatory documents delineate the utilization of conventional "normal" animal species to evaluate the safety risk of new medicines (i.e., new chemical entities and new biological entities). Animal models of human disease are commonly utilized to gain insight into the pathogenesis of disease and to evaluate efficacy but less frequently utilized in preclinical safety assessment. An understanding of the limitations of the animal disease models together with a better understanding of the disease and how toxicity may be impacted by the disease condition should allow for a better prediction of risk in the intended patient population. Importantly, regulatory authorities are becoming more willing to accept and even recommend data from experimental animal disease models that combine efficacy and safety to support clinical development.

  11. Clinical chemistry: challenges for analytical chemistry and the nanosciences from medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durner, Jürgen

    2010-02-01

    Clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine can look back over more than 150 years of eventful history. The subject encompasses all the medicinal disciplines as well as the remaining natural sciences. Clinical chemistry demonstrates how new insights from basic research in biochemical, biological, analytical chemical, engineering, and information technology can be transferred into the daily routine of medicine to improve diagnosis, therapeutic monitoring, and prevention. This Review begins with a presentation of the development of clinical chemistry. Individual steps between the drawing of blood and interpretation of laboratory data are then illustrated; here not only are pitfalls described, but so are quality control systems. The introduction of new methods and trends into medicinal analysis is explored, along with opportunities and problems associated with personalized medicine.

  12. Personalized Medicine in Pediatrics : The Clinical Potential of Orodispersible Films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, J. Carolina; Woerdenbag, Herman J; Hanff, Lidwien M; Frijlink, Henderik W

    2016-01-01

    Children frequently receive medicines that are designed for adults. The dose of commercially available products is adapted, mostly based on the child's bodyweight, thereby neglecting differences in pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics parameters. If commercial products are unsuitable for administrat

  13. The Role of Medicinal Cannabis in Clinical Therapy: Pharmacists' Perspectives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Isaac

    Full Text Available Medicinal cannabis has recently attracted much media attention in Australia and across the world. With the exception of a few countries, cannabinoids remain illegal-known for their adverse effects rather than their medicinal application and therapeutic benefit. However, there is mounting evidence demonstrating the therapeutic benefits of cannabis in alleviating neuropathic pain, improving multiple sclerosis spasticity, reducing chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting, and many other chronic conditions. Many are calling for the legalisation of medicinal cannabis including consumers, physicians and politicians. Pharmacists are the gatekeepers of medicines and future administrators/dispensers of cannabis to the public, however very little has been heard about pharmacists' perspectives. Therefore the aim of this study was to explore pharmacists' views about medicinal cannabis; its legalisation and supply in pharmacy.Semi-structured interviews with 34 registered pharmacists in Australia were conducted. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed ad verbatim and thematically analysed using the NVivo software.Emergent themes included stigma, legislation, safety and collaboration. Overall the majority of pharmacists felt national legalisation of a standardised form of cannabis would be suitable, and indicated various factors and strategies to manage its supply. The majority of participants felt that the most suitable setting would be via a community pharmacy setting due to the importance of accessibility for patients.This study explored views of practicing pharmacists, revealing a number of previously undocumented views and barriers about medicinal cannabis from a supply perspective. There were several ethical and professional issues raised for consideration. These findings highlight the important role that pharmacists hold in the supply of medicinal cannabis. Additionally, this study identified important factors, which will help shape future

  14. Study of regenerative medicine in China: demands and clinical translation

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Xiao-Bing

    2012-01-01

    The repair and regeneration of tissue is a well-discussed topic. Over the past 20 years, with the development of genetics, auxology, stem cell biology, and tissue engineering, tissue repair and regeneration have rapidly developed as emerging "Regenerative Medicine". Regenerative medicine has significant market demand in China. Based on national statistics, injury and poisoning patients rank third in afflictions in city hospitals (accounting for 9.13%) and rank second in afflictions in county ...

  15. A Lifestyle Medicine Clinic in a Community Pharmacy Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L. Lenz, PharmD, MA, PAPHS

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic diseases continue to be a significant burden to the health care system. Pharmacists have been able to show that drugtherapy for patients with chronic diseases can be improved through medication therapy management (MTM services but have yet to become significantly involved in implementing lifestyle modification programs to further control and prevent chronic conditions. A novel and innovative lifestyle medicine program was started by pharmacists in a community pharmacy in 2008 to more comprehensively prevent and manage chronic conditions. The lifestyle medicine program consists of designing seven personalized programs for patients to address physical activity, nutrition, alcohol consumption, weight control, stress management, sleep success, and tobacco cessation (if needed. The lifestyle medicine program complements existing MTM services for patients with hypertension, dyslipidemia, and/or diabetes. This program is innovative because pharmacists have developed and implemented amethod to combine lifestyle medicine with MTM services to not only manage chronic conditions, but prevent the progression of those conditions and others. Several innovative tools have also been developed to enhance the effectiveness of a lifestyle medicine program. This manuscript describes the program’s pharmacy setting, pharmacy personnel, participants and program details as well as the tools used to integrate a lifestyle medicine program with MTM services.

  16. Evaluation of Patient Satisfaction with Medical Services at Traditional Iranian Medicine Clinics in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fataneh Dabaghian

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: According to the results of this study, over 60% of the patients were satisfied with the health care services offered at traditional medicine clinics. Insurance coverage for traditional treatments could significantly reduce treatment costs. Furthermore, technical quality and communication skills of practitioners need to be improved through training courses in the field of traditional medicine.

  17. Stem cells: progressions and applications in clinical medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hosseini Bereshneh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are undifferentiated and multi pluripotent cells which can differentiate into a variety of mature cells and tissues such as nervous tissue, muscle tissue, epithelial tissue, skeletal tissue and etc. Stem cells from all different source have three unique features: 1 Proliferative capability: Stem cells are capable of self dividing and self renewing for long periods or more than six months at least that called immortalization. 2 Undifferentiated nature: It’s considered as one of the essential characteristics of stem cell, so it doesn't have any tissue-specific construction. 3 Differentiation to the different cells from all organs: This ability can Induced by tissue specific transcription factors. Because of that, they are so important in prevention and treatment of human disease. Depending on the sources from which they derive, they have different types which can be used to produce special cells and tissues. The most significant types of stem cells are; embryonic stem cells (ESCs which are derived from embryos, adult stem cells (ASCs which are derived from differentiated cells in a specific tissue, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSs which are produced from adult differentiated cells that have been genetically reprogrammed to act resemble to an embryonic stem cell and cord blood stem cells which contains haematopoietic stem cells and derived from the umbilical cord after gestation. By providing a medium containing of special growth factor, it is possible to orientated stem cell differentiation pathway and gained certain cells from them. The important uses of stem cells includes damaged heart tissue cells improvements and bone tissue repairing, cancer treatment, damaged neurological and spinal tissue repairing, improving burns and injuries and the treatment of diabetes, infertility and spermatogenesis dysfunction. Furthermore, the application of them in gene therapy is an important issue in the modern medicine science due to the role

  18. Do clinical prediction models improve concordance of treatment decisions in reproductive medicine?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W. van der Steeg; P. Steures; M.J.C. Eijkemans; J.D.F. Habbema; P.M.M. Bossuyt; P.G.A. Hompes; F. van der Veen; B.W.J. Mol

    2006-01-01

    Objective To assess whether the use of clinical prediction models improves concordance between gynaecologists with respect to treatment decisions in reproductive medicine. Design We constructed 16 vignettes of subfertile couples by varying fertility history, postcoital test, sperm motility, follicle

  19. Behavioral medicine and clinical health psychology: introduction to the special issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Alan J; Nezu, Arthur M

    2013-04-01

    This issue represents the 4th Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology special issue on behavioral medicine and clinical health psychology over the past 4 decades. Recent developments in health care policy, as well as in the maturation of the science, make a special issue in this area particularly timely. This collection includes state of the clinical science reviews, reports of clinical trials, and articles addressing theory and methods in behavioral medicine and clinical health psychology. A multilevel, ecological perspective that considers multiple levels of influences (e.g., cultural influences on behavior-health linkages, individual differences) is salient throughout many of the articles. Our hope is that this sampling of this broad field, and coverage of some key issues and areas, will play a role in stimulating the next 10 years of research, practice, and policy implementation in behavioral medicine and clinical health psychology.

  20. The European Register of Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine: guide to the Register, version 3-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMurray, Janet; Zérah, Simone; Hallworth, Michael;

    2010-01-01

    In 1997, the European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EC4) set up a Register for European Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. The operation of the Register is undertaken by a Register Commission (EC4RC). During the last 12 years, more...... than 2200 specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine have joined the Register. In 2007, EC4 merged with the Forum of European Societies of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (FESCC) to form the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFCC). Two previous...

  1. Changing the Face of Veterinary Medicine: Research and Clinical Developments at AAVMC Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Donald F; Hagstrom, Melena R

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a 50-year overview of research and clinical advances in AAVMC member colleges in four representative fields of veterinary medicine: oncology, vaccine development, production medicine, and public health. Though emphasis is on the progress since the mid-1960s, the salient background and associated personnel in each field are also identified to the extent that their description informs more recent events. Advances in board certification and post-graduate clinical and research educational opportunities are also described.

  2. Handbook of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging principles and clinical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Edmund E; Tateishi, Ukihide; Baum, Richard P

    2012-01-01

    This handbook will provide updated information on nuclear medicine and molecular imaging techniques as well as its clinical applications, including radionuclide therapy, to trainees and practitioners of nuclear medicine, radiology and general medicine. Updated information on nuclear medicine and molecular imaging are vitally important and useful to both trainees and existing practitioners. Imaging techniques and agents are advancing and changing so rapidly that concise and pertinent information are absolutely necessary and helpful. It is hoped that this handbook will help readers be better equipped for the utilization of new imaging methods and treatments using radiopharmaceuticals.

  3. Promoting integrative medicine by computerization of traditional Chinese medicine for scientific research and clinical practice: The SuiteTCM Project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arthur de Sá Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Chinese and contemporary Western medical practices evolved on different cultures and historical contexts and,therefore,their medical knowledge represents this cultural divergence.Computerization of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is being used to promote the integrative medicine to manage,process and integrate the knowledge related to TCM anatomy,physiology,semiology,pathophysiology,and therapy.METHODS:We proposed the development of the SuiteTCM software,a collection of integrated computational models mainly derived from epidemiology and statistical sciences for computerization of Chinese medicine scientific research and clinical practice in all levels of prevention.The software includes components for data management (DataTCM),simulation of cases (SimTCM),analyses and validation of datasets (SciTCM),clinical examination and pattern differentiation (DiagTCM,Tongue TCM,and Pulse TCM),intervention selection (AcuTCM,HerbsTCM,and DietTCM),management of medical records (ProntTCM),epidemiologic investigation of sampled data (ResearchTCM),and medical education,training,and assessment (StudentTCM).DISCUSSION:The SuiteTCM project is expected to contribute to the ongoing development of integrative medicine and the applicability of TCM in worldwide scientific research and health care.The SuiteTCM 1.0 runs on Windows XP or later and is freely available for download as an executable application.

  4. Dictionary/handbook of nuclear medicine and clinical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iturralde, M.P. (Univ. of Pretoria and H.S. Verwoerd Hospital, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Pretoria (ZA))

    1989-01-01

    This book covers the following topics: Fundamentals of English medical etymology, Abbreviations, acronyms, symbols, denotations, and signs commonly used or defined in the dictionary, Characteristics of the elements, Characteristics of practicable radioisotopes and of selected radionuclides commonly used in nuclear medicine, Properties and production of radionuclides, Radioactive decay, Radiopharmaceuticals, and Radiation dosimetry.

  5. Navigating legal constraints in clinical data warehousing: a case study in personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferys, Benjamin R; Nwankwo, Iheanyi; Neri, Elias; Chang, David C W; Shamardin, Lev; Hänold, Stefanie; Graf, Norbert; Forgó, Nikolaus; Coveney, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Personalized medicine relies in part upon comprehensive data on patient treatment and outcomes, both for analysis leading to improved models that provide the basis for enhanced treatment, and for direct use in clinical decision-making. A data warehouse is an information technology for combining and standardizing multiple databases. Data warehousing of clinical data is constrained by many legal and ethical considerations, owing to the sensitive nature of the data being stored. We describe an unconstrained clinical data warehousing architecture, some of the legal constraints that have led us to reconsider this architecture, and the legal and technical solutions to these constraints developed for the clinical data warehouse in the personalized medicine project p-medicine. We also propose some changes to the legal constraints that will further enable clinical research.

  6. Regulation of Clinical Trials with Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Matthias; Anliker, Brigitte; Sanzenbacher, Ralf; Schuele, Silke

    2015-01-01

    In the European Union, clinical trials for Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products are regulated at the national level, in contrast to the situation for a Marketing Authorisation Application, in which a centralised procedure is foreseen for these medicinal products. Although based on a common understanding regarding the regulatory requirement to be fulfilled before conduct of a clinical trial with an Advanced Therapy Investigational Medicinal Product, the procedures and partly the scientific requirements for approval of a clinical trial application differ between the European Union Member States. This chapter will thus give an overview about the path to be followed for a clinical trial application and the subsequent approval process for an Advanced Therapy Investigational Medicinal Product in Germany and will describe the role of the stakeholders that are involved. In addition, important aspects of manufacturing, quality control and non-clinical testing of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products in the clinical development phase are discussed. Finally, current and future approaches for harmonisation of clinical trial authorisation between European Union Member States are summarised.

  7. Does the Concept of the “Flipped Classroom” Extend to the Emergency Medicine Clinical Clerkship?

    OpenAIRE

    Corey Heitz; Melanie Prusakowski; George Willis; Christopher Franck

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Linking educational objectives and clinical learning during clerkships can be difficult. Clinical shifts during emergency medicine (EM) clerkships provide a wide variety of experiences, some of which may not be relevant to recommended educational objectives. Students can be directed to standardize their clinical experiences, and this improves performance on examinations. We hypothesized that applying a “flipped classroom” model to the clinical clerkship would improve performance...

  8. Significance of Kampo, Japanese Traditional Medicine, in the Treatment of Obesity: Basic and Clinical Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-ichi Yamakawa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The cause of obesity includes genetic and environmental factors, including cytokines derived from adipocytes (adipo-cytokines. Although drug therapy is available for obesity, it is highly risky. Our main focus in this review is on the traditional form of Japanese medicine, Kampo, in the treated of obesity. Two Kampo formulas, that is, bofutsushosan (防風通聖散 and boiogito (防己黄耆湯, are covered by the national health insurance in Japan for the treatment of obesity. Various issues related to their action mechanisms remain unsolved. Considering these, we described the results of basic experiments and presented clinical evidence and case reports on osteoarthritis as examples of clinical application of their two Kampo medicine. Traditional medicine is used not only for treatment but also for prevention. In clinical practice, it is of great importance to prove the efficacy of combinations of traditional medicine and Western medicine and the utility of traditional medicine in the attenuation of adverse effects of Western medicine.

  9. A Lifestyle Medicine Clinic in a Community Pharmacy Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas L. Lenz, PharmD; Jessica Skradski, PharmD; Maryann Z. Skrabal, PharmD, CDE; Liz Ferguson, MA; Michael S. Monaghan, PharmD, BCPS

    2010-01-01

    Chronic diseases continue to be a significant burden to the health care system. Pharmacists have been able to show that drugtherapy for patients with chronic diseases can be improved through medication therapy management (MTM) services but have yet to become significantly involved in implementing lifestyle modification programs to further control and prevent chronic conditions. A novel and innovative lifestyle medicine program was started by pharmacists in a community pharmacy in 2008 to mo...

  10. Clinical oncology and palliative medicine as a combined specialty--a unique model in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Rebecca; Wong, Kam-Hung; Yuen, Kwok-Keung; Wong, Ka-Yan; Yau, Yvonne; Lo, Sing-Hung; Liu, Rico

    2015-07-01

    The importance of early integration of palliative care (PC) into oncology treatment is increasingly being recognized. However, there is no consensus on what is the optimal way of integration. This article describes a unique model in Hong Kong where clinical oncology and palliative medicine (PM) is integrated through the development of PM as a subspecialty under clinical oncology.

  11. [Construction of Research-Oriented State Key Clinical Department by Highlighting the Characteris- tics and Advantages of Chinese Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shi-yu; Guo, Li-heng; Han, Yun; Li, Jian; Zhang, Min-zhou

    2016-04-01

    As the largest research-oriented specialty department in national traditional Chinese medicine hospitals, the Department of Critical Care Medicine in Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine insists on the development mode combined with clinical medicine and scientific research. By taking clinical and basic researches for integrative medicine preventing and treating acute myocardial in-farction and sepsis as a breakthrough, authors explored key problems of Chinese medicine in improving the prognosis related diseases and patients' quality of life. In recent 3 years our department has successively become the principal unit of the national key specialties cooperative group of critical care medicine (awarded by State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine), the key clinical specialties (awarded by National Health and Family Planning Commission), and Guangzhou key laboratory construction unit, and achieved overall lap in clinical medical treatment, personnel training, scientific research, and social service.

  12. [Construction and implementation of quality control index for clinical safety of Chinese medicine injection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jun-jie; Xie, Yan-ming

    2015-12-01

    In order to ensure the authenticity and accuracy of traditional Chinese medicine injection safety monitoring data, Chinese medicine injection safety monitoring quality control indicators, including the monitoring center, monitoring personnel, hardware conditions, monitoring progress and the number of patients into the group, original documents and archives management, electronic data, adverse events, quality management were constructed. Its application in the creation of major new drugs technology major projects, 10 kinds of traditional Chinese medicine injections clinical safety monitoring quality control work, found the missing case surveillance, not reported adverse events, only reported adverse reactions, electronic data reporting lag, lack of level of efforts to control the problem, and corrected, the traditional Chinese medicine injection safety monitoring of quality control and quality assurance, and subsequent Chinese medicine safety monitoring quality control to provide the reference. PMID:27245020

  13. The clinical study on the cased of Herpes Zoster Treated with Korean Oriental Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Wook Kim

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective : These case study were made to evaluate and observe the treatment for the Herpes-Zoster through the korean oriental medicine. Method : Clinical observation and analysis about 4 cases of Herpes-zoster including the Ramsay's-hunt syndrome had been done the patients of the Sang-Ji Oriental Medicine Hospital. These cases were mainly treated with oriental medicine using the Herb medication, Korean Bee-Venom therapy, Acupuncture and Electro-acupuncture therapy. Acupuncture technic was mainly used Sa-Am acupuncture(Four needle technique. Result : After treatment, all of cases were completely cured without any complication. Conclusion : Based on the clinical results, Korean Oriental Medicine is believed to be effective for treating Herpes-zoster, and further studies should be conducted to provide more valuable information.

  14. Precision manufacturing for clinical-quality regenerative medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David J; Thomas, Robert J; Hourd, Paul C; Chandra, Amit; Ratcliffe, Elizabeth; Liu, Yang; Rayment, Erin A; Archer, J Richard

    2012-08-28

    Innovations in engineering applied to healthcare make a significant difference to people's lives. Market growth is guaranteed by demographics. Regulation and requirements for good manufacturing practice-extreme levels of repeatability and reliability-demand high-precision process and measurement solutions. Emerging technologies using living biological materials add complexity. This paper presents some results of work demonstrating the precision automated manufacture of living materials, particularly the expansion of populations of human stem cells for therapeutic use as regenerative medicines. The paper also describes quality engineering techniques for precision process design and improvement, and identifies the requirements for manufacturing technology and measurement systems evolution for such therapies.

  15. Essentials of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellowship: Part 4: Beyond Clinical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Margaret; Carney, Michele; Eldridge, Charles; Zaveri, Pavan; Kou, Maybelle

    2016-08-01

    This article is the third in a 7-part series that aims to comprehensively describe the current state and future directions of pediatric emergency medicine fellowship training from the essential requirements to considerations for successfully administering and managing a program to the careers that may be anticipated upon program completion. This article focuses on the skills beyond clinical training required of pediatric emergency medicine physicians including teaching, leadership, teamwork, and communication. PMID:27490731

  16. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Developing from Asthma, Allergy, and Eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows how consciousness-based holistic medicine can be used in the case of asthma, allergy, and eczema. We have many fine drugs to relieve patients from the worst of these symptoms, where many children and adults suffer health problems related to hyper-reactivity of the immune system. Many symptoms remain throughout life because the drugs do not cure the allergy and allergy today is the sixth leading cause of chronic illness. The etiology of the immune disturbances is mostly unknown from a biomedical perspective. Consciousness-based holistic medicine could therefore be used to treat these diseases if the patient is willing to confront hidden existential pain, is motivated to work hard, and is dedicated to improve quality of life, quality of working life, and personal relationships. Improving quality of life is not always an easy job for the patient, but it can be done with coaching from the physician. An increased physical health is often observed after only a few sessions with a physician skilled in using holistic medical tools and able to coach the patient successfully through a few weeks of dedicated homework. Children with allergy and asthma can also be helped if their parents are able to do work on personal development, to improve the general quality of life in the family and their relationship with the child.

  17. [Sample size calculation in clinical post-marketing evaluation of traditional Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yingkun; Xie, Yanming

    2011-10-01

    In recent years, as the Chinese government and people pay more attention on the post-marketing research of Chinese Medicine, part of traditional Chinese medicine breed has or is about to begin after the listing of post-marketing evaluation study. In the post-marketing evaluation design, sample size calculation plays a decisive role. It not only ensures the accuracy and reliability of post-marketing evaluation. but also assures that the intended trials will have a desired power for correctly detecting a clinically meaningful difference of different medicine under study if such a difference truly exists. Up to now, there is no systemic method of sample size calculation in view of the traditional Chinese medicine. In this paper, according to the basic method of sample size calculation and the characteristic of the traditional Chinese medicine clinical evaluation, the sample size calculation methods of the Chinese medicine efficacy and safety are discussed respectively. We hope the paper would be beneficial to medical researchers, and pharmaceutical scientists who are engaged in the areas of Chinese medicine research. PMID:22292397

  18. Clinical implications for substandard, nonproprietary medicines in multiple sclerosis: focus on fingolimod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correale, Jorge; Chiquete, Erwin; Boyko, Alexey; Beran, Roy G; Strauch, Jorge Barahona; Milojevic, Snezana; Frider, Nadina

    2016-01-01

    Both proprietary and nonproprietary medicines are expected to undergo rigorous preapproval testing and both should meet stringent health authority regulatory requirements related to quality to obtain approval. Nonproprietary (also known as copy, or generic) medicines, which base their authorization and use on the proprietary documentation and label, are often viewed as a means to help lower the cost and, thus, increase patient access. If these medicines fail to meet quality standards, such as good manufacturing practice and bioequivalence (in humans), they are then defined as substandard copies and can pose serious risks to patients in terms of safety and efficacy. Potentially noncontrolled or different manufacturing process and excipients in nonproprietary medicines may result in poor batch-to-batch reproducibility (accurate and consistent quantity of each ingredient in each capsule/tablet) and lower quality. Substandard, nonproprietary copies of medicines that are immunomodulatory or immunosuppressive are of concern to patients due to their possible untoward safety and lack of efficacy events. This article reviews the potential risks associated with nonproprietary medicines that do not meet the regulatory requirements of the United States Food and Drug Administration, the European Medicines Agency, or the World Health Organization. The clinical implications for patients are described. This article focuses on nonproprietary medicines for multiple sclerosis, particularly fingolimod, that are not identical to proprietary versions and could thus fail to meet efficacy expectations or have different impact on the safety of patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:27418809

  19. Translational medicine as a new clinical tool and application which improves metabolic diseases: perspectives from 2012 Sino-American symposium on clinical and translational medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Lin; López Villar, Elena; Chen, Chengshui

    2014-01-01

    Because of the economic growth and changes in lifestyle, metabolic diseases have become a major public health problem, which impose heavy economic burdens on individuals, families and health systems. However, its precise mediators and mechanisms remain to be fully understood. Clinical translational medicine (CTM) is an emerging area comprising multidisciplinary research from basic science to medical applications and as a new tool to improve human health by reducing disease incidence, morbidit...

  20. Medicine for children: The European initiative in the regulation of new drugs and clinical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živković Zorica

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two years, a special field named the "Medicine for Children" has been intensively developed. It is particularly significant for professionals, parents, but also for politicians and high-level officials of the European Union and its constitutive institutions: the European Health Commission and the European Council. The main idea is to make a drastic change in the attitude toward children, as the most vulnerable members of the society, namely to create the "Medicine for Children" instead of the "Medicine in Children". This short report presents the draft and ideas of the new European legislation on the application of drugs for children, performance of clinical studies in pediatric population and mandatory inclusion into the international network of scientific experts, clinical centers capable of performing studies and the already completed or ongoing clinical study registers.

  1. [Research on establishment of clinical safety intensive hospital monitoring net of traditional Chinese medicine injection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lian-Xin; Xie, Yan-Ming; Wang, Zhi-Fei

    2012-09-01

    The establishment of clinical safety monitoring net of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) injection is the one of the key issues of the monitoring work. The monitoring net is including varieties of types of net, such as clinical monitoring net, multimedia network platform, the net of experts or talents. The paper will introduce the establishing method of clinical safety monitoring net, the establishing of clinical safety monitoring net, and the establishing of network based on the internet, the knowledge network construction of experts, the net construction of talents are all included, to assure the development for clinical safety monitoring work.

  2. [Establish research model of post-marketing clinical safety evaluation for Chinese patent medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wen-ke; Liu, Zhi; Lei, Xiang; Tian, Ran; Zheng, Rui; Li, Nan; Ren, Jing-tian; Du, Xiao-xi; Shang, Hong-cai

    2015-09-01

    The safety of Chinese patent medicine has become a focus of social. It is necessary to carry out work on post-marketing clinical safety evaluation for Chinese patent medicine. However, there have no criterions to guide the related research, it is urgent to set up a model and method to guide the practice for related research. According to a series of clinical research, we put forward some views, which contained clear and definite the objective and content of clinical safety evaluation, the work flow should be determined, make a list of items for safety evaluation project, and put forward the three level classification of risk control. We set up a model of post-marketing clinical safety evaluation for Chinese patent medicine. Based this model, the list of items can be used for ranking medicine risks, and then take steps for different risks, aims to lower the app:ds:risksrisk level. At last, the medicine can be managed by five steps in sequence. The five steps are, collect risk signal, risk recognition, risk assessment, risk management, and aftereffect assessment. We hope to provide new ideas for the future research. PMID:26983223

  3. Rehabilitation Medicine in a Small Clinic: Effort of a private clinic with small inpatient facility in a province of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Ken

    2012-05-01

    Dyna Rehabilitation Clinic is a small clinic located in Tochigi (Japan) with a capacity of 19 patients, serving as the core facility in providing borderless and seamless care in medicine, rehabilitation medicine, and long-term care; from inpatient rehabilitation for recovering patients to home-visit medical services and long-term care, including terminal care. In Japan, the managing physician of an authorized clinic with small inpatient facilities lives within the clinic's property or in the land adjacent to it and attends the inpatients while responding to local medical needs on a 24-hour basis, reflecting local climate, communities, and culture. Unlike a large-scale hospital, a clinic with a small-scale inpatient facilities specialized in rehabilitation with close links to local communities can still survive as a business and contribute to local society - Dyna Rehabilitation Clinic is a good example. Patients vary in their diseases, complications, age, family structure, living environment, financial status, sense of values, and the lives they lead. It is impossible to meet all such needs with one standard rehabilitation scheme - but, clinics with small inpatient facilities, such as Dyna Rehabilitation Clinic, can provide more treatment more flexibly, and fill in the gap.

  4. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Holistic Treatment of Rape and Incest Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies indicate that at least 15% of the female population in western countries has experienced sexual abuse and severe sexual traumas. This paper explains how even serious sexual abuse and trauma can be healed when care and resources encourage the patient to return to the painful life events. When the physician cares and receives the trust of the patient, emotional holding and processing will follow quite naturally. Spontaneous regression seems to be an almost pain-free way of integrating the severe traumas from earlier experiences of rape and incest. This technique is a recommended alternative to classical timeline therapy using therapeutic commands. When traumatized patients distance themselves from their soul (feelings, sexuality, and existential depth, they often lose their energy and enjoyment of life. However, this does not mean that they are lost to life. Although it may seem paradoxical, a severe trauma may be a unique opportunity to regain enjoyment of life. The patient will often be richly rewarded for the extensive work of clearing and sorting out in order to experience a new depth in his or her existence and emotional life, with a new ability to understand life in general and other people in particular. So what may look like a tragedy can be transformed into a unique gift; if the patient gets sufficient support, there is the possibility of healing and learning. Consciousness-based medicine seems to provide severely traumatized patients with the quality of support and care needed for their soul to heal.

  5. Objective Structured Clinical Examinations Provide Valid Clinical Skills Assessment in Emergency Medicine Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wallenstein, Joshua

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Evaluation of emergency medicine (EM learners based on observed performance in the emergency department (ED is limited by factors such as reproducibility and patient safety. EM educators depend on standardized and reproducible assessments such as the objective structured clinical examination (OSCE. The validity of the OSCE as an evaluation tool in EM education has not been previously studied. The objective was to assess the validity of a novel management-focused OSCE as an evaluation instrument in EM education through demonstration of performance correlation with established assessment methods and case item analysis. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study of fourth-year medical students enrolled in a required EM clerkship. Students enrolled in the clerkship completed a five-station EM OSCE. We used Pearson’s coefficient to correlate OSCE performance with performance in the ED based on completed faculty evaluations. Indices of difficulty and discrimination were computed for each scoring item. Results: We found a moderate and statistically-significant correlation between OSCE score and ED performance score [r(239 =0.40, p<0.001]. Of the 34 OSCE testing items the mean index of difficulty was 63.0 (SD =23.0 and the mean index of discrimination was 0.52 (SD =0.21. Conclusion: Student performance on the OSCE correlated with their observed performance in the ED, and indices of difficulty and differentiation demonstrated alignment with published best-practice testing standards. This evidence, along with other attributes of the OSCE, attest to its validity. Our OSCE can be further improved by modifying testing items that performed poorly and by examining and maximizing the inter-rater reliability of our evaluation instrument. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(1:121–126.

  6. Clinically Available Medicines Demonstrating Anti-Toxoplasma Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Andrew J; Zach, Sydney J; Wang, Xiaofang; Larson, Joshua J; Judge, Abigail K; Davis, Lisa A; Vennerstrom, Jonathan L; Davis, Paul H

    2015-12-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an apicomplexan parasite of humans and other mammals, including livestock and companion animals. While chemotherapeutic regimens, including pyrimethamine and sulfadiazine regimens, ameliorate acute or recrudescent disease such as toxoplasmic encephalitis or ocular toxoplasmosis, these drugs are often toxic to the host. Moreover, no approved options are available to treat infected women who are pregnant. Lastly, no drug regimen has shown the ability to eradicate the chronic stage of infection, which is characterized by chemoresistant intracellular cysts that persist for the life of the host. In an effort to promote additional chemotherapeutic options, we now evaluate clinically available drugs that have shown efficacy in disease models but which lack clinical case reports. Ideally, less-toxic treatments for the acute disease can be identified and developed, with an additional goal of cyst clearance from human and animal hosts. PMID:26392504

  7. Early evolution of the thermometer and application to clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, William F

    2016-02-01

    By the time of Hippocrates and Galen the notion of fevers and temperature were known. Through ensuing centuries, ancient Greek, Roman, and medieval savants and physicians made additional contributions to the understanding of fever, temperature, and thermometry. By the end of that era, there was a working definition of what constitutes a rationale temperature scale, the distinction between fever as a symptom and fever as a disease, an elaborate classification scheme for temperature, hypotheses as to the causes of fever, and methods for measuring fevers. Based on the definition of fever at that time, the 16th century scientist Galileo promulgated production of thermometric instruments hundreds of years before they were routinely used in the clinical setting. In this work we examine the history of fever and clinical thermometry in the ancient world through the end of the eighteenth century with descriptions of instruments for its measure and human relationship to fever. PMID:26857973

  8. Predictive data mining in clinical medicine: Current issues and guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Bellazzi, Riccado; Zupan, Blaz

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The widespread availability of new computational methods and tools for data analysis and predictive modeling requires medical informatics researchers and practitioners to systematically select the most appropriate strategy to cope with clinical prediction problems. In particular, the collection of methods known as 'data mining' offers methodological and technical solutions to deal with the analysis of medical data and construction of prediction models. A large variety of these met...

  9. Thoracic electrical bioimpedance theory and clinical possibilities in perioperative medicine

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    This article is a short review of thoracic electrical bioimpedance (TEB) theory and clinical capabilities. Cardiac output measurement is used primarily to guide therapy in complex, critically ill patients. Thoracic electrical bioimpedance is one of several noninvasive techniques that have been investigated to measure cardiac output and other hemodynamic parameters. Opinions in current literature continue to be conflicting as to the utility of thoracic electrical bioimpedance to that purpose. ...

  10. ATTITUDE AND PERCEPTION OF FACULTIES TOWARDS TEACHING EVIDENCE BASED MEDICINE TO PRE - CLINICAL & PARA - CLINICAL MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavita Patel

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available NTRODUCTION: Evidence - based medicine (EBM is defined as the „conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence‟. It i s an important tool for lifelong learning in medicine, and medical students can develop the skills necessary to understand and use EBM. The teaching of EBM in Sumandeep Vidyapeeth is as part of Evidence Based Education System (EBES. The university has imp lemented the 16 hours of teaching with project work on Evidence Based Medicine in 1st MBBS and 2nd MBBS curriculum in addition to MBBS syllabus. AIMS & OBJECTIVES: This study was planned to take feedback from all the faculties those who are involved in Evi dence based Medicine teaching to evaluate their attitude and perception towards this innovative teaching method and to recommend improvements. MATERIAL & METHODS: A Descriptive, self - structured , pilot pretested questionnaire based cross sectional study was conducted in the year 2013 - 2014 among 40 faculties from 7 Departments like Anatomy, Physiology, Biochemistry, Microbiology, Pharmacology, Pathology and Forensic Medicine teaching Evidence Base d Medicine to students at S.B.K.S MI & RC, Sumandeep Vidyapeeth. Data was expressed as percentage. RESULTS: The response rate for the study was 75%. Almost 87% of faculties agreed that teaching EBM is a welcoming development during pre and para clinical ye ars. About 80% faculties agreed that it will help them in future clinical learning. 87% faculties agreed that literature and research searching improves their day to day teaching. About 77% of faculties have attended workshop and training held in Universit y and 83% of faculties agreed that they are interested in more learning and improving skills necessary to incorporate Evidence based medicine into their discipline. Barriers included shortage of time and need for training in teaching EBM. CONCLUSION: Facul ties of this University teaching Pre - clinical and Para - clinical medical students recognized

  11. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Mental Disorders in a Holistic Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available From a holistic perspective, psychiatric diseases are caused by the patient’s unwillingness to assume responsibility for his life, existence, and personal relations. The loss of responsibility arises from the repression of the fundamental existential dimensions of the patients. Repression of love and purpose causes depersonalization (i.e., a lack of responsibility for being yourself and for the contact with others, loss of direction and purpose in life. Repression of strength in mind and emotions leads to derealization (the breakdown of the reality testing, often with mental delusions and hallucinations. The repression of joy and gender leads to devitalization (emotional emptiness, loss of joy, personal energy, sexuality, and pleasure in life.The losses of existential dimensions are invariably connected to traumas with life-denying decisions. Healing the wounds of the soul by holding and processing will lead to the recovery of the person's character, purpose of life, and existential responsibility. It can be very difficult to help a psychotic patient. The physician must first love his patient unconditionally and then fully understand the patient in order to meet and support the patient to initiate the holistic process of healing. It takes motivation and willingness to suffer on behalf of the patients in order to heal, as the existential and emotional pain of the traumas resulting in insanity is often overwhelming. We believe that most psychiatric diseases can be alleviated or cured by the loving and caring physician who masters the holistic toolbox. Further research is needed to document the effect of holistic medicine in psychiatry.

  12. The mollusks in zootherapy: traditional medicine and clinical-pharmacological importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eraldo Medeiros Costa Neto

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of animals as sources of medicines is a cross-cultural phenomenon that is historically ancient and geographically widespread. This article reviews the use of mollusks in traditional medicine and discusses the clinical and pharmacological importance of these invertebrates. The roles that mollusks play in folk practices related to the healing and/or prevention of illnesses have been recorded in different social-cultural contexts worldwide. The clinical and therapeutic use of compounds coming from different species of mollusks is recorded in the literature. The chemistry of natural products provided by oysters, mussels, clams, sluggards, and snails has been substantially investigated, but the majority of these studies have focused on the subclasses Opistobranchia and Prosobranchia. Research into the knowledge and practices of folk medicine makes possible a better understanding of the interaction between human beings and the environment, in addition to allowing the elaboration of suitable strategies for the conservation of natural resources.

  13. [Summary and analysis of safety warning on clinical application of anti-cold Chinese patent medicine preparations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Xiao-xiao; Lin, Hua; Luo, Yi-ni; Wang, Ying-yan; Duan, Xiao-hong; Wang, Lin; Luo, Rui; Chen, Yan-hong

    2015-04-01

    In China, many surveys have shown that most people do not have a correct understanding about cold and administration of anti-cold Chinese patent medicine preparations. The author conducted a systematic summary and analysis on the actual application of anti-cold Chinese patent medicine preparations as well as the warning on safe application of anti-cold Chinese patent medicine preparations in Clinical Medication Information of China Pharmacopoeia, in the expectation of reducing the blind application of anti-cold Chinese patent medicine preparations and providing traditional Chinese medicine pharmacists new ideas in monitoring the safe application of exterior syndrome-relieving Chinese patent medicine preparations. PMID:26281605

  14. The thinking doctor: clinical decision making in contemporary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Michael; Hamilton, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Diagnostic errors are responsible for a significant number of adverse events. Logical reasoning and good decision-making skills are key factors in reducing such errors, but little emphasis has traditionally been placed on how these thought processes occur, and how errors could be minimised. In this article, we explore key cognitive ideas that underpin clinical decision making and suggest that by employing some simple strategies, physicians might be better able to understand how they make decisions and how the process might be optimised. PMID:27481378

  15. Therapeutic complement inhibition – from experimental to clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappegård, Knut Tore; Bjerre, Anna; Tjønnfjord, Geir Erland; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2015-10-20

    Internationally, the use of the C5-inhibiting monoclonal antibody eculizumab has in the course of just a few years become the first choice of treatment of atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome and the most severe phenotypes of paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria. At present eculizumab is the only complement inhibitor in ordinary clinical use. This despite the fact that there only exists one randomised, placebo-controlled trial of eculizumab for paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria and none for atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome, and that the therapy is very costly. There is reason to believe that complement inhibition as therapy will increase in the future, and that other drugs will also prove to be effective.

  16. Tibetan Medicine: A Systematic Review of the Clinical Research Available in the West

    OpenAIRE

    K. Philip Reuter; Weißhuhn, Thorolf E. R.; Claudia M Witt

    2013-01-01

    Background. Little is known about Tibetan medicine (TM), in Western industrialized countries. Objectives. To provide a systematic review of the clinical studies on TM available in the West. Data Sources. Seven literature databases, published literature lists, citation tracking, and contacts to experts and institutions. Study Eligibility Criteria. Studies in English, German, French, or Spanish presenting clinical trial results. Participants. All patients of the included studies. Interventions....

  17. Identifying low-value clinical practices in critical care medicine: protocol for a scoping review

    OpenAIRE

    Niven, Daniel J; McCormick, T Jared; Straus, Sharon E; Hemmelgarn, Brenda R.; Jeffs, Lianne P.; Stelfox, Henry T

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Reducing unnecessary, low-value clinical practice (ie, de-adoption) is key to improving value for money in healthcare, especially among patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) where resource consumption exceeds other medical and surgical populations. Research suggests that low-value clinical practices are common in medicine, however systematically and objectively identifying them is a widely cited barrier to de-adoption. We will conduct a scoping review to identify low-v...

  18. The EC4 European syllabus for post-graduate training in clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieringa, Gijsbert; Zerah, Simone; Jansen, Rob;

    2012-01-01

    and competencies' division embracing all laboratory medicine disciplines is described. For the first time the syllabus identifies the competencies required to meet clinical leadership demands for defining, directing and assuring the efficiency and effectiveness of laboratory services as well as expectations...

  19. Clinical applications of PET-CT in nuclear medicine to medical specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This regional training course about Clinical Applications of PET-Tc in nuclear medicine include: imaging, pathology, scintigraphy, computed tomography, radiology, endoscopy, magnetic resonance, biopsy, and histology. It also describes pathologies and diseases of organs and bone structures such as: musculoskeletal and osseous damage, tumors, fibroids, metastasize, neoplasm, adenopathies and cancer of liver, brain, glands, kidney, neck, thorax, lungs, uterus, ovaries, craniums, hypophysis etc

  20. Clinical Progress in the Treatment of Severe Acute Pancreatitis with Integrative Chinese and Western Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), one of the crucial acute abdominal diseases, has high mortality for its quick initiation, severe condition, long duration, and frequent complication with multiple organ failure. In this paper, the clinical progress in the treatment of SAP with integrative Chinese and Western medicine is inspected and summarized.

  1. Impact of Pharmacy Student Interventions in an Urban Family Medicine Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Ginzburg, Regina

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To determine the number of interventions made by pharmacy students at an urban family medicine clinic and the acceptance rate of these recommendations by the healthcare providers. The secondary objective was to investigate the cost avoidance value of the interventions.

  2. Characteristics of Ascending, Descending, Floating and Sinking Theor y based on the Concept of Translational Medicine and its Clinical Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xiaohui; Zhai Huaqiang; Wang Wei; Wang Xiaoxia; Zhang Xiaojuan; Zhang Tian

    2013-01-01

    Ascending, descending, lfoating and sinking theory is the summarization for the effects of drugs on the body. Translational medicine establishes a bi-directional conversion channels between clinics and laboratories. This article mainly introduces the relationship between traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) ascending, descending, lfoating and sinking theory and the concept of translational medicine, and how to study this theory based on the concept of translational medicine.

  3. Clinical Holistic Health: Advanced Tools for Holistic Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available According to holistic medical theory, the patient will heal when old painful moments, the traumatic events of life that are often called “gestalts”, are integrated in the present “now”. The advanced holistic physician’s expanded toolbox has many different tools to induce this healing, some that are more dangerous and potentially traumatic than others. The more intense the therapeutic technique, the more emotional energy will be released and contained in the session, but the higher also is the risk for the therapist to lose control of the session and lose the patient to his or her own dark side. To avoid harming the patient must be the highest priority in holistic existential therapy, making sufficient education and training an issue of highest importance. The concept of “stepping up” the therapy by using more and more “dramatic” methods to get access to repressed emotions and events has led us to a “therapeutic staircase” with ten steps: (1 establishing the relationship; (2 establishing intimacy, trust, and confidentiality; (3 giving support and holding; (4 taking the patient into the process of physical, emotional, and mental healing; (5 social healing of being in the family; (6 spiritual healing — returning to the abstract wholeness of the soul; (7 healing the informational layer of the body; (8 healing the three fundamental dimensions of existence: love, power, and sexuality in a direct way using, among other techniques, “controlled violence” and “acupressure through the vagina”; (9 mind-expanding and consciousness-transformative techniques like psychotropic drugs; and (10 techniques transgressing the patient's borders and, therefore, often traumatizing (for instance, the use of force against the will of the patient.We believe that the systematic use of the staircase will greatly improve the power and efficiency of holistic medicine for the patient and we invite a broad cooperation in scientifically testing the

  4. Clinical implications for substandard, nonproprietary medicines in multiple sclerosis: focus on fingolimod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Correale J

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Jorge Correale,1 Erwin Chiquete,2 Alexey Boyko,3 Roy G Beran,4–6 Jorge Barahona Strauch,7,8 Snezana Milojevic,9 Nadina Frider101Department of Neurology, Raúl Carrea Institute for Neurological Research, Foundation for the Fight against Infant Neurological Illnesses (FLENI, Buenos Aires, Argentina; 2Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Salvador Zubirán National Institute of Medical Sciences and Nutrition, Mexico City, Mexico; 3Clinical and Research Center “MS and Other Demyelinating Diseases” at the Neuroclinical Hospital, Department of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Medical Genetics of the Pirogov Russian National Research Medical University, Moscow, Russia; 4South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Liverpool, 5Department of Neurology, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW, 6School of Medicine, Griffith University, Southport, QLD, Australia; 7Department of Neurology, Clínica Alemana de Santiago, 8School of Medicine, Universidad del Desarrollo, Santiago, Chile; 9Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland; 10Novartis Latin America and Canada Region, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaAbstract: Both proprietary and nonproprietary medicines are expected to undergo rigorous preapproval testing and both should meet stringent health authority regulatory requirements related to quality to obtain approval. Nonproprietary (also known as copy, or generic medicines, which base their authorization and use on the proprietary documentation and label, are often viewed as a means to help lower the cost and, thus, increase patient access. If these medicines fail to meet quality standards, such as good manufacturing practice and bioequivalence (in humans, they are then defined as substandard copies and can pose serious risks to patients in terms of safety and efficacy. Potentially noncontrolled or different manufacturing process and excipients in nonproprietary medicines may result in poor batch-to-batch reproducibility (accurate and consistent quantity of

  5. Curcumin: from ancient medicine to current clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, H; Planalp, R; Cho, J; Torti, F M; Torti, S V

    2008-06-01

    Curcumin is the active ingredient in the traditional herbal remedy and dietary spice turmeric (Curcuma longa). Curcumin has a surprisingly wide range of beneficial properties, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activity. The pleiotropic activities of curcumin derive from its complex chemistry as well as its ability to influence multiple signaling pathways, including survival pathways such as those regulated by NF-kappaB, Akt, and growth factors; cytoprotective pathways dependent on Nrf2; and metastatic and angiogenic pathways. Curcumin is a free radical scavenger and hydrogen donor, and exhibits both pro- and antioxidant activity. It also binds metals, particularly iron and copper, and can function as an iron chelator. Curcumin is remarkably non-toxic and exhibits limited bioavailability. Curcumin exhibits great promise as a therapeutic agent, and is currently in human clinical trials for a variety of conditions, including multiple myeloma, pancreatic cancer, myelodysplastic syndromes, colon cancer, psoriasis and Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Targeting cancer epigenetics: Linking basic biology to clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinjo, Keiko; Kondo, Yutaka

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies provide compelling evidence that epigenetic dysregulation is involved in almost every step of tumor development and progression. Differences in tumor behavior, which ultimately reflects clinical outcome, can be explained by variations in gene expression patterns generated by epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation. Therefore, epigenetic abnormalities are considered potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. DNA methylation is stable at certain specific loci in cancer cells and predominantly reflects the characteristic clinicopathological features. Thus, it is an ideal biomarker for cancer screening, classification and prognostic purposes. Epigenetic treatment for cancers is based on the pharmacologic targeting of various core transcriptional programs that sustains cancer cell identity. Therefore, targeting aberrant epigenetic modifiers may be effective for multiple processes compared with using a selective inhibitor of aberrant single signaling pathway. This review provides an overview of the epigenetic alterations in human cancers and discusses about novel therapeutic strategies targeting epigenetic alterations.

  7. A review of clinical trials of lithium in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, C Y

    1984-01-01

    Since the approval of lithium use in treatment of acute mania, there have been numerous clinical trials of lithium in medical and psychiatric disorders. This paper gives a brief review of the literature on lithium trials in approximately fourteen medical conditions. These are: hyperthyroidism, metabolizing thyroid cancer, syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone, premenstrual tension syndrome, anorexia nervosa, Felty's syndrome, chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, aplastic anemia, seborrheic dermatitis, eczematoid dermatitis, cyclic vomiting, diabetes mellitus and asthma. Most of the case reports cited showed the efficacy of the side effects from lithium salt in the management of the symptoms and signs of these disorders, however, well-designed and controlled studies give negative results. The positive results are reported in the group of disorders having an underlying subdromal affective syndrome such as premenstrual tension syndrome and anorexia nervosa. Other encouraging reports include the effect of lithium to induce leucocytosis in Felty's syndrome and chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. PMID:6395135

  8. Identification of possible adverse drug reactions in clinical notes:the case of glucose-lowering medicines

    OpenAIRE

    Warrer, Pernille; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup; Aagaard, Lise; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Brunak, Søren; Krag, Malene Hammer; Rossing, Peter; Almdal, Thomas; Andersen, Henrik Ullits; Hansen, Ebba Holme

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Through manual review of clinical notes for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus attending a Danish diabetes center, the aim of the study was to identify adverse drug reactions (ADRs) associated with three classes of glucose-lowering medicines: "Combinations of oral blood-glucose lowering medicines" (A10BD), "dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DDP-4) inhibitors" (A10BH), and "other blood glucose lowering medicines" (A10BX). Specifically, we aimed to describe the potential of clinical notes ...

  9. The European Register of Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine: guide to the Register, version 3-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMurray, Janet; Zérah, Simone; Hallworth, Michael;

    2010-01-01

    In 1997, the European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EC4) set up a Register for European Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. The operation of the Register is undertaken by a Register Commission (EC4RC). During the last 12 years, more...

  10. LMNA cardiomyopathy: cell biology and genetics meet clinical medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan T. Lu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes A-type nuclear lamins (intermediate filament proteins expressed in most differentiated somatic cells, cause a diverse range of diseases, called laminopathies, that selectively affect different tissues and organ systems. The most prevalent laminopathy is cardiomyopathy with or without different types of skeletal muscular dystrophy. LMNA cardiomyopathy has an aggressive clinical course with higher rates of deadly arrhythmias and heart failure than most other heart diseases. As awareness among physicians increases, and advances in DNA sequencing methods make the genetic diagnosis of LMNA cardiomyopathy more common, cardiologists are being faced with difficult questions regarding patient management. These questions concern the optimal use of intracardiac cardioverter defibrillators to prevent sudden death from arrhythmias, and medical interventions to prevent heart damage and ameliorate heart failure symptoms. Data from a mouse model of LMNA cardiomyopathy suggest that inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways are beneficial in preventing and treating cardiac dysfunction; this basic research discovery needs to be translated to human patients.

  11. The European Register of Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine: guide to the Register, version 3-2010.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McMurray, Janet

    2010-07-01

    In 1997, the European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EC4) set up a Register for European Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. The operation of the Register is undertaken by a Register Commission (EC4RC). During the last 12 years, more than 2200 specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine have joined the Register. In 2007, EC4 merged with the Forum of European Societies of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (FESCC) to form the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFCC). Two previous Guides to the Register have been published, one in 1997 and another in 2003. The third version of the Guide is presented in this article and is based on the experience gained and development of the profession since the last revision. Registration is valid for 5 years and the procedure and criteria for re-registration are presented as an Appendix at the end of the article.

  12. The European Register of Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine: Code of Conduct, Version 2--2008.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McMurray, Janet

    2009-01-01

    In 1997, the European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EC4) set up a Register for European Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. The operation of the Register is undertaken by a Register Commission (EC4RC). During the last 10 years, more than 2000 specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine have joined the Register. In 2007, EC4 merged with the Federation of European Societies of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (FESCC) to form the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFCC). A Code of Conduct was adopted in 2003 and a revised and updated version, taking account particularly of the guidelines of the Conseil Européen des Professions Libérales (CEPLIS) of which EFCC is a member, is presented in this article. The revised version was approved by the EC4 Register Commission and by the EFCC Executive Board in Paris on 6 November, 2008.

  13. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Social Problems Disguised as Illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Many of the diseases seen in the clinic are actually symptoms of social problems. It is often easier for the physician to treat the symptoms than to be a coach and help the patient to assume responsibility in order to improve quality of life, social situation, and relations. If the physician ignores the signs of the disease as a symptom of social problems, and treats the patient with pharmaceuticals, he can give the patient the best justification in the world not to do anything about the situation. It is very important that the physician is not tricked by the games the socially troubled patient, more or less unconsciously, is playing. A firm and wise attitude that confronts the patient with his or her lack of responsibility for solving social problems seems to be a constructive way out. The physician can give holding and support, but the responsibility must remain with the patient. Often it is better for the patient that the physician abstains from giving drugs that can remedy the symptoms and takes the role of a coach instead. Suffering is not necessarily bad, suffering is actually highly motivating and often the most efficient source of learning. Coaching can help the patient canalize his motivation into highly constructive considerations and behavior. A holistic approach thus gives the patient learning and helps him rehabilitate his social reality. Concerning children with recurrent or chronic pain, we have observed an overuse of painkillers, where we believe part is of a psychosomatic nature due to poor thriving in the family. Here the physician has an important job helping the parents to develop as persons, teaching them the basic holding of awareness, respect, care, acknowledgment and acceptance of their child. Most of the chronic pain and discomfort with children can be improved if the physician understands how to use the holistic medical toolbox.

  14. Bioinformatics Workflow for Clinical Whole Genome Sequencing at Partners HealthCare Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen A. Tsai

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Effective implementation of precision medicine will be enhanced by a thorough understanding of each patient’s genetic composition to better treat his or her presenting symptoms or mitigate the onset of disease. This ideally includes the sequence information of a complete genome for each individual. At Partners HealthCare Personalized Medicine, we have developed a clinical process for whole genome sequencing (WGS with application in both healthy individuals and those with disease. In this manuscript, we will describe our bioinformatics strategy to efficiently process and deliver genomic data to geneticists for clinical interpretation. We describe the handling of data from FASTQ to the final variant list for clinical review for the final report. We will also discuss our methodology for validating this workflow and the cost implications of running WGS.

  15. Bioinformatics Workflow for Clinical Whole Genome Sequencing at Partners HealthCare Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ellen A; Shakbatyan, Rimma; Evans, Jason; Rossetti, Peter; Graham, Chet; Sharma, Himanshu; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Lebo, Matthew S

    2016-01-01

    Effective implementation of precision medicine will be enhanced by a thorough understanding of each patient's genetic composition to better treat his or her presenting symptoms or mitigate the onset of disease. This ideally includes the sequence information of a complete genome for each individual. At Partners HealthCare Personalized Medicine, we have developed a clinical process for whole genome sequencing (WGS) with application in both healthy individuals and those with disease. In this manuscript, we will describe our bioinformatics strategy to efficiently process and deliver genomic data to geneticists for clinical interpretation. We describe the handling of data from FASTQ to the final variant list for clinical review for the final report. We will also discuss our methodology for validating this workflow and the cost implications of running WGS. PMID:26927186

  16. Clinical Study on Treatment of Hyperuricaemia by Retention Enema of Chinese Herbal Medicine Combined with Allopurinol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈茜; 马丽; 阿克拜尔·乌普

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of retention enema of Chinese herbal medicine combined with allopurinol in treating hyperuricaemia(HUE).Methods:Seventy-eight patients with HUE were assigned to two groups,the 40 patients in the treated group were treated with retention enema of Chinese herbal medicine combined with oral intake of allopurinol,and the 38 patients in the control group were treated with allopurinol alone. The therapeutic course for all was 6 weeks.The clinical efficacy,changes of symptoms,blood...

