WorldWideScience

Sample records for clinical medical education

  1. Medical simulation-based education improves medicos' clinical skills

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhaoming; Liu, Qiaoyu; Wang, Hai

    2012-01-01

    Clinical skill is an essential part of clinical medicine and plays quite an important role in bridging medicos and physicians. Due to the realities in China, traditional medical education is facing many challenges. There are few opportunities for students to practice their clinical skills and their dexterities are generally at a low level. Medical simulation-based education is a new teaching modality and helps to improve medicos' clinical skills to a large degree. Medical simulation-based edu...

  2. Simulation-based medical education in clinical skills laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Akaike, Masashi; Fukutomi, Miki; Nagamune, Masami; Fujimoto, Akiko; Tsuji, Akiko; Ishida, Kazuko; Iwata, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Clinical skills laboratories have been established in medical institutions as facilities for simulation-based medical education (SBME). SBME is believed to be superior to the traditional style of medical education from the viewpoint of the active and adult learning theories. SBME can provide a learning cycle of debriefing and feedback for learners as well as evaluation of procedures and competency. SBME offers both learners and patients a safe environment for practice and error. In a full-env...

  3. Andragogy in clinical medicine: implications for medical educators

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Geetha Mani; Dr. Raja Danasekaran; Dr. Jegadeesh Ramasamy

    2014-01-01

    In Medical education, the final desired outcome is to prepare the students to meet the challenges in delivering health care to individuals and the community in the most competent and professional manner. Application of Andragogy in medical education especially clinical medicine will enrich the learning experience of students with respect to diagnosing their needs, acquiring knowledge, skills and appropriate attitudes. Various strategies such as problem based learning, clinically associated te...

  4. Simulation-based medical education in clinical skills laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaike, Masashi; Fukutomi, Miki; Nagamune, Masami; Fujimoto, Akiko; Tsuji, Akiko; Ishida, Kazuko; Iwata, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Clinical skills laboratories have been established in medical institutions as facilities for simulation-based medical education (SBME). SBME is believed to be superior to the traditional style of medical education from the viewpoint of the active and adult learning theories. SBME can provide a learning cycle of debriefing and feedback for learners as well as evaluation of procedures and competency. SBME offers both learners and patients a safe environment for practice and error. In a full-environment simulation, learners can obtain not only technical skills but also non-technical skills, such as leadership, team work, communication, situation awareness, decision-making, and awareness of personal limitations. SBME is also effective for integration of clinical medicine and basic medicine. In addition, technology-enhanced simulation training is associated with beneficial effects for outcomes of knowledge, skills, behaviors, and patient-related outcomes. To perform SBME, effectively, not only simulators including high-fidelity mannequin-type simulators or virtual-reality simulators but also full-time faculties and instructors as professionals of SBME are essential in a clinical skills laboratory for SBME. Clinical skills laboratory is expected to become an integrated medical education center to achieve continuing professional development, integrated learning of basic and clinical medicine, and citizens' participation and cooperation in medical education. PMID:22449990

  5. Andragogy in clinical medicine: implications for medical educators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Geetha Mani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In Medical education, the final desired outcome is to prepare the students to meet the challenges in delivering health care to individuals and the community in the most competent and professional manner. Application of Andragogy in medical education especially clinical medicine will enrich the learning experience of students with respect to diagnosing their needs, acquiring knowledge, skills and appropriate attitudes. Various strategies such as problem based learning, clinically associated teaching, critical reflection, role modeling and constructive feedback can be used to enhance the students’ competence and inculcate professionalism among the students.

  6. Educational climate seems unrelated to leadership skills of clinical consultants responsible of postgraduate medical education in clinical departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malling, Bente Vigh; Mortensen, Lene S.; Scherpbier, Albert J J;

    2010-01-01

    The educational climate is crucial in postgraduate medical education. Although leaders are in the position to influence the educational climate, the relationship between leadership skills and educational climate is unknown. This study investigates the relationship between the educational climate in...... clinical departments and the leadership skills of clinical consultants responsible for education....

  7. Educational climate seems unrelated to leadership skills of clinical consultants responsible of postgraduate medical education in clinical departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malling, Bente Vigh; Mortensen, Lene Sundahl; Scherpbier, Albert J J;

    2010-01-01

    The educational climate is crucial in postgraduate medical education. Although leaders are in the position to influence the educational climate, the relationship between leadership skills and educational climate is unknown. This study investigates the relationship between the educational climate ...... clinical departments and the leadership skills of clinical consultants responsible for education.......The educational climate is crucial in postgraduate medical education. Although leaders are in the position to influence the educational climate, the relationship between leadership skills and educational climate is unknown. This study investigates the relationship between the educational climate in...

  8. Educational climate seems unrelated to leadership skills of clinical consultants responsible of postgraduate medical education in clinical departments

    OpenAIRE

    Scherpbier Albert JJ; Mortensen Lene S; Malling Bente; Ringsted Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The educational climate is crucial in postgraduate medical education. Although leaders are in the position to influence the educational climate, the relationship between leadership skills and educational climate is unknown. This study investigates the relationship between the educational climate in clinical departments and the leadership skills of clinical consultants responsible for education. Methods The study was a trans-sectional correlation study. The educational clim...

  9. Ideological and political education for clinical graduates on the basis of medical characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-chuan JING

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Along with the reform of medical system, medical education in China is also undergoing great changes. Due to the special characteristics of medical education, it differs from other educational characteristics. It carries with the characteristics of clinical practice on the basis distributed learning, physical and mental development along with ages, enrollment expansion and medical requirement, and standardization training for resident doctors. So, ideological and political education of clinical graduates showed many new characteristics. First, medical ethics education is the basic step, combined with the related disciplines of medical humanity connotation. Second, flexible and diversified form of ideological and political education on the basis of medical work is necessary. Third, establish a system of ideological and political education for clinical graduates, to build up new education concept, and to develop ideological and political education activities for clinical graduates in depth.

  10. Advancing Medication Reconciliation in an Outpatient Internal Medicine Clinic through a Pharmacist-Led Educational Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah M. Westberg, Pharm.D.; Kathrine Beeksma, R.N.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To develop and deliver an effective pharmacist-led educational initiative to clinic staff to advance medication reconciliation in the electronic medical record of an outpatient internal medicine clinic.Methods: An educational initiative designed to improve the ability of nursing staff in medication reconciliation was launched in the outpatient internal medicine clinic of a regional healthcare system. The education was provided by the pharmacist to clinic nursing staff, includ...

  11. Educational climate seems unrelated to leadership skills of clinical consultants responsible of postgraduate medical education in clinical departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scherpbier Albert JJ

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The educational climate is crucial in postgraduate medical education. Although leaders are in the position to influence the educational climate, the relationship between leadership skills and educational climate is unknown. This study investigates the relationship between the educational climate in clinical departments and the leadership skills of clinical consultants responsible for education. Methods The study was a trans-sectional correlation study. The educational climate was investigated by a survey among all doctors (specialists and trainees in the departments. Leadership skills of the consultants responsible for education were measured by multi-source feedback scores from heads of departments, peer consultants, and trainees. Results Doctors from 42 clinical departments representing 21 specialties participated. The response rate of the educational climate investigation was moderate 52% (420/811, Response rate was high in the multisource-feedback process 84.3% (420/498. The educational climate was scored quite high mean 3.9 (SD 0.3 on a five-point Likert scale. Likewise the leadership skills of the clinical consultants responsible for education were considered good, mean 5.4 (SD 0.6 on a seven-point Likert scale. There was no significant correlation between the scores concerning the educational climate and the scores on leadership skills, r = 0.17 (p = 0.29. Conclusions This study found no relation between the educational climate and the leadership skills of the clinical consultants responsible for postgraduate medical education in clinical departments with the instruments used. Our results indicate that consultants responsible for education are in a weak position to influence the educational climate in the clinical department. Further studies are needed to explore, how heads of departments and other factors related to the clinical organisation could influence the educational climate.

  12. An E-Learning Module for Clinical Skills Training In Undergraduate Medical Education

    OpenAIRE

    Gürpınar, Erol; Alimoğlu, M. Kemal; Esin KULAÇ; Nacar, Melis; Budakoğlu, Işıl İrem; Karaoğlu, Nazan; Yılmaz, Nilüfer Demiral; Öncü, Selcen; Taşkıran, Cahit; Çalışkan, Ayhan; GÖNÜLLÜ, İpek; ONAN, Arif; Mamaklı, Sümer

    2012-01-01

    Eighty three medical education programs are offered in our country. Department of Medical Education exists in 33 medical schools. Forty-seven medical schools have Clinical Skills Training Laboratory. Mastery learning is targeted in Clinical Skills Training Laboratory which means that each student achieve required mastery level at completion of training. However students may loose their competence in time if they do not re-study or apply the skill immediately after training. The aim ...

  13. Advancing Medication Reconciliation in an Outpatient Internal Medicine Clinic through a Pharmacist-Led Educational Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Westberg, Pharm.D.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To develop and deliver an effective pharmacist-led educational initiative to clinic staff to advance medication reconciliation in the electronic medical record of an outpatient internal medicine clinic.Methods: An educational initiative designed to improve the ability of nursing staff in medication reconciliation was launched in the outpatient internal medicine clinic of a regional healthcare system. The education was provided by the pharmacist to clinic nursing staff, including registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and certified medical assistants. The impact of this training was measured through pre-initiation and post-implementation surveys, competency assessments and an audit. Results: The educational initiative was successfully designed and delivered to clinic nursing staff. Assessment of the initiative found that all nursing staff completing competency assessments successfully passed. Pre-initiation- and post-implementation- survey responses on the self-assessed ability to gather and document accurate medication lists did not show significant changes. Informal observations in the clinic indicated that this initiative changed the culture of the clinic, creating increased awareness of the importance of accurate medications and increased emphasis on medication reconciliation.Conclusions: The expertise of pharmacists can be utilized to educate nursing staff on the skills and abilities necessary to gather and document accurate medication lists. This study did not find measurable changes in the accuracy of medication lists in this clinic. Future research is needed to determine the best methods to train health professionals in medication reconciliation to ensure accurate medication lists in the outpatient setting.

  14. Breadth versus volume: Neurology outpatient clinic cases in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Dara V; Blood, Angela D; Park, Yoon Soo; Brorson, James R; Lukas, Rimas V

    2016-06-01

    This study examined how volume in certain patient case types and breadth across patient case types in the outpatient clinic setting are related to Neurology Clerkship student performance. Case logs from the outpatient clinic experience of 486 students from The University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, USA, participating in the 4week Neurology Clerkship from July 2008 to June 2013 were reviewed. A total of 12,381 patient encounters were logged and then classified into 13 diagnostic categories. How volume of cases within categories and the breadth of cases across categories relate to the National Board of Medical Examiners Clinical Subject Examination for Neurology and a Neurology Clerkship Objective Structured Clinical Examination was analyzed. Volume of cases was significantly correlated with the National Board of Medical Examiners Clinical Subject Examination for Neurology (r=.290, plearning experiences. PMID:26896906

  15. The Clinical Data Repository: A Challenge to Medical Student Education

    OpenAIRE

    Altman, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The implementation of comprehensive clinical data repositories carries implications for the medical informatics curriculum for pre-MD medical students. There is the risk that electronic health records will detract from students’ acquisition of basic skills in inquiry and information management. It is possible, however, to create an application within the data repositories that will provide students with opportunities to practice their skills as they follow the evaluation and management of pat...

  16. Transforming the Academic Faculty Perspective in Graduate Medical Education to Better Align Educational and Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Brian M; Holmboe, Eric S

    2016-04-01

    The current health care delivery model continues to fall short in achieving the desired patient safety and quality-of-care outcomes for patients. And, until recently, an explicit acknowledgment of the role and influence of the clinical learning environment on professional development had been missing from physician-based competency frameworks. In this Perspective, the authors explore the implications of the insufficient integration of education about patient safety and quality improvement by academic faculty into the clinical learning environment in many graduate medical education (GME) programs, and the important role that academic faculty need to play to better align the educational and clinical contexts to improve both learner and patient outcomes. The authors propose a framework that closely aligns the educational and clinical contexts, such that both educational and clinical outcomes are centered around the patient. This will require a reorganization of academic faculty perspective and educational design of GME training programs that recognizes that (1) the dynamic interplay between the faculty, learner, training program, and clinical microsystem ultimately influences the quality of physician that emerges from the training program and environment, and (2) patient outcomes relate to the quality of education and the success of clinical microsystems. To enable this evolution, there is a need to revisit the core competencies expected of academic faculty, implement innovative faculty development strategies, examine closely faculty's current clinical super vision practices, and establish a training environment that supports bridging from clinician to educator, training program to clinical microsystem, and educational outcomes to clinical outcomes that benefit patients. PMID:26703412

  17. Roles and Responsibilities, and Education and Training Requirements for Clinically Qualified Medical Physicists (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication addresses the shortfall of well trained and clinically qualified medical physicists working in radiation medicine. The roles, responsibilities and clinical training requirements of medical physicists have not always been well defined or well understood by health care professionals, health authorities and regulatory agencies. To fill this gap, this publication provides recommendations for the academic education and clinical training of clinically qualified medical physicists, including recommendations for their accreditation certification and registration, along with continuous professional development. The goal is to establish criteria that support the harmonization of education and clinical training worldwide

  18. Quality of Ambulatory Education from the Viewpoint of the Clinical Medical Students at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Niroumand

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ambulatory education is an integral part of medical education. The present study was carried out to evaluate the quality of ambulatory education from the viewpoint of clinical medical students at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, the study sample included medical externs externs and interns of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences that were selected through census sampling technique in the academic year 2012-2013. The instrument for data collection was a researcher-made questionnaire with acceptable validity and reliability. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS-16 software using descriptive statistics. Results: 65 (50% externs and 75 (65% interns participated in the study and 1588 questionnaires were completed via self-administered technique. The mean of the teachers’ quality of ambulatory education at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences was 22.6±5.2 and the mean for the clinics’ quality of physical environment was 19±5.13, indicating favorable and semi-favorable status, respectively. Qualitative evaluation of ambulatory education from the viewpoint of externs and interns showed a significant difference with more satisfaction from the part of the interns (p<0.001. Conclusion: The findings revealed that the teachers’ quality of ambulatory education at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences was favorable, but the physical condition of the clinics indicated a semi-favorable status.

  19. A model to begin to use clinical outcomes in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haan, Constance K; Edwards, Fred H; Poole, Betty; Godley, Melissa; Genuardi, Frank J; Zenni, Elisa A

    2008-06-01

    The latest phase of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Outcome Project challenges graduate medical education (GME) programs to select meaningful clinical quality indicators by which to measure trainee performance and progress, as well as to assess and improve educational effectiveness of programs. The authors describe efforts to measure educational quality, incorporating measurable patient-care outcomes to guide improvement. University of Florida College of Medicine-Jacksonville education leaders developed a tiered framework for selecting clinical indicators whose outcomes would illustrate integration of the ACGME competencies and their assessment with learning and clinical care. In order of preference, indicators selected should align with a specialty's (1) national benchmarked consensus standards, (2) national specialty society standards, (3) standards of local, institutional, or regional quality initiatives, or (4) top-priority diagnostic and/or therapeutic categories for the specialty, based on areas of high frequency, impact, or cost. All programs successfully applied the tiered process to clinical indicator selection and then identified data sources to track clinical outcomes. Using clinical outcomes in resident evaluation assesses the resident's performance as reflective of his or her participation in the health care delivery team. Programmatic improvements are driven by clinical outcomes that are shown to be below benchmark across the residents. Selecting appropriate clinical indicators-representative of quality of care and of graduate medical education-is the first step toward tracking educational outcomes using clinical data as the basis for evaluation and improvement. This effort is an important aspect of orienting trainees to using data for monitoring and improving care processes and outcomes throughout their careers. PMID:18520464

  20. Roles and Responsibilities, and Education and Training Requirements for Clinically Qualified Medical Physicists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA technical cooperation project Strengthening Medical Physics in Radiation Medicine was approved by the IAEA Board of Governors for the period 2009-2013 with the aim of ensuring the safe and effective diagnosis and treatment of patients. The IAEA, together with the World Health Organization and stakeholders from numerous medical physics professional societies worldwide, including the International Organization for Medical Physics (IOMP), the European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), the Latin American Medical Physics Association, the Asia-Oceania Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics, the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology, the European Commission and the International Radiation Protection Association, as well as regional counterparts from Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America, met in Vienna in May 2009 to plan and coordinate the new project. A shortage of clinically qualified medical physicists (CQMPs), insufficient education and training (especially properly organized and coordinated clinical training), and lack of professional recognition were identified as the main problems to be addressed under this project. This publication was developed under the project framework in response to these findings. It aims, first, at defining appropriately and unequivocally the roles and responsibilities of a CQMP in specialties of medical physics related to the use of ionizing radiation, such as radiation therapy, nuclear medicine, and diagnostic and interventional radiology. Important, non-ionizing radiation imaging specialties, such as magnetic resonance and ultrasound, are also considered for completeness. On the basis of these tasks, this book provides recommended minimum requirements for the academic education and clinical training of CQMPs, including recommendations for their accreditation, certification and registration, along with continuing professional development

  1. Roles and Responsibilities, and Education and Training Requirements for Clinically Qualified Medical Physicists (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA technical cooperation project Strengthening Medical Physics in Radiation Medicine was approved by the IAEA Board of Governors for the period 2009-2013 with the aim of ensuring the safe and effective diagnosis and treatment of patients. The IAEA, together with the World Health Organization and stakeholders from numerous medical physics professional societies worldwide, including the International Organization for Medical Physics (IOMP), the European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), the Latin American Medical Physics Association, the Asia-Oceania Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics, the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology, the European Commission and the International Radiation Protection Association, as well as regional counterparts from Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America, met in Vienna in May 2009 to plan and coordinate the new project. A shortage of clinically qualified medical physicists (CQMPs), insufficient education and training (especially properly organized and coordinated clinical training), and lack of professional recognition were identified as the main problems to be addressed under this project. This publication was developed under the project framework in response to these findings. It aims, first, at defining appropriately and unequivocally the roles and responsibilities of a CQMP in specialties of medical physics related to the use of ionizing radiation, such as radiation therapy, nuclear medicine, and diagnostic and interventional radiology. Important, non-ionizing radiation imaging specialties, such as magnetic resonance and ultrasound, are also considered for completeness. On the basis of these tasks, this book provides recommended minimum requirements for the academic education and clinical training of CQMPs, including recommendations for their accreditation, certification and registration, along with continuing professional development

  2. Initial experience of the medical clinic of the education Casmu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: What happens when a patient (p te) is faced once treatment Q T? We know that for p te involves both how their family; face a charge of myths and half-truths; causing the treatment is so vivid apprehension as the disease itself. In this context the concern of the Department of Oncology Casmu arises; of give patients an area where the p te to receive information contribute to reaching the treatment of Q T in better condition. All patients will start treatment Q T for the first time; are cited for an interview at the Polyclinic of Education. It is coordinated delayed with respect to the talks with the Treating oncologist, in order to allow the patient to develop their doubts and to raise them. In the interview also involved the p te and his family, Oncology Residents Department, and a member of Campus Nursing thereof. the interview is divided into five modules: 1) Administrative Aspects 2) Nursing Care 3) Potential side effects. 4) Social Benefits 5) Resources Information. Between January 2003 and August 2004, 70 interviews were conducted education. the average length thereof was 30 minutes. Is in progress writing a brochure based on the questions most frequently asked by patients and their families; well as an evaluation of the experience

  3. Professional approaches in clinical judgements among senior and junior doctors: implications for medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilhammar Ewa

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical experience has traditionally been highly valued in medical education and clinical healthcare. On account of its multi-faceted nature, clinical experience is mostly difficult to articulate, and is mainly expressed in clinical situations as professional approaches. Due to retirement, hospitals in Scandinavia will soon face a substantial decrease in the number of senior specialist doctors, and it has been discussed whether healthcare will suffer an immense loss of experienced-based knowledge when this senior group leaves the organization. Both senior specialists and junior colleagues are often involved in clinical education, but the way in which these two groups vary in professional approaches and contributions to clinical education has not been so well described. Cognitive psychology has contributed to the understanding of how experience may influence professional approaches, but such studies have not included the effect of differences in position and responsibilities that junior and senior doctors hold in clinical healthcare. In the light of the discussion above, it is essential to describe the professional approaches of senior doctors in relation to those of their junior colleagues. This study therefore aims to describe and compare the professional approaches of junior and senior doctors when making clinical judgements. Methods Critical incident technique was used in interviews with nine senior doctors and nine junior doctors in internal medicine. The interviews were subjected to qualitative content analysis. Result Senior and junior doctors expressed a variety of professional approaches in clinical judgement as follows: use of theoretical knowledge, use of prior experience of cases and courses of events, use of ethical and moral values, meeting and communicating with the patient, focusing on available information, relying on their own ability, getting support and guidance from others and being directed by the

  4. The research and practice based on the full-time visitation model in clinical medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the higher medical colleges and universities teaching hospital carry certain clinical teaching tasks, but the traditional teaching pattern of "two stage", including the early stage of the theory of teaching, the late arrangement of clinical practice, had some drawbacks such as practice time is too concentrated and the chasm between students' theory and practice. It is suggested that students contact clinical diagnosis and treatment earlier, visit more patients and increase the ratio of visitation and course. But as more and more students flood into university, clinical visitation has turned into a difficulty to improve students’ ability. To resolve this problem, we have made some efficient practice and exploration in Rizhao City People's Hospital from September 2005 to July 2014. The students were divided into full-time visitation model group and “two stage” pattern group randomly. The single factors are of great difference between the two groups. The full-time visitation model in clinical medical education builds a new mode of practice of clinical practice teaching in the medical stuents' concept of doctor-patient communication, humanistic care to patients, basic theoretical knowledge, clinical practice skills and graduate admission rate increased significantly. Continuous improvement of OSCE exam is needed to make evaluation more scientific, objective and fair.

  5. "Unwell while Aboriginal": iatrogenesis in Australian medical education and clinical case management

    OpenAIRE

    Ewen SC; Hollinsworth D

    2016-01-01

    Shaun C Ewen,1 David Hollinsworth2 1Melbourne Poche Centre for Indigenous Health, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, 2Indigenous Studies, Faculty of Arts, Business and Law, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, QLD, Australia Introduction: Attention to Aboriginal health has become mandatory in Australian medical education. In parallel, clinical management has increasingly used Aboriginality as an identifier in both de...

  6. "Unwell while Aboriginal": iatrogenesis in Australian medical education and clinical case management

    OpenAIRE

    Ewen, Shaun

    2016-01-01

    Shaun C Ewen,1 David Hollinsworth2 1Melbourne Poche Centre for Indigenous Health, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, 2Indigenous Studies, Faculty of Arts, Business and Law, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, QLD, Australia Introduction: Attention to Aboriginal health has become mandatory in Australian medical education. In parallel, clinical management has increasingly used Aboriginality as an identifier in bot...

  7. Clinical skills training in undergraduate medical education using a student-centered approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolsgaard, Martin Grønnebæk

    2013-01-01

    professors. This study showed that student teachers performed as good as or even better than associate professors when teaching simple clinical skills. The second study of this thesis examined how complex clinical skills--such as patient management skills--develop with increasing levels of competence. The...... practicing in pairs significantly out-performed those training alone using RIME-based assessments and that dyad training significantly improved students' confidence in managing future patient encounters. The final study examined students' use of self-directed clinical encounter cards (CECs) based on the RIME......This thesis focuses on how to engage students in self-directed learning and in peer-learning activities to improve clinical skills training in undergraduate medical education. The first study examined the clinical skills teaching provided by student teachers compared to that provided by associate...

  8. Feedback is good or bad? Medical residents’ points of view on feedback in clinical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEILA BAZRAFKAN

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Feedback is very important in education and can help quality in the training process and orient the trainees in clinical contexts. This study aimed to assess the residents’ points of view about feedback in clinical education at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: The sample of this study included 170 medical residents attending medical workshops in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. The residents filled a valid and reliable questionnaire containing 21 items on their perceptions of the feedback they got throughout the workshops. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 14. Results: The study revealed that residents, generally, have a positive perception of feedback in their training. The highest score belonged to the items such as “feedback was applicable to future work”, “feedback corrected my behavior”, “feedback worked as a motivation for education” and “feedback was specific in one subject”. Residents who had a negative feedback experience also increased their efforts to learn. The Surgery residents acquired the highest scores while radiology residents got the lowest. The difference between these groups was statistically significant (P = 0.000. Conclusion: The highest mean score belonged to internal medicine residents. This shows that residents believe that obstetrics & gynecology ward is a ward in which the formative assessment is much more powerful in comparison to the other three major wards. The surgery ward received the lowest score for formative assessment and this shows that the feedback in surgery ward is very low.

  9. "Unwell while Aboriginal": iatrogenesis in Australian medical education and clinical case management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewen SC

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Shaun C Ewen,1 David Hollinsworth2 1Melbourne Poche Centre for Indigenous Health, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, 2Indigenous Studies, Faculty of Arts, Business and Law, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, QLD, Australia Introduction: Attention to Aboriginal health has become mandatory in Australian medical education. In parallel, clinical management has increasingly used Aboriginality as an identifier in both decision making and reporting of morbidity and mortality. This focus is applauded in light of the gross inequalities in health outcomes between indigenous people and other Australians. Methods: A purposive survey of relevant Australian and international literature was conducted to map the current state of play and identify concerns with efforts to teach cultural competence with Aboriginal people in medical schools and to provide “culturally appropriate” clinical care. The authors critically analyzed this literature in light of their experiences in teaching Aboriginal studies over six decades in many universities to generate examples of iatrogenic effects and possible responses. Results and discussion: Understanding how to most effectively embed Aboriginal content and perspectives in curriculum and how to best teach and assess these remains contested. This review canvasses these debates, arguing that well-intentioned efforts in medical education and clinical management can have iatrogenic impacts. Given the long history of racialization of Aboriginal people in Australian medicine and the relatively low levels of routine contact with Aboriginal people among students and clinicians, the review urges caution in compounding these iatrogenic effects and proposes strategies to combat or reduce them. Conclusion: Long overdue efforts to recognize gaps and inadequacies in medical education about Aboriginal people and their health and to provide equitable health services

  10. SIMULATION IN MEDICAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge L. Palés Argullós

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In last twenty years, we are seeing increasingly widespread use of simulations in the training of doctors and other professionals of health sciences at the different stages of their educational continuum (undergraduate, postgraduate and continuing medical education. So much so that the concept of simulations-based medical education has emerged and it is now recognized as a vital tool to ensure the learning of medical students and doctors, and to improve patient safety. This article will describe the reasons for the introduction and development of this new methodology, its advantages and the different models and currently available resources. We will describe also the characteristics of so-called simulation centres or clinical skills laboratories that have been developed worldwide, where the simulation-based medical education take place. Moreover, we will refer briefly to the situation in our country and finally to the principles of a good development of the simulation-based medical education.

  11. Mini clinical evaluation exercise in undergraduate dermatovenereology education: an experience of University of Pamukkale, Medical Faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şeniz Ergin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Mini Clinical Evaluation Exercise (Mini-CEX is being widely used in medical education and is a reliable and valid method for the assessment of residents’ competency in medical interviewing, physical examination, humanistic qualities/professionalism, clinical judgment, counseling skills, organization, and efficiency. In order to enhance formative evaluation methods in our faculty, we planned to apply the method to students on dermatovenereology training. Materials and Methods: The Mini-CEX was performed by residents to 42 medical students. At first, 5 residents were evaluated by a faculty member with Mini-CEX and were informed about their application-oriented evaluator roles. The students were informed prior to conducting the assessment. Standard Mini-CEX form was used for the assessment. The participants were rated in 7 competencies and each was rated using a 9-point Likert scale. At the end of each encounter, students and evaluators rated their satisfaction with Mini-CEX using a 9-point Likert scale. Student’s t-test and one-way ANOVA were used for statistical analysis. Student feedback was evaluated with “grounded theory”. Results: A total of 50 assessments, 44 in outpatient and 6 in inpatient clinic, were performed. Satisfaction with the Mini-CEX was rated by the evaluators and the students as 7,16 and 7,98, respectively. There was no significant difference between the evaluators in terms of student satisfaction. Average time spent on observing the encounter and in giving feedback was 16.5 and 6.5 minutes, respectively. There was no significant difference between assessors in terms of time spent observing and giving feedback. Average scores of assessed clinical competencies were between 4,28 and 8,14. The highest scores were reported on humanistic qualities/ professionalism whereas the lowest were reported on clinical judgment skills. Discussion: According to our data, we believe that Mini-CEX may be used as an

  12. Prescription Writing in Small Groups as a Clinical Pharmacology Educational Intervention: Perceptions of Preclerkship Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Henry; Tayem, Yasin I Y; Al Khaja, K A J; Veeramuthu, Sindhan; Sequeira, Reginald P

    2016-08-01

    Medical students do not perform well in writing prescriptions, and the 3 variables-learner, teacher, and instructional method-are held responsible to various degrees. The objective of this clinical pharmacology educational intervention was to improve medical students' perceptions, motivation, and participation in prescription-writing sessions. The study participants were second-year medical students of the College of Medicine and Medical Sciences of the Arabian Gulf University, Bahrain. Two prescription-writing sessions were conducted using clinical case scenarios based on problems the students had studied as part of the problem-based learning curriculum. At the end of the respiratory system subunit, the training was conducted in small groups, each facilitated by a tutor. At the end of the cardiovascular system subunit, the training was conducted in a traditional large-group classroom setting. Data were collected with the help of a questionnaire at the end of each session and a focus group discussion. A majority of the students (95.3% ± 2.4%) perceived the small-group method better for teaching and learning of all aspects of prescription writing: analyzing the clinical case scenario, applying clinical pharmacology knowledge for therapeutic reasoning, using a formulary for searching relevant prescribing information, and in writing a complete prescription. Students also endorsed the small-group method for better interaction among themselves and with the tutor and for the ease of asking questions and clarifying doubts. In view of the principles of adult learning, where motivation and interaction are important, teaching and learning prescription writing in small groups deserve a serious consideration in medical curricula. PMID:26677798

  13. Novel Longitudinal and Propensity Score Matched Analysis of Hands-On Cooking and Nutrition Education versus Traditional Clinical Education among 627 Medical Students

    OpenAIRE

    Dominique J. Monlezun; Benjamin Leong; Esther Joo; Andrew G. Birkhead; Leah Sarris; Harlan, Timothy S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Physicians are inadequately equipped to respond to the global obesity and nutrition-associated chronic disease epidemics. We investigated superiority of simulation-based medical education with deliberate practice (SBME-DP) hands-on cooking and nutrition elective in a medical school-based teaching kitchen versus traditional clinical education for medical students. Materials and Methods. A 59-question panel survey was distributed to an entire medical school twice annually from Septe...

  14. Global medical education partnerships to expand specialty expertise: a case report on building neurology clinical and research capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Kaddumukasa, Mark; Katabira, Elly; Salata, Robert A.; Costa, Marco A.; Ddumba, Edward; Furlan, Anthony; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Kamya, Moses R.; Kayima, James; Longenecker, Chris T.; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Mondo, Charles; Moore, Shirley; Pundik, Svetlana; Sewankambo, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Background Neurological disorders are a common cause of morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan African, but resources for their management are scarce. Collaborations between training institutions in developed and resource-limited countries can be a successful model for supporting specialty medical education and increasing clinical and research capacity. Case report This report describes a US National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) to enhance ...

  15. Preparation courses for medical clerkships and the final clinical internship in medical education – The Magdeburg Curriculum for Healthcare Competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spura, Anke

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Goals: Supporting medical students entering their internships – the clinical clerkship and the internship “final clinical year” (Praktisches Jahr, PJ – the seminars “Ready for Clerkship” and “Ready for PJ” were held for the first time in 2014 and continued successfully in 2015. These seminars are part of the “Magdeburg Curriculum for Healthcare Competence” (Magdeburger Curriculum zur Versorgungskompetenz, MCV. The concept comprises three main issues: “Understanding interdisciplinary clinical procedures”, “Interprofessional collaboration”, and “Individual cases and their reference to the system.” The aim of the seminar series is to prepare students as medical trainees for their role in the practice-oriented clinical clerkship and PJ, respectively.Methods: Quality assurance evaluations and didactic research are integral parts of the seminars. In preparation for the “Ready for PJ” seminar a needs assessment was conducted. The seminars were rated by the participants using an anonymized questionnaire consisting of a 5-choice Likert scale (ranging from 1=fully agree to 5=fully disagree and spaces for comments that was generated by the evaluation software Evasys.Results: The results are presented for the preparatory seminars “Ready for Clerkship” and “Fit für PJ” held in 2014 and 2015. Overall, the students regarded the facultative courses as very good preparation for the clerkship as well as for the PJ. The three-dimensional main curricular concept of the MCV was recognized in the evaluation as a valuable educational approach. Interprofessional collaboration, taught by instructors focussing in teamwork between disciplines, was scored positively and highly valued.Conclusions: The “Magdeburg Curriculum for Healthcare Competence” (MCV integrates clerkship and PJ in a framing educational concept and allows students a better appreciation of their role in patient care and the tasks that they will

  16. Preparation courses for medical clerkships and the final clinical internship in medical education – The Magdeburg Curriculum for Healthcare Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spura, Anke; Werwick, Katrin; Feißel, Annemarie; Gottschalk, Marc; Winkler-Stuck, Kirstin; Robra, Bernt-Peter; Braun-Dullaeus, Rüdiger C.; Stieger, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Background/Goals: Supporting medical students entering their internships – the clinical clerkship and the internship “final clinical year” (Praktisches Jahr, PJ) – the seminars “Ready for Clerkship” and “Ready for PJ” were held for the first time in 2014 and continued successfully in 2015. These seminars are part of the “Magdeburg Curriculum for Healthcare Competence” (Magdeburger Curriculum zur Versorgungskompetenz, MCV). The concept comprises three main issues: “Understanding interdisciplinary clinical procedures”, “Interprofessional collaboration”, and “Individual cases and their reference to the system.” The aim of the seminar series is to prepare students as medical trainees for their role in the practice-oriented clinical clerkship and PJ, respectively. Methods: Quality assurance evaluations and didactic research are integral parts of the seminars. In preparation for the “Ready for PJ” seminar a needs assessment was conducted. The seminars were rated by the participants using an anonymized questionnaire consisting of a 5-choice Likert scale (ranging from 1=fully agree to 5=fully disagree) and spaces for comments that was generated by the evaluation software Evasys. Results: The results are presented for the preparatory seminars “Ready for Clerkship” and “Fit für PJ” held in 2014 and 2015. Overall, the students regarded the facultative courses as very good preparation for the clerkship as well as for the PJ. The three-dimensional main curricular concept of the MCV was recognized in the evaluation as a valuable educational approach. Interprofessional collaboration, taught by instructors focussing in teamwork between disciplines, was scored positively and highly valued. Conclusions: The “Magdeburg Curriculum for Healthcare Competence” (MCV) integrates clerkship and PJ in a framing educational concept and allows students a better appreciation of their role in patient care and the tasks that they will face. The MCV

  17. Virtual Reality, Telemedicine, Web and Data Processing Innovations in Medical and Psychiatric Education and Clinical Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilty, Donald M.; Alverson, Dale C.; Alpert, Jonathan E.; Tong, Lowell; Sagduyu, Kemal; Boland, Robert J.; Mostaghimi, Arash; Leamon, Martin L.; Fidler, Don; Yellowlees, Peter M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This article highlights technology innovations in psychiatric and medical education, including applications from other fields. Method: The authors review the literature and poll educators and informatics faculty for novel programs relevant to psychiatric education. Results: The introduction of new technologies requires skill at…

  18. National Clinical Skills Competition: an effective simulation-based method to improve undergraduate medical education in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanchao Jiang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The National Clinical Skills Competition has been held in China for 5 consecutive years since 2010 to promote undergraduate education reform and improve the teaching quality. The effects of the simulation-based competition will be analyzed in this study. Methods: Participation in the competitions and the compilation of the questions used in the competition finals are summarized, and the influence and guidance quality are further analyzed. Through the nationwide distribution of questionnaires in medical colleges, the effects of the simulation-based competition on promoting undergraduate medical education reform were evaluated. Results: The results show that approximately 450 students from more than 110 colleges (accounting for 81% of colleges providing undergraduate clinical medical education in China participated in the competition each year. The knowledge, skills, and attitudes were comprehensively evaluated by simulation-based assessment. Eight hundred and eighty copies of the questionnaires were distributed to 110 participating medical schools in 2015. In total, 752 valid responses were received across 95 schools. The majority of the interviewees agreed or strongly agreed that competition promoted the adoption of advanced educational principles (76.8%, updated the curriculum model and instructional methods (79.8%, strengthened faculty development (84.0%, improved educational resources (82.1%, and benefited all students (53.4%. Conclusions: The National Clinical Skills Competition is widely accepted in China. It has effectively promoted the reform and development of undergraduate medical education in China.

  19. Mobile Learning in a Rural Medical School: Feasibility and Educational Benefits in Campus and Clinical Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra Nestel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Students in a new medical school were provided with laptops. This study explored the feasibility and educational benefits of mobile learning for two cohorts of students learning in two settings—university campus (first-year students and rural clinical placements (second-year students. Evaluation involved questionnaires, focus groups (faculty and students, and document analysis. Descriptive statistics were computed. Focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed, and analysed thematically. Response rates for questionnaires exceeded 84%. Compared with second-year students, significantly more first-year students (60% took their laptops to campus daily (P=0.14 and used their laptops for more hours each day (P=0.031. All students used laptops most frequently to access the internet (85% and 97% and applications (Microsoft Word (80% and 61% and Microsoft PowerPoint (80% and 63%. Focus groups with students revealed appreciation for the laptops but frustration with the initial software image. Focus groups with faculty identified enthusiasm for mobile learning but acknowledged its limitations. Physical infrastructure and information technology support influenced mobile learning. Document analysis revealed significant costs and issues with maintenance. If adequately resourced, mobile learning through university-issued laptops would be feasible and have educational benefits, including equitable access to learning resources, when and where they are needed. However, barriers remain for full implementation.

  20. Slow medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wear, Delese; Zarconi, Joseph; Kumagai, Arno; Cole-Kelly, Kathy

    2015-03-01

    Slow medical education borrows from other "slow" movements by offering a complementary orientation to medical education that emphasizes the value of slow and thoughtful reflection and interaction in medical education and clinical care. Such slow experiences, when systematically structured throughout the curriculum, offer ways for learners to engage in thoughtful reflection, dialogue, appreciation, and human understanding, with the hope that they will incorporate these practices throughout their lives as physicians. This Perspective offers several spaces in the medical curriculum where slowing down is possible: while reading and writing at various times in the curriculum and while providing clinical care, focusing particularly on conducting the physical exam and other dimensions of patient care. Time taken to slow down in these ways offers emerging physicians opportunities to more fully incorporate their experiences into a professional identity that embodies reflection, critical awareness, cultural humility, and empathy. The authors argue that these curricular spaces must be created in a very deliberate manner, even on busy ward services, throughout the education of physicians. PMID:25426738

  1. The role of peer-assisted learning in building evaluative judgement: opportunities in clinical medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Joanna Hong-Meng; Canny, Benedict J; Haines, Terry P; Molloy, Elizabeth K

    2016-08-01

    This study explored the contribution of peer-assisted learning (PAL) in the development of evaluative judgement capacity; the ability to understand work quality and apply those standards to appraising performance. The study employed a mixed methods approach, collecting self-reported survey data, observations of, and reflective interviews with, the medical students observed. Participants were in their first year of clinical placements. Data were thematically analysed. Students indicated that PAL contributed to both the comprehension of notions of quality, and the practice of making comparisons between a given performance and the standards. Emergent themes included peer story-telling, direct observation of performance, and peer-based feedback, all of which helped students to define 'work quality'. By participating in PAL, students were required to make comparisons, therefore using the standards of practice and gaining a deeper understanding of them. The data revealed tensions in that peers were seen as less threatening than supervisors with the advantage of increasing learners' appetites for thoughtful 'intellectual risk taking'. Despite this reported advantage of peer engagement, learners still expressed a preference for feedback from senior teachers as more trusted sources of clinical knowledge. While this study suggests that PAL already contributes to the development of evaluative judgement, further steps could be taken to formalise PAL in clinical placements to improve learners' capacity to make accurate judgements on the performance of self and others. Further experimental studies are necessary to confirm the best methods of using PAL to develop evaluative judgement. This may include both students and educators as instigators of PAL in the workplace. PMID:26662035

  2. The research and practice based on the full-time visitation model in clinical medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Hong Zhang(Department of Physics and Center for Quantum Spacetime (CQUeST), Sogang University, 35 Baekbeom-ro, Mapo-gu, Seoul, 121-742 Korea); Jing Leng; Shu-juan Xu; Zuofeng Zhang; Gangping Wang

    2015-01-01

    Most of the higher medical colleges and universities teaching hospital carry certain clinical teaching tasks, but the traditional teaching pattern of "two stage", including the early stage of the theory of teaching, the late arrangement of clinical practice, had some drawbacks such as practice time is too concentrated and the chasm between students' theory and practice. It is suggested that students contact clinical diagnosis and treatment earlier, visit more patients and increase the ratio o...

  3. Longitudinal PBL in Undergraduate Medical Education Develops Lifelong-Learning Habits and Clinical Competencies in Social Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Yumiko; Matsushita, Susumu; Takakuwa, Yuichi; Yoshioka, Toshimasa; Nitta, Kosaku

    2016-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is popular in medical education in Japan. We wished to understand the influence of PBL on the clinical competence of medical residents, using self-assessment and observer assessment. Tokyo Women's Medical University (TWMU) implemented PBL longitudinally (long-time) for four years, and on this basis we analyzed whether long-time PBL education is useful for clinical work. A self-assessment questionnaire was sent to junior and senior residents who were alumni of several schools, and an observation-based assessment questionnaire to senior doctors instructing them. Respondents were asked if they had used the PBL process in daily clinical tasks, and if so in what processes. Senior doctors were asked whether TWMU graduates perform differently from graduates of other schools. TWMU graduates answered "used a lot" and "used a little" with regard to PBL at significantly higher rates than other graduates. As useful points of PBL, they mentioned extracting clinical problems, solving clinical problems, self-directed leaning, positive attitude, collaboration with others, presentation, doctor-patient relations, self-assessment, and share the knowledge with doctors at lower levels and students. Observer assessments of TWMU graduates by senior doctors represented them as adaptive, good at presenting, good at listening to others' opinions, practical, selfish, and eager in their instructional practice. Longitudinal PBL can be a good educational method to develop lifelong-learning habits and clinical competencies especially in terms of the social aspect. PMID:26725844

  4. Achieving Educational Goals in Neurology Ward from the Viewpoint of Clinical Clerkship at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazanin Razazian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In medical education, setting goals for clinical clerkship is the responsibility of educational groups. Taking the students' opinions into account, it is possible to study the efficacy of education in terms of learning and achieving educational goals. (1In periodontics and restorative departments of Shahed and Tehran University of Medical Sciences, it is reported that, achieving educational goals is not poss-ible (2. Also, some studies have reported the inadequacy of educational objectives in anesthesia clerkship from the viewpoint of medical students (3. In this descriptive-analytic study, 166 medical students of neurology wards at Imam Reza Hospital in Kermanshah during 2011- 2012 were selected via a survey to study the achievement rate of educational goals. We used a questionnaire to collect data. Reliability of the questionnaire (including content and face validity was obtained via consulting with ten faculty members of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences.The mean age of the participants was 21.34 (±1.43 years. 60.5% of them were females. 3.6% were freshmen and 49.9% were sophomores. 79.5% knew the goals before the start of clinical clerkship and 76.5% took part in the justification session in which their responsibility and method of evaluation were presented. 78.3% of them received the emergency protocol of Neurology. Overall, the participants ranked the goal achievement as high (41.6%, well (45.2% and medium (23.3%. There was no statistically significantly association between achieving educational goals and age and clinical clerkship period. However, there was a statis¬tically significantly association between the increase rate of achieving educational goals and introducing the objectives at the beginning of clinical clerkship period (p=0.011, justification session at the beginning of clinical clerkship (p=0.019 being familiar with emergency protocols of Neurology (p=0.04 and the season (winter in comparison with fall and spring in

  5. 77 FR 41431 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request: Impact of Clinical Research Training and Medical Education...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-13

    ... more of the following points: (1) Evaluate whether the proposed collection of information is necessary..., evaluated by, and incorporated into the ongoing operational improvement efforts of the Director of the Office of Clinical Research Training and Education, and the Clinical Center Director. This...

  6. Classroom to Clinic: Merging Education and Research to Efficiently Prototype Medical Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Hanumara, Nevan C.; Begg, Nikolai D.; Walsh, Conor; Custer, David; Gupta, Rajiv; Osborn, Lynn R.; Slocum, Alexander H.

    2013-01-01

    Innovation in patient care requires both clinical and technical skills, and this paper presents the methods and outcomes of a nine-year, clinical-academic collaboration to develop and evaluate new medical device technologies, while teaching mechanical engineering. Together, over the course of a single semester, seniors, graduate students, and clinicians conceive, design, build, and test proof-of-concept prototypes. Projects initiated in the course have generated intellectual property and peer...

  7. [Research in medical education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringsted, Charlotte Vibeke

    2008-01-01

    Research in medical education is a relatively new discipline. Over the past 30 years, the discipline has experienced a tremendous growth, which is reflected in an increase in the number of publications in both medical education journals and medical science journals. However, recent reviews of...... articles on medical education studies indicate a need for improvement of the quality of medical education research in order to contribute to the advancement of educational practice as well as educational research. In particular, there is a need to embed studies in a conceptual theoretical framework...