  17. Harnessing the potential clinical use of medicinal plants as anti-diabetic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell-Tofte JI

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Joan IA Campbell-Tofte,1 Per Mølgaard,2 Kaj Winther11Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Frederiksberg University Hospital, Frederiksberg, Denmark; 2Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, DenmarkAbstract: Diabetes is a metabolic disorder arising from complex interactions between multiple genetic and/or environmental factors. The characteristic high blood sugar levels result from either lack of the hormone insulin (type 1 diabetes, T1D, or because body tissues do not respond to the hormone (type 2 diabetes, T2D. T1D patients currently need exogenous insulin for life, while for T2D patients who do not respond to diet and exercise regimes, oral anti-diabetic drugs (OADs and sometimes insulin are administered to help keep their blood glucose as normal as possible. As neither the administration of insulin nor OADs is curative, many patients develop tissue degenerative processes that result in life-threatening diabetes comorbidities. Several surveys of medicinal plants used as anti-diabetic agents amongst different peoples have been published. Some of this interest is driven by the ongoing diabetes pandemic coupled with the inadequacies associated with the current state of-the-art care and management of the syndrome. However, there is a huge cleft between traditional medicine and modern (Western medicine, with the latter understandably demanding meaningful and scientific validation of anecdotal evidence for acceptance of the former. The main problems for clinical evaluation of medicinal plants with promising anti-diabetic properties reside both with the complexity of components of the plant materials and with the lack of full understanding of the diabetes disease etiology. This review is therefore focused on why research activities involving an integration of Systems Biology-based technologies of pharmacogenomics, metabolomics, and bioinformatics with standard clinical data

  18. The Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania: an organizational model for clinical research in a school of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Brian L; Kelly, Thomas O; Landis, J Richard; Feldman, Harold I

    2012-01-01

    A new model for the conduct of clinical research was established at the University of Pennsylvania (Penn) School of Medicine, now the Perelman School of Medicine, through the development of the interdepartmental Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics in 1993 and the basic science Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology in 1994. The authors describe the development and evolution of these novel structures.Five key objectives were achieved with these structures' creation: (1) Clinical faculty have the opportunity to be identified as both clinicians and epidemiologists, (2) nonclinical faculty have an academic "home," (3) clinical trainees are now educated in population medicine, which promotes its incorporation into their clinical practice, (4) population medicine and clinical medicine have become fully integrated, and (5) better epidemiologic research is conducted, informed by clinical insights.Today's center is the primary home for epidemiology and biostatistics at Penn, linking epidemiology, biostatistics, clinical medicine, and the health sciences. The center's core faculty manage their own research programs, conduct primary research in epidemiology and biostatistics, serve as members of collaborative research teams, manage cores and service centers that support research projects, and lead graduate training programs in epidemiology and biostatistics. The department provides an academic home and structure for faculty, provides primary research in epidemiology and biostatistics, supports the center's mission, and provides training in biostatistics. This organizational approach has wide applicability across schools of medicine in the United States and abroad and has been a model for many.

  19. Helen Flanders Dunbar, John Dewey, and clinical pragmatism: reflections on method in psychosomatic medicine and bioethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Curtis W

    2002-01-01

    This article outlines the method utilized by physicians and major figures in the founding of Clinical Pastoral Education, Helen Flanders Dunbar, in her work of 1943, Psychosomatic Diagnosis, and relates it to the currently evolving approach in bioethics known as clinical pragmatism. It assesses Dewey's influence on both Dunbar in psychosomatic medicine and clinical pragmatism in bioethics, and illustrates the breadth of influence of the school of philosophical thought known as pragmatism with which Dewey's name and those of William James and Charles Sanders Pierce are most often identified. PMID:12385140

  20. Clinical implications of omics and systems medicine: focus on predictive and individualized treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, M

    2016-03-01

    Many patients with common diseases do not respond to treatment. This is a key challenge to modern health care, which causes both suffering and enormous costs. One important reason for the lack of treatment response is that common diseases are associated with altered interactions between thousands of genes, in combinations that differ between subgroups of patients who do or do not respond to a given treatment. Such subgroups, or even distinct disease entities, have been described recently in asthma, diabetes, autoimmune diseases and cancer. High-throughput techniques (omics) allow identification and characterization of such subgroups or entities. This may have important clinical implications, such as identification of diagnostic markers for individualized medicine, as well as new therapeutic targets for patients who do not respond to existing drugs. For example, whole-genome sequencing may be applied to more accurately guide treatment of neurodevelopmental diseases, or to identify drugs specifically targeting mutated genes in cancer. A study published in 2015 showed that 28% of hepatocellular carcinomas contained mutated genes that potentially could be targeted by drugs already approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. A translational study, which is described in detail, showed how combined omics, computational, functional and clinical studies could identify and validate a novel diagnostic and therapeutic candidate gene in allergy. Another important clinical implication is the identification of potential diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets for predictive and preventative medicine. By combining computational and experimental methods, early disease regulators may be identified and potentially used to predict and treat disease before it becomes symptomatic. Systems medicine is an emerging discipline, which may contribute to such developments through combining omics with computational, functional and clinical studies. The aims of this review are to provide

  1. 3D Reconstruction from X-ray Fluoroscopy for Clinical Veterinary Medicine using Differential Volume Rendering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khongsomboon, Khamphong; Hamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kondo, Shozo

    3D reconstruction from ordinary X-ray equipment which is not CT or MRI is required in clinical veterinary medicine. Authors have already proposed a 3D reconstruction technique from X-ray photograph to present bone structure. Although the reconstruction is useful for veterinary medicine, the thechnique has two problems. One is about exposure of X-ray and the other is about data acquisition process. An x-ray equipment which is not special one but can solve the problems is X-ray fluoroscopy. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a method for 3D-reconstruction from X-ray fluoroscopy for clinical veterinary medicine. Fluoroscopy is usually used to observe a movement of organ or to identify a position of organ for surgery by weak X-ray intensity. Since fluoroscopy can output a observed result as movie, the previous two problems which are caused by use of X-ray photograph can be solved. However, a new problem arises due to weak X-ray intensity. Although fluoroscopy can present information of not only bone structure but soft tissues, the contrast is very low and it is very difficult to recognize some soft tissues. It is very useful to be able to observe not only bone structure but soft tissues clearly by ordinary X-ray equipment in the field of clinical veterinary medicine. To solve this problem, this paper proposes a new method to determine opacity in volume rendering process. The opacity is determined according to 3D differential coefficient of 3D reconstruction. This differential volume rendering can present a 3D structure image of multiple organs volumetrically and clearly for clinical veterinary medicine. This paper shows results of simulation and experimental investigation of small dog and evaluation by veterinarians.

  2. Patients visiting the complementary medicine clinic for pain: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Press Yan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain is one of the most common reasons for seeking medical care. The purpose of this study was to characterize patients visiting the complementary medicine clinic for a pain complaint. Methods This is a cross-sectional study. The study took place at Clalit Health Services (CHS complementary clinic in Beer-Sheva, Israel. Patients visiting the complementary clinic, aged 18 years old and older, Hebrew speakers, with a main complaint of pain were included. Patients were recruited consecutively on random days of the month during a period of six months. Main outcome measures were: pain levels, location of pain, and interference with daily activities. Once informed consent was signed patients were interviewed using a structured questionnaire by a qualified nurse. The questionnaire included socio-demographic data, and the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI. Results Three-hundred and ninety-five patients were seen at the complementary medicine clinic during the study period, 201 (50.8% of them met the inclusion criteria. Of them, 163 (81.1% agreed to participate in the study and were interviewed. Pain complaints included: 69 patients (46.6% with back pain, 65 (43.9% knee pain, and 28 (32.4% other limbs pain. Eighty-two patients (50.3% treated their pain with complementary medicine as a supplement for their conventional treatment, and 55 (33.7% felt disappointed from the conventional medicine experience. Eighty-three patients (50.9% claimed that complementary medicine can result in better physical strength, or better mental state 51 (31.3%. Thirty-seven patients (22.7% were hoping that complementary medicine will prevent invasive procedures. Conclusion Given the high proportion of patients with unsatisfactory pain relief using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM, general practitioners should gain knowledge about CAM and CAM providers should gain training in pain topics to improve communication and counsel patients. More clinical

  3. Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Nuclear Medicine (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of radiation in human health, for both diagnosis and treatment of disease, is an important component of the work of the IAEA. The responsibility for the increasingly technical aspects of this work is undertaken by the medical physicist. To ensure good practice in this vital area, structured clinical training programmes are required to complement academic learning. This publication is intended to be a guide to the practical implementation of such a programme for nuclear medicine. There is a general and growing awareness that radiation medicine is increasingly dependent on well trained medical physicists who are based in a clinical setting. However an analysis of the availability of medical physicists indicates a large shortfall of qualified and capable professionals. This is particularly evident in developing countries. While strategies to increase educational opportunities are critical to such countries, the need for guidance on structured clinical training was recognized by the members of the Regional Cooperative Agreement for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Science and Technology (RCA) for the Asia-Pacific region. Consequently, a technical cooperation regional project (RAS6038) under the RCA programme was formulated to address this need in this region by developing suitable material and establishing its viability. Development of a clinical training guide for medical physicists specialising in nuclear medicine was started in 2009 with the appointment of a core drafting committee of regional and international experts. The publication drew on the experience of clinical training in Australia, Croatia and Sweden and was moderated by physicists working in the Asian region. The present publication follows the approach of earlier IAEA publications in the Training Course Series, specifically Nos 37 and 47, Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Radiation Oncology and Clinical Training of Medical Physicists

  4. Information management to enable personalized medicine: stakeholder roles in building clinical decision support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinner Kristin M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in technology and the scientific understanding of disease processes are presenting new opportunities to improve health through individualized approaches to patient management referred to as personalized medicine. Future health care strategies that deploy genomic technologies and molecular therapies will bring opportunities to prevent, predict, and pre-empt disease processes but will be dependent on knowledge management capabilities for health care providers that are not currently available. A key cornerstone to the potential application of this knowledge will be effective use of electronic health records. In particular, appropriate clinical use of genomic test results and molecularly-targeted therapies present important challenges in patient management that can be effectively addressed using electronic clinical decision support technologies. Discussion Approaches to shaping future health information needs for personalized medicine were undertaken by a work group of the American Health Information Community. A needs assessment for clinical decision support in electronic health record systems to support personalized medical practices was conducted to guide health future development activities. Further, a suggested action plan was developed for government, researchers and research institutions, developers of electronic information tools (including clinical guidelines, and quality measures, and standards development organizations to meet the needs for personalized approaches to medical practice. In this article, we focus these activities on stakeholder organizations as an operational framework to help identify and coordinate needs and opportunities for clinical decision support tools to enable personalized medicine. Summary This perspective addresses conceptual approaches that can be undertaken to develop and apply clinical decision support in electronic health record systems to achieve personalized medical care. In

  5. Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Nuclear Medicine (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of radiation in human health, for both diagnosis and treatment of disease, is an important component of the work of the IAEA. The responsibility for the increasingly technical aspects of this work is undertaken by the medical physicist. To ensure good practice in this vital area, structured clinical training programmes are required to complement academic learning. This publication is intended to be a guide to the practical implementation of such a programme for nuclear medicine. There is a general and growing awareness that radiation medicine is increasingly dependent on well trained medical physicists who are based in a clinical setting. However an analysis of the availability of medical physicists indicates a large shortfall of qualified and capable professionals. This is particularly evident in developing countries. While strategies to increase educational opportunities are critical to such countries, the need for guidance on structured clinical training was recognized by the members of the Regional Cooperative Agreement for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Science and Technology (RCA) for the Asia-Pacific region. Consequently, a technical cooperation regional project (RAS6038) under the RCA programme was formulated to address this need in this region by developing suitable material and establishing its viability. Development of a clinical training guide for medical physicists specialising in nuclear medicine was started in 2009 with the appointment of a core drafting committee of regional and international experts. The publication drew on the experience of clinical training in Australia, Croatia and Sweden and was moderated by physicists working in the Asian region. The present publication follows the approach of earlier IAEA publications in the Training Course Series, specifically Nos 37 and 47, Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Radiation Oncology and Clinical Training of Medical Physicists

  6. Dynamic Studies with Radioisotopes in Medicine. Proceedings of the Symposium on Dynamics Studies with Radioisotopes in Clinical Medicine and Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observations on the temporal patterns of uptake, metabolism, clearance or excretion of administered radioactive materials form the basis of many important applications of radioisotopes in clinical medicine and research. Such applications include studies of organ function, of regional blood flow and of the turnover of various substances in the human body. Newly available radioisotopes, new instruments such as gamma came ras, new techniques and new methods of data analysis based on the use of analogue and digital computers are continually enlarging the scope of the applications. Progress in these matters was discussed at the Symposium on Dynamic Studies with Radioisotopes in Clinical Medicine and Research, organized by the lnternational Atomic Energy Agency and held in Rotterdam, The Netherlands, from 31 August to 4 September 1970. A total of 315 participants nominated by 39 countries and 4 international organizations attended, and the 70 papers presented cove r the theoretical aspects of dynamic studies, the development of techniques and instruments for such studies, and specific applications in studies of thyroid, renal, hepatic and splenic function, mineral metabolism, regional blood flow, and cardiac and pulmonary function. The proceedings include the full texts of all the papers presented together with the edited discussions. Invited review papers deal with the general aspects of the various main groups of applications covered. Many of the applications described have already reached the stage of routine use; others are still in the developmental stage. Of particular note in the latter connection are applications based on the quantitative analysis of scintillation camera data. The many papers presented on these topics and the ensuing discussions indicate the great interest now shown in this promising area of development. It is hoped that the proceedings will provide a valuable guide to the present status of the subject

  7. [93 YEARS OF CLINICAL EMPATHY, STATE-OF-THE-ART MEDICINE AND RESEARCH EXCELLENCE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Aharon; Odeh, Majed; Rofe, Amnon

    2015-12-01

    This issue of Harefuah is devoted to articles and reviews written by the medical staff of Bnai Zion Medical Center in Haifa. Celebrating 93 years since its inception, Bnai Zion Medical Center is home to the oldest public hospital in Haifa, and a founding affiliate of the Technion's Faculty of Medicine. Known for its centers of excellence and the impactful clinical and basic research developed, the hospital has a reputation for state-of-the-art medicine, both conventional and complementary. Bnai Zion prides itself as an innovation leader in medical and nursing education, with its staff's empathetic and personalized approach to patient care, and the center's dedication to applying emotional intelligence to medicine. PMID:26897773

  8. Anticandidal activity of medicinal plants and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains of clinical specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bora, Limpon

    2016-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate the in vitro anticandidal activity of some medicinal plants and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains against Candida species. The antifungal activity of methanolic extracts of five medicinal plants, namely, Cinnamomum porrectum, Lippia nudiflora, Cestrum nocturnum, Trachyspermum ammi, and Sida carpinifolia were studied. The medicinal characteristics of these plants were compared with commercially used antibiotics. The antimicrobial assay was done by agar well diffusion and the broth dilution method. Among the plants used, T. ammi and C. nocturnum were found to be more potent than the others. Twenty P. aeruginosa strains were isolated from various clinical specimens. The total inhibitions obtained were found to be 47%, 38%, and 36% in blood agar, whereas in Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) the inhibitions were 57%, 48%, and 37%, respectively. PMID:25592881

  9. The clinical benefits, ethics, and economics of stratified medicine and companion diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusheim, Mark R; Berndt, Ernst R

    2015-12-01

    The stratified medicine companion diagnostic (CDx) cut-off decision integrates scientific, clinical, ethical, and commercial considerations, and determines its value to developers, providers, payers, and patients. Competition already sharpens these issues in oncology, and might soon do the same for emerging stratified medicines in autoimmune, cardiovascular, neurodegenerative, respiratory, and other conditions. Of 53 oncology targets with a launched therapeutic, 44 have competing therapeutics. Only 12 of 141 Phase III candidates addressing new targets face no competition. CDx choices might alter competitive positions and reimbursement. Under current diagnostic incentives, payers see novel stratified medicines that improve public health and increase costs, but do not observe companion diagnostics for legacy treatments that would reduce costs. It would be in the interests of payers to rediscover their heritage of direct investment in diagnostic development. PMID:26542060

  10. Education and training for medicines development, regulation, and clinical research in emerging countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerpel-Fronius, Sandor; Rosenkranz, Bernd; Allen, Elizabeth; Bass, Rolf; Mainard, Jacques D; Dodoo, Alex; Dubois, Dominique J; Hela, Mandisa; Kern, Steven; Massud, Joao; Silva, Honorio; Whitty, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this satellite workshop held at the 17th World Congress of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (WCP2014) was to discuss the needs, optimal methods and practical approaches for extending education and teaching of medicines development, regulation, and clinical research to Low and Middle Income Countries (LMICs). It was generally agreed that, for efficiently treating the rapidly growing number of patients suffering from non-communicable diseases, modern drug therapy has to become available more widely and with a shorter time lag in these countries. To achieve this goal many additional experts working in medicines development, regulation, and clinical research have to be trained in parallel. The competence-oriented educational programs designed within the framework of the European Innovative Medicine Initiative-PharmaTrain (IMI-PhT) project were developed with the purpose to cover these interconnected fields. In addition, the programs can be easily adapted to the various local needs, primarily due to their modular architecture and well defined learning outcomes. Furthermore, the program is accompanied by stringent quality assurance standards which are essential for providing internationally accepted certificates. Effective cooperation between international and local experts and organizations, the involvement of the industry, health care centers and governments is essential for successful education. The initiative should also support the development of professional networks able to manage complex health care strategies. In addition it should help establish cooperation between neighboring countries for jointly managing clinical trials, as well as complex regulatory and ethical issues. PMID:25926798

  11. Education and training for medicines development, regulation and clinical research in emerging countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandor - Kerpel-Fronius

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this satellite workshop held at the 17th World Congress of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology (WCP2014 was to discuss the needs, optimal methods and practical approaches for extending education teaching of medicines development, regulation and clinical research to Low and Middle Income Countries (LMIC’s. It was generally agreed that, for efficiently treating the rapidly growing number of patients suffering from non-communicable diseases, modern drug therapy has to become available more widely and with a shorter time lag in these countries. To achieve this goal many additional experts working in medicines development, regulation and clinical research have to be trained in parallel. The competence-oriented educational programs designed within the framework of the European Innovative Medicine Initiative-PharmaTrain (IMI-PhT project were developed with the purpose to cover these interconnected fields. In addition, the programs can be easily adapted to the various local needs, primarily due to their modular architecture and well defined learning outcomes. Furthermore, the program is accompanied by stringent quality assurance standards which are essential for providing internationally accepted certificates. Effective cooperation between international and local experts and organizations, the involvement of the industry, health care centers and governments is essential for successful education. The initiative should also support the development of professional networks able to manage complex health care strategies. In addition it should help establish cooperation between neighboring countries for jointly managing clinical trials, as well as complex regulatory and ethical issues.

  12. [Evidence-based medicine. 1. The transfer of research results to clinical practice. The Italian Group for Evidence-Based Medicine-GIMBE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartabellotta, A

    1998-03-01

    Evidence-based Medicine, born officially in November 1992, during last five years is grown everywhere, showing its power to influence virtually all aspects of health care: clinical practice, medical education, patient information and health policy. Because of the raising interest also in Italy for the new paradigm of clinical practice, "Recently Progress in Medicina" launches a series of articles with the aim of giving to physicians tools and skills for searching, critically appraising and implementing in their own decisions the best results of clinical research. For a better explanation of practical aspects of Evidence-based Medicine, the first article discusses about several obstacles existing in transferring correctly and timely the results of research into clinical practice, and about the potential role of Evidence-based Medicine in the evolution of the medical art and the health systems of the third millennium.

  13. Strategies to overcome clinical, regulatory, and financial challenges in the implementation of personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimberidou, Apostolia M; Ringborg, Ulrik; Schilsky, Richard L

    2013-01-01

    This article highlights major developments over the last decade in personalized medicine in cancer. Emerging data from clinical studies demonstrate that the use of targeted agents in patients with targetable molecular aberrations improves clinical outcomes. Despite a surge of studies, however, significant gaps in knowledge remain, especially in identifying driver molecular aberrations in patients with multiple aberrations, understanding molecular networks that control carcinogenesis and metastasis, and most importantly, discovering effective targeted agents. Implementation of personalized medicine requires continued scientific and technological breakthroughs; standardization of tumor tissue acquisition and molecular testing; changes in oncology practice and regulatory standards for drug and device access and approval; modification of reimbursement policies by health care payers; and innovative ways to collect and analyze electronic patient information that are linked to prospective clinical registries and rapid learning systems. Informatics systems that integrate clinical, laboratory, radiologic, molecular, and economic data will improve clinical care and will provide infrastructure to enable clinical research. The initiative of the EurocanPlatform aims to overcome the challenges of implementing personalized medicine in Europe by sharing patients, biologic materials, and technological resources across borders. The EurocanPlatform establishes a complete translational cancer research program covering the drug development process and strengthening collaborations among academic centers, pharmaceutical companies, regulatory authorities, health technology assessment organizations, and health care systems. The CancerLinQ rapid learning system being developed by ASCO has the potential to revolutionize how all stakeholders in the cancer community assemble and use information obtained from patients treated in real-world settings to guide clinical practice, regulatory

  14. Medical Students’ Clinical Skills Do Not Match Their Teachers’ Expectations: Survey at Zagreb University School of Medicine, Croatia

    OpenAIRE

    Sičaja, Mario; Romić, Dominik; Prka, Željko

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate self-assessed level of clinical skills of graduating medical students at Zagreb University School of Medicine and compare them with clinical skill levels expected by their teachers and those defined by a criterion standard. Method: The study included all medical students (n = 252) graduating from the Zagreb University School of Medicine in the 2004-2005 academic year and faculty members (n = 129) involved in teaching clinical skills. The participants completed anonymous qu...

  15. The Theoretical Construction of a Classification of Clinical Somatic Symptoms in Psychosomatic Medicine Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fanmin; Sun, Xueli; Yang, Bangxiang; Shen, Hong; Liu, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Objective This article adopts the perspective of psychosomatic medicine to present and test a theoretical model of the classification of clinical somatic symptoms. The theoretical model consists of four dimensions: emotional somatic symptoms, biological somatic symptoms, imaginative somatic symptoms, and cognitive somatic symptoms. Method A clinical somatic symptom classification scale was developed according to the theoretical model. A total of 542 participants completed the clinical somatic symptoms classification scale. The data were analyzed using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Results The results confirmed the theoretical model. The analyses found that the proposed theoretical structure of the scale was good, as indicated by factor loadings and fit indices, and that the scale had good reliability and construct validity. Conclusions Based on the interpretation of the clinical symptoms of psychosomatic medicine, the treatment of chronic non-infectious diseases includes at least three dimensions: the first is the etiological treatment, the second is the pathophysiological and pathopsychological dimension, and the third is symptomatic treatment. The unified psychosomatic point of view and diverse clinical thinking modes are aimed at identifying different classes of somatic symptoms and important prerequisites for the treatment of these symptoms. We registered the study with the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry and it was approved by the West China Hospital, Sichuan University ethics committee. Trial registration: The registration number is ChiCTR-OCS-14004632 (time: 2014-05-12). PMID:27525701

  16. Translating molecular medicine into clinical tools: doomed to fail by neglecting basic preanalytical principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannello Ferdinando

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This commentary discusses a study on measurements of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9 in serum of pseudoxanthoma elasticum patients recently published in Journal of Molecular Medicine. This study can be considered the typical "obstacle" to effective translational medicine as previously documented in JTM journal. Although serum has been frequently proven as inappropriate sample for determining numerous circulating MMPs, among them MMP-9, there are over and over again studies, as in this case, that measure MMP-9 in serum. Comparative measurements in serum and plasma samples demonstrated higher concentrations for MMP-9 in serum due to the additional release from leukocytes and platelets following the coagulation/fibrinolysis process. From this example it can be concluded that translating basic research discoveries into clinical tools needs a more intensive exchange between basic biomedical research and clinical scientists already in an early stage. Otherwise a lost of translation, as discussed in JTM journal, seems to be inevitable.

  17. A Bright Future for Precision Medicine: Advances in Fluorescent Chemical Probe Design and Their Clinical Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Megan; Yim, Joshua J; Bogyo, Matthew

    2016-01-21

    The Precision Medicine Initiative aims to use advances in basic and clinical research to develop therapeutics that selectively target and kill cancer cells. Under the same doctrine of precision medicine, there is an equally important need to visualize these diseased cells to enable diagnosis, facilitate surgical resection, and monitor therapeutic response. Therefore, there is a great opportunity for chemists to develop chemically tractable probes that can image cancer in vivo. This review focuses on recent advances in the development of optical probes, as well as their current and future applications in the clinical management of cancer. The progress in probe development described here suggests that optical imaging is an important and rapidly developing field of study that encourages continued collaboration among chemists, biologists, and clinicians to further refine these tools for interventional surgical imaging, as well as for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:26933740

  18. Health Anxiety Levels in Patients Admitted to Internal Medicine Outpatient Clinic for Several Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Gul

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Health anxiety (HA in patients consist of incorrect reference to normal bodily sensations as a signs of a serious disease. The aim of this study is to investigate the HA in patients admitted to internal medicine outpatient clinic for several times within one year. Material and Method: 60 patients who admitted more than one time to internal medicine outpatient clinic within one year and the control group consisted of 60 people were enrolled in this study. Short-form of health anxiety inventory (SAE-KF was given to these groups, The results were compared statistically. Results: SAE-KF scores were significantly higher in the patient group (11.17 ± 6.07 than the control group (10.71±4.44 (Z=-5.96, P

  19. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Holistic Sexology and Acupressure Through the Vagina (Hippocratic Pelvic Massage)

    OpenAIRE

    Søren Ventegodt; Birgitte Clausen; Hatim A. Omar; Joav Merrick

    2006-01-01

    Many gynecological and sexological problems (like urine incontinence, chronic pelvic pains, vulvodynia, and lack of lust, excitement, and orgasm) are resistant to standard medical treatment. In our work at the Research Clinic for Holistic Medicine in Copenhagen, we have found that vaginal acupressure, or Hippocratic pelvic massage, can help some of these problems. Technically, it is a very simple procedure as it corresponds to the explorative phase of the standard pelvic examination, suppleme...

  20. Reflective Writing in the Competency-Based Curriculum at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Isaacson, J Harry; Salas, Renee; Koch, Carl; McKenzie, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    The Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University is a five-year medical school where the major emphasis is to train physician investigators. In this article we describe our experience with reflective writing in our competency-based medical school, which has reflective practice as one of the nine core competencies. We outline how we use reflective writing as a way to help students develop their reflective practice skills. Reflective writing opportunities, exce...

  1. Training in clinical forensic medicine in the UK--perceptions of current regulatory standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Margaret M; Norfolk, Guy A

    2011-08-01

    As clinical forensic medicine (CFM) is not currently recognised as a speciality in the UK there are no nationally agreed mandatory standards for training forensic physicians in either general forensic (GFM) or sexual offence medicine (SOM). The General Medical Council (GMC), the medical regulator in the UK, has issued clear standards for training in all specialities recommending that "trainees must be supported to acquire the necessary skills and experience through induction, effective educational supervision, an appropriate workload and time to learn". In order to evaluate the current situation in the field of clinical forensic medicine, doctors who have recently (within the last two years) started working in the field "trainees" (n = 38), and trainers (n = 61) with responsibility for clinical and educational supervision of new trainees, were surveyed by questionnaire to gather their perceptions of how the relevant GMC standards are being met in initial on-the-job training. Telephone interviews were performed with eleven doctors working as clinical or medical directors to determine their views. It is clear that currently the quality of training in CFM is sub-standard and inconsistent and that the published standards, as to the minimum requirement for training that must be met by post-graduate medical and training providers at all levels, are not being met. The Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine (FFLM) needs to set explicit minimum standards which will comply with the regulator and work to pilot credentialing for forensic physicians. A number of recommendations are made for urgent FFLM development. PMID:21771557

  2. Training in clinical forensic medicine in the UK--perceptions of current regulatory standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Margaret M; Norfolk, Guy A

    2011-08-01

    As clinical forensic medicine (CFM) is not currently recognised as a speciality in the UK there are no nationally agreed mandatory standards for training forensic physicians in either general forensic (GFM) or sexual offence medicine (SOM). The General Medical Council (GMC), the medical regulator in the UK, has issued clear standards for training in all specialities recommending that "trainees must be supported to acquire the necessary skills and experience through induction, effective educational supervision, an appropriate workload and time to learn". In order to evaluate the current situation in the field of clinical forensic medicine, doctors who have recently (within the last two years) started working in the field "trainees" (n = 38), and trainers (n = 61) with responsibility for clinical and educational supervision of new trainees, were surveyed by questionnaire to gather their perceptions of how the relevant GMC standards are being met in initial on-the-job training. Telephone interviews were performed with eleven doctors working as clinical or medical directors to determine their views. It is clear that currently the quality of training in CFM is sub-standard and inconsistent and that the published standards, as to the minimum requirement for training that must be met by post-graduate medical and training providers at all levels, are not being met. The Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine (FFLM) needs to set explicit minimum standards which will comply with the regulator and work to pilot credentialing for forensic physicians. A number of recommendations are made for urgent FFLM development.

  3. Patients’ and physicians’ satisfaction with a pharmacist managed anticoagulation program in a family medicine clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Bishop, Lisa; Young, Stephanie; Twells, Laurie; Dillon, Carla; Hawboldt, John

    2015-01-01

    Background A pharmacist managed anticoagulation service was initiated in a multi-physician family medicine clinic in December 2006. In order to determine the patient and physician satisfaction with the service, a study was designed to describe the patients’ satisfaction with the warfarin education and management they received from the pharmacist, and to describe the physicians’ satisfaction with the level of care provided by the pharmacist for patients taking warfarin. A self-administered sur...

  4. From P0 to P6 medicine, a model of highly participatory, narrative, interactive, and “augmented” medicine: some considerations on Salvatore Iaconesi’s clinical story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bragazzi NL

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Nicola Luigi Bragazzi School of Public Health, Department of Health Sciences (DISSAL, Genoa, Italy Abstract: Salvatore Iaconesi was recently diagnosed with a brain tumor. He decided to share his clinical records not only with doctors but with everybody who wishes to find him a cure. “Because cure is not unique,” he emphasizes “there are cures for the body and cures for the soul, and everyone, from a painter to a musician, can find me a cure. Please, feel free to take my clinical history for example and let it become a game, a video, a music, a picture, whatever you like.” The emblematic hallmark of the changing times, Salvatore Iaconesi’s case is an example of how many profound revolutions and steps medicine has undertaken during the past few centuries. Stemming from a form of remote medical paternalism and arriving at the concept of a therapeutic alliance, medicine nowadays faces challenges and opportunities at a level before unforeseeable and unimaginable. The new concept of P6 medicine (personalized, predictive, preventive, participatory, psychocognitive, and public is discussed, together with its profound implications. Keywords: cancer, narrative medicine, paternalistic medicine, P4 medicine, P5 medicine

  5. Lollipops in the Clinic: Information Dense Mutation Plots for Precision Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Cory

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Concise visualization is critical to present large amounts of information in a minimal space that can be interpreted quickly. Clinical applications in precision medicine present an important use case due to the time dependent nature of the interpretations, although visualization is increasingly necessary across the life sciences. In this paper we describe the Lollipops software for the presentation of panel or exome sequencing results. Source code and binaries are freely available at https://github.com/pbnjay/lollipops. Although other software and web resources exist to produce lollipop diagrams, these packages are less suited to clinical applications. The demands of precision medicine require the ability to easily fit into a workflow and incorporate external information without manual intervention. Results The Lollipops software provides a simple command line interface that only requires an official gene symbol and mutation list making it easily scriptable. External information is integrated using the publicly available Uniprot and Pfam resources. Heuristics are used to select the most informative components and condense them for a concise plot. The output is a flexible Scalable Vector Graphic (SVG) diagram that can be displayed in a web page or graphic illustration tool. Conclusion The Lollipops software creates information-dense, publication-quality mutation plots for automated pipelines and high-throughput workflows in precision medicine. The automatic data integration enables clinical data security, and visualization heuristics concisely present knowledge with minimal user configuration. PMID:27490490

  6. Emotional Intelligence in Internal Medicine Residents: Educational Implications for Clinical Performance and Burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterfield, Jason; Swenson, Sara; Rabow, Michael

    2009-01-01

    We measured emotional intelligence (EQ; the ability to perceive, understand, and manage emotions in the self and others) in a sample of 28 internal medicine residents at the beginning and end of an academic year. EQ scores increased significantly over the course of the year. Higher EQ scores at the end of the year were significantly related to higher ratings for overall clinical performance and medical interviewing. Higher EQ scores also correlated with lower levels of burnout. Results suggest that clinically significant changes in EQ can occur over the course of medical training. Further study should determine if and how educational interventions can affect EQ, EQ-related performance, and burnout.

  7. New clinical end points in rehabilitation medicine: tools for measuring quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abresch, Richard T; Carter, Gregory T; Han, Jay J; McDonald, Craig M

    Traditional clinical end points in rehabilitation medicine have centered on objective measures of human performance, including quantitative muscle strength testing, functional independence measurements (FIM), and timed motor performance (TMP). However, it is now increasingly recognized that health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is a valid clinical end point. Health-related quality of life is a broad concept involving an individual's physical health, psychological state, personal beliefs, and interpersonal and social support relationships. The goals for this article are to show the value of performing HRQoL measurements and briefly describe methods used to assess quality of life (QoL). PMID:19923631

  8. Challenges in the clinical development requirements for the marketing authorization of new medicines in southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudrin, Alex

    2009-03-01

    A rapid growth of investment into clinical research and new drug development has manifested itself by an exponential increase of new products coming onto the worldwide market. The emerging pharmaceutical and biotech markets in Southeast Asia are believed to be extremely promising from a commercial point of view in the next decade. The unique position of the Asian market and the diversity in clinical research initiatives are linked with diverse regulatory requirements for clinical development and registration of new medicines. Some of these differences have an impact on timelines for marketing authorizations in South Korea, China, Thailand, Japan, Singapore, and other countries. One of the approaches to streamlining regulatory strategy in different countries is the initiation of multicountry international clinical trials trying to address requirements and allowing registration in several regional countries simultaneously. Increasing cooperation between South Asian countries in relation to regulatory requirements and clinical development will facilitate the registration of innovative medicines in this rapidly developing region of the world and enable improved cohesiveness between countries in a drug safety framework. PMID:19168433

  9. Integrating Personalized Medicine in the Canadian Environment: Efforts Facilitating Oncology Clinical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syme, Rachel; Carleton, Bruce; Leyens, Lada; Richer, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    There is currently a rapid evolution of clinical practices based on the introduction of patient stratification and molecular diagnosis that is likely to improve health outcomes. Building on a strong research base, complemented by strong support from clinicians and health authorities, the oncology field is at the forefront of this evolution. Yet, clinical research is still facing many challenges that need to be addressed in order to conduct necessary studies and effectively translate medical breakthroughs based on personalized medicine into standards of care. Leveraging its universal health care system and on resources developed to support oncology clinical research, Canada is well positioned to join the international efforts deployed to address these challenges. Available resources include a broad range of structures and funding mechanisms, ranging from direct clinical trial support to post-marketing surveillance. Here, we propose a clinical model for the introduction of innovation for precision medicine in oncology that starts with patients' and clinicians' unmet needs to initiate a cycle of discovery, validation, translation and sustainability development. PMID:26565702

  10. Tibetan Medicine: A Systematic Review of the Clinical Research Available in the West

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Philip Reuter

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Little is known about Tibetan medicine (TM, in Western industrialized countries. Objectives. To provide a systematic review of the clinical studies on TM available in the West. Data Sources. Seven literature databases, published literature lists, citation tracking, and contacts to experts and institutions. Study Eligibility Criteria. Studies in English, German, French, or Spanish presenting clinical trial results. Participants. All patients of the included studies. Interventions. Tibetan medicine treatment. Study Appraisal and Synthesis Methods. Included studies were described quantitatively; their quality was assessed with the DIMDI HTA checklist; for RCTs the Jadad score was used. Results. 40 studies from 39 publications were included. They were very heterogeneous regarding study type and size, treated conditions, treatments, measured outcomes, and quality. Limitations. No Russian, Tibetan, or Chinese publications were included. Possible publication bias. Conclusions. The number of clinical trials on TM available in the West is small; methods and results are heterogeneous. Implications of Key Findings. Higher quality larger trials are needed, as is a general overview of traditional usage to inform future clinical trials. Systematic Review Registration Number. None.

  11. Tibetan medicine: a systematic review of the clinical research available in the west.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, K Philip; Weißhuhn, Thorolf E R; Witt, Claudia M

    2013-01-01

    Background. Little is known about Tibetan medicine (TM), in Western industrialized countries. Objectives. To provide a systematic review of the clinical studies on TM available in the West. Data Sources. Seven literature databases, published literature lists, citation tracking, and contacts to experts and institutions. Study Eligibility Criteria. Studies in English, German, French, or Spanish presenting clinical trial results. Participants. All patients of the included studies. Interventions. Tibetan medicine treatment. Study Appraisal and Synthesis Methods. Included studies were described quantitatively; their quality was assessed with the DIMDI HTA checklist; for RCTs the Jadad score was used. Results. 40 studies from 39 publications were included. They were very heterogeneous regarding study type and size, treated conditions, treatments, measured outcomes, and quality. Limitations. No Russian, Tibetan, or Chinese publications were included. Possible publication bias. Conclusions. The number of clinical trials on TM available in the West is small; methods and results are heterogeneous. Implications of Key Findings. Higher quality larger trials are needed, as is a general overview of traditional usage to inform future clinical trials. Systematic Review Registration Number. None. PMID:23662117

  12. 50th anniversary of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine--a historical overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körber, Friedrich; Plebani, Mario

    2013-01-01

    In the early 1960s, Joachim Brugsch, one of the founders of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM) (then Zeitschrift für Klinische Chemie), had the idea to found a journal in the upcoming field of clinical chemistry. He approached Ernst Schütte, who was associated with the De Gruyter publishing house through another journal, to participate, and Schütte thus became the second founder of this Journal. The aim was to create a vehicle allowing the experts to express their opinions and raise their voices more clearly than they could in a journal that publishes only original experimental papers, a laborious and difficult, but important endeavor, as the profession of clinical chemistry was still in the early stages of development at this time. The first issue of this Journal was published in early 1963, and today, we are proud to celebrate the 50th anniversary of CCLM. This review describes the development of this Journal in light of the political situation of the time when it was founded, the situation of the publisher Walter De Gruyter after the erection of the Berlin Wall, and the development of clinical chemistry, and later on, laboratory medicine as a well-acknowledged discipline and profession.

  13. Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium: Accelerating Evidence-Based Practice of Genomic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert C; Goddard, Katrina A B; Jarvik, Gail P; Amendola, Laura M; Appelbaum, Paul S; Berg, Jonathan S; Bernhardt, Barbara A; Biesecker, Leslie G; Biswas, Sawona; Blout, Carrie L; Bowling, Kevin M; Brothers, Kyle B; Burke, Wylie; Caga-Anan, Charlisse F; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Chung, Wendy K; Clayton, Ellen W; Cooper, Gregory M; East, Kelly; Evans, James P; Fullerton, Stephanie M; Garraway, Levi A; Garrett, Jeremy R; Gray, Stacy W; Henderson, Gail E; Hindorff, Lucia A; Holm, Ingrid A; Lewis, Michelle Huckaby; Hutter, Carolyn M; Janne, Pasi A; Joffe, Steven; Kaufman, David; Knoppers, Bartha M; Koenig, Barbara A; Krantz, Ian D; Manolio, Teri A; McCullough, Laurence; McEwen, Jean; McGuire, Amy; Muzny, Donna; Myers, Richard M; Nickerson, Deborah A; Ou, Jeffrey; Parsons, Donald W; Petersen, Gloria M; Plon, Sharon E; Rehm, Heidi L; Roberts, J Scott; Robinson, Dan; Salama, Joseph S; Scollon, Sarah; Sharp, Richard R; Shirts, Brian; Spinner, Nancy B; Tabor, Holly K; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Veenstra, David L; Wagle, Nikhil; Weck, Karen; Wilfond, Benjamin S; Wilhelmsen, Kirk; Wolf, Susan M; Wynn, Julia; Yu, Joon-Ho

    2016-06-01

    Despite rapid technical progress and demonstrable effectiveness for some types of diagnosis and therapy, much remains to be learned about clinical genome and exome sequencing (CGES) and its role within the practice of medicine. The Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) consortium includes 18 extramural research projects, one National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) intramural project, and a coordinating center funded by the NHGRI and National Cancer Institute. The consortium is exploring analytic and clinical validity and utility, as well as the ethical, legal, and social implications of sequencing via multidisciplinary approaches; it has thus far recruited 5,577 participants across a spectrum of symptomatic and healthy children and adults by utilizing both germline and cancer sequencing. The CSER consortium is analyzing data and creating publically available procedures and tools related to participant preferences and consent, variant classification, disclosure and management of primary and secondary findings, health outcomes, and integration with electronic health records. Future research directions will refine measures of clinical utility of CGES in both germline and somatic testing, evaluate the use of CGES for screening in healthy individuals, explore the penetrance of pathogenic variants through extensive phenotyping, reduce discordances in public databases of genes and variants, examine social and ethnic disparities in the provision of genomics services, explore regulatory issues, and estimate the value and downstream costs of sequencing. The CSER consortium has established a shared community of research sites by using diverse approaches to pursue the evidence-based development of best practices in genomic medicine. PMID:27181682

  14. Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium: Accelerating Evidence-Based Practice of Genomic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert C; Goddard, Katrina A B; Jarvik, Gail P; Amendola, Laura M; Appelbaum, Paul S; Berg, Jonathan S; Bernhardt, Barbara A; Biesecker, Leslie G; Biswas, Sawona; Blout, Carrie L; Bowling, Kevin M; Brothers, Kyle B; Burke, Wylie; Caga-Anan, Charlisse F; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Chung, Wendy K; Clayton, Ellen W; Cooper, Gregory M; East, Kelly; Evans, James P; Fullerton, Stephanie M; Garraway, Levi A; Garrett, Jeremy R; Gray, Stacy W; Henderson, Gail E; Hindorff, Lucia A; Holm, Ingrid A; Lewis, Michelle Huckaby; Hutter, Carolyn M; Janne, Pasi A; Joffe, Steven; Kaufman, David; Knoppers, Bartha M; Koenig, Barbara A; Krantz, Ian D; Manolio, Teri A; McCullough, Laurence; McEwen, Jean; McGuire, Amy; Muzny, Donna; Myers, Richard M; Nickerson, Deborah A; Ou, Jeffrey; Parsons, Donald W; Petersen, Gloria M; Plon, Sharon E; Rehm, Heidi L; Roberts, J Scott; Robinson, Dan; Salama, Joseph S; Scollon, Sarah; Sharp, Richard R; Shirts, Brian; Spinner, Nancy B; Tabor, Holly K; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Veenstra, David L; Wagle, Nikhil; Weck, Karen; Wilfond, Benjamin S; Wilhelmsen, Kirk; Wolf, Susan M; Wynn, Julia; Yu, Joon-Ho

    2016-06-01

    Despite rapid technical progress and demonstrable effectiveness for some types of diagnosis and therapy, much remains to be learned about clinical genome and exome sequencing (CGES) and its role within the practice of medicine. The Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research (CSER) consortium includes 18 extramural research projects, one National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) intramural project, and a coordinating center funded by the NHGRI and National Cancer Institute. The consortium is exploring analytic and clinical validity and utility, as well as the ethical, legal, and social implications of sequencing via multidisciplinary approaches; it has thus far recruited 5,577 participants across a spectrum of symptomatic and healthy children and adults by utilizing both germline and cancer sequencing. The CSER consortium is analyzing data and creating publically available procedures and tools related to participant preferences and consent, variant classification, disclosure and management of primary and secondary findings, health outcomes, and integration with electronic health records. Future research directions will refine measures of clinical utility of CGES in both germline and somatic testing, evaluate the use of CGES for screening in healthy individuals, explore the penetrance of pathogenic variants through extensive phenotyping, reduce discordances in public databases of genes and variants, examine social and ethnic disparities in the provision of genomics services, explore regulatory issues, and estimate the value and downstream costs of sequencing. The CSER consortium has established a shared community of research sites by using diverse approaches to pursue the evidence-based development of best practices in genomic medicine.

  15. Clinical complexity in medicine: A measurement model of task and patient complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, R.; Weir, C.; Fiol, G. Del

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Complexity in medicine needs to be reduced to simple components in a way that is comprehensible to researchers and clinicians. Few studies in the current literature propose a measurement model that addresses both task and patient complexity in medicine. Objective The objective of this paper is to develop an integrated approach to understand and measure clinical complexity by incorporating both task and patient complexity components focusing on infectious disease domain. The measurement model was adapted and modified to healthcare domain. Methods Three clinical Infectious Disease teams were observed, audio-recorded and transcribed. Each team included an Infectious Diseases expert, one Infectious Diseases fellow, one physician assistant and one pharmacy resident fellow. The transcripts were parsed and the authors independently coded complexity attributes. This baseline measurement model of clinical complexity was modified in an initial set of coding process and further validated in a consensus-based iterative process that included several meetings and email discussions by three clinical experts from diverse backgrounds from the Department of Biomedical Informatics at the University of Utah. Inter-rater reliability was calculated using Cohen’s kappa. Results The proposed clinical complexity model consists of two separate components. The first is a clinical task complexity model with 13 clinical complexity-contributing factors and 7 dimensions. The second is the patient complexity model with 11 complexity-contributing factors and 5 dimensions. Conclusion The measurement model for complexity encompassing both task and patient complexity will be a valuable resource for future researchers and industry to measure and understand complexity in healthcare. PMID:26404626

  16. Bryophyllum pinnatum and Related Species Used in Anthroposophic Medicine: Constituents, Pharmacological Activities, and Clinical Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürer, Karin; Simões-Wüst, Ana Paula; von Mandach, Ursula; Hamburger, Matthias; Potterat, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    Bryophyllum pinnatum (syn. Kalanchoe pinnata) is a succulent perennial plant native to Madagascar that was introduced in anthroposophic medicine in the early 20th century. In recent years, we conducted a large collaborative project to provide reliable data on the chemical composition, pharmacological properties, and clinical efficacy of Bryophyllum. Here, we comprehensively review the phytochemistry, as well as the pharmacological and clinical data. As to the pharmacology, special emphasis is given to properties related to the use in anthroposophic medicine as a treatment for "hyperactivity diseases", such as preterm labor, restlessness, and sleep disorders. Studies suggesting that B. pinnatum may become a new treatment option for overactive bladder syndrome are also reviewed. Tolerability is addressed, and toxicological data are discussed in conjunction with the presence of potentially toxic bufadienolides in Bryophyllum species. The few data available on two related species with medicinal uses, Bryophyllum daigremontianum and Bryophyllum delagoense, have also been included. Taken together, current data support the use of B. pinnatum for the mentioned indications, but further studies are needed to fully understand the modes of action, and to identify the pharmacologically active constituents. PMID:27220081

  17. A systems medicine clinical platform for understanding and managing non- communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesario, Alfredo; Auffray, Charles; Agusti, Alvar; Apolone, Giovanni; Balling, Rudi; Barbanti, Piero; Bellia, Alfonso; Boccia, Stefania; Bousquet, Jean; Cardaci, Vittorio; Cazzola, Mario; Dall'Armi, Valentina; Daraselia, Nikolai; Ros, Lucio Da; Bufalo, Alessandra Del; Ducci, Giuseppe; Ferri, Luigi; Fini, Massimo; Fossati, Chiara; Gensini, Gianfranco; Granone, Pierluigi Maria; Kinross, James; Lauro, Davide; Cascio, Gerland Lo; Lococo, Filippo; Lococo, Achille; Maier, Dieter; Marcus, Frederick; Margaritora, Stefano; Marra, Camillo; Minati, Gianfranco; Neri, Monica; Pasqua, Franco; Pison, Christophe; Pristipino, Christian; Roca, Joseph; Rosano, Giuseppe; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Russo, Patrizia; Salinaro, Gianluca; Shenhar, Shani; Soreq, Hermona; Sterk, Peter J; Stocchi, Fabrizio; Torti, Margherita; Volterrani, Maurizio; Wouters, Emiel F M; Frustaci, Alessandra; Bonassi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) are among the most pressing global health problems of the twenty-first century. Their rising incidence and prevalence is linked to severe morbidity and mortality, and they are putting economic and managerial pressure on healthcare systems around the world. Moreover, NCDs are impeding healthy aging by negatively affecting the quality of life of a growing number of the global population. NCDs result from the interaction of various genetic, environmental and habitual factors, and cluster in complex ways, making the complex identification of resulting phenotypes not only difficult, but also a top research priority. The degree of complexity required to interpret large patient datasets generated by advanced high-throughput functional genomics assays has now increased to the point that novel computational biology approaches are essential to extract information that is relevant to the clinical decision-making process. Consequently, system-level models that interpret the interactions between extensive tissues, cellular and molecular measurements and clinical features are also being created to identify new disease phenotypes, so that disease definition and treatment are optimized, and novel therapeutic targets discovered. Likewise, Systems Medicine (SM) platforms applied to extensively-characterized patients provide a basis for more targeted clinical trials, and represent a promising tool to achieve better prevention and patient care, thereby promoting healthy aging globally. The present paper: (1) reviews the novel systems approaches to NCDs; (2) discusses how to move efficiently from Systems Biology to Systems Medicine; and (3) presents the scientific and clinical background of the San Raffaele Systems Medicine Platform. PMID:24641232

  18. A scheme for the audit of scientific and technological standards in clinical nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: Audit is the process whereby the quality of a service is monitored and optimised. It forms an essential component of the quality assurance process, whether by self-assessment or by external peer review. In the UK the British Nuclear Medicine Society (BNMS) has undertaken external organisational audit of departments providing clinical nuclear medicine services. This work aimed to develop a more thorough and service specific process for the audit of scientific and technological standards in nuclear medicine. Materials and Methods: The audit process has been implemented using written audit documents to facilitate the audit procedure. A questionnaire forms part of the formal documentation for audit of the scientific and technical standards of a clinical service. Scientific and technical standards were derived from a number of sources including legal requirements, regulatory obligations, notes for guidance, peer reviewed publications and accepted good clinical practice (GCP). Results: The audit process graded the standards of an individual department according to legal or safety requirements (Grade A), good practice (Grade B) and desirable aspects of service delivery (Grade C). The standards have been allocated into eight main categories. These are: Instrumentation; Software and data protection; Electrical Safety; Mechanical Safety; Workstation Safety; The Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH); Radiation Protection; Scientific and Technical staffing levels. During the audit visit a detailed inspection of clinical and laboratory areas and department written documentation is also necessary to validate the data obtained. Conclusion: The printed scheme now provides a means for external audit or self-assessment. There should be evidence of a well-organised and safe environment for both patients and staff. Health and Safety legislation requires written local rules and these records should be available to demonstrate the standard of service provision. Other

  19. Typical investigational medicinal products follow relatively uniform regulations in 10 European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN) countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Christian; Kubiak, Christine; Whitfield, Kate;

    2012-01-01

    In order to facilitate multinational clinical research, regulatory requirements need to become international and harmonised. The EU introduced the Directive 2001/20/EC in 2004, regulating investigational medicinal products in Europe.......In order to facilitate multinational clinical research, regulatory requirements need to become international and harmonised. The EU introduced the Directive 2001/20/EC in 2004, regulating investigational medicinal products in Europe....

  20. Prospective registration, bias risk and outcome-reporting bias in randomised clinical trials of traditional Chinese medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jian-Ping; Han, Mei; Li, Xin-Xue;

    2013-01-01

    Clinical trials on Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) should be registered in a publicly accessible international trial register and report on all outcomes. We systematically assessed and evaluated TCM trials in registries with their subsequent publications.......Clinical trials on Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) should be registered in a publicly accessible international trial register and report on all outcomes. We systematically assessed and evaluated TCM trials in registries with their subsequent publications....

  1. Design, clinical translation and immunological response of biomaterials in regenerative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadtler, Kaitlyn; Singh, Anirudha; Wolf, Matthew T.; Wang, Xiaokun; Pardoll, Drew M.; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.

    2016-07-01

    The field of regenerative medicine aims to replace tissues lost as a consequence of disease, trauma or congenital abnormalities. Biomaterials serve as scaffolds for regenerative medicine to deliver cells, provide biological signals and physical support, and mobilize endogenous cells to repair tissues. Sophisticated chemistries are used to synthesize materials that mimic and modulate native tissue microenvironments, to replace form and to elucidate structure-function relationships of cell-material interactions. The therapeutic relevance of these biomaterial properties can only be studied after clinical translation, whereby key parameters for efficacy can be defined and then used for future design. In this Review, we present the development and translation of biomaterials for two tissue engineering targets, cartilage and cornea, both of which lack the ability to self-repair. Finally, looking to the future, we discuss the role of the immune system in regeneration and the potential for biomaterial scaffolds to modulate immune signalling to create a pro-regenerative environment.

  2. Design, clinical translation and immunological response of biomaterials in regenerative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadtler, Kaitlyn; Singh, Anirudha; Wolf, Matthew T.; Wang, Xiaokun; Pardoll, Drew M.; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.

    2016-07-01

    The field of regenerative medicine aims to replace tissues lost as a consequence of disease, trauma or congenital abnormalities. Biomaterials serve as scaffolds for regenerative medicine to deliver cells, provide biological signals and physical support, and mobilize endogenous cells to repair tissues. Sophisticated chemistries are used to synthesize materials that mimic and modulate native tissue microenvironments, to replace form and to elucidate structure–function relationships of cell–material interactions. The therapeutic relevance of these biomaterial properties can only be studied after clinical translation, whereby key parameters for efficacy can be defined and then used for future design. In this Review, we present the development and translation of biomaterials for two tissue engineering targets, cartilage and cornea, both of which lack the ability to self-repair. Finally, looking to the future, we discuss the role of the immune system in regeneration and the potential for biomaterial scaffolds to modulate immune signalling to create a pro-regenerative environment.

  3. On art and science: an epistemic framework for integrating social science and clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Jason Adam

    2014-06-01

    Calls for incorporating social science into patient care typically have accounted for neither the logistic constraints of medical training nor the methodological fallacies of utilizing aggregate "social facts" in clinical practice. By elucidating the different epistemic approaches of artistic and scientific practices, this paper illustrates an integrative artistic pedagogy that allows clinical practitioners to generate social scientific insights from actual patient encounters. Although there is no shortage of calls to bring social science into medicine, the more fundamental processes of thinking by which art and science proceed have not been addressed to this end. As such, the art of medical practice is conceptualized as an innate gift, and thus little is done to cultivate it. Yet doing so is more important than ever because uncertainty in diagnosing and treating chronic illnesses, the most significant contemporary mortality risks, suggests a re-expanding role for clinical judgment.