  8. The Revolution in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Christina M; Cox, Susan M; Dalrymple, John L

    2016-02-01

    Medical education has been gradually evolving for hundreds of years, but educators are now seeking to identify ways to prepare students for the future of health care delivery. Medical education reform today focuses on creating entirely new models and is moving away from the traditional, post-Flexnerian organization of the medical school curriculum. Content is now being integrated thematically and presented along interdisciplinary lines with an interdigitation of basic and clinical sciences across all four years. Current trends indicate education should contain elements that produce a physician who is able to improve the quality of health care by taking a humanistic approach to medicine, thinks critically, and participates effectively in multidisciplinary and team approaches to patient care. Ultimately, medical education innovation should recognize the development of a physician is a lifetime process and will approach the formation of physicians from a new paradigm to better serve the educator and prepare the learner for the medical practice of tomorrow. PMID:26859376

  9. Community-based clinical education increases motivation of medical students to medicine of remote area : comparison between lecture and practice

    OpenAIRE

    TANI, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Harutaka; Tada, Saaya; Kondo, Saki; Tabata, Ryo; Yuasa, Shino; Kawaminami, Shingo; Nakanishi, Yoshinori; Ito, Jun; Shimizu, Nobuhiko; Obata, Fumiaki; Shin, Teruki; Bando, Hiroyasu; Kohno, Mitsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we administered a questionnaire to medical students to evaluate the effect of community-based clinical education on their attitudes to community medicine and medicine in remote area. Questionnaires were given 4 times to all the students from first-year to sixth-year. Of 95 students, 65 students (68.4%) who completed all questionnaires, were used in this study. The intensity of students’ attitudes was estimated by using visual analogue scale. The intensity of interest, a sens...

  10. How do Medical Radiation Science educators keep up with the [clinical] Joneses?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giles, Eileen [School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia)

    2014-06-15

    Medical radiation science (MRS) disciplines include medical imaging, radiation therapy and nuclear medicine. These allied health fields are technology driven and evolving rapidly with regard to imaging and treatment techniques within the clinical environment. This research aims to identify the activities academics are currently participating in to maintain clinical currency and offer strategies to support academics to connect with an ever-changing clinical environment. A cross-sectional designed survey was sampled across the nine Australian universities where MRS programmes are offered. The survey targeted academic teaching staff that were working in MRS programmes at the time of distribution (n ≈ 90). Enablers and barriers to maintaining clinical currency as well as support to participate in continuing professional development were rated by the respondents. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse quantitative data, and free-text comment responses were collated and themed. There were 38 responses to the survey (42%) and all three disciplines were represented. Responses highlighted activities valued by academics as contributing to their knowledge of current practice and as resources to inform their teaching. Positive elements included participating in clinical work and research, attending clinical sites and training days and attending scientific meetings. Common barriers identified by academics in this area were time constraints, workload allocation and employer/financial support. This research has identified that Australian MRS academics participate in a broad range of activities to inform their teaching and maintain knowledge of contemporary clinical practice. A connection with the clinical world is valued highly by academics, however, access and support to maintain that link is often a difficulty and as a result for MRS teaching staff keeping up with the clinical [MRS] Joneses is often a challenge.

  11. How do Medical Radiation Science educators keep up with the [clinical] Joneses?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medical radiation science (MRS) disciplines include medical imaging, radiation therapy and nuclear medicine. These allied health fields are technology driven and evolving rapidly with regard to imaging and treatment techniques within the clinical environment. This research aims to identify the activities academics are currently participating in to maintain clinical currency and offer strategies to support academics to connect with an ever-changing clinical environment. A cross-sectional designed survey was sampled across the nine Australian universities where MRS programmes are offered. The survey targeted academic teaching staff that were working in MRS programmes at the time of distribution (n ≈ 90). Enablers and barriers to maintaining clinical currency as well as support to participate in continuing professional development were rated by the respondents. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse quantitative data, and free-text comment responses were collated and themed. There were 38 responses to the survey (42%) and all three disciplines were represented. Responses highlighted activities valued by academics as contributing to their knowledge of current practice and as resources to inform their teaching. Positive elements included participating in clinical work and research, attending clinical sites and training days and attending scientific meetings. Common barriers identified by academics in this area were time constraints, workload allocation and employer/financial support. This research has identified that Australian MRS academics participate in a broad range of activities to inform their teaching and maintain knowledge of contemporary clinical practice. A connection with the clinical world is valued highly by academics, however, access and support to maintain that link is often a difficulty and as a result for MRS teaching staff keeping up with the clinical [MRS] Joneses is often a challenge

  12. Classroom to Clinic: Merging Education and Research to Efficiently Prototype Medical Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanumara, Nevan C; Begg, Nikolai D; Walsh, Conor; Custer, David; Gupta, Rajiv; Osborn, Lynn R; Slocum, Alexander H

    2013-01-01

    Innovation in patient care requires both clinical and technical skills, and this paper presents the methods and outcomes of a nine-year, clinical-academic collaboration to develop and evaluate new medical device technologies, while teaching mechanical engineering. Together, over the course of a single semester, seniors, graduate students, and clinicians conceive, design, build, and test proof-of-concept prototypes. Projects initiated in the course have generated intellectual property and peer-reviewed publications, stimulated further research, furthered student and clinician careers, and resulted in technology licenses and start-up ventures. PMID:27170859

  13. Classroom to Clinic: Merging Education and Research to Efficiently Prototype Medical Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, Nikolai D.; Walsh, Conor; Custer, David; Gupta, Rajiv; Osborn, Lynn R.; Slocum, Alexander H.

    2013-01-01

    Innovation in patient care requires both clinical and technical skills, and this paper presents the methods and outcomes of a nine-year, clinical-academic collaboration to develop and evaluate new medical device technologies, while teaching mechanical engineering. Together, over the course of a single semester, seniors, graduate students, and clinicians conceive, design, build, and test proof-of-concept prototypes. Projects initiated in the course have generated intellectual property and peer-reviewed publications, stimulated further research, furthered student and clinician careers, and resulted in technology licenses and start-up ventures.

  14. Beyond information retrieval and electronic health record use: competencies in clinical informatics for medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hersh WR

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available William R Hersh,1 Paul N Gorman,1 Frances E Biagioli,2 Vishnu Mohan,1 Jeffrey A Gold,3 George C Mejicano4 1Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology, 2Department of Family Medicine, 3Department of Medicine, 4School of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA Abstract: Physicians in the 21st century will increasingly interact in diverse ways with information systems, requiring competence in many aspects of clinical informatics. In recent years, many medical school curricula have added content in information retrieval (search and basic use of the electronic health record. However, this omits the growing number of other ways that physicians are interacting with information that includes activities such as clinical decision support, quality measurement and improvement, personal health records, telemedicine, and personalized medicine. We describe a process whereby six faculty members representing different perspectives came together to define competencies in clinical informatics for a curriculum transformation process occurring at Oregon Health & Science University. From the broad competencies, we also developed specific learning objectives and milestones, an implementation schedule, and mapping to general competency domains. We present our work to encourage debate and refinement as well as facilitate evaluation in this area. Keywords: curriculum transformation, clinical decision support, patient safety, health care quality, patient engagement

  15. Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine: an innovative approach to medical education and the training of physician investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishleder, Andrew J; Henson, Lindsey C; Hull, Alan L

    2007-04-01

    Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine (CCLCM) is an innovative, five-year medical education track within Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine (Case) with a focused mission to attract and educate a limited number of highly qualified persons who seek to become physician investigators. CCLCM curriculum governance, faculty appointments and promotions, and admissions committees are integrated with respective Case committees. The CCLCM curriculum is based on faculty-defined professional attributes that graduates are expected to develop. These attributes were used to create curricular and assessment principles that guided the development of an integrated basic science, clinical science, and research curriculum, conducted in an active learning environment. An organ-system approach is used to solidify an understanding of basic science discipline threads in the context of relevant clinical problems presented in PBL and case-based discussion formats. Clinical skills are introduced in the first year as part of the two-year longitudinal experience with a family practice or internal medicine physician. The research program provides all students with opportunities to learn and experience basic and translational research and clinical research before selecting a research topic for their 12- to 15-month master-level thesis project. All Case students participate in required and elective clinical curriculum after the second year, but CCLCM students return to the Cleveland Clinic on selected Friday afternoons for program-specific research and professionalism-learning activities. A unique portfolio-based assessment system is used to assess student achievements in nine competency areas, seven of which reflect the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies. PMID:17414197

  16. Professional medical education and genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmer, Laurie A; Waggoner, Darrel J

    2014-01-01

    Genomic medicine is a relatively new concept that involves using individual patients' genomic results in their clinical care. Genetic technology has advanced swiftly over the past decade, and most providers have been left behind without an understanding of this complex field. To realize its full potential, genomic medicine must be both understood and accepted by the greater medical community. The current state of professional medical education in genomics and genomic medicine is reviewed, including ongoing plans to expand educational efforts for medical students, clinical geneticists, and nongeneticist physicians. PMID:24635717

  17. Epidemiological, Clinical and Paraclinical Study of Hydatid Cysts in Three Educational Medical Centers in 10 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simindokht Shoaee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Echinococcosis or hydatidosis, caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus (E. granulosus, is an important public health problem in many areas of the world  and  Iran is a country of endemic situation for hydatidosis In the present study, we evaluated epidemiological, complications and clinical characteristics of hydatidosis at three University Medical Centers in Tehran over a 10-year period.Materials and Methods: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study performed in patients with hydatid cysts. Information about age, gender, number of cysts, organ involvement, morbidity and mortality and relapse were collected from medical records of hydatid patients. Paraclinic information such as CT Scan, MRI, ultrasound, complete blood count, pathological diagnosis and complication of disease were collected.Results: Overall, 81 patients, 35 (43.2% male and 46 (56.8% female, who were diagnosed as having hydatid cyst by clinical and radiological findings, with pathologic documentation were studied in three university medical center registries over a 10-year period (2003- 2012 in Tehran. Fourteen patients (17% of cases had complications resulting from this disease. Patients' age ranged from 5 to 86 years, and the peak prevalence of the disease was between 20 and 40 (34% of cases.Conclusion: Iran  is a country of endemic situation for hydatidosis. Prevalence rate of hydatidosis in Iran was reported to be 0.61-2 in 100000 populations. The highest  rate of infection and complications were in patients of 20-40 years age. Clinical examination revealed that abdominal pain was the most common complaint and was present in 51.7% of the cases. Other most common complain were cough, abdominal mass, dyspnea, icterus, chest pain, dyspepsia, back pain and seizure; and it was result of occupying effect of cysts in organs. This is similar with previous studies in Iran

  18. Research in medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Vassallo, Josanne

    2009-01-01

    The year 2009 saw a number of developments in Medical Education in Malta that were initiated as a result of a commitment to revising the medical curriculum in order to meet the challenges in medical education. A record number of students were admitted to the medical course in 2009. There is concern that eventually this exponential increase in admissions is not sustainable due to infrastructural, financial and human resource restraints. Meanwhile there has been a simultane...

  19. Medical education and society.

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    As health care changes under the pressures of restraint and constraint our vision of the future of medical education should be based on the medical school's responsibility to the community. The medical school is "an academy in the community": as an academy, it fosters the highest standards in education and research; as an institution in the community, it seeks to improve public health and alleviate suffering. The author argues that to better achieve these goals medical schools need to become ...

  20. Medical education in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgantopoulou, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to present an overview of current medical education in Greece. Greece has a centuries-long tradition in practising and teaching medicine. Medical training, although rigorous, is particularly humane. All Medical Schools in Modern Greece are currently, undergoing a series of changes in an effort to modernize training. The medical education system is also getting harmonized to European Standards for Higher Education, relating to Undergraduate, Postgraduate and Continuous Medical Education of doctors. A specific strength of the Greek educational system is its ethos that emphasises good working conditions and excellent support and supervision at all levels. The current overhauls in Higher Education occupy students, academics and the society at large. Political issues, such as accountability, regulation and autonomy of academia are generating debate. The two-cycle, Bachelor-Master, Undergraduate Model, as described in the Bologna Declaration is still to be implemented. Quality control measures are currently introduced in all academic sectors. PMID:19253151

  1. Undergraduate medical education in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenot, Jean-François

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to give international readers an overview of the organisation, structure and curriculum, together with important advances and problems, of undergraduate medical education in Germany. Interest in medical education in Germany has been relatively low but has gained momentum with the new "Regulation of the Licensing of Doctors" which came into effect in 2003. Medical education had required substantial reform, particularly with respect to improving the links between theoretical and clinical teaching and the extension of interdisciplinary and topic-related instruction. It takes six years and three months to complete the curriculum and training is divided into three sections: basic science (2 years, clinical science (3 years and final clinical year. While the reorganisation of graduate medical education required by the new "Regulation of the Licensing of Doctors" has stimulated multiple excellent teaching projects, there is evidence that some of the stipulated changes have not been implemented. Indeed, whether the medical schools have complied with this regulation and its overall success remains to be assessed systematically. Mandatory external accreditation and periodic reaccreditation of medical faculties need to be established in Germany.

  2. Measuring the impact of clinically relevant interprofessional education on undergraduate medical and nursing student competencies: A longitudinal mixed methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brashers, Valentina; Erickson, Jeanne M; Blackhall, Leslie; Owen, John A; Thomas, Shannon M; Conaway, Mark R

    2016-07-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) to improve collaborative competencies is essential for delivering high-quality care. Yet creating clinically relevant IPE and linking it to improvements in behaviours remains challenging, and few objective measurement instruments are available. We developed a process for creating IPE and objective observational tools through collaborative care best practice models (CCBPMs). These models describe the professional and interprofessional behaviours needed for specific patient populations, illnesses, and care settings. Four IPE workshops based on CCBPMs were implemented for all medical and nursing students during their clinical/clerkships years. Students in Cohort 1 completed two IPE workshops: rapid response and end-of-life. For Cohort 2, students completed four IPE workshops, adding chronic paediatric illness and transitions for the cognitively impaired. Valid and reliable collaborative behaviors observational assessment tools (CBOATs) derived from CCBPMs for the rapid response and end-of-life workshops were developed. CBOATs were used in the longitudinal assessment of student learning for both cohorts during two Interprofessional Teamwork Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (ITOSCEs) conducted before and after the students completed the IPE workshops. Over a 2-year period, 457 students completed the IPE simulations and ITOSCEs. Both medical and nursing students demonstrated significant improvement in CBOAT scores. Comparisons between the cohorts showed that participation in four versus two IPE experiences did not significantly improve most CBOAT scores. We conclude that undergraduate IPE simulation experiences based on CCBPMs result in measurable improvements in learner behaviours necessary for effective collaborative and team-based practice in specific care areas. PMID:27269441

  3. Rationing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kieran

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the role of rationing in medical education. Medical education is expensive and there is a limit to that which governments, funders or individuals can spend on it. Rationing involves the allocation of resources that are limited. This paper discussed the pros and cons of the application of rationing to medical education and the different forms of rationing that could be applied. Even though some stakeholders in medical education might be taken aback at the prospect of rationing, the truth is that rationing has always occurred in one form or another in medical education and in healthcare more broadly. Different types of rationing exist in healthcare professional education. For example rationing may be implicit or explicit or may be based on macro-allocation or micro-allocation decisions. Funding can be distributed equally among learners, or according to the needs of individual learners, or to ensure that overall usefulness is maximised. One final option is to allow the market to operate freely and to decide in that way. These principles of rationing can apply to individual learners or to institutions or departments or learning modes. Rationing is occurring in medical education, even though it might be implicit. It is worth giving consideration to methods of rationing and to make thinking about rationing more explicit. PMID:27358649

  4. Integrating the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Core competencies into the model of the clinical practice of emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Dane M; Hayden, Stephen; Sanders, Arthur B; Binder, Louis S; Chinnis, Ann; Corrigan, Kelly; LaDuca, Tony; Dyne, Pam; Perina, Debra G; Smith-Coggins, Rebecca; Sulton, Larry; Swing, Susan

    2004-06-01

    In response to public pressure for greater accountability from the medical profession, a transformation is occurring in the approach to medical education and assessment of physician competency. Over the past 5 years, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has implemented the Outcomes and General Competencies projects to better ensure that physicians are appropriately trained in the knowledge and skills of their specialties. Concurrently, the American Board of Medical Specialties, including the American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM), has embraced the competency concept. The core competencies have been integral in ABEM's development of Emergency Medicine Continuous Certification and the development of the Model of Clinical Practice of Emergency Medicine (Model). ABEM has used the Model as a significant part of its blueprint for the written and oral certification examinations in emergency medicine and is fully supportive of the effort to more fully define and integrate the ACGME core competencies into training emergency medicine specialists. To incorporate these competencies into our specialty, an Emergency Medicine Competency Taskforce (Taskforce) was formed by the Residency Review Committee-Emergency Medicine to determine how these general competencies fit in the Model. This article represents a consensus of the Taskforce with the input of multiple organizations in emergency medicine. It provides a framework for organizations such as the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD) and the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine to develop a curriculum in emergency medicine and program requirement revisions by the Residency Review Committee-Emergency Medicine. In this report, we describe the approach taken by the Taskforce to integrate the ACGME core competencies into the Model. Ultimately, as competency-based assessment is implemented in emergency medicine training, program directors, governing bodies such as the ACGME

  5. Ultrafest: A Novel Approach to Ultrasound in Medical Education Leads to Improvement in Written and Clinical Examinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langdorf, Mark I.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of hands-on training at a bedside ultrasound (US symposium (“Ultrafest” to improve both clinical knowledge and image acquisition skills of medical students. Primary outcome measure was improvement in multiple choice questions on pulmonary or Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma (FAST US knowledge. Secondary outcome was improvement in image acquisition for either pulmonary or FAST. Methods: Prospective cohort study of 48 volunteers at “Ultrafest,” a free symposium where students received five contact training hours. Students were evaluated before and after training for proficiency in either pulmonary US or FAST. Proficiency was assessed by clinical knowledge through written multiple-choice exam, and clinical skills through accuracy of image acquisition. We used paired sample t-tests with students as their own controls. Results: Pulmonary knowledge scores increased by a mean of 10.1 points (95% CI [8.9-11.3], p<0.00005, from 8.4 to a posttest average of 18.5/21 possible points. The FAST knowledge scores increased by a mean of 7.5 points (95% CI [6.3-8.7] p<0.00005, from 8.1 to a posttest average of 15.6/ 21. We analyzed clinical skills data on 32 students. The mean score was 1.7 pretest and 4.7 posttest of 12 possible points. Mean improvement was 3.0 points (p<0.00005 overall, 3.3 (p=0.0001 for FAST, and 2.6 (p=0.003 for the pulmonary US exam. Conclusion: This study suggests that a symposium on US can improve clinical knowledge, but is limited in achieving image acquisition for pulmonary and FAST US assessments. US training external to official medical school curriculum may augment students’ education. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(1:143–148.

  6. [Medical education and professionalism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins e Silva, João

    2013-01-01

    Is briefly analyzed the evolution that the objectives, strategies and models of medical education have had since their presentation and subsequent implementation of the famous model of Abraham Flexner, is now 103 years. Although globally accepted in their original pedagogical principles and instruments, that model does not have avoided the continuing dissatisfaction by the medical community and students and, most markedly in recent decades, the demanding of a most efficient health care by society, in general, and by patients in particular. In response to these ambitions, the medical community felt that it was essential to review the traditional criteria of medical professionalism, adapting them to a new paradigm of society and an appropriate and more efficient model of medical education. In this respect, are analyzed strategies and methodologies, apparently more suitable proposals for the inclusion of the principles and responsibilities of medical professionalism since the early period of pre-graduated medical education. It is assumed that the emphasis in teaching and practice of reflection throughout the course will have positive and lasting repercussions during active working life. However, the author believes that the success of the measures to be introduced in medical education programs to a new model of professionalism continues to depend, above all, of the humanistic and cognitive attributes of the students to be chosen, and the pedagogical quality, professional and academic of their teachers. PMID:24016652

  7. Clinical evidence continuous medical education: a randomised educational trial of an open access e-learning program for transferring evidence-based information – ICEKUBE (Italian Clinical Evidence Knowledge Utilization Behaviour Evaluation) – study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Satolli Roberto; Manfrini Roberto; Clivio Luca; Deligant Christian; Duca Piergiorgio; Compagnoni Anna; Sala Valeria; Cinquini Michela; Moschetti Ivan; Moja Lorenzo; Addis Antonio; Grimshaw Jeremy M; Dri Pietro; Liberati Alessandro

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background In an effort to ensure that all physicians have access to valid and reliable evidence on drug effectiveness, the Italian Drug Agency sponsored a free-access e-learning system, based on Clinical Evidence, called ECCE. Doctors have access to an electronic version and related clinical vignettes. Correct answers to the interactive vignettes provide Continuing Medical Education credits. The aims of this trial are to establish whether the e-learning program (ECCE) increases phys...

  8. Informing web-based communication curricula in veterinary education: a systematic review of web-based methods used for teaching and assessing clinical communication in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemiou, Elpida; Adams, Cindy L; Toews, Lorraine; Violato, Claudio; Coe, Jason B

    2014-01-01

    We determined the Web-based configurations that are applied to teach medical and veterinary communication skills, evaluated their effectiveness, and suggested future educational directions for Web-based communication teaching in veterinary education. We performed a systematic search of CAB Abstracts, MEDLINE, Scopus, and ERIC limited to articles published in English between 2000 and 2012. The review focused on medical or veterinary undergraduate to clinical- or residency-level students. We selected studies for which the study population was randomized to the Web-based learning (WBL) intervention with a post-test comparison with another WBL or non-WBL method and that reported at least one empirical outcome. Two independent reviewers completed relevancy screening, data extraction, and synthesis of results using Kirkpatrick and Kirkpatrick's framework. The search retrieved 1,583 articles, and 10 met the final inclusion criteria. We identified no published articles on Web based communication platforms in veterinary medicine; however, publications summarized from human medicine demonstrated that WBL provides a potentially reliable and valid approach for teaching and assessing communication skills. Student feedback on the use of virtual patients for teaching clinical communication skills has been positive,though evidence has suggested that practice with virtual patients prompted lower relation-building responses.Empirical outcomes indicate that WBL is a viable method for expanding the approach to teaching history taking and possibly to additional tasks of the veterinary medical interview. PMID:24418922

  9. Demonstrating social accountability in medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Hennen, B.

    1997-01-01

    The author considers the University of Toronto's Health, illness and the Community course for undergraduate medical students, described in this issue by Wasylenki and associates (see pages 379 to 383). Social accountability in medical education demands a community orientation and hence an emphasis on outreach. Medical schools should expand their clinical service to the community, provide community-based residency placements and offer continuing medical education in rural and regional centres....

  10. Medical education: Changes and perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qin; Lee, Liming; Gruppen, Larry D.; Ba, Denian

    2013-01-01

    As medical education undergoes significant internationalization, it is important for the medical education community to understand how different countries structure and provide medical education. This article highlights the current landscape of medical education in China, particularly the changes that have taken place in recent years. It also examines policies and offers suggestions about future strategies for medical education in China. Although many of these changes reflect international tr...

  11. Clinical skills training in undergraduate medical education using a student-centered approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolsgaard, Martin Grønnebæk

    2013-01-01

    professors. This study showed that student teachers performed as good as or even better than associate professors when teaching simple clinical skills. The second study of this thesis examined how complex clinical skills--such as patient management skills--develop with increasing levels of competence. The...... practicing in pairs significantly out-performed those training alone using RIME-based assessments and that dyad training significantly improved students' confidence in managing future patient encounters. The final study examined students' use of self-directed clinical encounter cards (CECs) based on the RIME...... development initiatives are required before implementation in large and dispersed settings. In conclusion, this thesis demonstrated different aspects of student-centered approaches to clinical skills learning. Whereas self-directed learning is difficult in clinical clerkship, the experimental studies...

  12. Medical Music Therapy: A Model Program for Clinical Practice, Education, Training and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standley, Jayne

    2005-01-01

    This monograph evolved from the unique, innovative partnership between the Florida State University Music Therapy Program and Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare. Its purpose is to serve as a model for music therapy educators, students, clinicians, and the hospital administrators who might employ them. This book should prove a valuable resource for…

  13. State of Clinical Education at Tehran University of Medical Sciences from the Viewpoint of Students of Nursing & Midwifery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Baraz Pardenjani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Clinical education is considered as the heart of medicine and health care due to the importance of training expert manpower. To achieve this goal, education quality should be promoted, this requiring its continuous evaluation. In this regard, application of appropriate educational strategies by competent clinical trainers or instructors leads to an improvement in the clinical education outcomes. This study was carried out to assess the learning method of clinical skills and its barriers from the viewpoint of students of midwifery. Materials & Methods : This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 140 employed BS midwives in Yazd Province who had a 6-month working experience using a questionnaire including demographic information and items on the common clinical skills grading, skills learning methods, and barriers to clinical learning. Having collected the questionnaires, the data were analyzed using SPSS. Results : The findings of the study revealed that the rate of clinical skills was at a good level for most of the subjects (56.5%, at an intermediate level for 30.7 %, and at a low level for 12.8% of the subjects. The correlation coefficients were statistically significant between subjects' level of clinical skills and age, department, and clinical experience. In studying the learning methods of clinical skills, 46.6% of learning was attributed to trainers, while 69.3% of the learning barriers were attributed to lack of sufficient cases during education, and 68.6% were attributed to insufficient practical training. Conclusion : Although the graduates had an acceptable level of clinical skills, the need for improving clinical education and administering continuous education programs for controlling and warranting care quality was markedly obvious. As the subjects reported, learning was attributed to trainers, while learning barriers were attributed to lack of sufficient cases during training, and insufficient practical

  14. Changing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, J; Gale, R

    1989-05-01

    This paper is based on one which was prepared to support the World Conference of the World Federation for Medical Education in August 1988. It is designed to provide a broad perspective on the essential elements of an educational change process. The paper covers the stages in designing a change strategy and highlights the difficulties that any change agent is likely to encounter. A review of the history of change in education and organizations is followed by discussion of the need for change and the ability to change. Reasons for resistance to change are presented and discussed. Implementation and reinforcement of change are considered before a final section on evaluation. PMID:2725362

  15. Medical education: Changes and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin; Lee, Liming; Gruppen, Larry D.; Ba, Denian

    2013-01-01

    As medical education undergoes significant internationalization, it is important for the medical education community to understand how different countries structure and provide medical education. This article highlights the current landscape of medical education in China, particularly the changes that have taken place in recent years. It also examines policies and offers suggestions about future strategies for medical education in China. Although many of these changes reflect international trends, Chinese medical education has seen unique transformations that reflect its particular culture and history. PMID:23631405

  16. Impact of medical informatics on medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, S M

    1999-11-01

    In recent years, medical informatics has become a well-recognized branch of medicine. It is a multidisciplinary science that combines information technology and various specialties of medicine. The impact of medical informatics on medical education is advancing along with the rapid developments in computer science. Departments of medical informatics or similar divisions have appeared in schools of medicine in Taiwan in the past 5 years. At National Taiwan University College of Medicine, we offer curricula in basic computer concepts, network concepts, operating systems, word processing, database and data processing, computer media resources, multimedia computer statistics, intelligent health information systems, medical diagnostic support systems, and electronic medical record systems. Distance learning has also been favorably accepted on this campus. Recently, we proposed the concept of a virtual medical campus, which will break the physical barriers of time and space. We expect this revolution to influence every aspect of medicine, especially medical education. PMID:10705693

  17. Standardizing and personalizing science in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, David R; Lurie, Stephen J; Lyness, Jeffrey M; Ward, Denham S

    2010-02-01

    In the century since the initial publication of the Flexner Report, medical education has emphasized a broad knowledge of science and a fundamental understanding of the scientific method, which medical educators believe are essential to the practice of medicine. The enormous growth of scientific knowledge that underlies clinical practice has challenged medical schools to accommodate this new information within the curricula. Although innovative educational modalities and new curricula have partly addressed this growth, the authors argue for a systematic restructuring of the content and structure of science education from the premedical setting through clinical practice. The overarching goal of science education is to provide students with a broad, solid foundation applicable to medicine, a deep understanding of the scientific method, and the attitudes and skills needed to apply new knowledge to patient care throughout their careers. The authors believe that to accomplish this successfully, the following changes must occur across the three major stages of medical education: (1) a reshaping of the scientific preparation that all students complete before medical school, (2) an increase in individualized science education during medical school, and (3) an emphasis on knowledge acquisition skills throughout graduate medical education and beyond to assure lifelong scientific learning. As students progress through the educational continuum, the balance of standardized and personalized scientific knowledge will shift toward personalization. Greater personalization demands that physicians possess well-refined skills in information acquisition, interpretation, and application for optimal lifelong learning and effective clinical practice. PMID:20107368

  18. Learning objects in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Jorge G; Mintzer, Michael J; Issenberg, S Barry

    2006-11-01

    A learning object (LO) is a grouping of instructional materials structured to meet a specified educational objective. Digital LOs, which can be stored electronically, allow a new approach to instructional activity, making medical education more efficient, and potentially more cost-effective. They are reusable and can incorporate text, graphics, animations, audio, and video to support and enhance learning. A learning object can stand alone or be aggregated with additional objects to create larger forms of educational content meeting multiple educational objectives. Digital learning objects located in online repositories can be accessed by many computers and are easily handled by an array of learning management systems for delivery to learners at any time. Integrating digital learning objects with traditional educational methods in a blended learning approach assists medical educators in meeting the challenges of competing priorities. Multimedia LOs enable learners to tailor their experience to their preferred learning style. Through the use of learning objects, learners' reactions, their acquisition of knowledge, skills and attitudes, and their behavioral changes become readily measurable. Learning objects provide multiple research opportunities, such as their use in adaptive learning, their added value in preclinical versus clinical education, and their impact as part of a blended learning strategy. PMID:17594550

  19. Community-based clinical education increases motivation of medical students to medicine of remote area: comparison between lecture and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Harutaka; Tada, Saaya; Kondo, Saki; Tabata, Ryo; Yuasa, Shino; Kawaminami, Shingo; Nakanishi, Yoshinori; Ito, Jun; Shimizu, Nobuhiko; Obata, Fumiaki; Shin, Teruki; Bando, Hiroyasu; Kohno, Mitsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we administered a questionnaire to medical students to evaluate the effect of community-based clinical education on their attitudes to community medicine and medicine in remote area. Questionnaires were given 4 times to all the students from first-year to sixth-year. Of 95 students, 65 students (68.4%) who completed all questionnaires, were used in this study. The intensity of students' attitudes was estimated by using visual analogue scale. The intensity of interest, a sense of fulfillment and passion in medicine of remote area was significantly increased after the community-based practice. On the other hand, the level of understanding in medicine in remote area was increased by the lecture not by the practice. The intensity of desire both to become a generalist and a specialist was significantly increased when the grade went up. Most of sixth-year students desired to have abilities of a generalist and a specialist simultaneously. This study shows that the community-based practice is more meaningful in increasing motivation in medicine in remote area than the lecture, and suggests that it is important to prepare more courses to experience community medicine to increase the number of physicians who desire to work in remote area. PMID:24705761

  20. Reform of medical education in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyong-Jee; Kee, Changwon

    2010-01-01

    There are 41 medical schools in South Korea with over 3500 students graduating from the medical schools annually with the appropriate qualifications to practice medicine. Korean medical educators have made significant efforts to enhance the effectiveness of medical education by preparing students for the rapidly changing global environment of medicine and healthcare. This article outlines the reform efforts made by Korean medical schools to meet such demands, which includes the adoption of student-centered and competency-based education, e-learning, and authentic assessment of clinical performance. It also discusses the recent reform of the medical education system, driven by the Government's policy to prepare Korean higher education for an increasingly knowledge-based society. PMID:20163225

  1. Trends in research about postgraduate medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galindo-Cárdenas, Leonor Angélica

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was framed in the research: Characterization of professional competency-based model in medical education developed in twelve clinical and nine surgical specializations at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Antioquia. Its aim was to inquire about the state of the art in medical postgraduate education. The guiding question was: Where is present-day research headed in medical postgraduate education. For this descriptive, nonexperimental work, 12 bibliographic databases were reviewed and 28 research articles related to graduate medical formation were selected. The findings were compared, analyzed and interpreted. The tendency in research on graduate medical education points to the need of having multi-inter-trans-disciplinary and humanistic proposals based on constructivism; to consider evaluation as a process emphasizing on learning and the participation of students, and to build systems of pedagogical formation of tutors and interactive and flexible curricula. The lack of studies that promote competencies-based training in postgraduate medical education is notorious.

  2. Description of an educational programme developed to support registered nurses during clinical supervision of student nurses in medical and surgical wards in a training health facility: Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Neshuku

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an educational programme interventions developed to support registered nurses during the clinical supervision of student nurses in the medical and surgical wards of a training hospital in the Oshana region, Namibia. The programme developed contained the purpose and goals of the programme, programme objectives, programme structure, processes and approaches. The programme catered for the following themes: Managerial challenges, educational challenges and non-conducive environment as was experienced by registered nurses and student nurses in order to support them during clinical supervision. It includes the activities to address managerial challenges as identified to be affecting the clinical supervision of student nurses; this is to address educational challenges identified during clinical supervision of student nurses. Furthermore, the programme contains activities focused on providing registered nurses with knowledge and skills on clinical supervision, in order to increase their understanding and competence about the clinical supervision of student nurses. Another activity included interventions for enhancing positive interpersonal relationships and good communication skills to improve effective interactions between registered nurses and student nurses. This study made it possible for the development of an educational programme that enable the registered nurses to receive the much needed information pertaining to the clinical supervision of student nurses, and served as a guide and support tool when carrying out clinical supervision of student nurses. In conclusion the study was justified as an original contribution to the existing body of knowledge in general health nursing science.

  3. Clinical medical librarian: the last unicorn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demas, J M; Ludwig, L T

    1991-01-01

    In the information age of the 1990s, the clinical medical librarian (CML) concept, like many other personalized library services, is often criticized as being too labor-intensive and expensive; others praise its advantages. To determine the attitudes of medical school library directors and clinical department heads toward implementation and feasibility of a CML program, forty randomly selected medical schools were surveyed. A double-blind procedure was used to sample department heads in internal medicine, pediatrics, and surgery, as well as health sciences library directors identified by the Association of Academic Health Sciences Library Directors (AAHSLD) annual statistics. The survey instrument was designed to measure responses to the following attitudinal variables: acceptance and nonacceptance of a CML program; importance to patient care, education, and research; influence on information-seeking patterns of health care professionals; ethical issues; CML extension services; and costs. Seventy-nine usable questionnaires out of a total of 120 (66%) were obtained from clinical medical personnel, and 30 usable questionnaires out of a total of 40 (75%) were obtained from medical school library directors. Survey results indicated significant differences between clinical medical personnel and library personnel regarding attitudes toward CML influence on information-seeking patterns, ethics, alternative CML services, and costs. Survey results also indicated a continuing strong support for CML programs in the medical school setting; however, differences of opinion existed toward defining the role of the CML and determining responsibility for funding. PMID:1998816

  4. What Medical Oncologist Residents Think about the Italian Speciality Schools: A Survey of the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM) on Educational, Clinical and Research Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Anna; De Angelis, Carmine; Lambertini, Matteo; Cremolini, Chiara; Imbimbo, Martina; Berardi, Rossana; Di Maio, Massimo; Cascinu, Stefano; La Verde, Nicla

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Relevant heterogeneity exists among Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology, also within the same country. In order to provide a comprehensive overview of the landscape of Italian Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology, the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM) undertook an online survey, inviting all the residents to describe their daily activities and to express their overall satisfaction about their programs. Methods A team composed of five residents and three consultants in medical oncology prepared a 38 items questionnaire that was published online in a reserved section, accessible through a link sent by e-mail. Residents were invited to anonymously fill in the questionnaire that included the following sub-sections: quality of teaching, clinical and research activity, overall satisfaction. Results Three-hundred and eleven (57%) out of 547 invited residents filled in the questionnaire. Two-hundred and twenty-three (72%) participants declared that attending lessons was frequently difficult and 153 (49%) declared they did not gain substantial improvement in their knowledge from them. Fifty-five percent stated that they did not receive lessons on palliative care. Their overall judgment about didactic activity was low in 63% of the interviewed. The satisfaction for clinical activity was in 86% of cases good: 84% recognized that, during the training period, they acquired a progressive independence on patients' management. About research activity, the majority (79%) of participants in the survey was actively engaged in managing patients included in clinical trials but the satisfaction level for the involvement in research activities was quite low (54%). Overall, 246 residents (79%) gave a positive global judgment of their Medical Oncology Schools. Conclusions The landscape of Italian Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology is quite heterogeneous across the country. Some improvements in the organization of teaching and in the

  5. Transforming Medical Education: Is Competency-Based Medical Education the Right Approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, Michael E

    2016-05-01

    There is growing recognition within the medical education community that medical education in this country needs to be changed to better prepare doctors for the challenges they will face in providing their patients high-quality medical care. A competency-based medical education (CBME) approach was endorsed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the American Board of Medical Specialties approximately 15 years ago, and a self-designated group-the International Competency-Based Medical Education (ICBME) Collaborators-is now calling on members of the medical education community to join them in their effort to establish CBME as the approach to be used in transforming medical education, not only in the United States but also around the world.In response to an article in this issue by a group of ICBME Collaborators, the author argues that more evidence about the effectiveness of CBME is needed before a global shift to this approach is undertaken. It is time for major organizations and foundations that are committed to improving medical education to step forward and take the lead in partnering with the medical education community to conduct a critical evaluation of CBME. In addition, maintenance of certification, relicensure, and continuing medical education programs should be evaluated for their effectiveness in ensuring that physicians are clinically competent not only at the beginning of their career but also until the end. PMID:26675191

  6. Computer Systems in Medical Education

    OpenAIRE

    Orthner, Helmuth F

    1982-01-01

    The application of computers in medical education spans wide and diverse areas. Many areas may be considered traditional applications of data processing techniques to manage administrative and fiscal data. Such areas are typical for student admissions, course registration, continuing medical education program management, etc. Other applications deal more directly with medical education, such as educational testing (examination processing, competency testing, skills evaluation, etc.), course e...

  7. Social accountability of medical education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Stefan; Karle, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Medical doctors constitute a profession which embraces trust from and accountability to society. This responsibility extends to all medical educational institutions. Social accountability of medical education means a willingness and ability to adjust to the needs of patients and health care systems...... accountability of medical education must be included in all accreditation processes at all levels. The global standards programme by World Federation for Medical Education (WFME) provides tools for national or regional accreditation but also guidance for reforms and quality improvement. The standards are used...

  8. Blended Learning in Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayapragassarazan, Z.; Kumar, Santosh

    2012-01-01

    The ongoing pedagogical advancements in medical education across the globe have gained the attention of academicians for the preparation of well-educated and competent physicians to address the healthcare issues facing today. The integration of technology into medical pedagogy has proved effective in many ways. This has made the medical education…

  9. Ultrafest: A Novel Approach to Ultrasound in Medical Education Leads to Improvement in Written and Clinical Examinations

    OpenAIRE

    Connolly, Kiah; Beier, Lancelot; Langdorf, Mark I.; Anderson, Craig L.; Fox, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Our objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of hands-on training at a bedside ultrasound (US) symposium (“Ultrafest”) to improve both clinical knowledge and image acquisition skills of medical students. Primary outcome measure was improvement in multiple choice questions on pulmonary or Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma (FAST) US knowledge. Secondary outcome was improvement in image acquisition for either pulmonary or FAST.  Methods...

  10. Undergraduate medical education in Germany.

    OpenAIRE

    Chenot, Jean-François

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to give international readers an overview of the organisation, structure and curriculum, together with important advances and problems, of undergraduate medical education in Germany. Interest in medical education in Germany has been relatively low but has gained momentum with the new "Regulation of the Licensing of Doctors" which came into effect in 2003. Medical education had required substantial reform, particularly with respect to improving the links between ...

  11. Competency-based medical education in postgraduate medical education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iobst, William F.; Sherbino, Jonathan; Ten Cate, Olle; Richardson, Denyse L.; Dath, Deepak; Swing, Susan R.; Harris, Peter; Mungroo, Rani; Holmboe, Eric S.; Frank, Jason R.

    2010-01-01

    With the introduction of Tomorrow's Doctors in 1993, medical education began the transition from a time-and process-based system to a competency-based training framework. Implementing competency-based training in postgraduate medical education poses many challenges but ultimately requires a demonstr

  12. Clinical service desires of medical cannabis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janichek Jennifer L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical cannabis dispensaries following the social or hybrid model offer supplementary holistic services in addition to dispensing medical cannabis. Historically, alternative physical health services have been the norm for these dispensaries, including services such as yoga, acupuncture, or chiropractor visits. A clinical service dearth remains for medical cannabis patients seeking substance use, misuse, dependence, and mental health services. This study examined patient desires for various clinical services and level of willingness to participate in specific clinical services. Methods Anonymous survey data (N = 303 were collected at Harborside Health Center (HHC, a medical cannabis dispensary in Oakland, CA. The sample was 70% male, 48% Caucasian and 21% African American. The mean male age was 38 years old and female mean age was 30. Sixty two percent of the male participants and 44% of the female participants are single. Sixteen percent of the population reported having a domestic partner. Forty six percent of the participants are employed full time, 41% have completed at least some college, and 49% make less than $40,000 a year. Results A significant portion of the sample, 62%, indicated a desire to participate in free clinical services at HHC, 34% would like more information about substances and use, and 41% want to learn more about reducing harms from substance use. About one quarter of the participants marked "would" or "likely would" participate in individual services such as consultation. Approximately 20% indicated "would" or "likely would" participate in psycho-educational forums, harm reduction information sharing sessions, online support groups, and coping, life, and social skills group. There was little interest in traditional NA/AA 12-step groups or adapted 12-step groups. Conclusions Desired clinical services can be qualified as a combination of harm reduction, educational, skills-based, peer support and

  13. Clinical evidence continuous medical education: a randomised educational trial of an open access e-learning program for transferring evidence-based information – ICEKUBE (Italian Clinical Evidence Knowledge Utilization Behaviour Evaluation – study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satolli Roberto

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In an effort to ensure that all physicians have access to valid and reliable evidence on drug effectiveness, the Italian Drug Agency sponsored a free-access e-learning system, based on Clinical Evidence, called ECCE. Doctors have access to an electronic version and related clinical vignettes. Correct answers to the interactive vignettes provide Continuing Medical Education credits. The aims of this trial are to establish whether the e-learning program (ECCE increases physicians' basic knowledge about common clinical scenarios, and whether ECCE is superior to the passive diffusion of information through the printed version of Clinical Evidence. Design All Italian doctors naïve to ECCE will be randomised to three groups. Group one will have access to ECCE for Clinical Evidence chapters and vignettes lot A and will provide control data for Clinical Evidence chapters and vignettes lot B; group two vice versa; group three will receive the concise printed version of Clinical Evidence. There are in fact two designs: a before and after pragmatic trial utilising a two by two incomplete block design (group one versus group two and a classical design (group one and two versus group three. The primary outcome will be the retention of Clinical Evidence contents assessed from the scores for clinical vignettes selected from ECCE at least six months after the intervention. To avoid test-retest effects, we will randomly select vignettes out of lot A and lot B, avoiding repetitions. In order to preserve the comparability of lots, we will select vignettes with similar, optimal psychometric characteristics. Trial registration ISRCTN27453314

  14. 临床药师在脑病科开展用药教育的体会%Experience of clinical pharmacist operating medical education in encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张梅; 王成义

    2015-01-01

    本文探讨临床药师在临床科室开展患者用药教育的方法,提高药师服务患者的能力。临床药师应下临床开展患者用药教育,在工作中不断进行总结归纳。在开展用药教育过程中,临床药师要加强自身能力建设,主动、热情地投入工作。%In this paper,the author explored the methods of clinical pharmacists carry out patients medication education in clinical departments,in order to improve the service ability of pharmacists.Clinical pharmacists should develop drug education in the clinical,and continuously summary in the work. In the process of carrying out education,the clinical pharmacists should strengthen their own ability,and put into work with initiative and enthusiasm.

  15. Pre-clinical medical student experience in a pediatric pulmonary clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Saba, Thomas G.; Hershenson, Marc B.; Arteta, Manuel; Ramirez, Ixsy A.; Mullan, Patricia B; Owens, Sonal T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Our objective was to evaluate the educational value of introducing pre-clinical medical students to pediatric patients and their families in a subspecialty clinic setting.Methods: First- and second-year medical students at the University of Michigan seeking clinical experience outside of the classroom attended an outpatient pediatric pulmonary clinic. Evaluation of the experience consisted of pre- and post-clinic student surveys and post-clinic parent surveys with statements employ...

  16. Microethics in medical education and practice

    OpenAIRE

    Mandal, Jharna; Dinoop, KP; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2015-01-01

    “Microethics” is an avant-garde in the field of ethics. When the term “ethics” is brought into discussion in medical education or clinical practice, it customarily points to the traditional ethics, that is, biomedical ethics that deals with the ethical issues faced during unaccustomed or rare clinical circumstances. In contrast, microethics is a continuous ethical science existing in the physician-patient interaction that happens each day in every physician's clinical liaison. These ethical i...

  17. 医学生辅助诊断能力的培养%Medical ethics education in clinic practice: Training medicos to envisage the effects of high- tech instruments in diagnoses of diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦怀新; 蔡绍曦

    2005-01-01

    It belongs to the ethics that depending to much on high - tech instruments in diagnoses of diseases and overlooking medical examination and clinical history. In clinic educations, we should train medicos to envisage the effects of high - tech instruments in diagnoses of diseases, and strengthen their feeling of responsibihty and training of clinic basic shills.

  18. The UCSF Academy of Medical Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Molly; Irby, David M; Debas, Haile T

    2003-07-01

    The Academy of Medical Educators at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), was established in 2000 to (1) foster excellence in teaching, (2) support teachers of medicine, and (3) promote curricular innovation. A membership organization, it recognizes five categories of educational activity: direct teaching, curriculum development and assessment of learner performance, advising and mentoring, educational administration and leadership, and educational research. Excellent medical student teaching and outstanding accomplishment in one or more areas of educational activity qualify a teacher for membership. Candidates prepare a portfolio that is reviewed internally and by national experts in medical education. Currently 37 faculty members, 3% of the entire school of medicine faculty, belong to the academy. The academy's innovations funding program disburses one-year grants to support curricular development and comparisons of pedagogical approaches; through this mechanism, the academy has funded 20 projects at a total cost of $442,300. Three fourths of expended funds support faculty release time. Faculty development efforts include promotion of the use of an educator's portfolio and the establishment of a mentoring program for junior faculty members built around observation of teaching. The Academy of Medical Educators vigorously supports expanded scholarship in education; the academy-sponsored Education Day is an opportunity for educators to present their work locally. Recipients of innovations-funding program grants are expected to present their work in an appropriate national forum and are assisted in doing this through quarterly scholarship clinics. The Academy of Medical Educators has been well received at UCSF and is enhancing the status of medical education and teachers. PMID:12857682

  19. Use of a data warehouse at an academic medical center for clinical pathology quality improvement, education, and research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Krasowski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pathology data contained within the electronic health record (EHR, and laboratory information system (LIS of hospitals represents a potentially powerful resource to improve clinical care. However, existing reporting tools within commercial EHR and LIS software may not be able to efficiently and rapidly mine data for quality improvement and research applications. Materials and Methods: We present experience using a data warehouse produced collaboratively between an academic medical center and a private company. The data warehouse contains data from the EHR, LIS, admission/discharge/transfer system, and billing records and can be accessed using a self-service data access tool known as Starmaker. The Starmaker software allows users to use complex Boolean logic, include and exclude rules, unit conversion and reference scaling, and value aggregation using a straightforward visual interface. More complex queries can be achieved by users with experience with Structured Query Language. Queries can use biomedical ontologies such as Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes and Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine. Result: We present examples of successful searches using Starmaker, falling mostly in the realm of microbiology and clinical chemistry/toxicology. The searches were ones that were either very difficult or basically infeasible using reporting tools within the EHR and LIS used in the medical center. One of the main strengths of Starmaker searches is rapid results, with typical searches covering 5 years taking only 1-2 min. A "Run Count" feature quickly outputs the number of cases meeting criteria, allowing for refinement of searches before downloading patient-identifiable data. The Starmaker tool is available to pathology residents and fellows, with some using this tool for quality improvement and scholarly projects. Conclusion: A data warehouse has significant potential for improving utilization of clinical pathology testing

  20. Augmented reality in medical education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphuis, Carolien; Barsom, Esther; Schijven, Marlies; Christoph, Noor

    2014-09-01

    Learning in the medical domain is to a large extent workplace learning and involves mastery of complex skills that require performance up to professional standards in the work environment. Since training in this real-life context is not always possible for reasons of safety, costs, or didactics, alternative ways are needed to achieve clinical excellence. Educational technology and more specifically augmented reality (AR) has the potential to offer a highly realistic situated learning experience supportive of complex medical learning and transfer. AR is a technology that adds virtual content to the physical real world, thereby augmenting the perception of reality. Three examples of dedicated AR learning environments for the medical domain are described. Five types of research questions are identified that may guide empirical research into the effects of these learning environments. Up to now, empirical research mainly appears to focus on the development, usability and initial implementation of AR for learning. Limited review results reflect the motivational value of AR, its potential for training psychomotor skills and the capacity to visualize the invisible, possibly leading to enhanced conceptual understanding of complex causality. PMID:24464832

  1. Benefits of simulation training in medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Abas T; Juma FZ

    2016-01-01

    Tamkin Abas, Fatema Zehra JumaManchester Medical School, University of Manchester, Manchester, UKWe read about the satisfaction of simulation experiences of paramedic students1 with great interest. As medical students, with early clinical experience comparative to paramedic training in the UK, we agree that simulation-based learning is well received in health care education. As part of the curriculum at the University of Manchester, we are exposed to a variety of simulation-based environments...

  2. Indirect Medical Education and Disproportionate Share Adj...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Indirect Medical Education and Disproportionate Share Adjustments to Medicare Inpatient Payment Rates The indirect medical education (IME) and disproportionate...

  3. A Viewpoint on Medical Education in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozafar Khazaei

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the unique characteristics of medical universities compared to other higher education centers in Iran is existence of medical education development centers. These centers have made an attempt to enhance the quality of medical education by regular and constant activity in various domains of educational planning and policymaking, and empowerment of the faculty members, students and personnel. Numerous studies published in Persian and English journals are one of the achievements of these centers. Also, several Persian and English scientific journals are being published by these centers among which the role of the few English languages journals of these centers is remarkably significant. Since these journals attract more audience, especially from abroad, it is necessary to pay special heed to the quality of their published articles. Avoiding the publication of such articles as “analysis of awareness and attitude” and turning to innovative intervention studies in medical education (1 have been highlighted by the authorities of medical education. During the past 30 years, the planners and medical sciences teachers have made to keep up with global developments in medicine. However, medical education in Iran has encountered numerous challenges, some of which have been referred to in the literature such as incompatibility of education with the real needs of the society, necessity of revising the syllabi and scientific resources, and weakness of clinical education (2, 3. One of the challenges highlighted in the recent years is the decreasing trend in medical students’ motivation and their academic failure. Various studies have investigated the factors affecting the students’ academic failure (4, 5, but few studies have analyzed the practical and scientific solutions to decrease and prevent it. Accepting undergraduate students in Iranian universities is state-based and the fact that universities have no role in the selection and acceptance

  4. MEC.O - Medical education online

    OpenAIRE

    Ziegler, R.; Knopp, W; Hohenberg, G.; Wendorf, A; Redies, M; Pohlemann, T

    2009-01-01

    Aim: In this document we describe a special e-learning project of the trauma surgery clinic at the University of Saarland/Germany: MEC.O (Medical education online). Methods: This e-learning concept was created as part of the students' education and it adds to the ever-expanding teaching and learning possibilities (practical lessons en bloc, practical seminars, practical year, voluntary additional lessons in surgery with multimedia learning and instructions by a tutor) in accident surge...

  5. Needs and necessities of medical ethics education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagher Larijani

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, new medical technologies and their probable misuses have emerged public concerns about medical ethics. Medical ethics is a practical discipline that provides a structured approach for identifying, analyzing, and resolving ethical issues in clinical medicine. "nIn this study we reviewed some new methods of teaching medical ethics in other countries by searching in internet and literature. "nTwo key features related to the teaching of medical ethics are active involvement of students in the learning process instead of merely lecturing about the ethical principles and assessing how students apply their knowledge of ethical principles in simulated and actual situations. In many countries such as Iran, medical schools attempted to address medical ethics issues in formal ethics classes. "nIt is clear that the traditional method is no longer sufficient to meet the needs of practitioners and societies and new methods particularly those emphasize on active learning, individual participation, group interactions, and a process - based approach, should be developed and implemented. In addition, a concerted effort to improve education in medical ethics will benefit the medical profession and services to patients. Therefore, we recommend policy makers of medical ethics education to change the traditional methods to the modern methods; which are used now in the world.

  6. Efficacy of an integrated continuing medical education (CME) and quality improvement (QI) program on radiation oncologist (RO) clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: There has been little radiation oncologist (RO)-specific research in continuing medical education (CME) or quality improvement (QI) program efficacy. Our aim was to evaluate a CME/QI program for changes in RO behavior, performance, and adherence to department protocols/studies over the first 12 months of the program. Methods and Materials: The CME/QI program combined chart audit with feedback (C-AWF), simulation review AWF (SR-AWF), reminder checklists, and targeted CME tutorials. Between April 2003 and March 2004, management of 75 patients was evaluated by chart audit with feedback (C-AWF) and 178 patients via simulation review audit (SR-AWF) using a validated instrument. Scores were presented, and case management was discussed with individualized educational feedback. RO behavior and performance was compared over the first year of the program. Results: Comparing the first and second 6 months, there was a significant improvement in mean behavior (12.7-13.6 of 14, p = 0.0005) and RO performance (7.6-7.9 of 8, p = 0.018) scores. Protocol/study adherence significantly improved from 90.3% to 96.6% (p = 0.005). A total of 50 actions were generated, including the identification of learning needs to direct CME tutorials, the systematic change of suboptimal RO practice, and the alteration of deficient management of 3% of patients audited during the program. Conclusion: An integrated CME/QI program combining C-AWF, SR-AWF, QI reminders, and targeted CME tutorials effectively improved targeted RO behavior and performance over a 12-month period. There was a corresponding increase in departmental protocol and study adherence

  7. Clinical leadership development in postgraduate medical education and training: policy, strategy, and delivery in the UK National Health Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggarwal R

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Reena Aggarwal,1,2 Tim Swanwick2 1Women's Health, Whittington Health, London, UK; 2Health Education England, North Central and East London, London, UK Abstract: Achieving high quality health care against a background of continual change, increasing demand, and shrinking financial resource is a major challenge. However, there is significant international evidence that when clinicians use their voices and values to engage with system delivery, operational efficiency and care outcomes are improved. In the UK National Health Service, the traditional divide between doctors and managers is being bridged, as clinical leadership is now foregrounded as an important organizational priority. There are 60,000 doctors in postgraduate training (junior doctors in the UK who provide the majority of front-line patient care and form an "operating core" of most health care organizations. This group of doctors is therefore seen as an important resource in initiating, championing, and delivering improvement in the quality of patient care. This paper provides a brief overview of leadership theories and constructs that have been used to develop a raft of interventions to develop leadership capability among junior doctors. We explore some of the approaches used, including competency frameworks, talent management, shared learning, clinical fellowships, and quality improvement. A new paradigm is identified as necessary to make a difference at a local level, which moves learning and leadership away from developing "leaders", to a more inclusive model of developing relationships between individuals within organizations. This shifts the emphasis from the development of a "heroic" individual leader to a more distributed model, where organizations are "leader-ful" and not just "well led" and leadership is centered on a shared vision owned by whole teams working on the frontline. Keywords: National Health Service, junior doctors, quality improvement, management, health care

  8. Evaluation of problem-based learning in medical students’ education

    OpenAIRE

    MOHAMMAD HADI IMANIEH; SEYED MOHSEN DEHGHANI; AHMAD REZA SOBHANI; MAHMOOD HAGHIGHAT

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In traditional medical education systems much interest is placed on the cramming of basic and clinical facts without considering their applicability in the future professional career. The aim of this study is to evaluate a novice medical training method (problem-based learning) as compared to the contemporary teacher-based medical education or traditional methods. Methods: Selection of the study subjects was done through simple sampling and according to the division of medical s...

  9. Interactive Video in Medical Education

    OpenAIRE

    Chandrasekhar, Arcot J.; Price, Ronald N.

    1989-01-01

    A variety of attributes have to be taught to a medical student. Various formats of these skills are currently in vogue, namely lectures, small group sessions, preceptorships, etc. The objective of this project is to evaluate the utility of interactive video in medical education. Lessons using interactive video were developed to teach history taking skills, procedural skills, problem solving skills and to acquire knowledge base. Evaluation strategies are being developed to assess which format,...

  10. Certification and licensing of clinical medical physicists in AFOMP countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In many countries the education and training of medical physicists has changed over the last few decades 'om being rather ad hoc to becoming structured with residency programs becoming quite common. These are often followed by formal certification by independent bodies, and medical physics professional organizations MPPOs) affirming the quality of certified physicists and recognizing their competence and ability to practice independently. Policies on the training and education of medical physicists have been developed by the International organization for Medical Physics (IOMP) and by the Asia Oceania Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics AFOMP). Currently nine countries in Asia-Oceania operate systems for the certification of clinical medical physicists and four others are planning or implementing such systems. The existing systems, which are described in his paper, generally conform to the policies. Licensing of medical physicists, which is primarily the responsibility of government bodies, is almost unknown in that region. (author)

  11. Clinical Trials: Key to Medical Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Clinical Trials: Key to Medical Progress Past Issues / Summer 2008 ... this page please turn Javascript on. Photo iStock Clinical trials are research studies that test how well new ...

  12. Mobile technologies in medical education: AMEE Guide No. 105.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Ken; Ellaway, Rachel H; Topps, David; Archibald, Douglas; Hogue, Rebecca J

    2016-06-01

    Mobile technologies (including handheld and wearable devices) have the potential to enhance learning activities from basic medical undergraduate education through residency and beyond. In order to use these technologies successfully, medical educators need to be aware of the underpinning socio-theoretical concepts that influence their usage, the pre-clinical and clinical educational environment in which the educational activities occur, and the practical possibilities and limitations of their usage. This Guide builds upon the previous AMEE Guide to e-Learning in medical education by providing medical teachers with conceptual frameworks and practical examples of using mobile technologies in medical education. The goal is to help medical teachers to use these concepts and technologies at all levels of medical education to improve the education of medical and healthcare personnel, and ultimately contribute to improved patient healthcare. This Guide begins by reviewing some of the technological changes that have occurred in recent years, and then examines the theoretical basis (both social and educational) for understanding mobile technology usage. From there, the Guide progresses through a hierarchy of institutional, teacher and learner needs, identifying issues, problems and solutions for the effective use of mobile technology in medical education. This Guide ends with a brief look to the future. PMID:27010681

  13. Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program for Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilan, Barbara A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The Clinical Oncology Assistantship Program at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences is described, along with student reactions to the program. The summer elective program involves cancer lectures (one week) and clinical exposure (nine weeks) in medical, surgical, and pediatric oncology services, as well as self-directed learning…

  14. Initiatives for Medical Education Research at the International Medical University

    OpenAIRE

    Ramesh Chandra Jutti; Vishna Devi Nadarajah; Victor Lim

    2008-01-01

    Medical Education research is a relativelynew field but one that is progressing rapidly worldwide.This article is an attempt to take stock of the currentstatus of Medical Education research in InternationalMedical University and to explore the various factorsthat have influenced its direction. It also shares some ofthe initiatives that have been instituted or intended tobe instituted at our university.

  15. Accreditation of undergraduate and graduate medical education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Deborah J; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2006-01-01

    Accreditation organizations such as the Liaison Committee for Medical Education (LCME), the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC), and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) are charged with the difficult task of evaluating the educational quality of...... not at all clear. As medical education moves toward outcome-based education related to a broad and context-based concept of competence, the accreditation paradigm should change accordingly. Udgivelsesdato: 2006-Aug...... medical education programs in North America. Traditionally accreditation includes a more quantitative rather than qualitative judgment of the educational facilities, resources and teaching provided by the programs. The focus is on the educational process but the contributions of these to the outcomes are......Accreditation organizations such as the Liaison Committee for Medical Education (LCME), the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC), and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) are charged with the difficult task of evaluating the educational quality of...

  16. Images in Rheumatology: a multimedia program for medical education.

    OpenAIRE

    Nashel, D J; Martin, J J

    1992-01-01

    In recent years, undergraduate medical education has benefited from the use of computer-based instructional programs. However, in the case of clinical and postgraduate medical education there is a scarcity of such programs, particularly those with access to high-resolution images. Having a fundamental knowledge base of disease-associated images is crucial for the physicians during the diagnostic process. To fill this gap in clinical instruction in the rheumatic diseases, Images in Rheumatolog...

  17. Clinical leadership development in postgraduate medical education and training: policy, strategy, and delivery in the UK National Health Service

    OpenAIRE

    Aggarwal R; Swanwick T

    2015-01-01

    Reena Aggarwal,1,2 Tim Swanwick2 1Women's Health, Whittington Health, London, UK; 2Health Education England, North Central and East London, London, UK Abstract: Achieving high quality health care against a background of continual change, increasing demand, and shrinking financial resource is a major challenge. However, there is significant international evidence that when clinicians use their voices and values to engage with system delivery, operational efficiency and care outcomes are i...

  18. Evaluation of Continuing Medical Education for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Wang, Virginia; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A continuing medical education program is discussed that addresses chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and that links primary care physicians to a source of needed clinical knowledge at a relatively low cost. The educational methods, evaluation design, diagnosis of educational needs, selection of program content and behavioral outcomes are…

  19. Innovations in higher medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popkov V.M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the innovations in the higher medical education. Particular attention in this sphere is paid to the detailed analysis of the subject as a mechanism of cognition and psycho-emotional aspect. It should be noticed that the development of the university education demands the integration of functional systems to study the general medicine and the art of healing. In conclusion it has been found out that the new methodological approach is necessary to bring the teacher closer to the subject particularly to integrate the relation of the opposites.

  20. Physical activity education in the undergraduate curricula of all UK medical schools: are tomorrow's doctors equipped to follow clinical guidelines?

    OpenAIRE

    Weiler, R.; Chew, S.; Coombs, N.; Hamer, M.; Stamatakis, E.

    2012-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) is a cornerstone of disease prevention and treatment. There is, however, a considerable disparity between public health policy, clinical guidelines and the delivery of physical activity promotion within the National Health Service in the UK. If this is to be addressed in the battle against non-communicable diseases, it is vital that tomorrow's doctors understand the basic science and health benefits of physical activity. The aim of this study was to assess the provision...

  1. Implementation and evaluation of an educational programme to support registered nurses during clinical supervision of student nurses in medical and surgical wards in a training health facility, Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Neshuku

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide an account of the implementation and evaluation of the educational programme was to support registered nurses in the Oshana region, Namibia educationally, in order to enable them to provide effective clinical supervision of student nurses The researcher selected to conduct a workshop because during a workshop it is possible to have two-way communication that encouraged the exchange of ideas and facts with the aim of sharing valued information among one another. The duration of the workshop was two days. The workshop was attended by registered nurses (registered nurses from a training institution and training health facilities from the Oshana Region. Participants were selected using a criterion sampling method (registered nurses who were supervising second and third year nursing students during clinical practice; those registered nurses were from medical and surgical wards at training heath facilities in the Oshana Region and had been working there for a year or more. There were no limitations on the number / sample size; the researcher allowed all participants who turned up to attend the workshop resulted in seventeen participants attended the workshop. The programme was implemented in three phases which in turn was divided into sessions. The orientation phase provided an introduction to the workshop where aspects related to the purpose, goals, and objectives of the workshop and logistical arrangements of the implementation of the programme were discussed. The working phase consisted of three sessions which is corresponding to the programme objectives. The implementation of each session was based on the specific objective activities of that session and it was expected to produce an outcome that would help the registered nurses during the execution of their clinical supervisory duties of nursing students During the termination phase two qualitative evaluations were done firstly, the evaluation of the

  2. Undergraduate medical education in emergency medical care: A nationwide survey at German medical schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timmermann Arnd

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since June 2002, revised regulations in Germany have required "Emergency Medical Care" as an interdisciplinary subject, and state that emergency treatment should be of increasing importance within the curriculum. A survey of the current status of undergraduate medical education in emergency medical care establishes the basis for further committee work. Methods Using a standardized questionnaire, all medical faculties in Germany were asked to answer questions concerning the structure of their curriculum, representation of disciplines, instructors' qualifications, teaching and assessment methods, as well as evaluation procedures. Results Data from 35 of the 38 medical schools in Germany were analysed. In 32 of 35 medical faculties, the local Department of Anaesthesiology is responsible for the teaching of emergency medical care; in two faculties, emergency medicine is taught mainly by the Department of Surgery and in another by Internal Medicine. Lectures, seminars and practical training units are scheduled in varying composition at 97% of the locations. Simulation technology is integrated at 60% (n = 21; problem-based learning at 29% (n = 10, e-learning at 3% (n = 1, and internship in ambulance service is mandatory at 11% (n = 4. In terms of assessment methods, multiple-choice exams (15 to 70 questions are favoured (89%, n = 31, partially supplemented by open questions (31%, n = 11. Some faculties also perform single practical tests (43%, n = 15, objective structured clinical examination (OSCE; 29%, n = 10 or oral examinations (17%, n = 6. Conclusion Emergency Medical Care in undergraduate medical education in Germany has a practical orientation, but is very inconsistently structured. The innovative options of simulation technology or state-of-the-art assessment methods are not consistently utilized. Therefore, an exchange of experiences and concepts between faculties and disciplines should be promoted to guarantee a standard

  3. Gender issues in medical and public health education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Y L

    2000-01-01

    There is no doubt that gender bias has been inherent in medical and public health education, research, and clinical practice. This paper discusses the central question for medical and public health educators viz. whether women's health concerns and needs could be best addressed by the conventional biomedical approach to medical and public health education, research, and practice. Gender inequalities in health and gender bias in medical and public health education are revealed. It is found that in most public health and prevention issues related to women's health, the core issue is male-female power relations, and not merely the lack of public health services, medical technology, or information. There is, thus, an urgent need to gender-sensitize public health and medical education. The paper proposes a gender analysis of health to distinguish between biological causes and social explanations for the health differentials between men and women. It also assessed some of the gender approaches to public health and medical education currently adopted in the Asia-Pacific region. It poses the pressing question of how medical and public health educators integrate the gender perspective into medical and public health education. The paper exhorts all medical and public health practitioners to explore new directions and identify innovative strategies to formulate a gender-sensitive curriculum towards the best practices in medicine and public health that will meet the health needs of women and men in the 21st century. PMID:11338745

  4. Hungarian medical physics MSc education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The medical physics specialisation aims at providing high level interdisciplinary theoretical and practical knowledge and readily applicable skills, which can put into action in both the clinical and the R and D field. The first competence based gradual medical physics course in the B.Sc./M.Sc. system in Hungary was launched two years ago at the Faculty of Natural Sciences of Budapest University of Technology and Economics managed by the Institute of Nuclear Techniques. The MSc programme was compiled on the base of EFOMP, IPEM, AAPM and IAEA recommendations. The course curriculum comprises fundamental physical subjects (atomic and molecular physics, nuclear physics and particle physics) as well as fundamental medical knowledge (anatomy, physiology and radiobiology) required for subjects of diagnostic and therapy. Students of this MSc branch may chose further subjects from a 'compulsory optional' set of subjects, which contains medical imaging, X-ray diagnostics, radiation therapy, magnetic resonance imaging, radiation protection, Monte Carlo calculation and its clinical applications, ultrasound diagnostics and nuclear medicine. (authors)

  5. Medical physics in radiotherapy: The importance of preserving clinical responsibilities and expanding the profession's role in research, education, and quality control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malicki, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Medical physicists have long had an integral role in radiotherapy. In recent decades, medical physicists have slowly but surely stepped back from direct clinical responsibilities in planning radiotherapy treatments while medical dosimetrists have assumed more responsibility. In this article, I argue against this gradual withdrawal from routine therapy planning. It is essential that physicists be involved, at least to some extent, in treatment planning and clinical dosimetry for each and every patient; otherwise, physicists can no longer be considered clinical specialists. More importantly, this withdrawal could negatively impact treatment quality and patient safety. Medical physicists must have a sound understanding of human anatomy and physiology in order to be competent partners to radiation oncologists. In addition, they must possess a thorough knowledge of the physics of radiation as it interacts with body tissues, and also understand the limitations of the algorithms used in radiotherapy. Medical physicists should also take the lead in evaluating emerging challenges in quality and safety of radiotherapy. In this sense, the input of physicists in clinical audits and risk assessment is crucial. The way forward is to proactively take the necessary steps to maintain and advance our important role in clinical medicine. PMID:25949219

  6. Extracting medication information from clinical text

    OpenAIRE

    Uzuner, Özlem; Solti, Imre; Cadag, Eithon

    2010-01-01

    The Third i2b2 Workshop on Natural Language Processing Challenges for Clinical Records focused on the identification of medications, their dosages, modes (routes) of administration, frequencies, durations, and reasons for administration in discharge summaries. This challenge is referred to as the medication challenge. For the medication challenge, i2b2 released detailed annotation guidelines along with a set of annotated discharge summaries. Twenty teams representing 23 organizations and nine...

  7. Medical students’ perspectives on clinical empathy training

    OpenAIRE

    Afghani, JA

    2011-01-01

    Context: There is a need for studies specifically addressing the barriers to empathy training from the perspective of medical students. The objective of this study was to evaluate attitudes of 3rd and 4th year medical students regarding their training in clinical empathy at a public teaching hospital and medical school. Methods: A questionnaire assessing students’ satisfaction with, and opinions on, empathy training, as well as barriers to training, was distributed during the last quarter of ...

  8. Pediatric hospitalists in medical education: current roles and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydarian, Cyrus; Maniscalco, Jennifer

    2012-05-01

    As the field of pediatric hospital medicine has evolved, pediatric hospitalists have become increasingly involved in medical student and resident education--providing direct education during clinical rotations, developing novel curricula to meet the demands of the new educational environment, occupying leadership roles in medical education, and more. The literature suggests that hospitalists possess the essential skills for teaching effectively, yet most hospitalists feel that additional training beyond residency is necessary to refine their knowledge and skills in education and in other essential domains. Several pediatric hospital medicine fellowships and continuing medical education activities have been developed in the last decade to meet this growing need. The recent publication of the Pediatric Hospital Medicine Core Competencies will help define the roles and expectations of practicing pediatric hospitalists, and will serve as a framework for future curriculum development in both graduate and continuing medical education. PMID:22483082

  9. From Medical Records to Clinical Science

    OpenAIRE

    Aickin, Mikel; Elder, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Medical records contain an abundance of information, very little of which is extracted and put to clinical use. Increasing the flow of information from medical records to clinical practice requires methods of analysis that are appropriate for large nonintervention studies. The purpose of this article is to explain in nontechnical language what these methods are, how they differ from conventional statistical analyses, and why the latter are generally inappropriate. This is important because of...

  10. Medication therapy management clinic: perception of healthcare professionals in a University medical center setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the overall perception and utilization of the pharmacist managed medication therapy management (MTM clinic services, by healthcare professionals in a large, urban, university medical care setting.Methods: This was a cross-sectional, anonymous survey sent to 195 healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, and pharmacists at The University of Illinois Outpatient Care Center to determine their perception and utilization of the MTM clinic. The survey consisted of 12 questions and was delivered through a secure online application. Results: Sixty-two healthcare professionals (32% completed the survey. 82% were familiar with the MTM clinic, and 63% had referred patients to the clinic. Medication adherence and disease state management was the most common reason for referral. Lack of knowledge on the appropriate referral procedure was the prominent reason for not referring patients to the MTM clinic. Of the providers that were aware of MTM services, 44% rated care as ‘excellent’, 44% as ‘good’, 5% as ‘fair’, and 0% stated ‘poor’. Strengths of MTM clinic identified by healthcare providers included in-depth education to patients, close follow-up, and detailed medication reconciliation provided by MTM clinic pharmacists. Of those familiar with MTM clinic, recommendations included; increase marketing efforts to raise awareness of the MTM clinic service, create collaborative practice agreements between MTM pharmacists and physicians, and ensure that progress notes are more concise.Conclusion: In a large, urban, academic institution MTM clinic is perceived as a valuable resource to optimize patient care by providing patients with in-depth education as it relates to their prescribed medications and disease states. These identified benefits of MTM clinic lead to frequent patient referrals specifically for aid with medication adherence and disease state management.

  11. Hospice Home Immersion Project: Advancing Medical Education

    OpenAIRE

    Marilyn R. Gugliucci; Himanshu Malhotra; Andrea Gaul

    2015-01-01

    The University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine (UNECOM) Hospice Immersion project was piloted in 2014 in southern Maine. It was designed and implemented as an experiential medical education learning model whereby medical students were “admitted” into the local Hospice Home to live there for 48 hours. Until this project, palliative and end of life care education at US Medical Schools and specifically UNECOM were accomplished through traditional medical education methods. Th...

  12. Pre-clinical medical student experience in a pediatric pulmonary clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G. Saba

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Our objective was to evaluate the educational value of introducing pre-clinical medical students to pediatric patients and their families in a subspecialty clinic setting. Methods: First- and second-year medical students at the University of Michigan seeking clinical experience outside of the classroom attended an outpatient pediatric pulmonary clinic. Evaluation of the experience consisted of pre- and post-clinic student surveys and post-clinic parent surveys with statements employing a four-point Likert scale as well as open-ended questions. Results: Twenty-eight first-year students, 6 second-year students, and 33 parents participated in the study. Post-clinic statement scores significantly increased for statements addressing empathic attitudes, confidence communicating with children and families, comfort in the clinical environment, and social awareness. Scores did not change for statements addressing motivation, a sense of team membership, or confidence with career goals. Students achieved their goals of gaining experience interacting with patients, learning about pulmonary diseases, and observing clinic workflow. Parents felt that they contributed to student education and were not inconvenienced. Conclusions: Students identified several educational benefits of exposure to a single pediatric pulmonary clinic. Patients and families were not inconvenienced by the participation of a student. Additional studies are warranted to further investigate the value of this model of pre-clinical medical student exposure to subspecialty pediatrics.

  13. MEDUCATE trial : effectiveness of an intensive EDUCATional intervention for IT-mediated MEDication management in the outpatient clinic - study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Stiphout, F; Zwart-van Rijkom, J E F; Aarts, J E C M; Koffijberg, H; Klarenbeek-deJonge, E; Krulder, M; Roes, K C B; Egberts, A C G; ter Braak, E W M T

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Using information technology for medication management is an opportunity to help physicians to improve the quality of their documentation and communication and ultimately to improve patient care and patient safety. Physician education is necessary to take full advantage of information te

  14. MEDUCATE trial: effectiveness of an intensive EDUCATional intervention for IT-mediated MEDication management in the outpatient clinic – study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stiphout, van F.; Zwart-van Rijkom, J.E.F.; Aarts, J.E.C.M.; Koffijberg, H.; Klarenbeek-de Jonge, E.; Krulder, M.; Roes, K.C.B.; Egberts, A.C.G.; Braak, ter E.W.M.T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Using information technology for medication management is an opportunity to help physicians to improve the quality of their documentation and communication and ultimately to improve patient care and patient safety. Physician education is necessary to take full advantage of information tec

  15. MEDUCATE trial: Effectiveness of an intensive EDUCATional intervention for IT-mediated MEDication management in the outpatient clinic - study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. van Stiphout; J.E.F. Zwart-van Rijkom (Jeannette); J.E.C.M. Aarts (Jos); H. Koffijberg (Hendrik); E. Klarenbeek-deJonge; M. Krulder; K.C. Roes (Kit); A.C.G. Egberts (Antoine); E.W.M.T. ter Braak

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Using information technology for medication management is an opportunity to help physicians to improve the quality of their documentation and communication and ultimately to improve patient care and patient safety. Physician education is necessary to take full advantage of in

  16. Do Continuing Medical Education Articles Foster Shared Decision Making?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrecque, Michel; Lafortune, Valerie; Lajeunesse, Judith; Lambert-Perrault, Anne-Marie; Manrique, Hermes; Blais, Johanne; Legare, France

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Defined as reviews of clinical aspects of a specific health problem published in peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed medical journals, offered without charge, continuing medical education (CME) articles form a key strategy for translating knowledge into practice. This study assessed CME articles for mention of evidence-based…

  17. Effects of LifeSkills Training on Medical Students' Performance in Dealing with Complex Clinical Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Ana E.; Williams, Virginia; Williams, Redford B.; Segundo, Marisol A.; Lydston, David; Weiss, Stephen M.'

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Sound clinical judgment is the cornerstone of medical practice and begins early during medical education. The authors consider the effect of personality characteristics (hostility, anger, cynicism) on clinical judgment and whether a brief intervention can affect this process. Methods: Two sophomore medical classes (experimental,…

  18. Medical teachers conceptualize a distinctive form of clinical knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, J; Yates, L; McColl, G

    2015-05-01

    For over four decades, there have been efforts to specify the types of knowledge that medical students need, how that knowledge is acquired and how its constituent parts are related. It is one of the areas of continuing concern underlying medical education reform. Despite their importance to medical students' learning and development, the perspectives of medical teachers in hospitals are not always considered in such discourse. This study sought to generate an understanding of these teachers' values, perspectives and approaches by listening to them and seeing them in their everyday teaching work, finding and understanding the meanings they bring to the work of medical teaching in hospitals. In interviews, all of the teachers talked more about the optimal forms of knowledge that are important for students than they talked about the form of the teaching itself. Many revealed to students what knowledge they do and do not value. They had a particular way of thinking about clinical knowledge as existing in the people and the places in which the teaching and the clinical practice happen, and represented this as 'real' knowledge. By implication, there is other knowledge in medical education or in students' heads that is not real and needs to be transformed. Their values, practices and passions add texture and vitality to existing ways of thinking about the characteristics of clinical knowledge, how it is depicted in the discourse and the curriculum and how it is more dynamically related to other knowledge than is suggested in traditional conceptualizations of knowledge relationships. PMID:25052431

  19. Radiation education in medical and Co-medical schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the medical field, ionizing radiation is very widely in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, Around 60% of environmental radiation, including natural background and man-made sources of radiation, is caused from medical exposure in Japan. Education of radiation in medical ad co-medical schools are mainly aimed to how effectively use the radiation, and the time shared to fundamental physics, biology and safety or protection of radiation is not so much. (author)

  20. Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of radiation in human health, for both diagnosis and treatment of disease, is an important component of the work of the IAEA. The responsibility for the increasingly technical aspects of this work is undertaken by the medical physicist. To ensure good practice in this vital area, structured clinical training programmes are required to complement academic learning. This publication is intended to be a guide to the practical implementation of such a programme for nuclear medicine. There is a general and growing awareness that radiation medicine is increasingly dependent on well trained medical physicists who are based in a clinical setting. However an analysis of the availability of medical physicists indicates a large shortfall of qualified and capable professionals. This is particularly evident in developing countries. While strategies to increase educational opportunities are critical to such countries, the need for guidance on structured clinical training was recognized by the members of the Regional Cooperative Agreement for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Science and Technology (RCA) for the Asia-Pacific region. Consequently, a technical cooperation regional project (RAS6038) under the RCA programme was formulated to address this need in this region by developing suitable material and establishing its viability. Development of a clinical training guide for medical physicists specialising in nuclear medicine was started in 2009 with the appointment of a core drafting committee of regional and international experts. The publication drew on the experience of clinical training in Australia, Croatia and Sweden and was moderated by physicists working in the Asian region. The present publication follows the approach of earlier IAEA publications in the Training Course Series, specifically Nos 37 and 47, Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Radiation Oncology and Clinical Training of Medical Physicists

  1. Simulation-based medical education in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopreiato, Joseph O; Sawyer, Taylor

    2015-01-01

    The use of simulation-based medical education (SBME) in pediatrics has grown rapidly over the past 2 decades and is expected to continue to grow. Similar to other instructional formats used in medical education, SBME is an instructional methodology that facilitates learning. Successful use of SBME in pediatrics requires attention to basic educational principles, including the incorporation of clear learning objectives. To facilitate learning during simulation the psychological safety of the participants must be ensured, and when done correctly, SBME is a powerful tool to enhance patient safety in pediatrics. Here we provide an overview of SBME in pediatrics and review key topics in the field. We first review the tools of the trade and examine various types of simulators used in pediatric SBME, including human patient simulators, task trainers, standardized patients, and virtual reality simulation. Then we explore several uses of simulation that have been shown to lead to effective learning, including curriculum integration, feedback and debriefing, deliberate practice, mastery learning, and range of difficulty and clinical variation. Examples of how these practices have been successfully used in pediatrics are provided. Finally, we discuss the future of pediatric SBME. As a community, pediatric simulation educators and researchers have been a leading force in the advancement of simulation in medicine. As the use of SBME in pediatrics expands, we hope this perspective will serve as a guide for those interested in improving the state of pediatric SBME. PMID:25748973

  2. A Historical Perspective of Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcioglu, Huseyin; Bilge, Ugur; Unluoglu, Ilhami

    2015-01-01

    Even though there are significant developments in recent years in medical education, physicians are still needed reform and innovation in order to prepare the information society. The spots in the forefront of medical education in recent years; holistic approach in all processes, including health education, evidence-based medicine and…

  3. Mobile Medical Education (MoMEd - how mobile information resources contribute to learning for undergraduate clinical students - a mixed methods study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies Bethany S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mobile technology is increasingly being used by clinicians to access up-to-date information for patient care. These offer learning opportunities in the clinical setting for medical students but the underlying pedagogic theories are not clear. A conceptual framework is needed to understand these further. Our initial questions were how the medical students used the technology, how it enabled them to learn and what theoretical underpinning supported the learning. Methods 387 medical students were provided with a personal digital assistant (PDA loaded with medical resources for the duration of their clinical studies. Outcomes were assessed by a mixed-methods triangulation approach using qualitative and quantitative analysis of surveys, focus groups and usage tracking data. Results Learning occurred in context with timely access to key facts and through consolidation of knowledge via repetition. The PDA was an important addition to the learning ecology rather than a replacement. Contextual factors impacted on use both positively and negatively. Barriers included concerns of interrupting the clinical interaction and of negative responses from teachers and patients. Students preferred a future involving smartphone platforms. Conclusions This is the first study to describe the learning ecology and pedagogic basis behind the use of mobile learning technologies in a large cohort of undergraduate medical students in the clinical environment. We have developed a model for mobile learning in the clinical setting that shows how different theories contribute to its use taking into account positive and negative contextual factors. The lessons from this study are transferable internationally, to other health care professions and to the development of similar initiatives with newer technology such as smartphones or tablet computers.

  4. Clinical health informatics education for a 21st Century World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Siaw Teng; Gray, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    This chapter gives an educational overview of: * health informatics competencies in medical, nursing and allied clinical health professions * health informatics learning cultures and just-in-time health informatics training in clinical work settings * major considerations in selecting or developing health informatics education and training programs for local implementation * using elearning effectively to meet the objectives of health informatics education. PMID:20407180

  5. Medical Physics Education at the University of Novi Sad - Serbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanković, Slobodanka; Vesković, Miroslav; Klisurić, Olivera; Spasić, Vesna

    2007-04-01

    Overview of new educational program and training in Medical Physics at the University of Novi Sad is presented, where the medical physics education from undergraduate to doctoral study is established in the last decade. Necessity for basic and additional education and hospital training for medical physicists becomes the evident subject in clinical practice in which physicists and physicians are in close collaboration to ensure high quality of patient care. Learning objectives: to incorporate the latest scientific and professional findings in the field of medical physics, medical diagnostics, therapy and instruments; to accomodate students' pursuits of individual fields by offering elective courses from different areas of current medical practice; to reflect the multidisciplinary spirit of the studies, since teaching is performed by experts from diverse fields.

  6. [Medical education centers: strategies and purpose].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binetti, P

    1999-01-01

    The introduction of new didactic guidelines, for the graduate degrees in medicine and allied disciplines, is secondary to the new needs of the National Health Care System, and in part to the significant developments of science. It is not easy to meet this challenge. It is likewise not easy to channel coherently the required changes, with respect to the scientific, clinical and didactic goals. Paradoxically the same institutions that are in such great need of transformation, are also a significant part of the existing problem. In many countries, schools of medicine have developed centers for medical education that are geared toward the development and growth of students, teachers-tutors, and patients alike. Medical education has become more global, in an attempt to meet much needed communication needs, from both ends, teachers and students, as well as the recipients of care, patients. One major goal of such centers is the introduction of innovative didactic activities. There is indeed a new tendency toward the development of methodological tracks aiming at the acquisition and consolidation of a deeper and broader cultural knowledge. Amongst these initiatives there is the introduction of an evaluation of the teaching delivered, as well as the development of a multidisciplinary approach to didactics. The latter, is a prerequisite of an effective training directed toward the development of the concept of "team approach", whose ultimate goal is patient care. In Italy, at the Università Campus Biomedico, in Rome, one of the first of such centers of medical education has been developed. Its goal is to be both a learning organization, as well as a center for both research and clinical services. PMID:10687267

  7. Provider Education about Glaucoma and Glaucoma Medications during Videotaped Medical Visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betsy Sleath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine how patient, physician, and situational factors are associated with the extent to which providers educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications, and which patient and provider characteristics are associated with whether providers educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications. Methods. Patients with glaucoma who were newly prescribed or on glaucoma medications were recruited and a cross-sectional study was conducted at six ophthalmology clinics. Patients’ visits were videotape recorded and patients were interviewed after visits. Generalized estimating equations were used to analyze the data. Results. Two hundred and seventy-nine patients participated. Providers were significantly more likely to educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications if they were newly prescribed glaucoma medications. Providers were significantly less likely to educate African American patients about glaucoma. Providers were significantly less likely to educate patients of lower health literacy about glaucoma medications. Conclusion. Eye care providers did not always educate patients about glaucoma or glaucoma medications. Practice Implications. Providers should consider educating more patients about what glaucoma is and how it is treated so that glaucoma patients can better understand their disease. Even if a patient has already been educated once, it is important to reinforce what has been taught before.

  8. Vertically integrated medical education and the readiness for practice of graduates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnen-Meijer, Marjo; ten Cate, Olle; van der Schaaf, Marieke; Burgers, Chantalle; Borleffs, Jan; Harendza, Sigrid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Medical curricula become more and more vertically integrated (VI) to prepare graduates better for clinical practice. VI curricula show early clinical education, integration of biomedical sciences and focus on increasing clinical responsibility levels for trainees. Results of earlier ques

  9. Nursing faculty teaching a module in clinical skills to medical students: a Lebanese experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah B

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Bahia Abdallah,1 Jihad Irani,2 Silva Dakessian Sailian,1 Vicky George Gebran,1 Ursula Rizk1 1Nursing Program at the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Balamand, 2Faculty of Medicine and Medical Sciences, University of Balamand, Beirut, Lebanon Abstract: Nursing faculty teaching medical students a module in clinical skills is a relatively new trend. Collaboration in education among medical and nursing professions can improve students' performance in clinical skills and consequently positively impact the quality of care delivery. In 2011, the Faculty of Medicine in collaboration with the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of Balamand, Beirut, Lebanon, launched a module in clinical skills as part of clinical skills teaching to first-year medical students. The module is prepared and delivered by nursing faculty in a laboratory setting. It consists of informative lectures as well as hands-on clinical practice. The clinical competencies taught are hand-washing, medication administration, intravenous initiation and removal, and nasogastric tube insertion and removal. Around sixty-five medical students attend this module every year. A Likert scale-based questionnaire is used to evaluate their experience. Medical students agree that the module provides adequate opportunities to enhance clinical skills and knowledge and favor cross-professional education between nursing and medical disciplines. Most of the respondents report that this experience prepares them better for clinical rotations while increasing their confidence and decreasing anxiety level. Medical students highly appreciate the nursing faculties' expertise and perceive them as knowledgeable and resourceful. Nursing faculty participating in medical students' skills teaching is well perceived, has a positive impact, and shows nurses are proficient teachers to medical students. Cross professional education is an attractive model when it comes to teaching clinical skills in

  10. Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Diagnostic Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of radiation in human health, for both diagnosis and treatment of disease, is an important component of the work of the IAEA. The responsibility for the increasing technical aspects of this work is undertaken by the medical physicist. To ensure good practice in this vital area, structured clinical training programmes are required to complement academic learning. This publication is intended to be a guide to the practical implementation of such a programme for diagnostic radiology. There is a general and growing awareness that radiation medicine is increasingly dependent on well trained medical physicists based in the clinical setting. However, an analysis of the availability of medical physicists indicates a large shortfall of qualified and capable professionals. This is particularly evident in developing countries. While strategies to increase academic educational opportunities are critical to such countries, the need for guidance on structured clinical training was recognized by the members of the Regional Cooperative Agreement (RCA) for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Sciences for Asia and the Pacific. Consequently, a technical cooperation regional project (RAS6038) under the RCA programme was formulated to address this need in the Asia-Pacific region by developing suitable material and establishing its viability. Development of a clinical training guide for medical physicists specializing in diagnostic radiology started in 2007 with the appointment of a core drafting committee of regional and international experts. The publication drew on the experiences of clinical training programmes in Australia and New Zealand, the UK and the USA, and was moderated by physicists working in the Asian region. This publication follows the approach of the IAEA publication Training Course Series No. 37, Clinical Training of Medical Physicists specializing in Radiation Oncology. This approach to clinical training has been successfully tested

  11. Undergraduate Rural Medical Education Program Development: Focus Group Consultation with the NRHA Rural Medical Educators Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Laura H.; Wheat, John R.; Leeper, James D.; Florence, Joseph A.; Boulger, James G.; Hunsaker, Matt L.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Over a decade ago, leaders in rural medical education established the Rural Medical Educators (RME) Group, an interest group within the National Rural Health Association, to support faculty in rural medical education programs. This group has convened an annual RME conclave since 2006. In 2008, this conclave convened 15 national leaders in…

  12. Extracting medication information from clinical text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzuner, Ozlem; Solti, Imre; Cadag, Eithon

    2010-01-01

    The Third i2b2 Workshop on Natural Language Processing Challenges for Clinical Records focused on the identification of medications, their dosages, modes (routes) of administration, frequencies, durations, and reasons for administration in discharge summaries. This challenge is referred to as the medication challenge. For the medication challenge, i2b2 released detailed annotation guidelines along with a set of annotated discharge summaries. Twenty teams representing 23 organizations and nine countries participated in the medication challenge. The teams produced rule-based, machine learning, and hybrid systems targeted to the task. Although rule-based systems dominated the top 10, the best performing system was a hybrid. Of all medication-related fields, durations and reasons were the most difficult for all systems to detect. While medications themselves were identified with better than 0.75 F-measure by all of the top 10 systems, the best F-measure for durations and reasons were 0.525 and 0.459, respectively. State-of-the-art natural language processing systems go a long way toward extracting medication names, dosages, modes, and frequencies. However, they are limited in recognizing duration and reason fields and would benefit from future research. PMID:20819854

  13. Child Psychiatry Curricula in Undergraduate Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Michael Gifford; Giesen, Femke; Walter, Garry

    2008-01-01

    A study to review the amount of time devoted to child psychiatry in undergraduate medical education is conducted. Results conclude that relatively low priority is given to child psychiatry in medical education with suggestions for international teaching standards on the subject.