  4. Clinical implementation of genetic testing in medicine: a US regulatory science perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesko, Lawrence J; Schmidt, Stephan

    2014-04-01

    Heterogeneity of treatment effects in unselected patient populations has stimulated various strategic approaches to reduce variability and uncertainty and improve individualization of drug selection and dosing. The rapid growth of DNA sequencing and related technologies has ramped up progress in interpreting germline and somatic mutations and has begun to reshape medicine, especially in oncology. Over the past decade, regulatory agencies realized that they needed to be proactive and not reactive if personalized medicine was to become a reality. The US Food and Drug Administration, in particular, took steps to nurture the field through peer-reviewed publications, co-sponsoring public workshops and issuing guidance for industry. The following two major approaches to personalized medicine were taken: (i) encouragement of de novo co-development of drug-genetic test combinations by industry; and (ii) retrospective assessment of legacy genetic data for the purpose of updating drug labels. The former strategy has been more successful in getting new targeted therapies to the marketplace with successful adoption, while the latter, as evidenced by the low adoption rate of pharmacogenetic testing, has been less successful. This reflection piece makes clear that several important things need to happen to make personalized medicine diffuse in more geographical areas and among more therapeutic specialties. The debate over clinical utility of genetic tests needs to be resolved with consensus on evidentiary standards. Physicians, as gatekeepers of prescription medicines, need to increase their knowledge of genetics and the application of the information to patient care. An infrastructure needs to be developed to make access to genetic tests and decision-support tools available to primary practitioners and specialists outside major medical centres and metropolitan areas. PMID:24286486

  5. [Histological view of ethics in medicine and handling of residual samples in clinical laboratories].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2004-03-01

    One of the important ethical issues in clinical laboratory medicine is whether organs and/or specimens should belong to the examinees. Tracing back to ancient Greece, an episode of the death of Asklepios, killed by Zeus to revive the dead, and the great contribution of Hippocrates to medicine including the vow and ethics of medicine, have been described. In the relationship between doctors and patients, the former had been superior to the latter for more than 2400 years, however, the situation has been changing from that to the same position since 1960th, along with the development of bioethics from medical ethics. For the promotion of bioethics, world medical associations have contributed declarations and continuous discussion. The declarations are based on the avoidance of actions detrimental to the life, health, privacy or dignity of examinees. On the medical use of human organs and specimens in relation to human rights, the mind and the body, discussion has continued, however, a consensus on the details has not been reached. A view on the use of residual samples for methodological study, teaching and research in the clinical laboratory was proposed by the Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine in 2002. Briefly, it included confidentiality of the laboratory staff, responsibility of the laboratory director, the absence of a necessity to obtain consent for the use of residual samples for methodological study when they are made anonymous or pooled, and the recommendation to obtain a judgement by an ethics committee for research use. The background and discussion for the proposal and the current situation on how to obtain consent from patients in Japan are mentioned.

  6. Can Emergency Medicine Residents Reliably Use the Internet to Answer Clinical Questions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June Abbas

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The study objective was to determine the accuracy of answers to clinical questions by emergency medicine (EM residents conducting Internet searches by using Google. Emergency physicians commonly turn to outside resources to answer clinical questions that arise in the emergency department (ED. Internet access in the ED has supplanted textbooks for references because it is perceived as being more up to date. Although Google is the most widely used general Internet search engine, it is not medically oriented and merely provides links to other sources. Users must judge the reliability of the information obtained on the links. We frequently observed EM faculty and residents using Google rather than medicine-specific databases to seek answers to clinical questions. Methods: Two EM faculties developed a clinically oriented test for residents to take without the use of any outside aid. They were instructed to answer each question only if they were confident enough of their answer to implement it in a patient-care situation. Questions marked as unsure or answered incorrectly were used to construct a second test for each subject. On the second test, they were instructed to use Google as a resource to find links that contained answers. Results: Thirty-three residents participated. The means for the initial test were 32% correct, 28% incorrect, and 40% unsure. On the Google test, the mean for correct answers was 59%; 33% of answers were incorrect and 8% were unsure. Conclusion: EM residents’ ability to answer clinical questions correctly by using Web sites from Google searches was poor. More concerning was that unsure answers decreased, whereas incorrect answers increased. The Internet appears to have given the residents a false sense of security in their answers. Innovations, such as Internet access in the ED, should be studied carefully before being accepted as reliable tools for teaching clinical decision making. [West J Emerg Med. 2011

  7. Clinical decision support systems for improving diagnostic accuracy and achieving precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaneda, Christian; Nalley, Kip; Mannion, Ciaran; Bhattacharyya, Pritish; Blake, Patrick; Pecora, Andrew; Goy, Andre; Suh, K Stephen

    2015-01-01

    As research laboratories and clinics collaborate to achieve precision medicine, both communities are required to understand mandated electronic health/medical record (EHR/EMR) initiatives that will be fully implemented in all clinics in the United States by 2015. Stakeholders will need to evaluate current record keeping practices and optimize and standardize methodologies to capture nearly all information in digital format. Collaborative efforts from academic and industry sectors are crucial to achieving higher efficacy in patient care while minimizing costs. Currently existing digitized data and information are present in multiple formats and are largely unstructured. In the absence of a universally accepted management system, departments and institutions continue to generate silos of information. As a result, invaluable and newly discovered knowledge is difficult to access. To accelerate biomedical research and reduce healthcare costs, clinical and bioinformatics systems must employ common data elements to create structured annotation forms enabling laboratories and clinics to capture sharable data in real time. Conversion of these datasets to knowable information should be a routine institutionalized process. New scientific knowledge and clinical discoveries can be shared via integrated knowledge environments defined by flexible data models and extensive use of standards, ontologies, vocabularies, and thesauri. In the clinical setting, aggregated knowledge must be displayed in user-friendly formats so that physicians, non-technical laboratory personnel, nurses, data/research coordinators, and end-users can enter data, access information, and understand the output. The effort to connect astronomical numbers of data points, including '-omics'-based molecular data, individual genome sequences, experimental data, patient clinical phenotypes, and follow-up data is a monumental task. Roadblocks to this vision of integration and interoperability include ethical, legal

  8. Evaluation of pharmacy students’ clinical interventions on a general medicine practice experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones JD

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available As colleges of pharmacy prepare a new generation of practitioners, it is important that during practice experiences students learn the impact of clinical interventions. For over ten years, pharmacy students have been a vital part of the multidisciplinary team at the military treatment facility. The overall impact of the student interventions on patient care has not been evaluated. To evaluate the impact, the students began documenting their clinical interventions in Medkeeper RxInterventions™, an online database. The program is used to document faculty and fourth year pharmacy students’ pharmaceutical interventions.Objective: The objective of this study was to analyze the interventions completed by fourth year pharmacy students during a general medicine advanced pharmacy practice experience at a military treatment facility.Methods: The students completing their general medicine advanced pharmacy practice experience at the military treatment facility are responsible for self reporting all interventions made during clinical rounds into the Medkeeper RxIntervention™ database. The researchers retrospectively collected and analyzed interventions made from June 2008 to June 2009.Results: The total number of interventions recorded by 8 fourth year pharmacy students was 114. Students averaged a number of 14.3 interventions during an eight week practice experience. Students spent an average of 5 minutes per intervention. Ninety- five percent of the interventions were accepted.Conclusion: Fourth year pharmacy students’ recommendations were accepted at a high rate by resident physicians. The high acceptance rate may have the ability to positively impact patient care.

  9. The Practice of Korean Medicine: An Overview of Clinical Trials in Acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Suk Kim

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture, one of the Oriental medical therapeutic techniques that can be traced back at least 2500 years, is growing in popularity all over the world. Korea has continued to develop its own unique tradition of medicine throughout its long history, and has formed different types of acupuncture methods. The purpose of this review is to summarize clinical case studies in acupuncture and related therapies, such as acupressure, electric acupuncture, auricular acupuncture and moxibustion in Korea. A survey of Korean journals revealed that a total of 124 studies were published from 1983 to 2001. Results obtained from the survey showed that most clinical studies using acupuncture, electric acupuncture, moxibustion and other traditional therapies could alleviate a relatively broad range of medical problems. However, it should be emphasized that almost all clinical case studies published in various local journals did not follow the ‘good clinical practice’ with respect to regulatory aspects. Since they were not conducted using the randomized double-blinded controls with a large sample size, all the results should be considered as therapeutic indications. This review is an attempt to show the scope of acupuncture in our country and the kind of diseases, after many years of clinical experience, that were deemed valid targets for clinical trials.

  10. Ideas and Methods of Research on Measurement and Evaluation of Clinical Effects of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Treating Tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程剑华

    2002-01-01

    @@ Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has a glorious history of over 3000 years. The daily increasing demand of Chinese herbal medicine in the world has urged the international society to pay more attention to TCM, which also means a new opportunity for and challenge to the study and development of TCM. Clinical therapeutic effect is the lifeline of TCM, but the present measurement for clinical effect evaluation fails to reflect the essential effect of TCM. Therefore, how to measure and evaluate objectively the clinical effect of TCM becomes a problem we have to study studiously. World Health Organization (WHO)is very much concerned about the clinical effect evaluation of traditional medicines, and has formulated the "Guidance of Researches on Safety and Validity Evaluation of Phyto-Drugs"(1). In this paper,the authors would mainly discuss the ideas and methods in studying measurement and evaluation of clinical effect of TCM (MECE-TCM) in treating malignant tumor.

  11. Reflective writing in the competency-based curriculum at the cleveland clinic lerner college of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacson, J Harry; Salas, Renee; Koch, Carl; McKenzie, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    The Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University is a five-year medical school where the major emphasis is to train physician investigators. In this article we describe our experience with reflective writing in our competency-based medical school, which has reflective practice as one of the nine core competencies. We outline how we use reflective writing as a way to help students develop their reflective practice skills. Reflective writing opportunities, excerpts of student pieces, and faculty and student perspectives are included. We have experienced the value of reflective writing in medical school education and believe elements of our program can be adapted to other training environments.

  12. The Role of Clinical Records in Narrative Medicine: A Discourse of Message.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, John W; Choi, Jung Min; Cadeiras, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This article is designed to unite theory and practice. The focus of attention is the impact of narrative medicine on clinical records. Specifically important is that records are created through dialogue, whereby patients are able to grow the record through their ability to offer critiques and alternative explanations. Merely allowing patients to peruse their records, through advances in technology, is not sufficient to facilitate this aim. Various theoretical and practical considerations are discussed that may facilitate patient involvement and the creation of more accurate and relevant patient records.

  13. [World level of competitiveness of national researches in the field of clinical medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starodubov, V I; Kuznetsov, S L; Kurakova, N G; Tsvetkova, L A; Aref'ev, P G

    2012-01-01

    There is proposed formalization of concepts ,world research levelb and "leading scientific technological directions" of global science used in program documents which define main trends of reformation of Russian science. Use of bibliographic index as an example of "normalized citation in related area" for analyzing various subject areas for Russian clinic medicine it was shown that there is a different correlation of some areas of some national subject areas to their world levels. It was noted that it's necessary to develop national methodology of Russian science audit considering its national aspect which is a real problem while application world-acclaimed methods. PMID:22988746

  14. National comparison of {sup 131}I measurement among nuclear medicine clinics of eight countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsovcova, Veronika, E-mail: volsovcova@cmi.c [Czech Metrology Institute, Radiova 1, Praha 10, 102 00 (Czech Republic); Iwahara, Akira [Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes, Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, Av. Salvador Allende, s/no. Recreio, Rio de Janeiro, CEP 22780-160 Brazil (Brazil); Oropesa, Pilar [Centro de Isotopos, Ave. Monumental y Carretera La Rada, Km 31/2, Guanabacoa, Ciudad Habana (Cuba); Joseph, Leena; Ravindra, Anuradha [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Radiation Safety Systems Division, Trombay, Mumbai-400 085 (India); Ghafoori, Mostafa [SSDL, Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School (AMIRS). Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, AEOI, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Son, Hye-Kyung [Radiation Safety Division, National Institute of Food and Drug Safety Evaluation, Korea Food and Drug Administration, 194 Tongilro, Eunpyung-Gu, Seoul, 122-704 (Korea, Republic of); Sahagia, Maria [Horia Hulubei National Institute of R and D for Physics and Engineering, POB MG-6, 077125 Bucharest (Romania); Tastan, Selma [Ankara University Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cebeci 06100, Ankara (Turkey); Zimmerman, Brian [Dosimetry and Medical Radiation Physics Section, International Atomic Energy Agency, P.O. Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Ionizing Radiation Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8462 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    A generally applicable protocol for organizing comparisons among nuclear medicine clinics created within the IAEA project CRP E2.10.05 was tested in Brazil, Cuba, Czech Republic, India, Iran, Republic of Korea, Romania and Turkey in 2007. Comparisons of measurement of {sup 131}I were organized by local pilot laboratories with different backgrounds and levels of experience in this field. The results and experiences gained were compared and analyzed. A majority of results in each national comparison were within 10% of the reference value.

  15. Spatial map dose of nuclear medicine service of the Clinical Hospital of Botucatu, SP, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted to describe levels of occupational and environmental exposure of the Nuclear Medicine Service of the Clinical Hospital of Botucatu. To this end, measurements were made of the radiometric levels of points strategically defined, in all the environments, for a period of six months, sampling different days and times, during operation normal routine of the sector. The results allow to estimate the expected dose for each environment, comparing them to the dose limitation established by the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN), allowing better targeting of occupationally exposed individuals, indicating the points where the occupation should be the minimum required, enabling the reduction of risks to potential exposures. (author)

  16. [Study of clinical character and medicinal therapy of viral hepatitis in hospital based on real world].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun-ru; Wang, Lian-xin; Xie, Yan-ming; Yang, Wei; Wang, Zhuo-yue; Yi, Dan-hui; Wang, Yong-yan

    2014-09-01

    Viral hepatitis was the most common infectious disease in china. But the diagnosis and treatment were varied because the viral hepatitis patients were hospitalized in different kinds of hospital such as infectious disease hospital, general hospital and Chinese medical hospital. It was necessary to know clinical characters and information of viral hepatitis patients in different hospitals. The general information, subtype distribution, prognosis, complication, medication and relations of onset with solar term from 41 180 viral hepatitis patients based on HIS data were analyzed. It was found that the age of patients between 18 to 59 years old was most; most patients were males. The national basic medical insurance was the most type of payment. The outcome of viral hepatitis in the youth and female were better than that in the old and male. Acute hepatitis was easer to restore than chronic hepatitis. Liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma were the two most complications. The peak of onset was during summer solstice, slight heat and great heat. The most common Chinese medicine was Diammonium glycyrrhizinate and the most common western medicine was reduced glutathione. The combination of D. glycyrrhizinate with reduced glutathione, polyene phosphatidylcholine and thymosin was the main pattern. But It was not knew if the combination of western and Chinese medicine was the most effective therapy to protect liver function. It was necessary to take deeply research of the relationship between the combination therapy and their effectiveness.

  17. Radioactive isotopes in clinical medicine and research. Final Programme and Abstracts Book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 25th symposium offers again a representative cross-section through the current topics of nuclear medicine of scientific interest. The general theme of research in nuclear medicine has shifted from the spectacular new developments which were so often reported in the first symposia to a less spectacular, nevertheless equally fruitful, consolidation period. The topics of the symposium reflect the major trends in nuclear medicine, witnessing the firm place which PET procedures have occupied in clinical practice. Standardization and validation is another area which has remained as a major task for the development of our specialty and which in spite of the enormous progress that has been made during the past two years still is far from a general solution. Networking, even between heterogeneous systems, has become less of a problem than it used to be a few years ago. However, new and more complex acquisition technology such as needed for quantitation in scintigraphy and for multi-modality imaging, is still a challenge for integration and for PACS systems. (author)

  18. In vitro antimicrobial activity of ten medicinal plants against clinical isolates of oral cancer cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushal Vivek

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suppression of immune system in treated cancer patients may lead to secondary infections that obviate the need of antibiotics. In the present study, an attempt was made to understand the occurrence of secondary infections in immuno-suppressed patients along with herbal control of these infections with the following objectives to: (a isolate the microbial species from the treated oral cancer patients along with the estimation of absolute neutrophile counts of patients (b assess the in vitro antimicrobial activity medicinal plants against the above clinical isolates. Methods Blood and oral swab cultures were taken from 40 oral cancer patients undergoing treatment in the radiotherapy unit of Regional Cancer Institute, Pt. B.D.S. Health University, Rohtak, Haryana. Clinical isolates were identified by following general microbiological, staining and biochemical methods. The absolute neutrophile counts were done by following the standard methods. The medicinal plants selected for antimicrobial activity analysis were Asphodelus tenuifolius Cav., Asparagus racemosus Willd., Balanites aegyptiaca L., Cestrum diurnum L., Cordia dichotoma G. Forst, Eclipta alba L., Murraya koenigii (L. Spreng. , Pedalium murex L., Ricinus communis L. and Trigonella foenum graecum L. The antimicrobial efficacy of medicinal plants was evaluated by modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. MIC and MFC were investigated by serial two fold microbroth dilution method. Results Prevalent bacterial pathogens isolated were Staphylococcus aureus (23.2%, Escherichia coli (15.62%, Staphylococcus epidermidis (12.5%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (9.37%, Klebsiella pneumonia (7.81%, Proteus mirabilis (3.6%, Proteus vulgaris (4.2% and the fungal pathogens were Candida albicans (14.6%, Aspergillus fumigatus (9.37%. Out of 40 cases, 35 (87.5% were observed as neutropenic. Eight medicinal plants (A. tenuifolius, A. racemosus, B. aegyptiaca, E. alba, M. koenigii, P. murex R

  19. Drug Dose Adjustment in Dialysis Patients Admitted in Clinics Other Than Internal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solak, Yalcin; Biyik, Zeynep; Gaipov, Abduzhappar; Kayrak, Mehmet; Ciray, Hilal; Cizmecioglu, Ahmet; Tonbul, Halil Zeki; Turk, Suleyman

    2016-01-01

    Many drugs that are administered during hospitalization are metabolized or excreted through kidneys, consequently require dosage adjustment. We aimed to investigate inappropriate prescription of drugs requiring renal dose adjustment (RDA) in various surgical and medical inpatient clinics. We retrospectively determined dialysis patients hospitalized between January 2007 and December 2010. Inpatient clinics, including cardiology, pulmonary medicine, neurology, infectious diseases (medical clinics) and cardiovascular surgery, orthopedics, general surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, and neurosurgery (surgical clinics), were screened via electronic database. Total and RDA medications were determined. RDA drugs correctly adjusted to creatinine clearance were labeled as RDA-A (appropriate), otherwise as RDA-I (inappropriate). Renal doses of RDA medications were based on the "American College of Physicians Drug Prescribing in Renal Failure, fifth Edition." Two hundred seventeen hospitalization records of 172 dialysis patients (92 men and 80 women) were included in the analysis. Mean age of patients was 59.4 ± 14.6 years, and the mean hospitalization duration was 8.5 ± 7.8 days. In total, 247 (84.3%, percentage in drugs requiring dose adjustment) and 175 (46.2%) drugs have been inadequately dosed in surgical and medical clinics, respectively. The percentage of patients to whom at least 1 RDA-I drug was ordered was 92% and 91.4% for surgical and medical clinics, respectively (P > 0.05). Nephrology consultation numbers were 8 (7.1%) in surgical and 32 (30.4%) in medical clinics. The most common RDA-I drugs were aspirin and famotidine. A significant portion of RDA drugs was ordered inappropriately both in surgical and medical clinics. Nephrology consultation rate was very low. Measures to increase physician awareness are required to improve results.

  20. Clinical preventive services in Guatemala: a cross-sectional survey of internal medicine physicians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan E Corral

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Guatemala is currently undergoing an epidemiologic transition. Preventive services are key to reducing the burden of non-communicable diseases, and smoking counseling and cessation are among the most cost-effective and wide-reaching strategies. Internal medicine physicians are fundamental to providing such services, and their knowledge is a cornerstone of non-communicable disease control. METHODS: A national cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2011 to evaluate knowledge of clinical preventive services for non-communicable diseases. Interns, residents, and attending physicians of the internal medicine departments of all teaching hospitals in Guatemala completed a self-administered questionnaire. Participants' responses were contrasted with the Guatemalan Ministry of Health (MoH prevention guidelines and the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF recommendations. Analysis compared knowledge of recommendations within and between hospitals. RESULTS: In response to simulated patient scenarios, all services were recommended by more than half of physicians regardless of MoH or USPSTF recommendations. Prioritization was adequate according to the MoH guidelines but not including other potentially effective services (e.g. colorectal cancer and lipid disorder screenings. With the exception of colorectal and prostate cancer screening, less frequently recommended by interns, there was no difference in recommendation rates by level. CONCLUSION: Guatemalan internal medicine physicians' knowledge on preventive services recommendations for non-communicable diseases is limited, and prioritization did not reflect cost-effectiveness. Based on these data we recommend that preventive medicine training be strengthened and development of evidence-based guidelines for low-middle income countries be a priority.

  1. Typical investigational medicinal products follow relatively uniform regulations in 10 European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gluud Christian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to facilitate multinational clinical research, regulatory requirements need to become international and harmonised. The EU introduced the Directive 2001/20/EC in 2004, regulating investigational medicinal products in Europe. Methods We conducted a survey in order to identify the national regulatory requirements for major categories of clinical research in ten European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN countries-Austria, Denmark, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Spain, Sweden, and United Kingdom-covering approximately 70% of the EU population. Here we describe the results for regulatory requirements for typical investigational medicinal products, in the ten countries. Results Our results show that the ten countries have fairly harmonised definitions of typical investigational medicinal products. Clinical trials assessing typical investigational medicinal products require authorisation from a national competent authority in each of the countries surveyed. The opinion of the competent authorities is communicated to the trial sponsor within the same timelines, i.e., no more than 60 days, in all ten countries. The authority to which the application has to be sent to in the different countries is not fully harmonised. Conclusion The Directive 2001/20/EC defined the term 'investigational medicinal product' and all regulatory requirements described therein are applicable to investigational medicinal products. Our survey showed, however, that those requirements had been adopted in ten European countries, not for investigational medicinal products overall, but rather a narrower category which we term 'typical' investigational medicinal products. The result is partial EU harmonisation of requirements and a relatively navigable landscape for the sponsor regarding typical investigational medicinal products.

  2. [Professor HE Tianyou's clinical experience of acupuncture and medicine on intractable facial paralysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fenghua; Yao, Xuhong; Yan, Xingke; Zhang, Yongkui; Jing, Xiaohui; He, Tianyou

    2015-02-01

    Professor HE Tianyou's unique understanding and treatment characteristics for intractahle facial paralysis are introduced. In clinical practice professor HE highly values acupoint selection and manipulation application, and integrates Chinese and western medicine to flexibly choose acupoints and formulate prescriptions according to syndrome differentiation and location differentiation, besides, he creates several specialized manipulation methods including "tug-of war opposite acupuncture method" and "tractive flash cupping". Based on strengthening body and dredging collaterals. more attention is given on stimulation to local paralyzed facial nerves; meanwhile acupuncture and medication are combined to improve clinical efficacy. During the treatment, the important role of psychological counseling on patient's anxiety is emphasized, and comprehensive treatment is given physically and psychologically in order to achieve the purpose of total rehabilitation.

  3. Potential Clinical Utility of Copeptin (C-terminal provasopressin) measurements in clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, K C; Brabant, G

    2016-03-01

    Copeptin is a 39-amino-acids containing glycosylated peptide derived from the C-terminal part of the arginine vasopressin (AVP) precursor. In the process of proteolysis the AVP precursor is processed to AVP, neurophysin II, and copeptin in equimolar amounts. In contrast to AVP, copeptin remains stable for several days at room temperature in serum or plasma. Hence, copeptin serves as a bona fide biomarker of AVP release. We briefly summarise clinical utility of copeptin in the diagnosis of diabetes insipidus. We also discuss potential applications of copeptin measurements in hyponatraemic states, assessment of an anterior pituitary function, as well as a wide range of several acute and chronic medical conditions, such as myocardial infarction, stroke or diabetes mellitus. PMID:27008633

  4. Clinical applications of SPECT/CT: New hybrid nuclear medicine imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interest in multimodality imaging shows no sign of subsiding. New tracers are spreading out the spectrum of clinical applications and innovative technological solutions are preparing the way for yet more modality marriages: hybrid imaging. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has enabled the evaluation of disease processes based on functional and metabolic information of organs and cells. Integration of X ray computed tomography (CT) into SPECT has recently emerged as a brilliant diagnostic tool in medical imaging, where anatomical details may delineate functional and metabolic information. SPECT/CT has proven to be valuable in oncology. For example, in the case of a patient with metastatic thyroid cancer, neither SPECT nor CT alone could identify the site of malignancy. SPECT/CT, a hybrid image, precisely identified where the surgeon should operate. However SPECT/CT is not just advantageous in oncology. It may also be used as a one-stop-shop for various diseases. Clinical applications with SPECT/CT have started and expanded in developed countries. It has been reported that moving from SPECT alone to SPECT/CT could change diagnoses in 30% of cases. Large numbers of people could therefore benefit from this shift all over the world. This report presents an overview of clinical applications of SPECT/CT and a relevant source of information for nuclear medicine physicians, radiologists and clinical practitioners. This information may also be useful for decision making when allocating resources dedicated to the health care system, a critical issue that is especially important for the development of nuclear medicine in developing countries. In this regard, the IAEA may be heavily involved in the promotion of programmes aimed at the IAEA's coordinated research projects and Technical Cooperation projects

  5. Child Rights and Clinical Bioethics: Historical Reflections on Modern Medicine and Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosco, Jeffrey P

    2016-01-01

    Why might pediatric bioethicists in the United States reject the U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) as a framework for resolving ethical issues? The essays in this issue present arguments and counterarguments regarding the usefulness of the CRC in various clinical and research cases. But underlying this debate are two historical factors that help explain the seeming paradox of pediatric bioethicists' arguing against child's rights. First, the profession of clinical bioethics emerged in the 1970s as one component of modern medicine's focus on improving health through the application of technologically sophisticated treatments. The everyday work of U.S. bioethicists thus usually involves emerging technologies or practices in clinical or laboratory settings; the articles of the CRC, in contrast, seem better suited to addressing broad policy issues that affect the social determinants of health. Second, U.S. child health policy veered away from a more communitarian approach in the early 20th century for reasons of demography that were reinforced by ideology and concerns about immigration. The divide between clinical medicine and public health in the United States, as well as the relatively meager social safety net, are not based on a failure to recognize the rights of children. Indeed, there is some historical evidence to suggest that "rights language" has hindered progress on child health and well-being in the United States. In today's political climate, efforts to ensure that governments pledge to treat children in accordance with their status as human beings (a child right's perspective) are less likely to improve child health than robust advocacy on behalf of children's unique needs, especially as novel models of health-care financing emerge. PMID:27157355

  6. Person-centered approaches in medicine: clinical tasks, psychological paradigms, and postnonclassic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mezzich J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article aims to demonstrate advances in methodological means suggested by Vygotsky’s cultural-historical concept in association with a theoretical model of a Person-centered diagnosis and practical use of the construct for clinical psychology and medicine. This, to a greater extent, arises from the fact that the cultural-historical concept (due to its humanistic nature and epistemological content is closely related to the person-centered integrative approach. But for all that the concept corresponds to the ideals of postnonclassical model of scientific rationality with a number of ‘key’ features. Above all it manifests its “methodological maturity” to cope with open self-developing systems, which is most essential at the modern stage of scientific knowledge.The work gives consideration to ‘defining pillars’ of Person-centered approach in modern medicine, to humanistic traditions of the Russian clinical school, and high prospects in diagnostics of such mental constructs as “subjective pattern of disease” and “social situation of personal development in disease” - within the context of person-centered integrative diagnosis.This article discusses the need for implementation a cross-cultural study of subjective pattern of disease and its correlation with a particular “social situation of personality development under disease conditions”. It aims at development and substantiation of the model of person-centered integrative approach, enhancement of its diagnostic scope and, consequently, improvement of the model of person-centered care in modern psychiatry and medicine.

  7. Clinical observation of associated treatment for Graves' disease with traditional chinese medicine and 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the method and curative effect of associated treatment for Graves Disease (GD) with traditional Chinese medicine and 131I. 100 patients with GD were randomly divided into two groups, the patients in group A was only given 131I treatment and the patients in group B was given traditional Chinese medicine (Shimaiqing Fluid, 3 times of 20 mL per day for 40 days) after 7 days of 131I treatment. The serum FT3, FT4 and TSH were measured before and 30 and 90 days after treatment. 8 cardinal symptoms were selected and Kupperman 4-grade grading method was used to assess the remission of the disease. The Results showed that the symptoms of patients in group B were improved ahead of time, and pass through the FT3 and FT4 rebound elevation period safely after one month of 131I treatment. The symptoms of patients in group A after 30 days treatment were more serious than that of before treatment, the levels of serum FT3 and FT4 were both higher than those of before treatment. The symptoms of patients in group B after 90 days treatment were improved significantly, and the levels of serum FT3, FT4 and TSH were in normal value. The clinical symptoms of patients in group A were improved, but the levels of serum FT3 and FT4 were lower and TSH was higher than normal value. The curative effect in group B was better than that in group A, the patients passed through the high risk period safely after 30 days treatment, and the hypothyroidism rate was decreased after 90 days treatment. The Shimaiqing Fluid is a nontoxic and safe medicine, and it may be widely used in clinical treatment for patients with GD. (authors)

  8. International conference on clinical PET and molecular nuclear medicine (IPET 2007). Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency is organizing its first international conference on 'Clinical PET and Molecular Nuclear Medicine'. Medical imaging technologies have undergone explosive growth over the past two decades. Today, imaging is at a crossroad, with molecular targeted imaging agents expected to broadly expand the capabilities of conventional anatomical imaging methods. Observing molecular interactions in the living body by the radiotracer technique has become known as 'molecular nuclear medicine'. Molecular nuclear medicine techniques analyze cellular biochemistry and its relationship to disease processes expressed in tissue and organ dysfunction, for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. People can often have similar manifestations of disease, but no two patients will be the same. Functional radionuclide imaging and positron emission tomography (PET) provide excellent opportunities to follow the pathology in individual patients and therefore provide a means for tailored clinical management. These also provide the means to assess the response to treatment in a safe and non-invasive manner. Changes at molecular and cellular levels provide vital clues for evaluating the effectiveness of chosen clinical treatment plans. This information is expected to have a major impact on understanding disease, disease detection, individualised treatment, and drug development. Recently, considerable attention has been drawn to nuclear medicine with the visualization of biochemical processes in vivo such as PET studies with 18F-FDG in many different organs and in cancerous tissues. With the arrival of PET/CT systems there is a new era of accurate mapping of disease processes. Today, 18F-FDG is the most useful PET tracer for the detection, staging, treatment planning and management of cancer. There is mounting evidence for its competitive advantage over conventional techniques in major medical areas including oncology, cardiology, and neurology. Nuclear medicine is

  9. Clinical Study on Treatment of Incipient Diabetic Nephropathy by Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    bian; fang

    2001-01-01

    [1]Mogensen CE. Early diabetic renal involvement and nephropathy. In: Alberti KGMM. Krall Lp (eds). The Diabetes Annual(1/3). Amsterdan: Elsevier, 1987∶306-311.[2]WANG XB, SANG Y, KONG XM, et al. Clinical observation on treatment of non-insulin dependent type of diabetes mellitus accompanied with microalbuminuria by Tangshen capsule combining western medicine. CJIM(Chin) 1997;17(10)∶622-623.[3]LU RH. Diagnosis and treatment of diabetes mellitus and its complications by traditional Chinese and western medicine. Beijing: People's Health Publishing House, 1998∶527-531.[4]Febre J, Balant LP, Dayerpa, et al. The kidney in maturity on set diabetes mellitus: a clinical study on 510 patients. Kidney Int 1982;21∶730-738.[5]David M, Neumann L, Lishher M. Plasma lipids and the progression of nephropathy in diabetes mellitus type 2: effect of ACE inhibitors. Kidney Int 1995;47∶907.[6]CAO SF, FANG FZ, AN XY, et al. Significance of microalbuminuria, blood and urine β2-MG and THP in diagnosis of early stage diabetic nephropathy. Chinese J Nephrology 1992;8(3)∶164-165.

  10. Thoracic sonography for pneumothorax: The clinical evaluation of an operational space medicine spin-off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Nicolaou, Savvas; Rowan, Kevin; Liu, David; Cunningham, Johan; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Hamilton, Douglas; Dulchavsky, Scott A.

    2005-05-01

    The recent interest in the use of ultrasound (US) to detect pneumothoraces after acute trauma in North America was initially driven by an operational space medicine concern. Astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) are at risk for pneumothoraces, and US is the only potential medical imaging available. Pneumothoraces are common following trauma, and are a preventable cause of death, as most are treatable with relatively simple interventions. While pneumothoraces are optimally diagnosed clinically, they are more often inapparent even on supine chest radiographs (CXR) with recent series reporting a greater than 50% rate of occult pneumothoraces. In the course of basic scientific investigations in a conventional and parabolic flight laboratory, investigators familiarized themselves with the sonographic features of both pneumothoraces and normal pulmonary ventilation. By examining the visceral-parietal pleural interface (VPPI) with US, investigators became confident in diagnosing pneumothoraces. This knowledge was subsequently translated into practice at an American and a Canadian trauma center. The sonographic examination was found to be more accurate and sensitive than CXR (US 96% and 100% versus US 74% and 36%) in specific circumstances. Initial studies have also suggested that detecting the US features of pleural pulmonary ventilation in the left lung field may offer the ability to exclude serious endotracheal tube malpositions such as right mainstem and esophageal intubations. Applied thoracic US is an example of a clinically useful space medicine spin-off that is improving health care on earth.

  11. The Theory of Clinical Medicine of Huangdi's Classic of Internal Medicine%《黄帝内经》的临床医学理论

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周安方

    2011-01-01

    The rich theory of clinical medicine of Huangdi 's Classic of Internal Medicine includes the clinical guiding ideology, theory of pathogenic factor and pathogenesis, theory of clinical diagnosis and examination, theory of clinical differentiation of syndrome, theory of clinical treatment. And the clinical guiding ideology includes the ideology of people o-riented, prevention foremost and harmony premium. And the theory of clinical treatment includes theory of root treatment, theory of yin - yang balance, theory of harmony of Qi and blood, theory of harmony of healthy Qi and pathogenic factor, theory of naturopathy, theory of five elements restraint, theory of opposition treatment, theory of correspondence between flavors and viscera. The theories and methods of Huangdis Classic of Internal Medicine have significant guiding effects on TCM clinic.%的临床医学理论非常丰富,它包括临床指导思想、病因病机理论、临床诊察理论、临床辩证理论、临床论治理论等,其临床指导思想包括以人为本思想、以防为主思想、以和为贵思想;其临床论治理论包括治病求本理论、阴阳求衡理论、气血求和理论、正邪求谐理论、时势求顺理论、五行制胜理论、以此治彼理论、各有所宜理论等.的这些理论及其方法,对中医临床具有重要的指导作用.

  12. Racial and ethnic disparities in the clinical practice of emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Lynne D; Babcock Irvin, Charlene; Tamayo-Sarver, Joshua H

    2003-11-01

    There is convincing evidence that racial and ethnic disparities exist in the provision of health care, including the provision of emergency care; and that stereotyping, biases, and uncertainty on the part of health care providers all contribute to unequal treatment. Situations, such as the emergency department (ED), that are characterized by time pressure, incomplete information, and high demands on attention and cognitive resources increase the likelihood that stereotypes and bias will affect diagnostic and treatment decisions. It is likely that there are many as-yet-undocumented disparities in clinical emergency practice. Racial and ethnic disparities may arise in decisions made by out-of-hospital personnel regarding ambulance destination, triage assessments made by nursing personnel, diagnostic testing ordered by physicians or physician-extenders, and in disposition decisions. The potential for disparate treatment includes the timing and intensity of ED therapy as well as patterns of referral, prescription choices, and priority for hospital admission and bed assignment. At a national roundtable discussion, strategies suggested to address these disparities included: increased use of evidence-based clinical guidelines; use of continuous quality improvement methods to document individual and institutional disparities in performance; zero tolerance for stereotypical remarks in the workplace; cultural competence training for emergency providers; increased workforce diversity; and increased epidemiologic, clinical, and services research. Careful scrutiny of the clinical practice of emergency medicine and diligent implementation of strategies to prevent disparities will be required to eliminate the individual behaviors and systemic processes that result in the delivery of disparate care in EDs. PMID:14597493

  13. Latest status of the clinical and industrial applications of cell sheet engineering and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egami, Mime; Haraguchi, Yuji; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2014-01-01

    Cell sheet engineering, which allows tissue engineering to be realized without the use of biodegradable scaffolds as an original approach, using a temperature-responsive intelligent surface, has been applied in regenerative medicine for various tissues, and a number of clinical studies have been already performed for life-threatening diseases. By using the results and findings obtained from the initial clinical studies, additional investigative clinical studies in several tissues with cell sheet engineering are currently in preparation stage. For treating many patients effectively by cell sheet engineering, an automated system integrating cell culture, cell-sheet fabrication, and layering is essential, and the system should include an advanced three-dimensional suspension cell culture system and an in vitro bioreactor system to scale up the production of cultured cells and fabricate thicker vascularized tissues. In this paper, cell sheet engineering, its clinical application, and further the authors' challenge to develop innovative cell culture systems under newly legislated regulatory platform in Japan are summarized and discussed.

  14. Community-based clinical education increases motivation of medical students to medicine of remote area : comparison between lecture and practice

    OpenAIRE

    TANI, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Harutaka; Tada, Saaya; Kondo, Saki; Tabata, Ryo; Yuasa, Shino; Kawaminami, Shingo; Nakanishi, Yoshinori; Ito, Jun; Shimizu, Nobuhiko; Obata, Fumiaki; Shin, Teruki; Bando, Hiroyasu; Kohno, Mitsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we administered a questionnaire to medical students to evaluate the effect of community-based clinical education on their attitudes to community medicine and medicine in remote area. Questionnaires were given 4 times to all the students from first-year to sixth-year. Of 95 students, 65 students (68.4%) who completed all questionnaires, were used in this study. The intensity of students’ attitudes was estimated by using visual analogue scale. The intensity of interest, a sens...

  15. Heart rate control with adrenergic blockade: Clinical outcomes in cardiovascular medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Feldman

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available David Feldman1, Terry S Elton2, Doron M Menachemi3, Randy K Wexler41Heart Failure/Transplant and VAD Programs, Minneapolis Heart Institute, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA; 2Division of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA; 3Heart Failure Services, Edith Wolfson Medical Center, The Heart Institute, Sakler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Holon, Israel; 4Department of Clinical Family Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USAAbstract: The sympathetic nervous system is involved in regulating various cardiovascular parameters including heart rate (HR and HR variability. Aberrant sympathetic nervous system expression may result in elevated HR or decreased HR variability, and both are independent risk factors for development of cardiovascular disease, including heart failure, myocardial infarction, and hypertension. Epidemiologic studies have established that impaired HR control is linked to increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. One successful way of decreasing HR and cardiovascular mortality has been by utilizing β-blockers, because their ability to alter cell signaling at the receptor level has been shown to mitigate the pathogenic effects of sympathetic nervous system hyperactivation. Numerous clinical studies have demonstrated that β-blocker-mediated HR control improvements are associated with decreased mortality in postinfarct and heart failure patients. Although improved HR control benefits have yet to be established in hypertension, both traditional and vasodilating β-blockers exert positive HR control effects in this patient population. However, differences exist between traditional and vasodilating β-blockers; the latter reduce peripheral vascular resistance and exert neutral or positive effects on important metabolic parameters. Clinical evidence suggests that attainment of HR control is an important treatment objective for patients with cardiovascular

  16. Integrating Clinical Medicine into Biomedical Graduate Education to Promote Translational Research: Strategies from Two New PhD Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Carolyn L; Jarrett, Marcia; Bierer, S. Beth

    2013-01-01

    For several decades, a barrier has existed between research and clinical medicine, making it difficult for aspiring scientists to gain exposure to human pathophysiology and access to clinical/translational research mentors during their graduate training. In 2005, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute announced the Med Into Grad initiative to support graduate programs that integrate clinical knowledge into PhD biomedical training, with the goal of preparing a new cadre of translational researche...

  17. Curricula for teaching the content of clinical practice guidelines to family medicine and internal medicine residents in the US: a survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moheet Amir

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Teaching the content of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs is important to both clinical care and graduate medical education. The objective of this study was to determine the characteristics of curricula for teaching the content of CPGs in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. Methods We surveyed the directors of family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. The questionnaire included questions about the characteristics of the teaching of CPGs: goals and objectives, educational activities, evaluation, aspects of CPGs that the program teaches, the methods of making texts of CPGs available to residents, and the major barriers to teaching CPGs. Results Of 434 programs responding (out of 839, 52%, 14% percent reported having written goals and objectives related to teaching CPGs. The most frequently taught aspect was the content of specific CPGs (76%. The top two educational strategies used were didactic sessions (76% and journal clubs (64%. Auditing for adherence by residents was the primary evaluation strategy (44%, although 36% of program directors conducted no evaluation. Programs made texts of CPGs available to residents most commonly in the form of paper copies (54% while the most important barrier was time constraints on faculty (56%. Conclusion Residency programs teach different aspects of CPGs to varying degrees, and the majority uses educational strategies not supported by research evidence.

  18. Cultural brokerage: Creating linkages between voices of lifeworld and medicine in cross-cultural clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ming-Cheng Miriam

    2010-09-01

    Culturally competent healthcare has emerged as a policy solution to racial and ethnic health disparities in the United States. Current research indicates that patient-centered care is a central component of culturally competent healthcare, and a rich literature exists on how to elicit patients' lifeworld voices through open-ended questions, sensitive communication skills, and power-sharing interaction styles. But it remains largely unclear how doctors create linkages between cultures of medicine and lifeworld as two sets of incongruent meaning systems. Without such linkages, a doctor lacks the cultural tool to incorporate her patient's assumptions or frameworks into the voice of medicine, rendering it difficult to (at least partially) expand and transform the latter from within. This study explores how doctors perform this bridging work, conceptualized as cultural brokerage, on the job. Cultural brokerage entails mutual inclusion of different sets of schemas or frameworks with which people organize their meanings and information. Based on 24 in-depth interviews with primary care physicians in Northern California, this study inductively documents four empirical mechanisms of cultural brokerage: 'translating between health systems', 'bridging divergent images of medicine', 'establishing long-term relationships', and 'working with patients' relational networks'. Furthermore, the study argues that cultural brokerage must be understood as concrete 'cultural labor', which involves specific tasks and requires time and resources. I argue that the performance of cultural brokerage work is embedded in the institutional contexts of the clinic and therefore faces two macro-level constraints: the cultural ideology and the political economy of the American healthcare system. PMID:20801996

  19. Personalized Medicine: how to Switch from the Concept to the Integration into the Clinical Development Plan to Obtain Marketing Authorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becquemont, Laurent; Bordet, Régis; Cellier, Dominic

    2012-01-01

    One of the challenges of the coming years is to personalize medicine in order to provide each patient with an individualized treatment plan. The three objectives of personalized medicine are to refine diagnosis, rationalize treatment and engage patients in a preventive approach. Personalization can be characterized by various descriptors whether related to the field, biology, imaging, type of lesion of the entity to be treated, comorbidity factors, coprescriptions or the environment As part of personalized medicine focused on biological markers including genetics or genomics, the integration of the clinical development plan to obtain marketing authorization may be segmented in 3 stages with a known descriptor identified before clinical development, a known descriptor discovered during clinical development or a known descriptor known after clinical development. For each stage, it is important to clearly define the technical optimization elements, to specify the expectations and objectives, to examine the methodological aspects of each clinical development phase and finally to consider the fast changing regulatory requirements in view of the few registered therapeutics complying with the definition of personalized medicine as well as the significant technological breakthroughs according to the screened and selected biomarkers. These considerations should be integrated in view of the time required for clinical development from early phase to MA, i.e. more than 10 years. Moreover, business models related to the economic environment should be taken into account when deciding whether or not to retain a biomarker allowing the selection of target populations in a general population. PMID:23110835

  20. Personalized Medicine: how to Switch from the Concept to the Integration into the Clinical Development Plan to Obtain Marketing Authorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becquemont, Laurent; Bordet, Régis; Cellier, Dominic

    2012-01-01

    One of the challenges of the coming years is to personalize medicine in order to provide each patient with an individualized treatment plan. The three objectives of personalized medicine are to refine diagnosis, rationalize treatment and engage patients in a preventive approach. Personalization can be characterized by various descriptors whether related to the field, biology, imaging, type of lesion of the entity to be treated, comorbidity factors, coprescriptions or the environment As part of personalized medicine focused on biological markers including genetics or genomics, the integration of the clinical development plan to obtain marketing authorization may be segmented in 3 stages with a known descriptor identified before clinical development, a known descriptor discovered during clinical development or a known descriptor known after clinical development. For each stage, it is important to clearly define the technical optimization elements, to specify the expectations and objectives, to examine the methodological aspects of each clinical development phase and finally to consider the fast changing regulatory requirements in view of the few registered therapeutics complying with the definition of personalized medicine as well as the significant technological breakthroughs according to the screened and selected biomarkers. These considerations should be integrated in view of the time required for clinical development from early phase to MA, i.e. more than 10 years. Moreover, business models related to the economic environment should be taken into account when deciding whether or not to retain a biomarker allowing the selection of target populations in a general population.

  1. Clinical Observation on Treatment of Anxiety with Combined Acupuncture and Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zhi-hua; YU Wei-ying; WU Zhou-hong; WU Bo-xiang; DAI Xiao-ying; HAN Chou-ping

    2003-01-01

    Purpose To observe the curative effect of combined acupuncture and medicine on anxiety. Method An acupuncture plus medicine group and a medicine group were established for a comparison of their curative effects on anxiety. Results The total effective rate was 96% in the acupuncture plus medicine group and 64% in the medicine group, and there was a significant difference between the two groups (P<0.001). Conclusion The curative effect of combined acupuncture and medicine on anxiety is better than that of simple medicine.

  2. Pain in the Blood? Envisioning Mechanism-Based Diagnoses and Biomarkers in Clinical Pain Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Bäckryd

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is highly prevalent, and pain medicine lacks objective biomarkers to guide diagnosis and choice of treatment. The current U.S. “opioid epidemic” is a reminder of the paucity of effective and safe treatment options. Traditional pain diagnoses according to the International Classification of Diseases are often unspecific, and analgesics are often prescribed on a trial-and-error basis. In contrast to this current state of affairs, the vision of future mechanism-based diagnoses of chronic pain conditions is presented in this non-technical paper, focusing on the need for biomarkers and the theoretical complexity of the task. Pain is and will remain a subjective experience, and as such is not objectively measurable. Therefore, the concept of “noci-marker” is presented as an alternative to “pain biomarker”, the goal being to find objective, measurable correlates of the pathophysiological processes involved in different chronic pain conditions. This vision entails a call for more translational pain research in order to bridge the gap between clinical pain medicine and preclinical science.

  3. Aging Q3: an initiative to improve internal medicine residents' geriatrics knowledge, skills, and clinical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, William P; Zapka, Jane; Iverson, Patty J; Zhao, Yumin; Wiley, M Kathleen; Pride, Pamela; Davis, Kimberly S

    2012-05-01

    A growing number of older adults coupled with a limited number of physicians trained in geriatrics presents a major challenge to ensuring quality medical care for this population. Innovations to incorporate geriatrics education into internal medicine residency programs are needed. To meet this need, in 2009, faculty at the Medical University of South Carolina developed Aging Q(3)-Quality Education, Quality Care, and Quality of Life. This multicomponent initiative recognizes the need for improved geriatrics educational tools and faculty development as well as systems changes to improve the knowledge and clinical performance of residents. To achieve these goals, faculty employ multiple intervention strategies, including lectures, rounds, academic detailing, visual cues, and electronic medical record prompts and decision support. The authors present examples from specific projects, based on care areas including vision screening, fall prevention, and caring for patients with dementia, all of which are based on the Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders quality indicators. The authors describe the principles driving the design, implementation, and evaluation of the Aging Q(3) program. They present data from multiple sources that illustrate the effectiveness of the interventions to meet the knowledge, skill level, and behavior goals. The authors also address major challenges, including the maintenance of the teaching and modeling interventions over time within the context of demanding primary care and inpatient settings. This organized, evidence-based approach to quality improvement in resident education, as well as faculty leadership development, holds promise for successfully incorporating geriatrics education into internal medicine residencies. PMID:22450181

  4. Managing chronic pathologies with a stepped mHealth-based approach in clinical psychology and medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca eCastelnuovo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic diseases and conditions typically require long-term monitoring and treatment protocols both in traditional settings and in out-patient frameworks. The economic burden of chronic conditions is a key challenge and new and mobile technologies could offer good solutions. mHealth could be considered an evolution of ehealth and could be defined as the practice of medicine and public health supported by mobile communication devices. mHealth approach could overcome limitations linked with the traditional, restricted and highly expensive in-patient treatment of many chronic pathologies. Possible applications include stepped mHealth approach, where patients can be monitored and treated in their everyday contexts. Unfortunately, many barriers for the spread of mHealth are still present. Due the significant impact of psychosocial factors on disease evolution, psychotherapies have to be included into the chronic disease protocols. Existing psychological theories of health behavior change have to be adapted to the new technological contexts and requirements. In conclusion, clinical psychology and medicine have to face the chronic care management challenge in both traditional and mHealth settings.

  5. Chemokine receptor CCR5 antagonist maraviroc: medicinal chemistry and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoyan G; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao

    2014-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes acquired immumodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), one of the worst global pandemic. The virus infects human CD4 T cells and macrophages, and causes CD4 depletion. HIV enters target cells through the binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein to CD4 and the chemokine coreceptor, CXCR4 or CCR5. In particular, the CCR5-utilizing viruses predominate in the blood during the disease course. CCR5 is expressed on the surface of various immune cells including macrophages, monocytes, microglia, dendric cells, and active memory CD4 T cells. In the human population, the CCR5 genomic mutation, CCR5Δ32, is associated with relative resistance to HIV. These findings paved the way for the discovery and development of CCR5 inhibitors to block HIV transmission and replication. Maraviroc, discovered as a CCR5 antagonist, is the only CCR5 inhibitor that has been approved by both US FDA and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for treating HIV/AIDS patients. In this review, we summarize the medicinal chemistry and clinical studies of Maraviroc.

  6. On first looking into Kutcher's "Contested Medicine": ethical tensions in clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    Contested Medicine examines the experiments done at the University of Cincinnati by Eugene Saenger and his colleagues during the 1960s, a time of great fear that the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union would become a hot war using nuclear weapons. These studies were to provide the Department of Defense information relevant to the consequences of exposure of military personnel to ionizing radiation in such circumstances. Kutcher, a radiation physicist turned historian of science, is especially well prepared to put these studies into the context of the evolving bioethics of the time. He reviews the essential ethical reviews, beginning with the Nuremberg Code and extending to those of the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments appointed by President Clinton. These evolving ethical standards provide a cautionary note to today's methods of clinical experimentation in search of proper evidence-based medicine. There has been an ascendance of the priority of patient rights over societal good except in increasingly limited special circumstances. Some of what was considered good and necessary science in the 1960s and 1970s is no longer considered proper. Similarly, future ethical norms may well find current trial methodology to be flawed.

  7. Acellular approaches for regenerative medicine: on the verge of clinical trials with extracellular membrane vesicles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster-Matanzo, Almudena; Gessler, Florian; Leonardi, Tommaso; Iraci, Nunzio; Pluchino, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are a heterogeneous population of naturally occurring secreted small vesicles, with distinct biophysical properties and different functions both in physiology and under pathological conditions. In recent years, a number of studies have demonstrated that EVs might hold remarkable potential in regenerative medicine by acting as therapeutically promising nanodrugs. Understanding their final impact on the biology of specific target cells as well as clarification of their overall therapeutic impact remains a matter of intense debate. Here we review the key principles of EVs in physiological and pathological conditions with a specific highlight on the most recently described mechanisms regulating some of the EV-mediated effects. First, we describe the current debates and the upcoming research on EVs as potential novel therapeutics in regenerative medicine, either as unmodified agents or as functionalized small carriers for targeted drug delivery. Moreover, we address a number of safety aspects and regulatory limitations related to the novel nature of EV-mediated therapeutic applications. Despite the emerging possibilities of EV treatments, these issues need to be overcome in order to allow their safe and successful application in future explorative clinical studies. PMID:26631254

  8. Ivermectin in human medicine, an overview of the current status of its clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, P; González, F A; Ueno, K

    2012-05-01

    Ivermectin is a broad spectrum antiparasitic veterinary drug introduced in human medicine in 1987. It is considered the drug of choice in onchocerciasis and strongyloidiasis infections, and remains as a therapeutic option for mass treatment in lymphatic filariasis, for which it has widely proved its efficacy. While research continued for human use, new therapeutic targets for ivermectin have emerged. It is currently the better therapeutic option in the treatment of gnathostomiasis and crusted scabies, and could be an alternative option in ascariasis and Mansonella infections. Although these uses are already included in clinical guidelines, more trials are needed to increase their grade of evidence and to obtain their official approval. Concerning other minor uses such as the treatment of enterobiasis or against Trichuris trichiura, more research is still needed in order to test the real activity of ivermectin. The use of ivermectin in human medicine has shown an outstanding low rate of adverse reactions, with the exception of treatment of loiasis and onchocerciasis, where the death of a high microfilarial load may cause severe encephalopathy. However special attention must be paid to the emergence of the first documented cases of resistance in treatment of scabies. PMID:22039800

  9. Vitamin D, Essential Minerals, and Toxic Elements: Exploring Interactions between Nutrients and Toxicants in Clinical Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerry K. Schwalfenberg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In clinical medicine, increasing attention is being directed towards the important areas of nutritional biochemistry and toxicant bioaccumulation as they relate to human health and chronic disease. Optimal nutritional status, including healthy levels of vitamin D and essential minerals, is requisite for proper physiological function; conversely, accrual of toxic elements has the potential to impair normal physiology. It is evident that vitamin D intake can facilitate the absorption and assimilation of essential inorganic elements (such as calcium, magnesium, copper, zinc, iron, and selenium but also the uptake of toxic elements (such as lead, arsenic, aluminum, cobalt, and strontium. Furthermore, sufficiency of essential minerals appears to resist the uptake of toxic metals. This paper explores the literature to determine a suitable clinical approach with regard to vitamin D and essential mineral intake to achieve optimal biological function and to avoid harm in order to prevent and overcome illness. It appears preferable to secure essential mineral status in conjunction with adequate vitamin D, as intake of vitamin D in the absence of mineral sufficiency may result in facilitation of toxic element absorption with potential adverse clinical outcomes.