  14. Medical Education and Curriculum Reform: Putting Reform Proposals in Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Kam Yin Chan, MD, MB.BS, MHA

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to elaborate criteria by which the principles of curriculum reform can be judged. To this end, the paper presents an overview of standard critiques of medical education and examines the ways medical curriculum reforms have responded to these critiques. The paper then sets out our assessment of these curriculum reforms along three parameters: pedagogy, educational context, and knowledge status. Following on from this evaluation of recent curriculum reforms, the paper puts forward four criteria with which to gauge the adequacy medical curriculum reform. These criteria enable us to question the extent to which new curricula incorporate methods and approaches for ensuring that its substance: overcomes the traditional opposition between clinical and resource dimensions of care; emphasizes that the clinical work needs to be systematized in so far as that it feasible; promotes multi-disciplinary team work, and balances clinical autonomy with accountability to non-clinical stakeholders.

  15. Medical Students' Affirmation of Ethics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrmann, Jon A.; Hoop, Jinger; Hammond, Katherine Green; Roberts, Laura Weiss

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Despite the acknowledged importance of ethics education in medical school, little empirical work has been done to assess the needs and preferences of medical students regarding ethics curricula. Methods: Eighty-three medical students at the University of New Mexico participated in a self-administered written survey including 41 scaled…

  16. Role Modeling for Clinical Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Ellen Richter

    1991-01-01

    To become better role models, higher educators in institutions of clinical education should be conscious of the behaviors they demonstrate and the broad range of activities and attitudes that students observe and emulate, including clinical competence, professional demeanor, doctor-patient interactions, ethical values, and social consciousness.…

  17. Osteopathic Medical Education and Social Accountability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips-Madson, Robyn; Dharamsi, Shafik

    2016-04-01

    The public's trust in physicians continues to decline. As a way to begin regaining this trust, stakeholders, including physicians, medical educators, patient advocacy groups, and community-based organizations, have called for medical education to meet societal health needs, particularly the needs of those members who are most vulnerable, by incorporating social accountability into the medical school curriculum. The unique attributes of the osteopath-ic medical profession provide an enabling and conducive environment for broader social accountability in the health care system. Osteopathic medical schools must actively safeguard the profession's unequivocal commitment to producing healers that are fiduciaries for their patients, communities, and populations at large. PMID:27018954

  18. Medical laser application: translation into the clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka, Ronald; Stepp, Herbert; Hennig, Georg; Brittenham, Gary M.; Rühm, Adrian; Lilge, Lothar

    2015-06-01

    Medical laser applications based on widespread research and development is a very dynamic and increasingly popular field from an ecological as well as an economic point of view. Conferences and personal communication are necessary to identify specific requests and potential unmet needs in this multi- and interdisciplinary discipline. Precise gathering of all information on innovative, new, or renewed techniques is necessary to design medical devices for introduction into clinical applications and finally to become established for routine treatment or diagnosis. Five examples of successfully addressed clinical requests are described to show the long-term endurance in developing light-based innovative clinical concepts and devices. Starting from laboratory medicine, a noninvasive approach to detect signals related to iron deficiency is shown. Based upon photosensitization, fluorescence-guided resection had been discovered, opening the door for photodynamic approaches for the treatment of brain cancer. Thermal laser application in the nasal cavity obtained clinical acceptance by the introduction of new laser wavelengths in clinical consciousness. Varicose veins can be treated by innovative endoluminal treatment methods, thus reducing side effects and saving time. Techniques and developments are presented with potential for diagnosis and treatment to improve the clinical situation for the benefit of the patient.

  19. Medical Students’ Attitudes about Team-Based Learning in a Pre-Clinical Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Parmelee, Dean X.; DeStephen, Dan; Borges, Nicole J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Team-Based Learning is relatively new in medical education. Team-Based Learning was integrated into one medical school's pre-clinical curriculum in 2002. Purpose: This study compared how medical students’ attitudes about the Team-Based Learning process changed between the first and second year of medical school. Method: 180 students responded to 19 statements regarding their attitudes about Team-Based Learning during their first and second year of medical school. Data were analyze...

  20. How to improve medical education website design

    OpenAIRE

    Levine David; Hill-Briggs Felicia; Sisson Stephen D

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The Internet provides a means of disseminating medical education curricula, allowing institutions to share educational resources. Much of what is published online is poorly planned, does not meet learners' needs, or is out of date. Discussion Applying principles of curriculum development, adult learning theory and educational website design may result in improved online educational resources. Key steps in developing and implementing an education website include: 1) Follow ...

  1. Troubling Muddy Waters: Problematizing Reflective Practice in Global Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Thirusha; Kumagai, Arno K

    2016-03-01

    The idea of exporting the concept of reflective practice for a global medical education audience is growing. However, the uncritical export and adoption of Western concepts of reflection may be inappropriate in non-Western societies. The emphasis in Western medical education on the use of reflection for a specific end--that is, the improvement of individual clinical practice--tends to ignore the range of reflective practice, concentrating on reflection alone while overlooking critical reflection and reflexivity. This Perspective places the concept of reflective practice under a critical lens to explore a broader view for its application in medical education outside the West. The authors suggest that ideas about reflection in medicine and medical education may not be as easily transferable from Western to non-Western contexts as concepts from biomedical science are. The authors pose the question, When "exporting" Western medical education strategies and principles, how often do Western-trained educators authentically open up to the possibility that there are alternative ways of seeing and knowing that may be valuable in educating Western physicians? One answer lies in the assertion that educators should aspire to turn exportation of educational theory into a truly bidirectional, collaborative exchange in which culturally conscious views of reflective practice contribute to humanistic, equitable patient care. This discussion engages in troubling the already-muddy waters of reflective practice by exploring the global applicability of reflective practice as it is currently applied in medical education. The globalization of medical education demands critical reflection on reflection itself. PMID:26630601

  2. Perspectives in medical education--1. Reflections on the state of medical education in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, R Harsha

    2006-06-01

    The current shortcomings in Japanese medical education are highlighted by identifying four major areas of concern, based on the author's personal observations at Keio University Hospital. The first of these is a woeful lack of clinical skills among Japanese medical students and residents. This lack springs directly from the complete absence of any bedside clinical instruction, which constitutes the second area of concern. The third is the attitude of faculty towards teaching as a burden that detracts and diverts them from their primary goal of academic advancement through research. Finally, there is no recognition of the value of a problem-based approach to teaching clinical medicine, so that clinical problem-solving skills have atrophied to the point of near-extinction in the current generation of Japanese physicians. The promise of problem-based learning (PBL) provides a crucial starting point for efforts to change the system. PBL emphasizes the importance of an integrated approach to clinical problems, and a reliance on critical thinking--the basis of primary care. This contrasts with the selective and highly specialized approach to disease, and reliance on sophisticated technology, which are hallmarks of specialty care. The effort to reform medical education will fail without visionary leadership and without the willingness to confront the truth, as unpleasant as it may seem to be. Both these crucial elements exist at Keio University at this critical juncture. It is this happy confluence that emboldens the author to hope that the future of reform is in good hands at this august institution. PMID:16823259

  3. [Medical Humanities--the Historical Significance and Mission in Medical Education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Akihiro

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we consider the significance and mission of medical humanities in medical education from the following six viewpoints: (1) misunderstanding of the medical humanities; (2) its historical development; (3) the criteria for the ideal physician; (4) the contents of current Medical Humanities education; (5) the basic philosophy; and (6) its relation to medical professionalism. Medical humanities consists of the three academic components of bioethics, clinical ethics and medical anthropology, and it is a philosophy and an art which penetrate to the fundamental essence of medicine. The purpose of medical humanities is to develop one's own humanity and spirituality through medical practice and contemplation by empathizing with patients' illness narratives through spiritual self-awakening and by understanding the mutual healing powers of human relations by way of the realization of primordial life. The basic philosophy is "the coincidence of contraries". The ultimate mission of medical humanities is to cultivate physicians to educate themselves and have a life-long philosophy of devotion to understanding, through experience, the coincidence of contraries. PMID:26667195

  4. Using systematically observed clinical encounters (SOCEs to assess medical students’ skills in clinical settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George R Bergus

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available George R Bergus1–3, Jerold C Woodhead4, Clarence D Kreiter2,51Performance Based Assessment Program, Office of Student Affairs and Curriculum, 2Department of Family Medicine, 3Department of Psychiatry, 4Department of Pediatrics, 5Office of Consultation and Research in Medical Education, Roy J and Lucille A Carver College of Medicine, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USAIntroduction: The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE is widely used to assess the clinical performance of medical students. However, concerns related to cost, availability, and validity, have led educators to investigate alternatives to the OSCE. Some alternatives involve assessing students while they provide care to patients – the mini-CEX (mini-Clinical Evaluation Exercise and the Long Case are examples. We investigated the psychometrics of systematically observed clinical encounters (SOCEs, in which physicians are supplemented by lay trained observers, as a means of assessing the clinical performances of medical students.Methods: During the pediatrics clerkship at the University of Iowa, trained lay observers assessed the communication skills of third-year medical students using a communication checklist while the students interviewed and examined pediatric patients. Students then verbally presented their findings to faculty, who assessed students’ clinical skills using a standardized form. The reliability of the combined communication and clinical skills scores was calculated using generalizability theory.Results: Fifty-one medical students completed 199 observed patient encounters. The mean combined clinical and communication skills score (out of a maximum 45 points was 40.8 (standard deviation 3.3. The calculated reliability of the SOCE scores, using generalizability theory, from 10 observed patient encounters was 0.81. Students reported receiving helpful feedback from faculty after 97% of their observed clinical encounters.Conclusion: The SOCE can

  5. Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Radiation Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of radiation in human health, for both diagnosis and treatment of disease, is an important component of the work of the IAEA. The responsibility for the increasing technical aspects of this work is undertaken by the medical physicist. To ensure good practice in this vital area structured clinical training programmes are required to complement academic learning. This publication is intended to be a guide to the practical implementation of such a programme for radiation therapy. There is a general and growing awareness that radiation medicine is increasingly dependant on well trained medical physicists that are based in the clinical setting. However an analysis of the availability of medical physicists indicates a large shortfall of qualified and capable professionals. This is particularly evident in developing countries. While strategies to increase academic educational opportunities are critical to such countries, the need for guidance on structured clinical training was recognised by the members of the Regional Cooperative Agreement (RCA) for research, development and training related to nuclear sciences for Asia and the Pacific. Consequently a technical cooperation regional project (RAS6038) under the RCA programme was formulated to address this need in the Asia Pacific region by developing suitable material and establishing its viability. Development of a clinical training guide for medical physicists specialising in radiation therapy was started in 2005 with the appointment of a core drafting committee of regional and international experts. Since 2005 the IAEA has convened two additional consultant group meetings including additional experts to prepare the present publication. The publication drew heavily, particularly in the initial stages, from the experience and documents of the Clinical Training Programme for Radiation Oncology Medical Physicists as developed by the Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine. Their

  6. In defence of utility: the medical humanities and medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blease, Charlotte

    2016-06-01

    The idea that a study of the humanities helps to humanise doctors has become a leitmotif within the field. It is argued that the humanities (especially, literature) help to foster insights beyond those provided by biomedical training. Healthy young medics, it is claimed, can thereby gain significant insights into patienthood, and obtain important skills that may be valuable for their professional life. But the instrumentality of the humanities is not the only justification proffered for its inclusion in medical curricula. In this paper I critically examine the two overarching justifications recurrently cited in the mainstream literature-namely, (1) the instrumental worth and (2) the intrinsic value of the medical humanities in educating doctors. Examining these theses (and focusing on the views of a leading medical humanities scholar) I show that the bifurcation into instrumental versus non-instrumental justifications is not supported by the argumentation. Instead, I find that the particulars of the supposedly intrinsic justifications amount to an unambiguously instrumental defence of the humanities. Contextualizing the present investigation to probe further, I describe a long history of debate about the role of the humanities in British education and find that it rests on unsupported dichotomies (utility vs non-utility, theoretical vs applied, educated vs trained). I conclude that the medical humanities' manifesto would be more intellectually honest and coherent, and provide a more robust defence of its value in medical education, if it chose to embrace a wholly instrumental rationale for its role. PMID:26842744

  7. Reflections on Experimental Research in Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David A.; Beckman, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    As medical education research advances, it is important that education researchers employ rigorous methods for conducting and reporting their investigations. In this article we discuss several important yet oft neglected issues in designing experimental research in education. First, randomization controls for only a subset of possible confounders.…

  8. Case Study: Learner Physiotherapists' Perceptions of Clinical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Duncan; Naylor, Sandra

    1992-01-01

    Describes a study conducted in the United Kingdom to discover what processes learner physiotherapists experience in clinical education and whether their experience is comparable to that of other students in medical professions. The need for feedback is addressed, and the role of the clinical educator is discussed. A form for student assessment is…

  9. Twelve tips for early career medical educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristancho, Sayra; Varpio, Lara

    2016-04-01

    The first 10 years of career development pose unique challenges for MD- and PhD-trained faculty members working in medical education. These may include publishing peer-reviewed articles, winning grant funding, teaching, maintaining a clinical practice, and supporting professional communities both within and external to their institution. As the inaugural and current leaders of the ECME group in Canada, we have actively sought to better understand the challenges ECME faculty members face. We developed this understanding by surveying and tracking the qualitative reports of our ECME members, reviewing the (limited) literature available on ECME faculty members' experiences, and learning from our own experiences as ECME faculty and the advice shared by our own mentors. In this paper, we consolidate this knowledge into 12 tips for ECME faculty members. We suggest these tips will benefit both MD- and PhD-trained ECME faculty members as they strive for professional success. PMID:26492100

  10. Medical education on cannabis and cannabinoids: Perspectives, challenges, and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, M A; Ziemianski, D

    2015-06-01

    The global regulatory landscape regarding the medical use of cannabis and cannabinoids is changing rapidly. This has considerable impact on health care professionals who currently receive little or no education on issues regarding medical cannabis. We propose a 'cannabis curriculum' that covers the spectrum of historical, botanical, physiological, clinical and legal issues to allow health care professionals to engage in meaningful discussions with their patients and colleagues around this stigmatized and controversial subject. PMID:25728558

  11. Teaching interprofessional teamwork in medical and nursing education in Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aase, Ingunn; Aase, Karina; Dieckmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The notions of interprofessional education and interprofessional teamwork have attained widespread acceptance, partly because lack of teamwork has been tentatively linked to adverse incidents in healthcare. By analyzing data from 32 educational institutions, this study identifies the status of...... interprofessional teamwork in all nursing and medical education in Norway. The study programs issued by the 32 educational institutions were subject to content analysis, distilling the ambitions and goals for teaching interprofessional teamwork. Study program coordinators were approached and asked to what degree...... interprofessional teamwork was actually introduced in lecturing and clinical training. Results indicate that the medical and nursing schools clearly aspire to teach interprofessional teamwork and that this has largely been achieved when it comes to theoretical teaching. Although three of the four medical programs...

  12. Evaluation of a clinical medical librarian program at the Yale Medical Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, B; Battison, S; Kolisch, M; Leredu, M

    1978-07-01

    A clinical medical librarian (CML) program in a large university-based teaching hospital setting is viewed by the majority of clinicians as education-oriented, with slightly fewer clinicians viewing it as patient care oriented. The CML service has been utilized for research purposes only when it is clear that case-relevant information can evolve into research intended to have "clinical" impact. This study reports the results of a questionnaire circulated among clinicians receiving CML support by a large medical school library. Results indicate that (1) the CML effected a change in information-seeking behavior by the clinicians--they obtained information that would not have been available to them if the CML had not been present in patient-management conferences; (2) relevancy of information provided by the CML was judged by the clinicians to be very high; (3) the accuracy of the CML's search, coupled with the rapidity of delivery, was found to be highly satisfactory; (4) acceptance of the CML within the patient care setting was acknowledged by the majority of clinicians, who contact the CML in-hospital and overwhelmingly prefer to do so; and (5) there was no statistically significant variation in the manner in which different medical specialties use the services of a CML. These findings justify implementation of a clinical medical librarian program, on a modified basis, as an additional service to already existing reference services offered by a large medical school library. PMID:678700

  13. Stress Management in Medical Education: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Shauna L.; Shapiro, Daniel E.; Schwartz, Gary E. R.

    2000-01-01

    Review of clinical studies providing empirical data on stress management programs in medical education found that student participants in such programs demonstrated improved immunologic functioning, decreased depression and anxiety, increased spirituality and empathy, enhanced knowledge of alternative therapies, improved knowledge of stress…

  14. Components of Culture in Health for Medical Students' Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervalon, Melanie

    2003-01-01

    Describes key themes and components of culture in health care for incorporation into undergraduate medical education. These include teaching the rationale for learning about culture in health care; "culture basics"; data on and concepts of health status; tools and skills for productive cross-cultural clinical encounters; characteristics and…

  15. Caring, Competence and Professional Identities in Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the multiple discourses that influence medical education with a focus on the discourses of competence and caring. Discourses of competence are largely constituted through, and related to, biomedical and clinical issues whereas discourses of caring generally focus on social concerns. These discourses are not necessarily equal…

  16. [Influence of clinical guidelines on medical practitioners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arii, Shigeki

    2007-09-01

    Evidenced-based clinical guidelines for diagnosing and treating hepatocellular carcinoma patients were published in 2005, which were edited by the executive members of the Liver Cancer Study Group of Japan (Chief Editor, Professor Masatosi Makuuchi, MD). This article presents the results of two surveys investigating the validity and usefulness of those guidelines. The author's opinions regarding the evaluation of the guidelines and guideline-based clinical practice are also presented. The surveys revealed that the guidelines are well known and thought to be useful by medical practitioners. The guidelines had changed the therapeutic strategy of 20% of experts in the field. However, 43% of experts and 30% of nonexperts believed that the guidelines restricted their medical discretion. Additionally, the percentage of physicians who felt that medical malpractice suits would increase exceeded those who did not. However, the guidelines do not provide clear recommendations in about 45% of diagnostic and therapeutic points because of a lack of evidence. The recommendations on these points in the guidelines require the commonsense discretion of physicians. The guidelines should be followed based on an understanding of biology and medicine, and not based on dogmatism. PMID:17907456

  17. Acute IPPS - Direct Graduate Medical Education (DGME)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Section 1886(h) of the Act, establish a methodology for determining payments to hospitals for the costs of approved graduate medical education (GME) programs.

  18. Scientific Skills as Core Competences in Medical Education: What do medical students think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Laura; Severo, Milton; Pereira, Margarida; Amélia Ferreira, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Background: Scientific excellence is one of the most fundamental underpinnings of medical education and its relevance is unquestionable. To be involved in research activities enhances students' critical thinking and problem-solving capacities, which are mandatory competences for new achievements in patient care and consequently to the improvement of clinical practice. Purposes: This work aimed to study the relevance given by Portuguese medical students to a core of scientific skills, and their judgment about their own ability to execute those skills. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on students attending the first, fourth and sixth years of medical course in the same period. An assessment istrument, exploring the importance given by Portuguese medical students to scientific skills in high school, to clinical practice and to their own ability to execute them, was designed, adapted and applied specifically to this study. Results: Students' perceptions were associated with gender, academic year, previous participation in research activities, positive and negative attitudes toward science, research integration into the curriculum and motivation to undertake research. The viewpoint of medical students about the relevance of scientific skills overall, and the ability to execute them, was independently associated with motivation to be enrolled in research. Conclusions: These findings have meaningful implications in medical education regarding the inclusion of a structural research program in the medical curriculum. Students should be aware that clinical practice would greatly benefit from the enrollment in research activities. By developing a solid scientific literacy future physicians will be able to apply new knowledge in patient care.

  19. Captive on a Carousel: Discourses of "New" in Medical Education 1910-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Cynthia R.; Hodges, Brian D.; Austin, Zubin

    2013-01-01

    Medical educators aim to train physicians with sound scientific knowledge, expert clinical skills and an ability to work effectively with patients, colleagues and health systems. Over the past century, educators have devoted considerable thought and effort to how medical education might be improved. Analysing the language used to describe these…

  20. Continuing Medical Education and the Competent Family Physician

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Gerald; Davis, Dave

    1986-01-01

    Several principles of adult education are explored in terms of how they relate to current practices in developing continuing medical education (CME) programs. The key to effective CME is its link with clinical competence. This entails reviewing how individual learning needs are determined, and how these needs are translated into programs. Ultimately, the success of CME depends on evaluating improvements in areas of physician knowledge, skills, and attitudes which will have a positive impact o...

  1. Ethics of cost analyses in medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Kieran

    2013-01-01

    Cost analyses in medical education are rarely straightforward, and rarely lead to clear-cut conclusions. Occasionally they do lead to clear conclusions but even when that happens, some stakeholders will ask difficult but valid questions about what to do following cost analyses–specifically about distributive justice in the allocation of resources. At present there are few or no debates about these issues and rationing decisions that are taken in medical education are largely made subconscious...

  2. Differences Between Clinical Trials of Medical Devices and Drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhi-jun; LIU Wei

    2014-01-01

    How to design clinical trials for medical devices is a problem plaguing the industry today. As there are many differences in clinical trials of medical devices and drugs. This paper describes the differences of the two points from the perspectivs of defi-nition of medical devices and drugs, scope, phasing, subjects and design of clinical trials in details, aiming to help the related personnel make scientific decisions while conduct-ing clinical trial design for medical devices.

  3. 临床医学院教育教学全过程质量管理探讨%Research on total processing quality management of clinical education in clinical school of medical university

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王克霞

    2011-01-01

    Total Processing Quality Management ( TPQM ) is an effective administration tool to improve clinical education quality. Deep meaning of TPQM is illustrated. By means of 5W1H, key points and relationship map of clinical education process are analyzed. Furthermore, valuable steps to execute TPQM of clinical education are put forward.%全过程质量管理是提升临床医学院教育教学质量的有效管理手段,在此探讨了教育教学全过程质量管理的涵义,运用5W1H方法分析了临床教育教学质量环节与关系网络,并对实施全过程教育教学质量管理提出参考步骤,具有一定的实践价值。

  4. Tele-education as method of medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet; Pandza, Haris; Kulasin, Igor; Masic, Zlatan; Valjevac, Salih

    2009-01-01

    Development of computer networks and introduction and application of new technologies in all aspects of human activity needs to be followed by universities in their transformation on how to approach scientific, research, and education teaching curricula. Development and increased use of distance learning (DL) over the past decade have clearly shown the potential and efficiency of information technology applied in education. Use of information technology in medical education is where medical informatics takes its place as important scientific discipline which ensures benefit from IT in teaching and learning process involved. Definition of telemedicine as "use of technologies based on health care delivered on distance" covers areas such as electronic health, tele-health (eHealth), telematics, but also tele-education. Web based medical education today is offered in different forms--from online lectures, online exams, web based continuous education programs, use of electronic libraries, online medical and scientific databases etc. Department of Medical Informatics of Medical Faculty of University of Sarajevo has taken many steps to introduce distance learning in medical curricula--from organising professional--scientific events (congresses, workshop etc), organizing first tele-exam at the faculty and among first at the university, to offering online lectures and online education material at the Department's website (www.unsa-medinfo.org). Distance learning in medical education, as well as telemedicine, significantly influence health care in general and are shaping the future model of medical practice. Basic computer and networks skills must be a part of all future medical curricula. The impact of technical equipment on patient-doctor relationship must be taken into account, and doctors have to be trained and prepared for diagnosing or consulting patients by use of IT. Telemedicine requires special approach in certain medical fields--tele-consultation, tele

  5. A national survey of medical education fellowships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta M. Thompson

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of our study was to determine the prevalence, focus, time commitment, graduation requirements and programme evaluation methods of medical education fellowships throughout the United States. Medical education fellowships are defined as a single cohort of medical teaching faculty who participate in an extended faculty development programme. Methods: A 26-item online questionnaire was distributed to all US medical schools (n=127 in 2005 and 2006. The questionnaire asked each school if it had a medical education fellowship and the characteristics of the fellowship programme. Results: Almost half (n=55 of the participating schools (n=120, response rate 94.5 % reported having fellowships. Duration (10–584 hours and length (<1 month–48 months varied; most focused on teaching skills, scholarly dissemination and curriculum design, and required the completion of a scholarly project. A majority collected participant satisfaction; few used other programme evaluation strategies. Conclusions: The number of medical education fellowships increased rapidly during the 1990s and 2000s. Across the US, programmes are similar in participant characteristics and curricular focus but unique in completion requirements. Fellowships collect limited programme evaluation data, indicating a need for better outcome data. These results provide benchmark data for those implementing or revising existing medical education fellowships.

  6. Educational innovations in clinical pharmacogenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, C G; Maloney, K A; Beitelshees, A L; Jeng, Ljb; Ambulos, N P; Shuldiner, A R; Blitzer, M G

    2016-06-01

    Genetic and genomic discovery is revolutionizing medicine at an extraordinary pace, leading to a better understanding of disease and improved treatments for patients. This advanced pace of discovery presents an urgency to expand medical school curricula to include genetic and genomic testing (including pharmacogenomics), and integration of genomic medicine into clinical practice. Consequently, organizations and healthcare authorities have charged medical schools with training future physicians to be competent in their knowledge of genomic implementation. PMID:26875057

  7. Medical Treatment and Educational Problems in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, Nettie R.; Thurman, S. Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    The miracles of modern medical technology are sometimes accompanied by unanticipated costs affecting survivors' quality of life. This article considers the educational implications for three groups of children who could not survive without medical intervention: children treated for cancer, low birth-weight and premature infants, and the medically…

  8. Just imagine: new paradigms for medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Neil B; Hull, Alan L; Young, James B; Stoller, James K

    2013-10-01

    For all its traditional successes, the current model of medical education in the United States and Canada is being challenged on issues of quality, throughput, and cost, a process that has exposed numerous shortcomings in its efforts to meet the needs of the nations' health care systems. A radical change in direction is required because the current path will not lead to a solution.The 2010 publication Educating Physicians: A Call for Reform of Medical School and Residency identifies several goals for improving the medical education system, and proposals have been made to reform medical education to meet these goals. Enacting these recommendations practically and efficiently, while training more health care providers at a lower cost, is challenging.To advance solutions, the authors review innovations that are disrupting higher education and describe a vision for using these to create a new model for competency-based, learner-centered medical education that can better meet the needs of the health care system while adhering to the spirit of the above proposals. These innovations include collaboration amongst medical schools to develop massive open online courses for didactic content; faculty working in small groups to leverage this online content in a "flipped-classroom" model; and digital badges for credentialing entrustable professional activities over the continuum of learning. PMID:23969368

  9. Software engineering education in medical informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leven, F J

    1989-11-01

    Requirements and approaches of Software Engineering education in the field of Medical Informatics are described with respect to the impact of (1) experiences characterizing the "software misery", (2) status and tendencies in software methodology, and (3) educational status and needs in computer science education influenced by the controversy "theoretical versus practical education". Special attention is directed toward the growing importance of analysis, design methods, and techniques in the professional spectrum of Medical Informatics, the relevance of general principles of systems engineering in health care, the potential of non-procedural programming paradigms, and the intersection of Artificial Intelligence and education. Realizations of and experiences with programs in the field of Software Engineering are reported with respect to special requirements in Medical Informatics. PMID:2695780

  10. An online interactive simulation system for medical imaging education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikshit, Aditya; Wu, Dawei; Wu, Chunyan; Zhao, Weizhao

    2005-09-01

    This report presents a recently developed web-based medical imaging simulation system for teaching students or other trainees who plan to work in the medical imaging field. The increased importance of computer and information technology widely applied to different imaging techniques in clinics and medical research necessitates a comprehensive medical imaging education program. A complete tutorial of simulations introducing popular imaging modalities, such as X-ray, MRI, CT, ultrasound and PET, forms an essential component of such an education. Internet technologies provide a vehicle to carry medical imaging education online. There exist a number of internet-based medical imaging hyper-books or online documentations. However, there are few providing interactive computational simulations. We focus on delivering knowledge of the physical principles and engineering implementation of medical imaging techniques through an interactive website environment. The online medical imaging simulation system presented in this report outlines basic principles underlying different imaging techniques and image processing algorithms and offers trainees an interactive virtual laboratory. For education purposes, this system aims to provide general understanding of each imaging modality with comprehensive explanations, ample illustrations and copious references as its thrust, rather than complex physics or detailed math. This report specifically describes the development of the tutorial for commonly used medical imaging modalities. An internet-accessible interface is used to simulate various imaging algorithms with user-adjustable parameters. The tutorial is under the MATLAB Web Server environment. Macromedia Director MX is used to develop interactive animations integrating theory with graphic-oriented simulations. HTML and JavaScript are used to enable a user to explore these modules online in a web browser. Numerous multiple choice questions, links and references for advanced study are

  11. Clinical laboratories: production industry or medical services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plebani, Mario

    2015-06-01

    The current failure to evidence any link between laboratory tests, clinical decision-making and patient outcomes, and the scarcity of financial resources affecting healthcare systems worldwide, have put further pressure on the organization and delivery of laboratory services. Consolidation, merger, and laboratory downsizing have been driven by the need to deliver economies of scale and cut costs per test while boosting productivity. Distorted economics, based on payment models rewarding volume and efficiency rather than quality and clinical effectiveness, have underpinned the entrance of clinical laboratories into the production industry thus forcing them to relinquish their original mission of providing medical services. The sea change in laboratory medicine in recent years, with the introduction of ever newer and ever more complex tests, including 'omics', which impact on clinical decision-making, should encourage clinical laboratories to return to their original mission as long as payments models are changed. Rather than being considered solely in terms of costs, diagnostic testing must be seen in the context of an entire hospital stay or an overall payment for a care pathway: the testing process should be conceived as a part of the patient's entire journey. PMID:25405721

  12. Evaluating clinical dermatology practice in medical undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, J M; Sanmartín, V; Martí, R M; Morales, J L; Soler, J; Purroy, F; Pujol, R

    2014-06-01

    The acquisition of competences (the set of knowledge, skills and attitudes required to perform a job to a professional level) is considered a fundamental part of medical training. Dermatology competences should include, in addition to effective clinical interviewing and detailed descriptions of skin lesions, appropriate management (diagnosis, differentiation, and treatment) of common skin disorders and tumors. Such competences can only be acquired during hospital clerkships. As a way of certifying these competences, we propose evaluating the different components as follows: knowledge, via clinical examinations or critical incident discussions; communication and certain instrumental skills, via structured workplace observation and scoring using a set of indicators; and attitudes, via joint evaluation by staff familiar with the student. PMID:23664251

  13. 关于八年制医学教学改革新思路的探索%The exploration about new idea of teaching reform for the eight-year clinical medical education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    游佳琳; 郁松

    2011-01-01

    上海交通大学医学院以提升学生综合能力为目标,以"PRICE"理念为核心,通过完善课程体系设置、创新教学方法模式、搭建实验教学平台、建立多维考核机制来探索八年制医学教学改革新思路.%According to the goal of promoting all-round ability and the core idea of PRICE,the Medical School of Shanghai Jiao Tong University improves the curriculum,teaching method,experimental teaching,multidimensional examination to explore the new system of teaching reform for eight-year clinical medical education.

  14. Status of Junior College Education on Clinical Medical Specialty in Chongqing and Its Countermeasures%重庆市专科层次临床医学专业培养现状分析及对策研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何坪; 邓宇; 罗利刚; 沈星亮; 杨晓梅; 何春玲; 陈凤兰; 吴建华

    2011-01-01

    目的 分析重庆市专科层次临床医学专业的培养现状,提出适应我市城乡社区卫生发展的人才培养新思路.方法 分别对我市12个社区卫生服务机构、42名新进社区全科医师和50名应届专科层次临床医学专业毕业生进行问卷调查,小组访谈上述机构负责人.结果 全科医师是社区医疗战线上的主要力量.近三年新进医师重医轻防,缺乏基本公共卫生相关知识和技能,临床基本诊疗水平和沟通能力也有待提高.54.55%的临床医学专业毕业生不愿意选择社区工作.结论 社区卫生服务机构对全科医师的需求量较大,现有专科层次临床医学专业培养不适应我市社区卫生服务的发展,建立和推行"以社区为基础的教育结合问题为基础的学习"三年制临床医学专业(全科医学方向)的培养模式迫在眉睫.%Objective To analyze the status of junior college education on clinical medical specialty in Chongqing so as to put forward a new idea on training professionals adapting to community health service development in Chongqing. Methods A questionnaire survey was performed in 12 community health services institutions among 42 new general practitioners ( GPs ) a-bout their abilities and 50 fresh graduates from clinical medical specialty of junior college. And the leaders of above - mentioned organizations were interviewed in groups. Results GPs were the main force in community medical services. New GPs, who were in recent 3 year recruited, paid more attention to treatments with less attention to prevention, were short of knowledge and skills related to basic public health; and their abilities of basic diagnosis and treatment as well as communication needed to be improved. About 54. 55% of the graduates from clinical medical specialty were not willing to work in communities. Conclusion Community health service organizations demands a lot of GPs. The current junior college education on clinical medical

  15. Feedback in clinical education: untying the Gordian knot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Debra F

    2015-05-01

    Feedback is essential to clinical education, especially in the era of competencies, milestones, and entrustable professional activities. It is, however, an area where medical educators often fall short. Although educational leaders and faculty supervisors provide feedback in a variety of clinical settings, surveys show important gaps in medical student and resident satisfaction with the feedback received, suggesting lost opportunities to identify performance problems as well as to help each learner reach his or her greatest potential.In this issue of Academic Medicine, Telio and colleagues extend the empirically validated concept of a "therapeutic alliance" to propose the "educational alliance" as a framework for enhancing feedback in medical education. They highlight the importance of source credibility, which depends on the teacher-learner relationship and alignment of values, the teacher's understanding of the learner's role and goals, the teacher's direct observation of the learner, and the learner's perception of the teacher's good intentions. The author of this Commentary suggests that the educational alliance framework should prompt medical educators to reconsider feedback and explore opportunities for optimizing it. Most medical schools and graduate medical education programs are not designed in a way that supports the education alliance model, but the Commentary author offers suggestions for cultivating educational alliances, including rethinking supervisor selection criteria. Such interventions should be combined with ongoing faculty development and efforts to improve coaching and mentoring for students, residents, and fellows. Untying the Gordian knot of effective feedback will require innovative approaches, exchange of successful strategies, and continued research. PMID:25406602

  16. The State of Nutrition Education at US Medical Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly M. Adams

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess the state of nutrition education at US medical schools and compare it with recommended instructional targets. Method. We surveyed all 133 US medical schools with a four-year curriculum about the extent and type of required nutrition education during the 2012/13 academic year. Results. Responses came from 121 institutions (91% response rate. Most US medical schools (86/121, 71% fail to provide the recommended minimum 25 hours of nutrition education; 43 (36% provide less than half that much. Nutrition instruction is still largely confined to preclinical courses, with an average of 14.3 hours occurring in this context. Less than half of all schools report teaching any nutrition in clinical practice; practice accounts for an average of only 4.7 hours overall. Seven of the 8 schools reporting at least 40 hours of nutrition instruction provided integrated courses together with clinical practice sessions. Conclusions. Many US medical schools still fail to prepare future physicians for everyday nutrition challenges in clinical practice. It cannot be a realistic expectation for physicians to effectively address obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, hospital malnutrition, and many other conditions as long as they are not taught during medical school and residency training how to recognize and treat the nutritional root causes.

  17. A Linked Dataset of Medical Educational Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietze, Stefan; Taibi, Davide; Yu, Hong Qing; Dovrolis, Nikolas

    2015-01-01

    Reusable educational resources became increasingly important for enhancing learning and teaching experiences, particularly in the medical domain where resources are particularly expensive to produce. While interoperability across educational resources metadata repositories is yet limited to the heterogeneity of metadata standards and interface…

  18. Assessment of Genetics Knowledge and Skills in Medical Students: Insight for a Clinical Neurogenetics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Phillip L.; Pettiford, Jennifer M.; Combs, Susan E.; Heffron, Ari; Healton, Sean; Hovaguimian, Alexandra; Macri, Charles J.

    2011-01-01

    The pace of discovery in biochemistry and genetics and its effect on clinical medicine places new curricular challenges in medical school education. We sought to evaluate students' understanding of neurogenetics and its clinical applications to design a pilot curriculum into the clinical neurology clerkship. We utilized a needs assessment and a…

  19. A needs assessment for mobile technology use in medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Vafa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study investigated how medical students perceived mobile technology as a component of their learning experience and identified barriers to the use of mobile technology in education. Methods: An anonymous survey developed by EDUCAUSE was distributed to 1000 first year medical students (M1s at two separate medical schools during three consecutive academic years, 2010 to 2013. The 25-item questionnaire assessed student use of mobile devices, student interest in mobile technologies as they apply to education, and technology issues related to implementing mobile application in education. Results: The majority of participating M1s (n=520 indicated that they own a smartphone or a similar mobile device. More than half of M1s reported using their devices for education, primarily to download educational course materials, listen to podcasts/lectures, and access medical resource applications. Two student-identified technology issues concerning the use of mobile technology in education were ensuring better implementation of technology and faster data transmission (60. Review of qualitative data from written responses to open-ended questions highlighted three common themes: (1 the current use of mobile technology in the clinics and other institutions, (2 common technology ownership and comfort of use, and (3 efficiency and accessibility to learning materials. Conclusions: While the needs assessment revealed student acceptance of mobile technology in education, student responses highlighted the need for a supportive academic and technological infrastructure.

  20. Exploring the transition of undergraduate medical students into a clinical clerkship using organizational socialization theory

    OpenAIRE

    Atherley, Anique E.; Hambleton, Ian R; Unwin, Nigel; George, Colette; Lashley, Paula M.; Taylor, Charles G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Transitions in medical education are emotionally and socially dynamic; this may affect learning. Students transitioning from preclinical to clinical training may experience negative consequences. Less is understood about students’ experiences during transitions within clinical training and influential factors. Methods The authors used organizational socialization theory to explore a transition within the clinical years. Final-year medical students experienced a nine-week internal m...

  1. What is the Best Evidence Medical Education?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasoul Masoomi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Best Evidence Medical Education (BEME is defined as: “The implementation by teachers and educational bodies in their practice, of methods and approaches to education based on the best evidence available.” Five steps have been recognized in the practice of BEME. These are: framing the question, developing a search strategy, evaluating the evidence, implementing change and evaluating that change. In this paper, I described the concept of BEME, its steps, and challenges.

  2. A training session in a clinical simulation laboratory for the acquisition of clinical skills by newly recruited medical interns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Akinobu; Shimura, Toshiro; Kim, Chol; Ishikawa, Gen; Haraguchi, Shuji; Ohno, Tadaaki; Hayashi, Hiroki; Nakano, Hiroshi; Nitta, Takashi; Takaoka, Masako

    2010-08-01

    In organized orientation programs for newly recruited medical interns of the Nippon Medical School Hospital, the working committee of the clinical simulation laboratory introduced a laboratory training session that was designed to improve the clinical skills of the medical interns. The session consisted of 6 training courses, comprising internal examination, tracheal intubation, auscultation of heart sounds, bandaging and the collection of samples of venous and arterial blood. Medical interns rotated to a new course every 30 minutes and did practical trainings in each of the 6 skills. A total of 36 newly recruited medical interns participated in the training session. The majority of medical interns took part in the practical training actively and positively. The session was efficiently carried out from the standpoints of human resources and the teaching hours involved. A post training questionnaire survey, completed by the medical interns, revealed that many of them valued the sessions for comprehensibility of the instructions, the descriptions in the manual and the content of the training; however, only 21% thought that they had successfully acquired the clinical skills. Medical interns must continually engage in self-training to steadily acquire basic clinical skills. The convenience of a clinical simulation laboratory, together with the reinforcement of the education of clinical skills during internship, is necessary to strengthen the educational benefits of the training session. PMID:20818139

  3. Medical education in the United Kingdom: Numerous positive indicators leading to a thriving specialty

    OpenAIRE

    Hashim Z, Fahim N, Brewer H, Pathiraja A, Rana NA

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, medical education always took a back seat and there was no impetus on clinical teachers to train as better teachers. However, attitudes have changed over the past couple of decades. Now, not only doctors and other health care professionals but also the General Medical Council (GMC) and the National Health Service (NHS) recognise the pivotal role that clinical teachers play in medical education and the constant need to update and improve teaching skills. There is now an increase...

  4. A meaningful MESS (Medical Education Scholarship Support)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whicker, Shari A.; Engle, Deborah L.; Chudgar, Saumil; DeMeo, Stephen; Bean, Sarah M.; Narayan, Aditee P.; Grochowski, Colleen O'Connor; Nagler, Alisa

    2016-01-01

    Background Graduate medical education faculty bear the responsibility of demonstrating active research and scholarship; however, faculty who choose education-focused careers may face unique obstacles related to the lack of promotion tracks, funding, career options, and research opportunities. Our objective was to address education research and scholarship barriers by providing a collaborative peer-mentoring environment and improve the production of research and scholarly outputs. Methods We describe a Medical Education Scholarship Support (MESS) group created in 2013. MESS is an interprofessional, multidisciplinary peer-mentoring education research community that now spans multiple institutions. This group meets monthly to address education research and scholarship challenges. Through this process, we develop new knowledge, research, and scholarly products, in addition to meaningful collaborations. Results MESS originated with eight founding members, all of whom still actively participate. MESS has proven to be a sustainable unfunded local community of practice, encouraging faculty to pursue health professions education (HPE) careers and fostering scholarship. We have met our original objectives that involved maintaining 100% participant retention; developing increased knowledge in at least seven content areas; and contributing to the development of 13 peer-reviewed publications, eight professional presentations, one Masters of Education project, and one educational curriculum. Discussion The number of individuals engaged in HPE research continues to rise. The MESS model could be adapted for use at other institutions, thereby reducing barriers HPE researchers face, providing an effective framework for trainees interested in education-focused careers, and having a broader impact on the education research landscape. PMID:27476538

  5. Can Medical Education be Researched?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, David A.

    1991-01-01

    The issues involved in conducting educational research are addressed. Some suggestions for methodology that can be used are suggested. Concerns about attempting to carry out investigations that follow the positivist model are discussed. (KR)

  6. Developing a competency-based medical education curriculum for the core basic medical sciences in an African Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olopade, Funmilayo Eniola; Adaramoye, Oluwatosin Adekunle; Raji, Yinusa; Fasola, Abiodun Olubayo; Olapade-Olaopa, Emiola Oluwabunmi

    2016-01-01

    The College of Medicine of the University of Ibadan recently revised its MBBS and BDS curricula to a competency-based medical education method of instruction. This paper reports the process of revising the methods of instruction and assessment in the core basic medical sciences directed at producing medical and dental graduates with a sound knowledge of the subjects sufficient for medical and dental practice and for future postgraduate efforts in the field or related disciplines. The health needs of the community and views of stakeholders in the Ibadan medical and dental schools were determined, and the "old" curriculum was reviewed. This process was directed at identifying the strengths and weaknesses of the old curricula and the newer competences required for modern-day medical/dental practice. The admission criteria and processes and the learning methods of the students were also studied. At the end of the review, an integrated, system-based, community-oriented, person-centered, and competency-driven curriculum was produced and approved for implementation. Four sets of students have been admitted into the curriculum. There have been challenges to the implementation process, but these have been overcome by continuous faculty development and reorientation programs for the nonteaching staff and students. Two sets of students have crossed over to the clinical school, and the consensus among the clinical teachers is that their knowledge and application of the basic medical sciences are satisfactory. The Ibadan medical and dental schools are implementing their competency-based medical education curricula successfully. The modifications to the teaching and assessment of the core basic medical science subjects have resulted in improved learning and performance at the final examinations. PMID:27486351

  7. Developing a competency-based medical education curriculum for the core basic medical sciences in an African Medical School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olopade, Funmilayo Eniola; Adaramoye, Oluwatosin Adekunle; Raji, Yinusa; Fasola, Abiodun Olubayo; Olapade-Olaopa, Emiola Oluwabunmi

    2016-01-01

    The College of Medicine of the University of Ibadan recently revised its MBBS and BDS curricula to a competency-based medical education method of instruction. This paper reports the process of revising the methods of instruction and assessment in the core basic medical sciences directed at producing medical and dental graduates with a sound knowledge of the subjects sufficient for medical and dental practice and for future postgraduate efforts in the field or related disciplines. The health needs of the community and views of stakeholders in the Ibadan medical and dental schools were determined, and the “old” curriculum was reviewed. This process was directed at identifying the strengths and weaknesses of the old curricula and the newer competences required for modern-day medical/dental practice. The admission criteria and processes and the learning methods of the students were also studied. At the end of the review, an integrated, system-based, community-oriented, person-centered, and competency-driven curriculum was produced and approved for implementation. Four sets of students have been admitted into the curriculum. There have been challenges to the implementation process, but these have been overcome by continuous faculty development and reorientation programs for the nonteaching staff and students. Two sets of students have crossed over to the clinical school, and the consensus among the clinical teachers is that their knowledge and application of the basic medical sciences are satisfactory. The Ibadan medical and dental schools are implementing their competency-based medical education curricula successfully. The modifications to the teaching and assessment of the core basic medical science subjects have resulted in improved learning and performance at the final examinations. PMID:27486351

  8. Education and training in medical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The medical physicist education and training reflects its role in medicine. A solid foundation in medical physics is fundamental for the practice of a physicist in any multidisciplinary activity in medicine, in particular when ionising radiation are used either in diagnosis or in therapy as a proper high-level knowledge of practicing is the tool to maintain proper radiation control and desirable outcome of results. In many countries specific organizations and legislative national bodies have constructed curricula for the medical physicist. For example, the EC Directive concerning basic safety standards and medical exposures have given statutory requirements for physicists to be involved in the medical use of ionising radiation. An outline of the medical physicist's duties, curricula and training is presented in a paper as a discussing basis for the introduction of the curricula in a specific national scheme in agreement with the existing legislation constraints. (author)

  9. Medical education in Maharashtra: The student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hira R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is hardly any structured study reporting the perspective of medical students, with regard to the medical education system in Maharashtra, which is facing challenges. Aim: A perception study of students was conducted to explore the situation, challenges, and consequent solutions of medical education in Maharashtra. Settings and Design: A descriptive perception study. Materials and Methods: A structured questionnaire was e-mailed to 92 students, and interviews with seven key-informants comprising of faculty, administrators, and policy makers were conducted, to gather qualitative insights. Results: Thirty-seven student replies were received and analyzed. The satisfaction level of student respondents for various factors was as follows: infrastructure 18/37 (48.6%, quality of teaching 14/37 (37.8%, patient population 22/37 (59.5%, and administration 8/37 (21.6%. Ninety-two percent (34/37 of the students stated that the fundamental problem was the inability of the system to attract good, quality teachers. The reasons stated were low salaries, low level of job satisfaction, high level of bureaucracy, and high work load. Conclusions: The medical education system in Maharashtra is viewed as being stagnant. The respondents emphasized an urgent need for educational reforms, which should include better compensation for teachers, sharing of facilities between government and private medical colleges, and improved efficiency of the Medical Council of India. In the long run a public-private mix with sharing of resources may be a plausible solution.

  10. Instruction in medical ethics during clinical training for medical students. Report on experience in radio-oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article gives a review of the current state of education in medical ethics in Germany. The issue is considered from the viewpoint of radio-oncology. Both the pertinent literature and our own experience in teaching medical ethics are presented. In October 2003, medical ethics was integrated into the curriculum of medicine. The aim was to train competence in the field of personal attitudes and to intensify skills of moral reasoning. Our own experiences are positive, which is in accordance with the reports of other working groups. Most of the students were interested in education in medical ethics and looked upon ethical training as being an important part of their studies. Medical students are interested in ethical education during the clinical period of their studies, which has been taken into account since the actual change of the curriculum. Radio-oncologists as specialists in other clinical fields can offer important contributions when they discuss clinical cases from the viewpoint of medical ethics. The long-term effect of such an education will become the subject of future research. (orig.)

  11. The educational attributes and responsibilities of effective medical educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatem, Charles J; Searle, Nancy S; Gunderman, Richard; Krane, N Kevin; Perkowski, Linda; Schutze, Gordon E; Steinert, Yvonne

    2011-04-01

    Of the many roles that the academic-educator may fulfill, that of teacher is particularly challenging. Building on prior recommendations from the literature, this article identifies the skill set of teachers across the medical education continuum-characteristics of attitude and attributes, knowledge, and pedagogic skills that permit effective teaching to be linked with effective learning and understanding. This examination which characterizes teachers' attitudes, knowledge, and skills serves to reemphasize the centrality of teaching within medical education, provides direction for faculty and institutions alike in the discharge of academic responsibilities, and makes educational accountability clear. This listing of teacher attitudes and responsibilities was vetted in 2009 by medical education leaders from across North America during a national conference on faculty development.A set of recommendations concerning faculty development issues for medical teachers is offered. The recommendations are intended to establish an academic culture in medical education that values and rewards-academically and fiscally-those centrally committed to the role of teacher. The challenges of defining skills, developing and funding programs, and ongoing evaluation must be faced to achieve success in teaching throughout medical education, now and in the future. Faculty members, fellow learners, and patients deserve no less. PMID:21346510

  12. Teleconferencing in Medical Education: A Useful Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamba Pankaj

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Education and healthcare are basic needs for humandevelopment. Technological innovation has broadened theaccess to higher quality healthcare and education withoutregard to time, distance or geopolitical boundaries. Distancelearning has gained popularity as a means of learning inrecent years due to widely distributed learners, busyschedules and rising travel costs. Teleconferencing is also avery useful tool as a distance learning method.Teleconferencing is a real-time and live interactiveprogramme in which one set of participants are at one ormore locations and the other set of participants are atanother. The teleconference allows for interaction,including audio and/or video, and possibly other modalities,between at least two sites. Various methods are availablefor setting up a teleconferencing unit. A detailed review ofthe trend in the use of teleconferencing in medicaleducation was conducted using Medline and a literaturesearch.Teleconferencing was found to be a very useful tool incontinuing medical education (CME, postgraduate medicaleducation, undergraduate medical education,telementoring and many other situations. The use ofteleconferencing in medical education has many advantagesincluding savings in terms of travel costs and time. It givesaccess to the best educational resources and experiencewithout any limitations of boundaries of distance and time.It encourages two-way interactions and facilitates learningin adults. Despite having some pitfalls in its implementationit is now being seen as an important tool in facilitatinglearning in medicine and many medical schools andinstitutions are adapting this novel tool.

  13. Are medical educators following General Medical Council guidelines on obesity education: if not why not?

    OpenAIRE

    Chisholm A, Mann K, Peters S, Hart J

    2013-01-01

    Background Although the United Kingdom’s (UK’s) General Medical Council (GMC) recommends that graduating medical students are competent to discuss obesity and behaviour change with patients, it is difficult to integrate this education into existing curricula, and clinicians report being unprepared to support patients needing obesity management in practice. We therefore aimed to identify factors influencing the integration of obesity management education within medical schools. Methods Twenty-...

  14. Radiation education required for medical staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper introduces the present state and problems of radiation education in the training course for health professionals. Firstly, the following are introduced: Revised version of 'Medical education model and core curriculum ? Guidelines for educational contents (FY2010),' and the contents of pre-graduation education of education curriculum at the Department of Radiation Biology and Health, University of Occupational and Environmental Health (UOEH). Next, the author describes his educational experience at the Institute of Industrial Ecological Sciences (Nursing) of UOEH, and stresses the need for radiation education in order to eliminate the anxiety of nurses against radiation. In addition, he also describes the present state and problems with respect to exposure and radiation risk due to the Fukushima nuclear accident. (A.O.)

  15. Teaching Conflict: Professionalism and Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, K J

    2015-12-01

    Resistance by physicians, medical researchers, medical educators, and medical students to pharmaceutical industry influence in medicine is often based on the notion that physicians (guided by the ethics of their profession) and the industry (guided by profit) are in conflict. This criticism has taken the form of a professional movement opposing conflict of interest (COI) in medicine and medical education and has resulted in policies and guidelines that frame COI as the problem and outline measures to address this problem. In this paper, I offer a critique of this focus on COI that is grounded in a broader critique of neo-liberalism, arguing it individualizes the relationship between physicians and industry, too neatly delineates between the two entities, and reduces the network of social, economic, and political relations to this one dilemma. PMID:26133893

  16. [Flipped classroom in basic medical education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merenmies, Jussi; Niemi-Murola, Leila; Pyörälä, Eeva

    2015-01-01

    Medical education is facing changes in order to improve young doctors' competency to respond better to current needs of the patients and the society. Both curriculum content and teaching methods are revised. In addition to vibrant research in academic medical education, teachers are supported by the improved web-based learning environments and novel technical tools. Flipped classroom, a new paradigm that benefits from technical development, provides many opportunities for medical education. This teaching method always consists of two mutually complementary parts. The first part of the learning action takes place independently off classroom with video lectures or other stimuli for learning. The second part takes place in conjunction with the teacher and other students, and requires student group interactions. PMID:26677552

  17. China's Medical Education and Interventional Neuroradiology Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xianli; He, Hongwei; Wu, Zhongxue

    2015-11-01

    China's medical education system is complex and consists of degree programs lasting from 3 to 8 years, the inconsistency across previous educational backgrounds is a challenge when implementing residency training objectives and contents. Only in several advanced medical universities, education for interventional neuroradiology (INR) is a part of a rotation in the 2-year training for neurosurgery. Advanced INR techniques are confined to big cities such as Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou, where most of the Chinese INRs have their 6 to 12 months fellowship to major medical centers. With a tremendous economic growth in the region, we expect that INR practice will evolve at an equally rapid pace, and information presented in this chapter may soon become obsolete. PMID:26079783

  18. Medical Education and Information and Communication Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Houshyari, Asefeh Badiey; Bahadorani, Mahnaz; Tootoonchi, Mina; Gardiner, John Jacob Zucker; Peña, Roberto A; Adibi, Peyman

    2012-01-01

    Background: Information and communication technology (ICT) has brought many changes in medical education and practice in the last couple of decades. Teaching and learning medicine particularly has gone under profound changes due to computer technologies, and medical schools around the world have invested heavily either in new computer technologies or in the process of adapting to this technological revolution. In order to catch up with the rest of the world, developing countries need to resea...

  19. Distributed medical informatics education using internet2.

    OpenAIRE

    Cummings, Joseph; Tidmarsh, Patricia; Hersh, William; Friedman, Charles

    2002-01-01

    The curricula of most medical informatics training programs are incomplete. We used Internet2-based videoconferencing to expand the educational opportunities of medical informatics students at Oregon Health & Science University and the University of Pittsburgh. Students and faculty in both programs shared extra-curricular research conferences and journal club meetings. A course in Information Retrieval was made available to students in both programs. The conferences, meetings and class were w...

  20. Medical ethics and education for social responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemer, M I

    1980-01-01

    The physician, said Henry Sigerist in 1940, has been acquiring an increasingly social role. For centuries, however, codes of medical ethics have concentrated on proper behavior toward individual patients and almost ignored the doctor's responsibilities to society. Major health service reforms have come principally from motivated lay leadership and citizen groups. Private physicians have been largely hostile toward movements to equalize the economic access for people to medical care and improve the supply and distribution of doctors. Medical practice in America and throughout the world has become seriously commercialized. In response, governments have applied various strategies to constrain physicians and induce more socially responsible behavior. But such external pressures should not be necessary if a broad socially oriented code of medical ethics were followed. Health care system changes would be most effective, but medical education could be thoroughly recast to clarify community health problems and policies required to meet them. Sigerist proposed such a new medical curriculum in 1941; if it had been introduced, a social code of medical ethics would not now seem utopian. An international conference might well be convened to consider how physicians should be educated to reach the inspiring goals of the World Health Organization. PMID:7405276

  1. Medical ultrasound education for bioengineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-04-01

    The widespread adoption of ultrasound technologies in medicine has necessitated the development of educational programs to address the growing demand for trained expertise in both academia and industry. The demand has been especially great in the field of therapeutic ultrasound that has experienced a significant level of research and development activities in the past decade. The applications cover a wide range including cancer treatment, hemorrhage control, cardiac ablation, gene therapy, and cosmetic surgery. A comprehensive educational program in ultrasound is well suited for bioengineering departments at colleges and universities. Our educational program for students in Bioengineering at the University of Washington includes a year-long coursework covering theory and practice of ultrasound, conducting research projects, attending and presenting at weekly seminars on literature survey, presentations at scientific meetings, and attending specialized workshops offered by various institutions for specific topics. An important aspect of this training is its multi-disciplinary approach, encompassing science, engineering, and medicine. The students are required to build teams with expertise in these disciplines. Our experience shows that these students are well prepared for careers in academia, conducting cutting edge research, as well as industry, being involved in the transformation of research end-products to commercially viable technology.

  2. Reducing obesity prejudice in medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Matharu, K; Shapiro, JF; Hammer, RR; Kravitz, RL; Wilson, MD; Fitzgerald, FT

    2014-01-01

    © 2014, Network: Towards Unity for Health. All rights reserved. Background: Healthcare worker attitudes toward obese individuals facilitate discrimination and contribute to poor health outcomes. Previous studies have demonstrated medical student bias toward obese individuals, but few have examined effects of the educational environment on these prejudicial beliefs. We sought to determine whether an innovative educational intervention (reading a play about obesity) could diminish obesity preju...

  3. Beyond the Margins: Reflective Writing and Development of Reflective Capacity in Medical Education

    OpenAIRE

    Wald, Hedy S.; Reis, Shmuel P.

    2010-01-01

    Reflective capacity has been described as an essential characteristic of professionally competent clinical practice, core to ACGME competencies. Reflection has been recently linked to promoting effective use of feedback in medical education and associated with improved diagnostic accuracy, suggesting promising outcomes. There has been a proliferation of reflective writing pedagogy within medical education to foster development of reflective capacity, extend empathy with deepened understanding...

  4. THE ROLES OF CLINICAL PHARMACY IN REDUCING MEDICATION ERRORS

    OpenAIRE

    Alsaraf Khulood Majid

    2012-01-01

    Potential activation of clinical pharmacist role is of great importance in reducing the medication errors which are a well- known problem in hospital. The medication errors could be prescribing errors, dispensing errors, and administering errors. In this study medication errors randomly were collected by clinical pharmacist and inpatient pharmacist from different wards at a Hospital in Dubai, UAE, from July to October 2011. The results showed that the highest percentage of medication errors w...

  5. Time to return medical schools to their primary purpose: education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahamson, S

    1996-04-01

    The author maintains that the quality of medical education has been dropping for the last few decades as medical schools become less and less focused on their primary purpose of training physicians. Until the years immediately following World War II, the administration of the medical school was carried out by a small staff headed by a dean whose role was to provide leadership in educational matters. Academic departments managed the educational program, and the faculty were expected to be teachers and to participate in educational planning, preparation of teaching materials, advising of students, assessment of students' performances, admission, and all other tasks associated with having a teaching position. Today, the administration of a typical school includes any number of assistants to the dean and a wide variety of other staff dealing not only with educational functions but with grant management, public relations, fund-raising, personnel policy, budgeting, and an enormous and complex parallel structure designed to manage clinical practice and to respond to market pressures. The role of faculty has also changed greatly; faculty are expected to be researchers and clinicians first, and teaching is usually shortchanged. The author explains why he believes these changes have come about; for example, the strong federal support of research after World War II, which encouraged a growing dependence of medical schools on research grants and consequently raised in importance those faculty who could obtain such grants. He concludes with common-sense proposals for reform (such as having the education of medical students in the hands of a small number of faculty whose prime responsibility is teaching), but admits that there are fundamental barriers to such reforms, especially vested interests and resistance to change. In the end, change will come only when those in power recognize that medical schools must be returned to their primary role of training physicians. PMID:8645396

  6. How to improve medical education website design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levine David

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Internet provides a means of disseminating medical education curricula, allowing institutions to share educational resources. Much of what is published online is poorly planned, does not meet learners' needs, or is out of date. Discussion Applying principles of curriculum development, adult learning theory and educational website design may result in improved online educational resources. Key steps in developing and implementing an education website include: 1 Follow established principles of curriculum development; 2 Perform a needs assessment and repeat the needs assessment regularly after curriculum implementation; 3 Include in the needs assessment targeted learners, educators, institutions, and society; 4 Use principles of adult learning and behavioral theory when developing content and website function; 5 Design the website and curriculum to demonstrate educational effectiveness at an individual and programmatic level; 6 Include a mechanism for sustaining website operations and updating content over a long period of time. Summary Interactive, online education programs are effective for medical training, but require planning, implementation, and maintenance that follow established principles of curriculum development, adult learning, and behavioral theory.

  7. Medical student attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies in medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kron Frederick W

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies in K-12 and college students show that their learning preferences have been strongly shaped by new media technologies like video games, virtual reality environments, the Internet, and social networks. However, there is no known research on medical students' game experiences or attitudes towards new media technologies in medical education. This investigation seeks to elucidate medical student experiences and attitudes, to see whether they warrant the development of new media teaching methods in medicine. Methods Medical students from two American universities participated. An anonymous, 30-item, cross-sectional survey addressed demographics, game play experience and attitudes on using new media technologies in medical education. Statistical analysis identified: 1 demographic characteristics; 2 differences between the two universities; 3 how video game play differs across gender, age, degree program and familiarity with computers; and 4 characteristics of students who play most frequently. Results 217 medical students participated. About half were female (53%. Respondents liked the idea of using technology to enhance healthcare education (98%, felt that education should make better use of new media technologies (96%, and believed that video games can have educational value (80%. A majority (77% would use a multiplayer online healthcare simulation on their own time, provided that it helped them to accomplish an important goal. Men and women agreed that they were most inclined to use multiplayer simulations if they were fun (97%, and if they helped to develop skill in patient interactions (90%. However, there was significant gender dissonance over types of favorite games, the educational value of video games, and the desire to participate in games that realistically replicated the experience of clinical practice. Conclusions Overall, medical student respondents, including many who do not play video games, held highly

  8. Clinical research and medical care: towards effective and complete integration

    OpenAIRE

    Sacristán, José A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite their close relationship, clinical research and medical care have become separated by clear boundaries. The purpose of clinical research is to generate generalizable knowledge useful for future patients, whereas medical care aims to promote the well-being of individual patients. The evolution towards patient-centered medicine and patient-oriented research, and the gradual standardization of medicine are contributing to closer ties between clinical research and medical pract...

  9. Medical specialty boards can help measure graduate medical education outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Lars E; Carek, Peter; Holmboe, Eric S; Puffer, James C; Warm, Eric J; Phillips, Robert L

    2014-06-01

    U.S. graduate medical education (GME) training institutions are under increasing scrutiny to measure program outcomes as a demonstration of accountability for the sizeable funding they receive from the federal government. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) is a potential agent of measuring GME accountability but has no interaction with physicians after residency training is completed. American Board of Medical Specialty (ABMS) member boards interact with physicians throughout their careers through maintenance of certification (MOC) and are a potential source of valuable data on physician competency and quality of care, both of which could be used to measure GME accountability.The authors propose that ABMS boards and the ACGME deepen their existing relationship to better assess residency training outcomes. ABMS boards have a wealth of data on physicians collected as a by-product of MOC and business operations. Further, many ABMS boards collect practice demographics and scope-of-practice information through MOC enrollment surveys or recertification examination questionnaires. These data are potentially valuable in helping residencies know what their graduates are doing in practice. Part 4 of MOC generally involves assessment of the quality of care delivered in practice, and ABMS boards could share these deidentified data with the ACGME and residency programs to provide direct feedback on the practice outcomes of graduates.ABMS member boards and the ACGME should broaden their long-standing relationship to further develop shared roles and data-sharing mechanisms to better inform residencies and the public about GME training outcomes. PMID:24871232

  10. Continuing medical education in Turkey: Recent developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, Hakan

    2002-01-01

    Background The Turkish Association of Medicine founded a Continuing Medical Education Accreditation Committee in 1993 to evaluate and accredit scientific meetings and publications. The aims of this project were to raise the standards of meetings and to introduce compulsory revalidation and re-certification for physicians in Turkey. Discussion Since the year 1994, 2348 applications to the Continuing Medical Education board have been made (mostly for scientific meetings), and 95% of these applications have been accepted. Physicians received 139.014 credits during this time. This number is increasing every year. Meeting organisers' demand for such a kind of evaluation is increasing, because participants increasingly request it. Summary Efforts for revalidation and re-certification of physicians have not been completely successful yet. In the near future the Co-ordination Council of Medical Speciality Societies is going to oblige member associations to establish speciality boards. This will be the first step to the conventional use of Continuing Medical Education credits in occupational evaluation. Time-limited re-certification of physicians is the principal goal of Turkish Medical Association. Efforts to implement this change in legislation are being made. PMID:12074763

  11. Teaching About Climate Change in Medical Education: An Opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Janie; Blashki, Grant

    2016-04-26

    Climate change threatens many of the gains in development and health over the last century. However, it could also be a catalyst for a necessary societal transformation to a sustainable and healthy future. Doctors have a crucial role in climate change mitigation and health system adaptation to prepare for emergent health threats and a carbon-constrained future. This paper argues that climate change should be integrated into medical education for three reasons: first, to prepare students for clinical practice in a climate-changing world; secondly, to promote public health and eco-health literacy; and finally, to deepen existing learning and strengthen graduate attributes. This paper builds on existing literature and the authors' experience to outline potential learning objectives, teaching methods and assessment tasks. In the wake of recent progress at the United Nations climate change conference, COP-21, it is hoped that this paper will assist universities to integrate teaching about climate change into medical education. Significance for public healthThere is a strong case for teaching about climate change in medical education. Anthropogenic climate change is accepted by scientists, governments and health authorities internationally. Given the dire implications for human health, climate change is of fundamental relevance to future doctors. Integrating climate change into medical education offers an opportunity for future doctors to develop skills and insights essential for clinical practice and a public health role in a climate-changing world. This echoes a broader call for improved public health literacy among medical graduates. This paper provides medical schools with a rationale and an outline for teaching on climate change. PMID:27190980

  12. Teaching About Climate Change in Medical Education: An Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Janie; Blashki, Grant

    2016-01-01

    Climate change threatens many of the gains in development and health over the last century. However, it could also be a catalyst for a necessary societal transformation to a sustainable and healthy future. Doctors have a crucial role in climate change mitigation and health system adaptation to prepare for emergent health threats and a carbon-constrained future. This paper argues that climate change should be integrated into medical education for three reasons: first, to prepare students for clinical practice in a climate-changing world; secondly, to promote public health and eco-health literacy; and finally, to deepen existing learning and strengthen graduate attributes. This paper builds on existing literature and the authors’ experience to outline potential learning objectives, teaching methods and assessment tasks. In the wake of recent progress at the United Nations climate change conference, COP-21, it is hoped that this paper will assist universities to integrate teaching about climate change into medical education. Significance for public health There is a strong case for teaching about climate change in medical education. Anthropogenic climate change is accepted by scientists, governments and health authorities internationally. Given the dire implications for human health, climate change is of fundamental relevance to future doctors. Integrating climate change into medical education offers an opportunity for future doctors to develop skills and insights essential for clinical practice and a public health role in a climate-changing world. This echoes a broader call for improved public health literacy among medical graduates. This paper provides medical schools with a rationale and an outline for teaching on climate change. PMID:27190980

  13. Potential advantage of student-run clinics for diversifying a medical school class

    OpenAIRE

    Chris N. Gu; McElroy, Jane A; Corcoran, Blake C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of a student-run clinic on the diversification of a medical student class. We distributed a two-page, 20-item, paper survey to students of the University of Missouri School of Medicine (MU SOM) class of 2015 in July of 2011. The survey gathered information on general demographics, opinions on the importance of medical education opportunities, and opinions on the importance of medical school characteristics in applying to and attending MU...

  14. How does the medical graduates' self-assessment of their clinical competency differ from experts' assessment?

    OpenAIRE

    Abadel Fatima Taleb; Hattab Abdulla Saeed

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The assessment of the performance of medical school graduates during their first postgraduate years provides an early indicator of the quality of the undergraduate curriculum and educational process. The objective of this study was to assess the clinical competency of medical graduates, as perceived by the graduates themselves and by the experts. Methods This is a hospital based cross-sectional study. It covered 105 medical graduates and 63 experts selected by convenient s...

  15. Does interprofessional education jeopardize medical skills?

    OpenAIRE

    Faresjö, Tomas; Wilhelmsson, Margaretha; Pelling, Staffan; Dahlgren, Lars-Ove; Hammar, Mats

    2007-01-01

    Original publication: Tomas Faresjö, Margaretha Wilhelmsson, Staffan Pelling, Lars-Ove Dahlgren and Mats Hammar, Does interprofessional education jeopardize medical skills?, 2008, Journal of Interprofessional Care, (21), 5, 573-576. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13561820701412335. Copyright © 2008 Taylor & Francis Group, an informa business

  16. Vanquishing Virtue: The Impact of Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulehan, Jack; Williams, Peter C.

    2001-01-01

    Asserts that North American medical education favors an explicit commitment to traditional values of doctoring--empathy, compassion, and altruism--but a tacit commitment to behaviors grounded in an ethic of detachment, self-interest, and objectivity. Explores differing ways (conflation, deflation, and maintaining of values) that students respond…

  17. Medical Education: Changing With The Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hla Yee Yee

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available “Lord grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannotchange, the courage to change the things I can, and thewisdom to know the difference.”– Saint Francis of AssisiNothing is static, and change comes inevitably,Medical Education being no exception. However,the degree of acceptance and pace of change varies fromcountry to country, and region to region, depending onthe leadership in teaching institutions, culture,political scene and material wealth. The theme for theInternational Medical Conference (IMEC for 2008 was“Winds of Change in Medical Education”. One of thereasons why this theme was chosen was that theOrganising Committee felt the need for a forum onwhich to exchange experiences in the region withrespect to local and global changes in educating today’shealth professionals.

  18. Addressing Assessment in Libyan Medical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson J, Gill D, Woolf K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Assessment is a powerful driver of student learning: it gives a message to learners about what theyshould be learning, what the learning organisation believes to be important, and how they should goabout learning. Assessment tools allow measurement of student achievement and thereby giveteachers insight into their students’ learning, and enable teachers to make systematic judgementsabout progress and achievement. It is vital then that assessment tools drive students to learn theright things as well as measure student learning appropriately. Any attempts to reform curricula andteaching methods must consider the role of assessment in the learning process.Libyan doctors and medical students have been calling for changes to teaching and assessmentmethods at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. A team from the Academic Centre for MedicalEducation at University College, London have been running workshops in conjunction with the LibyanBoard of Medical Specialties since 2006 to discuss strategic aims of assessment in medical educationin Libya for the 21st century and to deliver an assessment skills course to Libyan educators. Thisarticle outlines the course and the outcomes of preliminary discussions between academics from theUK, participants in the assessment courses and representatives from the Libyan Board of MedicalSpecialties. As a result of these discussions it was agreed by all that Libyan Medical Schoolassessment methods need updating and, despite significant challenges, changes in assessment mustbe made as soon as possible. There is a real need for support in both addressing these changes andfor practical training for assessors in contemporary assessment methods.

  19. On-line integration of computer controlled diagnostic devices and medical information systems in undergraduate medical physics education for physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanus, Josef; Nosek, Tomas; Zahora, Jiri; Bezrouk, Ales; Masin, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    We designed and evaluated an innovative computer-aided-learning environment based on the on-line integration of computer controlled medical diagnostic devices and a medical information system for use in the preclinical medical physics education of medical students. Our learning system simulates the actual clinical environment in a hospital or primary care unit. It uses a commercial medical information system for on-line storage and processing of clinical type data acquired during physics laboratory classes. Every student adopts two roles, the role of 'patient' and the role of 'physician'. As a 'physician' the student operates the medical devices to clinically assess 'patient' colleagues and records all results in an electronic 'patient' record. We also introduced an innovative approach to the use of supportive education materials, based on the methods of adaptive e-learning. A survey of student feedback is included and statistically evaluated. The results from the student feedback confirm the positive response of the latter to this novel implementation of medical physics and informatics in preclinical education. This approach not only significantly improves learning of medical physics and informatics skills but has the added advantage that it facilitates students' transition from preclinical to clinical subjects. PMID:22200603

  20. Medical Students’ Attitudes about Team-Based Learning in a Pre-Clinical Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Parmelee, Dean X.; DeStephen, Dan; Borges, Nicole J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Team-Based Learning is relatively new in medical education. Team-Based Learning was integrated into one medical school’s pre-clinical curriculum in 2002. Purpose: This study com­pared how medical students’ attitudes about the Team-Based Learning process changed between the first and second year of medical school. Method: 180 students responded to 19 statements regarding their attitudes about Team-Based Learning during their first and second year of medical school. Data were analy...

  1. Gender and sex: issues in medical education [

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lagro-Janssen, Toine

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] There is ample scientific evidence to support the importance of gender issues in health and illness. If we fail to take such sex and gender differences sufficiently into account, this will affect the quality of health care provided to men and women, and this is precisely what good medical education means to prevent. In this paper examples are given that show how knowledge, attitudes and skills relating to sex and gender can be implemented in both optional and compulsory courses. Next, factors that can facilitate or impede the implementation of gender specific medical education are described. Finally, the author discusses what needs to be done to educate future physicians that are equipped with appropriate expertise to deal with aspects of gender in medicine.

  2. The Impact of Interactive, Computerized Educational Modules on Preclinical Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryner, Benjamin S.; Saddawi-Konefka, Daniel; Gest, Thomas R.

    2008-01-01

    Interactive computerized modules have been linked to improved retention of material in clinical medicine. This study examined the effects of a new series of interactive learning modules for preclinical medical education, specifically in the areas of quiz performance, perceived difficulty of concepts, study time, and perceived stress level. We…

  3. Accelerating medical education: a survey of deans and program directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangiarella, Joan; Gillespie, Colleen; Shea, Judy A.; Morrison, Gail; Abramson, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    Background A handful of medical schools in the U.S. are awarding medical degrees after three years. While the number of three-year pathway programs is slowly increasing there is little data on the opinions of medical education leaders on the need for shortening training. Purpose To survey deans and program directors (PDs) to understand the current status of 3-year medical degree programs and to elicit perceptions of the need for shortening medical school and the benefits and liabilities of 3-year pathway programs (3YPP). Methods Online surveys were emailed to the academic deans of all U.S. medical schools and to a convenience sample of residency and fellowship PDs. Frequency distributions are reported for key survey items and content analysis was used to describe open-ended responses. Results Of the respondents, 7% have a 3YPP, 4% were developing one, and 35% were considering development. In 2014, 47% of educational deans and 32% of PDs agreed that there may be a need to shorten medical school. From a list of benefits, both deans and PDs agreed that the greatest benefit to a 3YPP was debt reduction (68%). PDs and deans felt reduced readiness for independence, reduced exposure to complementary curricula regarding safety and quality improvement, premature commitment to a specialty, and burnout were all potential liabilities. From a list of concerns, PDs were concerned about depth of clinical exposure, direct patient care experience, ability to assume increased responsibility, level of maturity, and certainty regarding career choice. Conclusions Over one-third of medical schools are considering the development of a 3YPP. While there may be benefits for a select group of students, concerns regarding maturity, depth of clinical exposure, and competency must be addressed for these programs to be well received. PMID:27301381

  4. Accelerating medical education: a survey of deans and program directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Cangiarella

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: A handful of medical schools in the U.S. are awarding medical degrees after three years. While the number of three-year pathway programs is slowly increasing there is little data on the opinions of medical education leaders on the need for shortening training. Purpose: To survey deans and program directors (PDs to understand the current status of 3-year medical degree programs and to elicit perceptions of the need for shortening medical school and the benefits and liabilities of 3-year pathway programs (3YPP. Methods: Online surveys were emailed to the academic deans of all U.S. medical schools and to a convenience sample of residency and fellowship PDs. Frequency distributions are reported for key survey items and content analysis was used to describe open-ended responses. Results: Of the respondents, 7% have a 3YPP, 4% were developing one, and 35% were considering development. In 2014, 47% of educational deans and 32% of PDs agreed that there may be a need to shorten medical school. From a list of benefits, both deans and PDs agreed that the greatest benefit to a 3YPP was debt reduction (68%. PDs and deans felt reduced readiness for independence, reduced exposure to complementary curricula regarding safety and quality improvement, premature commitment to a specialty, and burnout were all potential liabilities. From a list of concerns, PDs were concerned about depth of clinical exposure, direct patient care experience, ability to assume increased responsibility, level of maturity, and certainty regarding career choice. Conclusions: Over one-third of medical schools are considering the development of a 3YPP. While there may be benefits for a select group of students, concerns regarding maturity, depth of clinical exposure, and competency must be addressed for these programs to be well received.

  5. Modernizing and transforming medical education at the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisasi, Esther; Kulanga, Ahaz; Muiruri, Charles; Killewo, Lucy; Fadhili, Ndimangwa; Mimano, Lucy; Kapanda, Gibson; Tibyampansha, Dativa; Ibrahim, Glory; Nyindo, Mramba; Mteta, Kien; Kessi, Egbert; Ntabaye, Moshi; Bartlett, John

    2014-08-01

    The Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University (KCMU) College and the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) are addressing the crisis in Tanzanian health care manpower by modernizing the college's medical education with new tools and techniques. With a $10 million MEPI grant and the participation of its partner, Duke University, KCMU is harnessing the power of information technology (IT) to upgrade tools for students and faculty. Initiatives in eLearning have included bringing fiber-optic connectivity to the campus, offering campus-wide wireless access, opening student and faculty computer laboratories, and providing computer tablets to all incoming medical students. Beyond IT, the college is also offering wet laboratory instruction for hands-on diagnostic skills, team-based learning, and clinical skills workshops. In addition, modern teaching tools and techniques address the challenges posed by increasing numbers of students. To provide incentives for instructors, a performance-based compensation plan and teaching awards have been established. Also for faculty, IT tools and training have been made available, and a medical education course management system is now being widely employed. Student and faculty responses have been favorable, and the rapid uptake of these interventions by students, faculty, and the college's administration suggests that the KCMU College MEPI approach has addressed unmet needs. This enabling environment has transformed the culture of learning and teaching at KCMU College, where a path to sustainability is now being pursued. PMID:25072581

  6. Medical specialty considerations by medical students early in their clinical experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weissman Charles

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Specialty selection by medical students determines the future composition of the physician workforce. Selection of career specialties begins in earnest during the clinical rotations with exposure to the clinical and intellectual environments of various specialties. Career specialty selection is followed by choosing a residency program. This is the period where insight into the decision process might help healthcare leaders ascertain whether, when, and how to intervene and attempt to influence students' decisions. The criteria students consider important in selecting a specialty and a residency program during the early phases of their clinical rotations were examined. Methods Questionnaires distributed to fifth-year medical students at two Israeli medical schools. Results 229 of 275 (83% questionnaires were returned. 80% of the students had considered specialties; 62% considered one specialty, 25% two, the remainder 3-5 specialties. Students took a long-range view; 55% considered working conditions after residency more important than those during residency, another 42% considered both equally important. More than two-thirds wanted an interesting and challenging bedside specialty affording control over lifestyle and providing a reasonable relationship between salary and lifestyle. Men were more interested in well-remunerated procedure-oriented specialties that allowed for private practice. Most students rated as important selecting a challenging and interesting residency program characterized by good relationships between staff members, with positive treatment by the institution, and that provided much teaching. More women wanted short residencies with few on-calls and limited hours. More men rated as important residencies affording much responsibility for making clinical decisions and providing research opportunities. More than 50% of the students considered it important that their residency be in a leading department, and in

  7. Nutrition in medical education: reflections from an initiative at the University of Cambridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ball L

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Lauren Ball,1 Jennifer Crowley,2 Celia Laur,3 Minha Rajput-Ray,3 Stephen Gillam,4 Sumantra Ray3 1Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Allied Health Sciences, Centre for Health Practice Innovation, Griffith University, Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; 2Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; 3Need for Nutrition Education/Innovation Programme, Medical Research Council Human Nutrition Research, Cambridge, UK; 4Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK Abstract: Landmark reports have confirmed that it is within the core responsibilities of doctors to address nutrition in patient care. There are ongoing concerns that doctors receive insufficient nutrition education during medical training. This paper provides an overview of a medical nutrition education initiative at the University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, including 1 the approach to medical nutrition education, 2 evaluation of the medical nutrition education initiative, and 3 areas identified for future improvement. The initiative utilizes a vertical, spiral approach during the clinically focused years of the Cambridge undergraduate and graduate medical degrees. It is facilitated by the Nutrition Education Review Group, a group associated with the UK Need for Nutrition Education/Innovation Programme, and informed by the experiences of their previous nutrition education interventions. Three factors were identified as contributing to the success of the nutrition education initiative including the leadership and advocacy skills of the nutrition academic team, the variety of teaching modes, and the multidisciplinary approach to teaching. Opportunities for continuing improvement to the medical nutrition education initiative included a review of evaluation tools, inclusion of nutrition in assessment items, and further alignment of the Cambridge curriculum with the

  8. Nursing students’ perspectives on clinical education

    OpenAIRE

    MOHAMMAD REZA HEIDARI; REZA NOROUZADEH

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The importance of optimal clinical nursing education in professional skills development is undeniable. In clinical education, nursing students are often faced with problems. Recognizing nursing students’ perception on clinical education is the first step to remove the barriers of this challenge. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the nursing students’ perspectives on clinical education. 150 nursing students were select...

  9. Effectively implementing FDA medication alerts utilizing patient centered medical home clinical pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenz, Barbara J; Diez, Heidi L; Bostwick, Jolene R; Kales, Helen C; Zivin, Kara; Dalack, Gregory W; Fluent, Tom E; Standiford, Connie J; Stano, Claire; Mi Choe, Hae

    2016-03-01

    FDA medication alerts can be successfully implemented within patient centered medical home (PCMH) clinics utilizing clinical pharmacists. Targeted selection of high-risk patients from an electronic database allows PCMH pharmacists to prioritize assessments. Trusting relationships between PCMH clinical pharmacists and primary care providers facilitates high response rates to pharmacist recommendations. This health system approach led by PCMH pharmacists provides a framework for proactive responses to FDA safety alerts and medication related quality measure improvement. PMID:27001101

  10. Ethics of cost analyses in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kieran

    2013-11-01

    Cost analyses in medical education are rarely straightforward, and rarely lead to clear-cut conclusions. Occasionally they do lead to clear conclusions but even when that happens, some stakeholders will ask difficult but valid questions about what to do following cost analyses-specifically about distributive justice in the allocation of resources. At present there are few or no debates about these issues and rationing decisions that are taken in medical education are largely made subconsciously. Distributive justice 'concerns the nature of a socially just allocation of goods in a society'. Inevitably there is a large degree of subjectivity in the judgment as to whether an allocation is seen as socially just or ethical. There are different principles by which we can view distributive justice and which therefore affect the prism of subjectivity through which we see certain problems. For example, we might say that distributive justice at a certain institution or in a certain medical education system operates according to the principle that resources must be divided equally amongst learners. Another system may say that resources should be distributed according to the needs of learners or even of patients. No ethical system or model is inherently right or wrong, they depend on the context in which the educator is working. PMID:24203859

  11. Patient safety education for undergraduate medical students: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Mingming

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To reduce harm caused by health care is a global priority. Medical students should be able to recognize unsafe conditions, systematically report errors and near misses, investigate and improve such systems with a thorough understanding of human fallibility, and disclose errors to patients. Incorporating the knowledge of how to do this into the medical student curriculum is an urgent necessity. This paper aims to systematically review the literature about patient safety education for undergraduate medical students in terms of its content, teaching strategies, faculty availability and resources provided so as to identify evidence on how to promote patient safety in the curriculum for medical schools. This paper includes a perspective from the faculty of a medical school, a major hospital and an Evidence Based Medicine Centre in Sichuan Province, China. Methods We searched MEDLINE, ERIC, Academic Source Premier(ASP, EMBASE and three Chinese Databases (Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, CBM; China National Knowledge Infrastructure, CNKI; Wangfang Data from 1980 to Dec. 2009. The pre-specified form of inclusion and exclusion criteria were developed for literature screening. The quality of included studies was assessed using Darcy Reed and Gemma Flores-Mateo criteria. Two reviewers selected the studies, undertook quality assessment, and data extraction independently. Differing opinions were resolved by consensus or with help from the third person. Results This was a descriptive study of a total of seven studies that met the selection criteria. There were no relevant Chinese studies to be included. Only one study included patient safety education in the medical curriculum and the remaining studies integrated patient safety into clinical rotations or medical clerkships. Seven studies were of a pre and post study design, of which there was only one controlled study. There was considerable variation in relation to contents

  12. Education and Training of Medical Physicists in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Kaplanis

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical Physicist, as a professional who works in a hospital environment, is a member of a wide clinical team which is responsible for the correct diagnosis and the therapeutic methods applied using radiation. The role of a Medical Physicist is multifold and consists of the estimation of the dose received by patients and personnel, the quality control of radiological equipment, the studies for shielding requirements and the training of several health professionals (doctors, medical physicists, radiologists, technicians, nurses. All the above are prerequisites in order to receive the professional license to act as Medical Physicist.Aim-Research Inquires: The aim of European Union (EU via European Federation of Medical Physics (EFOMP is to apply a common policy among the EU countries in the area of Education and Training in Medical Physics within the context of the current developments in the European Higher Education Area arising from “The Bologna Declaration”. A short-term perspective is the free movement of professionals within EU, via the assurance of knowledge and skills uniformity. A necessary preliminary stage is the collection, classification and further process of relevant information at the European level.Methods-Techniques: To achieve the above in an efficient way EFOMP prepared a questionnaire and sent it to the National Organisation for Medical Physics of each country member of EFOMP (NMO. 23 out of 34 country members responded. The main parts (3 in total of this questionnaire and some typical questions were:Part A: Medical Physics Education•Which degree is required? Is this a university degree? How many years of studies does it represent?•Is there a nationally approved education programme and, if yes, then by whom?•Where do the education and training take place (University, Hospital, or both of them? Are these centers accredited and who gives the accreditation?Part B: Qualified / Specialist Medical Physicist

  13. Leveraging e-learning in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kadriye O; Cidon, Michal J; Seto, Teresa L; Chen, Haiqin; Mahan, John D

    2014-07-01

    e-Learning has become a popular medium for delivering instruction in medical education. This innovative method of teaching offers unique learning opportunities for medical trainees. The purpose of this article is to define the present state of e-learning in pediatrics and how to best leverage e-learning for educational effectiveness and change in medical education. Through addressing under-examined and neglected areas in implementation strategies for e-learning, its usefulness in medical education can be expanded. This study used a systematic database review of published studies in the field of e-learning in pediatric training between 2003 and 2013. The search was conducted using educational and health databases: Scopus, ERIC, PubMed, and search engines Google and Hakia. A total of 72 reference articles were suitable for analysis. This review is supplemented by the use of "e-Learning Design Screening Questions" to define e-learning design and development in 10 randomly selected articles. Data analysis used template-based coding themes and counting of the categories using descriptive statistics.Our search for pediatric e-learning (using Google and Hakia) resulted in six well-defined resources designed to support the professional development of doctors, residents, and medical students. The majority of studies focused on instructional effectiveness and satisfaction. There were few studies about e-learning development, implementation, and needs assessments used to identify the institutional and learners' needs. Reviewed studies used various study designs, measurement tools, instructional time, and materials for e-learning interventions. e-Learning is a viable solution for medical educators faced with many challenges, including (1) promoting self-directed learning, (2) providing flexible learning opportunities that would offer continuous (24h/day/7 days a week) availability for learners, and (3) engaging learners through collaborative learning communities to gain

  14. Clinical medical librarianship: a review of the literature.

    OpenAIRE

    Cimpl, K

    1985-01-01

    The history and evolution of clinical medical librarianship are analyzed and traditional and modified approaches, including LATCH, are reviewed. Cost and evaluation methods are outlined, indicating benefits and disadvantages of clinical medical librarian (CML) programs. The future of CMLs is explored.

  15. Medical academia clinical experiences of Ward Round Teaching curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Haghani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical students spend most of their time in hospital wards and it is necessary to study clinical educational opportunities. This study was aimed to explore faculty members′ experience on Ward Round Teaching content. Methods and Materials: This qualitative study was conducted by purposive sampling with the maximum variation of major clinical departments faculty members in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (n = 9. Data gathering was based on deep and semi-structured interviews. Data gathering continued till data saturation.Data was analyzed through the Collaizzi method and validated. Strategies to ensure trustworthiness of data (credibility, dependability, conformability, transferability were employed (Guba and Lincoln. Results: Basic codes extracted from the analyzed data were categorized into two main themes and related subthemes, including (1 tangible teachings (analytic intelligence, technical intelligence, legal duties and (2 implied teachings (professionalism, professional discipline, professional difficulties. Conclusion: Ward round teaching is a valuable opportunity for learners to learn not only patient care aspects but also ethical values. By appropriate planning, opportunities can be used to teach capabilities that are expected of general practitioners.

  16. Resources for Medical Education: Finding the Right Prescription

    OpenAIRE

    Humphrey, Holly J

    2010-01-01

    What are the resources necessary to provide the highest quality education for medical students? This is the essential question which must be answered before a medical school can make a rational decision about the number of students to have in each class. In deciphering an objective way to determine the class size of a medical school, this paper explores the principles of medical education, accrediting organizations institutional expectations in providing a medical education program, and the a...

  17. APPLICATION OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES IN MEDICAL EDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Tamimi, Dalal M.

    2003-01-01

    The recognition that information and communication technologies should play an increasingly important role in medical education is a key to educating physicians in the 21st century. Computer use in medical education includes, Internet hypermedia/multimedia technologies, medical informatics, distance learning and telemedicine. Adaptation to the use of these technologies should ideally start from the elementary school level. Medical schools must introduce medical informatics courses very early ...

  18. Medical student opinions on character development in medical education: a national survey

    OpenAIRE

    Carey, George B; Curlin, Farr A.; Yoon, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently United States (US) medical schools have implemented curricular reforms to address issues of character in medical education. Very few studies have examined students’ opinions about the importance of character development in medical school. This cross-sectional study assessed US medical students’ opinions regarding character-focused education and their experiences receiving character feedback from educators. We mailed a questionnaire to 960 third year medical students from 2...

  19. A Review on Usage and Effectiveness of e-Learning in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joo Hyun; Son, Ji Young; Yoo, Nam Jin; Kim, Sun

    2010-06-01

    E-learning is recently considered as a critical strategy to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of education. Although the use of e-learning has been growing rapidly in medical education, there are not sufficient data applying e-learning and evidence of the effectiveness. The purpose of the study is to review the recent literatures on applying e-learning in medical education settings and to identify usage types and educational effectiveness appeared in the research. The results demonstrated the types applying e-learning in medical education were categorized into the blended learning, online education, and virtual learning environment. The educational effectiveness of e-learning were the improvements of knowledge, clinical skill, attitude, and satisfaction. The study suggested the recommendations based on the results in order to apply e-learning effectively to medical education. PMID:25813808

  20. Values education: a new direction for medical education.

    OpenAIRE

    Grundstein-Amado, R

    1995-01-01

    This paper suggests that medical education should redirect resources to values education, specifically developing new strategies to improve the process of clarification of values. The author suggests using the values journal method which is based on a systematic record of students' personal value systems reflected in their stories and life experience; and on their responses to case presentation. Generating a personal values journal helps students define who they are, what their social and pro...