  10. Advance of Cellular Immunotherapy in Clinical and Translational Medicine of Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Fei; YU Shao-rong; FENG Ji-feng

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers and ranks the ifrst in the mortality worldwide. The core of immunotherapy, especially cellular immunotherapy, is to activate the T cell-mediated tumor-killing effect in patients with tumors, so as to increase their anti-tumor effect. Surgery and radio- and chemotherapy cannot radically eliminate cancerous cells, but immunotherapy is an important supplementary method in killing tumor stem cells and non-proliferating cells. Cellular immunotherapy contains dendritic cells (DC), cytokine-induced killer (CIK), DC-CIK, natural killer T cells (NKT) and γδ T cells, which provides new techniques for the comprehensive treatment of lung cancer. Using CIK combined with DC, radiochemotherapy, radiofrequency ablation and monomers of Chinese medicine to induce CIK cells that directionally migrate to cancerous nest can increase tumor-killing ability and immunoregulatory ability of CIK cells, reduce adverse and toxic reactions and increase patients’ quality of life, and NKT cell and γδ T cell therapies have also been gradually perfected and promoted in clinical translation. This study mainly introduced the clinical translation of DC vaccines, CIK cells and DC-CIK treatment for lung cancer, hoping to provide new pathways and reference for the clinical treatment of lung cancer.

  11. The role of 3DCT for the evaluation of chop injuries in clinical forensic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittschieber, Daniel; Beck, Laura; Vieth, Volker; Hahnemann, Maria L

    2016-09-01

    As hatchet blows to the human head frequently cause fatal injuries, the forensic examination of survivors with cranial chop injuries is a rare phenomenon in forensic casework. Besides evaluation of clinical records, photographs, and medico-legal physical examination, the analysis and 3-dimensional reconstruction of pre-treatment computed tomography data (3DCT) must be considered an important and indispensable tool for the assessment of those cases because the characteristics of chopping trauma often appear masked or changed by clinical treatment. In the present article, the role of 3DCT for the evaluation of chop wounds in clinical forensic medicine is demonstrated by an illustrative case report of a young man who was attacked with a hatchet. 3DCT provides additional possibilities for supplementing missing information, such as number and direction of blows as well as weapon identification. Furthermore, 3DCT facilitates demonstration in court and understanding of medical lay people. We conclude that 3DCT is of particular value for the evaluation of survivors of life-threatening head and face injury. An increasing significance of this technique may be expected.

  12. Vitamin D, Essential Minerals, and Toxic Elements: Exploring Interactions between Nutrients and Toxicants in Clinical Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalfenberg, Gerry K; Genuis, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    In clinical medicine, increasing attention is being directed towards the important areas of nutritional biochemistry and toxicant bioaccumulation as they relate to human health and chronic disease. Optimal nutritional status, including healthy levels of vitamin D and essential minerals, is requisite for proper physiological function; conversely, accrual of toxic elements has the potential to impair normal physiology. It is evident that vitamin D intake can facilitate the absorption and assimilation of essential inorganic elements (such as calcium, magnesium, copper, zinc, iron, and selenium) but also the uptake of toxic elements (such as lead, arsenic, aluminum, cobalt, and strontium). Furthermore, sufficiency of essential minerals appears to resist the uptake of toxic metals. This paper explores the literature to determine a suitable clinical approach with regard to vitamin D and essential mineral intake to achieve optimal biological function and to avoid harm in order to prevent and overcome illness. It appears preferable to secure essential mineral status in conjunction with adequate vitamin D, as intake of vitamin D in the absence of mineral sufficiency may result in facilitation of toxic element absorption with potential adverse clinical outcomes.

  13. 影像医学在临床医学中的作用与价值%The role and value of imaging medicine in clinical medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵常伦

    2016-01-01

    In recent years,with the rapid development of society,the level of medical technology continues to improve,medical imaging has also made a breakthrough,and it has played an important role in clinical medical work,which has greatly promoted the development of clinical medicine.Combined with the relevant information,the author describes the role and value of imaging medicine in clinical medicine in this paper.%近年来,随着社会的快速发展,医疗技术水平的不断提高,影像医学也取得了不断突破,并在临床医学工作中发挥着重要作用,极大地促进了临床医学的发展。本文结合相关资料对影像医学在临床医学中的作用与价值进行了阐述。

  14. Virtual anthropology: useful radiological tools for age assessment in clinical forensic medicine and thanatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedouit, Fabrice; Saint-Martin, Pauline; Mokrane, Fatima-Zohra; Savall, Frédéric; Rousseau, Hervé; Crubézy, Eric; Rougé, Daniel; Telmon, Norbert

    2015-09-01

    Virtual anthropology consists of the introduction of modern slice imaging to biological and forensic anthropology. Thanks to this non-invasive scientific revolution, some classifications and staging systems, first based on dry bone analysis, can be applied to cadavers with no need for specific preparation, as well as to living persons. Estimation of bone and dental age is one of the possibilities offered by radiology. Biological age can be estimated in clinical forensic medicine as well as in living persons. Virtual anthropology may also help the forensic pathologist to estimate a deceased person's age at death, which together with sex, geographical origin and stature, is one of the important features determining a biological profile used in reconstructive identification. For this forensic purpose, the radiological tools used are multislice computed tomography and, more recently, X-ray free imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound investigations. We present and discuss the value of these investigations for age estimation in anthropology.

  15. 3-D Reconstruction From 2-D Radiographic Images and Its Application to Clinical Veterinary Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Kazuhiko; Sato, Motoyoshi

    3D imaging technique is very important and indispensable in diagnosis. The main stream of the technique is one in which 3D image is reconstructed from a set of slice images, such as X-ray CT and MRI. However, these systems require large space and high costs. On the other hand, a low cost and small size 3D imaging system is needed in clinical veterinary medicine, for example, in the case of diagnosis in X-ray car or pasture area. We propose a novel 3D imaging technique using 2-D X-ray radiographic images. This system can be realized by cheaper system than X-ray CT and enables to get 3D image in X-ray car or portable X-ray equipment. In this paper, a 3D visualization technique from 2-D radiographic images is proposed and several reconstructions are shown. These reconstructions are evaluated by veterinarians.

  16. Tacit knowledge as the unifying factor in evidence based medicine and clinical judgement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Tim

    2006-03-17

    The paper outlines the role that tacit knowledge plays in what might seem to be an area of knowledge that can be made fully explicit or codified and which forms a central element of Evidence Based Medicine. Appeal to the role the role of tacit knowledge in science provides a way to unify the tripartite definition of Evidence Based Medicine given by Sackett et al: the integration of best research evidence with clinical expertise and patient values. Each of these three elements, crucially including research evidence, rests on an ineliminable and irreducible notion of uncodified good judgement. The paper focuses on research evidence, drawing first on the work of Kuhn to suggest that tacit knowledge contributes, as a matter of fact, to puzzle solving within what he calls normal science. A stronger argument that it must play a role in research is first motivated by looking to Collins' first hand account of replication in applied physics and then broader considerations of replication in justifying knowledge claims in scientific research. Finally, consideration of an argument from Wittgenstein shows that whatever explicit guidelines can be drawn up to guide judgement the specification of what counts as correctly following them has to remain implicit.Overall, the paper sets out arguments for the claim that even though explicit guidelines and codifications can play a practical role in informing clinical practice, they rest on a body of tacit or implicit skill that is in principle ineliminable. It forms the bedrock of good judgement and unites the integration of research, expertise and values.

  17. Herbal medicine for depression, anxiety and insomnia: a review of psychopharmacology and clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, Jerome; Panossian, Alexander; Schweitzer, Isaac; Stough, Con; Scholey, Andrew

    2011-12-01

    Research in the area of herbal psychopharmacology has increased markedly over the past decades. To date however, a comprehensive review of herbal antidepressant, anxiolytic and hypnotic psychopharmacology and applications in depression, anxiety and insomnia has been absent. A search of MEDLINE (PubMed), CINAHL, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Library databases was conducted (up to February 21st 2011) on commonly used psychotropic herbal medicines. A review of the literature was conducted to ascertain mechanisms of action of these botanicals, in addition to a systematic review of controlled clinical trials for treatment of mood, anxiety and sleep disorders, which are common comorbid psychiatric disorders. Specific emphasis was given to emerging phytomedicines. Analysis of evidence levels was conducted, as were effect sizes (Cohen's d) where data were available. Results provided evidence of a range of neurochemical, endocrinological, and epigenetic effects for 21 individual phytomedicines, which are detailed in this paper. Sixty six controlled studies were located involving eleven phytomedicines. Several of these provide a high level of evidence, such as Hypericum perforatum for major depression, and Piper methysticum for anxiety disorders. Several human clinical trials provide preliminary positive evidence of antidepressant effects (Echium amoenum, Crocus sativus, and Rhodiola rosea) and anxiolytic activity (Matricaria recutita, Ginkgo biloba, Passiflora incanata, E. amoenum, and Scutellaria lateriflora). Caution should however be taken when interpreting the results as many studies have not been replicated. Several herbal medicines with in vitro and in vivo evidence are currently unexplored in human studies, and along with use of emerging genetic technologies "herbomics", are areas of potential future research. PMID:21601431

  18. Clinical holistic medicine: teaching orgasm for females with chronic anorgasmia using the Betty Dodson method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struck, Pia; Ventegodt, Søren

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the Betty Dodson method of breaking the female orgasm barrier in chronic anorgasmic women. The aim was sexual and existential healing (salutogenesis) through direct confrontation and integration of both the repressed shame, guilt, and other negative feelings associated with body, genitals, and sexuality, and the repressed sexual pleasure and desire. We conducted a retrospective analysis of clinic data from holistic sexological manual therapeutic intervention, an intensive subtype of clinical holistic medicine (CHM). The patients received 3 "e 5 h of group therapy, integrating short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP) and complementary medicine (CAM bodywork, manual sexology similar to the inverted exclamation mark section signsexological examination inverted exclamation mark ). The therapy used the advanced tools of reparenting, genital acceptance, acceptance through touch, and direct sexual clitoral stimulation. A clitoral vibrator was used. Participants were 500 female patients between 18 and 88 years of age (mean of 35 years) with chronic anorgasmia (for 12 years on average) who were participating in the inverted exclamation mark section signorgasm course for anorgasmic women inverted exclamation mark ; 25% of the patients had never experienced an orgasm. Our results show that 465 patients (93%) had an orgasm during therapy, witnessed by the therapist, and 35 patients (7%) did not. Postmenopausal women were as able to achieve orgasm as fertile women, as were women who never had an orgasm. No patients had detectable negative side effects or adverse effects. NNT: 1.04 500. Therapeutic value: TV = NNH/NNT > 446. Our conclusions are that holistic sexological manual therapy may be rational, safe, ethical, and efficient. PMID:18836654

  19. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Teaching Orgasm for Females with Chronic Anorgasmia using the Betty Dodson Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Struck

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to test the Betty Dodson method of breaking the female orgasm barrier in chronic anorgasmic women. The aim was sexual and existential healing (salutogenesis through direct confrontation and integration of both the repressed shame, guilt, and other negative feelings associated with body, genitals, and sexuality, and the repressed sexual pleasure and desire. We conducted a retrospective analysis of clinic data from holistic sexological manual therapeutic intervention, an intensive subtype of clinical holistic medicine (CHM. The patients received 3 × 5 h of group therapy, integrating short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP and complementary medicine (CAM bodywork, manual sexology similar to the “sexological examination”. The therapy used the advanced tools of reparenting, genital acceptance, acceptance through touch, and direct sexual clitoral stimulation. A clitoral vibrator was used. Participants were 500 female patients between 18 and 88 years of age (mean of 35 years with chronic anorgasmia (for 12 years on average who were participating in the “orgasm course for anorgasmic women”; 25% of the patients had never experienced an orgasm. Our results show that 465 patients (93% had an orgasm during therapy, witnessed by the therapist, and 35 patients (7% did not. Postmenopausal women were as able to achieve orgasm as fertile women, as were women who never had an orgasm. No patients had detectable negative side effects or adverse effects. NNT: 1.04 500. Therapeutic value: TV = NNH/NNT > 446. Our conclusions are that holistic sexological manual therapy may be rational, safe, ethical, and efficient.

  20. Aligning clinical compensation with clinical productivity: design and implementation of the financial value unit (FVU) system in an academic department of internal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stites, Steven; Steffen, Patrick; Turner, Scott; Pingleton, Susan

    2013-07-01

    A new metric was developed and implemented at the University of Kansas School of Medicine Department of Internal Medicine, the financial value unit (FVU). This metric analyzes faculty clinical compensation compared with clinical work productivity as a transparent means to decrease the physician compensation variability and compensate faculty equitably for clinical work.The FVU is the ratio of individual faculty clinical compensation compared with their total work relative value units (wRVUs) generated divided by Medical Group Management Association (MGMA) salary to wRVUs of a similar MGMA physician.The closer the FVU ratio is to 1.0, the closer clinical compensation is to that of an MGMA physician with similar clinical productivity. Using FVU metrics to calculate a faculty salary gap compared with MGMA median salary and wRVU productivity, a divisional production payment was established annually.From FY 2006 to FY 2011, both total faculty numbers and overall clinical activity increased. With the implementation of the FVU, both clinical productivity and compensation increased while, at the same time, physician retention rates remained high. Variability in physician compensation decreased. Dramatic clinical growth was associated with the alignment of clinical work and clinical compensation in a transparent and equable process.

  1. Nonadherence to antihypertensive medications and associated factors in general medicine clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Ghobain M

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mohammed Al Ghobain,1,2 H Alhashemi,1,2 A Aljama,3 S Bin Salih,1,2 Z Assiri,4 A Alsomali,4 Gamal Mohamed5 1Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, 2King Abdullah International Medical Research Centre, 3Department of Medicine, King Abdulaziz Medical City, 4College of Nursing, 5College of Public Health, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Objectives: Nonadherence to antihypertensive medications has not been assessed in the Saudi population. The aim of this study was to address and evaluate the magnitude of nonadherence among hypertensive patients and the risk factors associated with it. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted on hypertensive patients who attended the general internal medicine clinics at King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, using a questionnaire that was modified after reviewing the literature. Hypertensive patients were labeled as nonadherent if they missed their medications for a total of 7 days during the previous month. Results: A total of 302 patients participated in the study, of whom 63% were females with a mean age of 64 years, and 64% were illiterate. The prevalence of nonadherence to medications among hypertensive patients was found to be 12.3%. Poor disease knowledge was reported in 80% of patients, while 66% of the patients had poor monitoring of their disease. Younger age (≤65 years, poor monitoring, and uncontrolled blood pressure (BP ≥140/90 mmHg were the predictor factors associated with nonadherence (odds ratio [OR] =2.04, P=0.025; OR=2.39, P=0.004; and OR=2.86, P=0.003, respectively. Conclusion: Nonadherence to antihypertensive medications is lower than that previously reported in the literature. Younger age, uncontrolled BP, and poor monitoring are the main risk factors associated with nonadherence. Keywords: nonadherence, hypertension, Saudi Arabia, uncontrolled blood

  2. Clinical guidelines on central venous catheterisation. Swedish Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frykholm, P; Pikwer, A; Hammarskjöld, F; Larsson, A T; Lindgren, S; Lindwall, R; Taxbro, K; Oberg, F; Acosta, S; Akeson, J

    2014-05-01

    Safe and reliable venous access is mandatory in modern health care, but central venous catheters (CVCs) are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, This paper describes current Swedish guidelines for clinical management of CVCs The guidelines supply updated recommendations that may be useful in other countries as well. Literature retrieval in the Cochrane and Pubmed databases, of papers written in English or Swedish and pertaining to CVC management, was done by members of a task force of the Swedish Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine. Consensus meetings were held throughout the review process to allow all parts of the guidelines to be embraced by all contributors. All of the content was carefully scored according to criteria by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. We aimed at producing useful and reliable guidelines on bleeding diathesis, vascular approach, ultrasonic guidance, catheter tip positioning, prevention and management of associated trauma and infection, and specific training and follow-up. A structured patient history focused on bleeding should be taken prior to insertion of a CVCs. The right internal jugular vein should primarily be chosen for insertion of a wide-bore CVC. Catheter tip positioning in the right atrium or lower third of the superior caval vein should be verified for long-term use. Ultrasonic guidance should be used for catheterisation by the internal jugular or femoral veins and may also be used for insertion via the subclavian veins or the veins of the upper limb. The operator inserting a CVC should wear cap, mask, and sterile gown and gloves. For long-term intravenous access, tunnelled CVC or subcutaneous venous ports are preferred. Intravenous position of the catheter tip should be verified by clinical or radiological methods after insertion and before each use. Simulator-assisted training of CVC insertion should precede bedside training in patients. Units inserting and managing CVC should

  3. Resourcing the clinical complementary medicine information needs of Australian medical students: Results of a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeman, Kate; Robinson, Anske; McKenna, Lisa

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify Australian medical students' complementary medicine information needs. Thirty medical students from 10 medical education faculties across Australian universities were recruited. Data were generated using in-depth semi-structured interviews and constructivist grounded theory method was used to analyze and construct data. Students sought complementary medicine information from a range of inadequate sources, such as pharmacological texts, Internet searches, peer-reviewed medical journals, and drug databases. The students identified that many complementary medicine resources may not be regarded as objective, reliable, differentiated, or comprehensive, leaving much that medical education needs to address. Most students sought succinct, easily accessible, evidence-based information to inform safe and appropriate clinical decisions about complementary medicines. A number of preferred resources were identified that can be recommended and actively promoted to medical students. Therefore, specific, evidence-based complementary medicine databases and secondary resources should be subscribed and recommended to medical schools and students, to assist meeting professional responsibilities regarding complementary medicines. These findings may help inform the development of appropriate medical information resources regarding complementary medicines.

  4. Resourcing the clinical complementary medicine information needs of Australian medical students: Results of a grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeman, Kate; Robinson, Anske; McKenna, Lisa

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify Australian medical students' complementary medicine information needs. Thirty medical students from 10 medical education faculties across Australian universities were recruited. Data were generated using in-depth semi-structured interviews and constructivist grounded theory method was used to analyze and construct data. Students sought complementary medicine information from a range of inadequate sources, such as pharmacological texts, Internet searches, peer-reviewed medical journals, and drug databases. The students identified that many complementary medicine resources may not be regarded as objective, reliable, differentiated, or comprehensive, leaving much that medical education needs to address. Most students sought succinct, easily accessible, evidence-based information to inform safe and appropriate clinical decisions about complementary medicines. A number of preferred resources were identified that can be recommended and actively promoted to medical students. Therefore, specific, evidence-based complementary medicine databases and secondary resources should be subscribed and recommended to medical schools and students, to assist meeting professional responsibilities regarding complementary medicines. These findings may help inform the development of appropriate medical information resources regarding complementary medicines. PMID:26818009

  5. The importance of clinical mistletoe cancer therapy and korean mistletoe pharmacopuncture preparation development and application possibility for oriental medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ok-Byung Choi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : Mistletoe extracts have been in use for around 85 years, predominantly in the area of cancer therapy. Today mistletoe preparations are among the most prescribed drugs in cancer medicine, thus constituting a standard biological therapy in the area of oncology. The purpose of this study is to analyze the practical implications of mistletoe cancer therapy, their clinical status, their preparation techniques and companies. Contents : Mistletoe therapy for cancer has been developed within the context of anthroposophical medicine. One major effect of mistletoe extract is that it stimulates the immune system and cancer defences. In Germany, a total of eight different mistletoe preparations are available, five developed by Anthroposophic Medicine and three evolved from research in phytotherapy. Therapy always consists of an introductory phase in order to test the patient′s tolerance, find the right dosage and choose the most suitable preparation. This paper covers the background of mistletoe medical plant materials, mistletoe therapy for cancer, the anthroposophical medicine and clinical research, the practical regulation of treatment, preparation of mistletoe drugs. Result & suggestion : Mistletoe extracts are a complementary teratment of cancer, widely used in intergrative cancer care. The study of the integration of korean mistletoe extracts to oriental cancer medicine, its development and feasibility in Korea are urgently needed. The products, substances, compositions of european mistletoe drugs are very similar to those of oriental medicine theory. Applying the mistletoe cancer therapy and its preparation techniques to oriental medicine, the herbal acupuncture preparation should be modernized and korean mistletoe products are to be developed. To this end, government and herbal acupuncture society need to interact each other for the development of oriental mistletoe cancer medicine.

  6. Discovering treatment pattern in Traditional Chinese Medicine clinical cases by exploiting supervised topic model and domain knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Liang; Zhang, Yin; Wei, Baogang; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Yuejiao; Ren, Xiaolin; Bian, Yali

    2015-12-01

    In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), the prescription is the crystallization of clinical experience of doctors, which is the main way to cure diseases in China for thousands of years. Clinical cases, on the other hand, describe how doctors diagnose and prescribe. In this paper, we propose a framework which mines treatment patterns in TCM clinical cases by exploiting supervised topic model and TCM domain knowledge. The framework can reflect principle rules in TCM and improve function prediction of a new prescription. We evaluate our method on 3090 real world TCM clinical cases. The experiment validates the effectiveness of our method.

  7. Clinical Holistic Medicine: How to Recover Memory Without “Implanting” Memories in Your Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Every therapeutic strategy and system teach us the philosophy of the treatment system to the patient, but often this teaching is subliminal and the philosophical impact must be seen as “implanted philosophy”, which gives distorted interpretations of past events called “implanted memories”. Based on the understanding of the connection between “implanted memory” and “implanted philosophy” we have developed a strategy for avoiding implanting memories arising from one of the seven most common causes of implanted memories in psychodynamic therapy: 1 Satisfying own expectancies, 2 pleasing the therapist, 3 transferences and counter transferences, 4 as source of mental and emotional order, 5 as emotional defence, 6 as symbol and 7 from implanted philosophy. Freud taught us that child sexuality is “polymorphously perverted”, meaning that all kinds of sexuality is present at least potentially with the little child; and in dreams consciousness often go back to the earlier stages of development, potentially causing all kinds of sexual dreams and fantasies, which can come up in therapy and look like real memories. The therapist working with psychodynamic psychotherapy, clinical holistic medicine, psychiatry, and emotionally oriented bodywork, should be aware of the danger of implanting philosophy and memories. Implanted memories and implanted philosophy must be carefully handled and de-learned before ending the therapy. In conclusion “clinical holistic medicine” has developed a strategy for avoiding implanting memories.

  8. Definition of major bleeding in clinical investigations of antihemostatic medicinal products in surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, S; Angerås, U; Bergqvist, D; Eriksson, B; Lassen, M R; Fisher, W

    2010-01-01

    The definition of major bleeding varies between studies on surgical patients, particularly regarding the criteria for surgical wound-related bleeding. This diversity contributes to the difficulties in comparing data between trials. The Scientific and Standardization Committee (SSC), through its subcommittee on Control of Anticoagulation, of the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis has previously published a recommendation for a harmonized definition of major bleeding in non-surgical studies. That definition has been adopted by the European Medicines Agency and is currently used in several non-surgical trials. A preliminary proposal for a parallel definition for surgical studies was presented at the 54(th) Annual Meeting of the SSC in Vienna, July 2008. Based on those discussions and further consultations with European and North American surgeons with experience from clinical trials a definition has been developed that should be applicable to all agents that interfere with hemostasis. The definition and the text that follows have been reviewed and approved by relevant co-chairs of the subcommittee and by the Executive Committee of the SSC. The intention is to seek approval of this definition from the regulatory authorities to enhance its incorporation into future clinical trial protocols.

  9. Clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine in Croatia: regulation of the profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simundic, Ana-Maria; Topic, Elizabeta; Cvoriscec, Dubravka; Cepelak, Ivana

    2011-01-01

    Heterogeneity exists across Europe in the definition of the profession of clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine and also in academic background of specialists in this discipline. This article provides an overview of the standards of education and training of laboratory professionals and quality regulations in Croatia. Clinical chemistry in Croatia is almost exclusively practiced by medical biochemists. Although term Medical biochemist often relates to medical doctors in other European countries, in Croatia medical biochemists are not medical doctors, but university degree professionals who are qualified scientifically. Practicing the medical biochemistry is regulated by The Health Care Law, The Law of the Medical Biochemistry Profession and The Law of the State and Private Health Insurance. According to the law, only medical biochemists are entitled to run and work in the medical biochemistry laboratory. University degree is earned after the 5 years of the studies. Register for medical biochemists is kept by the Croatian Chamber of Medical Biochemists. Licensing is mandatory, valid for 6 years and regulated by the government (Law on the Health Care, 1993). Vocational training for medical biochemists lasts 44 months and is regulated by the national regulatory document issued by the Ministry of Health. Accreditation is not mandatory and is provided by an independent, non-commercial national accreditation body. The profession has interdisciplinary character and a level of required competence and skills comparable to other European countries. PMID:22141201

  10. Explaining the Learning Experiences of Clinical Procedures of the Internal Medicine Residents at Department of Gastroenterology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Taghavinia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the method and way of learning and teaching are effective in acquiring clinical skills, and identifying the shortcomings of learning and teaching will lead to better planning. The purpose of this study was to explain the experiences of the learning clinical procedures of the internal medicine residents in gastroenterology department. Methods: qualitative study using content thematic analysis was done. Six fourth-year residents were selected and interviewed considering purposive sampling. The data of the interviews were transcribed and analyzed after rereading. Results: the collected data are divided into three categories: learning and experience with the following four categories (learning time and experiencing, leaning and experiencing times, learning and experiencing opportunities, training and the lack of the training of some procedures. These categories are explained by using some quotes derived from the data. Conclusion: the results of this study suggest that the administrative management of internal residency is poor and should get seriously in implementation and application of intended instructions existing in the prepared program of Medical Education and Specialized Council of internal residency period. The attending physicians and residents must be aware of the content of education program at the beginning of the residency periods and the trainers must try to supervise the residents’ education.

  11. Does the Concept of the “Flipped Classroom” Extend to the Emergency Medicine Clinical Clerkship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitz, Corey; Prusakowski, Melanie; Willis, George; Franck, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Linking educational objectives and clinical learning during clerkships can be difficult. Clinical shifts during emergency medicine (EM) clerkships provide a wide variety of experiences, some of which may not be relevant to recommended educational objectives. Students can be directed to standardize their clinical experiences, and this improves performance on examinations. We hypothesized that applying a “flipped classroom” model to the clinical clerkship would improve performance on multiple-choice testing when compared to standard learning. Methods Students at two institutions were randomized to complete two of four selected EM clerkship topics in a “flipped fashion,” and two others in a standard fashion. For flipped topics, students were directed to complete chief complaint-based asynchronous modules prior to a shift, during which they were directed to focus on the chief complaint. For the other two topics, modules were to be performed at the students’ discretion, and shifts would not have a theme. At the end of the four-week clerkship, a 40-question multiple-choice examination was administered with 10 questions per topic. We compared performance on flipped topics with those performed in standard fashion. Students were surveyed on perceived effectiveness, ability to follow the protocol, and willingness of preceptors to allow a chief-complaint focus. Results Sixty-nine students participated; examination scores for 56 were available for analysis. For the primary outcome, no difference was seen between the flipped method and standard (p=0.494.) A mixed model approach showed no effect of flipped status, protocol adherence, or site of rotation on the primary outcome of exam scores. Students rated the concept of the flipped clerkship highly (3.48/5). Almost one third (31.1%) of students stated that they were unable to adhere to the protocol. Conclusion Preparation for a clinical shift with pre-assigned, web-based learning modules followed by an

  12. Does the Concept of the “Flipped Classroom” Extend to the Emergency Medicine Clinical Clerkship?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey Heitz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Linking educational objectives and clinical learning during clerkships can be difficult. Clinical shifts during emergency medicine (EM clerkships provide a wide variety of experiences, some of which may not be relevant to recommended educational objectives. Students can be directed to standardize their clinical experiences, and this improves performance on examinations. We hypothesized that applying a “flipped classroom” model to the clinical clerkship would improve performance on multiple-choice testing when compared to standard learning. Methods: Students at two institutions were randomized to complete two of four selected EM clerkship topics in a “flipped fashion,” and two others in a standard fashion. For flipped topics, students were directed to complete chief complaint-based asynchronous modules prior to a shift, during which they were directed to focus on the chief complaint. For the other two topics, modules were to be performed at the students’ discretion, and shifts would not have a theme. At the end of the four-week clerkship, a 40-question multiple-choice examination was administered with 10 questions per topic. We compared performance on flipped topics with those performed in standard fashion. Students were surveyed on perceived effectiveness, ability to follow the protocol, and willingness of preceptors to allow a chief-complaint focus. Results: Sixty-nine students participated; examination scores for 56 were available for analysis. For the primary outcome, no difference was seen between the flipped method and standard (p=0.494. A mixed model approach showed no effect of flipped status, protocol adherence, or site of rotation on the primary outcome of exam scores. Students rated the concept of the flipped clerkship highly (3.48/5. Almost one third (31.1% of students stated that they were unable to adhere to the protocol. Conclusion: Preparation for a clinical shift with pre-assigned, web-based learning

  13. Review and comparison of clinical evidence submitted to support European Medicines Agency market authorization of orphan-designated oncological treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Winstone, Julie; Chadda, Shkun; Ralston, Stephen; Sajosi, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical trials for treatments indicated for orphan diseases may be limited due to the low prevalence of such diseases; this can result in implications for both regulatory and health economic perspectives. This study assessed the pivotal clinical evidence packages submitted to support applications for European Medicines Agency (EMA) marketing authorizations for treatments for orphan conditions, in relation to the size of the eligible patient population. Methods Approved treatments ...

  14. Internal Medicine Residents’ Perceptions of Team-Based Care and its Educational Value in the Continuity Clinic: A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Soones, TN; O Brien, BC; Julian, KA

    2015-01-01

    © 2015, Society of General Internal Medicine. BACKGROUND : In order to teach residents how to work in interprofessional teams, educators in graduate medical education are implementing team-based care models in resident continuity clinics. However, little is known about the impact of interprofessional teams on residents’ education in the ambulatory setting. OBJECTIVE: To identify factors affecting residents’ experience of team-based care within continuity clinics and the impact of these teams ...

  15. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Tools for a Medical Science Based on Consciousness

    OpenAIRE

    Søren Ventegodt; Mohammed Morad; Niels Jorgen Andersen; Joav Merrick

    2004-01-01

    Biomedicine focuses on the biochemistry of the body, while consciousness-based medicine — holistic medicine — focuses on the individual's experiences and conscious whole (Greek: holos, whole). Biomedicine perceives diseases as mechanical errors at the micro level, while consciousness-based medicine perceives diseases as disturbances in attitudes, perceptions, and experiences at the macro level — in the organism as a whole. Thus, consciousness-based medicine is based on the whole individual, w...

  16. How well does journal 'impact' work in the assessment of papers on clinical physiology and nuclear medicine?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, HB; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1997-01-01

    This study reports a citation analysis of 217 scientific papers on clinical physiology and nuclear medicine published in 69 different journals during the years 1985-92. The actual citation frequency was compared with the journal 'impact factor' (i.e. the average number of times a paper is cited i...

  17. Clinical study on treatment of rectal carcinoma with Chinese herbal medicine and high dose fluorouracil emulsion via rectal infusion.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晨光

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical significance of rectal infusion of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) plus high dose fluorouracil emulsion in treating rectal carcinoma. Methods: 86 patients of rectal carcinoma were randomly divided into CHM plus chemotherapy group and single chemotherapy group, and the

  18. The Exploration and Practice of the Comprehensive Reform in Graduate Education on Professional Degree of Clinical Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ling-Xiao; Yu, Fang; Ma, Zhen-Qiu; Zhou, Tian-Hua; Geng, Xiao-Bei; Huang, He

    2014-01-01

    The comprehensive reform in graduate education of Zhejiang University for a professional degree in clinical medicine accommodates the demand of both the Ministry of Education and Ministry of Health of China for educational reform by putting forward a "5+3" pattern, an innovative training pattern for this degree. The pattern focuses on…

  19. Cleveland Clinic's summer research program in reproductive medicine: an inside look at the class of 2014

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    Damayanthi Durairajanayagam

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The American Center for Reproductive Medicine's summer internship course in reproductive medicine and research at Cleveland Clinic is a rigorous, results-oriented annual program that began in 2008 to train both local and international students in the fundamentals of scientific research and writing. The foremost goal of the program is to encourage premedical and medical students to aspire toward a career as a physician–scientist. The internship provides participants with an opportunity to engage in original bench research and scientific writing while developing theoretical knowledge and soft skills. This study describes selected survey responses from interns who participated in the 2014 internship program. The objective of these surveys was to elicit the interns' perspective on the internship program, its strengths and weaknesses, and to obtain insight into potential areas for improvement. Methods: Questionnaires were structured around the five fundamental aspects of the program: 1 theoretical knowledge, 2 bench research, 3 scientific writing, 4 mentorship, and 5 soft skills. In addition, an exit survey gathered information on factors that attracted the interns to the program, communication with mentors, and overall impression of the research program. Results: The opportunity to experience hands-on bench research and scientific writing, personalized mentorship, and the reputation of the institution were appreciated and ranked highly among the interns. Nearly 90% of the interns responded that the program was beneficial and well worth the time and effort invested by both interns and faculty. Conclusion: The outcomes portrayed in this study will be useful in the implementation of new programs or refinement of existing medical research training programs.

  20. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Avoiding the Freudian Trap of Sexual Transference and Countertransference in Psychodynamic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Sexual transference and countertransference can make therapy slow and inefficient when libidinous gratification becomes more important for both the patient and the therapist than real therapeutic progress. Sexual transference is normal when working with a patient's repressed sexuality, but the therapeutic rule of not touching often hinders the integration of sexual traumas, as this needs physical holding. So the patient is often left with sexual, Oedipal energies projected onto the therapist as an “idealized father” figure. The strong and lasting sexual desire for the therapist without any healing taking place can prolong therapy for many years, as it often does in psychodynamic psychotherapy and psychoanalysis. We call this problem “Freud's Trap”. Freud used intimate bodywork, such as massage, in the beginning of his career, but stopped, presumably for moral and political reasons. In the tradition of psychoanalysis, touch is therefore not allowed. Recent research in clinical holistic medicine (CHM, salutogenesis, and sexual healing has shown that touch and bodywork (an integral part of medicine since Hippocrates are as important for healing as conversational therapy. CHM allows the patient to regress spontaneously to early sexual and emotional traumas, and to heal the deep wounds on body, soul, and sexual character from arrested psychosexual development. CHM treats sexuality in therapy more as the patient’s internal affair (i.e., energy work and less as a thing going on between the patient and the therapist (i.e., transference. This accelerates healing, and reduces sexual transference and the need for mourning at the end of therapy.

  1. CLINICAL STUDY ON THE TREATMENT OF ACUTE CEREBRAL INFARCTION WITH ACUPUNCTURE COMBINED WITH MEDICINES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Shou-hao; SHEN Qing-wei; LIN Mi-xiang; WANG Shao-zhen; ZHANG Qing-chen

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To observe the therapeutic effect of acupuncture combined with medicines for acute cerebral infarction and to study its mechanism. Methods: A total of 80 acute cerebral infarction patients were evenly randomized into treatment and control groups. Patients of treatment group were treated with acupuncture of Baihui (百会GV 20), Fengchi (风池GB 20), Jiquan (极泉HT 1), Neiguan (内关PC 6), etc. and those of control group treated with conventional medicines as low molecular dextran, compound Red Sage injection, Citicolinum, etc. Scores of clinical neurological deficits, blood flow velocity peak (Vp) and mean blood flow velocity (Vm) of the bilateral internal carotid artery (ICA), middle cerebral artery (MCA), anterior cerebral artery (ACA), posterior cerebral artery (PCA), basilar artery (BA) and vertebral artery (VA) were detected with transcranial Doppler (TCD) were analyzed before and after treatment. Results: After 12 days' treatment, the neurological deficit scores in both treatment and control groups decreased significantly, and the difference values of the score of the former group was significantly bigger than these of the later group (P<0.01). Vp and Vm of all the detected arteries in treatment group and bilateral ACA, MCA and PCA of control group increased significantly in comparison with pre-treatment (P<0.05, P<0.01); and the difference values of Vm of bilateral MCA and VA (between post- and pre-treatment) of treatment group were significantly bigger than those of control group (P<0.01). Conclusion: The therapeutic effect of acupuncture combined with medication is significantly superior to that of simple medication in the treatment of acute cerebral infarction.

  2. Next generation sequencing in clinical medicine: Challenges and lessons for pathology and biomedical informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rama R Gullapalli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Human Genome Project (HGP provided the initial draft of mankind′s DNA sequence in 2001. The HGP was produced by 23 collaborating laboratories using Sanger sequencing of mapped regions as well as shotgun sequencing techniques in a process that occupied 13 years at a cost of ~$3 billion. Today, Next Generation Sequencing (NGS techniques represent the next phase in the evolution of DNA sequencing technology at dramatically reduced cost compared to traditional Sanger sequencing. A single laboratory today can sequence the entire human genome in a few days for a few thousand dollars in reagents and staff time. Routine whole exome or even whole genome sequencing of clinical patients is well within the realm of affordability for many academic institutions across the country. This paper reviews current sequencing technology methods and upcoming advancements in sequencing technology as well as challenges associated with data generation, data manipulation and data storage. Implementation of routine NGS data in cancer genomics is discussed along with potential pitfalls in the interpretation of the NGS data. The overarching importance of bioinformatics in the clinical implementation of NGS is emphasized. [7] We also review the issue of physician education which also is an important consideration for the successful implementation of NGS in the clinical workplace. NGS technologies represent a golden opportunity for the next generation of pathologists to be at the leading edge of the personalized medicine approaches coming our way. Often under-emphasized issues of data access and control as well as potential ethical implications of whole genome NGS sequencing are also discussed. Despite some challenges, it′s hard not to be optimistic about the future of personalized genome sequencing and its potential impact on patient care and the advancement of knowledge of human biology and disease in the near future.

  3. Evidence-based Medicine e Clinical Governance: una survey tra giovani chirurghi italiani

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    Gabriele Maritati

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. La Clinical Governance (CG rappresenta in Italia la strategia di politica sanitaria di riferimento per la promozione di elevati standard qualitativi all’interno del SSN. Al centro della CG si colloca il movimento culturale dell’Evidence-based Medicine (EBM. Obiettivi. Misurare all’interno di un campione di giovani chirurghi: 1 la conoscenza dell’EBM e della CG 2 la rilevanza riconosciuta ai temi dell’EBM e della CG nella propria prospettiva professionale. Metodi. Un questionario anonimo è stato inviato via e-mail ai chirurghi iscritti alla Società Polispecialistica Italiana Giovani Chirurghi (SPIGC e a professionisti segnalati da altri colleghi. I chirurghi eleggibili dovevano essere specializzati da non oltre 4 anni o iscritti all’ultimo anno della Scuola di Specializzazione. Risultati. Sono stati invitati a partecipare 1077 chirurghi (1020 iscritti alla SPIGC e 57 segnalati. Dei 254 rispondenti (24% 137 erano eleggibili. Di questi, il 96% ha riferito di conoscere il termine Evidence-based Medicine e il 54 % quello di Clinical Governance. Il 62% ha dichiarato di conoscere la definizione dell’EBM e solo il 18% quello della CG. Per il 90% di essi, l’EBM condizionerà in maniera significativa la propria attività nei prossimi 15 anni; tale percentuale si riduce al 72% in merito alla CG. Inoltre, il 41% ritiene di non essere in grado di valutare critica mente la letteratura scientifica. Limiti. Il tasso di risposta alla survey potrebbe essere considerevolmente sottostimato poiché la mailing list della SPIGC comprende 1020 indirizzi non aggiornati in funzione dei soci correntemente iscritti che sono attualmente 435. Inoltre, i chirurghi partecipanti alla survey potrebbero non essere rappresentativi della totalità dei giovani chirurghi italiani, in quanto espressione di un sottogruppo particolarmente motivato alle tematiche dell’EBM e della CG. Conclusioni. Nonostante i giovani chirurghi italiani riconoscano la

  4. Demographic, epidemiologic and clinical profile of snake bite cases, presented to Emergency Medicine department, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavesh Jarwani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Snake bite is a common medical emergency faced mainly by the rural populations in tropical and subtropical countries with heavy rainfall and humid climate. Although India is a single largest contributor of snake bite cases, reporting is very poor. There is hardly any publication of the same from Gujarat state that is developing at a good pace. Hence, we aimed to study the snake bite cases with particular attention to demography, epidemiology, and clinical profile. Settings and Design: The present descriptive, observational study was carried out at the Emergency Medicine Department of a tertiary care center in Ahmedabad, Gujarat. This department is one if the firsts to get recognized by the Medical Council of India. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional single-center study. Cases were entered into the prescribed form, and detailed information regarding demographic, epidemiologic, and clinical parameters was entered. Statistical Method: Data were analyzed using Epi2000. Means and frequencies for each variable were calculated. Results: Majority (67.4% of the snake bite victims were in the age group between 15 and 45 years. Majority were male victims (74.2%. 71% victims of snake bite lived in rural areas. Farmers and laborers were the main victims. 61.2% incidents took place at night time or early morning (before 6 a.m.. 64% patients had bite mark on the lower limb. 40% victims had seen the snake. Eight patients had snake bite, but were asymptomatic. 52% had neuroparalytic manifestation, 34% were asymptomatic, and 9.6% had hemorrhagic manifestation. 14% cases received treatment within 1 h of the bite and 64.84% within 1-6 h after the bite. First aid given was in the form of application of tourniquet (16.2%, local application of lime, chillies, herbal medicine, etc., (1%. 2.20% cases were sensitive to anti-snake venom. Only three patients died. Conclusion: In this region (Gujarat, neuroparalytic manifestation of snake bite is more

  5. Community-based clinical education increases motivation of medical students to medicine of remote area: comparison between lecture and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Harutaka; Tada, Saaya; Kondo, Saki; Tabata, Ryo; Yuasa, Shino; Kawaminami, Shingo; Nakanishi, Yoshinori; Ito, Jun; Shimizu, Nobuhiko; Obata, Fumiaki; Shin, Teruki; Bando, Hiroyasu; Kohno, Mitsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we administered a questionnaire to medical students to evaluate the effect of community-based clinical education on their attitudes to community medicine and medicine in remote area. Questionnaires were given 4 times to all the students from first-year to sixth-year. Of 95 students, 65 students (68.4%) who completed all questionnaires, were used in this study. The intensity of students' attitudes was estimated by using visual analogue scale. The intensity of interest, a sense of fulfillment and passion in medicine of remote area was significantly increased after the community-based practice. On the other hand, the level of understanding in medicine in remote area was increased by the lecture not by the practice. The intensity of desire both to become a generalist and a specialist was significantly increased when the grade went up. Most of sixth-year students desired to have abilities of a generalist and a specialist simultaneously. This study shows that the community-based practice is more meaningful in increasing motivation in medicine in remote area than the lecture, and suggests that it is important to prepare more courses to experience community medicine to increase the number of physicians who desire to work in remote area. PMID:24705761

  6. The Master of Science in clinical epidemiology degree program of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania: a model for clinical research training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Brian L; Kelly, Thomas O; Norman, Sandra A; Farrar, John T; Kimmel, Stephen E; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Feldman, Harold I

    2012-01-01

    An innovative training program to provide clinical research training for clinicians was created in 1979 at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, now the Perelman School of Medicine. The program's principal and continuing aim is to provide trainees mentored experiences and the training needed to become skilled independent investigators able to conduct clinical research and develop academic careers as independent clinical investigators.The authors identify the vision that led to the creation of the master of science in clinical epidemiology (MSCE) degree program and describe today's training program, including administration, oversight, participating faculty, and trainees. They also describe the program's core curriculum, elective options, seminars on ongoing research, training in the responsible conduct of research, professional development activities, and the development and completion of a closely mentored clinical research project.Approximately 35 new trainees enter the two- to three-year program annually. Funding is provided primarily by National Institutes of Health-funded training programs and supplemented by private industry, private foundations, and employee-based benefits. More than 500 individuals have received or are currently receiving training through the MSCE program. A large percentage of former trainees maintain full-time positions in academic medicine today.The authors identify some challenges that have been met and insights regarding funding, faculty, trainees, and curriculum. Ongoing challenges include recruiting trainees from some selected highly paid, procedure-oriented specialties, maintaining sufficient mentors for the continually increasing numbers of trainees, and distinguishing applicants who truly desire a primary research career from others.

  7. [Japanese Association of Clinical Laborato Physicians--What We Are Doing Now and How We Should Develop in the Future as Competent Members of Team Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Junko

    2014-11-01

    No clinical laboratory would admit they do not practice team medicine, at least conceptually. However, true team medicine is more than an aspiration--it is an intentional care structure built, led, and delivered by a diverse, multidisciplinary team of physicians, medical technologists, nurses, pharmacists, and dozens of other professionals. We clinical laboratory physicians are able to fulfill an important role as competent members of the team medicine. Because we can look at the results of clinical examinations of patients earlier than anyone else, we can interpret the patient's condition by analyzing that results, and provide useful information to facilitate team medicine. I have conducted a questionnaire survey on team medicine targeting clinical laboratory physicians to clarify the tasks we are performing. In this paper, I describe what clinical laboratory physicians are currently doing, and how should we develop in the future.

  8. Evaluating the fundamental qualities of a nuclear medicine radiographer for the provision of an optimal clinical service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, Marc, E-mail: marc.griffiths@uwe.ac.u [Radiography, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of the West of England, Bristol (United Kingdom); King, Simon [University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol (United Kingdom); Stewart, Rob [Diagnostic Imaging, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, University of the West of England, Bristol (United Kingdom); Dawson, Gary [Nuclear Medicine, Salisbury District Hospital, Salisbury (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15

    The developing nature of nuclear medicine practice highlights the need for an evaluation of the fundamental qualities of a Radiographer working within this discipline. Existing guidelines appear to be in place for clinical technologists working within nuclear medicine. However, limited guidance has been provided for Radiographers practicing within this discipline. This article aims to discuss the fundamental qualities that are considered essential for optimal service delivery, following consultation with various stakeholders. Areas such as technical expertise and knowledge, appropriate use of imaging equipment and current models of safe working practice will be discussed. Patient care and ethical considerations will also be evaluated, along with some core recommendations for future advanced practice.

  9. Nuclear medicine. Basic knowledge and clinical applications. 7. rev. and enl. ed.; Nuklearmedizin. Basiswissen und klinische Anwendung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schicha, Harald [Universitaetsklinikum Koeln (Germany). Medizinisches Versorgungszentrum II; Schober, Otmar [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2013-11-01

    The book on basic knowledge and clinical applications of nuclear medicine covers the following issues: The first general part: principles of nuclear medicine; physical fundamentals; radiopharmaceutical chemistry; measuring techniques: gamma detectors, gamma spectrometry, gamma camera, SPECT, PET, PET/CT, PET/NMR, image processing and communication; nuclear medical examinations: metabolic and pharmacological kinetics, scintigraphic methods, criteria for the use; quality assurance; dosimetry and radiation protection, radiation risks and patients exposure, benefit-risk considerations. The second part covers endocrine organs, carcinomas, skeleton and bone joints, inflammations, lymph system, cardiovascular system, lungs, central nervous system, kidneys and urinary system, gastrointestinal tract, other scintigraphic examinations.

  10. Traditional Chinese Medicine Diagnosis and Evaluation of the Clinical Effect in Post-hepatitic Cirrhosis based on Fuzzy Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hao-wei; ZHU Xun-sheng

    2008-01-01

    In view of the problem of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) diagnosis, fuzzy comprehensive evaluation is introduced to the diagnosis and evaluation of the clinical effect of hepatitis. A new diagnosis and evaluation model of the TCM clinical effect standard was presented. The old disputed evaluation model by subjective analysis can be displaced by this objective method in its evaluation system. The foundation of this method is the fuzzy diagnosis model. This method has been realized to diagnose hepatitis and its values in practice has been validated through examples of clinical syndromes of post-hepatitic cirrhosis.

  11. Publishing history does not correlate with clinical performance among internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Rodrigo B; Detsky, Allan S

    2010-05-01

    OBJECTIVES Selection criteria for applicants to the internal medicine programme at the University of Toronto have included the number and quality of scholarly items published. We sought to determine whether previous publishing record correlated with resident performance as measured by in-training evaluation reports (ITERs) and global impressions of clinical competency by site programme directors and senior educators (global impression). METHODS Data on the total number, quality and type of items published, as well as the timing of publishing with regard to pre-MD training, were abstracted from the curricula vitae of individuals who applied for residency during 2001-2005. These were correlated with overall, Expert and Scholar role ITER scores, and with global impression, using Spearman rank correlation scores. RESULTS We gathered publishing history data on 181 residents, for 162 of whom ITER data were available. Overall, 68.5% of residents had published, but only 14.9% had published during medical school. There was a weak correlation of borderline significance (rho = 0.15, P = 0.055) between overall ITER score and number of items published. No such correlation was found with CanMEDS Medical Expert and Scholar role scores. Global impression classified 33.9% of residents as top-rated. More top-rated residents had published (76.7% versus 65.1%; P = 0.07), but the number of items published during medical school were similar between top-rated and non-top-rated residents (16.1% versus 12.3%; P = 0.46). CONCLUSIONS Our results do not support publishing record as a predictor of residents' clinical performance. Surprisingly, the correlation between publishing record and Scholar role scores was also weak, possibly indicating an inability of the ITER to capture this competency. Further research is needed to identify predictors and measures of performance in scholarly activities. PMID:20345694

  12. Incidence of Osteoporosis in Patients Admitted to our Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Outpatient Clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berat Meryem Alkan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Osteoporosis is a skeletal disease characterized with decreased bone mass and microarchtitectural deterioration of bone tissue which increases bone fragility and fracture risk. Osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures constitute an important health problem in general population. This study aimed to determine the incidence of osteoporosis, chronic diseases accompanying osteoporosis and incidence of falls in male and female patients admitted to our out patient clinics retrospectively. Material and Methods: Patient records of the 11624 patients admitted to Ankara Atatürk Education and Research Hospital Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Outpatient clinics between January 2010 and July 2010 were retrospectively reviewed and 644 patients diagnosed as osteoporosis according to femoral neck and/or lumbar dual energy x ray absoptiometry measurements were included in the study. Ages of the patients, sexes, chronic ilnesses, musculoskeletal sytem complaints and fall histories were also recorded. Results: The incidence of osteoporosis was found to be 7.61% in female patients and it was determined that incidence was 5-fold increased in women than in men. Besides, chronic ilnesses and fall history were accompanying in higher ratios in osteoporotic patients. Conclusion: Heart diseases, hypertension, diabetes, neurological diseases leading to impairment in balance and musculoskelatal system complaints were quite frequent in patients with osteoporosis and these diseases should be taken seriously since they increase the risk of falling. It is important to avoid using drugs which lead to balance impairment, to use walk aids like canes or walkers, to perform exercises including balance and coordination training and endurance exercises in order to prevent falls. (Turkish Journal of Osteoporosis 2011;17:10-3

  13. Observations from the Mayo Clinic National Conference on Medicine and the Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Jane C; Lanier, William L

    2002-12-01

    In September 2002, the Mayo Clinic National Conference on Medicine and the Media convened to consider the accurate, timely, and responsible reporting of medical news to the public. The more than 500 participants included medical and health journalists, scientific journal editors, physicians and other health care professionals, industry representatives, government officials, institutional public information officers, public relations professionals, patients, and representatives of patient advocacy groups. The goal of the conference was to bring together all facets of the medical news dissemination process with the hope of identifying ways to serve the public more effectively. Several key observations emerged: Medical news reports may be confusing because the underlying scientific issues are unresolved and open to multiple interpretations. People who are ill have different information needs than the rest of the public. Journalists' primary concern is accurate, clear reporting, with secondary concern for a story's consequences. Journalists consider themselves primarily reporters rather than educators, but the public expects reporting to contain an educational element. Financial and other more subtle interests may influence the quality and content of scientific news releases, presentations in scientific journals, and stories covered by print and broadcast news media. Full disclosure of commercial support and affiliations, peer review of study reports, and formal guidelines for conduct may limit inappropriate financial influence. PMID:12479517

  14. Training international medical graduate clinical fellows: the challenges and opportunities for adolescent medicine programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Eudice

    2016-08-01

    Adolescent medicine achieved accreditation status first in the United States in 1994 and then in Canada in 2008 and even if it is not an accredited subspecialty in most other Western nations, it has still become firmly established as a distinct discipline. This has not necessarily been the case in some developing countries, where even the recognition of adolescence as a unique stage of human development is not always acknowledged. The program at SickKids in Toronto has prided itself in treating its international medical graduates (IMG) clinical fellows the same as their Canadian subspecialty residents by integrating them seamlessly into the training program. Although this approach has been laudable to a great extent, it may have fallen short in formally acknowledging and addressing the challenges that the IMG trainees have had to overcome. Moving forward, faculty must be trained and supports instituted that are geared specifically towards these challenges. This must be done on a formal basis to ensure both the success of the trainees as well as the overall enrichment of the fellowship training programs. PMID:26115499

  15. Prevalence of accessory deep peroneal nerve in referred patients to an electrodiagnostic medicine clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raeissadat Seyed

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accessory Deep Peroneal Nerve (ADPN is an anatomic variation that can potentially cause disturbance in electrodiagnostic studies. This anomaly could be detected by nerve conduction studies. There are no recent updates about prevalence of this anatomic variation. Electrodiagnostic medicine clinic is the best environment for detecting presence and prevalence of this nerve, so present study enrolled. Materials & Methods In this cross sectional descriptive study that take place from March 2009 to July 2010, 230 cases comprising 460 legs referred for electrodiagnostic studies of upper limbs problems participated in the study. Compound muscle action potential (CMAP and Nerve conduction Velocity (NCV of Deep Peroneal Nerve (DPN were measured by using EMG machine by stimulating DPN at knee, ankle and lateral malleolous areas accordingly, with recording from extensor digitorum brevis muscle. Results were analyzed and conclusion made. Results The study population included 120 females (52% and 110 (47% males with mean age of 42.1 ± 13.5 years. ADPN was detected in 28 patients (12%. Among them,10(17.9% had bilateral ADPN and in remained 18 cases (82.1% APN was unilateral. In 8 patients there was no recorded CMAP from EDB by proximal and distal stimulation implying EDB agenesis. Gender distribution was similar which means half of the cases (14 patients belonged to each gender. Conclusion The prevalence of ADPN in this study was 12.2%, (17.9% bilateral and 82.1% unilateral.