  1. Continuing medical education in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In France, continuing medical education (CME) and professional practice evaluation (PPE) became mandatory by law in July 2009 for all health professionals. Recently published decrees led to the creation of national specialty councils to implement this organizational device. For radiation oncology, this council includes the French Society for Radiation Oncology (SFRO), the National Radiation Oncology Syndicate (SNRO) and the Association for Continuing Medical Education in Radiation Oncology (AFCOR). The Radiation Oncology National Council will propose a set of programs including CME and PPE, professional thesaurus, labels for CME actions consistent with national requirements, and will organize expertise for public instances. AFCOR remains the primary for CME, but each practitioner can freely choose an organisation for CME, provided that it is certified by the independent scientific commission. The National Order for physicians is the control authority. Radiation oncology has already a strong tradition of independent CME that will continue through this major reform. (authors)

  2. An Overview of Undergraduate Physiology Education in Turkish Medical Faculties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkanci, Z. Dicle; Pehlivanoglu, Bilge

    2008-01-01

    Physiology education, which occupies an important place in undergraduate medical education, exhibits diversities across the world. Since there was no specific source of information about physiology education in Turkish medical faculties, the authors aimed to evaluate the general status of undergraduate physiology teaching of medical students in…

  3. The unintended consequences of portfolios in graduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagler, Alisa; Andolsek, Kathryn; Padmore, Jamie S

    2009-11-01

    Portfolios have emerged in graduate medical education despite lack of consensus on their definition, purpose, or usefulness. Portfolios can be used as a tool for residents to record their accomplishments, reflect on their experiences, and gain formative feedback. This exercise may help prepare physicians for lifelong learning as well as enhance patient care. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has endorsed and may soon require the use of portfolios as an assessment tool to evaluate resident competence. However, using portfolios for summative evaluation purposes such as making high-stakes decisions on resident promotion or matriculation may deter resident candidness. In addition, the use of portfolios in clinical settings raises issues unique to the health care setting such as patient privacy, disclosure of clinical information, and professional liability exposure of physicians. It is not clear that peer-review statutes that sometimes protect educational materials used in teaching and evaluation of residents would also bar disclosure and/or evidentiary use of portfolio contents. Is the teaching institution, resident, or graduate vulnerable to requests and subpoenas for the portfolio contents? If so, then a resident's documentation of insecurities, suboptimal performance, or bad outcomes would be ripe for discovery in a medical malpractice lawsuit. If embraced too quickly and without sufficient reflection on the nuances of implementation, this well-intentioned initiative may present unintended legal consequences. PMID:19858808

  4. Continuing medical education for general practitioners--a Northern Ireland plan.

    OpenAIRE

    McKnight, A; Mills, K

    1992-01-01

    Following the introduction of the 1990 contract for general practitioners and the new postgraduate education allowance, the Northern Ireland Continuing Medical Education Group, comprising the clinical tutors from four Belfast hospitals and members of the University department of general practice, was established to provide high quality co-ordinated continuing medical education for general practitioners. A questionnaire was sent to all general practitioners in Northern Ireland to find out thei...

  5. Re-thinking clinical assessment: What can we learn from the medical literature?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article explores the literature available in the field of medical education on the topic of clinical assessment, in order to suggest different ways of assessing clinical experience that may not have been considered within undergraduate radiography programmes. The medical literature is contrasted with the clinical assessment currently being used in a medical imaging programme in New Zealand, with the aim of offering suggestions that may benefit the assessment of the clinical and professional elements of radiography programmes more generally. The authors conclude that ideally students need to be assessed in the clinical domain by multiple assessors, with varied assessment methods used repeatedly over a period of time and with the provision of frequent and constructive feedback. Various methods of clinical assessment are suggested and it is emphasised that the methods selected need to be valid, reliable and psychometrically supported. This encourages an evidence-based practice approach that is supportive of on-going programme development and change.

  6. University medical education in Kenya: The challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndetei, David M; Mathai, Muthoni; Khasakhala, Lincoln I; Mutiso, Victoria; Mbwayo, Anne W

    2010-01-01

    There are two medical schools training doctors in Kenya: the Moi University established in 1984 and the University of Nairobi established in 1967. The University of Nairobi has so far produced the majority of Kenyan doctors. Both are public universities with the Government being the main financier. The increased demand for university education and the inability to meet these demands has led to the introduction of a system of training self-sponsored medical students alongside Government-subsidised students. One other public university has started a medical school. The pressure to increase the number of schools and students in the absence of increased resources poses a particular challenge to the country. PMID:20854156

  7. Substance misuse teaching in undergraduate medical education.

    OpenAIRE

    Carroll, J; Goodair, C.; Chaytor, A.; Notley, C.; Ghodse, H; Kopelman, P

    2014-01-01

    Background: Over 12,000 hospital admissions in the UK result from substance misuse, therefore issues surrounding this need to be addressed early on in a doctor’s training to facilitate their interaction with this client group. Currently, undergraduate medical education includes teaching substance misuse issues, yet how this is formally integrated into the curriculum remains unclear. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with 17 key members of staff responsible for the whole or part of...

  8. Substance misuse teaching in undergraduate medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Carroll, Janine; Goodair, Christine; Chaytor, Andrew; Notley, Caitlin; Ghodse, Hamid; Kopelman, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Over 12,000 hospital admissions in the UK result from substance misuse, therefore issues surrounding this need to be addressed early on in a doctor’s training to facilitate their interaction with this client group. Currently, undergraduate medical education includes teaching substance misuse issues, yet how this is formally integrated into the curriculum remains unclear. Methods Semi-structured interviews with 17 key members of staff responsible for the whole or part of the undergr...

  9. Technology: changing the focus of medical education?

    OpenAIRE

    Vivekanantham S; Ravindran RP

    2014-01-01

    Sayinthen Vivekanantham, Rahul Prashanth Ravindran Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UKWith technology advancing at such a fast rate, our ability to look up and use information quickly and efficiently has improved significantly. With electronic devices capable of accessing information becoming more prevalent within the hospital setting, how this could influence medical education should be brought into question.As we are now able to look up information quickly within the cl...

  10. Practitioners education on medical exposure justification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The knowledge of practitioners on justification of the individual medical exposure was assessed during education and training programmes. A survey containing questions on this issue was used. The results show that the Good Practice Guide should be disseminated and studied by radiation protection training programmes and such kind of training must be extended to prescribers because they have to be involved in the justification process. (authors)

  11. Gender and sex: issues in medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Lagro-Janssen, Toine

    2010-01-01

    [english] There is ample scientific evidence to support the importance of gender issues in health and illness. If we fail to take such sex and gender differences sufficiently into account, this will affect the quality of health care provided to men and women, and this is precisely what good medical education means to prevent. In this paper examples are given that show how knowledge, attitudes and skills relating to sex and gender can be implemented in both optional and compulsory courses. Nex...

  12. Evaluation of a novel nutrition education intervention for medical students from across England

    OpenAIRE

    Ray, Sumantra; Udumyan, Ruzan; Rajput-Ray, Minha; Thompson, Ben; Lodge, Keri-Michele; Douglas, Pauline; Sharma, Poonam; Broughton, Rachel; Smart, Sandra; Wilson, Rick; Gillam, Stephen; van der Es, Mike J; Fisher, Ilana; Gandy, Joan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Problems such as hospital malnutrition (∼40% prevalence in the UK) may be managed better by improving the nutrition education of ‘tomorrow's doctors’. The Need for Nutrition Education Programme aimed to measure the effectiveness and acceptability of an educational intervention on nutrition for medical students in the clinical phase of their training. Design An educational needs analysis was followed by a consultative process to gain consensus on a suitable educational intervention....

  13. The Education Review Board: A Mechanism for Managing Potential Conflicts of Interest in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borus, Jonathan F; Alexander, Erik K; Bierer, Barbara E; Bringhurst, F Richard; Clark, Christopher; Klanica, Kaley E; Stewart, Erin C; Friedman, Lawrence S

    2015-12-01

    Concerns about the influence of industry support on medical education, research, and patient care have increased in both medical and political circles. Some academic medical centers, questioning whether industry support of medical education could be appropriate and not a conflict of interest, banned such support. In 2009, a Partners HealthCare System commission concluded that interactions with industry remained important to Partners' charitable academic mission and made recommendations to transparently manage such relationships. An Education Review Board (ERB) was created to oversee and manage all industry support of Partners educational activities.Using a case review method, the ERB developed guidelines to implement the commission's recommendations. A multi-funder rule was established that prohibits industry support from only one company for any Partners educational activity. Within that framework, the ERB established guidelines on industry support of educational conferences, clinical fellowships, and trainees' expenses for attending external educational programs; gifts of textbooks and other educational materials; promotional opportunities associated with Partners educational activities; Partners educational activities under contract with an industry entity; and industry-run programs using Partners resources.Although many changes have resulted from the implementation of the ERB guidelines, the number of industry grants for Partners educational activities has remained relatively stable, and funding for these activities declined only moderately during the first three full calendar years (2011-2013) of ERB oversight. The ERB continually educates both the Partners community and industry about the rationale for its guidelines and its openness to their refinement in response to changes in the external environment. PMID:26083402

  14. Curriculum gaps in teaching clinical skills to Iranian undergraduate medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Mirzazadeh, Azim; Bavarian, Behrouz; Labaf, Ali; Afshari, Ali; Nikoo, Mohammad; Meshkani, Zahra Sadat; Khashayar, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The inefficacy of clinical skill education during the clerkship has been reported in several studies. The present study was conducted to evaluate the competency of medical students in performing several clinical skills through an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE), aiming to evaluate the quality of the existing curriculum in the clerkship phase. Material and methods The cross sectional study was conducted at the end of the clerkship period, before the students had e...

  15. Wireless clinical alerts for physiologic, laboratory and medication data.

    OpenAIRE

    Shabot, M M; LoBue, M.; J. Chen

    2000-01-01

    A fully interfaced clinical information system (CIS) contains physiologic, laboratory, blood gas, medication and other data that can be used as the information base for a comprehensive alerting system. Coupled with an event driven rules engine, a CIS can generate clinical alerts which may both prevent medical errors and assist caregivers in responding to critical events in a timely way. The authors have developed a clinical alerting system which delivers alerts and reminders to clinicians in ...

  16. Detached concern?: Emotional socialization in twenty-first century medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underman, Kelly; Hirshfield, Laura E

    2016-07-01

    Early works in medical sociology have been pivotal in the development of scholarly knowledge about emotions, emotional socialization, and empathy within medical training, medical education, and medical contexts. Yet despite major shifts in both medical education and in medicine writ-large, medical sociologists' focus on emotions has largely disappeared. In this paper, we argue that due to recent radical transformations in the medical arena, emotional socialization within medical education should be of renewed interest for sociologists. Developments in medical education such as increased diversity among enrollees, the rise of patient health movements, and curricular transformation have made this context a particularly interesting case for sociologists working on a variety of questions related to structural, organizational, and cultural change. We offer three areas of debate within studies in medical education that sociologists may be interested in studying: 1) gendered and racialized differences in the performance of clinical skills related to emotion, 2) differences in self-reported empathy among subspecialties, and 3) loss of empathy during the third year or clinical year of medical school. PMID:27227696

  17. THE ROLES OF CLINICAL PHARMACY IN REDUCING MEDICATION ERRORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alsaraf Khulood Majid

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Potential activation of clinical pharmacist role is of great importance in reducing the medication errors which are a well- known problem in hospital. The medication errors could be prescribing errors, dispensing errors, and administering errors. In this study medication errors randomly were collected by clinical pharmacist and inpatient pharmacist from different wards at a Hospital in Dubai, UAE, from July to October 2011. The results showed that the highest percentage of medication errors was prescribing errors, followed by administering errors and then dispensing errors. Among prescribing errors, the results showed the highest percentage was stat errors, followed by pro re nata(PRN, then incomplete or unclear Rx and at the end antibiotic errors. The study shows that the clinical pharmacist play important role in reduction of medication errors evolving from pharmacist and nursing site, on the other hand, prescribing errors were reduced up to 23% with the medication review system.

  18. A survey of medical information education in radiological technology schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to clarify actual conditions and problems in medical information education and to propose the educational concept to be adopted in medical information. A questionnaire survey was carried out by the anonymous method in June 2008. The survey was intended for 40 radiological technology schools. The questionnaire items were as follows: educational environment in medical information education, content of a lecture in medical information, problems in medical information education. The response rate was 55.0% (22 schools). Half of the responding schools had a laboratory on medical information. Seventeen schools had a medical information education facility, and out of them, approximately 50% had an educational medical information system. The main problems of the medical information education were as follows: motivation of the students is low, the educational coverage and level for medical information are uncertain, there are not an appropriate textbook and educational guidance. In conclusion, these findings suggest that it is necessary to have a vision of medical information education in the education of radiological technologists. (author)

  19. Managed care and medical education: hard cases and hard choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E

    1997-05-01

    As managed care becomes more and more dominant in U.S. health care, it is coming into conflict with medical education. There are historical reasons for this: medical education traditionally excluded physicians who chose to work in health plans, and for profit managed care has tended to avoid subsidizing medical education. In order to improve the climate, three changes are necessary: medical education must understand the tense history of discord between the two; distinctions must be made between responsible and irresponsible managed care plans; and medical educators should not assume they own the moral high ground. Arrogance, a gross oversupply of physicians and especially specialists, scandals and fraud, an often callous attitude toward the poor, and other sins can be laid at medical education's door. The worse threat for both sides is that the public and payers could simply abandon both, leading to underfunding for health professions education, a society that does not trust its health care system, and the loss of superb teaching organizations. To prevent this, managed care and medical education should work together to solve several difficult problems: how to shrink the medical education infrastructure; how to report honestly the uses to which medical education funds are put; and how to identify and end irresponsible behavior on the part of health plans and medical education entities alike. If the two sides can exercise leadership in these areas, they will be able to protect and enhance the singular place of honor that medical education holds in this society. PMID:9159575

  20. Training of Leadership Skills in Medical Education

    OpenAIRE

    Kiesewetter, Jan; Schmidt-Huber, Marion; Netzel, Janine; Krohn, Alexandra C.; Angstwurm, Matthias; Fischer, Martin R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Effective team performance is essential in the delivery of high-quality health-care. Leadership skills therefore are an important part of physicians’ everyday clinical life. To date, the development of leadership skills are underrepresented in medical curricula. Appropriate training methods for equipping doctors with these leadership skills are highly desirable. Objective: The review aims to summarize the findings in the current literature regarding training in leadership skills i...

  1. Training of Leadership Skills in Medical Education

    OpenAIRE

    Kiesewetter, J; Schmidt-Huber, M; Netzel, J; Krohn, AC; Angstwurm, M; Fischer,

    2013-01-01

    Background: Effective team performance is essential in the delivery of high-quality health-care. Leadership skills therefore are an important part of physicians' everyday clinical life. To date, the development of leadership skills are underrepresented in medical curricula. Appropriate training methods for equipping doctors with these leadership skills are highly desirable. Objective: The review aims to summarize the findings in the current literature regarding training in leadership skills...

  2. Virtual reality in medical education and assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Laurie A.; Bell, Brad; Sullivan, Tim; Voss, Mark; Payer, Andrew F.; Goza, Stewart Michael

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC)/LinCom Corporation, the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB), and the Galveston Independent School District (GISD) have teamed up to develop a virtual visual environment display (VIVED) that provides a unique educational experience using virtual reality (VR) technologies. The VIVED end product will be a self-contained educational experience allowing students a new method of learning as they interact with the subject matter through VR. This type of interface is intuitive and utilizes spatial and psychomotor abilities which are now constrained or reduced by the current two dimensional terminals and keyboards. The perpetual challenge to educators remains the identification and development of methodologies which conform the learners abilities and preferences. The unique aspects of VR provide an opportunity to explore a new educational experience. Endowing medical students with an understanding of the human body poses some difficulty challenges. One of the most difficult is to convey the three dimensional nature of anatomical structures. The ideal environment for addressing this problem would be one that allows students to become small enough to enter the body and travel through it - much like a person walks through a building. By using VR technology, this effect can be achieved; when VR is combined with multimedia technologies, the effect can be spectacular.

  3. The role of Educational Technology in Medical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZAHRA SAFFARI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Dear Editor Being one of the most effective tools for educational system improvement, educational Technology plays an important role in learning facilitation. In order to have a deeper, more effective and long lasting learning impact, this systematic approach designs, implements and evaluates the teaching- learning process, using specific purposes, new methods of psychology and communication sciences and also human and non-human resources (1. A fruitful and effective educational system which results in actual learning improvement cannot be achieved unless its faculty members become competent. To achieve this goal, not only they must attain and/or maintain academic qualifications, especially in their teaching area, but also be familiar with the newest communication and teaching methods and equipped with educational and professional skills. Considering the growing movement of education towards the new technologies and the Ministry of Health and Medical Education tendency for upgrading the educational technology and virtual learning, the need for experts in education technology was clear. Therefore, given its mission which focuses on scientific promotion and academic training improvement, in an cooperation with shiraz educational development center along with Center of Excellence for electronic learning`s staff and faculty members, Shiraz Educational Technology unit, established the Master of education technology courses (2. Education’s technology and E-Learning, have arises a condition in which many educational goals, such as independent learning, self-directed learning, learning regardless of time or place, collaborative learning and providing immediate feedbacks and assessment of learning, appears more achievable. Electronic medical education has become very popular in developed countries and is rapidly developing, since it has educational value and the tremendous broadening audience through educational programs. Considering the fact that

  4. Medical students’ attitudes towards early clinical exposure in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabaz Mafinejad, Mahboobeh; Peiman, Soheil; Khajavirad, Nasim; Mirabdolhagh Hazaveh, Mojgan; Edalatifard, Maryam; Allameh, Seyed-Farshad; Naderi, Neda; Foroumandi, Morteza; Afshari, Ali; Asghari, Fariba

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was carried out to investigate the medical students’ attitudes towards early clinical exposure at Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted during 2012-2015. A convenience sample of 298 first- and second-year students, enrolled in the undergraduate medical curriculum, participated in an early clinical exposure program. To collect data from medical students, a questionnaire consisting of open-ended questions and structured questions, rated on a five-point Likert scale, was used to investigate students’ attitudes toward early clinical exposure. Results Of the 298 medical students, 216 (72%) completed the questionnaires. The results demonstrated that medical students had a positive attitude toward early clinical exposure. Most students (80.1%) stated that early clinical exposure could familiarize them with the role of basic sciences knowledge in medicine and how to apply this knowledge in clinical settings. Moreover, 84.5% of them believed that early clinical exposure increased their interest in medicine and encouraged them to read more. Furthermore, content analysis of the students’ responses uncovered three main themes of early clinical exposure, were considered helpful to improve learning: “integration of theory and practice”, “interaction with others and professional development” and “desire and motivation for learning medicine”. Conclusions Medical students found their first experience with clinical setting valuable. Providing clinical exposure in the initial years of medical curricula and teaching the application of basic sciences knowledge in clinical practice can enhance students’ understanding of the role they will play in the future as a physician. PMID:27318794

  5. Perspectives in medical education 7. Observations on clinical training at a "US-style" residency program at Teine Keijinkai Hospital in Sapporo, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, R Harsha

    2009-06-01

    The residency program at Teine Keijinkai Hospital in Sapporo has successfully implemented a training philosophy that is focused on the development of clinical skills and critical thinking in Japanese residents. Several elements contribute to its success. The first and foremost is visionary physician leadership, beginning with the pioneers who implemented the philosophy, and continuing through the current leadership, which has sustained the original vision. A close second is the administrative and financial commitment to invest in producing more clinically accomplished Japanese physicians, long before that need was officially recognized. Third is the program's explicit aim of adhering to international norms by requiring three years of training, promulgating a benevolent, not paternalistic teaching philosophy and encouraging an interactive and interrogatory learning ethic. Fourth is the year-round presence of a US-trained Physician-in-Residence, to sustain the focus on clinical skills and international norms. Fifth is a long-term relationship with the Internal Medicine Training Program at the University of Pittsburgh, providing a conduit for ongoing academic exchange and programmatic advice. Last, but not least, is its avowed intention of being viewed as an "American-style program" with a preference for English fluent applicants, which acts as a magnet for trainees motivated to acquire clinical skills and competencies, with an eye to future training in the US. All these elements contribute to the program's unique focus on teaching clinical skills and critical thinking. Others who are striving with varying degrees of success to implement a similar philosophy in Japan may benefit from studying its example. PMID:19597304

  6. Medical education reimagined: a call to action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prober, Charles G; Khan, Salman

    2013-10-01

    The authors propose a new model for medical education based on the "flipped classroom" design. In this model, students would access brief (~10 minute) online videos to learn new concepts on their own time. The content could be viewed by the students as many times as necessary to master the knowledge in preparation for classroom time facilitated by expert faculty leading dynamic, interactive sessions where students can apply their newly mastered knowledge.The authors argue that the modern digitally empowered learner, the unremitting expansion of biomedical knowledge, and the increasing specialization within the practice of medicine drive the need to reimagine medical education. The changes that they propose emphasize the need to define a core curriculum that can meet learners where they are in a digitally oriented world, enhance the relevance and retention of knowledge through rich interactive exercises, and facilitate in-depth learning fueled by individual students' aptitude and passion. The creation and adoption of this model would be meaningfully enhanced by cooperative efforts across medical schools. PMID:23969367

  7. Communicating with graduate medical trainees: the Cleveland Clinic experience

    OpenAIRE

    Greenwald, Laura R.; Stoller, James K

    2013-01-01

    Optimizing communication with graduate medical trainees is critical, as they contribute importantly to the mission of academic medical centres. Yet, communication is challenged by their complex schedules, geographic separation, and time constraints. Few studies have examined this issue to offer valuable solutions. Because traditional approaches are suboptimal, two communication tools were implemented: (1) a web-based intranet site called [graduate medical education] GME|com, and (2) an electr...

  8. Envisioning a Future Governance and Funding System for Undergraduate and Graduate Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Jeffrey P; Stimpson, Jim P; Caverzagie, Kelly J

    2015-09-01

    Funding for graduate medical education (GME) and undergraduate medical education (UME) in the United States is being debated and challenged at the national and state levels as policy makers and educators question whether the multibillion dollar investment in medical education is succeeding in meeting the nation's health care needs. To address these concerns, the authors propose a novel all-payer system for GME and UME funding that equitably distributes medical education costs among all stakeholders, including those who benefit most from medical education. Through a "Medical Education Workforce (MEW) trust fund," indirect and direct GME dollars would be replaced with a funds-flow mechanism using fees paid for services by all payers (Medicaid, Medicare, private insurers, others) while providing direct compensation to physicians and institutions that actively engage medical learners in providing clinical care. The accountability of those receiving MEW funds would be improved by linking their funding levels to their ability to meet predetermined institutional, program, faculty, and learner benchmarks. Additionally, the MEW fund would cover learners' UME tuition, potentially eliminating their UME debt, in return for their provision of health care services (after completing GME training) in an underserved area or specialty. This proposed model attempts to increase transparency and enhance accountability in medical education by linking funding to the development of a physician workforce that is able to excel in the evolving health delivery system. Achieving this vision requires physician educators, leaders of academic health centers, policy makers, insurers, and patients to muster the courage to embrace transformational change. PMID:26164639

  9. 专业学位研究生培养与住院医师规范化培训相结合改革的初步实践%Initial practice: the innovation combines clinical medical graduated education with residential training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李震; 胡瑶; 胡学梅; 何惠君

    2015-01-01

    A new medical education model combine' s clinical medical graduated education with residential training (called four licenses in one) was employed in many medical schools in China.Two groups of students were received new "Four licenses in one" medical education model and traditional medical education model respectively in the past 3 years in our medical school,and it' s the first year the students received new education method graduated successfully.The education backgrounds,clinical skills and employment condition were compared between the two groups of students.Although the education background almost same,the clinical skills and employment condition in the students received new education model were much better than that of the students received traditional medical education model.The new medical education model is a good method and worth to spreading.%将临床医学专业学位研究生培养与住院医师规范化培训相结合的“四证合一”的培养模式已经在许多医学院校试行.本文对华中科技大学2011级全部131名临床医学专业学位硕士研究生的相关数据进行深入分析,对参加和未参加“四证合一”培养的学生状况进行比较分析.入学时两组学生的入学成绩和临床背景均无明显差异,而参加“四证合一”培养的学生毕业时的临床技能考核成绩和就业状况均优于未参加培养的学生,“四证合一”的培养方式具有较大的优越性,值得进一步推广.

  10. Selecting a commercial clinical information system: an academic medical center's experience.

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, E.T.; Abendroth, T. W.

    1994-01-01

    Choosing a commercial clinical information system to meet the information needs of patient care, research, education, administration, finance, and ongoing changes of the healthcare system of an academic medical center is a challenging task. For the past six months, The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center undertook this task through (i) establishing a task force, (ii) assessing end-user information needs, (iii) understanding future institutional development and strategies, (iv) conceptualizing th...

  11. Integrating Emerging Infections Education into Medical Education: An Innovative Approach

    OpenAIRE

    May, Larissa; Omron, Rodney; Piller, Marsha; Haile-Mariam, Tenagne; Scott, James

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: All graduating physicians should be competent with the basic principles of conta­gious disease outbreak detection and management. In order to educate our students and residents on this important topic, we created a three-hour workshop that included a case-based simulation exercise, and we offered a two-week medical student course in Emerging Infections and Bioter­rorism. Methods: Twenty-two emergency medicine residents and sixty-four senior medical students rotat­ing in the emer...

  12. The h-index in medical education: an analysis of medical education journal editorial boards

    OpenAIRE

    Doja, Asif; Eady, Kaylee; Horsley, Tanya; Bould, M. Dylan; Victor, J. Charles; Sampson, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Disciplines differ in their authorship and citation practices, thus discipline-specific h-index norms are desirable. Thus the goal of this study was to examine the relationship between the h-index and academic rank in the field of medical education, and the differences in the h-index between MD’s and PhD’s in this field. Methods: Due to the absence of a formalized registry of medical educators, we sampled available editorial board membership (considered a proxy for identi...

  13. Advancing Competency-Based Medical Education: A Charter for Clinician-Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraccio, Carol; Englander, Robert; Van Melle, Elaine; Ten Cate, Olle; Lockyer, Jocelyn; Chan, Ming-Ka; Frank, Jason R; Snell, Linda S

    2016-05-01

    The International Competency-Based Medical Education (ICBME) Collaborators have been working since 2009 to promote understanding of competency-based medical education (CBME) and accelerate its uptake worldwide. This article presents a charter, supported by a literature-based rationale, which is meant to provide a shared mental model of CBME that will serve as a path forward in its widespread implementation.At a 2013 summit, the ICBME Collaborators laid the groundwork for this charter. Here, the fundamental principles of CBME and professional responsibilities of medical educators in its implementation process are described. The authors outline three fundamental principles: (1) Medical education must be based on the health needs of the populations served; (2) the primary focus of education and training should be the desired outcomes for learners rather than the structure and process of the educational system; and (3) the formation of a physician should be seamless across the continuum of education, training, and practice.Building on these principles, medical educators must demonstrate commitment to teaching, assessing, and role modeling the range of identified competencies. In the clinical setting, they must provide supervision that balances patient safety with the professional development of learners, being transparent with stakeholders about level of supervision needed. They must use effective and efficient assessment strategies and tools for basing transition decisions on competence rather than time in training, empowering learners to be active participants in their learning and assessment. Finally, advancing CBME requires program evaluation and research, faculty development, and a collaborative approach to realize its full potential. PMID:26675189

  14. Ethnographic edutainment for transformative medical education: Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woratanarat, Thira

    2014-01-01

    Transformative learning is a most important issue in medical education. Ethnographic edutainment is a concept that consists of reward, competition, and motivation strategies, which are more effective in engaging with learners. First-year medical students (N = 321) were included in this study during the Doctor and Society course at Chulalongkorn University in 2011. Four preset learning objectives were set and participants assigned a term group project with clouding technologies. The deliverables and the attitude toward this method were evaluated. Nineteen of 20 (95%) groups achieved all objectives. Females rated higher scores for this activity than males (P lecture-based sessions and field visit sessions as well as ethnographic edutainment activity sessions and other types (P < 0.01). The results were consistent in both male and female groups. Ethnographic edutainment can be well-accepted with higher satisfaction than some other types of teaching. PMID:25416434

  15. Integrating quality and safety education into clinical nursing education through a dedicated education unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Kelli

    2016-03-01

    The Institute of Medicine and American Association of Colleges of Nursing are calling for curriculum redesign that prepares nursing students with the requisite knowledge and skills to provide safe, high quality care. The purpose of this project was to improve nursing students' knowledge of quality and safety by integrating Quality and Safety Education for Nurses into clinical nursing education through development of a dedicated education unit. This model, which pairs nursing students with front-line nursing staff for clinical experiences, was implemented on a medical floor in an acute care hospital. Prior to implementation, nurses and students were educated about the dedicated education unit and quality and safety competencies. During each clinical rotation, students collaborated with their nurses on projects related to these competencies. Students' knowledge was assessed using questions related to quality and safety. Students who participated in the dedicated education unit had higher scores than those with traditional clinical rotations. Focus groups were held mid-semester to assess nurses' perceptions of the experience. Five themes emerged from the qualitative data including thirsting for knowledge, building teamwork and collaboration, establishing trust and decreasing anxiety, mirroring organization and time management skills, and evolving confidence in the nursing role. PMID:26777871

  16. Effects of structured written feedback by cards on medical students’ performance at mini clinical evaluation exercise (Mini-CEX) in an outpatient clinic

    OpenAIRE

    FARIBA HAGHANI; MOHAMMAD HATEF KHORAMI; MOHAMMAD FAKHARI

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Feedback cards are recommended as a feasible tool for structured written feedback delivery in clinical education while effectiveness of this tool on the medical students’ performance is still questionable. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of structured written feedback by cards as well as verbal feedback versus verbal feedback alone on the clinical performance of medical students at the Mini Clinical Evaluation Exercise (Mini-CEX) test in...

  17. The clinical nurse educator as leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman-Mullally, Theresa; Mulder, Cindy K; McCarter-Spalding, Deborah E; Hagler, Debra A; Gaberson, Kathleen B; Hanner, Mary Beth; Oermann, Marilyn H; Speakman, Elizabeth T; Yoder-Wise, Patricia S; Young, Patricia K

    2013-01-01

    The National League for Nursing recognizes leadership as an important aspect of the educator role. The purpose of this article is to describe leadership in the context of clinical nursing education and how clinical nurse educators enact leadership. The article identifies particular nursing practice skills and strengths that clinicians bring to nursing education that enhance leadership knowledge, skills, and abilities. After review of several leadership models, we identified five overarching themes that demonstrate how clinical nurse educators exemplify the various models including role modeling, providing vision, helping students to learn, challenging the system or status quo, and seeking relational integrity. We explicate the themes with examples affirming the leadership potential of clinical nurse educators, and suggest ways in which nursing faculty members and administrators might draw on the leadership capital of clinical nurse educators. PMID:22854312

  18. The Dialysis Exercise: A Clinical Simulation for Preclinical Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; Bernstein, Richard A.

    1980-01-01

    A clinical decision-making simulation that helps students understand the relationship between psychosocial factors and medical problem-solving is described. A group of medical students and one faculty member comprise a selection committee to agree on the order in which four patients will be selected for renal dialysis. (MLW)

  19. The Prediction of Academic and Clinical Performance in Medical School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Harrison G.; Hall, Wallace B.

    1975-01-01

    A study of medical student performance showed the clinical performance factor more or less unpredictable from aptitude and premedical academic achievement indices while the academic performance factor was forecast with acceptable accuracy by equations based on the Medical College Admissions Test and premedical grade point average. (JT)

  20. Electronic teaching materials for inter-professional education in a college of medical professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Hinako; Inoue, Rie; Ito, Yumi; Sakamoto, Chieko; Ishikawa, Toru; Eda, Tetsuya; Saito, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    In order to promote the utilization of digital clinical information among medical professionals, an education program and electronic teaching materials involving fictitious model patients were developed for students in a health and welfare college. The purposes of this program were for students to learn the role of each medical professional and to understand the medical records written by each medical staff member in interdisciplinary medicine (a collaborative approach to medicine). The materials for fictitious patients, including medical records, study results, medical images and the associated documents, were stored in a database on a virtual private network. The electronic medical records were easily modified according to the specialty of the students in each class. Fictional medical records of patients with lacunar infarction, fracture of the distal radius, fracture of the femur, diabetes mellitus and breast cancer were generated and evaluated in inter-professional education classes. PMID:23920893

  1. Gendered specialities during medical education: a literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alers, M.; Leerdam, L. van; Dielissen, P.; Lagro-Janssen, A.

    2014-01-01

    The careers of male and female physicians indicate gender differences, whereas in medical education a feminization is occurring. Our review aims to specify gender-related speciality preferences during medical education. A literature search on gender differences in medical students' speciality prefer

  2. Students' Views on Factors Affecting Empathy in Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winseman, Jeffrey; Malik, Abid; Morison, Julie; Balkoski, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Empathy is a prominent goal of medical education that is too often underachieved. Using concept mapping, the authors constructed a student-generated conceptual model of factors viewed as affecting empathy during medical education. Methods: During the 2005-2006 academic year, 293 medical students and interns answered a brainstorming…

  3. Whither (Whether) Medical Humanities? The Future of Humanities and Arts in Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Johanna

    2012-01-01

    This special issue of "Journal for Learning through the Arts" focuses on the uses of literature and arts in medical education. The introductory article addresses current debate in the field of medical humanities (MH), namely the existential question of what is the purpose of integrating humanities/arts in medical education; and then examines how…

  4. Radiation Oncology in Undergraduate Medical Education: A Literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To review the published literature pertaining to radiation oncology in undergraduate medical education. Methods and Materials: Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE Daily Update and EMBASE databases were searched for the 11-year period of January 1, 1998, through the last week of March 2009. A medical librarian used an extensive list of indexed subject headings and text words. Results: The search returned 640 article references, but only seven contained significant information pertaining to teaching radiation oncology to medical undergraduates. One article described a comprehensive oncology curriculum including recommended radiation oncology teaching objectives and sample student evaluations, two described integrating radiation oncology teaching into a radiology rotation, two described multidisciplinary anatomy-based courses intended to reinforce principles of tumor biology and radiotherapy planning, one described an exercise designed to test clinical reasoning skills within radiation oncology cases, and one described a Web-based curriculum involving oncologic physics. Conclusions: To the authors' knowledge, this is the first review of the literature pertaining to teaching radiation oncology to medical undergraduates, and it demonstrates the paucity of published work in this area of medical education. Teaching radiation oncology should begin early in the undergraduate process, should be mandatory for all students, and should impart knowledge relevant to future general practitioners rather than detailed information relevant only to oncologists. Educators should make use of available model curricula and should integrate radiation oncology teaching into existing curricula or construct stand-alone oncology rotations where the principles of radiation oncology can be conveyed. Assessments of student knowledge and curriculum effectiveness are critical.

  5. Use of patient video cases in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Damian; Balslev, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Patient video cases (PVCs) are brief video recordings of patients during spontaneous or instructed activity. PVCs are true to life and can be replayed, enabling the establishment of highly interactive, contextual and safe learning environments, with a minimum of facilitation. This article describes the use of workshops in which PVCs are used to assist with the development of observational skills and clinical reasoning in medical students and postgraduates. We describe why PVCs are a valuable addition to an educator's portfolio of resources, what evidence there is for their effectiveness, how to use videos for teaching, and some practical advice and tips on their collection and storage. PMID:25972599

  6. Introducing Handheld Computing for Interactive Medical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Finkelstein

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The goals of this project were: (1 development of an interactive multimedia medical education tool (CO-ED utilizing modern features of handheld computing (PDA and major constructs of adult learning theories, and (2 pilot testing of the computer-assisted education in residents and clinicians. Comparison of the knowledge scores using paired t-test demonstrated statistically significant increase in subject knowledge (p<0.01 after using CO-ED. Attitudinal surveys were analyzed by total score (TS calculation represented as a percentage of a maximal possible score. The mean TS was 74.5±7.1%. None of the subjects (N=10 had TS less than 65% and in half of the subjects (N=5 TS was higher than 75%. Analysis of the semi-structured in-depth interviews showed strong support of the study subjects in using PDA as an educational tool, and high acceptance of CO-ED user interface. We concluded that PDA have a significant potential as a tool for clinician education.

  7. Funding medical education: should we follow a different model to general higher education?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kieran Walsh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ISSUE. There has been much recent discussion on the funding of medical education. There has also been much discussion about the funding of higher education more generally. EVIDENCE. The topics of discussion have included the rising costs of education; who should pay; the various potential models of funding; and how best to ensure maximum returns from investment. IMPLICATIONS. Medical education has largely followed the emerging models of funding for higher education. However there are important reasons why the funding models for higher education may not suit medical education. These reasons include the fact that medical education is as important to the public as it is to the learner; the range of funding sources available to medical schools; the strict regulation of medical education; and the fact that the privatisation and commercialisation of higher education may not been in keeping with the social goals of medical schools and the agenda of diversification within the medical student population.

  8. Last Laughs: Gallows Humor and Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piemonte, Nicole M

    2015-12-01

    This paper argues that "backstage" gallows humor among clinical mentors not only affects medical students' perceptions of what it means to be a doctor but is also symptomatic and indicative of a much larger problem in medicine-namely, the failure to attend fully to the complexity and profundity of the lived experiences of illness, suffering, and death. Reorienting the discourse surrounding gallows humor away from whether or in what context it is acceptable and toward the reasons why doctors feel the need to use such humor in the first place addresses this issue in a more illuminating way. PMID:26062447

  9. Medical education and medical educators in South Asia--a set of challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, P Ravi; Piryani, Rano Mal

    2009-01-01

    South Asia has vast unmet health needs especially in rural areas. Community-based medical education can partly address these needs and can serve to introduce students to a number of community health problems. Climate change has the potential to produce major challenges for health and food security in South Asia. Medical students should be taught about climate change and methods to tackle its impact on health. The pharmaceutical industry in South Asia aggressively promotes their products. Disease mongering is becoming more common in South Asia. Educational initiatives to sensitize students regarding promotion are common in developed countries. In Nepal, an educational initiative critically looks at the industry's promotional tactics. Similar initiatives are required in other medical schools. The nature of the doctor-patient relationship is changing. An increasing demand for patient autonomy and for their involvement in therapeutic decisions is seen. Access to the internet and internet sources of health information is increasing. Medical schools should address these issues as well. Medical Humanities modules and courses in communication skills are required. Research can play an important role in alleviating the health problems of South Asia. Students should be taught the basics of scientific research and student research should be strongly encouraged. PMID:19149982

  10. Chasing Perfection and Catching Excellence in Graduate Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolsek, Kathryn M

    2015-09-01

    The author reflects on the chapter titled "Preserving Excellence in Residency Training and Medical Care" in Dr. Kenneth Ludmerer's book Let Me Heal: The Opportunity to Preserve Excellence in American Medicine. Rather than assuming that the status quo represents excellence, however, the author asserts that we must make an informed judgment regarding the quality of graduate medical education (GME) by applying an evidence-based approach, carefully measuring performance against specific criteria. But what are the right criteria to judge excellence in GME? The author posits that the first criterion for excellence is the foundational concept identified by the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation, that of accountability to the public. The author argues that for GME to be truly excellent it must produce a workforce "of sufficient size, specialty mix, and skill" needed to serve the public good. For GME to be truly excellent it must produce the right composition (reflecting the population it serves), use the right pedagogy, and be embedded within the right clinical learning environment. Implementation of competency-based education must be bolder and accelerated. The process of culling out service from education in GME must be more honest, not because all service cannot in some ways be educational but because it is simply too expensive to squander a single minute of time in training. Finally, the epidemic of burnout must be addressed urgently and innovatively. PMID:26177530

  11. For the General Internist: A Summary of Key Innovations in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Brita; Chheda, Shobhina G; Bates, Carol; Dunn, Kathel; Karani, Reena; Willett, Lisa L

    2016-08-01

    We conducted a review of published medical education articles to identify high-quality research and innovation relevant to educators in general medicine. Our review team consisted of six general internists with expertise in medical education and a professional medical librarian. We manually searched 15 journals in pairs (a total of 3062 citations) for original research articles in medical education published in 2014. Each pair of reviewers independently rated the relevance, importance, and generalizability of articles on medical education in their assigned journals using a 27-point scale (maximum of 9 points for each characteristic). From this list, each team member independently reviewed the 22 articles that received a score of 20 or higher from both initial reviewers, and for each selected article rated the quality and global relevance for the generalist educator. We included the seven top-rated articles for presentation in this review, and categorized the studies into four general themes: continuity clinic scheduling, remediation, interprofessional education, and quality improvement and patient safety. We summarized key findings and identified significant limitations of each study. Further studies assessing patient outcomes are needed to strengthen the literature in medical education. This summary of relevant medical education articles can inform future research, teaching, and practice. PMID:27084757

  12. Mobile Learning in Medical Education: Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kieran

    2015-10-01

    In the past several years, mobile learning made rapid inroads into the provision of medical education. There are significant advantages associated with mobile learning. These include high access, low cost, more situated and contextual learning, convenience for the learner, continuous communication and interaction between learner and tutor and between learner and other learners, and the ability to self-assess themselves while learning. Like any other form of medical pedagogy, mobile learning has its downsides. Disadvantages of mobile learning include: inadequate technology, a risk of distraction from learning by using a device that can be used for multiple purposes, and the potential for breakdown in barriers between personal usage of the mobile device and professional or educational use. Despite these caveats, there is no question but that mobile learning offers much potential. In the future, it is likely that the strategy of mobile first, whereby providers of e-learning think of the user experience on a mobile first, will result in learners who increasingly expect that all e-learning provision will work seamlessly on a mobile device. PMID:26949301

  13. Accreditation of Medical Education in China: Accomplishments and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    As an external review mechanism, accreditation has played a positive global role in quality assurance and promotion of educational reform. Accreditation systems for medical education have been developed in more than 100 countries including China. In the past decade, Chinese standards for basic medical education have been issued together with…

  14. Education and Moral Respect for the Medical Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    In this paper I argue that medical education must remain attuned to the interests that physicians have in their own self-development despite ongoing calls for ethics education aimed at ensuring physicians maintain focus on the interests of the patient and society. In particular, I argue that medical education should advance (and abide by) criteria…

  15. Toward Social Accountability of Medical Education in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Entezari

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nFour values of social accountability are, relevance, quality, cost effectiveness and equity, as they pertain to the activities of medi­cal schools, namely education, research and service. Integration of medical education into health service provision is the best strategy for health system responsiveness and social accountability of medical education.

  16. Toward Social Accountability of Medical Education in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    A Entezari; N Momtazmanesh; A. Khojasteh; Einollahi, B.

    2009-01-01

    "nFour values of social accountability are, relevance, quality, cost effectiveness and equity, as they pertain to the activities of medi­cal schools, namely education, research and service. Integration of medical education into health service provision is the best strategy for health system responsiveness and social accountability of medical education.

  17. Continuing Medical Education: Linking the Community Hospital and the Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Phil R.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A group of community hospitals has been linked to the University of Southern California School of Medicine in a continuing medical education network. An educational development team based at the school helps community hospital physicians identify educational needs and develop responses using local and medical school experts as faculty. (Author/JMD)

  18. Directory of Credit-Granting Policies in Medical Laboratory Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Committee for Careers in Medical Technology, Bethesda, MD.

    Ways now exist for medical laboratory workers to advance up the educational career ladder, gaining credit for prior training and/or experience. A total of 369 Certified Medical Laboratory Assistant Schools, colleges with Associate Degree Medical Laboratory Technicians programs, schools of Medical Technology, and colleges with baccalaureate Medical…

  19. Diagnostic Reasoning across the Medical Education Continuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Scott Smith

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to study linguistic and non-linguistic elements of diagnostic reasoning across the continuum of medical education. We performed semi-structured interviews of premedical students, first year medical students, third year medical students, second year internal medicine residents, and experienced faculty (ten each as they diagnosed three common causes of dyspnea. A second observer recorded emotional tone. All interviews were digitally recorded and blinded transcripts were created. Propositional analysis and concept mapping were performed. Grounded theory was used to identify salient categories and transcripts were scored with these categories. Transcripts were then unblinded. Systematic differences in propositional structure, number of concept connections, distribution of grounded theory categories, episodic and semantic memories, and emotional tone were identified. Summary concept maps were created and grounded theory concepts were explored for each learning level. We identified three major findings: (1 The “apprentice effect” in novices (high stress and low narrative competence; (2 logistic concept growth in intermediates; and (3 a cognitive state transition (between analytical and intuitive approaches in experts. These findings warrant further study and comparison.