  16. Integrating precision medicine in the study and clinical treatment of a severely mentally ill person.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rawe, Jason A; Fang, Han; Rynearson, Shawn; Robison, Reid; Kiruluta, Edward S; Higgins, Gerald; Eilbeck, Karen; Reese, Martin G; Lyon, Gholson J

    2013-01-01

    .Glu429Ala allele in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and the p.Asp7Asn allele in ChAT, encoding choline O-acetyltransferase, with both alleles having been shown to confer an elevated susceptibility to psychoses. We have found thousands of other variants in his genome, including pharmacogenetic and copy number variants. This information has been archived and offered to this person alongside the clinical sequencing data, so that he and others can re-analyze his genome for years to come. Conclusions. To our knowledge, this is the first study in the clinical neurosciences that integrates detailed neuropsychiatric phenotyping, deep brain stimulation for OCD and clinical-grade WGS with management of genetic results in the medical treatment of one person with severe mental illness. We offer this as an example of precision medicine in neuropsychiatry including brain-implantable devices and genomics-guided preventive health care. PMID:24109560

  17. Integrating precision medicine in the study and clinical treatment of a severely mentally ill person

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason A. O’Rawe

    2013-10-01

    carries the p.Glu429Ala allele in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR and the p.Asp7Asn allele in ChAT, encoding choline O-acetyltransferase, with both alleles having been shown to confer an elevated susceptibility to psychoses. We have found thousands of other variants in his genome, including pharmacogenetic and copy number variants. This information has been archived and offered to this person alongside the clinical sequencing data, so that he and others can re-analyze his genome for years to come. Conclusions. To our knowledge, this is the first study in the clinical neurosciences that integrates detailed neuropsychiatric phenotyping, deep brain stimulation for OCD and clinical-grade WGS with management of genetic results in the medical treatment of one person with severe mental illness. We offer this as an example of precision medicine in neuropsychiatry including brain-implantable devices and genomics-guided preventive health care.

  18. Marketing strategy for a traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) clinic in Vancouver

    OpenAIRE

    Janjua, Qaiser Rashid

    2006-01-01

    Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) has gained worldwide acceptance in the recent past. Apart from all other modalities of CAM, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has gained enormous interest globally. TCM has become a mainstream medicine in several underdeveloped countries and is rapidly gaining recognition in developed countries such as in the U.S and especially Canada. British Columbia is the only jurisdiction in North America that officially recognizes TCM. Consequently, the loca...

  19. 西药不良反应的临床分析%Clinical Analysis of Adverse reaction of Chinese medicine and Western Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秀梅

    2015-01-01

    目的 探讨并分析西药不良反应的规律及特点,为临床安全用药提供更为科学的理论依据.方法 收集我院2012年4月至2013年11月收治的100例由西药引起的药物不良反应患者资料,进行回顾性分析研究.结果 通过实例研究发现,在临床中症状为皮疹、红肿、皮肤瘙痒比重超过50.0%;给药途径中最容易引起药物不良反应为静脉注射,比重超过70.0%;在所用的西药种类中,最多的是抗生素,占西药种类29.0%.结论 为了提高临床用药的安全性,应加大对药物不良反应相关知识的培训与宣传,加强药物不良反应的监测工作.%Objective To investigate the rule and characteristics of adverse drug reactions and analysis of Western medicine,for clinical safe medication to provide a more scientific basis.Methods Selected in our hospital in 2012 April~2013 year in November 100 cases of adverse drug reaction caused by western medicine to the patients,retrospective analysis.Results Through the case study found that in the clinical symptoms of rash,redness,itching skin accounted for more than 50.0%;to the adverse reactions of the drugs most likely to cause the route of administration is the intravenous injection,the proportion of more than 70.0%;in western medicine types used in most of the antibiotics,accounting for about29.0%of Western medicine category.Conclusion In order to improve the safety of clinical medication,we should increase the adverse drug reaction related knowledge training and publicity work to strengthen the monitoring of adverse drug reactions.

  20. Clinical Holistic Medicine: the “New Medicine”, the Multiparadigmatic Physician, and the Medical Record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The modern physician is often multiparadigmatic as he serves many different types of people in many different existential circumstances. The physician basically often has three, very different sets of technologies or “toolboxes” at his disposal, derived from three different medical paradigms: classical, manual medicine; biomedicine; and holistic or consciousness-oriented medicine. For lack of a better term, we have called the extended medical science — integrating these three different paradigms and their three strands of tools and methods — the “new medicine”. The excellent physician, mastering the “new medicine”, uses the most efficient way to help every patient, giving him or her exactly what is needed under the circumstances. The excellent physician will choose the right paradigm(s for the person, the illness, or the situation, and will use the case record to keep track of all the subjective and objective factors and events involved in the process of healing through time. The case or medical record has the following purposes: A. Reflection: To keep track of facts, to provide an overview, to encourage causal analysis, to support research and learning, and to reveal mistakes easily. B. Communication: To communicate with the patient with a printout of the case record to create trust and help the patient to remember all assignments and exercises. C. Evidence and safety: To provide evidence and safety for the patient or to be used in case of legal questions. D. Self-discipline: To encourage discipline, as a good case record is basically honest, sober, brief, and sticks to the point. It forces the physician to make an effort to be more diligent and careful than a busy day usually allows.The intention of the case or medical record is ethical: to be sure that you, as a physician, give the best possible treatment to your patient. It helps you to reflect deeply, communicate efficiently, provide evidence and safety, and back your self

  1. Plant-based medicines for anxiety disorders, part 2: a review of clinical studies with supporting preclinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, Jerome; McIntyre, Erica; Camfield, David A

    2013-04-01

    Research in the area of herbal psychopharmacology has revealed a variety of promising medicines that may provide benefit in the treatment of general anxiety and specific anxiety disorders. However, a comprehensive review of plant-based anxiolytics has been absent to date. Thus, our aim was to provide a comprehensive narrative review of plant-based medicines that have clinical and/or preclinical evidence of anxiolytic activity. We present the article in two parts. In part one, we reviewed herbal medicines for which only preclinical investigations for anxiolytic activity have been performed. In this current article (part two), we review herbal medicines for which there have been both preclinical and clinical investigations of anxiolytic activity. A search of MEDLINE (PubMed), CINAHL, Scopus and the Cochrane Library databases was conducted (up to 28 October 2012) for English language papers using the search terms 'anxiety' OR 'anxiety disorder' OR 'generalized anxiety disorder' OR 'social phobia' OR 'post-traumatic stress disorder' OR 'panic disorder' OR 'agoraphobia' OR 'obsessive compulsive disorder' in combination with the search terms 'Herb*' OR 'Medicinal Plants' OR 'Botanical Medicine' OR 'Chinese herb*', in addition to individual herbal medicines. This search of the literature revealed 1,525 papers, of which 53 plants were included in the review (having at least one study using the whole plant extract). Of these plants, 21 had human clinical trial evidence (reviewed here in part two), with the other 32 having solely preclinical evidence (reviewed in part one). Support for efficacy was found for chronic use (i.e. greater than one day) of the following herbs in treating a range of anxiety disorders in human clinical trials: Piper methysticum, Matricaria recutita, Ginkgo biloba, Scutellaria lateriflora, Silybum marianum, Passiflora incarnata, Withania somniferum, Galphimia glauca, Centella asiatica, Rhodiola rosea, Echinacea spp., Melissa officinalis and Echium

  2. Plant-based medicines for anxiety disorders, part 2: a review of clinical studies with supporting preclinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, Jerome; McIntyre, Erica; Camfield, David A

    2013-04-01

    Research in the area of herbal psychopharmacology has revealed a variety of promising medicines that may provide benefit in the treatment of general anxiety and specific anxiety disorders. However, a comprehensive review of plant-based anxiolytics has been absent to date. Thus, our aim was to provide a comprehensive narrative review of plant-based medicines that have clinical and/or preclinical evidence of anxiolytic activity. We present the article in two parts. In part one, we reviewed herbal medicines for which only preclinical investigations for anxiolytic activity have been performed. In this current article (part two), we review herbal medicines for which there have been both preclinical and clinical investigations of anxiolytic activity. A search of MEDLINE (PubMed), CINAHL, Scopus and the Cochrane Library databases was conducted (up to 28 October 2012) for English language papers using the search terms 'anxiety' OR 'anxiety disorder' OR 'generalized anxiety disorder' OR 'social phobia' OR 'post-traumatic stress disorder' OR 'panic disorder' OR 'agoraphobia' OR 'obsessive compulsive disorder' in combination with the search terms 'Herb*' OR 'Medicinal Plants' OR 'Botanical Medicine' OR 'Chinese herb*', in addition to individual herbal medicines. This search of the literature revealed 1,525 papers, of which 53 plants were included in the review (having at least one study using the whole plant extract). Of these plants, 21 had human clinical trial evidence (reviewed here in part two), with the other 32 having solely preclinical evidence (reviewed in part one). Support for efficacy was found for chronic use (i.e. greater than one day) of the following herbs in treating a range of anxiety disorders in human clinical trials: Piper methysticum, Matricaria recutita, Ginkgo biloba, Scutellaria lateriflora, Silybum marianum, Passiflora incarnata, Withania somniferum, Galphimia glauca, Centella asiatica, Rhodiola rosea, Echinacea spp., Melissa officinalis and Echium

  3. The committee for advanced therapies' of the European Medicines Agency reflection paper on management of clinical risks deriving from insertional mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiuti, Alessandro; Cossu, Giulio; de Felipe, Pablo; Galli, Maria Cristina; Narayanan, Gopalan; Renner, Matthias; Stahlbom, Axel; Schneider, Christian K; Voltz-Girolt, Caroline

    2013-06-01

    In the European Union, the Committee for Advanced Therapies of the European Medicines Agency takes the lead in the scientific assessment for marketing authorization applications for advanced therapy medicinal products, which include gene therapy medicinal products, somatic cell therapy medicinal products, and tissue-engineered products. The Committee for Advanced Therapies also takes the lead in defining the scientific framework for the quality, nonclinical and clinical development of such products. This reflection paper represents the Committee's current thinking on management of clinical risks deriving from insertional mutagenesis. A multidisciplinary approach to insertional mutagenesis is provided. This reflection paper has been adopted by the committee in its April 2013 meeting.

  4. Ethical standards for clinical trials conducted in third countries: the new strategy of the European Medicines Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altavilla, Annagrazia

    2011-01-01

    Clinical trials increasingly occur on a global scale as industry and government sponsors in wealthy countries move trials to low- and middle-income countries. The globalization of clinical research raises important questions about the economical and ethical aspects of clinical research and the translation of trial results to clinical practice: which ethical standards are applied? Are trials results accurate and valid, and can they be extrapolated to other settings? This article provides an overview of the strategy approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) to clarify ethical standards for clinical research conducted outside the European Economic Area (EEA) and included in Marketing Authorization Applications. Reference to the EMA Reflection paper is made. PMID:21409974

  5. A regulatory perspective of clinical trial applications for biological products with particular emphasis on Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products (ATMPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David R; McBlane, James W; McNaughton, Graham; Rajakumaraswamy, Nishanthan; Wydenbach, Kirsty

    2013-08-01

    The safety of trial subjects is the tenet that guides the regulatory assessment of a Clinical Trial Authorization application and applies equally to trials involving small molecules and those with biological/biotechnological products, including Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products. The objective of a regulator is to ensure that the potential risk faced by a trial subject is outweighed by the potential benefit to them from taking part in the trial. The focus of the application review is to assess whether risks have been identified and appropriate steps taken to alleviate these as much as possible. Other factors are also taken into account during a review, such as regulatory requirements, and emerging non-clinical and clinical data from other trials on the same or similar products. This paper examines the regulatory review process of a Clinical Trial Authorization application from the perspectives of Quality, Non-Clinical and Clinical Regulatory Assessors at the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency. It should be noted that each perspective has highlighted specific issues from their individual competence and that these can be different between the disciplines.

  6. The "Bantu Clinic": a genealogy of the African patient as object and effect of South African clinical medicine, 1930-1990.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butchart, A

    1997-12-01

    This paper is about power, medicine and the identity of the African as a patient of western medicine. From a conventional perspective and as encoded in the current "quest for wholeness" that characterises South African biomedical discourse, the African patient--like any other patient--has always existed as an authentic and subjectified being, whose true attributes and experiences have been denied by the "mechanistic," "reductionistic" and "ethnocentric" practices of clinical medicine. Against this liberal humanist perspective on the body as ontologically independent of power, this paper offers a Foucaultian reading of the African patient as-like any other patient--contingent upon the force relations immanent within and relayed through the clinical practices of biomedicine. A quintessential form of disciplinary micro-power, these fabricate the most intimate recesses of the human body as manageable objects of medical knowledge and social consciousness to make possible the great control strategies of repression, segmentation and liberation that are the usual focus of conventional investigations into the place and function of medicine in society. Since the 1930s when the African body first emerged as a discrete object of a secular clinical knowledge, these have repeatedly transformed the attributes and identity of the African patient, and the paper traces this archaeology of South African clinical perception from then until the 1990s to show how its "quest for wholeness" is not an end point of "discovery" or "liberation," but merely another ephemeral crystallization of socio-medical knowledge in a constantly changing force field of disciplinary power. PMID:9492973

  7. SEMIOTICS, DIAGNOSTICS AND THERAPY TACTICS OF DEPRESSIVE DISORDERS IN CLINICAL MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Kornetov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Study objectives are dedicated to brief synthesized establishment of diagnostics general standard, management and therapy of major depressive disorders (MDD in clinical medicine to provide education in medical practice.Study methods are based on short-term, medium-term and long-term educational programs in 24 Russian and Ukraine cities, which were based on original educational programs under the direction of World Psychiatric Association (WPA and International Committee For Prevention and Treatment of Depression (PTD. There, about 1450 doctors of different occupations were acquainted with the detection, management and treatment of MDD. The Russian version of WPA/PTD programs was created. The program of education included 4 modules. The Core module included an overview of the epidemiology, impact, concepts and classification, and etiology of depressive disorders as well as their recognition, diagnosis, and management in the primary care setting. The second module focused on depressive disorders in physical illness and covered those major illnesses for which is reasonable evidence for an association with depressive disorders. The third module included the development of the depressive disorders in older persons. The forth module included training physicians in mental health skills. 39 theme improvements for 858 primary care setting physicians within the framework of faculty training program of physicians’ development were the part of other programs of physicians’ occupations.Results. A number of highlights were included in the general algorithm of the educational programs. The creation of optimum «physician-depressive patient» contact demands a number of new skills to establish effective communication. These skills involve training of meeting of depressive patient and physician, the ability to follow a certain communication style; identify emotional, cognitive, psychomotor and nonverbal patterns of behavior. Besides that, the education

  8. Severe acute pancreatitis: clinical findings and therapeutic tools in Internal Medicine practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Generoso Uomo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Recent advances in pathophysiology and therapeutic measures suggest that patients suffering from acute pancreatitis (AP should undergo an early evaluation and treatment in Internal Medicine wards. Severe AP, usually associated with pancreatic necrosis and peripancreatic fluid collections, may be frequently complicated by distant organ(s involvement. RESULTS The dreadful multi-organ failure may occur as an early event (during the first week of the disease or in association with the infection of pancreatic necrosis in a later stage. So, during the clinical outcome, physicians may be compelled to counteract cardio-circulatory, pulmonary, renal, hepatic, haematological and hydro-electrolytic complex derangements. Arterial hypotension and shock may be consequence of hypovolemia and/or hearth failure or septic shock syndrome. Pleural effusions are frequent in the early phase of the disease as well as pulmonary densifications and renal insufficiency. Urinary, pulmonary, and biliary infections may intervene during all phases of the disease whereas pancreatic necrosis and fluid collections infections are more frequent after the second week of hospitalization. Prognostic evaluation should be obtained by simple and precise scoring system such as the modified Marshall score and CT-scan severity index. CONCLUSIONS Treatment must be initiated as soon as possible with special focusing on fluid and nutritional supplementation, pain control, cardio-respiratory support, antiproteases and antibiotics. Invasive procedures such as endoscopic sphincterotomy in biliary AP with cholangitis and/or obstruction and percutaneous drainage should be utilized in specific cases. Surgical necrosectomy is mandatory in patients with documented infection of pancreatic necrosis.

  9. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Holistic Sexology and Acupressure Through the Vagina (Hippocratic Pelvic Massage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Many gynecological and sexological problems (like urine incontinence, chronic pelvic pains, vulvodynia, and lack of lust, excitement, and orgasm are resistant to standard medical treatment. In our work at the Research Clinic for Holistic Medicine in Copenhagen, we have found that vaginal acupressure, or Hippocratic pelvic massage, can help some of these problems. Technically, it is a very simple procedure as it corresponds to the explorative phase of the standard pelvic examination, supplemented with the patient's report on the feelings it provokes and the processing and integration of these feelings. Sometimes it can be very difficult to control the emotions released by the technique, i.e., regression to earlier traumas from childhood sexual abuse. This review discusses the theory behind vaginal acupressure, ethical aspects, and presentation of a case story. This procedure helped the patient to become present in her pelvis and to integrate old traumas with painful emotions. Holistic gynecology and sexology can help the patient to identify and let go of negative feelings, beliefs, and attitudes related to sex, gender, sexual organs, body, and soul at large. Shame, guilt, helplessness, fear, disgust, anxiety, anger, hatred, and other strong feelings are almost always an important part of a sexual or functional problem as these feelings are “held” by the tissue of the pelvis and sexual organs. Acupressure through the vagina/pelvic massage must be done with great care by an experienced physician, with a third person present, after obtaining consent and the necessary trust of the patient. It must be followed by conversational therapy and further holistic existential processing.

  10. What is the position of Clinical and Experimental Reproductive Medicine in its scholarly journal network based on journal metrics?

    OpenAIRE

    Huh, Sun

    2014-01-01

    Objective Clinical and Experimental Reproductive Medicine (CERM) converted its language to English only beginning with the first issue of 2011. From that point in time, one of the goals of the journal has been to become a truly international journal. This paper aims to identify the position of CERM in its scholarly journal network based on the journal's metrics. Methods The journal's metrics, including citations, countries of author affiliation, and countries of citing authors, Hirsch index, ...

  11. The quality of clinical practice guidelines in traditional medicine in Korea: appraisal using the AGREE II instrument

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Tae-Young; Choi, Jiae; Lee, Ju Ah; Jun, Ji Hee; Park, Bongki; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the quality of the current clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) in traditional medicine (TM) in South Korea using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument to further enhance the CPG development. Methods A search was performed for guidelines in Korea from inception until March 2014 in the major Korean guideline websites [the Korean Medical Guideline Information Centre (KoMGI), the Korean Guideline Clearing House (KGC)]...

  12. The effectiveness of a clinically integrated e-learning course in evidence-based medicine: A cluster randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Arvanitis Theodoros N; Emparanza Jose I; Nagy Eva; Horvath Andrea R; Decsi Tamas; Meyerrose Berrit; Weinbrenner Susanne; Das Kausik; Malick Sadia; Hadley Julie; Zamora Javier; Coppus Sjors FPJ; Kulier Regina; Burls Amanda; Cabello Juan B

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background To evaluate the educational effects of a clinically integrated e-learning course for teaching basic evidence-based medicine (EBM) among postgraduates compared to a traditional lecture-based course of equivalent content. Methods We conducted a cluster randomised controlled trial in the Netherlands and the UK involving postgraduate trainees in six obstetrics and gynaecology departments. Outcomes (knowledge gain and change in attitude towards EBM) were compared between the cl...

  13. A survey of the use of prostitutes (commercial sex workers) by new male attenders at a genito urinary medicine clinic.

    OpenAIRE

    C. C. Lim; Armstrong, D.K.; Dinsmore, W W; Maw, R. D.

    1995-01-01

    This study documents the use of prostitutes (commercial sex workers) by new male patients attending a genito urinary medicine clinic. 541 consecutive male patients completed an anonymous self-administered questionnaire. 48 (8.9%) gave a history of previous purchase of sexual services in Northern Ireland and/or elsewhere; 69% of these encounters occurred outside Northern Ireland. The largest group were single men aged 20-29 years. 87% of those who purchased services in Northern Ireland were as...

  14. Comparison of residents’ approaches to clinical decisions before and after the implementation of Evidence Based Medicine course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZAHRA KARIMIAN

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It has been found that the decision-making process in medicine is affected, to a large extent, by one’s experience, individual mentality, previous models, and common habitual approaches, in addition to scientific principles. Evidence-based medicine is an approach attempting to reinforce scientific, systematic and critical thinking in physicians and provide the ground for optimal decision making. In this connection, the purpose of the present study is to find out to what extent the education of evidence based medicine affects clinical decision making. Methods: The present quasi-experimental study was carried out on 110 clinical residents, who started their education in September, 2012 and finally 62 residents filled out the questionnaires. The instrument used was a researchermade questionnaire containing items on four decision-making approaches. The questionnaire was used both as a pre-test and a post-test to assess the residents’ viewpoints on decision making approaches. The validity of the questionnaire was determined using medical education and clinical professionals’ viewpoints, and the reliability was calculated through Chronbach alpha; it was found to be 0.93. The results were analyzed by paired t-test using SPSS, version 14. Results: The results demonstrated that evidence-based medicine workshop significantly affected the residents’ decision-making approaches (p<0.001. The pre-test showed that principles-based, reference-based and routine model-based approaches were more preferred before the program (p<0.001. However, after the implementation of the program, the dominant approaches used by the residents in their decision making were evidence-based ones. Conclusion: To develop the evidence-based approach, it is necessary for educational programs to continue steadily and goal-orientedly. In addition, the equipment infrastructure such as the Internet, access to data bases, scientific data, and clinical guides should

  15. Clinical Frailty Scale in an Acute Medicine Unit: a Simple Tool That Predicts Length of Stay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juma, Salina; Taabazuing, Mary-Margaret; Montero-Odasso, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Background Frailty is characterized by increased vulnerability to external stressors. When frail older adults are admitted to hospital, they are at increased risk of adverse events including falls, delirium, and disability. The Clinical Frailty Scale (CFS) is a practical and efficient tool for assessing frailty; however, its ability to predict outcomes has not been well studied within the acute medical service. Objective To examine the CFS in elderly patients admitted to the acute medical ward and its association with length of stay. Design Prospective cohort study in an acute care university hospital in London, Ontario, Canada, involving 75 patients over age 65, admitted to the general internal medicine clinical teaching units (CTU). Measurements Patient demographics were collected through chart review, and CFS score was assigned to each patient after brief clinician assessment. The CFS ranges from 1 (very fit) to 9 (terminally ill) based on descriptors and pictographs of activity and functional status. The CFS was collapsed into three categories: non-frail (CFS 1–4), mild-to-moderately frail (CFS 5–6), and severely frail (CFS 7–8). Outcomes of length of stay and 90-day readmission were gathered through the LHSC electronic patient record. Results Severe frailty was associated with longer lengths of stay (Mean = 12.6 ± 12.7 days) compared to mild-to-moderate frailty (mean = 11.2 ± 10.8 days), and non-frailty (mean = 4.1 ± 2.1 days, p = .014). This finding was significant after adjusting for age, sex, and number of medications. Participants with higher frailty scores showed higher readmission rates when compared with those with no frailty (31.2% for severely frail, vs. 34.2% for mild-to-moderately frail vs. 19% for non-frail) although there was no significant difference in the adjusted analysis. Conclusion The CFS helped identify patients that are more likely to have prolonged hospital stays on the acute medical ward. The CFS is an easy to use tool which

  16. Clinical Holistic Medicine (Mindful, Short-Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Complemented with Bodywork) in the Treatment of Experienced Impaired Sexual Functioning

    OpenAIRE

    Søren Ventegodt; Suzette Thegler; Tove Andreasen; Flemming Struve; Lars Enevoldsen; Laila Bassaine; Margrethe Torp; Joav Merrick

    2007-01-01

    In this clinical follow-up study, we examined the effect of clinical holistic medicine (psychodynamic short-term therapy complemented with bodywork) on patients with poor self-assessed sexual functioning and found that this problem could be solved in 41.67% of the patients ((95% CI: 27.61–56.7%; 1.75 < NNT < 3.62, p = 0.05). The bodywork was inspired by the Marion Rosen method and helped the patients to confront painful emotions from childhood trauma(s), and thus accelerated and deepened the ...

  17. Basic Science and Clinical Application of Stem Cells in Veterinary Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribitsch, I.; Burk, J.; Delling, U.; Geißler, C.; Gittel, C.; Jülke, H.; Brehm, W.

    Stem cells play an important role in veterinary medicine in different ways. Currently several stem cell therapies for animal patients are being developed and some, like the treatment of equine tendinopathies with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), have already successfully entered the market. Moreover, animal models are widely used to study the properties and potential of stem cells for possible future applications in human medicine. Therefore, in the young and emerging field of stem cell research, human and veterinary medicine are intrinsically tied to one another. Many of the pioneering innovations in the field of stem cell research are achieved by cooperating teams of human and veterinary medical scientists.

  18. Sustainable and responsible preventive medicine : Conceptualising ethical dilemmas arising from clinical implementation of advancing medical technology

    OpenAIRE

    Getz, Linn

    2006-01-01

    Background and setting Health care has become one of the most expansive activities in contemporary societies, and technology is one of its most influential factors. The modern medical-technological enterprise is however facing unprecedented practical, ethical and epistemic challenges. This thesis arises from a well-founded concern that medicine in general, and individually targeted preventive medicine in particular, may be about to become technified and dehumanised to an extent where its inte...

  19. Education in clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine in various European countries

    OpenAIRE

    Simundic, Ana-Maria

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the complexity and heterogeneity of the educational systems, across Europe, aids in the identification of new initiatives in defining the core competences and skills necessary to practice the profession. Basic education of those who practice laboratory medicine, in European countries, may be in medicine, pharmacy, biochemistry or science. Their postgraduate education may last quite a variable time: from several months to several years, depending on the country. Some countries ha...

  20. CLINICAL OBSERVATION ON TREATMENT OF CHRONIC PHARYNGITIS WITH ACUPUNCTURE PLUS CHINESE HERBAL MEDICINES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    聂荣华

    2003-01-01

    @@ Chronic pharyngitis is the diffuse inflammation of the pharyngeal mucus, submucosal and lymph tissues. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) considers it to be the category of "Meiheqi" (梅核气,globus hystericus), "Shiyin" (失音,aphonia) and "Houbi" (喉痹,inflammation of the throat). According to the theory of TCM, the author of the present paper adopted acupuncture plus Chinese herbal medicines to treat it from 1990 to 2002, and achieved a satisfactory result. It is reported as follows.

  1. Clinical Holistic Medicine: the “New Medicine”, the Multiparadigmatic Physician, and the Medical Record

    OpenAIRE

    Søren Ventegodt; Mohammed Morad; Joav Merrick

    2004-01-01

    The modern physician is often multiparadigmatic as he serves many different types of people in many different existential circumstances. The physician basically often has three, very different sets of technologies or “toolboxes” at his disposal, derived from three different medical paradigms: classical, manual medicine; biomedicine; and holistic or consciousness-oriented medicine. For lack of a better term, we have called the extended medical science — integrating these three different paradi...

  2. Filling the gaps between theory and daily clinical procedural skills training in family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Rodriguez, Juan Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Performance of procedures is an integral part of any family physician/general practitioner's practice. Unfortunately, discrepancy occurs between the existing theoretical methods of procedural teaching and the training imparted during real daily practice, which creates gaps that need to be overcome. This article identifies and reviews teaching gaps in family medicine training and presents suggestions to overcome them with a view to forming holistic psychomotor skills based on the learner's characteristics within the patient-centred philosophy of family medicine. PMID:27073067

  3. Analysis of the systems for management of radioactive wastes from nuclear medicine clinics of the city of Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear medicine compounds marked with radionuclides, called radiopharmaceuticals, for obtention diagnostic information and for diseases treatment. The physicochemical characteristics of the radiopharmaceuticals determine his fixation at target-organ, and the physical characteristics determine the compound application in diagnostic or therapy. The handling of radiopharmaceuticals generates solid, liquid and gas wastes. The presence of these wastes implies in a adequate management according to regulation standards established by the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). The objective of safe management of radioactive wastes is to protect the human being and the preservation of the environment, limiting possible radiological impacts for the future generation, and comprehend a set of technical and administrative activities involved in the collection, segregation, handling, conditioning, transportation, storage, control and elimination, or the final deposition. This work intends to verify if the radioactive waste management systems from the nuclear medicine clinics at the city of Recife are conformal with te normative regulations issued by the CNEN. The initial obtained results are used to elaboration of conformal verification spreadsheet and its application in six nuclear medicine clinics at Recife

  4. Clinical Effects of Lithospermum Ruderale Dosage and Using-time on Medicinal Abortion Induced by Mifepris tone and Misoprostol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The clinical effects of dosage during the period of treatment of Lithospermum Ruderale extract-a kind of Chinese traditional herbal medicine-on medicinal abor tion induced by mifepristone and misoprostol were studied. Lithospermum Ruderale extract was administrated 3 d before, 3 d after or 3 d before plus 3 d after the admin istration of misoprostol respectively. The dose of Lithospermum Ruderale extract was 50 g, 75 g or 100g respectively. Thus 1 350 women of early pregnancy were grouped into 9 groups and observed. The results showed that the effects of Lithospermum Rud erale used 3 d before, and 3 d before plus 3 d after (6 days misoprostol were signifi cantly better than those only used 3 d after misoprostol both for complete abortion and bleeding (P<0.05). The dosage between 50 g and l00 g made no significant differ ence in clinical effects. Therefore it is reasonable to use 50 g Lithospermum Ruderale before misoprostol to improve medicinal abortion.

  5. Evaluating the value of a web-based natural medicine clinical decision tool at an academic medical center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpa Kelly

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Consumer use of herbal and natural products (H/NP is increasing, yet physicians are often unprepared to provide guidance due to lack of educational training. This knowledge deficit may place consumers at risk of clinical complications. We wished to evaluate the impact that a natural medicine clinical decision tool has on faculty attitudes, practice experiences, and needs with respect to H/NP. Methods All physicians and clinical staff (nurse practitioners, physicians assistants (n = 532 in departments of Pediatrics, Family and Community Medicine, and Internal Medicine at our medical center were invited to complete 2 electronic surveys. The first survey was completed immediately before access to a H/NP clinical-decision tool was obtained; the second survey was completed the following year. Results Responses were obtained from 89 of 532 practitioners (16.7% on the first survey and 87 of 535 (16.3% clinicians on the second survey. Attitudes towards H/NP varied with gender, age, time in practice, and training. At baseline, before having an evidence-based resource available, nearly half the respondents indicated that they rarely or never ask about H/NP when taking a patient medication history. The majority of these respondents (81% indicated that they would like to learn more about H/NP, but 72% admitted difficulty finding evidence-based information. After implementing the H/NP tool, 63% of database-user respondents indicated that they now ask patients about H/NP when taking a drug history. Compared to results from the baseline survey, respondents who used the database indicated that the tool significantly increased their ability to find reliable H/NP information (P Conclusions Our results demonstrate healthcare provider knowledge and confidence with H/NP can be improved without costly and time-consuming formal H/NP curricula. Yet, it will be challenging to make providers aware of such resources.

  6. Andrea Pasta (1706-1782), eclectic scholar of anatomy and clinical medicine, communication and the history of art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Veneroni, Laura; Patriarca, Carlo

    2014-11-01

    Andrea Pasta was an eclectic visionary light years ahead of his time. He made numerous contributions to the field of medicine, some recognized by his contemporaries and others so visionary that they are being applied only in modern times. His contributions spanned the disciplines of psychology, gynaecology, haematology, infectious diseases and the doctor-patient relationship. Well known among his contemporaries, he combined a passion for clinical medicine and a keen interest in history and art with a strict research methodology and an approach to caring for patients as human beings. By studying his life and works, we can better understand the magnitude and significance of his innovative method and its applicability in modern times and also the significance of his many contributions.

  7. Teaching evidence-based medicine to undergraduate medical students: a course integrating ethics, audit, management and clinical epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Martin; Ashcroft, Richard; Atun, Rifat A; Freeman, George K; Jamrozik, Konrad

    2006-06-01

    A six-week full time course for third-year undergraduate medical students at Imperial College uniquely links evidence-based medicine (EBM) with ethics and the management of change in health services. It is mounted jointly by the Medical and Business Schools and features an experiential approach. Small teams of students use a problem-based strategy to address practical issues identified from a range of clinical placements in primary and secondary care settings. The majority of these junior clinical students achieve important objectives for learning about teamwork, critical appraisal, applied ethics and health care organisations. Their work often influences the care received by patients in the host clinical units. We discuss the strengths of the course in relation to other accounts of programmes in EBM. We give examples of recurring experiences from successive cohorts and discuss assessment issues and how our multi-phasic evaluation informs evolution of the course and the potential for future developments.

  8. The role of family therapists in veterinary medicine: opportunities for clinical services, education, and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafen, McArthur; Rush, Bonnie R; Reisbig, Allison M J; McDaniel, Kara Z; White, Mark B

    2007-04-01

    Marriage and family therapists (MFTs) are applying their specific skill set in a variety of arenas. A new area for collaboration is veterinary medicine. The veterinary medical profession is emphasizing the importance of non-biomedical skills such as communication skills, acknowledging that human clientele are likely to view their pets as family members, and discussing veterinarian personal well-being. Each of these trends has clear application for intervention by MFTs. A discussion of how MFTs may be uniquely positioned to assist veterinary medicine is presented. An example of collaboration between MFT and veterinary medicine at Kansas State University is highlighted. Recommendations are made for development of effective educational relationships and possible private sector collaborations. PMID:17437457

  9. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Treatment of Physical Health Problems Without a Known Cause, Exemplified by Hypertension and Tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the medical clinic, we often face health problems that have no known cause, even after a thorough examination. Biomedicine is often unable to find a cure in these situations, leaving the problem unsolved or leaving the patient on a palliative pharmaceutical cure, which is often for a lifetime. In this case, consciousness-based, holistic medicine could be an alternative. Using the theories and tools of holistic medicine wisely, the physician can often provide treatment for the patient. The toolbox of holistic medicine makes it possible to work on everybody because there is always something related to the patients quality of life that can be improved: his love, his purpose of life, and the way he uses his talents, his mind, his feelings, his body, and his sexuality. For treatment in holistic medicine, it really does not matter as much that you cannot give the patient a precise medical diagnosis, because you can always work on the patient with the intention of healing his or her whole life and existence. It is quite a paradox that many of these diseases can be understood on the level of the individual patient at the same moment that the patient is cured; many of these diseases seem to be clearly related to the repression of the individual character, as stressed already by Hippocrates. So if you simply start working with the patient to help him confront old existential pain and coach him in his personal development of his life by intensifying its meaning and purpose, the symptoms very often simply disappear. The toolbox of holistic medicine also seems relevant to even difficult, neurotic, psychosomatic, and hypochondriac patients. Believing in the treatment and not giving up on your patient, and moving forward in the treatment with the patient himself is the ultimate goal, even when you yourself do not understand the mechanism fully. This will force you to develop your own competence and is, in essence, what makes an outstanding holistic

  10. Gambling as an addictive disorder among athletes: clinical issues in sports medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, T W; Adams, J M; Kraus, R F; Clayton, R; Miller, J M; Anderson, J; Ogilvie, B

    2001-01-01

    This article examines the role of gambling as an addictive disorder experienced by athletes, both college and professional. Gambling may often be seen as a comorbid factor with other addictions and with depression among athletes. The focus on addictions among athletes has gained considerable attention among sports medicine clinicians. Diagnostic indicators, risk and protective factors, and a stage model of addiction among athletes are addressed. An algorithm and pathway of care for athletes with an addictive disorder is offered as are recommendations that sports physicians, sports medicine specialists, coaches and counsellors need to address athletes who have an addictive disorder.

  11. Personalised Medicine Possible With Real-Time Integration of Genomic and Clinical Data To Inform Clinical Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Sanchez, Fernando; Turner, Maureen; Johnstone, Alice; Heffer, Leon; Rafael, Naomi; Bakker, Tim; Thorne, Natalie; Macciocca, Ivan; Gaff, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Despite widespread use of genomic sequencing in research, there are gaps in our understanding of the performance and provision of genomic sequencing in clinical practice. The Melbourne Genomics Health Alliance (the Alliance), has been established to determine the feasibility, performance and impact of using genomic sequencing as a diagnostic tool. The Alliance has partnered with BioGrid Australia to enable the linkage of genomic sequencing, clinical treatment and outcome data for this project. This integrated dataset of genetic, clinical and patient sourced information will be used by the Alliance to evaluate the potential diagnostic value of genomic sequencing in routine clinical practice. This project will allow the Alliance to provide recommendations to facilitate the integration of genomic sequencing into clinical practice to enable personalised disease treatment. PMID:26262351

  12. Clinical Holistic Medicine (Mindful, Short-Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Complemented with Bodywork in the Treatment of Experienced Impaired Sexual Functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this clinical follow-up study, we examined the effect of clinical holistic medicine (psychodynamic short-term therapy complemented with bodywork on patients with poor self-assessed sexual functioning and found that this problem could be solved in 41.67% of the patients ((95% CI: 27.61–56.7%; 1.75 < NNT < 3.62, p = 0.05. The bodywork was inspired by the Marion Rosen method and helped the patients to confront painful emotions from childhood trauma(s, and thus accelerated and deepened the therapy. The goal of therapy was the healing of the whole life of the patient through Antonovsky-salutogenesis. In this process, rehabilitation of the character and purpose of life of the patient was essential, and assisted the patient to recover his or her sense of coherence (existential coherence. We conclude that clinical holistic medicine is the treatment of choice if the patient is ready to explore and assume responsibility for his or her existence (true self, and willing to struggle emotionally in the therapy to reach this important goal. When the patient heals existentially, quality of life, health, and ability to function in general are improved at the same time. The therapy was “mindful” in its focus on existential and spiritual issues. The patients received in average 14.8 sessions at the cost of 1,188 EURO.

  13. Making clinical case-based learning in veterinary medicine visible: analysis of collaborative concept-mapping processes and reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosa, Deep K; Volet, Simone E; Bolton, John R

    2014-01-01

    The value of collaborative concept mapping in assisting students to develop an understanding of complex concepts across a broad range of basic and applied science subjects is well documented. Less is known about students' learning processes that occur during the construction of a concept map, especially in the context of clinical cases in veterinary medicine. This study investigated the unfolding collaborative learning processes that took place in real-time concept mapping of a clinical case by veterinary medical students and explored students' and their teacher's reflections on the value of this activity. This study had two parts. The first part investigated the cognitive and metacognitive learning processes of two groups of students who displayed divergent learning outcomes in a concept mapping task. Meaningful group differences were found in their level of learning engagement in terms of the extent to which they spent time understanding and co-constructing knowledge along with completing the task at hand. The second part explored students' and their teacher's views on the value of concept mapping as a learning and teaching tool. The students' and their teacher's perceptions revealed congruent and contrasting notions about the usefulness of concept mapping. The relevance of concept mapping to clinical case-based learning in veterinary medicine is discussed, along with directions for future research.

  14. National Farm Medicine Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Areas Applied Sciences Biomedical Informatics Clinical Research Epidemiology Farm Medicine Human Genetics Oral-Systemic Health Clinical ... Consulting Agritourism Farm MAPPER Lyme Disease ROPS Rebate Zika Virus National Farm Medicine Center The National Farm ...

  15. Quality control in Department of Nuclear Medicine, Clinical Center Banja Luka, RS, Bosnia and Herzegovina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete test of publication follows. The aim of this work is to give a review of situations in the Department of Nuclear Medicine in Banja Luka related to quality control. We must perform daily, weekly and monthly control of equipment in the Department of Nuclear Medicine, and we must keep records. In our Department we have equipment from different producers and different year of production: 3 gamma cameras (1973, 1989, 2000); 2 auto gamma counters (2000, 2006); 2 dose calibrators (1973, 2000); 1 thyroid uptake system (2000). Normally procedures for quality control are also different. The situation, according to results of quality control is good. All equipment is working normally and with good performance (except one gamma camera - a problem with hard drive), but we don't have a routine daily control and periodical control for others tests. Keeping a records is another problem. Why? 1. In Bosnia and Herzegovina we don't have Regulatory authority. That means that we don't have legislation, rules, inspection or any other regulatory instruments. 2. There is only school for nurses, we have no special school for medical technician. So, we need an education in that field. 3. Very small number of physicist in hospital, no education for medical and nuclear medicine physicist. Conclusion. Situation in Department of Nuclear Medicine in Banja Luka related to quality control is on the medium level. We are trying to put that on the higher level, but to accomplish that we need additional education for nurses (technicians) and physicist.

  16. An Assessment of an Oral Examination Format for Evaluating Clinical Competence in Emergency Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, David J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    In July 1989 the American Board of Emergency Medicine conducted a field test of the oral recertification examination process. Sixteen examiners and 25 examinees participated in the field test. The examination included 3 chart-stimulated recall and 3 simulated-patient encounter cases. (MLW)

  17. Metabolomics-based systems biology and personalized medicine: Moving towards n = 1 clinical trials?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greef, J. van der; Hankemeier, T.; McBurney, R.N.

    2006-01-01

    Personalized medicine - defined as customized medical care for each patient's unique condition - in the broader context of personalized health, will make significant strides forward when a systems approach is implemented to achieve the ultimate in disease phenotyping and to create novel therapeutics

  18. Effect of integrated traditional Chinese and Western medicine on SARS:A review of clinical evidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Ming Zhang; Xue-Mei Liu; Lin He

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To assess the possible effect of integrated traditional Chinese and Western medicine on severe acute respiratory syndromes.METHODS: The current available randomized controlled trials of integrated traditional Chinese and Western medicine on SARS were identified through systematically searching literature in any languages or any types of publications.Additional studies of gray literature were also collected.The quality of studies was evaluated by two investigators independently based largely on the quality criteria specified CONSORT. Statistical analysis of the results was performed using RevMan 4.2.0 software developed by the Cochrane Collaboration.RESULTS: Six studies (n = 366) fulfilling the inclusion criteria were found, of which the quality of one study was graded as B, the remaining five were graded as C. Two studies were performed with meta-analysis, the other four studies existed some heterogeneity for which meta-analysis could not be performed, a significant effect on lung infiltrate absorption was found in the treatment groups of these two studies [RR 6.68, 95% CI (2.93, 15.24), P<0.01], there was no significant differences between the mortality [RR 0.86, 95%CI (0.22, 3.29), P = 0.82] and the average dosage of corticosteroid [WMD -39.65, 95% CI (-116.84, 37.54),P = 0.31]. The other three studies also showed significant differences in infiltrate absorption, including national drug No. 2. 3.4 in combination with Western medicine [RR 5.45,95% CI (1.54, 19.26)], compound formulas NO. 1 combined with Western medicine [WMD 0.24, 95% CI (0.02, 0.46)],compound formulas combined with Western medicine [RR 8.06, 95% CI (0.40, 163.21)]. Kangfeidian No.4 in combination with Western medicine had no significant effect on symptom improvement such as loss of dyspnea and cough [RR 1.50,95%CI (0.41, 5.43)] and [RR 1.29, 95%CI (0.30, 5.43)].CONCLUSION: Integrated traditional Chinese and Western medicines has some positive effects on lung infiltrate absorption in SARS

  19. Systematic Evaluation on Clinical Efifcacy of External Application of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Treatment of Breast Hyperplasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LYU Yan-hong; XIANG Jing-fang; ZHANG Kang; LU Qin

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the clinical efifcacy of external application of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in the treatment of breast hyperplasia. Methods:Randomized controlled clinical trial literatures on external application of TCM in the treatment of breast hyperplasia in PubMed, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), China National Knowledge Infrastructure Database (CNKI) and Chinese Biomedical Abstract Database (CBM) from January 2000 to August 2015 were retrieved, and screened by researchers to data extraction. RevMan 5.3 was applied for meta analysis. Results: A total of 15 clinical trials with 2 107 patients with breast hyperplasia were included, in which 1 151 were divided into treatment group treated with external application of TCM while 956 into control group. Meta analysis indicated that the clinical response rate and improvement of symptom scores (breast lump size) as well as serum levels of estradiol (E2), progesterone (P) and prolactin (PRL) in treatment group were superior to the control group and the differences were statistically significant (P0.05). Conclusion: External application of TCM, to some extent, can improve the clinical efifcacy in the treatment of breast hyperplasia, and it is necessary to carry out higher-quality, multicenter, large-scale, prospective and double-blind clinical trials for further validation.

  20. E-film - an interactive clinical teaching tool for nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: With the advent of technology the old fashioned film library used by our Nuclear Medicine staff has been updated and remodelled from 'hard copy learning' with film and light boxes to 'soft-copy learning' using standard PC hardware and software. The new model 'e-film' is a web browser based image viewer written in HTML. It incorporates interesting case studies with interactive questions and answers based on pathology. The easy-to-use design involves selecting a Nuclear Medicine scan e g bone scan, and then the pathology of interest e g osteomyelitis. Each pathology selected has a normal and a number of abnormal cases, which can be viewed as static planar and dynamic images or as movies. The text displayed with each case study is a question with an answer that can be revealed when ready. A general learning tip pertaining to the scan type or particular pathology can also be revealed on request. Many of the case studies incorporate images from other modalities such as CT or MRI for comparison with the Nuclear Medicine images. Pre- and post- treatment scans can also be viewed to assess outcome 'e film' allows staff to search in a specific area of Nuclear Medicine and then test themselves on their understanding of the scan and relevant pathologies. Standard web browsers on PC's allow department-wide user accessibility of e-film via an intranet configuration. In summary, e-film is a convenient, time efficient way of learning with the potential of unlimited data expansion. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  1. Clinical biochemistry and laboratory medicine in the post-genome era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The last decades of the 20th century were a period of outstanding scientific achievements. The most significant discovery was the decoding of the human genome (Venter, J. et al., 2001; Dennis, C. et al., 2001; Baltimore, D., 2001). In this article the present view of the post genomic era is presented. The new analytical methods, such as micro arrays, bio chips, and nano technology, the discovery of SNPs, and the analysis of the proteome will lead to a greater understanding of the pathogenesis of inherited and acquired diseases. Their use in clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine, and the future of technological innovations are discussed. In the post genomic era the greatest interest will be devoted to the application of these scientific achievements in the diagnosis, prevention and therapy of human diseases. The advances in human genetics that have occurred during the past 20 years have revolutionized our knowledge of the role played by inheritance in health and disease. It is clear that our DNA determines not only single gene disorders but also interacts with environments to predispose individuals to cancer, allergy, hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, psychiatric disorders and even to some infectious diseases. The study of longevity and the demonstration of genes favouring a long lifespan suggest that such protective systems exist. The study of genetic polymorphisms has made clear that some alleles have beneficial effects. These discoveries will be of great help in our understanding of the interactions between genetics and environment. Gene array analysis has become the method of choice for identifying genes expressed at different levels in different samples. The mRNA expression profiles of normal and tumor tissues, treated and untreated cell cultures, and developmental stages of an organism can be compared quickly and easily with an appropriate array analysis system. A major task after a genome has been fully sequenced is to understand the functions

  2. Teaching trainers to incorporate evidence-based medicine (EBM teaching in clinical practice: the EU-EBM project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaleta Anna

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence based medicine (EBM is considered an integral part of medical training, but integration of teaching various EBM steps in everyday clinical practice is uncommon. Currently EBM is predominantly taught through theoretical courses, workshops and e-learning. However, clinical teachers lack confidence in teaching EBM in workplace and are often unsure of the existing opportunities for teaching EBM in the clinical setting. There is a need for continuing professional development (CPD courses that train clinical trainers to teach EBM through on-the-job training by demonstration of applied EBM real time in clinical practice. We developed such a course to encourage clinically relevant teaching of EBM in post-graduate education in various clinical environments. Methods We devised an e-learning course targeting trainers with EBM knowledge to impart educational methods needed to teach application of EBM teaching in commonly used clinical settings. The curriculum development group comprised experienced EBM teachers, clinical epidemiologists, clinicians and educationalists from institutions in seven European countries. The e-learning sessions were designed to allow participants (teachers to undertake the course in the workplace during short breaks within clinical activities. An independent European steering committee provided input into the process. Results The curriculum defined specific learning objectives for teaching EBM by exploiting educational opportunities in six different clinical settings. The e-modules incorporated video clips that demonstrate practical and effective methods of EBM teaching in everyday clinical practice. The course encouraged focussed teaching activities embedded within a trainer's personal learning plan and documentation in a CPD portfolio for reflection. Conclusion This curriculum will help senior clinicians to identify and make the best use of available opportunities in everyday practice in clinical

  3. Improving surveillance of sexually transmitted infections using mandatory electronic clinical reporting: the genitourinary medicine clinic activity dataset, England, 2009 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, E J; Mohammed, H; Leong, G; Duffell, S; Hughes, G

    2014-01-01

    A new electronic surveillance system for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) was introduced in England in 2009. The genitourinary medicine clinic activity dataset (GUMCAD) is a mandatory, disaggregated, pseudo-anonymised data return submitted by all STI clinics across England. The dataset includes information on all STI diagnoses made and services provided alongside demographic characteristics for every patient attendance at a clinic. The new system enables the timely analysis and publication of routine STI data, detailed analyses of risk groups and longitudinal analyses of clinic attendees. The system offers flexibility so new codes can be introduced to help monitor outbreaks or unusual STI activity. From January 2009 to December 2013 inclusive, over twenty-five million records from a total of 6,668,648 patients of STI clinics have been submitted. This article describes the successful implementation of this new surveillance system and the types of epidemiological outputs and analyses that GUMCAD enables. The challenges faced are discussed and forthcoming developments in STI surveillance in England are described. PMID:25496573

  4. GMP facilities for manufacturing of advanced therapy medicinal products for clinical trials: an overview for clinical researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alici, Evren; Blomberg, Pontus

    2010-12-01

    To be able to produce advanced therapy medicinal products, compliance with regulatory standards while maintaining flexibility is mandatory. For this purpose, careful planning is vital in the design or upgrade of a facility. Similarly, extensive foresight is elemental to anticipate upcoming needs and requirements. Failing this may lead to the facility's in-ability to meet the demands. In this chapter we aimed to outline the current issues with regards to the European Union Directives (EUD) and the proposal for Advanced Therapies, which are of importance to cellular and gene therapy facilities in Europe. This chapter is an attempt to elucidate what the minimum requirements for GMP facilities for cell and gene therapy products are and what is considered necessary to comply with the regulations in Europe.

  5. Clinical Holistic Medicine: The Dean Ornish Program (“Opening the Heart” in Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Dean Ornish of the Preventive Medicine Research Institute in Sausalito, California has created an intensive holistic treatment for coronary heart patients with improved diet (low fat, whole foods, plant based, exercise, stress management, and social support that has proven to be efficient. In this paper, we analyze the rationale behind his cure in relation to contemporary holistic medical theory. In spite of a complex treatment program, the principles seem to be simple and in accordance with holistic medical theories, like the Antonovsky concept of rehabilitating the sense of coherence and the life mission theory for holistic medicine. We believe there is a need for the allocation of resources for further research into the aspects of holistic health and its methods, where positive and significant results have been proven and reproduced at several sites.

  6. Systematic Evaluation on Clinical Efficacy of External Application of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Treatment of Breast Hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-hong Lyu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of external application of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM in the treatment of breast hyperplasia. Methods: Randomized controlled clinical trial literatures on external application of TCM in the treatment of breast hyperplasia published in PubMed, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL , China National Knowledge Infrastructure Database (CNKI and Chinese Biomedical Abstract Database (CBM from January 2000 to August 2015 were retrieved, and screened by researchers to data extraction. RevMan 5.3 was applied for Meta analysis. Results: A total of 15 clinical trials with 2 107 patients with breast hyperplasia were included, in which 1 151 were divided into treatment group treated with external application of TCM while 956 into control group. Meta analysis indicated that the clinical response rate and clinical symptom score improvement (lump size as well as serum levels of estradiol (E2, progesterone (P and prolactin (PRL in treatment group were superior to the control group and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05. Although external application of TCM had a tendency of alleviating clinical symptom (lump pain, hardness and range as well as complicated symptoms, there was no statistically significant difference between two groups (P>0.05. Conclusion: External application of TCM, to some extent, can improve the clinical efficacy in the treatment of breast hyperplasia, and it is necessary to carry out higher-quality, multicenter, large-scale, prospective and double-blind clinical experiments for further validation.

  7. Clinical Application of a Modular Genomics Technique in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Progress towards Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollars, Eric; Courtney, Sean M; Wolf, Bethany J; Allaire, Norm; Ranger, Ann; Hardiman, Gary; Petri, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring disease activity in a complex, heterogeneous disease such as lupus is difficult. Both over- and undertreatment lead to damage. Current standard of care serologies are unreliable. Better measures of disease activity are necessary as we move into the era of precision medicine. We show here the use of a data-driven, modular approach to genomic biomarker development within lupus-specifically lupus nephritis. PMID:27656648

  8. Acellular approaches for regenerative medicine: on the verge of clinical trials with extracellular membrane vesicles?

    OpenAIRE

    Fuster-Matanzo, Almudena; Gessler, Florian; Leonardi, Tommaso; Iraci, Nunzio; Pluchino, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are a heterogeneous population of naturally occurring secreted small vesicles, with distinct biophysical properties and different functions both in physiology and under pathological conditions. In recent years, a number of studies have demonstrated that EVs might hold remarkable potential in regenerative medicine by acting as therapeutically promising nanodrugs. Understanding their final impact on the biology of specific target cells as well as clarification of th...

  9. Clinical implementation of genetic testing in medicine: a US regulatory science perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Lesko, Lawrence J.; Schmidt, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneity of treatment effects in unselected patient populations has stimulated various strategic approaches to reduce variability and uncertainty and improve individualization of drug selection and dosing. The rapid growth of DNA sequencing and related technologies has ramped up progress in interpreting germline and somatic mutations and has begun to reshape medicine, especially in oncology. Over the past decade, regulatory agencies realized that they needed to be proactive and not react...