  20. The ELEPHANT criteria in medical education: can medical education be fun?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Hugh; Varatharaj, Aravinthan

    2010-01-01

    'Hilarity and a good nature [and] a breezy cheerfulness help enormously in the study and in the practice of medicine,' said Sir William Osler, Regius Professor of Medicine at Oxford, pioneering medical educationalist, and arguably one of the greatest physicians of all time (Osler W. 1905 ). We present evidence that (1) Encouraging Learning, (2) Entertaining People, and (3) Having a Nice Time are dangerously powerful adjuncts to medical education. These are, by acronym, the ELEPHANT criteria. Encouraging is the motivating heart of the matter. Entertainment engages the mind and has been shown to enhance working memory and recall. Enjoyment is associated with deep learning, which comes with a whole host of benefits. However, learning in fear and misery can be an effective tool--but for other reasons--and the pessimistic personality type may respond badly to 'fun learning.' Even so, medical education that fulfills the ELEPHANT criteria can be an effective tool in training young doctors. PMID:20218834

  1. Medical Student Attitudes about Mental Illness: Does Medical-School Education Reduce Stigma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korszun, Ania; Dinos, Sokratis; Ahmed, Kamran; Bhui, Kamaldeep

    2012-01-01

    Background: Reducing stigma associated with mental illness is an important aim of medical education, yet evidence indicates that medical students' attitudes toward patients with mental health problems deteriorate as they progress through medical school. Objectives: Authors examined medical students' attitudes to mental illness, as compared with…

  2. Teaching Fellows in undergraduate medical education-the ‎student’s perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Hashim Z.‎; Miller A.‎; Fahim N‎; Sam M.‎

    2012-01-01

    Background: Currently there is a lack of data exploring the value added by Clinical Teaching ‎Fellow posts over teaching led by regular working clinicians.‎Aim: To explore the perceptions of medical students regarding the value attached to having ‎fulltime Teaching Fellows to deliver undergraduate medical education. ‎Method: A total of 521 clinical year medical students from the University of Leicester were ‎asked to complete an online questionnaire.‎Result: 375 medical students responded t...

  3. Evaluation of problem-based learning in medical students’ education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMAD HADI IMANIEH

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In traditional medical education systems much interest is placed on the cramming of basic and clinical facts without considering their applicability in the future professional career. The aim of this study is to evaluate a novice medical training method (problem-based learning as compared to the contemporary teacher-based medical education or traditional methods. Methods: Selection of the study subjects was done through simple sampling and according to the division of medical students introduced from Medical Faculty to the Pediatrics Department with no personal involvement. 120 medical students were assigned to 8 groups of 15 students each. For four months, 4 groups were trained with traditional method and 4 other groups underwent problem-based learning method on selected subject materials. In each method, a pre-course test at the beginning and a post-course test at the end of each course were given to each group. The questionnaire used in this study as the instrument was composed of 39 questions, 37 multiple choice questions and two short answer questions. Three professors of pediatric gastroenterologist took part in the training. Two of these professors were responsible for solving task training method. The third professor used traditional teacher-centered methodology to eliminate any possible bias. Scores obtained from these tests were analyzed using paired t-test and independent t-test. P values of less than 0.05 were considered as significant. Results: The scores of the students undergoing the traditional method were 14.70±3.03 and 21.20±4.07 in the first and second test, respectively. In problembased learning, the scores were 15.82±3.29 in the first and 27.52±4.72 in the second test. There was a significant difference between the mean scores of post-course exams of the two groups (p=0.001, while no significant difference was observed between the mean scores of pre-course exams of the groups (p=0.550. Conclusion: It may be

  4. Evaluation of problem-based learning in medical students’ education

    Science.gov (United States)

    IMANIEH, MOHAMMAD HADI; DEHGHANI, SEYED MOHSEN; SOBHANI, AHMAD REZA; HAGHIGHAT, MAHMOOD

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In traditional medical education systems much interest is placed on the cramming of basic and clinical facts without considering their applicability in the future professional career. The aim of this study is to evaluate a novice medical training method (problem-based learning) as compared to the contemporary teacher-based medical education or traditional methods. Methods: Selection of the study subjects was done through simple sampling and according to the division of medical students introduced from Medical Faculty to the Pediatrics Department with no personal involvement. 120 medical students were assigned to 8 groups of 15 students each. For four months, 4 groups were trained with traditional method and 4 other groups underwent problem-based learning method on selected subject materials. In each method, a pre-course test at the beginning and a post-course test at the end of each course were given to each group. The questionnaire used in this study as the instrument was composed of 39 questions, 37 multiple choice questions and two short answer questions. Three professors of pediatric gastroenterologist took part in the training. Two of these professors were responsible for solving task training method. The third professor used traditional teacher-centered methodology to eliminate any possible bias. Scores obtained from these tests were analyzed using paired t-test and independent t-test. P-values of less than 0.05 were considered as significant. Results: The scores of the students undergoing the traditional method were 14.70±3.03 and 21.20±4.07 in the first and second test, respectively. In problem-based learning, the scores were 15.82±3.29 in the first and 27.52±4.72 in the second test. There was a significant difference between the mean scores of post-course exams of the two groups (p=0.001), while no significant difference was observed between the mean scores of pre-course exams of the groups (p=0.550). Conclusion: It may be concluded that

  5. Educational resources used by medical students in primary healthcare rotation: A cross sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Hazmi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify what educational resources are used by medical students for their personal study during Primary health care (PHC) clinical rotation and the reasons for making these choices at King Saud University in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Methods: A survey of 176 male and female medical students was conducted during PHC rotation. A self-administered questionnaire ascertained the type of educational source with reason and preferred type of teaching method. Responses by male and female st...

  6. Anonymization of Electronic Medical Records to Support Clinical Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Gkoulalas-Divanis, Aris

    2013-01-01

    Anonymization of Electronic Medical Records to Support Clinical Analysis closely examines the privacy threats that may arise from medical data sharing, and surveys the state-of-the-art methods developed to safeguard data against these threats. To motivate the need for computational methods, the book first explores the main challenges facing the privacy-protection of medical data using the existing policies, practices and regulations. Then, it takes an in-depth look at the popular computational privacy-preserving methods that have been developed for demographic, clinical and genomic data sharing, and closely analyzes the privacy principles behind these methods, as well as the optimization and algorithmic strategies that they employ. Finally, through a series of in-depth case studies that highlight data from the US Census as well as the Vanderbilt University Medical Center, the book outlines a new, innovative class of privacy-preserving methods designed to ensure the integrity of transferred medical data for su...

  7. On Development of Medical Informatics Education via European Cooperation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zvárová, Jana

    1998-01-01

    Roč. 50, - (1998), s. 219-223. ISSN 1386-5056 Keywords : information technologies * education * training * medical informatics * medical statistics * epidemiology Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 0.357, year: 1998

  8. Do Clinical Breast Examination Skills Improve During Medical School?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Karen C.; Dunlop, Dorothy; Dolan, Nancy C.

    1998-01-01

    A study assessed the effect of training stage, gender, and specialty interest on 493 Northwestern University (Illinois) medical students' breast cancer knowledge, attitudes, and clinical breast examination skills. Results suggest knowledge and attitudes are not related to clinical breast examination proficiency, which is a practiced tactile skill.…

  9. International electives in the final year of German medical school education – a student's perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahimi-Fakhari, Darius; Agrawal, Mridul; Wahlster, Lara

    2014-01-01

    [english] The final year of medical school has a unique role for introducing students to their future responsibilities and challenges. At many medical schools, electives at an accredited institution abroad are a common part of the student’s final year experience. International electives provide an opportunity for a personal and academic experience that will often create new perspectives on clinical medicine and research, medical education and healthcare policy. In this article the authors ref...

  10. Comparison of Wound Education in Medical Schools in the United States, United Kingdom, and Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Nima P; Granick, Mark S.; Kanakaris, Nikolaos K.; Giannoudis, Peter V.; Werdin, Frank; Rennekampff, Hans-Oliver

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Millions of patients are treated annually in the United States, United Kingdom, and Germany with either acute or chronic wounds. The purpose of this study is to compare how the medical education systems in the United States, Germany, and United Kingdom have prepared their physician trainees to deal with clinical issues of wounds. Methods: A retrospective study was performed in the United States by obtaining medical school curriculum data from the American Association of Medical Col...

  11. To consider e-learning in dental and medical education in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Abe, Kazuhiro

    2006-01-01

    All of Japanese medical and dental schools have constructed information-technology network systems. But only about 10 percent medical, dental, pharmaceutical, and health professional schools are using e-learning, and 60 percent are negative for planning to introduce e-learning systems. The IT or e-learning systems in medical and dental education in Japan are seen in the on line self-learning media for dissection for gross anatomy and media for simulated training systems for clinical diagnosis...

  12. The attitudes of medical students in Europe toward the clinical importance of embryology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxham, Bernard John; Emmanouil-Nikoloussi, Elpida; Standley, Henrietta; Brenner, Erich; Plaisant, Odile; Brichova, Hana; Pais, Diogo; Stabile, Isobel; Borg, Jordy; Chirculescu, Andy

    2016-03-01

    Although there have been many studies reporting the attitudes of medical students to the clinical importance of gross anatomy, little is known about their opinions concerning the clinical importance of embryology. Using Thurstone and Chave methods to assess attitudes, nearly 1,600 medical students across Europe in the early stages of their training provided responses to a survey that tested the hypothesis that they do not regard embryology as highly clinically relevant. Indeed, we further proposed that student attitudes to gross anatomy are much more positive than those toward embryology. Our findings show that our hypotheses hold, regardless of the university and country surveyed and regardless of the teaching methods employed for embryology. Clearly, embryology has a significant part to play in medical education in terms of understanding prenatal life, of appreciating how the organization of the mature human body has developed, and of providing essential information for general medical practice, obstetrics and pediatrics, and teratology. However, while newly recruited medical students understand the importance of gross anatomy in the development of professional competence, understanding the importance of embryology requires teachers, medical educationalists, and devisors of medical curricula to pay special attention to informing students of the significant role played by embryology in attaining clinical competence and achieving the knowledge and understanding of the biomedical sciences that underpins becoming a learned member of a health care profession. Clin. Anat. 29:144-150, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26538399

  13. Implementing video cases in clinical paediatric teaching increases medical students' self-assessed confidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malon, Michelle; Cortes, Dina; Andersen, Jesper;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Use of video cases in clinical education is rarely used systematically. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Medical students (n = 127) reported by questionnaire whether they had or had not seen a bedside case of each of 22 specific clinical conditions during their five-week clinical course in...... having seen a child with asthma in the daily clinic. In contrast, respiratory syncytial virus infection was only seen by 20%. Students' self-reported confidence in the assessment of paediatric patients increased after the video case library was made available: Before the intervention, 41% (57/138) of the...

  14. Role of Medical Education in Preventing and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases in India?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K K Talwar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available India has approximately 335 medical colleges, which produce around 40,000 medical graduates annually. Even though medical professional have a critical role in prevention and control of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs including injuries, it has been observed that the present medical and nursing curriculum in India does not adequately cover prevention and control of NCDs. The topics for specific approach to prevent NCDs and various strategies can be incorporated into public health and clinical courses in undergraduate medical education, with brief optional courses in residency and continuing medical education for established practitioners. High-level expert group instituted by Planning Commission of India on Universal Health Coverage recommended that medical education requires greater orientation of providers to the social determinants of health as well as to gender and equity issues. Curricula in medical schools should keep pace with the changing dynamics of public health, health policy, and health demographics. Medical education and training should be reoriented by introducing competency-based, health system connected curricula, and continuous education. There is a need to review of medical curriculum, introducing innovative integrated teaching methods, and capacity building of teachers for meeting the challenge of rising burden of NCDs in India.

  15. Needs Assessment in Postgraduate Medical Education: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Ratnapalan, Savithiri; Hilliard, Robert I.

    2009-01-01

    Although the concept of needs assessment in continuing medical education is well accepted, there is limited information on needs assessment in postgraduate medical education. We discuss the learning needs of postgraduate trainees and review the various methods of needs assessment such as: questionnaire surveys, interviews, focus groups, chart audits, chart-stimulated recall, standardized patients, and environmental scans in the context of post graduate medical education. Keywords: residents, ...

  16. Needs Assessment in Postgraduate Medical Education:A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Savithiri Ratnapalan MRCP,FRCPC,

    2002-01-01

    Although the concept of needs assessment in continuing medical education is well ac-cepted, there is limited information on needs assessment in postgraduate medical education. We discuss the learning needs of postgraduate trainees and review the various methods of needs as-sessment such as: questionnaire surveys, interviews, focus groups, chart audits, chart-stimulated recall, standardized patients, and environmental scans in the context of post graduate medical edu-cation.

  17. Status of nutrition education in Canadian dental and medical schools.

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, M. L.; Hargreaves, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    To investigate the present status of nutrition education for dentists and physicians in Canada, we conducted a survey of the nutrition education programs in 10 Canadian dental and 16 medical schools in the academic year 1982-83. Seven of the dental schools and seven of the medical schools had a separate course in nutrition. The average duration of these courses was 22 hours for the dental schools and 26 hours for the medical schools. Nutrition education was integrated with another discipline ...

  18. The State of Nutrition Education at US Medical Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Kelly M.; W. Scott Butsch; Martin Kohlmeier

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the state of nutrition education at US medical schools and compare it with recommended instructional targets. Method. We surveyed all 133 US medical schools with a four-year curriculum about the extent and type of required nutrition education during the 2012/13 academic year. Results. Responses came from 121 institutions (91% response rate). Most US medical schools (86/121, 71%) fail to provide the recommended minimum 25 hours of nutrition education; 43 (36%) provide less t...

  19. Why decision support systems are important for medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinidis, Stathis Th; Bamidis, Panagiotis D

    2016-03-01

    During the last decades, the inclusion of digital tools in health education has rapidly lead to a continuously enlarging digital era. All the online interactions between learners and tutors, the description, creation, reuse and sharing of educational digital resources and the interlinkage between them in conjunction with cheap storage technology has led to an enormous amount of educational data. Medical education is a unique type of education due to accuracy of information needed, continuous changing competences required and alternative methods of education used. Nowadays medical education standards provide the ground for organising the educational data and the paradata. Analysis of such education data through education data mining techniques is in its infancy, but decision support systems (DSSs) for medical education need further research. To the best of our knowledge, there is a gap and a clear need for identifying the challenges for DSSs in medical education in the era of medical education standards. Thus, in this Letter the role and the attributes of such a DSS for medical education are delineated and the challenges and vision for future actions are identified. PMID:27222734

  20. MEDICAL EDUCATION - INTERDISCIPLINARY LIGHT OF ANDRAGOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Cristina Uliana Peterle

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The National Programme for Reorientation of Vocational Training in Health (Pro-Health and the Education Program of Work for Health (Health-PET are linked with the prospect of shifting training. Thus, we seek to replace the traditional model of organization of health care has historically focused on illness and hospitalization. One of the fundamental premises is to strengthen the teaching-service integration with the Family Health Strategy, where the action is based on the principles of integrity, fairness and universality of the Unified Health System as a space to the development of actions in a comprehensive approach of the health and disease. This article presents the authors' experience as mentors and tutors of projects and actions of the Health PET / Federal District, in partnership with the University of Brasilia in the vision of the development of interdisciplinary activities. By exposing the facilitators of coping strategies, as well as those that hinder raises the reflection on the concept of integrating medical education teaching and service in the light of Andragogy, which considers the experience as a key element of educational methods.

  1. Der Einsatz von medizinischen Trainingszentren für die Ausbildung zum Arzt in Deutschland, Österreich und der deutschsprachigen Schweiz [Clinical Skills Labs in Medical Education in Germany, Austria and German Speaking Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt, Anita

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available [english] Introduction: Following the reform of the medical licensure law in 2002 German medical faculties have started implementing clinical skills labs. This survey aims to present a review about the stage of development in this domain in Germany as well as in Austria and in German-speaking Switzerland. Method: In the period between August and December 2007 all the 43 medical faculties in Germany, Austria and in German-speaking Switzerland were interviewed with a questionnaire covering 7 topics. The further analysis included skills labs where more than one medical specialty was involved (“central” skills labs Results: The response rate was 100 %. By the time of the survey 33 of the existing 43 faculties maintained a skills lab, 24 of them entered the overview. 22 skills labs were managed by physicians. The number of employees varied between 1 and 8, the number of student tutors between 0 and 40. The size of the existing skills labs varied between below 100 m² and 2500 m². Most of the skills labs (19 based their tuition upon instruction manuals, and 19 worked with simulated patients (mostly using both. In 15 skills labs simulated patients were also set in for assessment. 17 skills labs taught with problem based learning, 16 taught with computer based learning. Questions about personal costs, acquisition cost and current costs were answered scarcely and inhomogeneously. Discussion: The foundation of clinical skills labs in Germany was furthered by the medical licensure law reform and by the recent introduction of tuition fees. Marked similarities amongst the skills labs existed in teaching methods and content and in assessment. The increasing number of new skills labs since tuition fees have been introduced suggests that medical faculties use such resources for the improvement of practical competencies in medical education. Conclusion: In order to save resources we suggest an exchange and co-operation between existing medical skills labs

  2. Optimizing the clinical pharmacology of tuberculosis medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egelund, E F; Alsultan, A; Peloquin, C A

    2015-10-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) treatment has changed little in the past 40 years. The current standard therapy requires four drugs for 2 months followed by two drugs for 4 months. This "short-course" regimen is not based on optimized pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, but empiric evidence. A review of existing data suggests that pharmacokinetic variability with isoniazid and rifampin is greater than previously thought, and that efficacy is not as good as traditionally reported. Adding new drugs to the current regimen will be costly and time-consuming. Maximizing the efficacy of the current medications is a less expensive and more feasible option. This article reviews the current potential of the first-line TB drugs (rifamycins, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol) as well as the fluoroquinolones to introduce a true short-course TB regimen. PMID:26138226

  3. Towards a Uniform European Education for Medical Physicists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European Federation of Organisations in Medical Physics (EFOMP) mission and objectives are briefly presented. The most attention is given to the education and training activities of the EFOMP. Revised EFOMP recommendations on Education, Training and CPD of Medical Physicists and Policy Statements are listed. In order for Medical Physics to be recognised by the European Union as a profession some future activities like Bologna Declaration process, continuous professional development, European Network for Medical Physics training Schools, actions for the harmonisation of the Education and Training of the Medical Physicist in Europe in accordance with EU Directive 2005/36/EC and EU Recommendation 2008/C 111/01 are also discussed

  4. Monitor Preference for Electronic Medical Record in Outpatient Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kee-Hyuck; Bae, Woo Kyung; Han, Jong Soo; Yoo, Sooyoung; Kim, Jon Soo; Yun, Jonghoar; Baek, Hyun Young; Baek, Rong-Min; Hwang, Hee

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this paper is to assess which wide type monitor configurations are preferred when physicians use an Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system in an outpatient clinic setting. Methods We selected three kinds of monitor configurations available for adoption at outpatient clinics with reference to monitor market trends. Fifteen attending physicians of the Seoul National University Bundang Hospital used each monitor configuration in their outpatient clinics. After complet...

  5. Patients′ attitude towards medical students rotating in the dermatology clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bukhari Iqbal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the attitudes of the patients towards medical students rotating in the dermatology clinic in the King Fahad Hospital of the University (KFHU. Materials and Methods: One hundred and two adult outpatients attending the KFHU in Alkhobar, Saudi Arabia during the period March to June 2004 completed a questionnaire to evaluate their receptiveness towards medical students attending with the dermatologist. Results: Almost 57% preferred physician and medical student participation in their care and 46% welcomed their presence during physical examination. The majority of patients (64.8% felt comfortable disclosing personal information to the medical student and (68.7% enjoyed the interaction with the medical students. Patients (63.7% agreed that the students understood their healthcare needs. Conclusion: The majority of the patients in this study enjoyed their interactions with the students and felt comfortable disclosing information. Some patients want to spend time alone with the physician so permission for medical student participation should be requested.

  6. Clinical capabilities of graduates of an outcomes-based integrated medical program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scicluna Helen A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The University of New South Wales (UNSW Faculty of Medicine replaced its old content-based curriculum with an innovative new 6-year undergraduate entry outcomes-based integrated program in 2004. This paper is an initial evaluation of the perceived and assessed clinical capabilities of recent graduates of the new outcomes-based integrated medical program compared to benchmarks from traditional content-based or process-based programs. Method Self-perceived capability in a range of clinical tasks and assessment of medical education as preparation for hospital practice were evaluated in recent graduates after 3 months working as junior doctors. Responses of the 2009 graduates of the UNSW’s new outcomes-based integrated medical education program were compared to those of the 2007 graduates of UNSW’s previous content-based program, to published data from other Australian medical schools, and to hospital-based supervisor evaluations of their clinical competence. Results Three months into internship, graduates from UNSW’s new outcomes-based integrated program rated themselves to have good clinical and procedural skills, with ratings that indicated significantly greater capability than graduates of the previous UNSW content-based program. New program graduates rated themselves significantly more prepared for hospital practice in the confidence (reflective practice, prevention (social aspects of health, interpersonal skills (communication, and collaboration (teamwork subscales than old program students, and significantly better or equivalent to published benchmarks of graduates from other Australian medical schools. Clinical supervisors rated new program graduates highly capable for teamwork, reflective practice and communication. Conclusions Medical students from an outcomes-based integrated program graduate with excellent self-rated and supervisor-evaluated capabilities in a range of clinically-relevant outcomes. The program

  7. Perspective: Competency-based medical education: a defense against the four horsemen of the medical education apocalypse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Mark; Mejicano, George; Gruppen, Larry

    2008-12-01

    Medical education is facing a convergence of challenges that the authors characterize as the four horsemen of the medical education apocalypse: teaching patient shortages, teacher shortages, conflicting systems, and financial problems. Rapidly expanding class sizes and new medical schools are coming online as medical student access to teaching patients is becoming increasingly difficult because of the decreasing length and increasing intensity of hospital stays, concerns about patient safety, patients who are stressed for time, teaching physician shortages and needs for increasing productivity from those who remain, and increasing emphasis on translational research. Further, medical education is facing reductions in funding from all sources, just as it is mounting its first major expansion in 40 years. The authors contend that medical education is on the verge of crisis and that little outside assistance is forthcoming. If medical education is to avoid a catastrophic decline, it will need to take steps to reinvent itself and make optimum use of all available resources. Curriculum materials developed nationally, increased reliance on simulation and standardized patient experiences, and adoption of quality-control methods such as competency-based education are suggested as ways to keep medical education vital in an environment that is increasingly preoccupied with fending off the four horsemen. The authors conclude with a call for a national dialogue about how the medical education community can address the problems represented by the four horsemen, and they offer some potential ways to maintain the vitality of medical education in the face of such overwhelming problems. PMID:19202480

  8. Nonstandard Programs: the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center's next frontier in graduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroboth, Frank J; Zerega, W Dennis; Patel, Rita M; Barnes, Barbara E; Webster, Marshall W

    2011-02-01

    The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center has seen continuous growth in the number and types of graduate training programs not accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), the American Board of Medical Specialties, or the American Osteopathic Association. For the purposes of ensuring best educational products and of controlling unrecognized competition with our accredited programs, a sequential process of centralized oversight of these nonstandard programs was undertaken. The first step involved programs whose fellows were hired and tracked like accredited fellows (i.e., not instructors). The basic process began with consensus among leadership, writing of policy with consultation as necessary, establishment of a registry of programs and graduates, and a committee to allow sharing of best practices and dissemination of policy. The second step applied the same process to instructor-level programs. Whereas the previous group of programs was made subject to ACGME regulations, more latitude in duty hours and progressive responsibility were allowed for instructor programs. The final step, in progress, is extending a similar but modified approach to short-duration clinical experiences and observerships. The outcomes of these efforts have been the creation of a centralized organizational structure, policies to guide this structure, an accurate registry of a surprising number of training programs, and a rolling record of all graduates from these programs. Included in the process is a mechanism that ensures that core program directors and department chairs specifically review the impact of new programs on core programs before allowing their creation. PMID:21169779

  9. Identify practice gaps in medication education through surveys to patients and physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi ZM

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Zhan-Miao Yi,1 Xiao-Jie Zhi,2 Ling Yang,3 Shu-Sen Sun,4 Zhuo Zhang,2 Zhi-Ming Sun,2 Suo-Di Zhai1 1Department of Pharmacy, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 2School of Pharmaceutical Science, 3School of Public Health, Peking University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; 4College of Pharmacy, Western New England University, Springfield, MA, USA Background: Effective communication and education formats between health care providers and patients about medication use are associated with patients’ satisfaction, recall of information, and eventually their health status. Limited research exists on physician-delivered education interventions, as well as on whether the current content of medication education and delivery formats satisfies the needs of both patients and physicians. Our objective was to identify the practice gaps regarding medication education content and delivery.Methods: Separate surveys were obtained from ambulatory care patients presenting to the outpatient pharmacy for medication pickups, and physicians working at the hospital clinics.Results: A total of 108 patients completed the patient survey, and 116 hospital clinic physicians completed the physician survey. Female patients had a higher degree of concern regarding medication information compared with male patients (4.04±0.65 versus 3.58±0.66, P=0.001. Physicians were less likely to educate patients regarding their medications’ on drug–drug interactions (24.3%, drug–food interactions (24.3%, and what to do about their prescriptions if an adverse reaction is experienced (24.3% during physician–patient encounters. Patients’ most desired education format was physician counseling (82.4% and the second most desired education format was pharmacist counseling (50.9%. Medication device demonstration (7.0% was the least used educational format delivered to patients by physicians, and patients would like to see an increased education

  10. Globalization, migration health, and educational preparation for transnational medical encounters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koehn Peter H

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Unprecedented migration, a core dimension of contemporary globalization, challenges population health. In a world of increasing human mobility, many health outcomes are shaped by transnational interactions among care providers and care recipients who meet in settings where nationality/ethnic match is not an option. This review article explores the value of transnational competence (TC education as preparation for ethnically and socially discordant clinical encounters. The relevance of TC's five core skill domains (analytic, emotional, creative, communicative, and functional for migration health and the medical-school curriculum is elaborated. A pedagogical approach that prepares for the transnational health-care consultation is presented, with a focus on clinical-clerkship learning experiences. Educational preparation for contemporary medical encounters needs to include a comprehensive set of patient-focused interpersonal skills, be adaptable to a wide variety of service users and global practice sites, and possess utility in addressing both the quality of patient care and socio-political constraints on migration health.

  11. Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Nuclear Medicine (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of radiation in human health, for both diagnosis and treatment of disease, is an important component of the work of the IAEA. The responsibility for the increasingly technical aspects of this work is undertaken by the medical physicist. To ensure good practice in this vital area, structured clinical training programmes are required to complement academic learning. This publication is intended to be a guide to the practical implementation of such a programme for nuclear medicine. There is a general and growing awareness that radiation medicine is increasingly dependent on well trained medical physicists who are based in a clinical setting. However an analysis of the availability of medical physicists indicates a large shortfall of qualified and capable professionals. This is particularly evident in developing countries. While strategies to increase educational opportunities are critical to such countries, the need for guidance on structured clinical training was recognized by the members of the Regional Cooperative Agreement for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Science and Technology (RCA) for the Asia-Pacific region. Consequently, a technical cooperation regional project (RAS6038) under the RCA programme was formulated to address this need in this region by developing suitable material and establishing its viability. Development of a clinical training guide for medical physicists specialising in nuclear medicine was started in 2009 with the appointment of a core drafting committee of regional and international experts. The publication drew on the experience of clinical training in Australia, Croatia and Sweden and was moderated by physicists working in the Asian region. The present publication follows the approach of earlier IAEA publications in the Training Course Series, specifically Nos 37 and 47, Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Radiation Oncology and Clinical Training of Medical Physicists

  12. Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Nuclear Medicine (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of radiation in human health, for both diagnosis and treatment of disease, is an important component of the work of the IAEA. The responsibility for the increasingly technical aspects of this work is undertaken by the medical physicist. To ensure good practice in this vital area, structured clinical training programmes are required to complement academic learning. This publication is intended to be a guide to the practical implementation of such a programme for nuclear medicine. There is a general and growing awareness that radiation medicine is increasingly dependent on well trained medical physicists who are based in a clinical setting. However an analysis of the availability of medical physicists indicates a large shortfall of qualified and capable professionals. This is particularly evident in developing countries. While strategies to increase educational opportunities are critical to such countries, the need for guidance on structured clinical training was recognized by the members of the Regional Cooperative Agreement for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Science and Technology (RCA) for the Asia-Pacific region. Consequently, a technical cooperation regional project (RAS6038) under the RCA programme was formulated to address this need in this region by developing suitable material and establishing its viability. Development of a clinical training guide for medical physicists specialising in nuclear medicine was started in 2009 with the appointment of a core drafting committee of regional and international experts. The publication drew on the experience of clinical training in Australia, Croatia and Sweden and was moderated by physicists working in the Asian region. The present publication follows the approach of earlier IAEA publications in the Training Course Series, specifically Nos 37 and 47, Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Radiation Oncology and Clinical Training of Medical Physicists

  13. Clinical Legal Education Models: Recommended Assessment Regimes

    OpenAIRE

    Riette (MA) du Plessis

    2015-01-01

    Clinical legal education (CLE) forms part of the LLB curriculum at most South African Universities. There are many similarities in the approach to CLE, but often also many differences. The clinical models of four South African university law clinics are reviewed in an effort to find suitable models. It is indicated that formulating a mission for the law clinic will have a direct impact on the clinical model chosen. The integration of CLE courses into the core curriculum of the law school will...

  14. [The educational change in medical schools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Manuel; Hawes, Gustavo; Castillo, Silvana; Romero, Luis; Rojas, Ana María; Espinoza, Mónica; Oyarzo, Sandra

    2014-08-01

    This paper reports the reflections of a group of members of the University of Chile Faculty of Medicine, about the changes in teaching methods that medical schools should incorporate. In a complex scenario, not only new and better knowledge should be transmitted to students but also values, principles, critical reasoning and leadership, among others. In the first part, a proposal to understand this educational development in the context of complex universities, incorporating pedagogical skills and reviewing institutional leadership, is carried out. In the second part, the training of teaching physicians, as part of the changes, is extensively discussed. Physicians hired as academics in the University should have the opportunity to work mainly as teachers and be relieved of research obligations. For them, teaching should become a legitimate area of academic development. PMID:25424678

  15. [A course for continuing medical education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza Hernández, S

    1985-01-01

    To promote continuing medical education, the Central Military Hospital of Mexico offers a course in which the student may develop his skills for finding and using sources of information, applying the scientific method to biomedical research, and communicating the results thereof in writing. The methodology is more self-instructional than expository. The course program is divided into three modules geared to the general objectives, and the duration varies between 10 and 14 weeks. The course is attended in the final stage of the professional training, when the student has just completed his specialization, or when he is beginning it, on the premise that this is the best time to make clear to the physician the need to continue studying and learning throughout life. The author of this article explains why the course is important, states its specific objectives and, in an annex, presents the content of the program. PMID:4029062

  16. "Making strange": a role for the humanities in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Arno K; Wear, Delese

    2014-07-01

    Stories, film, drama, and art have been used in medical education to enhance empathy, perspective-taking, and openness to "otherness," and to stimulate reflection on self, others, and the world. Yet another, equally important function of the humanities and arts in the education of physicians is that of "making strange"-that is, portraying daily events, habits, practices, and people through literature and the arts in a way that disturbs and disrupts one's assumptions, perspectives, and ways of acting so that one sees the self, others, and the world anew. Tracing the development of this concept from Viktor Shklovsky's "enstrangement" (ostranenie) through Bertolt Brecht's "alienation effect," this essay describes the use of this technique to disrupt the "automaticity of thinking" in order to discover new ways of perceiving and being in the world.Enstrangement may be used in medical education in order to stimulate critical reflection and dialogue on assumptions, biases, and taken-for-granted societal conditions that may hinder the realization of a truly humanistic clinical practice. In addition to its ability to enhance one's critical understanding of medicine, the technique of "making strange" does something else: By disrupting fixed beliefs, this approach may allow a reexamination of patient-physician relationships in terms of human interactions and provide health care professionals an opportunity-an "open space"-to bear witness and engage with other individuals during challenging times. PMID:24751976

  17. Radiation oncology medical physics education and training in Queensland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The training education and accreditation program (TEAP) for radiation oncology commenced formally in Queensland in 2008 with an initial intake of nine registrars. In 2011 there are 17 registrars across four ACPSEM accredited Queensland Health departments (Mater Radiation Oncology Centre, Princess Alexandria Hospital, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Townsville Hospital). The Queensland Statewide Cancer Services Plan 2008-2017 outlines significant expansion to oncology services including increases in total number of treatment machines from 14 (2007) to 29-31 (2017) across existing and new clinical departments. A direct implication of this will be the number of qualified ROMPs needed to maintain and develop medical physics services. This presentation will outline ongoing work in the ROMP education and Training portfolio to develop, facilitate and provide training activities for ROMPs undertaking TEAP in the Queensland public system. Initiatives such as Department of Health and Aging scholarships for medical physics students, and the educational challenges associated with competency attainment will also be discussed in greater detail.

  18. Ethik in der Medizinischen Ausbildungsforschung [Ethics in medical education research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marienhagen, Jörg

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available [english] Research ethics criteria that are used for reviewing clinical trials are also applicable to research designs used within the field of medical education. Especially the principles of nonmaleficence, informed consent, and freedom to participate are relevant in this area of research. Due to the high impact of university education on tomorrow’s doctors, high-quality ethical and methodological standards are essential in medical education research. A responsible handling of ethical problems in the area of medical education research requires careful handling of issues concerning participants, informed consent, and the methodology used. As it is obligatory in clinical trials, risk-benefit and cost-performance analyses have to be a part of the complete process, from the planning phase onwards, to avoid potential harm to the participants. Every publication of study results should contain information about the methodology used and the reliability of the data. It is important that the contribution of all mentioned co-authors becomes clear. The authors recommend the constitution of an ethics committee within the German Association for Medical Education (Gesellschaft für Medizinische Ausbildung, GMA to support researchers and to meet the interests of all groups involved. Additionally, more and more journals dealing with publications in the area of medical education demand an ethical statement as part of their publication requirements. The GMA is called on to establish such a committee to secure ethical standards for medical education research. [german] Es zeigt sich, dass forschungsethische Kriterien wie in medikamentösen Interventionsstudien auch in der Ausbildungsforschung sinnvoll und ohne große Einschnitte ins Studiendesign applizierbar sind. Das Nichtschadensprinzip, die informierte Einwilligung und Freiwilligkeit der Teilnahme stehen hierbei im Vordergrund. Aus dem hohen Stellenwert der Ausbildung für Studierende begründet sich ein

  19. Positive Porn: Educational, Medical, and Clinical Uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Mary Ann; Smith, Randyl D.

    2012-01-01

    Despite its widespread use, pornography has been vilified as a symptom of personal and cultural depravity and as a cause of rape, aggression, devaluation of women, and marital dissolution. Yet in some cases there may be personal, relational, and social value to the use of sexually explicit material. In this paper, we briefly review the literature,…

  20. Comparison of medication reconciliation and medication review: errors and clinical importance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjeldbak-Olesen, Mette; Danielsen, Anja Gadsbølle; Tomsen, Dorthe Vilstrup;

    2013-01-01

    of Cardiology, Hillerød Hos­pital. Medication reconciliation compared the prescriptions in patient records, an electronic medication system (EMS) and in discharge summaries (DS). The medication review was based on the EMS. The two methods were performed on the same data material. To assess the clinical...... importance of the errors, a four-point scale was applied. Results: A total of 75 patient records were included. In all, 198 discrepancies were identified by medication reconcili­ation, 2.6 per patient. The most frequent discrepancies were omission of a drug in the DS and discrepancy between the drugs noted...

  1. Evaluating the impact of the humanities in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wershof Schwartz, Andrea; Abramson, Jeremy S; Wojnowich, Israel; Accordino, Robert; Ronan, Edward J; Rifkin, Mary R

    2009-08-01

    The inclusion of the humanities in medical education may offer significant potential benefits to individual future physicians and to the medical community as a whole. Debate remains, however, about the definition and precise role of the humanities in medical education, whether at the premedical, medical school, or postgraduate level. Recent trends have revealed an increasing presence of the humanities in medical training. This article reviews the literature on the impact of humanities education on the performance of medical students and residents and the challenges posed by the evaluation of the impact of humanities in medical education. Students who major in the humanities as college students perform just as well, if not better, than their peers with science backgrounds during medical school and in residency on objective measures of achievement such as National Board of Medical Examiners scores and academic grades. Although many humanities electives and courses are offered in premedical and medical school curricula, measuring and quantifying their impact has proven challenging because the courses are diverse in content and goals. Many of the published studies involve self-selected groups of students and seek to measure subjective outcomes which are difficult to measure, such as increases in empathy, professionalism, and self-care. Further research is needed to define the optimal role for humanities education in medical training; in particular, more quantitative studies are needed to examine the impact that it may have on physician performance beyond medical school and residency. Medical educators must consider what potential benefits humanities education can contribute to medical education, how its impact can be measured, and what ultimate outcomes we hope to achieve. PMID:19642151

  2. Incorporating Nurse-Midwifery Students into Graduate Medical Education: Lessons Learned in Interprofessional Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Rebekah; Shaw-Battista, Jenna; Stotland, Naomi Ellen

    2015-01-01

    There is a current emphasis on interprofessional education in health care with the aim to improve teamwork and ultimately the quality and safety of care. As part of a Health Resources and Services Administration Advanced Nursing Education project, an interprofessional faculty and student team planned and implemented the first didactic coursework for nurse-midwifery and medical students at the University of California, San Francisco and responded to formative feedback in order to create a more meaningful educational experience for future combined cohorts. This article describes the process of including advanced nurse-midwifery students into 2 classes previously offered solely to medical students: 1) an elective in which students are matched with a pregnant woman to observe care that she receives before, during, and after giving birth; and 2) a required course on basic clinical care across the human lifespan. The development of these interprofessional courses, obstacles to success, feedback from students, and responses to course evaluations are reviewed. Themes identified in student course evaluations included uncertainty about interprofessional roles, disparity in clinical knowledge among learners, scheduling difficulties, and desire for more interprofessional education opportunities and additional time for facilitated interprofessional discussion. As a result of this feedback, more class time was designated for interprofessional exchange; less experienced rather than advanced midwifery students were included in both classes; and more interdisciplinary panel presentations were provided, along with clearer communication about student and clinician roles. Early project activities indicated nurse-midwifery students can be effectively included in existing medical student courses with revised curriculum and highlighted challenges that should be considered in the planning phase of similar projects in the future. This article is part of a special series of articles that

  3. A Comparison of Management Conditions in Japan's Dental Clinics and Medical Clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Kawabuchi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, national medical expenditures have continued to increase in Japan, and have now reached 39 trillion yen. In contrast, dental clinic expenditures have been slow to grow over the past few years, totaling 2.7132 trillion yen. At the same time, the number of dentists continues to increase, with a total of 102,551 dentists in 2012, surpassing the 100,544 physicians at medical clinics. Objective: Given this, we compared management conditions at dental clinics and medical clinics over time to determine whether management conditions of dental clinics are really as harsh as often claimed. Methods: we used the relevant data provided in the Central Social Insurance Medical Council's Survey on Economic Conditions in Health Care for statistics, which depicts management conditions at clinics, and analyzed the causes. Results: Annual fluctuations in the revenue/expense gap (revenue less expense show that the gap for dentists far undercut that for physicians at medical clinics. The main reason for this decline in revenue is that the number of dental patients declined more that the unit price rose compared to the medical clinic. Conclusion: We determined that management conditions are harsh for dental clinics.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v22i2.507

  4. Why medical education is being (inexorably) re-imagined and re-designed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, John D; Clinchot, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    The last widespread reimagining and substantive reform in medical student education followed the Flexner Report (published 1910). Given the dramatic changes in educational methods, pedagogy, and technology, and the dramatic changes in society, medical education has inexorably evolved in intentional and unintentional ways. The transition from the post-Flexnerian model (university-based education with the first 2 years organized around classroom didactics, laboratory/anatomy learning followed by 2 years of inpatient and outpatient clinical experiences organized around a distribution of block and elective rotations) to the models of today (highlighting early clinical exposure, integration of foundational and clinical sciences, longitudinal learning experiences, promotion of self-directed learning skills, and competency-based education) is underway. The focus now is to prepare graduates for the continued explosion of medical knowledge, technological development and expanded patient and societal expectations that increasingly characterize this century. The following five important developments in medical education drive these re-imaging and re-design efforts: (1) patient, societal and governmental pressure to deliver on the Triple Aim; (2) conceptualization of medical education as a translational science; (3) medical knowledge and technology will continue to expand and accelerate the pace of new development; (4) new expectations of present and future generations of learners; and (5) better understanding of the neurobiology of learning. The impact of these developments, and our responses as those dedicated to educating the present and future physicians, will determine much of the outcomes in this journey to evidence-based medical education. With all of the information and techniques available to the inquisitive and diligent teacher, there will be ample rewards for teaching well done. PMID:24981662

  5. The Current State of Medical Education in Chinese Medical Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosik, Russell Oliver; Huang, Lei; Cai, Qiaoling; Xu, Guo-Tong; Zhao, Xudong; Guo, Li; Tang, Wen; Chen, Qi; Fan, Angela Pei-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Today's doctor is as much a humanist as a scientist. Medical schools have responded to this change by introducing a variety of courses, most notably those concerning the humanities and ethics. Thus far, no one has examined the extent of use of these subjects in Chinese medical schools. The goal of this study is to determine how many and in…

  6. The Changing Medical Care System: Some Implications for Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Spencer

    1986-01-01

    The medical care system is undergoing widespread and significant changes. Individual hospitals may be disappearing as mergers, acquisitions, and a variety of multi-institutional arrangements become the dominant form and as a host of free-standing medical enterprises spread out into the community. (MLW)

  7. The Government-Medical Education Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Califano, Joseph A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Issues addressed in this speech to the Association of American Medical Colleges include: oversupply of doctors, geographic maldistribution, demographic changes needed by medical schools, federal strategies, medical ethics, preventive medicine, and the economics of health care.

  8. Clinical Experience of Medical Students at University Sains Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Quah, Ban Seng; Malik, Alam Sher; Simpson, Hamish

    2000-01-01

    Experience of acute medical, surgical conditions, and clinical procedures of undergraduate students were assessed via a questionnaire survey during the final week of the 1993/1998 programme at the School of Medical Sciences, Univestiti Sains Malaysia. Individual performances were assessed by a scoring system. One hundred and twenty four students responded, (response rate 97%). More than 90% had seen myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accident, pneumonia, respiratory distress, gastroenteri...

  9. Learning style preferences among pre-clinical medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Aye Aye Mon; Amirah Fatini; Chang Wei Ye; Mohamad Ammar Barakat; Paw Lih Jen; Tai Ken Lin

    2014-01-01

    Generally, different students employ different learning styles dur-ing their studies and medical students are exposed to diverse methods of teaching. Therefore, understanding students’ learning style preference is an important consideration for a high quality and effective teaching and learning process.The aim of the study was to study the variation of learning styles among pre-clinical medical students of SEGi University, Malaysia. A cross-sectional study was performed by using VARK (Visual,...