  10. [Postgraduates' training as laboratory physicians/clinical pathologists in Japan--board certification of JSLM as a mandatory requirement for chairpersons of laboratory medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumasaka, Kazunari

    2002-04-01

    The educational committee of the Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine(JSLM) proposed a revised laboratory medicine residency curriculum in 1999 and again in 2001. The committee believes that present undergraduate clinical training is insufficient and that Japanese medical graduates need clinical training for two years after graduation. This two years training should be a precondition for further postgraduate training in laboratory medicine and should include fundamental clinical skills(communication skills, physical examination and common laboratory procedures such as Gram's stain, Wright-Giemsa stain and urinalysis). After the two years training, the minimal training period of laboratory medicine should be three years, and should include: 1) Principles, instrumentation and techniques of each discipline including clinical chemistry, clinical hematology, clinical microbiology, clinical immunology, blood banking and other specific areas. 2) The use of laboratory information in a medical setting. 3) Interaction of the laboratory physician with laboratory staff, physicians and patients. With good on-the-job training and 24 hours on-call duties, laboratory physicians are expected to perform their tasks, including laboratory management, effectively. They should have appropriate educational background and should be well motivated. The background and duties of the laboratory physicians often reflect the institutional needs and personal philosophy of the chairperson of their department. At the moment, few senior physicians in Japan have qualifications in laboratory medicine and are unable, therefore, to provide the necessary guidance to help the laboratory physicians in their work. I therefore believe that the board certification of JSLM should be regarded as mandatory for chairpersons of laboratory medicine. Our on-call service system can enhance the training in laboratory medicine, and improve not only laboratory quality assurance but patients' care as well. PMID

  11. Efficacy of clinical diagnostic procedures utilized in nuclear medicine. Technical progress report, 1 December 1981-30 November 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficacy of nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures was measured. Three levels of efficacy were defined. However, two different methods of evaluating efficacy itself were first compared. Using two methods, logistic regression and entropy-minimax pattern detection, substantial agreement was found between them in several clinical observations. (1) There are no attributes that indicate that any grouping of symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings is capable of suggesting that a patient does or does not have a pulmonary embolus. (2) The lung scan test is the only reliable method which indicates that a patient may have a pulmonary embolus or does not have a pulmonary embolus. (3) The validity of these conclusions and the ability to apply them widely to ongoing clinical practice is based on the prospective design of the Study which included an appropriate distribution of institutions by type, size, and geographic location. Also, the only judgement samples was that of the referring physician

  12. Comparison of 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography Ventilation With Nuclear Medicine Ventilation-Perfusion Imaging: A Clinical Validation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy, E-mail: yevgeniy.vinogradskiy@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Koo, Phillip J. [Department of Radiology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Castillo, Richard [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Castillo, Edward; Guerrero, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Computational and Applied Mathematics, Rice University, Houston, Texas (United States); Gaspar, Laurie E.; Miften, Moyed; Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) ventilation imaging provides lung function information for lung cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy. Before 4DCT-ventilation can be implemented clinically it needs to be validated against an established imaging modality. The purpose of this work was to compare 4DCT-ventilation to nuclear medicine ventilation, using clinically relevant global metrics and radiologist observations. Methods and Materials: Fifteen lung cancer patients with 16 sets of 4DCT and nuclear medicine ventilation-perfusion (VQ) images were used for the study. The VQ-ventilation images were acquired in planar mode using Tc-99m-labeled diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid aerosol inhalation. 4DCT data, spatial registration, and a density-change-based model were used to compute a 4DCT-based ventilation map for each patient. The percent ventilation was calculated in each lung and each lung third for both the 4DCT and VQ-ventilation scans. A nuclear medicine radiologist assessed the VQ and 4DCT scans for the presence of ventilation defects. The VQ and 4DCT-based images were compared using regional percent ventilation and radiologist clinical observations. Results: Individual patient examples demonstrate good qualitative agreement between the 4DCT and VQ-ventilation scans. The correlation coefficients were 0.68 and 0.45, using the percent ventilation in each individual lung and lung third, respectively. Using radiologist-noted presence of ventilation defects and receiver operating characteristic analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the 4DCT-ventilation were 90%, 64%, and 81%, respectively. Conclusions: The current work compared 4DCT with VQ-based ventilation using clinically relevant global metrics and radiologist observations. We found good agreement between the radiologist's assessment of the 4DCT and VQ-ventilation images as well as the percent ventilation in each lung. The agreement lessened when the data were

  13. Comparison of 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography Ventilation With Nuclear Medicine Ventilation-Perfusion Imaging: A Clinical Validation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Koo, Phillip J.; Castillo, Richard; Castillo, Edward; Guerrero, Thomas; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Miften, Moyed; Kavanagh, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) ventilation imaging provides lung function information for lung cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy. Before 4DCT-ventilation can be implemented clinically it needs to be validated against an established imaging modality. The purpose of this work was to compare 4DCT-ventilation to nuclear medicine ventilation, using clinically relevant global metrics and radiologist observations. Methods and Materials Fifteen lung cancer patients with 16 sets of 4DCT and nuclear medicine ventilation-perfusion (VQ) images were used for the study. The VQ-ventilation images were acquired in planar mode using Tc-99m-labeled diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid aerosol inhalation. 4DCT data, spatial registration, and a density-change-based model were used to compute a 4DCT-based ventilation map for each patient. The percent ventilation was calculated in each lung and each lung third for both the 4DCT and VQ-ventilation scans. A nuclear medicine radiologist assessed the VQ and 4DCT scans for the presence of ventilation defects. The VQ and 4DCT-based images were compared using regional percent ventilation and radiologist clinical observations. Results Individual patient examples demonstrate good qualitative agreement between the 4DCT and VQ-ventilation scans. The correlation coefficients were 0.68 and 0.45, using the percent ventilation in each individual lung and lung third, respectively. Using radiologist-noted presence of ventilation defects and receiver operating characteristic analysis, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the 4DCT-ventilation were 90%, 64%, and 81%, respectively. Conclusions The current work compared 4DCT with VQ-based ventilation using clinically relevant global metrics and radiologist observations. We found good agreement between the radiologist’s assessment of the 4DCT and VQ-ventilation images as well as the percent ventilation in each lung. The agreement lessened when the data were analyzed

  14. National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry laboratory medicine practice guidelines for use of tumor markers in testicular, prostate, colorectal, breast, and ovarian cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturgeon, Catharine M; Duffy, Michael J; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Updated National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry (NACB) Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines for the use of tumor markers in the clinic have been developed. METHODS: Published reports relevant to use of tumor markers for 5 cancer sites--testicular, prostate, colorectal, breast...

  15. Is the Information about a Test Important? Applying the Methods of Evidence-Based Medicine to the Clinical Examination of Swallowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbek, John C.; McCullough, Gary H.; Wertz, Robert T.

    2004-01-01

    A hotly debated topic in oropharyngeal dysphagia is the Clinical Swallowing Examination's (CSE) importance in clinical practice. That debate can profit from the application of evidence-based medicine's (EBM) principles and procedures. These can guide both appropriate data collection and interpretation as will be demonstrated in the present report.…

  16. A framework for implementation, education, research and clinical use of ultrasound in emergency departments by the Danish Society for Emergency Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Laursen, Christian B; Nielsen, Klaus; Riishede, Minna; Tiwald, Gerhard; Møllekær, Anders; Aagaard, Rasmus; Posth, Stefan; Weile, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    The first Danish Society for Emergency Medicine (DASEM) recommendations for the use of clinical ultrasound in emergency departments has been made. The recommendations describes what DASEM believes as being current best practice for training, certification, maintenance of acquired competencies, quality assurance, collaboration and research in the field of clinical US used in an ED.

  17. The case for social marketing in gonorrhoea prevention: insights from sexual lifestyles in Glasgow genitourinary medicine clinic attendees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoular, Anne; Abu-Rajab, Kirsty; Winter, Andy; Connell, Judith; Hart, Graham

    2008-08-01

    We conducted a matched case-control study to investigate social factors associated with gonorrhoea acquisition among genitourinary (GU) medicine clinic attendees, designed to inform appropriate prevention strategies. Detailed social and behavioural data were elicited using a self-completed questionnaire. The effect sizes of these characteristics were quantified using univariate and multivariable conditional logistic regression in 53 cases and 106 matched controls. Homo-bisexual orientation was the strongest independent predictor of gonorrhoea acquisition (Adjusted odds ratio 31.1 (95% confidence intervals, 3.09-312.92). Other independent predictors were not currently being in a relationship and concordant residential characteristics. Three principal implications for sexual health policy were identified; social marketing approaches to gonorrhoea prevention should focus on gay men and individuals not in established relationships; gonorrhoea prevention should be more closely integrated with wider social inclusion policies; finally, more proactive, systematic and theory-based approaches should capitalize on opportunities for sexual health promotion in GU medicine clinic settings. PMID:18663042

  18. A First-Year, Student-Managed Course to Correlate Basic Sciences with Clinical Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffran, Murray; Yeasting, Richard A.

    1985-01-01

    A course, designed to illustrate the correlation of the biochemistry and physiology content of the curriculum with clinical applications, is described. The entire presentation, from introduction and interview of the patient to the correlation of the clinical application with the basic sciences, was managed by the students. (Author/MLW)

  19. Making Evidence-based Decisions in the Clinical Practice of Integrative Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Hao; CHEN Ke-ji

    2010-01-01

    @@ In 1948.the first clinical paper adopting the protocol of randomized and controlled design was published in British Medical Journal by Bradford Hill, a noted British biostatistician, who introduced rigorous theory of mathematical statistics into clinical design the first time and successfully evaluated the therapeutic effect of streptomycin on tuberculosis(1).

  20. Lab Plays Central Role in Groundbreaking National Clinical Trial in Precision Medicine | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Molecular Characterization Laboratory lies at the heart of an ambitious new approach for testing cancer drugs that will use the newest tools of precision medicine to select the best treatment for individual patients based on the genetic makeup of their tumors. The protocol, called NCI-Molecular Analysis for Therapy Choice (NCI-MATCH), will start with tumor biopsies from as many as 3,000 patients to see if they have genetic defects for which a targeted cancer drug is available. Cancers will be treated based on their genetic profiles rather than by their location in the body, which is the conventional approach.

  1. [Eye tracking and desire: new scientific and clinical perspectives in sexual medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolmont, Mylène; Bianchi-Demicheli, Francesco

    2016-03-16

    There is a growing interest in the field of neurobiology of sexual function. With the advent of advanced technologies such as fMRI or EEG, it was possible to investigate the neuronal and psychobiological bases of the various phases of sexual response and sexual desire. Recently, a new technique debuted in sexual medicine, eye tracking. Thus through this article, we will leave the definition of sexual desire, through various neuropsychological studies in this field to finish on the unique and very recent eye tracking study that highlighted the visual patterns of desire sexual. PMID:27149718

  2. Clinical efficacy and safety of Chinese herbal medicine for Wilson's disease: a systematic review of 9 randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Xie, Cheng-long; Fu, Deng-lei; Lu, Lin; Lin, Yan; Dong, Qi-qian; Wang, Xiao-tong; Zheng, Guo-qing

    2012-06-01

    Wilson's disease is an autosomal recessive disorder of copper metabolism. Despite being treatable, there is no universally accepted treatment regimen. Currently, various Chinese herbal medicines (CHMs) are widely used in the treatment of Wilson's disease in China, but there is a lack of reliable scientific evidence for the effectiveness of such therapies. The objective of this systematic review is to assess the clinical efficacy and safety of CHM as an alternative or/and adjuvant therapy for Wilson's disease. A systematic literature search in different medical databases was performed to identify randomized controlled trials comparing CHM as monotherapy or CHM as adjuvant therapy with western conventional medical therapy in the treatment of Wilson's disease. A total of 687 participants were included in nine eligible studies. The main findings are that CHM as monotherapy or adjuvant therapy for Wilson's disease may be able to improve the clinical symptoms, to promote the urinary copper excretion, to ameliorate liver function and/or liver cirrhosis, and has fewer adverse effects in comparison with western conventional medication. Furthermore, CHM generally appeared to be safe and well tolerated in patients with Wilson's disease. However, the evidence presented in this review are insufficient to warrant a clinical recommendation due to the generally low methodological quality of the included studies. In conclusion, CHM seems to be beneficial and safe for Wilson's disease, but high-quality evidences are still needed to further evaluate this therapy. Therefore, additional well-designed, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials are needed.

  3. Precision Medicine in NCI’s National Clinical Trials Network: Progress and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI’s Jeff Abrams, M.D., Acting Director for Clinical Research in the Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis (DCTD) and Associate Director of the Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) and Nita Seibel, M.D., Head of the Pediatric Solid Tumor Therapeutics in the Clinical Investigations Branch of CTEP, DCTD will host a Google Hangout on Air. The discussion will be moderated by Andrea Denicoff, R.N., N.P, Head, NCTN Clinical Trials Operations in the Investigational Drug Branch of CTEP, DCTD.

  4. Clinical Space Medicine Products as Developed by the Medical Operations Support Team (MOST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polk, James D.; Doerr, Harold K.; Hurst, Victor W., IV; Schmid, Josef

    2007-01-01

    Medical Operations Support Team (MOST) is introducing/integrating teaching practices associated with high fidelity human patient simulation into the NASA culture, in particular, into medical training sessions and medical procedure evaluations. Current/Future Products iclude: a) Development of Sub-optimal Airway Protocols for the International Space Station (ISS) using the ILMA; b) Clinical Core Competency Training for NASA Flight Surgeons (FS); c) Post-Soyuz Landing Clinical Training for NASA FS; d) Experimental Integrated Training for Astronaut Crew Medical Officers and NASA FS; and e) Private Clinical Refresher Training.

  5. The use of personalized medicine for patient selection for renal transplantation: Physicians' views on the clinical and ethical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doucet Hubert

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The overwhelming scarcity of organs within renal transplantation forces researchers and transplantation teams to seek new ways to increase efficacy. One of the possibilities is the use of personalized medicine, an approach based on quantifiable and scientific factors that determine the global immunological risk of rejection for each patient. Although this approach can improve the efficacy of transplantations, it also poses a number of ethical questions. Methods The qualitative research involved 22 semi-structured interviews with nephrologists involved in renal transplantation, with the goal of determining the professionals' views about calculating the global immunological risk and the attendant ethical issues. Results The results demonstrate a general acceptance of this approach amongst the participants in the study. Knowledge of each patient's immunological risk could improve treatment and the post-graft follow-up. On the other hand, the possibility that patients might be excluded from transplantation poses a significant ethical issue. This approach is not seen as something entirely new, given the fact that medicine is increasingly scientific and evidence-based. Although renal transplantation incorporates scientific data, these physicians believe that there should always be a place for clinical judgment and the physician-patient relationship. Conclusions The participants see the benefits of including the calculation of the global immunological risk within transplantation. Such data, being more precise and rigorous, could be of help in their clinical work. However, in spite of the use of such scientific data, a place must be retained for the clinical judgment that allows a physician to make decisions based on medical data, professional expertise and knowledge of the patient. To act in the best interests of the patient is key to whether the calculation of the global immunological risk is employed.

  6. Clinical pharmacology of analgesic medicines in older people: impact of frailty and cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLachlan, Andrew J; Bath, Sally; Naganathan, Vasi; Hilmer, Sarah N; Le Couteur, David G; Gibson, Stephen J; Blyth, Fiona M

    2011-03-01

    Pain is highly prevalent in frail older people who often have multiple co-morbidities and multiple medicines. Rational prescribing of analgesics in frail older people is complex due to heterogeneity in drug disposition, comorbid medical conditions, polypharmacy and variability in analgesic response in this population. A critical issue in managing older people with pain is the need for judicious choice of analgesics based on a comprehensive medical and medication history. Care is needed in the selection of analgesic medicine to avoid drug-drug or drug-disease interactions. People living with dementia and cognitive impairment have suboptimal pain relief which in part may be related to altered pharmacodynamics of analgesics and challenges in the systematic assessment of pain intensity in this patient group. In the absence of rigorously controlled trials in frail older people and those with cognitive impairment a pharmacologically-guided approach can be used to optimize pain management which requires a systematic understanding of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of analgesics in frail older people with or without changes in cognition. PMID:21284694

  7. Big data and clinical research: focusing on the area of critical care medicine in mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongheng

    2014-10-01

    Big data has long been found its way into clinical practice since the advent of information technology era. Medical records and follow-up data can be more efficiently stored and extracted with information technology. Immediately after admission a patient immediately produces a large amount of data including laboratory findings, medications, fluid balance, progressing notes and imaging findings. Clinicians and clinical investigators should make every effort to make full use of the big data that is being continuously generated by electronic medical record (EMR) system and other healthcare databases. At this stage, more training courses on data management and statistical analysis are required before clinicians and clinical investigators can handle big data and translate them into advances in medical science. China is a large country with a population of 1.3 billion and can contribute greatly to clinical researches by providing reliable and high-quality big data.

  8. Study on the evaluation of the clinical effects of traditional chinese medicine in heart failure by complex intervention: protocol of SECETCM-HF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Xiuli

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experts in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM have studied the TCM subject of the pathogenesis of heart failure (HF for several decades. As a result, the general idea is ben deficiency and biao excess. However, the clinical evaluation system which combined the TCM and western medicine in HF has not been developed yet. The objective is to establish the evaluation index system for the integration of TCM and western medicine. The evaluation indexes which include TCM items will specify the research design and methods. Methods Nine medical centers in different cities in China will participate in the trial. A population of 340 patients with HF will be enrolled through a central randomized system for different test groups. Group A will be treated with only western medicine, while group B with western and Chinese medicine together. The study will last for 12 months from the date of enrollment. The cardiovascular death will be the primary outcome. Discussion By putting the protocol into practice, the clinical effects of TCM for HF will be identified scientifically, objectively as well as rationally. The proper index system which built in the study will be helpful for the clinical effect expression of HF by integrated medicine in future. Trial Registration ChiCTR-TRC-00000059

  9. How current Clinical Practice Guidelines for low back pain reflect Traditional Medicine in East Asian Countries: a systematic review of Clinical Practice Guidelines and systematic reviews.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Woo Cho

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to investigate whether there is a gap between evidence of traditional medicine (TM interventions in East-Asian countries from the current Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs and evidence from current systematic reviews and meta-analyses (SR-MAs and to analyze the impact of this gap on present CPGs. METHODS: We examined 5 representative TM interventions in the health care systems of East-Asian countries. We searched seven relevant databases for CPGs to identify whether core CPGs included evidence of TM interventions, and we searched 11 databases for SR-MAs to re-evaluate current evidence on TM interventions. We then compared the gap between the evidence from CPGs and SR-MAs. RESULTS: Thirteen CPGs and 22 SR-MAs met our inclusion criteria. Of the 13 CPGs, 7 CPGs (54% mentioned TM interventions, and all were for acupuncture (only one was for both acupuncture and acupressure. However, the CPGs did not recommend acupuncture (or acupressure. Of 22 SR-MAs, 16 were for acupuncture, 5 for manual therapy, 1 for cupping, and none for moxibustion and herbal medicine. Comparing the evidence from CPGs and SR-MAs, an underestimation or omission of evidence for acupuncture, cupping, and manual therapy in current CPGs was detected. Thus, applying the results from the SR-MAs, we moderately recommend acupuncture for chronic LBP, but we inconclusively recommend acupuncture for (subacute LBP due to the limited current evidence. Furthermore, we weakly recommend cupping and manual therapy for both (subacute and chronic LBP. We cannot provide recommendations for moxibustion and herbal medicine due to a lack of evidence. CONCLUSIONS: The current CPGs did not fully reflect the evidence for TM interventions. As relevant studies such as SR-MAs are conducted and evidence increases, the current evidence on acupuncture, cupping, and manual therapy should be rigorously considered in the process of developing or updating the CPG system.

  10. Methodological quality and reporting of generalized linear mixed models in clinical medicine (2000-2012: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martí Casals

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Modeling count and binary data collected in hierarchical designs have increased the use of Generalized Linear Mixed Models (GLMMs in medicine. This article presents a systematic review of the application and quality of results and information reported from GLMMs in the field of clinical medicine. METHODS: A search using the Web of Science database was performed for published original articles in medical journals from 2000 to 2012. The search strategy included the topic "generalized linear mixed models","hierarchical generalized linear models", "multilevel generalized linear model" and as a research domain we refined by science technology. Papers reporting methodological considerations without application, and those that were not involved in clinical medicine or written in English were excluded. RESULTS: A total of 443 articles were detected, with an increase over time in the number of articles. In total, 108 articles fit the inclusion criteria. Of these, 54.6% were declared to be longitudinal studies, whereas 58.3% and 26.9% were defined as repeated measurements and multilevel design, respectively. Twenty-two articles belonged to environmental and occupational public health, 10 articles to clinical neurology, 8 to oncology, and 7 to infectious diseases and pediatrics. The distribution of the response variable was reported in 88% of the articles, predominantly Binomial (n = 64 or Poisson (n = 22. Most of the useful information about GLMMs was not reported in most cases. Variance estimates of random effects were described in only 8 articles (9.2%. The model validation, the method of covariate selection and the method of goodness of fit were only reported in 8.0%, 36.8% and 14.9% of the articles, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: During recent years, the use of GLMMs in medical literature has increased to take into account the correlation of data when modeling qualitative data or counts. According to the current recommendations, the

  11. 临床合理用药中若干问题的思考%Deliberation about Several Problems in Rational Use of Clinical Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王思颖; 彭六保; 曾小慧; 欧阳丽辉

    2012-01-01

    Provide the references for rational use of clinical medicine. Refers to massive literature, and analysis the problems existed in rational use of clinical medicine with philosophy of unification and opposites. Due to many problems occurred in rational use of clinical medicine, we should treat and solve these problems correctly with the dialectical thoughts and methods of unification and opposites.%为临床合理用药提供参考依据.参考大量文献,用对立统一的思想分析临床合理用药存在的问题.结果临床合理用药目前存在许多问题,我们需要用对立统一的辩证思维和方法正确对待和处理目前临床用药存在的问题.

  12. Scientific publications from departments of clinical physiology and nuclear medicine in Denmark. A bibliometric analysis of "impact' in the years 1989-1994

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H B; Brinch, K; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    1996-01-01

    This study reports a bibliometric analysis of scientific publications emanating from departments of clinical physiology and nuclear medicine, Denmark, during the years 1989-1994. The total number of publications during this period was 860 (763 scientific journal papers, 71 book/book chapters and 26...... a collaboration between two or more departments of clinical physiology and nuclear medicine, but the collaboration with other medical specialities and institutions was much greater (85%). The 763 papers were published in 239 different scientific journals, 80% in journals with an official 'impact factor...... average (1.10, P papers from a department and its cumulated impact (r = -0.97, P scientific papers from Danish departments of clinical physiology and nuclear medicine fell in the period...

  13. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF SOME MEDICINAL HERBAL EXTRACTS ON CLINICALLY IMPORTANT BACTERIAL PATHOGENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Suriya et al.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The antibacterial activity of methanol extract of Abutilon indicum, Hygrophila spinosa and Mimosa pudica were studied by agar well diffusion method in vitro. The effect of antibacterial potential was examined against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Proteus vulgaris, Enterococcus faecalis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Vibrio cholerae, Salmonella typhi and Salmonella paratyphi. The methanol extract of these medicinal plants have showed consistently significant inhibitory activity on different bacterial pathogens tested. Furthermore, the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC studies carried out by broth dilution assay and found the MIC ranged between 0.2 to 0.9mg/ml. Overall the methanol extracts was found to be more effective. The results of the extracts were compared with the standard antibiotics Kanamycin.

  14. Definition of major bleeding in clinical investigations of antihemostatic medicinal products in surgical patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulman, S; Angerås, U; Bergqvist, D;

    2010-01-01

    a definition has been developed that should be applicable to all agents that interfere with hemostasis. The definition and the text that follows have been reviewed and approved by relevant co-chairs of the subcommittee and by the Executive Committee of the SSC. The intention is to seek approval......The definition of major bleeding varies between studies on surgical patients, particularly regarding the criteria for surgical wound-related bleeding. This diversity contributes to the difficulties in comparing data between trials. The Scientific and Standardization Committee (SSC), through its...... subcommittee on Control of Anticoagulation, of the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis has previously published a recommendation for a harmonized definition of major bleeding in non-surgical studies. That definition has been adopted by the European Medicines Agency and is currently used...

  15. Subcutaneous electrical stimulation (acupuncture) in the clinical practice of physical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waylonis, G W

    1976-04-01

    There has been a rapid growth in both interest and concern over the value of acupuncture in this country during the last three years. Initially it was regarded with doubt, then with overwhelming interest, but only recently have any research data appeared as to its true value and applicability to western medicine. An acupuncture research project was initiated in November 1972 by the author to assess the immediate and long-range benefits of acupuncture in a group of 179 patients with various neuromuscular-skeletal pain and mobility problems. A total of 1,112 treatments have been administered. A follow-up survey of these patients was completed in October 1974 with 126 (70%) of the patients responding to a subjective questionnaire. In 49% of the patients the initial response to acupuncture treatments was some reduction of symptoms and in a significant percentage there was persistence of beneficial response for greater than three months. PMID:1083724

  16. [Management of Personal Information in Clinical Laboratory Medicine:--Chairmen's Introductory Remarks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Shimetani, Naoto

    2014-11-01

    The Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine has been running its own Medical Safety Committee, and holding a symposium on medical safety during the annual meeting. The medical world is filled with a considerable amount of personal information, including genetic information, the ultimate personal information. We, as medical staff, have to manage such personal information not only in times of peace but also during disasters or emergency situations. In Japan, the Act on the Protection of Personal Information is currently being implemented, but a number of problems remain. Human beings have entered the information technology era, including electrical medical record systems, which is useful for research and education besides medical practice. This is why personal information must be more effectively protected from leakage, misconception, and abuse. We should create a sound system to manage personal information, with the spirit of protecting patient information that originated from the Oath of Hippocrates. PMID:27509731

  17. Selenium, copper and iron in veterinary medicine-From clinical implications to scientific models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humann-Ziehank, Esther

    2016-09-01

    Diseases related to copper, selenium or iron overload or deficiency are common and well-described in large animal veterinary medicine. Some of them certainly have the potential to serve as useful animal models for ongoing research in the field of trace elements. Obvious advantages of large animal models compared to laboratory animal models like rats and mice are the option of long-term, consecutive examinations of progressive deficient or toxic stages and the opportunity to collect various, high volume samples for repeated measurements. Nevertheless, close cooperation between scientific disciplines is necessary as scientists using high sophisticated analytical methods and equipment are not regularly in touch with scientists working with large animal diseases. This review will give an introduction into some typical animal diseases related to trace elements and will present approaches where the animal diseases were used already as a model for interdisciplinary research.

  18. Clinical Study on Preventing and Treating Left Ventricle Remodeling after Acute Myocardial Infarction with Integrative Chinese and Western Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐耀平; 刘鹰; 梁萍

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical efficacy of Xuefu Zhuyu (血府逐瘀, XFZY) oral liquid combined with western medicine (WM) in reversing left ventricle remodeling (LVR) after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in patients and its therapeutic mechanism. Methods: Sixty patients conforming to criteria were divided into the treated group and WM control group with randomly stratified method. Thirty cases were assigned to each group, they were given XFZY + WM + general treatment and WM + general treatment respectively. Color Doppler ultrasonography was used to study the changes of LVR before and after treatment.Results: In both groups, before and after treatment the P value of such parameters as the changes of their left diastolic volume (LDV), left systolic volume (LSV), left ventricle ejection fraction (EF) was <0. 05, suggesting that the difference of various parameters was significantly different; but when compared with the results of the 12th week after medications, the change of LDV, LSV, EF showed that the LDV, LSV of the treated group were lower than that of the control group, the EF of the treated group was higher than that of the control group, and the P value of various groups was all <0. 05, suggesting that the different data of various groups showed significant difference. Conclusion: Conventional WM treatment and XFZY combined with WM could both, in treating AMI, effectively reverse the patients′ LVR; yet the use of integrative Chinese and western medicine on reversing patients LVR showed even better results than that of simple WM treatment.

  19. Clinical Study on Preventing and Treating Left Ventricle Remodeling after Acute Myocardial Infarction with Integrative Chinese and Westem Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐耀平; 刘鹰; 梁萍

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical efficacy of Xuefu Zhuyu (血府逐瘀, XFZY) oral liquid combined with western medicine (WM) in reversing left ventricle remodeling (LVR) after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in patients and its therapeutic mechanism. Methods. Sixty patients conforming to criteria were divided into the treated group and WM control group with randomly stratified method. Thirty cases were assigned to each group, they were given XFZY + WM + general treatment and WM + general treatment respectively. Color Doppler ultrasonography was used to study the changes of LVR before and after treatment. Results: In both groups, before and after treatment the P value of such parameters as the changes of their left diastolic volume (LDV), left systolic volume (LSV), left ventricle ejection fraction (EF) was <0.05, suggesting that the difference of various parameters was significantly different; but when compared with the results of the 12th week after medications, the change of LDV, LSV, EF showed that the LDV, LSV of the treated group were lower than that of the control group, the EF of the treated group was higher than that of the control group, and the P value of various groups was all <0.05, suggesting that the different data of various groups showed significant difference. Conclusion: Conventional WM treatment and XFZY combined with WM could both, in treating AMI, effectively reverse the patients LVR; yet the use of integrative Chinese and western medicine on reversing patient's LVR showed even better results than that of simple WM treatment.

  20. [Medicinal glaucoma therapy. What can we learn from large randomized clinical trials?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jünemann, A G M; Huchzermeyer, C; Rejdak, R

    2013-12-01

    The prospective multicenter randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) Ocular Hypertension Glaucoma Treatment Study (OHTS), Early Manifest Glaucoma Trial (EMGT), Advanced Glaucoma Intervention Study (AGIS), Collaborative Initial Glaucoma Treatment Study (CITGS) and Collaborative Normal Tension Glaucoma Study (CNGTS) are often named as landmarks for glaucoma management as the results of these studies provided the evidence for numerous therapeutic decisions in clinical practice. The studies confirmed the consensus that reduction of intraocular pressure reduces the risk of glaucoma progression covering the whole spectrum of glaucoma from ocular hypertension to advanced glaucoma. Furthermore, the identification of new risk factors allows a higher precision of assessment of the risk of progression. The RCTs achieved the main goal of high level of evidence, thus making progress in the understanding of glaucoma and its treatment and bridging consensus-based and evidence-based decisions. However, the implementation of the results into clinical practice needs adequate and accurate interpretation of the results.

  1. Capabilities for Clinical Management of Radiation Injuries of the Nikiforov Russian Center of Emergency and Radiation Medicine (EMERCOM of Russia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksanin, S

    2016-09-01

    This article presents an overview of the capabilities for clinical management of radiation injuries available at the Nikiforov Russian Center of Emergency and Radiation Medicine (NRCERM) of the Ministry of the Russian Federation for Civil Defense, Emergencies and Elimination of Consequences of Natural Disasters (EMERCOM). NRCERM is a federal state budgetary institution and the Russian Federation's head organization for providing medical assistance for persons overexposed to ionizing radiation, responders to radiation emergencies and people evacuated from radiation contaminated areas. As the WHO Collaborating Center for Treatment and Rehabilitation of Accident Recovery Workers of Nuclear and Other Disasters and a member of the WHO Radiation Emergency Medical Preparedness and Assistance Network (REMPAN), NRCERM is prepared to provide assistance and technical support in case of a radiation accident. For this purpose, NRCERM hospitals are equipped with technologically advanced facilities and possess well-trained specialist staff.

  2. Didactic guide for tutors on the development of clinical skills in the in the course General Integrating Medicine-II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Roméu Escobar

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: the simple spread of the teaching learning process in the working scenarios guarantee a true education at work process. Professors must know how to differentiate his/her assistance activity from his/her educational one, although they are executed in a very integrated way. Objectives: to elaborate a didactical proposal to be applied during the education at work process in the subject Integral and General Medicine II. Methods: this proposal consisted on offering the tutors the general methodological instructions, specific orientations of each educational activity proposed as well as the observational guides of the students' performance including the system clinical abilities according to the kind of patient: child, pregnant, and adult.

  3. Scientific publications from departments of clinical physiology and nuclear medicine in Denmark. A bibliometric analysis of "impact' in the years 1989-1994

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, HB; Brinch, K; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1996-01-01

    This study reports a bibliometric analysis of scientific publications emanating from departments of clinical physiology and nuclear medicine, Denmark, during the years 1989-1994. The total number of publications during this period was 860 (763 scientific journal papers, 71 book/book chapters and 26...... theses). Whereas the number of publications per year (188-113) decreased significantly with time (r = -0.94, P ... a collaboration between two or more departments of clinical physiology and nuclear medicine, but the collaboration with other medical specialities and institutions was much greater (85%). The 763 papers were published in 239 different scientific journals, 80% in journals with an official 'impact factor...

  4. Herpes simplex virus type 2-associated recurrent aseptic (Mollaret's meningitis in genitourinary medicine clinic: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abou-Foul AK

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ahmad K Abou-Foul, Thajunisha M Buhary, Sedki L Gayed Department of Genitourinary Medicine, Royal Blackburn Hospital, East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust, Blackburn, UK Introduction: Cases of idiopathic recurrent benign aseptic meningitis were first described by Mollaret. Today, herpes simplex virus (HSV is considered the cause of most cases of Mollaret's meningitis. Case report: A 40-year-old male was referred to our genitourinary medicine clinic with recurrent genital herpetic lesions. He had HSV-2-positive genital ulcers 8 years earlier. One year after the first infection, he developed severe recurrent attacks of headache associated with meningitis symptoms. The results of all radiological and biochemical tests were normal, but the patient reported a correlation between his attacks and genital herpes flare-ups. We diagnosed the patient with Mollaret's meningitis and started him on continuous suppressive acyclovir therapy, which resulted in marked clinical improvement. Discussion: Mollaret's meningitis is a rare form of idiopathic recurrent aseptic meningitis that has a sudden onset, short duration, and spontaneous remission with unpredictable recurrence. We believe that the presence of concurrent or recurrent mucocutaneous herpetic lesions can aid its diagnosis, prior to which, affected patients usually have many unnecessary investigations and treatments. Therefore, detailed sexual history should be sought in all patients with aseptic meningitis, and clinicians should also ask about history of recurrent headaches in all patients with recurrent herpetic anogenital lesions. Continuous suppressive acyclovir therapy may reduce the frequency and severity of attacks and can dramatically improve lifestyle. Keywords: HSV-2 virus, acyclovir, Mollaret's meningitis, recurrent aseptic meningitis, HSV-2 virus, viral meningitis, acyclovir

  5. A Web-Based Compendium of Clinical Questions and Medical Evidence To Educate Internal Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Steven H.; Owens, Thomas A.; Schardt, Connie M.; Wardell, Sarah I.; Peterson, Josh; Garrison, Scott; Keitz, Sheri A.

    2003-01-01

    Describes an electronic database of clinical questions (CQs) and medical evidence, the Critical Appraisal Resource (CAR). Evaluation of ten months of use found that medical residents did engage the medical literature on behalf of their patients, which influenced approximately half of their patient-care decisions. (EV)

  6. World Workshop on Oral Medicine VI : clinical implications of medication-induced salivary gland dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aliko, Ardita; Wolff, Andy; Dawes, Colin; Aframian, Doron; Proctor, Gordon; Ekstrom, Jorgen; Narayana, Nagamani; Villa, Alessandro; Sia, Ying Wai; Joshi, Revan Kumar; McGowan, Richard; Jensen, Siri Beier; Kerr, A. Ross; Pedersen, Anne Marie Lynge; Vissink, Arjan

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to systematically review the available literature on the clinical implications of medication-induced salivary gland dysfunction (MISGD). Study Design. The systematic review was performed using PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science (through June 2013). Studies were assessed f

  7. Clinical use of novel biomarkers in heart failure : towards personalized medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitter, Daniela; Cotter, Gadi; Voors, Adriaan A.

    2014-01-01

    Biomarkers play an important role in heart failure. They provide us information about the mechanisms involved in specific types of heart failure and can identify patients at higher risk. Although the majority of biomarker studies in heart failure focus on their prognostic value, the clinical applica

  8. Survey and Practice of Reporting Quality of Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials on Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ting-qian; MAO Bing; WANG Gang; CHANG Jing; WANG Lei

    2008-01-01

    @@ Evidence obtained from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) has been generally accepted as the gold standard in the evaluation of clinical effectiveness. Readers need to understand the trial design, implementation, results, analysis and interpretation, so as to fully understand the results of RCTs. Thus, the investigators of RCTs have to report these items in a complete, accurate and clear manner.

  9. Preliminary evaluation of an experimental clinical chemistry analyzer developed for space medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, A H; Gornet, T G; Schenkel, O; Smith-Cronin, L; Graham, G A; Tonnesen, A S; McKinley, B A

    1993-01-01

    An experimental clinical chemistry analyzer system was designed and built to demonstrate the feasibility of clinical chemistry as part of a medical-care system at NASA's planned space station Freedom. We report the performance of the experimental analyzer, called a medical development unit (MDU), for selected analytes in a laboratory setting in preparation for a preliminary clinical trial at patients' bedsides in an intensive-care unit. Within-run CVs ranged from 0.7% for sodium to 7.1% for phosphorus; day-to-day CVs ranged from 1.0% for chloride to 23.4% for calcium. Correlation of patients' blood sample analyses compared well with those by Ektachem E700 and other high-volume central laboratory analyzers (r ranged from 0.933 for creatine kinase MB isoenzyme to 0.997 for potassium), except for hemoglobin (r = 0.901) and calcium (r = 0.823). Although several CVs obtained in this study exceeded theoretical desired precision limits based on biological variations, performance was adequate for clinical laboratory diagnosis. We examined the effect of potentially interfering concentrations of hemoglobin, bilirubin, and lipids: the only effect was negative interference with calcium analyses by high concentrations of bilirubin. We also examined the effects of preanalytical variables and the performance of experimental sample-transfer cups designed to retain sample and reference liquid in microgravity. Continued development of the MDU system is recommended, especially automation of sample processing.

  10. Lung-MAP Launches: First Precision Medicine Trial From National Clinical Trials Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    A unique public-private collaboration today announced the initiation of the Lung Cancer Master Protocol (Lung-MAP) trial, a multi-drug, multi-arm, biomarker-driven clinical trial for patients with advanced squamous cell lung cancer. Squamous cell carcinom

  11. Improved clinical outcomes of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus utilizing integrative medicine: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grise, Diane E; McAllister, Heath M; Langland, Jeffrey

    2015-05-01

    This case report demonstrates a successful approach to managing patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). Botanical herbs (including Gymnema sylvestre) and nutrients (including alpha lipoic acid and chromium) were used alongside metformin to help improve insulin sensitization; however, the greatest emphasis of treatment for this patient centered on a low-carbohydrate, whole-foods diet and regular exercise that shifted the focus to the patient's role in controlling their disease. Research on DM2 often focuses on improving drug efficacy while diet and lifestyle are generally overlooked as both a preventive and curative tool. During the 7 months of treatment, the patient's hemoglobin A1c and fasting glucose significantly decreased to within normal ranges and both cholesterol and liver enzyme markers normalized. A significant body of evidence already exists advocating for disease management using various diets, including Mediterranean, low-carb, and low-fat vegan diets; however, no clear dietary standards have been established. This study supports the use of naturopathic medicine as well as dietary and lifestyle changes to develop the most efficacious approach for the treatment of DM2. PMID:25984419

  12. Cannabis, pain, and sleep: lessons from therapeutic clinical trials of Sativex, a cannabis-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Ethan B; Guy, Geoffrey W; Robson, Philip J

    2007-08-01

    Cannabis sativa L. has been utilized for treatment of pain and sleep disorders since ancient times. This review examines modern studies on effects of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) on sleep. It goes on to report new information on the effects on sleep in the context of medical treatment of neuropathic pain and symptoms of multiple sclerosis, employing standardized oromucosal cannabis-based medicines containing primarily THC, CBD, or a 1 : 1 combination of the two (Sativex). Sleep-laboratory results indicate a mild activating effect of CBD, and slight residual sedation with THC-predominant extracts. Experience to date with Sativex in numerous Phase I-III studies in 2000 subjects with 1000 patient years of exposure demonstrate marked improvement in subjective sleep parameters in patients with a wide variety of pain conditions including multiple sclerosis, peripheral neuropathic pain, intractable cancer pain, and rheumatoid arthritis, with an acceptable adverse event profile. No tolerance to the benefit of Sativex on pain or sleep, nor need for dosage increases have been noted in safety extension studies of up to four years, wherein 40-50% of subjects attained good or very good sleep quality, a key source of disability in chronic pain syndromes that may contribute to patients' quality of life. PMID:17712817

  13. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Teaching Orgasm for Females with Chronic Anorgasmia using the Betty Dodson Method

    OpenAIRE

    Pia Struck; Søren Ventegodt

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the Betty Dodson method of breaking the female orgasm barrier in chronic anorgasmic women. The aim was sexual and existential healing (salutogenesis) through direct confrontation and integration of both the repressed shame, guilt, and other negative feelings associated with body, genitals, and sexuality, and the repressed sexual pleasure and desire. We conducted a retrospective analysis of clinic data from holistic sexological manual therapeutic interve...

  14. Clinical implications for substandard, nonproprietary medicines in multiple sclerosis: focus on fingolimod

    OpenAIRE

    Correale, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Jorge Correale,1 Erwin Chiquete,2 Alexey Boyko,3 Roy G Beran,4–6 Jorge Barahona Strauch,7,8 Snezana Milojevic,9 Nadina Frider101Department of Neurology, Raúl Carrea Institute for Neurological Research, Foundation for the Fight against Infant Neurological Illnesses (FLENI), Buenos Aires, Argentina; 2Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Salvador Zubirán National Institute of Medical Sciences and Nutrition, Mexico City, Mexico; 3Clinical and Research Center &am...

  15. Clinical implications for substandard, nonproprietary medicines in multiple sclerosis: focus on fingolimod

    OpenAIRE

    Correale J; Chiquete E; Boyko A.; Beran RG; Strauch JB; Milojevic S.; Frider N

    2016-01-01

    Jorge Correale,1 Erwin Chiquete,2 Alexey Boyko,3 Roy G Beran,4–6 Jorge Barahona Strauch,7,8 Snezana Milojevic,9 Nadina Frider101Department of Neurology, Raúl Carrea Institute for Neurological Research, Foundation for the Fight against Infant Neurological Illnesses (FLENI), Buenos Aires, Argentina; 2Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Salvador Zubirán National Institute of Medical Sciences and Nutrition, Mexico City, Mexico; 3Clinical and Research Center “MS and O...

  16. Pulmonary thromboembolic disease – clinical and etiological aspects in internal medicine department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazilu Laura

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulmonary embolism (PE represents the third most frequent vascular disease following acute myocardial ischemic disease and stroke. It is a common and potentially lethal disease. Aim: We observed etiological spectrum, clinical aspects and diagnostic tests for patients with PE. Material and methods: Retrospective observational study that included 53 patients diagnosed with PE between 01.01.2009- 31.12.2013. We followed epidemiological aspects, risk factors, clinical manifestations and methods for positive diagnosis. Results: 53 patients which represents 0.66% from the patients admitted in our department (n=8,011, were diagnosed with PE. The main risk factor for PE was malignancy (n=16. Twenty patients with PE presented deep venous thrombosis (DVT and 12 patients arterial thrombosis (AT. Main clinical syndromes of patients with PE were pulmonary infarction (n=32, isolated dyspnea (n=11 and circulatory collapse (n=10. A lot of paraclinical investigation sustained positive diagnosis,mainly by high performance techniques. Four cases were diagnosed postmortem.

  17. [Yeasts of the genus Malassezia: taxonomic classification and significance in (veterinary and) clinical medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, R; Raabe, P; Mayser, P

    2000-01-01

    The historical development of the taxonomic classification of Malassezia yeasts until today yielded the description of seven different species based upon molecularbiological, morphological and biochemical parameters (M. furfur, M. pachydermatis, M. sympodialis, M. globosa, M. obtusa, M. restricta, M. slooffiae). Tests like Cremophor EL assimilation, esculin degradation, catalase test, pigment production and determination of polidocanol sensitivity appear to be suitable procedures for routine identification of the different species. Their colonization of clinically healthy humans (in particular M. sympodialis, M. globosa, M. obtusa) and animals (M. pachydermatis) skin renders interpretation difficulties, when isolating Malassezia spp. from clinical specimens. Out of the seven species, in man the clinical significance of M. furfur for pityriasis versicolor and systemic infections appears to be accepted largely. In dogs and cats M. pachydermatis has been regarded as cause of otitis externa and seborrhoeic dermatitis. But, due to geno- and phenotypic variabilities described for M. pachydermatis field isolates further investigations concerning the taxonomic uniformity of the species are necessary. PMID:11098629

  18. Prolongevity medicine: Antagonic-Stress drug in distress, geriatrics, and related diseases. II. Clinical review--2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riga, S; Riga, D; Schneider, F

    2004-06-01

    Distress and senescence, their reciprocal aggravating-quickening connections, and their related pathologies have a large worldwide impact on healthcare systems in this new millennium. For this reason, Antagonic-Stress (AS)--an advanced integrative therapy, with specific synergistic composition, and patented internationally--represents a significant strategy in health, aging, and longevity. Clinical research with AS proves the drug's efficacy in the management of distress (neurotic, stress-related, and affective disorders; behavioral syndromes associated with physiological disturbances and physical factors; mental and behavioral disorders due to psychoactive substance uses) and psychogeriatrics [organic, including symptomatic, mental disorders (OMD)]. Specific multiaxial psychopathological instruments and psychometric tests in multiple assessments used for gerontopsychiatry demonstrated strong improvements after AS administration in early-moderate stages of Alzheimer or vascular dementia, as well as in other OMD. In addition, comparative clinical studies evinced the superiority of AS (synergistic multitherapy) versus monotherapy [meclofenoxate (MF), piracetam (PA), pyritinol (PT), and nicergoline (NE), respectively]. These comparative clinical trials agreed closely with comparative preclinical research and confirmed AS synergistic homeostatic, adaptogenic, antioxidative, cerebrovascular, neurometabolic, and nootropic actions. Also, the AS protective actions against oxidative stress recommend this orthomolecular therapy in stress, aging, and free radical pathology. PMID:15247054

  19. Feasibility and Merits of Performing Preclinical Imaging on Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Bilgen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Researchers have limited access to systems dedicated to imaging small laboratory animals. This paper aims to investigate the feasibility and merits of performing preclinical imaging on clinical systems. Materials and Methods. Scans were performed on rat and mouse models of diseases or injuries on four radiology systems, tomosynthesis, computed tomography (CT, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET-CT, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, based on the availability at the author’s institute. Results. Tomosysthesis delineated soft tissue anatomy and hard tissue structure with superb contrast and spatial resolution at minimal scan time and effort. CT allowed high resolution volumetric visualization of bones. Molecular imaging with PET was useful for detecting cancerous tissue in mouse but at the expense of poor resolution. MRI depicted abnormal or intervened tissue at quality and resolution sufficient for experimental studies. The paper discussed limitations of the clinical systems in preclinical imaging as well as challenges regarding the need of additional gadgets, modifications, or upgrades required for longitudinally scanning animals under anesthesia while monitoring their vital signs. Conclusion. Clinical imaging technologies can potentially make cost-effective and efficient contributions to preclinical efforts in obtaining anatomical, structural, and functional information from the underlying tissue while minimally compromising the data quality in certain situations.

  20. Integrating an internet-mediated walking program into family medicine clinical practice: a pilot feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Ananda

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular participation in physical activity can prevent many chronic health conditions. Computerized self-management programs are effective clinical tools to support patient participation in physical activity. This pilot study sought to develop and evaluate an online interface for primary care providers to refer patients to an Internet-mediated walking program called Stepping Up to Health (SUH and to monitor participant progress in the program. Methods In Phase I of the study, we recruited six pairs of physicians and medical assistants from two family practice clinics to assist with the design of a clinical interface. During Phase II, providers used the developed interface to refer patients to a six-week pilot intervention. Provider perspectives were assessed regarding the feasibility of integrating the program into routine care. Assessment tools included quantitative and qualitative data gathered from semi-structured interviews, surveys, and online usage logs. Results In Phase I, 13 providers used SUH and participated in two interviews. Providers emphasized the need for alerts flagging patients who were not doing well and the ability to review participant progress. Additionally, providers asked for summary views of data across all enrolled clinic patients as well as advertising materials for intervention recruitment. In response to this input, an interface was developed containing three pages: 1 a recruitment page, 2 a summary page, and 3 a detailed patient page. In Phase II, providers used the interface to refer 139 patients to SUH and 37 (27% enrolled in the intervention. Providers rarely used the interface to monitor enrolled patients. Barriers to regular use of the intervention included lack of integration with the medical record system, competing priorities, patient disinterest, and physician unease with exercise referrals. Intention-to-treat analyses showed that patients increased walking by an average of 1493 steps

  1. The challenge to bring personalized cancer medicine from clinical trials into routine clinical practice: the case of the Institut Gustave Roussy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnedos, Monica; André, Fabrice; Farace, Françoise; Lacroix, Ludovic; Besse, Benjamin; Robert, Caroline; Soria, Jean Charles; Eggermont, Alexander M M

    2012-04-01

    Research with high throughput technologies has propitiated the segmentation of different types of tumors into very small subgroups characterized by the presence of very rare molecular alterations. The identification of these subgroups and the apparition of new agents targeting these infrequent alterations are already affecting the way in which clinical trials are being conducted with an increased need to identify those patients harboring specific molecular alterations. In this review we describe some of the currently ongoing and future studies at the Institut Gustave Roussy that aim for the identification of potential therapeutic targets for cancer patients with the incorporation of high throughput technologies into daily practice including aCGH, next generation sequencing and the creation of a software that allows for target identification specific for each tumor. The initial intention is to enrich clinical trials with cancer patients carrying certain molecular alterations in order to increase the possibility of demonstrating benefit from a targeted agent. Mid and long term aims are to facilitate and speed up the process of drug development as well as to implement the concept of personalized medicine. PMID:22483534

  2. Clinical applications of the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD in hepatic medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau T

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Tsang Lau, Jawad AhmadDivision of Liver Diseases, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, USAAbstract: The Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD score incorporates serum bilirubin, creatinine, and the international normalized ratio (INR into a formula that provides a continuous variable that is a very accurate predictor of 90-day mortality in patients with cirrhosis. It is currently utilized in the United States to prioritize deceased donor organ allocation for patients listed for liver transplantation. The MELD score is superior to other prognostic models in patients with end-stage liver disease, such as the Child–Turcotte–Pugh score, since it uses only objective criteria, and its implementation in 2002 led to a sharp reduction in the number of people waiting for liver transplant and reduced mortality on the waiting list without affecting posttransplant survival. Although mainly adopted for use in patients waiting for liver transplant, the MELD score has also proved to be an effective predictor of outcome in other situations, such as patients with cirrhosis going for surgery and patients with fulminant hepatic failure or alcoholic hepatitis. Several variations of the original MELD score, involving the addition of serum sodium or looking at the change in MELD over time, have been examined, and these may slightly improve its accuracy. The MELD score does have limitations in situations where the INR or creatinine may be elevated due to reasons other than liver disease, and its implementation for organ allocation purposes does not take into consideration several conditions that benefit from liver transplantation. The application of the MELD score in prioritizing patients for liver transplantation has been successful, but further studies and legislation are required to ensure a fair and equitable system.Keywords: MELD score, liver transplantation

  3. In Vitro Procedures with Radioisotopes in Medicine. Proceedings of the Symposium on In Vitro Procedures with Radioistopes in Clinical Medicine and Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive tracer techniques are now being widely used in the study of substances of medical interest in vitro. The introduction of tracer techniques often leads to a considerable improvement in established medical laboratory procedures. Tracer techniques also form the basis of certain special procedures for the measurement of hormones, vitamins and other substances in specimens of blood, urine, body tissues, etc.; these techniques are of such elegance and simplicity that they may readily be carried out in the average medical radioisotope laboratory without the need for additional specialized equipment. In none of these procedures is radioactive material administered to the patient; indeed, they do not require his direct participation at all and may well be carried out in some central laboratory on specimens sent in from a wide area. They may thus freely be used in investigations on all classes of patient and are. particularly suitable for use in regions where local facilities are limited or where field studies are to be undertaken. Progress in these applications of tracer techniques was discussed in the Symposium on In Vitro Procedures with Radioisotopes in Clinical Medicine and Research, organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency in co-operation with the World Health Organization. The symposium was held in Vienna from 8 to 12 September 1969, and the full Proceedings appear in the present volume. A total of 191 participants nominated by 32 countries and 3 international organizations attended, and the 50 papers presented, which cover the applications of tracer, techniques in cytological studies, immunological studies, derivative, dilution and enzymatic analysis, saturation analysis, thyroid function studies and radioimmunoassay, indicate the great variety of in vitro procedures now in use. Invited review papers deal with the general aspects of the various main groups of applications. Many of the procedures discussed are still in the developmental stage

  4. "Beauty is a light in the heart": the transformative potential of optogenetics for clinical applications in cardiovascular medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Patrick M; Karathanos, Thomas V; Trayanova, Natalia A

    2015-02-01

    Optogenetics is an exciting new technology in which viral gene or cell delivery is used to inscribe light sensitivity in excitable tissue to enable optical control of bioelectric behavior. Initial progress in the fledgling domain of cardiac optogenetics has included in vitro expression of various light-sensitive proteins in cell monolayers and transgenic animals to demonstrate an array of potentially useful applications, including light-based pacing, silencing of spontaneous activity, and spiral wave termination. In parallel to these developments, the cardiac modeling community has developed a versatile computational framework capable of realistically simulating optogenetics in biophysically detailed, patient-specific representations of the human heart, enabling the exploration of potential clinical applications in a predictive virtual platform. Toward the ultimate goal of assessing the feasibility and potential impact of optogenetics-based therapies in cardiovascular medicine, this review provides (1) a detailed synopsis of in vivo, in vitro, and in silico developments in the field and (2) a critical assessment of how existing clinical technology for gene/cell delivery and intra-cardiac illumination could be harnessed to achieve such lofty goals as light-based arrhythmia termination.

  5. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Holistic Sexology and Treatment of Vulvodynia Through Existential Therapy and Acceptance Through Touch

    OpenAIRE

    Søren Ventegodt; Mohammed Morad; Eytan Hyam; Joav Merrick

    2004-01-01

    Sexual problems are found in four major forms: lack of libido, lack of arousal and potency, pain and discomfort during intercourse, and lack of orgasm. It is possible to work with a holistic approach to sexology in the clinic in order to find and repair the negative beliefs, repressions of love, and lack of purpose of life, which are the core to problems like arousal, potency, and pain with repression of gender and sexuality. It is important not to focus only on the gender and genitals in und...

  6. Clinical neurological examination vs electrophysiological studies: Reflections from experiences in occupational medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Jørgen Riis

    2015-01-01

    a diagnosis requires the identification of the responsible pathology and the involved tissues and structures. Consequently, improved diagnostic approaches are needed. This editorial discusses the potentials of using the clinical neurologic examination in patients with upper limb complaints related to work......Seventy-five percent of upper limb disorders that are related to work are regarded as diagnostically unclassifiable and therefore challenging to the clinician. Therefore it has been generally less successfully to prevent and treat these common and frequently disabling disorders. To reach...

  7. Pyrexia of unknown origin 90 years on: a paradigm of modern clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael

    2015-12-01

    In 1925, Sir Thomas Horder, a leading physician of his day, gave a lecture, published in this journal, entitled 'Some cases of pyrexia without physical signs'. The paper highlighted what was already a familiar clinical presentation "which taxes our resources to the utmost". Fast-forward through 90 years of careful clinical description, technological innovation in diagnosis and treatment, emergent infections, novel diagnoses, demographic shifts, and radical changes in the health economy. Sir Thomas would find certain aspects familiar, and others revolutionary, in the differential diagnosis and management of the 21st century patient with pyrexia of unknown origin (PUO). Within high-income settings, the proportion of cases due to infection has declined, albeit unevenly. The era of untreated HIV, and the consequences of iatrogenic intervention and immunosuppression, led to Durack and Street's subclassification of the condition in the early 1990 s into classic, nosocomial, neutropenic and HIV-associated PUO. Shifts towards ambulatory care have driven a change in the definition of many diseases. An era of observant clinicians, who lent their names to eponymous syndromes, followed by meticulous serological, genetic and clinicopathological correlation, generated a battery of diagnoses that, along with malignancy, form a large proportion of diagnoses in more recent clinical care. In the current era, universal access to cross-sectional imaging and an infinite array of laboratory tests has undermined the attention paid to history and examination. In some areas of the clinical assessment, such as assessing the fever pattern, this shift is supported by research evidence. The issues that need to be addressed in the next 90 years of technological innovation, information sharing and health service transformation are likely to include: transcriptomic approaches to diagnosis; the place of positron emission tomography (PET) in the diagnostic pathway; the optimal management of high

  8. Advances in the Use of Stem Cells in Veterinary Medicine: From Basic Research to Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Today, several veterinary diseases may be treated with the administration of stem cells. This is possible because these cells present a high therapeutic potential and may be injected as autologous or allogenic, freshly isolated, or previously cultured. The literature supports that the process is safe and brings considerable benefits to animal health. Knowledge about how adult stem cells modulate the molecular signals to activate cell homing has also been increasingly determined, evidencing the mechanisms which enable cells to repair and regenerate injured tissues. Preclinical studies were designed for many animal models and they have contributed to the translation to the human clinic. This review shows the most commonly used stem cell types, with emphasis on mesenchymal stem cells and their mechanistic potential to repair, as well as the experimental protocols, studied diseases, and species with the highest amount of studies and applications. The relationship between stem cell protocols utilized on clinics, molecular mechanisms, and the physiological responses may offer subsidies to new studies and therefore improve the therapeutic outcome for both humans and animals. PMID:27379197

  9. Pharmaco-EEG: A Study of Individualized Medicine in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swatzyna, Ronald J; Kozlowski, Gerald P; Tarnow, Jay D

    2015-07-01

    Pharmaco-electroencephalography (Pharmaco-EEG) studies using clinical EEG and quantitative EEG (qEEG) technologies have existed for more than 4 decades. This is a promising area that could improve psychotropic intervention using neurological data. One of the objectives in our clinical practice has been to collect EEG and quantitative EEG (qEEG) data. In the past 5 years, we have identified a subset of refractory cases (n = 386) found to contain commonalities of a small number of electrophysiological features in the following diagnostic categories: mood, anxiety, autistic spectrum, and attention deficit disorders, Four abnormalities were noted in the majority of medication failure cases and these abnormalities did not appear to significantly align with their diagnoses. Those were the following: encephalopathy, focal slowing, beta spindles, and transient discharges. To analyze the relationship noted, they were tested for association with the assigned diagnoses. Fisher's exact test and binary logistics regression found very little (6%) association between particular EEG/qEEG abnormalities and diagnoses. Findings from studies of this type suggest that EEG/qEEG provides individualized understanding of pharmacotherapy failures and has the potential to improve medication selection.

  10. Advances in the Use of Stem Cells in Veterinary Medicine: From Basic Research to Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Medeiros Markoski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, several veterinary diseases may be treated with the administration of stem cells. This is possible because these cells present a high therapeutic potential and may be injected as autologous or allogenic, freshly isolated, or previously cultured. The literature supports that the process is safe and brings considerable benefits to animal health. Knowledge about how adult stem cells modulate the molecular signals to activate cell homing has also been increasingly determined, evidencing the mechanisms which enable cells to repair and regenerate injured tissues. Preclinical studies were designed for many animal models and they have contributed to the translation to the human clinic. This review shows the most commonly used stem cell types, with emphasis on mesenchymal stem cells and their mechanistic potential to repair, as well as the experimental protocols, studied diseases, and species with the highest amount of studies and applications. The relationship between stem cell protocols utilized on clinics, molecular mechanisms, and the physiological responses may offer subsidies to new studies and therefore improve the therapeutic outcome for both humans and animals.

  11. Advances in the Use of Stem Cells in Veterinary Medicine: From Basic Research to Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markoski, Melissa Medeiros

    2016-01-01

    Today, several veterinary diseases may be treated with the administration of stem cells. This is possible because these cells present a high therapeutic potential and may be injected as autologous or allogenic, freshly isolated, or previously cultured. The literature supports that the process is safe and brings considerable benefits to animal health. Knowledge about how adult stem cells modulate the molecular signals to activate cell homing has also been increasingly determined, evidencing the mechanisms which enable cells to repair and regenerate injured tissues. Preclinical studies were designed for many animal models and they have contributed to the translation to the human clinic. This review shows the most commonly used stem cell types, with emphasis on mesenchymal stem cells and their mechanistic potential to repair, as well as the experimental protocols, studied diseases, and species with the highest amount of studies and applications. The relationship between stem cell protocols utilized on clinics, molecular mechanisms, and the physiological responses may offer subsidies to new studies and therefore improve the therapeutic outcome for both humans and animals. PMID:27379197

  12. Advances in the Use of Stem Cells in Veterinary Medicine: From Basic Research to Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markoski, Melissa Medeiros

    2016-01-01

    Today, several veterinary diseases may be treated with the administration of stem cells. This is possible because these cells present a high therapeutic potential and may be injected as autologous or allogenic, freshly isolated, or previously cultured. The literature supports that the process is safe and brings considerable benefits to animal health. Knowledge about how adult stem cells modulate the molecular signals to activate cell homing has also been increasingly determined, evidencing the mechanisms which enable cells to repair and regenerate injured tissues. Preclinical studies were designed for many animal models and they have contributed to the translation to the human clinic. This review shows the most commonly used stem cell types, with emphasis on mesenchymal stem cells and their mechanistic potential to repair, as well as the experimental protocols, studied diseases, and species with the highest amount of studies and applications. The relationship between stem cell protocols utilized on clinics, molecular mechanisms, and the physiological responses may offer subsidies to new studies and therefore improve the therapeutic outcome for both humans and animals.

  13. [Pharmacogenetics in anesthesia and intensive care medicine : Clinical and legal challenges exemplified by malignant hyperthermia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingler, W; Pfenninger, E

    2016-05-01

    Pharmacotherapy is a key component of anesthesiology and intensive care medicine. The individual genetic profile influences not only the effect of pharmaceuticals but can also completely alter the mode of action. New technologies for genetic screening (e.g. next generation sequencing) and increasing knowledge of molecular pathways foster the disclosure of pharmacogenetic syndromes, which are classified as rare diseases. Taking into account the high genetic variability in humans and over 8000 known rare diseases, up to 20 % of the population may be affected. In summary, rare diseases are not rare. Most pharmacogenetic syndromes lead to a weakening or loss of pharmacological action. In contrast, malignant hyperthermia (MH), which is the most relevant pharmacogenetic syndrome for anesthesia, is characterized by a pharmacologically induced overactivation of calcium metabolism in skeletal muscle. Volatile anesthetic agents and succinylcholine trigger life-threatening hypermetabolic crises. Emergency treatment is based on inhibition of the calcium release channel of the sarcoplasmic reticulum by dantrolene. After an adverse pharmacological event patients must be informed and a clarification consultation must be carried out during which the hereditory character of MH is explained. The patient should be referred to a specialist MH center where a predisposition can be diagnosed by the functional in vitro contracture test from a muscle biopsy. Additional molecular genetic investigations can yield mutations in the genes for calcium-regulating proteins in skeletal muscle, e.g. ryanodine receptor 1 (RyR1) and calcium voltage-gated channel subunit alpha 1S (CACNA1S). Currently, an association to MH has only been shown for 35 mutations out of more than 400 known and probably hundreds of unknown genetic variations. Furthermore, MH predisposition is not excluded by negative mutation screening. For anesthesiological patient safety it is crucial to identify individuals at risk and

  14. Rebuilding the injured brain: use of MRS in clinical regenerative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Alina; Weiss, Michael; Gader, Paul

    2011-03-01

    Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE) is the brain manifestation of systemic asphyxia that occurs in 20 out of 1000 births. HIE triggers an immediate neuronal and glial injury leading to necrosis secondary to cellular edema and lysis. Because of this destructive neuronal injury, up to 25% of neonates exhibit severe permanent neuropsychological handicaps in the form of cerebral palsy, with or without associated mental retardation, learning disabilities, or epilepsy. Due to the devastating consequences of HIE, much research has focused on interrupting the cascade of events triggered by HIE. To date, none of these therapies, with the exception of hypothermia, have been successful in the clinical environment. Even in the case of hypothermia, only neonates with mild to moderate HIE respond to therapy. Stem cell therapy offers an attractive potential treatment for HIE. The ability to replace necrotic cells with functional cells could limit the degree of long-term neurological deficits. The neonatal brain offers a unique milieu for stem cell therapy due to its overall plasticity and the continued division of cells in the sub-ventricular zones. New powerful imaging tools allow researchers to track stem cells in vivo post-transplant, as shown in Figure 1. However, neuroimaging still leaves numerous questions unresolved: How can we identify stem cells without using tracking agents, what cells types are destroyed in the brain post injury? What is the final phenotypic fate of transplanted cells? Are the transplanted cells still viable? Do the transplanted cells spare endogenous neuronal tissue? We hypothesize that magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), a broadly used clinical technique that can be performed at the time of a standard MRI scan, can provide answers to these questions when coupled with advanced computational approaches. MRS is widely available clinically, and is a relative measure of different metabolites within the sampled area. These measures are presented as a

  15. Measuring revolutionary biomedical science 1992-2006 using Nobel prizes, Lasker (clinical medicine) awards and Gairdner awards (NLG metric).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Bruce G

    2007-01-01

    The Nobel prize for medicine or physiology, the Lasker award for clinical medicine, and the Gairdner international award are given to individuals for their role in developing theories, technologies and discoveries which have changed the direction of biomedical science. These distinctions have been used to develop an NLG metric to measure research performance and trends in 'revolutionary' biomedical science with the aim of identifying the premier revolutionary science research institutions and nations from 1992-2006. I have previously argued that the number of Nobel laureates in the biomedical field should be expanded to about nine per year and the NLG metric attempts to predict the possible results of such an expansion. One hundred and nineteen NLG prizes and awards were made during the past fifteen years (about eight per year) when overlapping awards had been removed. Eighty-five were won by the USA, revealing a massive domination in revolutionary biomedical science by this nation; the UK was second with sixteen awards; Canada had five, Australia four and Germany three. The USA had twelve elite centres of revolutionary biomedical science, with University of Washington at Seattle and MIT in first position with six awards and prizes each; Rockefeller University and Caltech were jointly second placed with five. Surprisingly, Harvard University--which many people rank as the premier world research centre--failed to reach the threshold of three prizes and awards, and was not included in the elite list. The University of Oxford, UK, was the only institution outside of the USA which featured as a significant centre of revolutionary biomedical science. Long-term success at the highest level of revolutionary biomedical science (and probably other sciences) probably requires a sufficiently large number of individually-successful large institutions in open competition with one another--as in the USA. If this model cannot be replicated within smaller nations, then it implies

  16. Clinical Holistic Medicine: A Pilot Study on HIV and Quality of Life and a Suggested Cure for HIV and AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to examine the association between the immunological impact of HIV (measured by CD4 count and global self-assessed quality of life (QOL (measured with QOL1 for people suffering from HIV, to see if the connection was large and statistically strong enough to support our hypothesis of a strong QOL-immunological connection through the nonspecific, nonreceptor-mediated immune system, and thus to give a rationale for a holistic cure for HIV. This cross-sectional population study in Uganda included 20 HIV infected persons with no symptoms of AIDS and a CD4 count above 200 mill./liter. The main outcome measures were CD4 count, global QOL measured with the validated questionnaire QOL1, translated to Luganda and translated back to English. We found a large, clinically significant correlation between the number of T-helper cells (CD4 and global self-assessed quality of life (QOL1 (r = 0.57, p = 0.021, when controlled for age, gender, and years of infection. Together with other studies and holistic medicine theory, the results have given rationale for a holistic cure for HIV. We suggest, based on our findings and theoretical considerations, that HIV patients who improve their global QOL, also will improve their CD4 counts. Using the technique of holistic medicine based on the life mission theory and the holistic process theory of healing, we hypothesize that the improvement of QOL can have sufficient biological effect on the CD4, which could avoid or postpone the development of AIDS. A holistic HIV/AIDS cure improving the QOL draws on hidden resources in the person and is thus affordable for everybody. Improving global QOL also means a higher consciousness and a more ethical attitude, making it more difficult for the HIV-infected person to pass on the infection.

  17. From a traditional medicinal plant to a rational drug: understanding the clinically proven wound healing efficacy of birch bark extract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Ebeling

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Birch bark has a long lasting history as a traditional medicinal remedy to accelerate wound healing. Recently, the efficacy of birch bark preparations has also been proven clinically. As active principle pentacyclic triterpenes are generally accepted. Here, we report a comprehensive study on the underlying molecular mechanisms of the wound healing properties of a well-defined birch bark preparation named as TE (triterpene extract as well as the isolated single triterpenes in human primary keratinocytes and porcine ex-vivo wound healing models. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show positive wound healing effects of TE and betulin in scratch assay experiments with primary human keratinocytes and in a porcine ex-vivo wound healing model (WHM. Mechanistical studies elucidate that TE and betulin transiently upregulate pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and cyclooxygenase-2 on gene and protein level. For COX-2 and IL-6 this increase of mRNA is due to an mRNA stabilizing effect of TE and betulin, a process in which p38 MAPK and HuR are involved. TE promotes keratinocyte migration, putatively by increasing the formation of actin filopodia, lamellipodia and stress fibers. Detailed analyses show that the TE components betulin, lupeol and erythrodiol exert this effect even in nanomolar concentrations. Targeting the actin cytoskeleton is dependent on the activation of Rho GTPases. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results provide insights to understand the molecular mechanism of the clinically proven wound healing effect of birch bark. TE and betulin address the inflammatory phase of wound healing by transient up-regulation of several pro-inflammatory mediators. Further, they enhance migration of keratinocytes, which is essential in the second phase of wound healing. Our results, together with the clinically proven efficacy, identify birch bark as the first medical plant with a high potential to improve wound healing, a field which urgently

  18. The effectiveness of a clinically integrated e-learning course in evidence-based medicine: A cluster randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvanitis Theodoros N

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the educational effects of a clinically integrated e-learning course for teaching basic evidence-based medicine (EBM among postgraduates compared to a traditional lecture-based course of equivalent content. Methods We conducted a cluster randomised controlled trial in the Netherlands and the UK involving postgraduate trainees in six obstetrics and gynaecology departments. Outcomes (knowledge gain and change in attitude towards EBM were compared between the clinically integrated e-learning course (intervention and the traditional lecture based course (control. We measured change from pre- to post-intervention scores using a validated questionnaire assessing knowledge (primary outcome and attitudes (secondary outcome. Results There were six clusters involving teaching of 61 postgraduate trainees (28 in the intervention and 33 in the control group. The intervention group achieved slightly higher scores for knowledge gain compared to the control, but these results were not statistically significant (difference in knowledge gain: 3.5 points, 95% CI -2.7 to 9.8, p = 0.27. The attitudinal changes were similar for both groups. Conclusion A clinically integrated e-learning course was at least as effective as a traditional lecture based course and was well accepted. Being less costly than traditional teaching and allowing for more independent learning through materials that can be easily updated, there is a place for incorporating e-learning into postgraduate EBM curricula that offer on-the-job training for just-in-time learning. Trial registration Trial registration number: ACTRN12609000022268.

  19. The History, Mechanism, and Clinical Application of Auricular Therapy in Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pu-Wei Hou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Auricular therapy includes acupuncture, electroacupuncture, acupressure, lasering, cauterization, moxibustion, and bloodletting in the auricle. For 2500 years, people have employed auricular therapy for treating diseases, but the methods have been limited to bloodletting and cauterization. Only after 1957, the international scientific community became aware that the map of the ear resembles an inverted fetus, its introduction has led to auricular acupuncture (AA becoming a more systemic approach, and, following the identification and standardization of more precise points, AA has been employed in clinical applications. The mechanisms of AA are considered to have a close relationship with the autonomic nervous system, the neuroendocrine system, neuroimmunological factors, neuroinflammation, and neural reflex, as well as antioxidation. Auricular therapy has been applied, for example, for pain relief, for the treatment of epilepsy, anxiety, and obesity, and for improving sleep quality. However, the mechanisms and evidence for auricular therapy warrant further study.

  20. Current and future directions in clinical fatigue management: An update for emergency medicine practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yi Han; Roach, Gregory D; Petrilli, Renee Ma

    2014-12-01

    Physicians worldwide are working round the clock to meet the demands of healthcare systems, especially in acute medical settings such as EDs. Demanding shift work schedules cause fatigue and thus deterioration in mood and motor performance. This article explores the effects of sleep deprivation, focusing on cognition, executive decision-making and the implications for clinical care. Humans are capable of functioning and even adapting to sleep restriction; however, clinicians should be aware of pitfalls and absolute minimums for sleep. Fatigue management training shows promise in enhancing safety in aviation and might have a role in medical shift work. Strategic napping improves performance during night shift in the ED, but does not fully negate fatigue. Drugs offer limited benefit for performance under sleep-deprived conditions, and whenever possible, sleep and/or strategic napping takes precedence.

  1. [Inhibitory effect of Chinese herb medicine zhuling on urinary bladder cancer. An experimental and clinical study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, D A

    1991-06-01

    Inhibitory effect of Zhuling (Grifola umbellata pilat) on urinary bladder cancer was determined experimentally and clinically. The results showed that zhuling inhibited significantly the induction of bladder cancer in rats exposed to N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl) nitrosamine (BBN), decreasing from 100% (18/18) in control group to 61.1% (11/18) in zhuling (P less than 0.01). Zhuling was given to 22 patients with recurrent bladder cancer after TUR or partial cystectomy. The patients were followed up for 12 to 38 months (average 26.5 months). Bladder cancer recurred in seven of the patients with a longer recurrence interval (19.2 months) after medication than before medication (P less than 0.05). The remaining 15 patients had no recurrence. The mechanism of Zhuling is discussed. PMID:1935440

  2. The use of PC based VR in clinical medicine: the VREPAR projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, G; Bacchetta, M; Baruffi, M; Borgomainerio, E; Defrance, C; Gatti, F; Galimberti, C; Fontaneto, S; Marchi, S; Molinari, E; Nugues, P; Rinaldi, S; Rovetta, A; Ferretti, G S; Tonci, A; Wann, J; Vincelli, F

    1999-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) is an emerging technology that alters the way individuals interact with computers: a 3D computer-generated environment in which a person can move about and interact as if he actually was inside it. Given to the high computational power required to create virtual environments, these are usually developed on expensive high-end workstations. However, the significant advances in PC hardware that have been made over the last three years, are making PC-based VR a possible solution for clinical assessment and therapy. VREPAR - Virtual Reality Environments for Psychoneurophysiological Assessment and Rehabilitation - are two European Community funded projects (Telematics for health - HC 1053/HC 1055 - http://www.psicologia.net) that are trying to develop a modular PC-based virtual reality system for the medical market. The paper describes the rationale of the developed modules and the preliminary results obtained.

  3. Place of the nuclear medicine in the clinical development of the gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although gene therapy has been proposed first for genetic diseases, its concept has been extended to many acquired diseases, owing to a better understanding of pathology at a molecular level. Overall, very few trials have shown to be efficient, and safety concerns have emerged, as a result of several patients deaths. There is a need for new techniques able to improve both the knowledge of the therapeutic gene fate once administered and the early detection of events likely to lead to serious adverse events. In vivo imaging of a reporter gene associated with the therapeutic one is certainly the most promising technique for these goals. Among available imaging modalities, nuclear imaging is the most likely to be applied to patients. This review begins with a summary of current knowledge about the steps that a therapeutic gene has to cross from vector delivery to appropriate expression in target cells. We show how gene imaging could allow to investigate many pitfalls of trials by providing a better understanding of these steps in patients. The reporter genes available for nuclear imaging are presented in the second section, through animal studies. Then, relevant examples of clinical trials are presented. These include cancer (suicide gene therapy and adoptive immunotherapy), ischemic heart diseases and cystic fibrosis. The results are commented with emphasis on the role of nuclear imaging to address the questions raised by these studies, and imaging studies carried out on animals or patients for the corresponding diseases or organs are presented. The results obtained in animal studies warrant the introduction of gene imaging in clinical trials. (authors)

  4. Correlation of the National Board of Medical Examiners Emergency Medicine Advanced Clinical Examination Given in July to Intern American Board of Emergency Medicine in-training Examination Scores: A Predictor of Performance?

    OpenAIRE

    Katherine Hiller; Doug Franzen; Corey Heitz; Matthew Emery; Stacy Poznanski

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: There is great variation in the knowledge base of Emergency Medicine (EM) interns in July. The first objective knowledge assessment during residency does not occur until eight months later, in February, when the American Board of EM (ABEM) administers the in-training examination (ITE). In 2013, the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) released the EM Advanced Clinical Examination (EM-ACE), an assessment intended for fourth-year medical students. Administration of the EM-AC...

  5. Non-antibacterial tetracycline formulations: clinical applications in dentistry and medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Gu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In 1983, it was first reported that tetracyclines (TCs can modulate the host response, including (but not limited to inhibition of pathologic matrix metalloproteinase (MMP activity, and by mechanisms unrelated to the antibacterial properties of these drugs. Soon thereafter, strategies were developed to generate non-antibacterial formulations (subantimicrobial-dose doxycycline; SDD and compositions (chemically modified tetracyclines; CMTs of TCs as host-modulating drugs to treat periodontal and other inflammatory diseases. This review focuses on the history and rationale for the development of: (a SDD which led to two government-approved medications, one for periodontitis and the other for acne/rosacea and (b CMTs, which led to the identification of the active site of the drugs responsible for MMP inhibition and to studies demonstrating evidence of efficacy of the most potent of these, CMT-3, as an anti-angiogenesis agent in patients with the cancer, Kaposi's sarcoma, and as a potential treatment for a fatal lung disease (acute respiratory distress syndrome; ARDS. In addition, this review discusses a number of clinical studies, some up to 2 years’ duration, demonstrating evidence of safety and efficacy of SDD formulations in humans with oral inflammatory diseases (periodontitis, pemphigoid as well as medical diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, post-menopausal osteopenia, type II diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and a rare and fatal lung disease, lymphangioleiomyomatosis.

  6. Deciphering signaling pathways in clinical tissues for personalized medicine using protein microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowsky, K; Wolff, C; Ergin, B; Berg, D; Becker, K F

    2010-11-01

    The current transition in cancer therapy from general treatment approaches, based mainly on chemotherapy and radiotherapy, to more directed approaches that aim to inhibit specific molecular targets has brought about new challenges for pathology. In the past, classical assignment of pathology consisted of tumor diagnosis and staging for further therapy decisions; nowadays, pathologists are asked to predict possible therapeutic results by detecting and quantifying therapeutic targets in tumors such as the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2). The best approach to analyze such molecular targets is to provide a tumor-specific protein expression profile prior to therapy. To further elucidate signaling networks underlying cancer development and to identify new targets, it is necessary to implement tools that allow fast, precise, cheap, and simultaneous analysis of many network components while requiring only a small amount of clinical material. Reverse phase protein microarray (RPPA) is a promising technology that meets these requirements while enabling quantitative measurement of proteins. Recently, methods for the extraction of proteins from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues have become available. In this article, we demonstrate how the use of RPPA to analyze signaling pathways from FFPE tissues may improve quantification of therapeutic targets and diagnostic markers in the near future.

  7. Counseling in fetal medicine: evidence-based answers to clinical questions on morbidly adherent placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antonio, F; Palacios-Jaraquemada, J; Lim, P S; Forlani, F; Lanzone, A; Timor-Tritsch, I; Cali, G

    2016-03-01

    Although the incidence of morbidly adherent placenta (MAP) has risen progressively in the last two decades, there remains uncertainty about the diagnosis and management of this condition. The aim of this review is to provide up-to-date and evidence-based answers to common clinical questions regarding the diagnosis and management of MAP. Different risk factors have been associated with MAP; however, previous Cesarean section and placenta previa are the most frequently associated. Ultrasound is the primary method for diagnosing MAP and has a good overall diagnostic accuracy for its detection. When considering the different ultrasound signs of MAP, color Doppler seems to provide the best diagnostic performance. Magnetic resonance imaging has the same accuracy in diagnosing MAP as does ultrasound examination; its use should be considered when a resective procedure, such as hysterectomy, is planned as it can provide detailed information about the topography of placental invasion and predict difficulties that may arise in surgery. The optimal gestational age for delivery in pregnancies with MAP is yet to be established; planning surgery between 35 and 36 weeks of gestation provides the best balance between fetal maturity and the risk of unexpected episodes of heavy bleeding, which are more likely to occur with delivery after this timepoint, especially in severe cases of MAP. The optimal surgical approach to MAP depends on multiple factors, including availability of an experienced team, specific surgical skills and hospital resources. Copyright © 2015 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26195324

  8. [Informatics in medicine: drug monitoring in the elderly. Software for clinical procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburrini, L R

    1991-10-01

    The Author describes the main procedure for the clinical control of pharmacokinetics and therapeutical programmes in medical practice, taking the use of digitalic alkaloids as an example. The procedure entails: a) Data records: this comprises a system for loading the patient's data into three different structures. The first record contains general information regarding the patient and it is used independently during the therapeutic regimen selection phase. The second record contains details of previous therapy, while the third concerns the input of digitalemic vales. b) The programme: it elaborates the main pharmacokinetic constants (Ka, Kcp, Kpc, Kslope, VC) of the predicted two-compartment model and Sheiner's expression is used to correct it for the reference statistical population. c) Distribution values in the compartments: the chapter illustrates the mean values of alkaloid tissue distribution in normal subjects, the mean value of digoxin with protein binding, the importance of circulating pharmacological ranges and the digitalisation load in relation to tissue deposits. d) Print-out: this represents the observation and therapy selection phase. A typical example of digoxin therapy is illustrated using a dot-matrix plotter and the methods are discussed for interpreting the results of this print-out. PMID:1745372

  9. The American Society of Clinical Oncology's Efforts to Support Global Cancer Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; El-Saghir, Nagi S; Cufer, Tanja; Cazap, Eduardo; de Guzman, Roselle; Othieno-Abinya, Nicholas Anthony; Sanchez, Jose Angel; Pyle, Doug

    2016-01-01

    Despite much progress in the management of malignant diseases, the number of new cases and cancer-related deaths continues to rise around the world. More than half of new cases occur in economically developing countries, where more than two thirds of cancer deaths are expected. However, implementation of all necessary steps to accomplish the dissemination of state-of-the-art prevention, diagnosis, and management will require increased allocation of resources, and, more importantly, harmonization of the efforts of hundreds of national and international public health agencies, policy-setting bodies, governments, pharmaceutical companies, and philanthropic organizations. More than 30% of the members of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) reside and practice outside US borders, and more than half of attendees at all of the scientific congresses and symposia organized by ASCO are international. As cancer has become an increasingly global disease, ASCO has evolved as a global organization. The ASCO Board of Directors currently includes members from France, Brazil, and Canada. In 2013, the ASCO Board of Directors identified a number of strategic priorities for the future. Recognizing the importance of non-US members to the society, their first strategic priority was improving the society's service to non-US members and defining these members' identity in the international oncology community. This article reviews current ASCO activities in the international arena and its future plans in global oncology.

  10. Clinical application of CYP2C19 pharmacogenetics toward more personalized medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Jun eLee

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available More than 30 years of genetic research on the CYP2C19 gene alone has identified approximately 2,000 reference single nucleotide polymorphisms (rsSNPs containing 28 registered alleles in the P450 Allele Nomenclature Committee and the number continues to increase. However, knowledge of CYP2C19 SNPs remains limited with respect to biological functions. Functional information on the variant is essential for justifying its clinical use. Only common variants (minor allele frequency >5% that represent CYP2C19*2, *3, *17, and others have been mostly studied. Discovery of new genetic variants is outstripping the generation of knowledge on the biological meanings of existing variants. Alternative strategies may be needed to fill this gap. The present study summarizes up-to-date knowledge on functional CYP2C19 variants discovered in phenotyped humans studied at the molecular level in vitro. Understanding the functional meanings of CYP2C19 variants is an essential step toward shifting the current medical paradigm to highly personalized therapeutic regimens.

  11. Concepts for the clinical use of stem cells in equine medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Berg, Lise Charlotte; Betts, Dean H.

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells from various tissues hold great promise for their therapeutic use in horses, but so far efficacy or proof-of-principle has not been established. The basic characteristics and properties of various equine stem cells remain largely unknown, despite their increasingly widespread experimen...... to move this new equine research field forward. Stem cell research in the horse has exciting equine specific and comparative perspectives that will most likely benefit the health of horses and, potentially, humans.......Stem cells from various tissues hold great promise for their therapeutic use in horses, but so far efficacy or proof-of-principle has not been established. The basic characteristics and properties of various equine stem cells remain largely unknown, despite their increasingly widespread...... experimental and empirical commercial use. A better understanding of equine stem cell biology and concepts is needed in order to develop and evaluate rational clinical applications in the horse. Controlled, well-designed studies of the basic biologic characteristics and properties of these cells are needed...

  12. Clinical efficacy and effectiveness of Sativex, a combined cannabinoid medicine, in multiple sclerosis-related spasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreja-Guevara, Celia

    2012-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with a wide range of disease symptoms and amongst these, spasticity is one of the most disabling and has the greatest impact on patient well-being and quality of life. Until now, available drug therapies for spasticity appear to have limited benefit and are often associated with poor tolerability. In a recent Spanish survey it was noted that multidrug therapy and a low control rate were common features for a large proportion of patients with MS-related spasticity, suggesting that currently available monotherapies lack significant activity. Sativex is a 1:1 mixture of δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol derived from Cannabis sativa chemovars, which is available as an oromucosal spray. Clinical experience with Sativex in patients with MS-related spasticity is steadily accumulating. Results from randomized, controlled trials have reported a reduction in the severity of symptoms associated with spasticity, leading to a better ability to perform daily activities and an improved perception of patients and their carers regarding functional status. These are highly encouraging findings that provide some much needed optimism for the treatment of this disabling and often painful symptom of MS. PMID:22509985

  13. [Clinical laboratory medicine: continuous amelioration with a book of objectives and satisfaction survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reix, Nathalie; Agin, Arnaud; Bahram, Seiamak; Dali-Youcef, Nassim; Grucker, Daniel; Jaulhac, Benoît; Lepiller, Quentin; Lessinger, Jean-Marc; Mauvieux, Laurent; Monier, Laurie; Schramm, Frédéric; Stoll-Keller, Françoise; Vallat, Laurent; Ludes, Bertrand; Candolfi, Ermanno; Filisetti, Denis

    2015-01-01

    We report in this publication the use of two educational tools, a questionnaire of satisfaction and a training book, to improve the training of students during their internship in clinical laboratory at the "Pôle de biologie des Hôpitaux universitaires de Strasbourg" in France. First, the ongoing training was assessed by the interns with a questionnaire measuring satisfaction. The analysis of this questionnaire identified four key points to improve: 1) define the teaching objectives, 2) organize the training with a schedule, 3) revise certain teaching methods and 4) ensure better integration of the students in the team of medical biologists. After this assessment, we implemented a training book to answer these four points. Indeed, the training book presents the objectives, the schedule of training, and how to validate the educational objectives. A new assessment was performed again using the same methodology. Results showed an improvement in student satisfaction from 74 to 88 %. The questionnaire of satisfaction and the training book are presented in this article. The aim of the assessment of training combined with the training book is to incite the actors of the training (students and teachers) to continually improve the training. The objectives of the Pôle de Biologie are to obtain an 80 % satisfaction rate during the 6 months trainings and to reduce or eliminate dissatisfaction, and finally to ensure the validation by students of 80 to 100 % of their predetermined objectives.

  14. Clinical Study on Endometrial Ovarian Cyst Treated by Combined Laparoscopy and Chinese Herbal Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate a new method of combined laparoscopy edici ne (CHM) in treating endometrial ovarian cyst. Methods: One hundre d and fifty-two patients with endometrial ovarian cyst three therapies: combined laparoscopy with CHM (combination group), CHM (TCM group) and To compare the clinical efficacy and side-effects shown by the three groups and to elucidate the therapeutic mechanism by ne hormone, plasma prostaglandin F 2α , prostaglandin E 2 etc. Results: The shrinking rate, ate of the cysts and markedly effective rate in the combination group were obviously higher than those in the TCM group and WM bination group was also higher than that of the WM group (P<0.05). Few side-effects constituted age for the combination g roup and TCM group. After treatment, the plasm a prostaglandin F 1α lowered remarkably, serum obviously (P<0. 01, P<0.05). Conclusion: The laparoscopy and CHM combination therapy is a new method in cyst which has signifi cant efficacy, minimal adverse effect and maximal preservation of reproductive function.

  15. 眩晕中西医诊治中的若干临床问题%Several Clinical Problems in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Vertigo with Traditional Chinese Medicine and Western Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    符孝磊; 范云操; 王艳

    2011-01-01

    眩晕是目前医学界无法客观定义和测量的一个很有挑战性的常见的主观症状.就眩晕中西医结合中的若干临床问题进行阐述,包括眩晕的涵义和鉴别诊断;眩晕的病因病机;眩晕的诊断流程及临床诊断类型;眩晕的治疗原则,以期为眩晕的中西医结合临床诊治及研究提供参考.%Vertigo is a very challenging common subjective symptom which can not be objectively defined or measured in the medical profession now. Several clinical problems concerning the treatment of vertigo with combined TCM and Western medicine are discussed in this article, including the meaning and differential diagnosis of dizziness, pathogenesis of vertigo, diagnostic process and clinical diagnostic classification of vertigo and the treatment principles for vertigo. Thus to provide reference for the clinical diagnosis and treatment, as well as research study of vertigo with combined traditional Chinese Medicine and Western medicine.

  16. Teaching evidence based medicine literature searching skills to medical students during the clinical years - a protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misso Marie

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two of the key steps in evidence based medicine (EBM are being able to construct a clinical question and effectively search the literature to source relevant information. No evidence currently exists that informs whether such skills should be taught to medical students during their pre-clinical years, or delivered to include both the pre-clinical and clinical years of study. This is an important component of curriculum design as the level of clinical maturity of students can affect their perception of the importance and uptake of EBM principles in practice. Methods/Design A randomised controlled trial will be conducted to identify the effectiveness of delivering a formal workshop in EBM literature searching skills to third year medical students entering their clinical years of study. The primary outcome of EBM competency in literature searching skills will be evaluated using the Fresno tool. Discussion This trial will provide novel information on the effectiveness of delivering a formal education workshop in evidence based medicine literature searching skills during the clinical years of study. The result of this study will also identify the impact of teaching EBM literature searching skills to medical students during the clinical years of study.

  17. Criterion-referenced evaluation of day one clinical competencies of veterinary students: VOLES-the VMTH (Veterinary Medicine Teaching Hospital) Online Evaluation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeck, Steven; Wall, Judy A; Smith, Bradford P; Wilson, W David; Walsh, Donal A

    2012-01-01

    This article describes an extensive online criterion-referenced evaluation system for the assessment of veterinary students' achievement during their final year's Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (or equivalent) clinical education. Data are reported for the 2001 to 2009 University of California at Davis veterinary graduates, for a total of more than 1,100 students. These criterion-referenced evaluations extensively document the level of clinical skills attained and demonstrated during the individual clinical rotations that comprise the fourth-year curriculum. On average, in each of the 17,500 clinical rotations undertaken during this time period, student performance was assessed in at least 11 separate areas of skills, knowledge, and professional attributes. This provided more than 200,000 criterion-referenced judgments of the individual clinical attributes of graduates over nine years. The system is based on a previously detailed and validated definition of the skills, knowledge, and professional attributes that students should have demonstrated before graduation. The extensive database that this system has provided has established that this system, termed VOLES (VMTH [Veterinary Medicine Teaching Hospital] On-Line Evaluation System), is an effective tool to assess the clinical capabilities of veterinary students and their achievement of the "Day One" skills required for entering clinical practice. These expected proficiencies are balanced according to the differing expectations that each area of veterinary clinical practice demands.

  18. Quality of care associated with number of cases seen and self-reports of clinical competence for Japanese physicians-in-training in internal medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikawa Kazuhiko

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The extent of clinical exposure needed to ensure quality care has not been well determined during internal medicine training. We aimed to determine the association between clinical exposure (number of cases seen, self- reports of clinical competence, and type of institution (predictor variables and quality of care (outcome variable as measured by clinical vignettes. Methods Cross-sectional study using univariate and multivariate linear analyses in 11 teaching hospitals in Japan. Participants were physicians-in-training in internal medicine departments. Main outcome measure was standardized t-scores (quality of care derived from responses to five clinical vignettes. Results Of the 375 eligible participants, 263 (70.1% completed the vignettes. Most were in their first (57.8% and second year (28.5% of training; on average, the participants were 1.8 years (range = 1–8 after graduation. Two thirds of the participants (68.8% worked in university-affiliated teaching hospitals. The median number of cases seen was 210 (range = 10–11400. Greater exposure to cases (p = 0.0005, higher self-reports of clinical competence (p = 0.0095, and type of institution (p Conclusion The amount of clinical exposure and levels of self-reports of clinical competence, not years after graduation, were positively associated with quality of care, adjusting for the remaining factors. The learning curve tapered after about 200 cases.

  19. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Pilot Study on the Effect of Vaginal Acupressure (Hippocratic Pelvic Massage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a pilot study of 20 female patients with a long history of sexual problems (mean is 8.92 years who received vaginal acupressure (VA with a quantitative and qualitative evaluation: 56% experienced help and none reported setbacks, 89% rated the treatment to be of high quality, and 89% rated it as valuable. After the treatment, most reported their problems to be less serious and their general quality of life improved. Only 17% reported minor or temporary side effects. VA was found statistically and clinically significant (p < 0.05, improvement more than 0.5 step on a 5-point Likert scale to help patients with chronic genital pains, pain or discomfort during sexual intercourse, lack of desire or orgasm, and subjective sexual insufficiency, and all patients taken as one group (about 1 step up a 5-point Likert scale. Self-evaluated physical and mental health was significantly improved for the total group; the relationship with partner, the subjective sexual ability, and the quality of life that were measured with QOL1 and QOL5 questionnaires were all significantly improved. VA or Hippocratic pelvic massage is technically a simple procedure corresponding to the explorative phase of the standard pelvic examination, supplemented with the patient’s report on the feelings provoked followed by processing and integration of these feelings, but ethical aspects are complicated. Acupressure through the vagina/pelvic massage must be done according to the highest ethical standard with great care, after obtaining consent and the necessary trust of the patient within the framework of the local laws. It must be followed by conversational therapy and further holistic existential processing.

  20. Snake venoms in science and clinical medicine. 2. Applied immunology in snake venom research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theakston, R D

    1989-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is a very important tool for studying both the epidemiology and clinical effects of snake bite in man. For epidemiology ELISA depends on the development and persistence of specific humoral venom antibody in previous snake bite victims. In the Nigerian savanna 63% of previous bite victims possessed specific venom antibodies against Echis carinatus venom; in Ecuador, where there is a 5% annual mortality due to snake bite in a population of Waorani Indians, venom antibodies against a wide range of different venoms were identified in previous bite victims using ELISA. In certain areas it is often not possible, using the symptoms of envenoming, to determine which species of snake has bitten the patient. Field studies using ELISA in Nigeria and Thailand have been successful in establishing the species responsible for envenoming. Current studies are in progress on the development of a rapid immunoassay which should be capable of detecting the biting species within 5-10 min of sampling from the admission patient. This will be useful for the clinician as it will enable the rapid detection of the species responsible for envenoming and, therefore, the use of the correct antivenom. Experimental work on the development of new methods of antivenom production includes immunization of experimental animals with venom/liposome preparations, the preparation of venom antigens using monoclonal antibodies on affinity columns, and recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid technology. Liposomal immunization requires only a single injection of venom to obtain a rapid, high level and protective immune response. Venom liposomes may also be given orally resulting in a serum immunoglobulin G immune response in experimental animals. Use of such a system may eventually result in immunization of man in areas of high snake bite incidence and mortality. PMID:2617643

  1. A clinically integrated post-graduate training programme in evidence-based medicine versus 'no intervention' for improving disability evaluations: a cluster randomised clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Kok

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although several studies have shown that teaching EBM is effective in improving knowledge, at present, there is no convincing evidence that teaching EBM also changes professional behaviour in practice. Therefore, the primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a clinically integrated post-graduate training programme in EBM on evidence-based disability evaluation. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In a cluster randomised controlled trial, fifty-four case-based learning groups consisting of 132 physicians and 1680 patients were randomly assigned to the intervention or control groups. A clinically integrated, post-graduate, 5-day training programme in evidence-based medicine, consisting of (home assignments, peer teaching, interactive training in searching databases, lectures and brainstorming sessions was provided to the intervention group. The control group received no training. The primary outcome was evidence-based disability evaluation, as indicated by the frequency in use of evidence of sufficient quality in disability evaluation reports. There are no general EBM behaviour outcome measures available. Therefore, we followed general guidelines for constructing performance indicators and defined an a priori cut-off for determination of sufficient quality as recommended for evaluating EB training. Physicians trained in EBM performed more evidence-based disability evaluations compared to physicians in the control group (difference in absolute proportion 9.7%, 95% CI 3.5 to 15.9. The primary outcome differences between groups remained significant after both cluster-adjusted analysis and additional sensitivity analyses accounting for subjects lost to follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: A EBM programme successfully improved the use of evidence in a non-hospital based medical specialty. Our findings support the general recommendations to use multiple educational methods to change physician behaviour. In addition, it appeared important that the

  2. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Holistic Pelvic Examination and Holistic Treatment of Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In clinical holistic practice, it is recommended that ample time is spent with the gynecological or pelvic examination, especially in cases of women with suspected old emotional traumas following early childhood cases of incest or sexual abuse. The holistic principles of holding and processing should be followed with the purpose of healing the patient, re-establishing the natural relationship with the body, sexuality, and reproductive organs. Sexual violations are often forcibly repressed. It appears that the tissues that were touched during the violation often bear the trauma. It is characteristic of these patients that their love lives are often problematic and do not provide the necessary support to heal the old wounds in the soul and therapy is therefore indicated. When this is concerned with the reproductive organs, it poses particular difficulties, as the therapy can easily be experienced as a repetition of the original violation, not least due to the risk of projection and transference. There is, therefore, a need for a procedure that is familiar to and safe for the patient, for all work that involves therapeutic touching of sexual organs over and beyond what is standard medical practice. This paper presents one case story of earlier child sexual abuse and one case of temporary infertility. We have established a procedure of slow or extended pelvic examination, where time is spent to make the patient familiar with the examination and accept the whole procedure, before the treatment is initiated. The procedure is carried out with a nurse, and 3 h are set aside. It includes conversation on the present condition and symptoms; concept of boundaries; about how earlier assaults can be projected into the present; establishment of the therapeutic room as a safe place; exercises on when to say “stop”; therapeutic touch; visualization of the pelvic examination step by step beforehand; touching on the outside of the clothes with repetition of the

  3. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Holistic Sexology and Treatment of Vulvodynia Through Existential Therapy and Acceptance Through Touch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Sexual problems are found in four major forms: lack of libido, lack of arousal and potency, pain and discomfort during intercourse, and lack of orgasm. It is possible to work with a holistic approach to sexology in the clinic in order to find and repair the negative beliefs, repressions of love, and lack of purpose of life, which are the core to problems like arousal, potency, and pain with repression of gender and sexuality. It is important not to focus only on the gender and genitals in understanding the patient's sexual problems. It is of equal importance not to neglect the body, its parts, and the feelings and emotions connected to them. Shame, guilt, helplessness, fear, disgust, anger, hatred, and other strong feelings are almost always an important part of a sexual problem and these feelings are often “held” by the tissue of the pelvis and sexual organs. The patient with sexual problems can be helped both by healing existence in general and by discharging old painful emotions from the tissues. The later process of local healing is often facilitated by a simple technique: accepting contact via touch. This is a very simple technique, where the self-acceptance of the patient is to be promoted, for example, asking the female patient to put her hand on her stomach (uterus or vulva, after which the holistic physician puts his hand supportively around hers. When done with care and after obtaining the necessary trust of the patient, this aspect of holding often releases the old negative emotions of shame bound to the touched areas. Afterwards, the emotional problems become a subject for conversational therapy and further holistic processing. Primary vulvodynia seems to be one of the diseases that can be cured after only a few successful sessions of working with acceptance through touch. The technique can be used as an isolated procedure or as a part of a pelvic examination. When touching the genitals with the intention of sexual healing, a

  4. Evolving from Reactive to Proactive Medicine: Community Lead (Pb and Clinical Disparities in Pre- and Post-Katrina New Orleans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard W. Mielke

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In 2012 the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC set the blood Pb reference value at ≥5 µg/dL. Clinical analysis of children’s blood Pb levels is the common way to diagnose environmental Pb contamination, and intervention ensues with education and household dust cleanup. Recent review indicates that education and household dust cleanup are not effective at reducing children’s Pb exposure. Here we review mapping environmental Pb and children’s blood Pb response as an alternative approach for proactive Pb dust intervention. New Orleans was divided into a high (≥100 mg/kg and low (<100 mg/kg soil Pb communities. The children’s blood Pb prevalence ≥5 µg/dL for the high and low Pb domains were 58.5% and 24.8% respectively pre-Katrina vs. 29.6% and 7.5% post-Katrina. Elevated soil Pb (mg/kg and consequently Pb loading (µg/square area permeates the high Pb domain and outdoor locations lack Pb dust safe play areas. The U.S. EPA 400 mg/kg soil Pb standard poses an outside Pb dust loading burden >37 times larger than allowed on interior residential floor environments. Environmental Pb dust is decreasing because of the transfer of large quantities of low Pb soil into selected communities. City-scale soil Pb mapping is an alternative diagnostic tool that provides information for planning proactive medicine to prevent clinical Pb exposure in the first place.

  5. Clinical holistic medicine: factors influencing the therapeutic decision-making. From academic knowledge to emotional intelligence and spiritual "crazy" wisdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Kandel, Isack; Merrick, Joav

    2007-01-01

    Scientific holistic medicine is built on holistic medical theory, on therapeutic and ethical principles. The rationale is that the therapist can take the patient into a state of salutogenesis, or existential healing, using his skills and knowledge. But how ever much we want to make therapy a science it remains partly an art, and the more developed the therapist becomes, the more of his/her decisions will be based on intuition, feeling and even inspiration that is more based on love and human concern and other spiritual motivations than on mental reason and rationality in a simple sense of the word. The provocative and paradoxal medieval western concept of the "truth telling clown", or the eastern concepts of "crazy wisdom" and "holy madness" seems highly relevant here. The problem is how we can ethically justify this kind of highly "irrational" therapeutic behavior in the rational setting of a medical institution. We argue here that holistic therapy has a very high success rate and is doing no harm to the patient, and encourage therapists, psychiatrists, psychologist and other academically trained "helpers" to constantly measure their own success-rate. This paper discusses many of the important factors that influence clinical holistic decision-making. Sexuality could, as many psychoanalysts from Freud to Reich and Searles have believed, be the most healing power that exists and also the most difficult for the mind to comprehend, and thus the most "crazy-wise" tool of therapy. PMID:18167609

  6. Personalized laboratory medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pazzagli, M.; Malentacchi, F.; Mancini, I.;

    2015-01-01

    diagnostic tools and expertise and commands proper state-of-the-art knowledge about Personalized Medicine and Laboratory Medicine in Europe, the joint Working Group "Personalized Laboratory Medicine" of the EFLM and ESPT societies compiled and conducted the Questionnaire "Is Laboratory Medicine ready...... for the era of Personalized Medicine?". 48 laboratories from 18 European countries participated at this survey. The answers of the participating Laboratory Medicine professionals indicate that they are aware that Personalized Medicine can represent a new and promising health model. Whereas they are aware...... that Laboratory Medicine should play a key role to support the implementation of Personalized Medicine in the clinical settings, the participants of this survey think that the current organization of the Laboratory Medicine needs additional/relevant implementations such as: 1. New technological Facilities...

  7. Clinical Observation on Treatment of 2,062 Cases of Immune Infertility with Integration of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Western Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To study the therapeutic effect of integrated traditional Chinese medicine and western medicine on female immune infertility. 3,496 women suffering from primary or secondary infertility had their ASAb, EMAb,AOAb and ACAb level tested, with the positive rate of 23.11%, 34.95%, 20.77% and 30.41% respectively.2,062 positive cases were periodically treated with the Chinese drug Xiaokangwan (消抗丸) plus dexamethasone, vitamin E and vitamin C for 2 periods as a course of treatment. At the end of a treatment course, the rate for the antibodies to turn negative reached over 85% and the average pregnant rate reached 36.66%. The treatment of immune infertility with the integrated approach can reduce or eliminate the influence of antibodies in the serum of patients on various links of pregnancy, thus reaching the goal of curing infertility.

  8. Exploration and Practice on the Teaching of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Clinical Medicine%临床医学专业中医教学的探索与实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张银萍; 张岩

    2015-01-01

    根据高职高专的人才定位和专业技能培养目标要求,以及目前高职高专临床医学专业《中医学》教学中存在的问题,对中医教学进行了大胆的探索与实践.压缩基础理论学时,以必需、够用为度;突出应用与实践,加强实践技能训练;改革考核体系,着重培养学生在临床实践中的中医应用能力,收效显著.%According to the vocationall talent orientation and professional skills training goals and requirements, as well as the existing problems of traditional Chinese medicine teaching inclinical medicine, made the bold exploration and practice on traditional Chinese medicine teaching. Compressed basic theoretical class hours, with the necessity and ufifciency for degree, highlight the application and practice, strengthen the training of practical skills, strengthen the training of practical skills, reform the evaluation system, and concentrate on cultivating students' application ability of traditional Chinese medicine in clinical practice. The effect achieved signiifcantly.

  9. Is Marijuana Medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications » DrugFacts » Is Marijuana Medicine? DrugFacts: Is Marijuana Medicine? Email Facebook Twitter Revised July 2015 What is ... isn’t the marijuana plant an FDA-approved medicine? The FDA requires carefully conducted studies (clinical trials) ...

  10. 中西医结合治疗肝硬化腹水80例%Clinical Observation of Traditional Chinese Medicine Combined with Western Medicine on Liver Cirrhosis Ascites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟军华; 袁勇; 林丹; 冯钊

    2012-01-01

    Objective; To study the clinical effect of traditional Chinese medicine combined with western medicine in treatment of liver cirrhosis ascites. Method: One handred and sixty patients with liver cirrhosis ascites from Mar, 2009 to Sep, 2011 were randomly divided into treatment group and control group. The patients in control group were treated with westeren medicine, the patients in treatment group was received with traditional Chinese medicine combined with western medicine. Three month after, clinical symptom, liver function, liver fibrosis and total effective ratio were compared. Result: After 3 months, the clinical symptom of treatment group was improved faster than that in control group (P < 0. 05 ) ; the functional marker of liver in treatment group was lower than that in control group (P <0.05 ) . And liver fibrosis in treatment group was much optimistic than control group. And the abdominal circumference was less than control group ( P < 0. 05 ) ; the total effective rate of treatment group was 90. 0% , and the rate of control group was 68. 8% ( P < 0. 05 ) . Conclusion: Traditional Chinese medicine combined with western medicine showed satisfactory clinical efficacy in the treatment of liver cirrhosis ascites. It improved clinical symptom significantly, live function and fibrosis of patients in treatment group were better those in than control group, and it was worthy of clinical use.%目的:了解用中西医结合方法治疗乙型肝炎后肝硬化腹水的临床效果.方法:将160例乙肝后肝硬化腹水患者,随机分为两组,对照组给予常规西医治疗,治疗组在常规西医治疗基础上,给予益气疏肝活血的中药汤剂,3个月后观察并比较两组患者的临床症状与体征、肝功能、肝纤维化程度以及临床总有效率.结果:与对照组比较,治疗组患者纳差、腹胀、浮肿等临床症状改善更快(P<0.05);治疗组患者丙氨酸转氨酶( ALT)、凝血酶原时间(PT)和总胆红素(TBil)

  11. Emergency Medicine-bound medical student performance on the National Board of Medical Examiners Emergency Medicine Advanced Clinical Examination and Versions 1 and 2 of the National Emergency Medicine M4 exams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Hiller

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In April 2013, the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME released an Advanced Clinical Examination (ACE in emergency medicine (EM. In addition to this new resource, CDEM (Clerkship Directors in EM provides two online, high-quality, internally validated examinations. National usage statistics are available for all three examinations, however, it is currently unknown how students entering an EM residency perform as compared to the entire national cohort. This information may help educators interpret examination scores of both EM-bound and non-EM-bound students. Objectives: The objective of this study was to compare EM clerkship examination performance between students who matched into an EM residency in 2014 to students who did not. We made comparisons were made using the EM-ACE and both versions of the National fourth year medical student (M4 EM examinations. Method: In this retrospective multi-institutional cohort study, the EM-ACE and either Version 1 (V1 or 2 (V2 of the National EM M4 examination was given to students taking a fourth-year EM rotation at five institutions between April 2013 to February 2014. We collected examination performance, including the scaled EM-ACE score, and percent correct on the EM M4 exams, and 2014 NRMP Match status. Student t-tests were performed on the examination averages of students who matched in EM as compared with those who did not. Results: A total of 606 students from five different institutions took both the EM-ACE and one of the EM M4 exams; 94 (15.5% students matched in EM in the 2014 Match. The mean score for EM-bound students on the EM-ACE, V1 and V2 of the EM M4 exams were 70.9 (n=47, SD=9.0, 84.4 (n=36, SD=5.2, and 83.3 (n=11, SD=6.9, respectively. Mean scores for non-EM-bound students were 68.0 (n=256, SD=9.7, 82.9 (n=243, SD=6.5, and 74.5 (n=13, SD=5.9. There was a significant difference in mean scores in EM-bound and non-EM-bound student for the EM-ACE (p=0.05 and V2 (p<0.01 but

  12. Clinical nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress is reported in the following areas of research: radionuclide lung-imaging procedures in the assessment of injury due to ammonia and carbon monoxide inhalation and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; physiological diagnosis of pulmonary embolism; dynamic imaging of the dual circulation of lung cancer; and an intravenous radionuclide method to evaluate hyposemia caused by abnormal alveolar vessels

  13. Clinical Holistic Medicine (Mindful, Short-Term Psychodynamic Psychotherapy Complemented with Bodywork) in the Treatment of Experienced Physical Illness and Chronic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Søren Ventegodt; Suzette Thegler; Tove Andreasen; Flemming Struve; Lars Enevoldsen; Laila Bassaine; Margrethe Torp; Joav Merrick

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the treatment effect of psychodynamic short-term therapy complemented with bodywork on patients who presented with physical illness at the Research Clinic for Holistic Medicine in Copenhagen. Psychodynamic short-term therapy was complemented with bodywork (Marion Rosen) to help patients confront old emotional pain from childhood trauma(s). Patients were measured with a five-item quality of life and health questionnaire (QOL5), a one-item questionnaire of self-assessed quality ...

  14. An embedded longitudinal multi-faceted qualitative evaluation of a complex cluster randomized controlled trial aiming to reduce clinically important errors in medicines management in general practice

    OpenAIRE

    Cresswell Kathrin M; Sadler Stacey; Rodgers Sarah; Avery Anthony; Cantrill Judith; Murray Scott A; Sheikh Aziz

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background There is a need to shed light on the pathways through which complex interventions mediate their effects in order to enable critical reflection on their transferability. We sought to explore and understand key stakeholder accounts of the acceptability, likely impact and strategies for optimizing and rolling-out a successful pharmacist-led information technology-enabled (PINCER) intervention, which substantially reduced the risk of clinically important errors in medicines ma...

  15. Mental health and learning disability nursing students' perceptions of the usefulness of the objective structured clinical examination to assess their competence in medicine administration

    OpenAIRE

    Hemingway, Steve; Stephenson, John; Roberts, Bronwyn; McCann, Terence

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate mental health and learning disability nursing students’ perceptions of the usefulness of the objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) in assessing their administration of medicine competence. Learning disability (n = 24) and mental health (n = 46) students from a single cohort were invited to evaluate their experience of the OSCE. A 10-item survey questionnaire was used, comprising open- and closed-response questions. Twelve (50%) lear...

  16. Mice Exposed to Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia Simulate Clinical Features of Deficiency of both Qi and Yin Syndrome in Traditional Chinese Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Chengzhi Chai; Junping Kou; Danni Zhu; Yongqing Yan; Boyang Yu

    2011-01-01

    Deficiency of both Qi and Yin Syndrome (DQYS) is one of the common syndromes in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), mainly characterized by tiredness, emaciation, anorexia, fidget, palpitation and rapid pulse, and so forth. Currently, there is no available animal model which can reflect the clinical features of this syndrome. In the present paper, we observed the time-course changes of whole behavior, body weight, food intake, locomotive activity and electrocardiogram in mice exposed to chron...

  17. Science Translational Medicine - improving human health care worldwide by providing an interdisciplinary forum for idea exchange between basic scientists and clinical research practitioners

    OpenAIRE

    Forsythe, K

    2010-01-01

    Science Translational Medicine 's mission is to improve human health care worldwide by providing a forum for communication and interdisciplinary idea exchange between basic scientists and clinical research practitioners from all relevant established and emerging disciplines. The weekly journal debuted in October 2009 and is published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the publisher of Science and Science Signaling . The journal features peer-reviewed researc...

  18. Transfusion Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smit Sibinga CT

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cees Th. Smit Sibinga ID Consulting, Zuidhorn, The NetherlandsTransfusion Medicine is a bridging science, spanning the evidence-based practice at the bedside with the social sciences in the community.     Transfusion Medicine starts at the bedside. Surprisingly, only recently that has become rediscovered with the development of ‘patient blood management’ and ‘patient centered’ approaches to allow the growth of an optimal and rational patient care through supportive hemotherapy – safe and effective, affordable and accessible.1    Where transfusion of blood found its origin in the need of a patient, it has drifted away for a long period of time from the bedside and has been dominated for almost a century by laboratory sciences. At least the first ten editions of the famous and well reputed textbook Mollison’s Blood Transfusion in Clinical Medicine contained only a fraction on the actual bedside practice of transfusion medicine and did not focus at all on patient blood management.2    This journal will focus on all aspects of the transfusion chain that immediately relate to the bedside practice and clinical use of blood and its components, and plasma derivatives as integral elements of a human transplant tissue. That includes legal and regulatory aspects, medical, ethical and cultural aspects, pure science and pathophysiology of disease and the impact of transfusion of blood, as well as aspects of the epidemiology of blood transfusion and clinical indications, and cost-effectiveness. Education through timely and continued transfer of up to date knowledge and the application of knowledge in clinical practice to develop and maintain clinical skills and competence, with the extension of current educational approaches through e-learning and accessible ‘apps’ will be given a prominent place.

  19. Mental health and learning disability nursing students' perceptions of the usefulness of the objective structured clinical examination to assess their competence in medicine administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemingway, Steve; Stephenson, John; Roberts, Bronwyn; McCann, Terence

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate mental health and learning disability nursing students' perceptions of the usefulness of the objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) in assessing their administration of medicine competence. Learning disability (n = 24) and mental health (n = 46) students from a single cohort were invited to evaluate their experience of the OSCE. A 10-item survey questionnaire was used, comprising open- and closed-response questions. Twelve (50%) learning disability and 32 (69.6%) mental health nursing students participated. The OSCE was rated highly compared to other theoretical assessments; it was also reported as clinically real and as a motivational learning strategy. However, it did not rate as well as clinical practice. Content analysis of written responses identified four themes: (i) benefits of the OSCE; (ii) suggestions to improve the OSCE; (iii) concern about the lack of clinical reality of the OSCE; and (iv) OSCE-induced stress. The themes, although repeating some of the positive statistical findings, showed that participants were critical of the university setting as a place to conduct clinical assessment, highlighted OSCE-related stress, and questioned the validity of the OSCE as a real-world assessment. The OSCE has an important role in the development of student nurses' administration of medicine skills. However, it might hinder their performance as a result of the stress of being assessed in a simulated environment. PMID:25180411

  20. Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive tracers? ... funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that uses ...

  1. Clinical observation of treating 62 patients with severe aplastic anemia failing in immunosuppressive therapy by integrative medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏尔云

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore treatment methods for patients with severe aplastic anemia(SAA) failing in immunosuppressive therapy(IST). Methods Totally 62 SAA patients failing in IST were treated by integrative medicine(IM).

  2. Vom "vorklinischen Studienabschnitt" zu "Medizin I" [The new pre-clinical curriculum "Medicine I" at Hamburg Medical School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuhnigk, Olaf

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available [english] A revision of the educational law (ÄAppO in Germany requires major reorganization of the curricula since 2002. Hamburg Medical Faculty introduced interdisciplinary education into the pre-clinical education integrating case-based and problem-based theoretical knowledge of medical preclinical subjects with practical skills. For this curricular change an independent curriculum committee was established by the faculty board. Reformation was carried out in close cooperation of the departments of medical science and basic science and was accompanied by a central evaluation organized by the office of the vice-dean of education. Curriculum contents were distributed on the basis of an interdisciplinary learning spiral with horizontal and vertical connections of basic and medical science subjects. Basic sciences are strictly focussed on medically relevant topics as required by the new ÄAppO. Case-based learning has become the major focus during "Integrated seminars" where small group discussions, self-studies, essays, and short reports form the basis for modern didactics. Electives are offered on the basis of the research profiles determined by the medical basic sciences. Training of basic medical skills is offered during the course "Introduction to clinical medicine". Students´ parcours through the curriculum are analysed by regular feedback meetings and followed by a computer programme. For better management of information the internet homepage of Hamburg medical faculty was reorganized. Positive results of evaluation and exams confirm a successful reform of the pre-clinical curriculum. [german] Die neue Approbationsordnung für Ärzte (ÄAppO stellt die Universitäten seit 2002 vor die Aufgabe einer weit reichenden Umstrukturierung des Medizinstudiums. An der Medizinischen Fakultät in Hamburg erfolgte die Einführung einer fächerübergreifenden Ausbildung, die an den medizinischen Grundlagenfächern orientiert fallbasiert und

  3. 中西医结合治疗银屑病关节炎的临床研究%Clinical Research of Psoriatic Arthritis Treated by the Integration of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Western Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱红军

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨中西医结合治疗银屑病关节炎的临床疗效.方法:将45例患者随机分为两组,对照组采用甲氨蝶呤(MTX)+环孢菌素(CS)+非甾体类抗炎药治疗;治疗组在对照组治疗的基础上采用四妙勇安汤加味(方药组成:金银花30 g,当归20 g,玄参20 g,生地黄12 g,虎杖12 g,白花蛇舌草20 g,山慈菇10 g,鹿衔草10 g,甘草15 g)治疗.结果:对照组有效率为44.4%,治疗组有效率为88.9%,两组有效率比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论:中西医结合治疗银屑病关节炎的临床疗效显著.%Objective:To discuss the clinical curative effects of psoriatic arthritis treated by the integration of traditional Chinese medicine and western medicine. Methods :45 cases of psoriatic arthritis patients suited for the inclusive standard were randomly divided into two groups, the control group adopted combination drug therapy, namely, Methotrexate ( MTX) plus Cyclosporin(CS) plus non-steroidal anti-in-flammatory drugs; the treatment group was treated by addition of Simiao Yongan Decoction ( composition: Lonicera japonica Thunb 30 g, Angelica sinensis 20 g, Scrophularia ningpoensis Hemsl 20 g,Rehmannia glutinosa 12 g,Rhiaoma Polygoni Cuspidati 12 g, Herba Hedyotis Diffusae 20 g,Cremastra appendiculata 10 g,Pyrola deco-rata 10 g, Radix Glycyrrhizae 15 g) based on the control group therapy- Results;The effective rate in the control group and the treatment group was 44, 4% and 88-9% respectively,and the difference between them had statistical significance (F <0. 05) . Conclusion: Clinical curative effect of psoriatic arthritis treated by the integration of traditional Chinese medicine and western medicine is obviously superior to the treatment of simple western medicine.

  4. Problems associated with clinical trials of Ayurvedic medicines Problemas associados com ensaios clínicos de medicamentos Ayurvédicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish K Sharma

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Herbal drugs have been used since ancient times as medicines for the treatment of various diseases. Especially in countries like India many of herbal drugs and formulations are used in different practices of treatment like Ayurveda, Siddha and Unani. It is estimated that about 25% of all modern medicines are directly or indirectly derived from plants sources. The contribution of developing countries in global herbal business is very poor due to lack of quality control and standardization measures. There is lack of common standards and appropriate methods for evaluating Traditional Medicine to ensure the safety, efficacy and quality control. This indicates the importance and necessity to develop a standard operational procedure for the standardization of herbal drugs and formulations. Benchmarking the evaluation protocols including both quality control and quality assurance of herbal drugs would play a major role in providing highly reliable and effective herbals drugs and to attract international trade, thus generating revenue. The article highlights various problems being faced by developing countries and suggests a unique approach for the preparation of SOP/guidelines for the standardization of all herbal based formulations, also there is a need for systematic clinical trials of traditional plant based medicines to enhance global acceptance

  5. Fundamentals of nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alazraki, N.P.; Mishkin, F.S.

    1984-01-01

    This guidebook for clinical nuclear medicine is written as a description of how nuclear medicine procedures should be used by clinicians in evaluating their patients. It is designed to assist medical students and physicians in becoming acquainted with nuclear medicine techniques for detecting and evaluating most common disorders. The material provides an introduction to, not a textbook of, nuclear medicine. Each chapter is devoted to a particular organ system or topic relevant to the risks and benefits involved in nuclear medicine studies. The emphasis is on presenting the rationales for ordering the various clinical imaging procedures performed in most nuclear medicine departments. Where appropriate, alternative imaging modalities including ultrasound, computed tomography imaging, and radiographic special procedures are discussed. Comparative data between nuclear medicine imaging and other modalities are presented to help guide the practicing clinician in the selection of the most appropriate procedure for a given problem.

  6. Exploration of Clinical Pharmacy Model for Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital%中医医院开展临床中药学工作初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾晓玲; 朱江; 陈丽华

    2014-01-01

    In this paper , the current status of the development of clinical pharmacy in our hospital ( as a type A of grade two hospital of traditional Chinese medicine ) , especially the clinical Chinese material medica was analyzed . The training pattern of clinical pharmacist of Chinese medicine and the development strategy were discussed . The standardization of working mode of pharmaceutical ward round was explored , such as the combination of ward round with doctor and without doctor . A valuable reference was provided for clinical work and for the improvement of pharmaceutical service of pharmacist .%分析我院(二级甲等中医医院)临床药学开展的现状,特别是临床中药学,讨论临床中药师的培养模式及发展策略,探索规范化药学查房的工作模式---随医查房和独自查房相结合,为提高药师的临床药学服务质量提供参考。

  7. Exploratory study on the clinical and mycological effectiveness of a herbal medicinal product from Solanum chrysotrichum in patients with Candida yeast-associated vaginal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Arellano, Armando; Jiménez-Ferrer, Enrique; Zamilpa, Alejandro; Martínez-Rivera, María de los Angeles; Rodríguez-Tovar, Aída Verónica; Herrera-Alvarez, Sara; Salas-Andonaegui, María Luisa; Nava-Xalpa, María Yemina; Méndez-Salas, Ansberto; Tortoriello, Jaime

    2009-04-01

    Mexican traditional medicine uses Solanum chrysotrichum to treat fungi-associated dermal and mucosal illness; its methanolic extract is active against dermatophytes and yeasts. Different spirostanic saponins (SC-2-SC-6) were identified as the active molecules; SC-2 was the most active in demonstrating a fungicidal effect against Candida albicans and non-albicans strains. The aim of the present study was to compare the clinical (elimination of signs and symptoms) and mycological effectiveness (negative mycological studies) of an S. chrysotrichum herbal medicinal product (Sc-hmp), standardized in 1.89 mg of SC-2, against ketoconazole (400 mg) in the topical treatment of cervical and/or vaginal infection by Candida. Both treatments (vaginal suppositories) were administered daily during 7 continuous nights. The study included 101 women (49 in the experimental group) with a confirmed clinical condition and positive mycological studies (direct examination and/or culture) of Candida infection. Basal conditions did not show differences between the groups; a moderate clinical picture was present in 62% of the cases, direct examination was positive in 69%, and the culture was positive with C. albicans predominating (65%). At the end of the administration period, both treatments demonstrated 100% tolerability, and clinical cure in 57.14% of S. chrysotrichum-treated cases and in 72.5% of ketoconazole-treated cases (p = 0.16), as well as 62.8% and 97.5% of mycological effectiveness, respectively (p = 0.0 001). We conclude that, at the doses used, Sc-hmp exhibits the same clinical effectiveness as ketoconazole, but with lower percentages of mycological eradication. Additional clinical studies with Sc-hmp are necessary, with increasing doses of SC-2, for improving the clinical and mycological effectiveness. PMID:19189246

  8. The role of European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine Working Group for Preanalytical Phase in standardization and harmonization of the preanalytical phase in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornes, Michael P; Church, Stephen; van Dongen-Lases, Edmée;

    2016-01-01

    and Laboratory Medicine Working Group for Preanalytical Phase (EFLM WG-PRE) was established to lead in standardization and harmonization of preanalytical policies and practices at a European level. One of the key activities of the WG-PRE is the organization of the biennial EFLM-BD conference on the preanalytical......Patient safety is a leading challenge in healthcare and from the laboratory perspective it is now well established that preanalytical errors are the major contributor to the overall rate of diagnostic and therapeutic errors. To address this, the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry...... summarises the work that has and will be done in these areas. The goal of this initiative is to ensure the EFLM WG-PRE produces work that meets the needs of the European laboratory medicine community. Progress made in the identified areas will be updated at the next preanalytical phase conference and show...

  9. Clinical Observation of Traditional Chinese Medicine Prescription Freatiag Vitiligo%活血袪风法治疗白癜风的疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐艳丽; 许爱娥

    2012-01-01

    目的:观察活血祛风法治疗进展期白癜风的临床效果.方法:根据中医辨证,证型为风血相搏的患者,口服以活血祛风法为主要治则的方剂治疗白癜风患者.结果:活血祛风法治疗白癜风具有较好的疗效,口服此方能有效控制进展期白癜风的发展.%Objective: The clinical efficacy of Traditional Chinese Medicine prescription which is used to treat 63 patients with vitiligo was observed. Medthods: According to treatment syndrome and differentiation,63 patients with vitiligo take the prescription,twice a day for 3 months. Results-. Traditional Chinese Medicine prescription has better efficacy on treating vitiligo and could control effectively the progress of vitiligo.

  10. Study on XML based Data Collection Planning of Traditional Chinese Medicine Clinical Medicine%基于XML的中医临床数据汇交方案研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周敏; 邓文萍; 马红敏; 常凯

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed to discuss possible problems in the data collection process of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) clinical medicine and to propose appropriate solutions. Based on analysis of clinical data features and data collection demands among 20 TCM clinical research bases, reference were made on key technologies of the Electronic Medical Records' integration and sharing, to propose the solution of TCM clinical data collection. The re-sults showed that proposing the "metadata and data entities synchronized intersecting" strategy, analyzing key points on this strategy, and proposing appropriate solutions, found the technical processes of the TCM clinical data collec-tion. It was concluded that the analysis and solution on key points of TCM clinical data collection provided the basis and the reference to data collection issues of TCM clinical research base.%目的:探讨中医临床数据汇交过程中可能存在的问题,并提出相应的解决方案。方法:在分析20家中医临床研究基地临床数据特点和数据汇交需求的基础上,借鉴电子病历集成共享的关键技术,提出中医临床数据汇交的解决方案。结果:提出“元数据与数据实体同步汇交”的策略,对此策略下的关键问题进行分析,提出相应的解决方案,建立中医临床数据汇交的技术流程。结论:中医临床数据汇交关键问题的分析及解决方案为中医临床研究基地数据汇交问题提供了依据及参考。

  11. CLINICAL OBSERVATION ON TREATMENT OF 80 CASES OF PROLAPSE OF LUMBAR INTERVERTEBRAL DISC BY COMBINATION OF ACUPUNCTURE AND MEDICINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RUAN Yongdui; ZHOU Weixiong; ZHENG Zhi; HE Xuewu

    2002-01-01

    150 cases of prolapse of lumbar intervetebral disc were randomly divided into treatment and control groups. 80 cases in treatment group were treated with combination of acupuncture, oral administration of Chinese medicinal herbs, traction, point-injection and intravenous drip of energy dehydration mixture; 70 cases in control group were managed by combination of acupuncture, oral administration of herbal medicines, traction, acupoint-injection (without energy dehydration mixture). The results showed that the curative rate and the total effective rate of the treatment group were 91.25 % and 98.75% separately, while those of the control group 62.86 % and 92.86 % respectively. Comparison of the curative rate between the 2 groups showed a remarkable significance ( P < 0.01 ). The observation demonstrated that combined treatment of prolapse of lumbar intervertebral disc with traditional Chinese and Western medicine is an effective approach.

  12. Pharmacological and clinical effects of TCM medicine vinegar process%浅析中药醋制的药理作用与临床疗效

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张兰芳; 董永宁

    2015-01-01

    TCM medicine vinegar processing is an integral part of the heritage of TCM medicine processing. Chinese herbal medicine by vinegar processed can change physicochemical properties of the drug, reduce its toxicity or side effects, and enhance the efficacy of the drug, to ensure safe and effective clinical application, its role can be proved by the basic modern pharmacological research. As one method of TCM medicine vinegar processing valuable heritage of TCM medicine, it needs to strengthen research in this area.%中药炮制是中国中医药遗产的组成部分。数千年来,它与中医临床紧密配合,在中国人民防病治病中起到了重要作用,保证了中医临床用药安全有效。醋制是中药炮制中重要的炮制方法之一,中药饮片通过醋制可以改变药物的理化性质、降低其毒性或副作用、矫味矫臭、增强药物的疗效、确保临床用药安全有效,其作用基本可以通过现代药理研究证明。目前由于多种原因,传统炮制方法醋制饮片日趋减少,这是一个值得注意的问题。中药醋制法作为中医药学宝贵遗产之一,有必要加强此方面的研究。

  13. Clinical practice parameters for hemodynamic support of pediatric and neonatal septic shock: 2007 update from the American College of Critical Care Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brierley, Joe; Carcillo, Joseph A.; Choong, Karen; Cornell, Tim; DeCaen, Allan; Deymann, Andreas; Doctor, Allan; Davis, Alan; Duff, John; Dugas, Marc-Andre; Duncan, Alan; Evans, Barry; Feldman, Jonathan; Felmet, Kathryn; Fisher, Gene; Frankel, Lorry; Jeffries, Howard; Greenwald, Bruce; Gutierrez, Juan; Hall, Mark; Han, Yong Y.; Hanson, James; Hazelzet, Jan; Hernan, Lynn; Kiff, Jane; Kissoon, Niranjan; Kon, Alexander; Irazusta, Jose; Lin, John; Lorts, Angie; Mariscalco, Michelle; Mehta, Renuka; Nadel, Simon; Nguyen, Trung; Nicholson, Carol; Peters, Mark; Okhuysen-Cawley, Regina; Poulton, Tom; Relves, Monica; Rodriguez, Agustin; Rozenfeld, Ranna; Schnitzler, Eduardo; Shanley, Tom; Skache, Sara; Skippen, Peter; Torres, Adalberto; von Dessauer, Bettina; Weingarten, Jacki; Yeh, Timothy; Zaritsky, Arno; Stojadinovic, Bonnie; Zimmerman, Jerry; Zuckerberg, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    Background The Institute of Medicine calls for the use of clinical guidelines and practice parameters to promote “best practices” and to improve patient outcomes. Objective 2007 update of the 2002 American College of Critical Care Medicine Clinical Guidelines for Hemodynamic Support of Neonates and Children with Septic Shock. Participants Society of Critical Care Medicine members with special interest in neonatal and pediatric septic shock were identified from general solicitation at the Society of Critical Care Medicine Educational and Scientific Symposia (2001–2006). Methods The Pubmed/MEDLINE literature database (1966–2006) was searched using the keywords and phrases: sepsis, septicemia, septic shock, endotoxemia, persistent pulmonary hypertension, nitric oxide, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), and American College of Critical Care Medicine guidelines. Best practice centers that reported best outcomes were identified and their practices examined as models of care. Using a modified Delphi method, 30 experts graded new literature. Over 30 additional experts then reviewed the updated recommendations. The document was subsequently modified until there was greater than 90% expert consensus. Results The 2002 guidelines were widely disseminated, translated into Spanish and Portuguese, and incorporated into Society of Critical Care Medicine and AHA sanctioned recommendations. Centers that implemented the 2002 guidelines reported best practice outcomes (hospital mortality 1%–3% in previously healthy, and 7%– 10% in chronically ill children). Early use of 2002 guidelines was associated with improved outcome in the community hospital emergency department (number needed to treat = 3.3) and tertiary pediatric intensive care setting (number needed to treat = 3.6); every hour that went by without guideline adherence was associated with a 1.4-fold increased mortality risk. The updated 2007 guidelines continue to recognize an increased likelihood that

  14. Therapeutic Observation on Treatment of Infantile Cerebral Palsy with Integrative Chinese-Western Medicine: A Clinical Report of 104 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Dong-hao; SHI Bing-pei; SHI Wei; CHEN Dong-dong; MIAO Jing; YANG Hong; HAN Chou-ping

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the therapeutic effects of combined treatment with Chinese and western medicine in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Methods: 104 CP children were treated mainly with physiotherapy and acupuncture, together with occupational therapy, sensory integration and electrical stimulation. Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) was used to assess the effects of treatment. Results: After treatment for 3.29±0.80 months, the majority of CP children improved their IQ and limb symptoms, with decreased abnormal posture, increased muscle strength and improved motor developmental function. GMFM88 and GMFM66 scores had significantly increased after treatment. Conclusions: Combined treatment with Chinese and Western Medicine has confirmed effects on CP children.

  15. Implementation of an Integrative Medicine Curriculum for Preventive Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaramonte, Delia R; D'Adamo, Christopher; Amr, Sania

    2015-11-01

    The University of Maryland Department of Epidemiology and Public Health collaborated with the Center for Integrative Medicine at the same institution to develop and implement a unique integrative medicine curriculum within a preventive medicine residency program. Between October 2012 and July 2014, Center for Integrative Medicine faculty provided preventive medicine residents and faculty, and occasionally other Department of Epidemiology and Public Health faculty, with comprehensive exposure to the field of integrative medicine, including topics such as mind-body medicine, nutrition and nutritional supplements, Traditional Chinese Medicine, massage, biofield therapies, manual medicine, stress management, creative arts, and the use of integrative medicine in the inpatient setting. Preventive medicine residents, under the supervision of Department of Epidemiology and Public Health faculty, led integrative medicine-themed journal clubs. Resident assessments included a case-based knowledge evaluation, the Integrative Medicine Attitudes Questionnaire, and a qualitative evaluation of the program. Residents received more than 60 hours of integrative medicine instruction, including didactic sessions, experiential workshops, and wellness retreats in addition to clinical experiences and individual wellness mentoring. Residents rated the program positively and recommended that integrative medicine be included in preventive medicine residency curricula. The inclusion of a wellness-focused didactic, experiential, and skill-based integrative medicine program within a preventive medicine residency was feasible and well received by all six preventive medicine residents.

  16. Implementation of an Integrative Medicine Curriculum for Preventive Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaramonte, Delia R; D'Adamo, Christopher; Amr, Sania

    2015-11-01

    The University of Maryland Department of Epidemiology and Public Health collaborated with the Center for Integrative Medicine at the same institution to develop and implement a unique integrative medicine curriculum within a preventive medicine residency program. Between October 2012 and July 2014, Center for Integrative Medicine faculty provided preventive medicine residents and faculty, and occasionally other Department of Epidemiology and Public Health faculty, with comprehensive exposure to the field of integrative medicine, including topics such as mind-body medicine, nutrition and nutritional supplements, Traditional Chinese Medicine, massage, biofield therapies, manual medicine, stress management, creative arts, and the use of integrative medicine in the inpatient setting. Preventive medicine residents, under the supervision of Department of Epidemiology and Public Health faculty, led integrative medicine-themed journal clubs. Resident assessments included a case-based knowledge evaluation, the Integrative Medicine Attitudes Questionnaire, and a qualitative evaluation of the program. Residents received more than 60 hours of integrative medicine instruction, including didactic sessions, experiential workshops, and wellness retreats in addition to clinical experiences and individual wellness mentoring. Residents rated the program positively and recommended that integrative medicine be included in preventive medicine residency curricula. The inclusion of a wellness-focused didactic, experiential, and skill-based integrative medicine program within a preventive medicine residency was feasible and well received by all six preventive medicine residents. PMID:26477900

  17. [Strategic considerations on the design and choice of animal models for non-clinical investigations of cell-based medicinal products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Jörg; Schulz, Ronny M; Sanzenbacher, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    For the development of medicinal products animal models are still indispensable to demonstrate efficacy and safety prior to first use in humans. Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP), which include cell-based medicinal products (CBMP), differ in their pharmacology and toxicology compared to conventional pharmaceuticals, and thus, require an adapted regime for non-clinical development. Developers are, therefore, challenged to develop particular individual concepts and to reconcile these with regulatory agencies. Guidelines issued by the European Medicines Agency (EMA), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other sources can provide direction.The published approaches for non-clinical testing of efficacy document that homologous animal models where the therapeutic effect is investigated in a disease-relevant animal model utilizing cells derived from the same species are commonly used. The challenge is that the selected model should reflect the human disease in all critical features and that the cells should be comparable to the investigated human medicinal product in terms of quality and biological activity. This is not achievable in all cases. In these cases, alternative methods may provide supplemental information. To demonstrate the scientific proof-of-concept (PoC), small animal models such as mice or rats are preferred. During the subsequent product development phase, large animal models (i.e. sheep, minipigs, dogs) must be considered, as they may better reflect the anatomical or physiological situation in humans. In addition to efficacy, those models may also be suitable to prove some safety aspects of ATMP (e.g. regarding dose finding, local tolerance, or undesired interactions and effects of the administered cells in the target tissue). In contrast, for evaluation of the two prominent endpoints for characterizing the safety of ATMP (i.e. biodistribution, tumorigenicity) heterologous small animal models, especially immunodeficient mouse strains

  18. Clinical study of Chinese medicine in the treatment ofankylosing spondylitis%中医药治疗强直性脊柱炎的临床探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔社明

    2014-01-01

    目的:对中医药治疗强直性脊柱炎进行探讨研究。方法通过文献查阅,研究中西医对强直性脊柱炎的研究进展,结合笔者的临床经验,进行相关阐述。结果强直性脊柱炎病因病机复杂,笔者结合临床经验从疾病分期诊治、药对配伍辨证分析、临床辨证施治等方面进行诊治,多获良效。结论中医治疗强直性脊柱炎以辨证施治为主,治法以祛风散寒,利湿通络,活血化瘀,解毒消肿,补肾健骨为原则,早期以实证为主,晚期则以虚实夹杂,虚证为主。%Objective to further study of traditional chinese medicine treatment of ankylosing spondylitis. Methods through literature review, the research progress of the research of chinese and western medicine for ankylosing spondylitis, combined with the author's clinical experience, related in this paper. Results the etiology and pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis is complex, the author combined with clinical experience in diagnosis and treatment of disease staging and medicine on the compatibility of dialectical analysis, clinical evidence-based medicine to make a diagnosis and give treatment, obtain good effect. Conclusion tcM treatment of ankylosing spondylitis is given priority to with evidence-based medicine, treatment with wind and cold wet t2dm, activate blood, detumescence, detoxification kidney JianGu for the principle, early is given priority to with the empirical, late to factors, deficiency syndrome.

  19. [Strategic considerations on the design and choice of animal models for non-clinical investigations of cell-based medicinal products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Jörg; Schulz, Ronny M; Sanzenbacher, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    For the development of medicinal products animal models are still indispensable to demonstrate efficacy and safety prior to first use in humans. Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP), which include cell-based medicinal products (CBMP), differ in their pharmacology and toxicology compared to conventional pharmaceuticals, and thus, require an adapted regime for non-clinical development. Developers are, therefore, challenged to develop particular individual concepts and to reconcile these with regulatory agencies. Guidelines issued by the European Medicines Agency (EMA), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other sources can provide direction.The published approaches for non-clinical testing of efficacy document that homologous animal models where the therapeutic effect is investigated in a disease-relevant animal model utilizing cells derived from the same species are commonly used. The challenge is that the selected model should reflect the human disease in all critical features and that the cells should be comparable to the investigated human medicinal product in terms of quality and biological activity. This is not achievable in all cases. In these cases, alternative methods may provide supplemental information. To demonstrate the scientific proof-of-concept (PoC), small animal models such as mice or rats are preferred. During the subsequent product development phase, large animal models (i.e. sheep, minipigs, dogs) must be considered, as they may better reflect the anatomical or physiological situation in humans. In addition to efficacy, those models may also be suitable to prove some safety aspects of ATMP (e.g. regarding dose finding, local tolerance, or undesired interactions and effects of the administered cells in the target tissue). In contrast, for evaluation of the two prominent endpoints for characterizing the safety of ATMP (i.e. biodistribution, tumorigenicity) heterologous small animal models, especially immunodeficient mouse strains

  20. [Osteopathic medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, P; Lepers, Y; Salem, W

    2011-09-01

    Osteopathy is originated in the 19th century in the United States. Andrew Taylor Still seek for an alternative medical system to the orthodox medicine largely empirical and advocating bloodletting, calomel, etc., all of which was resumed with terms like" heroic medicine". Osteopathy as other alternative medical practices (homeopathy, eclecticism, etc.) based on rational and metaphysical postulates as vitalism or the fact that man is a divinely ordained machine. Still's approach was essentially manual and based on manipulation of the joints. Today osteopaths challenge these dogmas and seek to agree their practice within scientific biomedical standards. Even if strong randomized clinical trials are lacking, several surveys report how osteopathy gained public notoriety. Several recent meta-analyses pinpoint the benefit of the spinal manipulative treatment and even if there is no evidence that such an approach is superior to other advocated therapies there is no evidence that these therapies are more effective than the first one. The major indications for such a treatment are cervical and low back pain, either chronic or acute. The quality of the relationship between the practitioner and patient together with the placebo effect are important components of a treatment effect. Osteopathic education is an important aspect and only higher education institutions, i.e. universities can achieve and maintain adequate standards. Materia medica and surgery represent the two major therapeutic mainstreams in medicine; osteopathy considered as manual medicine could be the third one. PMID:22034767

  1. 以转化医学理念推动临床实验室发展的探讨%For clinical laboratory development and promotion with translational medicine concept

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄琼坚

    2014-01-01

    转化医学是医学领域的一次重大革命,它的出现引起基础医学、预防医学、临床医学、生物制药以及医学规划与管理等领域的极大关注。通过综合分析转化医学的特点、发展历程及其与检验医学、临床医学的相互关系,探讨如何以转化医学理念推动临床实验室发展,提出从加强质量管理、人才培养、信息化建设、与临床联系、科研合作等方面推动临床实验室发展,更好地迎接检验医学发展的新机遇与挑战。%Translational medicine is a great revolution in the field of medicine,it causes at-tention in field of the basic medicine,preventive medicine,clinical medicine,biological pharma-ceutical,medical planning and management.Through the comprehensive analysis of the characteris-tics of translational medicine,development and its relationship with laboratory medicine and clinical medicine,discussed how the idea of translational medicine in promoting the development of clinical laboratory,proposed from strengthening the construction of quality management,personnel training, information sharing,clinical cooperation and so on to better meet the new opportunities and challen-ges in laboratory medicine.

  2. Gene/Environment Interaction in Atherosclerosis: An Example of Clinical Medicine as Seen from the Evolutionary Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Mertens

    2010-01-01

    The chronic multifactorial disease of atherosclerosis clearly illustrates the Darwinian paradigm. Recent research, combining the effects of genes and environment, has provided surprising clues to the pathogenesis of this major public health problem. This example makes a strong case for recognizing evolution biology as a basic science for medicine.

  3. 蒙西医结合治疗森林脑炎32例临床观察%Clinical observation on the treatment of light forest encephalitis with Mongolian medicine and Western Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪中华; 郝淑梦

    2015-01-01

    目的:观察以十三味红花秘诀丸与巴特日-7味丸(一方)为主,土木香十味散、嘎巴拉-3汤、洪格日散为辅的5种蒙药与西医常规疗法结合治疗轻型森林脑炎急性期的临床疗效。方法:选取森林脑炎急性期轻型患者63例作为研究对象,随机分为试验组32例和对照组31例。试验组给予口服巴特日-7味丸(一方)及十三味红花秘诀丸等蒙药结合西医常规治疗,对照组给予西医常规治疗,2周后分别对患者发热、头痛等症状进行疗效评分,评价两种疗法的临床疗效。结果:试验组在缩短发热、头痛天数及减轻发热、头痛程度方面均显著优于对照组,两组差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:蒙药巴特日-7味丸(一方)、十三味红花秘诀丸为主,土木香十味散、嘎巴拉-3汤、洪格日散为辅结合西医常规疗法治疗森林脑炎急性期的发热、头痛效果优于单独使用西医常规疗法。%Objective To observe the Garidi -7 (one)and Safflower-13 secret pills,TuMuXiang-10 powder,kapala -3 soup,HongGeRi powder supplement 5 for kill"stick bugs"and clear"blood Xila"function of Mongolian medicine and modern west-ern medicine conventional therapy on acute stage light forest encephalitis the clinical curative effect.Methods Selection of forest en-cephalitis acute light 63 patients as the research object,and randomly divided into experimental group 32 cases and control group with 31 cases,the experimental group was given oral Bart -7 pill (one)and Safflower-13 secret pills and so on,modern Western conven-tional medicine therapy,control group was given the routine treatment of Western medicine,treatment of 2 weeks respectively for pa-tients with fever,headache,and other symptoms,signs were evaluated,finally the score results for statistical treatment,clinical evalu-ation of two kinds of therapy.Results In the experimental group,reduce the fever

  4. 中西医药联合高压氧治疗突发性耳聋疗效观察%Clinic effect observation of traditional chinese medicine and western medicine combined hyperbaric oxygen in treatment of sudden hearing loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张登科; 李正贤; 江文; 刘阳云; 冯秀荣

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinic effect of traditional Chinese medicine and western medicine combined hyperbaric oxygen in treatment of sudden hearing loss.Methods 120 patients with sudden deafness were randomly divided into 2 groups.60 cases of group A treated by traditional Chinese medicine ( including radix bupleuri, rhynchophylla, salviae miltiorrbizae, radix gentianae, radix puerariae, rhizoma gastrodiae, hemlock parsley, phelledendron, rhizoma aeori tatarinowii, angelica, cedonopsis, gentian, cork, prunella, cyperus rotundus, etc.) and 60 cases of group B treated by western medicine ( including low molecular weight dextran, prostaglandin E1, adenosine triphosphate, coenzyme A, dexamethasone and vitamin, etc.) combined hyperbaric oxygen.Among these patients, there were74 males and46 females, rangingin age from 34 to72 yearn.Results A, 15 cases cured, 19 cases markedly, 17 cases effective, 9 healed cases, the total effective rate is 85%.In group B, 13 cases cured, 14 cases markedly, 16 cases effective, 17 healed cases.The total effective rate is 71.66%.The results in group A were better than that in group B ( P < 0.05).Conclusion The results showed that sudden hearing loss with traditional Chinese medicine and western medicine combined hyperbaric oxygen treatment is better than single western medicine treatment.%目的 观察中西医药联合高压氧治疗突发性耳聋的临床效果.方法 突发性耳聋患者120例,男74例,女46例,年龄34~72岁.随机分为中西医组(A组)和西医组(B组)各60例.两组均使用低分子右旋糖酐,前列腺素E1,三磷酸腺苷,辅酶A,地塞米松,维生素等.A组同时加服中药(柴胡、钩藤、丹参、龙胆草、党参,石菖蒲、当归、天麻、川芎、黄柏、夏枯草、葛根、香附等).两组均辅以高压氧治疗.结果 A组痊愈15例,显效19例,有效17例,无效9例,临床总有效率为85%.B组痊愈13例,显效14例,有效16例,无效17例,临床总有效率为71.66%.

  5. Traditional Japanese Kampo Medicine: Clinical Research between Modernity and Traditional Medicine—The State of Research and Methodological Suggestions for the Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Watanabe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Japanese traditional herbal medicine, Kampo, has gradually reemerged and 148 different formulations (mainly herbal extracts can be prescribed within the national health insurance system. The objective of this article is to introduce Kampo and to present information from previous clinical studies that tested Kampo formulae. In addition, suggestions on the design of future research will be stated. The literature search was based on a summary, up until January 2009, by the Japanese Society of Oriental Medicine and included only those trials which were also available in either Pubmed or ICHUSHI (Japan Medical Abstracts Society. We included 135 studies, half of these studies (n=68 used a standard control and 28 a placebo control. Thirty-seven trials were published in English [all randomized controlled trials (RCTs] and the remaining articles were in Japanese only. The sample size for most studies was small (two-third of the studies included less than 100 patients and the overall methodological quality appeared to be low. None of the studies used Kampo diagnosis as the basis for the treatment. In order to evaluate Kampo as a whole treatment system, certain aspects should be taken into account while designing studies. RCTs are the appropriate study design to test efficacy or effectiveness; however, within the trial the treatment could be individualized according to the Kampo diagnosis. Kampo is a complex and individualized treatment with a long tradition, and it would be appropriate for further research on Kampo medicine to take this into account.

  6. Science Translational Medicine – improving human health care worldwide by providing an interdisciplinary forum for idea exchange between basic scientists and clinical research practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forsythe, Katherine

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Science Translational Medicine’s mission is to improve human health care worldwide by providing a forum for communication and interdisciplinary idea exchange between basic scientists and clinical research practitioners from all relevant established and emerging disciplines. The weekly journal debuted in October 2009 and is published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS, the publisher of Science and Science Signaling. The journal features peer-reviewed research articles, perspectives and commentary, and is guided by an international Advisory Board, led by Chief Scientific Adviser, Elias A. Zerhouni, M.D., former Director of the National Institutes of Health, and Senior Scientific Adviser, Elazer R. Edelman, M.D., Ph.D., Thomas D. and Virginia W. Cabot Professor of Health Sciences and Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The Science Translational Medicine editorial team is led by Katrina L. Kelner, Ph.D., AAAS. A profound transition is required for the science of translational medicine. Despite 50 years of advances in our fundamental understanding of human biology and the emergence of powerful new technologies, the rapid transformation of this knowledge into effective health measures is not keeping pace with the challenges of global health care. Creative experimental approaches, novel technologies, and new ways of conducting scientific explorations at the interface of established and emerging disciplines are now required to an unprecedented degree if real progress is to be made. To aid in this reinvention, Science and AAAS have created a new interdisciplinary journal, Science Translational Medicine. The following interview exemplefies the pioneering content found in Science Translational Medicine. It is an excerpt from a Podcast interview with Dr. Samuel Broder, former director of the National Cancer Institute and current Chief Medical Officer at Celera. The Podcast was produced in tangent with Dr

  7. The three avenues of gerontology: from basic research to clinical gerontology and anti-aging medicine. Another French paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Leslie

    2004-06-01

    This is a contribution to the debate raised by the position statement on aging ( 1) and comments ( 2) concerning the rapid increase of anti-aging medicine. After a short summary of the history of social attitude to aging and the emergence of experimental gerontology, the French situation is described, emphasizing the economic basis of this phenomenon: increasing insurance fees and tightly controlled honoraria push an increasing number of physicians to this new discipline. No lack of communication seems to be involved between basic gerontologists and physicians ( 2). Anti-aging medicine profits of the increasing population of seniors who want to remain healthy, look young and dislike to consult geriatricians. And also of the fact that no over-the-counter delivery of drugs is available in France. For these reasons there is no serious hope to stop it otherwise than by state legislation. PMID:15215259

  8. Could We Use Clinical Benefit to Evaluate the Effects of Chinese Medicine on the Treatment of Cancer?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ping-ping

    2010-01-01

    @@ Chinese medicine (CM) exhibits special characteristics and unique superiority in the cancer treatment, mainly showing in the alleviation of the side effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, such as the arrest of bone marrow and gastrointestinal symptoms etc., and palliating the discomforts, such as fatigue and anorexia. CM can improve the effects when combined with chemotherapy and enhance the patients' tolerance to promote rehabilitation by regulating the whole body. The patients with cancer in the late stage usually select CM as palliative care.

  9. Randomized Placebo-Controlled Double-Blind Clinical Trial of Cannabis-Based Medicinal Product (Sativex) in Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Selvarajah, D.; Gandhi, R.; Emery, C.J.; Tesfaye, S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy of Sativex, a cannabis-based medicinal extract, as adjuvant treatment in painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Research design and methods: In this randomized controlled trial, 30 subjects with painful DPN received daily Sativex or placebo. The primary outcome measure was change in mean daily pain scores, and secondary outcome measures included quality-of-life assessments. Results: There was significant improvement in pain scores in ...

  10. Mice Exposed to Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia Simulate Clinical Features of Deficiency of both Qi and Yin Syndrome in Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengzhi Chai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Deficiency of both Qi and Yin Syndrome (DQYS is one of the common syndromes in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM, mainly characterized by tiredness, emaciation, anorexia, fidget, palpitation and rapid pulse, and so forth. Currently, there is no available animal model which can reflect the clinical features of this syndrome. In the present paper, we observed the time-course changes of whole behavior, body weight, food intake, locomotive activity and electrocardiogram in mice exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia for 6 weeks, and measured bleeding time at last according to the clinical features of DQYS and one key pathological factor. The results showed that the mice exposed to intermittent hypoxia for certain time presented lackluster hair, dull looking hair, resistance, attacking, body weight loss, food intake decline, locomotive activity decrease, heart rate quickening and T wave elevating, which were similar to the major clinical features of DQYS. Meanwhile, bleeding time shortening was also found, which was consistent with the clinical fact that DQYS often accompanied with blood stasis. The possible explanation was also outlined according to the available literature. Such findings suggested chronic intermittent hypoxia could induce similar symptoms and signs in mice accorded with the clinical features of DQYS, which provided a suitable animal model for evaluation of drugs for the treatment of this syndrome and further exploration of pathological process or correlation of the syndrome and related diseases.

  11. Mice Exposed to Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia Simulate Clinical Features of Deficiency of both Qi and Yin Syndrome in Traditional Chinese Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Chengzhi; Kou, Junping; Zhu, Danni; Yan, Yongqing; Yu, Boyang

    2011-01-01

    Deficiency of both Qi and Yin Syndrome (DQYS) is one of the common syndromes in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), mainly characterized by tiredness, emaciation, anorexia, fidget, palpitation and rapid pulse, and so forth. Currently, there is no available animal model which can reflect the clinical features of this syndrome. In the present paper, we observed the time-course changes of whole behavior, body weight, food intake, locomotive activity and electrocardiogram in mice exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia for 6 weeks, and measured bleeding time at last according to the clinical features of DQYS and one key pathological factor. The results showed that the mice exposed to intermittent hypoxia for certain time presented lackluster hair, dull looking hair, resistance, attacking, body weight loss, food intake decline, locomotive activity decrease, heart rate quickening and T wave elevating, which were similar to the major clinical features of DQYS. Meanwhile, bleeding time shortening was also found, which was consistent with the clinical fact that DQYS often accompanied with blood stasis. The possible explanation was also outlined according to the available literature. Such findings suggested chronic intermittent hypoxia could induce similar symptoms and signs in mice accorded with the clinical features of DQYS, which provided a suitable animal model for evaluation of drugs for the treatment of this syndrome and further exploration of pathological process or correlation of the syndrome and related diseases.

  12. Clinical use of quantitative cardiac perfusion PET: rationale, modalities and possible indications. Position paper of the Cardiovascular Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciagrà, Roberto; Passeri, Alessandro; Bucerius, Jan; Verberne, Hein J; Slart, Riemer H J A; Lindner, Oliver; Gimelli, Alessia; Hyafil, Fabien; Agostini, Denis; Übleis, Christopher; Hacker, Marcus

    2016-07-01

    Until recently, PET was regarded as a luxurious way of performing myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, with excellent image quality and diagnostic capabilities that hardly justified the additional cost and procedural effort. Quantitative perfusion PET was considered a major improvement over standard qualitative imaging, because it allows the measurement of parameters not otherwise available, but for many years its use was confined to academic and research settings. In recent years, however, several factors have contributed to the renewal of interest in quantitative perfusion PET, which has become a much more readily accessible technique due to progress in hardware and the availability of dedicated and user-friendly platforms and programs. In spite of this evolution and of the growing evidence that quantitative perfusion PET can play a role in the clinical setting, there are not yet clear indications for its clinical use. Therefore, the Cardiovascular Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, starting from the experience of its members, decided to examine the current literature on quantitative perfusion PET to (1) evaluate the rationale for its clinical use, (2) identify the main methodological requirements, (3) identify the remaining technical difficulties, (4) define the most reliable interpretation criteria, and finally (5) tentatively delineate currently acceptable and possibly appropriate clinical indications. The present position paper must be considered as a starting point aiming to promote a wider use of quantitative perfusion PET and to encourage the conception and execution of the studies needed to definitely establish its role in clinical practice.

  13. Foucault and modern medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peerson, A

    1995-06-01

    Modernity as a concept or ideal, resulting from the age of Enlightenment and the French Revolution gave hope of a better future and new possibilities. To be modern means an 'enlightened' individual and society, welcoming change and development. In this paper, I will discuss Foucault's analysis (1973) of problematics in medicine in eighteenth century France. Three themes prominent in the text are: 'the birth of the clinic', 'the clinical gaze' and the power-knowledge relationship. Three problematics identified in modern medicine by Foucault and which are particularly relevant to twentieth century medicine are: (i) the extension of the clinical gaze from the individual body to the wider population; (ii) the increasing medical intervention and use of technology in fundamental life processes; and (iii) the relationship between society and medicine. I will argue that Foucault's analysis is fraught with ambiguities. It is useful, however, for establishing an explanation for medicine today and for presenting a particular interpretation of modernity.

  14. Evaluating the evidence for evidence-based medicine: are randomized clinical trials less flawed than other forms of peer-reviewed medical research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, R Grant; Dager, Stephen R

    2013-09-01

    Evidence-based medicine considers randomized clinical trials (RCTs) to be the strongest form of evidence for clinical decision making. To test the hypothesis that RCTs have fewer methodological flaws than non-RCTs, limitations of 17,591 RCTs and 39,029 non-RCTs were characterized. Panels of experts assembled to write meta-analyses evaluated this literature to determine which articles should be included in 316 meta-analytic reviews. Overall, 38.7% of RCTs evaluated were excluded from review for an identified flaw. Commonly identified flaws in RCTs were as follows: insufficient data provided to evaluate the study (9.6% of 17,591 RCTs); inadequate randomization (9.0%); inadequate blinding (4.9%); and duplicative publication (4.4%). Overall, 20.2% of all published medical research has an identified methodological flaw, with RCTs having as many limitations as non-RCTs.

  15. 中医治疗慢性骨髓炎的临床探析%The Clinical Investigated on Traditional Chinese Medicine Treatment of Chronic Osteomyelitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓峰

    2015-01-01

    Objective The clinical efficacy of traditional Chinese medicine in treatment of chronic osteomyelitis is to be investigated. Methods Choose 84 chronic osteomyelitis patients who are treated in hospital from June 2013 to June 2014 and separate them into control group and study group according to different treatment methods. 41 patients in control group are given conventional treatment,while 43 patients in study group are given traditional Chinese medicine treatment. And then observe and compare the treatment efficacy of the two groups after treatment. Results The treatment efficiency in study group is much higher than control group;there is a treatment differential between the two groups,such a differential has statistic value(P<0.05). Conclusion The traditional Chinese medicine treatment is quite effective to cure chronic osteomyelitis with high efficiency,which is worthy to be promoted and applied clinical y.%目的:观察中医治疗对慢性骨髓炎的临床效果。方法搜集2013年6月~2014年6月我院接收的慢性骨髓炎84例患者,按照治疗方法差异分为对照组与研究组。对对照组41例实施常规治疗,对研究组43例实施中医治疗。观察并比较对照组、研究组的治疗效果。结果两组相比,研究组治疗有效率较高,有明显差异,有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论中医治疗慢性骨髓炎的临床效果较好,有效率高。

  16. 浅析口腔内科疾病的临床治疗%Analysis of the Clinical Treatment of Oral Diseases in Department of Internal Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苗静

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveDiscussion about clinical diagnosis and treatment of oral medical disease.MethodsColect related information of 190 patients with oral medicine disease,carry out the relevant research with retrospective analysis method. ResultsProportion in male patients is higher with oral medicine disease,periarthritis of root and has a high incidence of dental caries. Dental pulp and root canal therapy is more common in the clinical treatment. Conclusion Oral medicine disease with high incidence,self oral health awareness should be increased. For patients in the prevention,treatment and prognosis of oral diseases three aspects to reduce adverse effects,to achieve the expected effect.%目的:针对临床诊治口腔内科疾病的有关情况进行较深入地探讨。方法收集190例口腔内科疾病患者有关资料,采取回顾性分析方法开展有关研究。结果男性患者在口腔内科疾病患者中占有较高比例,根尖周炎及龋齿的发病率较高。牙髓及根管治疗是临床中比较常见的治疗手段。结论口腔内科疾病具有较高的发病率,自我口腔保健意识应不断提高。对患者口腔疾病在预防、治疗及预后3方面降低不良影响,才能实现预期疗效。

  17. Nocebo Effect in New Medicine Clinical Trials%新药临床试验中的反安慰剂效应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小龙; 王莉; 方相锋

    2011-01-01

    Inform the patients of the existence of placebo control may go against the intention of taking placebo as hinted treatment in new medicine clinical trial. We found in the Phase Ⅱ clinical trial of a new medicine that the curative effect differed obviously by informing or concealing the truth to the patient that the placebo control group was set up. It indicated that informs the patients of the possibility of using placebo during the treatment will produce the "nocebo effect" and discount the curative effect. We give following four suggestions: assess the curative effect by objective indicators; use the superposition design; take "temporary concealment" method; psycho[ogical doctor get involved.%新药在临床试验中设立安慰剂对照需要患者知情同意,有违安慰剂暗示治疗的本意.在一种新药Ⅱ期临床试验中,发现告知与隐瞒设立安慰剂对照的事实,疗效差异明显.表明告知患者可能使用到安慰剂,会产生反安慰剂效应,影响疗效判定.提出疗效判定尽量使用客观指标、采用叠加设计、采用暂时隐瞒法、心理医生介入等4项对策.

  18. Differences in the perception of characteristics of excellence of clinical tutors among residents and consultants at an emergency medicine residency program a qualitative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muna Saleem Aljahany

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Defining exactly what characterizes a clinical tutor as excellent and another less effective, is an important task in assessing the effectiveness of clinical training and guiding faculty development. Aim: We aimed to evaluate those characteristics and measure differences in their perception among accomplished and non-accomplished consultants and residents in the Emergency Department. We also compared perceptions between the different groups of participants. Methods: The characteristics measured were extracted from an extensive search of previously published studies summarized in a review article. A qualitative study was conducted, using a 20 item questionnaire piloted from the refined characteristics (good indicator of reliability; Cronbach′s Alpha = 0.86. The questionnaire was distributed among all consultants and residents in Saudi Board of Emergency Medicine. Results: No significant difference between consultants′ and residents′ perception was found. "Sincere" was an exception 87.8% versus 55.1%, P = 0.013. Consultants′ specifications did not seem to affect perception on overall scores and its component sub-scores. Conclusion: Since results showed no relation between accomplished and non-accomplished consultants in perceiving those qualities, we excluded the lack of knowledge of those characteristics as a cause of being accomplished or non-accomplished. We suggest a greater dedication from program developers towards creating more opportunities to involve more consultants in basic Emergency Medicine training.

  19. Teaching Translational Research to Medical Students: The New York University School of Medicine's Master's of Science in Clinical Investigation Dual-Degree Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillman, Jennifer; Pillinger, Michael; Plottel, Claudia S; Galeano, Claudia; Maddalo, Scott; Hochman, Judith S; Cronstein, Bruce N; Gold-von Simson, Gabrielle

    2015-12-01

    To develop the next generation of translational investigators, New York University School of Medicine (NYUSOM) and the NYU-NYC Health and Hospitals Corporation Clinical and Translational Science Institute (NYU-HHC CTSI) developed the Master's of Science in Clinical Investigation dual-degree (MD/MSCI) program. This 5-year program dedicates 1 year to coursework and biomedical research, followed by a medical school/research overlap year, to prepare students for academic research careers. This paper details the MD/MSCI program's curriculum and approach to mentorship, describes the research/professional interests of students, and reports student productivity. In the first 4 years of the program (2010-2014) 20 students were matriculated; 7 (35%) were women, and 12 (60%) research projects were in surgical specialties. To date, 14 students have applied to residency, and half pursued surgical residency programs. Our students have produced 68 accepted abstracts, 15 abstracts in submission, 38 accepted papers, and 24 papers in submission. Despite the time-limited nature of this program, additional training in research design and implementation has promoted a high level of productivity. We conclude that dual-degree training in medicine and translational research is feasible for medical students and allows for meaningful participation in valuable projects. Follow-up is warranted to evaluate the academic trajectory of these students. PMID:26365704

  20. Effect of Clinically Discriminating, Evidence-Based Checklist Items on the Reliability of Scores from an Internal Medicine Residency OSCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Vijay J.; Bordage, Georges; Gierl, Mark J.; Yudkowsky, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) are used worldwide for summative examinations but often lack acceptable reliability. Research has shown that reliability of scores increases if OSCE checklists for medical students include only clinically relevant items. Also, checklists are often missing evidence-based items that high-achieving…