  10. Impact of clinical supervision on field training of nursing students at Urmia University of Medical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    DEHGHANI, MOHAMMADREZA; GHANAVATI, SHIRIN; SOLTANi, BEHROUZ; AGHAKHANI, NADER; HAGHPANAH, SEZANEH

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obtaining clinical competency in clinical education is one of the problems in nursing and use of the new methods of clinical training is very important. Clinical supervision is one of the methods used as a mechanism to promote knowledge and skill for promoting professional performance in nursing students. This study is carried out to determine the impact of clinical supervision on field training of nursing students at Urmia University of Medical Sciences. Methods In the present experimental study, 32 nursing students were enrolled in the study based on census and randomly assigned into two groups of experimental and control by block randomization. Clinical supervision was used in the experimental group and the control group received routine clinical trainings in the field. The students’ clinical skills were assessed using a researcher-made checklist, the validity of which was confirmed through content validity method by 13 faculty members and its reliability was approved by test-retest method on 20 nursing students in the form of a pilot study and through Cronbach’s alpha (87%). Data were analyzed using SPSS, version 14. Results ‍There was a significant difference between the experimental and control groups in clinical skills such as recognition and administration of medication, team participation,  patients and their relatives’ education, considering the safety,  infection prevention and  nursing process (p<0.005). Conclusion The study demonstrated that in clinical supervision process, students have a better communication and cooperation with their instructor and with each other and their confidence and understanding and the amount of learning in practical skills was enhanced more than routine clinical training. The implementation of this clinical training method for students of nursing and other fields of medical sciences is recommendable. PMID:27104203

  11. Improving medical graduates' training in palliative care: advancing education and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Head BA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Barbara A Head,1 Tara J Schapmire,1 Lori Earnshaw,1 John Chenault,2 Mark Pfeifer,1 Susan Sawning,3 Monica A Shaw,3 1Division of General Internal Medicine, Palliative Care and Medical Education, University of Louisville School of Medicine, 2Kornhouser Health Sciences Library, University of Louisville, 3Undergraduate Medical Education Office, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY, USA Abstract: The needs of an aging population and advancements in the treatment of both chronic and life-threatening diseases have resulted in increased demand for quality palliative care. The doctors of the future will need to be well prepared to provide expert symptom management and address the holistic needs (physical, psychosocial, and spiritual of patients dealing with serious illness and the end of life. Such preparation begins with general medical education. It has been recommended that teaching and clinical experiences in palliative care be integrated throughout the medical school curriculum, yet such education has not become the norm in medical schools across the world. This article explores the current status of undergraduate medical education in palliative care as published in the English literature and makes recommendations for educational improvements which will prepare doctors to address the needs of seriously ill and dying patients. Keywords: medical education, palliative care, end-of-life care

  12. The role of computers in medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Devitt

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Los cambios en la atención médica y los estilos de aprendizaje en la educación médica han llevado a la necesidad de usar y de evaluar críticamente una variedad de nuevas herramientas de enseñanza, incluyendo la computadora. Aun cuando la computadora difícilmente nunca podrá reemplazar al paciente como foco primario del aprendizaje, sí tiene la capacidad de reproducir un medio altamente interactivo y puede mimetizar muchas situaciones médicas. Aparte de la realidad virtual y la simulación, que aún están en su infancia dentro de la educación médica, la computadora y un software apropiado pueden ser usados para generar escenarios clínicos extremadamente efectivos. Se ha ido incrementando la elaboración de una gran cantidad de material en formato electrónico y las escuelas médicas dan mayor énfasis, en sus curricula, a la instrucción basada en la computación. Esto tiene un beneficio potencial para la velocidad y facilidad de acceso a la información actualizada y el material puede ser empleado por individuos y organizaciones fuera del recinto universitario. Es posible que materiales basados en la computación, adecuadamente preparados, puedan emplearse para reemplazar estilos tradicionales de enseñanza-aprendizaje, entre ellos las conferencias, los tutoriales y las clases prácticas. En la literatura existen evidencia de que tales materiales computacionales pueden ser al menos efectivos en términos de mejoría del aprendizaje a corto plazo y de las habilidades de solución de problemas, pero el lugar de estos recursos como una ayuda para la comprensión y el aprendizaje a largo plazo aún no ha sido definido. La instrucción basada en la computación es cara y para el uso apropiado, efectivo y eficiente de este recurso en la educación médica requerirá un análisis considerable y cuidadoso.Changes in health care delivery and styles of learning in medical education have forced a need to use and critically evaluate a variety

  13. System of continuing education and professional development of medical radiation physicists in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The active process of technical equipment of radiation therapy, nuclear medicine and diagnostic radiology departments requires increased staffing of qualified medical physicists in Russia. To work with the radiotherapy equipment, treatment and diagnostic procedures available in Russian clinics today, it is necessary to have 1,000 medical radiation physics, 30% of which should have a high degree of professional excellence. To achieve the required high technology equipment and procedure level it is essential to have 5,000 specialists. Today Russia has only 280 medical radiation physicists, 25 of which have high qualification - less than 10%. The efficient exploitation of modern radiation therapeutic diagnostic technologies and equipment demands highly qualified medical radiation physicists. However, in Russia the medical physicist responsibilities in the clinic are carried out by the specialists who do not have the basic radiation physics education and the necessary basis of physical and technical knowledge. Medical and clinical physics knowledge is acquired at random through various courses, by self education or empirically without quality and thoroughness control. It is natural that it adversely affects the physical and technical maintenance of radiation therapy and, in the end, the cancer patient treatment quality. Medical physicists are required in different areas, such as: 1. clinics together with the physician to deliver procedures in radiotherapy, nuclear medicine and diagnostic radiology 2. scientific and engineering organizations involved in the new radiological equipment and technology development 3. universities and other educational institutions engaged in the system of continuing education and professional development of medical physicists and research activities 4. companies supplying medical radiological equipment 5. companies busy with the equipment maintenance, adjustment and certification 6. project organizations involved in scientific

  14. Palliative and end of life care communication as emerging priorities in postgraduate medical education

    OpenAIRE

    des Ordons, Amanda Roze; Ajjawi, Rola; MacDonald, John; Sarti, Aimee; Lockyer, Jocelyn; Hartwick, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Reliance on surveys and qualitative studies of trainees to guide postgraduate education about palliative and end of life (EOL) communication may lead to gaps in the curriculum. We aimed to develop a deeper understanding of internal medicine trainees’ educational needs for a palliative and EOL communication curriculum and how these needs could be met. Methods Mixed methods, including a survey and focus groups with trainees, and interviews with clinical faculty and medical educators,...

  15. Medical Device Data and Modeling for Clinical Decision Making

    CERN Document Server

    Zaleski, John R

    2010-01-01

    This cutting-edge volume is the first book that provides you with practical guidance on the use of medical device data for bioinformatics modeling purposes. You learn how to develop original methods for communicating with medical devices within healthcare enterprises and assisting with bedside clinical decision making. The book guides in the implementation and use of clinical decision support methods within the context of electronic health records in the hospital environment.This highly valuable reference also teaches budding biomedical engineers and bioinformaticists the practical benefits of

  16. Incorporating the principles of the patient- centered medical home into a student-run free clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riddle MC

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Megan C Riddle,1,* Jiahui Lin,3,* Jonathan B Steinman,2 Joshua D Salvi,2 Margaret M Reynolds,3 Anne S Kastor,3,† Christina Harris,4 Carla Boutin-Foster3 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, 2Weill Cornell/Rockefeller/Sloan-Kettering Tri-Institutional MD–PhD Program, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, 4Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, LA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work †Anne S Kastor passed away on July 5, 2013. Abstract: As the health care delivery landscape changes, medical schools must develop creative strategies for preparing future physicians to provide quality care in this new environment. Despite the growing prominence of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH as an effective model for health care delivery, few medical schools have integrated formal education on the PCMH into their curricula. Incorporating the PCMH model into medical school curricula is important to ensure that students have a comprehensive understanding of the different models of health care delivery and can operate effectively as physicians. The authors provide a detailed description of the process by which the Weill Cornell Community Clinic (WCCC, a student-run free clinic, has integrated PCMH principles into a service-learning initiative. The authors assessed patient demographics, diagnoses, and satisfaction along with student satisfaction. During the year after a PCMH model was adopted, 112 students and 19 licensed physicians volunteered their time. A review of the 174 patients seen from July 2011 to June 2012 found that the most common medical reasons for visits included management of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, gastrointestinal conditions, arthritis, anxiety, and depression. During the year after the adoption of the PCMH model, 87

  17. 42 CFR 412.322 - Indirect medical education adjustment factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Payment System for Inpatient Hospital Capital Costs Basic Methodology for Determining the Federal Rate for Capital-Related Costs § 412.322 Indirect medical education adjustment factor. (a) Basic data. CMS... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Indirect medical education adjustment factor....

  18. Promoting Interdisciplinary Collaboration: Trainees Addressing Siloed Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitts, Robert Li; Christodoulou, Joanna; Goldman, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Professional siloing within medical institutions has been identified as a problem in medical education, including resident training. The authors discuss how trainees from different disciplines can collaborate to address this problem. Method: A group of trainees from psychiatry, developmental medicine, neurology, and education came…

  19. The role of the postgraduate medical education and training board

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, S.

    2006-01-01

    The Postgraduate Medical Education and Training Board (PMETB) is a new organisation set up to develop, establish, and maintain standards and requirements for postgraduate medical education (PGME) and training. First trailed in the NHS Plan,1 its remit covers the UK. As such it aims to be a single, unifying framework for doctors in training.

  20. Storytelling: Discourse Analysis for Understanding Collective Perceptions of Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vovides, Yianna; Inman, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Using discourse analysis, the goal of this exploratory project was to determine what practitioners of medical education in Sub-Saharan Africa considered key achievements, within the scope of their Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) activities, after their initial two-year implementation efforts. To do so, a series of 58 video stories…

  1. Virtues Education in Medical School: The Foundation for Professional Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoane, Leonardo; Tompkins, Lisa M.; De Conciliis, Anthony; Boysen, Philip G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown that medical students have high rates of burnout accompanied by a loss of empathy as they progress through their training. This article describes a course for medical students at The University of Queensland-Ochsner Clinical School in New Orleans, LA, that focuses on the development of virtues and character strengths necessary in the practice of medicine. Staff of the Ochsner Clinical School and of the Institute of Medicine, Education, and Spirituality at Ochsner, a research and consulting group of Ochsner Health System, developed the course. It is a curricular innovation designed to explicitly teach virtues and their associated prosocial behaviors as a means of promoting professional formation among medical students. Virtues are core to the development of prosocial behaviors that are essential for appropriate professional formation. Methods: Fourth-year medical students receive instruction in the virtues as part of the required Medicine in Society (MIS) course. The virtues instruction consists of five 3-hour sessions during orientation week of the MIS course and a wrapup session at the end of the 8-week rotation. Six virtues—courage, wisdom, temperance, humanity, transcendence, and justice—are taught in a clinical context, using personal narratives, experiential exercises, contemplative practices, and reflective practices. Results: As of July 2015, 30 medical students had completed and evaluated the virtues course. Ninety-seven percent of students felt the course was well structured. After completing the course, 100% of students felt they understood and could explain the character strengths that improve physician engagement and patient care, 100% of students reported understanding the importance of virtues in the practice of medicine, and 83% felt the course provided a guide to help them deal with the complexities of medical practice. Ninety-three percent of students stated they would use the character strengths for their own

  2. Analysis of medication incidents and development of a Medication Incident Rate Clinical Indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headford, C; McGowan, S; Clifford, R

    2001-07-01

    Most health service organisations depend solely upon spontaneous voluntary reporting of medication incidents and a wide variety of available denominators are used in order to calculate the Medication Incident Rate (MIR). This paper describes how nursing staff and clinical pharmacists reviewed medication incident data, revised and established new systems of reporting and developed a clinically useful, rate-based MIR Clinical Indicator. In order to make the MIR more meaningful, the frequency of occurrence of incidents was considered within the context of the total number of medications given to patients. This was achieved by undertaking a point prevalence audit of all inpatient medication charts (n=372) to determine the total number of doses of medication given to patients during a 24 hour period (n=3211). This value was then used as the denominator for the MIR indicator. During 1998, a total of 475 medication incidents were reported; the average number of incidents was 1.3 per 24 hours. The MIR per 1000 doses was calculated to be 0.4. In most cases (77%) the incident caused no harm to the patient and no change in treatment was required, and the most 'severe' category for any incident was that active treatment was required (3% of reported incidents). The most common type of incident was the omission of a dose of medication (50%). A wide range of drugs were involved in the incidents, most commonly morphine (3.4%). The authors consider that the development and use of the MIR Clinical Indicator has positively influenced clinical practice in some areas at the authors' hospital. PMID:15484647

  3. New perspectives—approaches to medical education at four new UK medical schools

    OpenAIRE

    Howe, A.; Campion, P; J Searle; H. Smith

    2004-01-01

    With the expansion in UK medical student numbers, four new medical schools have been established. The authors, all senior faculty members at these new schools at the time of writing, discuss how much the schools have in common in their approaches to medical education

  4. Collaborative learning of clinical skills in health professions education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolsgaard, Martin G; Kulasegaram, Kulamakan M; Ringsted, Charlotte V

    2016-01-01

    . Training efficiency may therefore be improved if the outcomes of collaborative learning of clinical skills are superior or equivalent to those attained through individual learning. HOW: According to a social interaction perspective, collaborative learning of clinical skills mediates its effects through......, scaffolding and cognitive co-construction are outweighed by reductions in hands-on experience and time on task. CONCLUSIONS: Collaborative learning of clinical skills has demonstrated promising results in the simulated setting. However, further research into how collaborative learning of clinical skills may......OBJECTIVES: This study is designed to provide an overview of why, how, when and for whom collaborative learning of clinical skills may work in health professions education. WHY: Collaborative learning of clinical skills may influence learning positively according to the non-medical literature...

  5. MCI Regulations on Graduate Medical Education, 2012- Are we ready for paradigm shift?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj R Patel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Medical college equips medical students with the scientific background and technical skills they need for practice. But it is equally important for the new graduates to both understand and commit to high personal and professional values. Globally, there is an increasing concern among society about doctors‘ adequacy of the scientific education, clinical skills, interactions with patients and commitment to improving healthcare and providing leadership. India is no exception with frequent hue and cry expressed about proficiency of our doctors. Obviously a need has been felt since long for overhauling our medical education to make it more relevant to the role of future graduates as ―Good Doctors‖.

  6. Social accountability of medical education: Aspects on global accreditation.

    OpenAIRE

    Lindgren, Stefan; Karle, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Medical doctors constitute a profession which embraces trust from and accountability to society. This responsibility extends to all medical educational institutions. Social accountability of medical education means a willingness and ability to adjust to the needs of patients and health care systems both nationally and globally. But it also implies a responsibility to contribute to the development of medicine and society through fostering competence for research and improvement. Accreditation ...

  7. EFSUMB statement on medical student education in ultrasound [short version].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantisani, V; Dietrich, C F; Badea, R; Dudea, S; Prosch, H; Cerezo, E; Nuernberg, D; Serra, A L; Sidhu, P S; Radzina, M; Piscaglia, F; Bachmann Nielsen, M; Calliada, F; Gilja, O H

    2016-02-01

    The European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) recommends that ultrasound should be used systematically as an easy accessible and instructive educational tool in the curriculum of modern medical schools. Medical students should acquire theoretical knowledge of the modality and hands-on training should be implemented and adhere to evidence-based principles. In this paper we summarise EFSUMB policy statements on medical student education in ultrasound. PMID:26871409

  8. What Can We Learn From Narratives in Medical Education?

    OpenAIRE

    Johna, Samir; Woodward, Brandon; Patel, Sunal

    2014-01-01

    Medical literature has demonstrated the effectiveness of narrative writing in enhancing self-reflection and empathy, which opens the door for deeper understanding of patients’ experiences of illness. Similarly, it promotes practitioner well-being. Therefore, it is no surprise that narrative writing finds a new home in medical education. The Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), through its Outcome Project, established six core competencies that every residency program m...

  9. Provider Education about Glaucoma and Glaucoma Medications during Videotaped Medical Visits

    OpenAIRE

    Betsy Sleath; Blalock, Susan J; Carpenter, Delesha M.; Kelly W. Muir; Robyn Sayner; Scott Lawrence; Giangiacomo, Annette L.; Mary Elizabeth Hartnett; Gail Tudor; Jason Goldsmith; Robin, Alan L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine how patient, physician, and situational factors are associated with the extent to which providers educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications, and which patient and provider characteristics are associated with whether providers educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications. Methods. Patients with glaucoma who were newly prescribed or on glaucoma medications were recruited and a cross-sectional study was conducted at s...

  10. Modernizing and Transforming Medical Education at the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College

    OpenAIRE

    Lisasi, Esther; Kulanga, Ahaz; Muiruri, Charles; Killewo, Lucy; Fadhili, Ndimangwa; Mimano, Lucy; Kapanda, Gibson; Tibyampansha, Dativa; Ibrahim, Glory; Nyindo, Mramba; Mteta, Kien; Kessi, Egbert; Ntabaye, Moshi; Bartlett, John

    2014-01-01

    The Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University (KCMU) College and the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) are addressing the crisis in Tanzanian health care manpower by modernizing the college’s medical education with new tools and techniques. With a $10 million MEPI grant and the participation of its partner, Duke University, KCMU is harnessing the power of information technology (IT) to upgrade tools for students and faculty. Initiatives in eLearning have included bringing fiber-o...

  11. 临床药师开展用药教育对老年高血压合并高胆固醇血症患者的影响%The Effect of Medication Education from Clinical Pharmacists on the Elderly Hypertension Patients with Hypercholesterolemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙艳萍; 王烨; 李影影; 邢玉晶; 蔡郁

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨临床药师开展用药教育对老年高血压合并高胆固醇血症患者用药依从性及治疗达标率的影响。方法:依据是否实施用药教育将老年高血压合并高胆固醇血症患者分为试验组和对照组,分别在用药教育前和教育后半年对2组患者进行用药依从性和治疗达标率的调查。结果:临床药师通过用药教育可提高老年高血压合并高胆固醇血症患者的用药依从性和降压调脂治疗达标率。结论:影响老年高血压合并高胆固醇血症患者用药依从性的因素是多方面的,临床药师可通过个体化的用药指导,提高药物治疗的依从性及治疗达标率。%Objective: To discuss the effect of medication education from clinical pharmacists on medication compliance and therapeutic efficiency of hypercholesterolemia and hypertension treatment for the elderly hypertension patients. Methods: Elderly hypertension patients with hypercholesterolemia were randomly divided into intervention group and control group. The intervention group was given medication education, while control group was not. Medication compliance and the rate of patient reaching the treatment standard were investigated before the intervention and 0.5 year after the intervention. Results:Medication education from clinical pharmacists couldsignificantly enhance medication compliance and increase the rate of patient reaching the standard of blood pressure and lipid lowering therapy. Conclusion:There were many influential factors which could affect medication compliance of the elderly hypertension patients with hypercholesterolemia. Clinical pharmacists could improve patient medication compliance and therapeutic efficiency with individual medication education.

  12. Nursing students’ perspectives on clinical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMAD REZA HEIDARI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The importance of optimal clinical nursing education in professional skills development is undeniable. In clinical education, nursing students are often faced with problems. Recognizing nursing students’ perception on clinical education is the first step to remove the barriers of this challenge. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the nursing students’ perspectives on clinical education. 150 nursing students were selected randomly from nursing and midwifery schools (Tehran. Data collection instrument was a researcher made questionnaire consisting of five domains: objective and curricula, instructor, feedback to student in clinical field, clinical environment, supervision and evaluation. Mean and standard deviation were calculated for each item, using SPSS, ver. 14. Chi-square test was used to compare the nursing students’ perspectives on clinical education based on age, sex and the work experience. The significance level was considered 0.05. Results: Mean age of the students was 21.58±26.97 students (66% were male. 44 students (30.1% had work experience (3.58±6.48 month. Male and female students had different perceptions in domains of clinical education (p<0.05. Nursing student had different perceptions as to objectives and curricula (p=0.039, how to deal with students in the clinical environment (p=0.032, supervision, and evaluation (p<0.001 with respect to their work experience duration. The most positive responses were in clinical instructor (81.5% and the most negative ones were the clinical environment (33.66%, respectively. Conclusion: Providing an optimal clinical environment and improving the supervision and evaluation of student practice should prioritized in schools of nursing and midwifery.

  13. THE RESEARCH ACTIVITY OF THE STUDENTS AT CLINICAL DEPARTMENTS AS THE ACTIVE EDUCATIONAL FORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.P. Denisova

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A definition of the educational research activity of the students at clinical departments of medical high school is present at the paper. Major methods of this active educational form organization were discussed at the body paper. Differential markers of educational research and scientific research activities of the students were shown.

  14. Clinical and Educational Gaps in Diagnosis of Nail Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Anna Q; Rich, Phoebe

    2016-07-01

    Dermatologists care for skin, hair, and nails, yet many dermatologists find nail disorders challenging. Practice gaps in knowledge, skill, and attitude in clinical practice and resident education are sometimes impediments to timely medical and surgical diagnosis of nail disorders. Limited resident exposure to diagnosis and management of complicated nail disorders and lack of experience performing diagnostic and surgical procedures impairs progress toward surmounting these gaps. PMID:27363883

  15. The development of scientific reasoning in medical education: a psychological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barz, Daniela Luminita; Achimaş-Cadariu, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Scientific reasoning has been studied from a variety of theoretical perspectives, which have tried to identify the underlying mechanisms responsible for the development of this particular cognitive process. Scientific reasoning has been defined as a problem-solving process that involves critical thinking in relation to content, procedural, and epistemic knowledge. The development of scientific reasoning in medical education was influenced by current paradigmatic trends, it could be traced along educational curriculum and followed cognitive processes. The purpose of the present review is to discuss the role of scientific reasoning in medical education and outline educational methods for its development. Current evidence suggests that medical education should foster a new ways of development of scientific reasoning, which include exploration of the complexity of scientific inquiry, and also take into consideration the heterogeneity of clinical cases found in practice. PMID:27004023

  16. Assessment of technical documentation of medical devices for clinical investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roszek B; Bruijn ACP de; Drongelen AW van; Geertsma RE; BMT

    2007-01-01

    The technical documentation on non-market approved medical devices intended for clinical investigation contains major shortcomings. This could imply increased risks which could affect patient safety. The investigation described here focused on the availability and quality of the technical documentat

  17. Clinical evaluation of coded excitation in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Høgholm; Misaridis, Thanssis; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2003-01-01

    Despite the enormous development in medical ultrasound (US) imaging over the last decades, penetration depth with satisfying image quality is often a problem in clinical practice. Coded excitation, used for years in radar techniques to increase signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), has recently been...

  18. Clinical reasoning of nursing students on clinical placement: Clinical educators' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Sharyn; Arthur, Carol

    2016-05-01

    Graduate nurses may have knowledge and adequate clinical psychomotor skills however they have been identified as lacking the clinical reasoning skills to deliver safe, effective care suggesting contemporary educational approaches do not always facilitate the development of nursing students' clinical reasoning. While nursing literature explicates the concept of clinical reasoning and develops models that demonstrate clinical reasoning, there is very little published about nursing students and clinical reasoning during clinical placements. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten clinical educators to gain an understanding of how they recognised, developed and appraised nursing students' clinical reasoning while on clinical placement. This study found variability in the clinical educators' conceptualisation, recognition, and facilitation of students' clinical reasoning. Although most of the clinical educators conceptualised clinical reasoning as a process those who did not demonstrated the greatest variability in the recognition and facilitation of students' clinical reasoning. The clinical educators in this study also described being unable to adequately appraise a student's clinical reasoning during clinical placement with the use of the current performance assessment tool. PMID:27235568

  19. Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Diagnostic Radiology (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of radiation in human health, for both diagnosis and treatment of disease, is an important component of the work of the IAEA. The responsibility for the increasing technical aspects of this work is undertaken by the medical physicist. To ensure good practice in this vital area, structured clinical training programmes are required to complement academic learning. This publication is intended to be a guide to the practical implementation of such a programme for diagnostic radiology. There is a general and growing awareness that radiation medicine is increasingly dependent on well trained medical physicists based in the clinical setting. However, an analysis of the availability of medical physicists indicates a large shortfall of qualified and capable professionals. This is particularly evident in developing countries. While strategies to increase academic educational opportunities are critical to such countries, the need for guidance on structured clinical training was recognized by the members of the Regional Cooperative Agreement (RCA) for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Sciences for Asia and the Pacific. Consequently, a technical cooperation regional project (RAS6038) under the RCA programme was formulated to address this need in the Asia-Pacific region by developing suitable material and establishing its viability. Development of a clinical training guide for medical physicists specializing in diagnostic radiology started in 2007 with the appointment of a core drafting committee of regional and international experts. The publication drew on the experiences of clinical training programmes in Australia and New Zealand, the UK and the USA, and was moderated by physicists working in the Asian region. This publication follows the approach of the IAEA publication Training Course Series No. 37, Clinical Training of Medical Physicists specializing in Radiation Oncology. This approach to clinical training has been successfully tested

  20. Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Diagnostic Radiology (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of radiation in human health, for both diagnosis and treatment of disease, is an important component of the work of the IAEA. The responsibility for the increasing technical aspects of this work is undertaken by the medical physicist. To ensure good practice in this vital area, structured clinical training programmes are required to complement academic learning. This publication is intended to be a guide to the practical implementation of such a programme for diagnostic radiology. There is a general and growing awareness that radiation medicine is increasingly dependent on well trained medical physicists based in the clinical setting. However, an analysis of the availability of medical physicists indicates a large shortfall of qualified and capable professionals. This is particularly evident in developing countries. While strategies to increase academic educational opportunities are critical to such countries, the need for guidance on structured clinical training was recognized by the members of the Regional Cooperative Agreement (RCA) for Research, Development and Training related to Nuclear Sciences for Asia and the Pacific. Consequently, a technical cooperation regional project (RAS6038) under the RCA programme was formulated to address this need in the Asia-Pacific region by developing suitable material and establishing its viability. Development of a clinical training guide for medical physicists specializing in diagnostic radiology started in 2007 with the appointment of a core drafting committee of regional and international experts. The publication drew on the experiences of clinical training programmes in Australia and New Zealand, the UK and the USA, and was moderated by physicists working in the Asian region. This publication follows the approach of the IAEA publication Training Course Series No. 37, Clinical Training of Medical Physicists specializing in Radiation Oncology. This approach to clinical training has been successfully tested

  1. Abstract from the International Medical Education Conference 2007: Keynote Address

    OpenAIRE

    Harden, Ronald M

    2007-01-01

    The IMU story represents one of the most exciting andsignificant experiments in medical education in recent years.The educational strategies implemented at IMU, the learningopportunities made available to IMU students, theeducational climate created and elements of the assessmentprocess could all be highlighted as significant contemporarydevelopments in medical education. Two aspects of the IMUstory, however, merit special attention and in themselvesmake the IMU story a unique one and one tha...

  2. Doctors or technicians: assessing quality of medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Tayyab Hasan

    2010-01-01

    Tayyab HasanPAPRSB Institute of Health Sciences, University Brunei Darussalam, Bandar Seri Begawan, BruneiAbstract: Medical education institutions usually adapt industrial quality management models that measure the quality of the process of a program but not the quality of the product. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the impact of industrial quality management models on medical education and students, and to highlight the importance of introducing a proper educational quality manageme...

  3. ASSESSMENT OF THE EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT AMONG MEDICAL UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS IN A GOVERNMENT MEDICAL COLLEGE

    OpenAIRE

    Ramamurthy; Lilian D; Ranganath; Arun Mohan

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The improved health of all people is the ultimate goal of medical education. Every student works hard to get into the best educational institution in order to pursue a competent career. Every institution has its core objective as imparting high standards of education and bringing out well trained students. The environment in which a student learns and grows is crucial to the overall development. AIM: To assess the perceptions of medical students of their educat...

  4. Job Analysis Techniques for Restructuring Health Manpower Education and Training in the Navy Medical Department. Attachment 4. Clinic QPCB Task Sort for Clinical Physician Assistants--Dermatology, ENT, Opththalmology, Orthopedics, and Urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technomics, Inc., McLean, VA.

    This publication is Attachment 4 of a set of 16 computer listed QPCB task sorts, by career level, for the entire Hospital Corps and Dental Technician fields. Statistical data are presented in tabular form for a detailed listing of job duties for clinical physician assistants. (BT)

  5. Proyecto institucional para la educación médica continua en investigación clínica Continuing medical education: A clinical research institutional project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora A. Fuentes

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available En la Argentina, educar en investigación clínica consiste principalmente en cursos teóricos. En países desarrollados existen programas que generan el entorno propicio para un aprendizaje práctico y continuo. En el 2006, en el Servicio de Clínica Médica del Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires se creó el Área de Investigación en Medicina Interna para formar profesionales capaces de participar en todas las etapas de la investigación clínica. El propósito de este estudio es describir el área y su impacto en la educación en investigación en medicina interna durante el período 2006-2008. El proyecto cuenta con un programa de capacitación en investigación clínica para residentes y otro de perfeccionamiento para becarios. Además de becas, asesoramiento en proyectos, ateneos sobre investigación clínica y registros de enfermedades prevalentes en medicina interna. Participan el 33% (6/18 de los clínicos de internación, se encuentran en formación 3 becarios y 7 monitores de investigación. 25 residentes pasaron por el programa de capacitación, completaron una propuesta de investigación 19 (76%. Se hicieron 59 presentaciones en congresos. Se encuentran en proceso de publicación 6 artículos originales y 2 en revisión por comités editoriales. De un cuestionario de evaluación del área, el 76% (35/46 considera que ha adquirido nuevas habilidades, y 93% (44/47 refiere que las utiliza en la práctica diaria. El 100% (47/47 considera que ha recibido orientación adecuada. El 97% (45/46 considera que sus ideas han sido respetadas. La implementación del área de investigación logró aumentar la capacitación y producción científica en investigación clínica independiente.In Argentina, education in clinical investigation is based on courses with theoric content. In developed countries programs with ongoing and practical content exist, generating the proper context to learn. In 2006, the Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires (HIBA

  6. The views of medical students about psychiatry clerkship education

    OpenAIRE

    Varkal, Mihriban Dalkıran; Yüksek, Erhan; Demirel, Ömer Faruk; Çağlar, Nuran; Eliüşük, Nihan; Gökdoğan, Pınar; Özmansur, Elif Nurdan; Emül, Murat

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Psychiatry education in medical schools seems to be given little attention and has not been fully integrated into curriculum. In this study our purpose was to get feedback about all phases of psychiatry clerkship from medical students, who completed psychiatry clerkship. Methods: A 31 item questionnaire investigating the views of medical students about psychiatry clerkship and a socio-demographic survey were given to the medical students, who completed psychiatry clerkship and...

  7. Availability of learning objects for graduate and continuing medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Stausberg, Jürgen; Van Loo, Anne

    2008-01-01

    [english] A great number of learning objects is available for graduate and continuing medical education. Nevertheless, it is not known how well the range of available learning objects covers the needs of the various medical fields. To get an idea of this, the content of two catalogs of learning objects (LRSMed and KELDAmed) was compared with the study regulations of the medical faculty of the University of Duisburg-Essen on the one hand and with the 2006 directory of certified medical specia...

  8. Continuing Education Instrumentation Training in Clinical Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Jacqueline; Frankel, Saundra

    1980-01-01

    Describes the continuing education program for clinical chemistry instrumentation training established at The College of Staten Island, New York. A course consisting of 14 sessions is outlined and discussed. (CS)

  9. Teamwork of clinical teachers in postgraduate medical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slootweg, Irene Arida

    2016-08-01

    Teamwork among clinical teachers is essential for continuous improvement of postgraduate medical training. This thesis deconstructs teamwork in four studies, mostly based on qualitative research approaches and one study utilizes mixed methods. We found that clinical teachers do train residents, but individually rather than as a team. The programme directors as leaders focus more on teaching activities than on the collective ambition and mutual engagement of clinical teachers. During the teaching meetings, mistakes and conflicts are mainly discussed in a general sense and are often neither directed at the individual, nor result-oriented. A valid evaluation instrument is constructed to improve teamwork. PMID:27432367

  10. Offshore Medical Schools Are Buying Clinical Clerkships in U.S. Hospitals: The Problem and Potential Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, Edward C; Goldberg, Robert B

    2016-05-01

    U.S. medical education faces a threat from for-profit Caribbean medical schools which purchase clinical rotation slots for their students at U.S. hospitals. These offshore schools are monetizing a system that was previously characterized as a duty-the duty of the current generation of physicians to educate their successors. Offshore schools purchase clinical rotation slots using funds largely derived from federally subsidized student loans. This leads to pressure on U.S. schools to pay for clinical clerkships and is forcing some of them to find new clinical training sites.For-profit Caribbean schools largely escape the type of scrutiny that U.S. schools face from U.S. national accreditation organizations. They also enroll large classes of students with lower undergraduate GPAs and Medical College Admission Test scores than those of students at U.S. medical schools; their students take and pass Step 1 of the United States Medical Licensing Examination at a substantially lower rate than that of U.S. medical students; and their students match for residencies at a fraction of the rate of U.S. medical school graduates.Among the potential solutions proposed by the authors are passing laws to hold for-profit Caribbean schools to standards for board passage rates, placing restrictions on federal student loans, monitoring attrition rates, and denying offshore schools access to U.S. clinical training sites unless they meet accreditation standards equivalent to those of U.S. medical schools. PMID:26910896

  11. Role Models and Teachers: medical students perception of teaching-learning methods in clinical settings, a qualitative study from Sri Lanka

    OpenAIRE

    Jayasuriya-Illesinghe, Vathsala; Nazeer, Ishra; Athauda, Lathika; Perera, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Background Medical education research in general, and those focusing on clinical settings in particular, have been a low priority in South Asia. This explorative study from 3 medical schools in Sri Lanka, a South Asian country, describes undergraduate medical students’ experiences during their final year clinical training with the aim of understanding the teaching-learning experiences. Methods Using qualitative methods we conducted an exploratory study. Twenty eight graduates from 3 medical s...

  12. Medical data mining: knowledge discovery in a clinical data warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, J C; Lobach, D F; Goodwin, L K; Hales, J W; Hage, M L; Hammond, W E

    1997-01-01

    Clinical databases have accumulated large quantities of information about patients and their medical conditions. Relationships and patterns within this data could provide new medical knowledge. Unfortunately, few methodologies have been developed and applied to discover this hidden knowledge. In this study, the techniques of data mining (also known as Knowledge Discovery in Databases) were used to search for relationships in a large clinical database. Specifically, data accumulated on 3,902 obstetrical patients were evaluated for factors potentially contributing to preterm birth using exploratory factor analysis. Three factors were identified by the investigators for further exploration. This paper describes the processes involved in mining a clinical database including data warehousing, data query and cleaning, and data analysis. PMID:9357597

  13. MO-E-18C-06: Enriching Medical Physics Education By Visualizing The Invisible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprawls, P [Emory University and Sprawls Educational Foundation, Montreat, NC (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To enhance the understanding of medical physics concepts and develop higher levels of learning relating to invisible physics phenomena such as radiation. To provide medical physics educators in all countries of the world with understanding of knowledge structures in the human brain, the different levels of learning, and the types of knowledge required for higher level functions such as problem solving, creative innovations, and applied clinical applications. To provide medical physics educators with an open access resource (tool) that they can use in their teaching activities to enrich and elevate the level of learning for their students, residents, etc. with respect to the invisible realm of medical physics. Methods: An experienced clinical medical physicist and educator has created and provided with open access three complementary web-based resources to achieve the purposes described above. One is a module focusing on the medical physics learning process with respect to mental knowledge structures, how they relate to outcomes and applications, and learning activities that are required to develop the required knowledge structures. The second is an extensive set of visuals that educators can use in their activities (classes, small group discussions, etc.) to visualize the invisible. The third is an interactive online simulation where learners can adjust factors and visually observe changes in x-radiation.These resources are available online at www.BLINDED FOR REVIEW . Results: Medical physics education, especially for non-physicists, is becoming much more interesting and useful especially with respect to invisible radiation. The global impact is that medical imaging professionals can be more effective in optimizing x-ray imaging procedures and risk management when they have knowledge levels that enhance problem solving, innovation, and creativity. Conclusion: Medical physics educators in all institutions can be much more effective and efficient in the

  14. MO-E-18C-06: Enriching Medical Physics Education By Visualizing The Invisible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To enhance the understanding of medical physics concepts and develop higher levels of learning relating to invisible physics phenomena such as radiation. To provide medical physics educators in all countries of the world with understanding of knowledge structures in the human brain, the different levels of learning, and the types of knowledge required for higher level functions such as problem solving, creative innovations, and applied clinical applications. To provide medical physics educators with an open access resource (tool) that they can use in their teaching activities to enrich and elevate the level of learning for their students, residents, etc. with respect to the invisible realm of medical physics. Methods: An experienced clinical medical physicist and educator has created and provided with open access three complementary web-based resources to achieve the purposes described above. One is a module focusing on the medical physics learning process with respect to mental knowledge structures, how they relate to outcomes and applications, and learning activities that are required to develop the required knowledge structures. The second is an extensive set of visuals that educators can use in their activities (classes, small group discussions, etc.) to visualize the invisible. The third is an interactive online simulation where learners can adjust factors and visually observe changes in x-radiation.These resources are available online at www.BLINDED FOR REVIEW . Results: Medical physics education, especially for non-physicists, is becoming much more interesting and useful especially with respect to invisible radiation. The global impact is that medical imaging professionals can be more effective in optimizing x-ray imaging procedures and risk management when they have knowledge levels that enhance problem solving, innovation, and creativity. Conclusion: Medical physics educators in all institutions can be much more effective and efficient in the

  15. The Medical Staff Ride: an education tool for military medical leadership development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricknell, Martin C M

    2016-08-01

    This paper provides a description of the Medical Staff Ride as an educational tool for military medical leadership. It is based upon two Medical Staff Rides covering the Somme Campaign 1916 and the Normandy Campaign 1944. It describes the key educational activity 'The Stand' at which history and current issues are brought together through study of a particular location on the historical battlefield. The Medical Staff Ride can be divided into six distinct phases, each of which have common question sets for analysis by attendees. The Medical Staff Ride can be shown to have valuable educational outcomes that are efficient in time and cost, and effective in achieving personal learning. The supporting Readers for the two Medical Staff Rides covered by this paper are available as electronic supplement to this edition of the journal. PMID:26115999

  16. Technology-assisted education in graduate medical education: a review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Jwayyed, Sharhabeel; Stiffler, Kirk A; Wilber, Scott T; Southern, Alison; Weigand, John; Bare, Rudd; Gerson, Lowell W.

    2011-01-01

    Studies on computer-aided instruction and web-based learning have left many questions unanswered about the most effective use of technology-assisted education in graduate medical education. Objective We conducted a review of the current medical literature to report the techniques, methods, frequency and effectiveness of technology-assisted education in graduate medical education. Methods A structured review of MEDLINE articles dealing with "Computer-Assisted Instruction," "Internet or World W...

  17. Experiences of accreditation of medical education in taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chi-Wan

    2009-01-01

    THIS REVIEW AIMS TO INTRODUCE THE TAIWANESE MEDICAL ACCREDITATION SYSTEM: its history, role and future goals. In 1999, the Ministry of Education, Taiwanese Government commissioned the non-profit National Health Research Institutes (NHRI) to develop a new medical accreditation system. According to that policy, the Taiwan Medical Accreditation Council (TMAC) was established in the same year. The council serves a similar function to that of the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) of the United States and the Australian Medical Council (AMC). The accreditation process consists of a self-assessment plus a four-day site visit by a team of eight medical educators that are headed by one of the council members of the TMAC. The first cycle of initial visits was completed from 2001 to 2004. Subsequent follow-up visits were arranged according to the results of the survey with smaller-sized teams and shorter periods. There is evidence to suggest that the majority (seven of eleven) of the medical schools in Taiwan have made good progress. TMAC's next step will be to monitor the progress and raise the standard of medical education in individual schools with a homogenous, superior standard of medical education. PMID:20046455

  18. A framework of teaching competencies across the medical education continuum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M. Molenaar; A. Zanting; P. van Beukelen; W. de Grave; J.A. Baane; J.A. Bustraan; R. Engbers; T.E. Fick; J.C.G. Jacobs; J.M. Vervoorn

    2009-01-01

    Background: The quality of teachers in higher education is subject of increasing attention, as exemplified by the development and implementation of guidelines for teacher qualifications at Universities in The Netherlands. Aim: Because medical education takes a special position in higher education th

  19. A framework of teaching competencies across the medical education continuum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, W. M.; Zanting, A.; Van Beukelen, P.; De Grave, W.; Baane, J. A.; Bustraan, J. A.; Engbers, R.; Fick, Th E.; Jacobs, J. C. G.; Vervoorn, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The quality of teachers in higher education is Subject of increasing attention, its exemplified by the development and implementation of guidelines for teacher qualifications at Universities in The Netherlands. Aim: Because medical education takes a special position in higher education t

  20. Medical education in the Russian Federation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, R A; Goldfarb, A S

    1996-11-01

    The process of becoming a medical doctor in the Russian Federation is detailed in this paper. There has been a decline in the number of students entering the medical profession, as well as a marked decrease in the faculty members at the medical institutes since perestroika. This is secondary to a marked decrease in financial support as well as falling morale. PMID:9217911

  1. The Future of e-Learning in Medical Education: Current Trend and Future Opportunity

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Kim

    2006-01-01

    A wide range of e-learning modalities are widely integrated in medical education. However, some of the key questions related to the role of e-learning remain unanswered, such as (1) what is an effective approach to integrating technology into pre-clinical vs. clinical training?; (2) what evidence exists regarding the type and format of e-learning technology suitable for medical specialties and clinical settings?; (3) which design features are known to be effective in designing on-line patient...

  2. Medical students' use of Facebook for educational purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Anam

    2016-06-01

    Medical students use Facebook to interact with one another both socially and educationally. This study investigates how medical students in a UK medical school use Facebook to support their learning. In particular, it identifies the nature of their educational activities, and details their experiences of using an educational Facebook group. Twenty-four medical students who self-identified as being Facebook users were invited to focus groups to attain a general overview of Facebook use within an educational context. A textual analysis was then conducted on a small group of intercalating medical students who used a self-created Facebook group to supplement their learning. Five of these students participated in semi-structured interviews. Six common themes were generated. These included 'collaborative learning', 'strategic uses for the preparation for assessment', 'sharing experiences and providing support', 'creating and maintaining connections', 'personal planning and practical organization' and 'sharing and evaluating educational resources'. Evidence from this study shows that medical students are using Facebook informally to enhance their learning and undergraduate lives. Facebook has enabled students to create a supportive learning community amongst their peers. Medical educators wishing to capitalize on Facebook, as a platform for formal educational initiatives, should remain cautious of intruding on this peer online learning community. PMID:27271571

  3. Comparison of empathy score among medical students in both basic and clinical levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MITRA KHADEMALHOSSEINI

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Empathy refers to a personality character that has a great role in communication with others. Thus, proper evaluation and education of empathy in medical students is important for medical education. Because previous studies had suggested that physician’s empathy may reduce with clinical trainings, in this study we decided to measure the empathy score among medical students. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study conducted on medical students in the first to seventh years of their studies at Shiraz medical school (south of Iran in 2010. We designed new Iranian version questionnaire of the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy. Sample size was 260 students and the results were analyzed in SPSS, version 11.5 (statistical tests such as descriptive methods, t-test, and ANOVA and p<0.05 was considered as the significant level. Results: The empathy score decreased with increase in the students’ age (p=0.001 and educational level (p=0.030. The overall rate of empathy score in basic science level (65.5±0.84 was more than that in the clinical level (55.5±1.78. The lowest empathy score was seen in the seventh year students (55.51 and the highest was in the first year students (65.50. Female students had higher mean empathy score (65.53 while it was 59.02 in the male students. Conclusion: In general, medical students in Shiraz University of Medical Sciences had low empathy level and this may be a cause for concern; as such we suggest a possible inclusion of courses on empathy in the curriculum.

  4. Designing effective on-line continuing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimitat, Craig

    2001-03-01

    The Internet, and new information and communication technologies available through the Internet, provides medical educators with an opportunity to develop unique on-line learning environments with real potential to improve physicians' knowledge and effect change in their clinical practice. There are approximately 100 websites offering on-line CME courses in the USA alone. However, few of these CME courses appear to be based on sound educational principles or CME research and may have little chance of achieving the broader goals of CME. The majority of these courses closely resemble their traditional counterparts (e.g. paper-based books are now electronic books) and appear to be mere substitutions for old-technology CME resources. Whilst some CME providers add unique features of the Internet to enrich their websites, they do not employ strategies to optimize the learning opportunities afforded by this new technology. The adoption of adult learning principles, reflective practice and problem-based approaches can be used as a foundation for sound CME course design. In addition, knowledge of Internet technology and the learning opportunities it affords, together with strategies to maintain participation and new assessment paradigms, are all needed for developing online CME. We argue for an evidence-based and strategic approach to the development of on-line CME courses designed to enhance physician learning and facilitate change in clinical behaviour. PMID:11371287

  5. [Undergraduate education of medical technologists to promote scientific and technological literacy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Akizawa, Hirotsugu

    2010-07-01

    It is becoming increasingly important for today's medical technologists to receive proper training on the safety of medical treatment and healthcare in order to accommodate the rapid changes and advancement in medical technology. In particular, because of the increase of hospital-acquired infections, the role of medical technologists involved in infection control has become much more important. In addition, particularly in Japan, the career options available to students graduating with a degree in medical technology have become much more diverse, ranging from research laboratories to clinical services; however, undergraduate education for medical technologists is limited. It is therefore deemed necessary for undergraduate students to be provided with adequate training from their universities by offering a wider selection of classes in this subject area. In this paper, we summarize our preliminary findings on the trial lessons that are offered to medical technology students in their microbiology class. These lessons are designed to enhance students' academic potential and to engage their interest. PMID:20715516

  6. Internationalizing Medical Education: The Special Track Curriculum 'Global Health' at Justus Liebig University Giessen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knipper, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Internationalizing higher education is considered to be a major goal for universities in Germany and many medical students aspire to include international experiences into their academic training. However, the exact meaning of “internationalizing” medical education is still poorly defined, just as is the possible pedagogic impact and effects. Against this background, this article presents the special track curriculum on global health (in German: , short: at Justus Liebig University Giessen, which was established in 2011 as a comprehensive teaching program to integrate international perspectives and activities systematically into the clinical years of the medical curriculum. The report of the structure, content, didactic principles and participants’ evaluations of the SPC is embedded into a larger discussion of the pedagogic value of a broad and interdisciplinary perspective on “global health” in medical education, that explicitly includes attention for health inequities, social determinants of health and the cultural dimensions of medicine and health abroad and “at home” (e.g. in relation to migration. We conclude that if properly defined, the emerging field of “global health” represents a didactically meaningful approach for adding value to medical education through internationalizing the curriculum, especially in regard to themes that despite of their uncontested value are often rather weak within medical education. The concrete curricular structures, however, have always to be developed locally. The “SPC” at Giessen University Medical School is only one possible way of addressing these globally relevant issues in one particular local academic setting.

  7. Role of accrediting bodies in providing education leadership in medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Leinster

    2014-01-01

    Role of accreditation authorities: If accreditation authorities are to provide leadership in medical education they must undertake regular review of their standards. This should be informed by all stakeholders and include experts in medical education. The format of the standards must provide clear direction to medical schools. Accreditation should take place regularly and should result in the production of a publicly accessible report.

  8. Building clinical data groups for electronic medical record in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Haibo; Yu, Yingtao; Yang, Peng; Tang, Xuejun; Hu, Jianping; Rao, Keqin; Pan, Feng; Xu, Yongyong; Liu, Danhong

    2012-04-01

    This article aims at building clinical data groups for Electronic Medical Records (EMR) in China. These data groups can be reused as basic information units in building the medical sheets of Electronic Medical Record Systems (EMRS) and serve as part of its implementation guideline. The results were based on medical sheets, the forms that are used in hospitals, which were collected from hospitals. To categorize the information in these sheets into data groups, we adopted the Health Level 7 Clinical Document Architecture Release 2 Model (HL7 CDA R2 Model). The regulations and legal documents concerning health informatics and related standards in China were implemented. A set of 75 data groups with 452 data elements was created. These data elements were atomic items that comprised the data groups. Medical sheet items contained clinical records information and could be described by standard data elements that exist in current health document protocols. These data groups match different units of the CDA model. Twelve data groups with 87 standardized data elements described EMR headers, and 63 data groups with 405 standardized data elements constituted the body. The later 63 data groups in fact formed the sections of the model. The data groups had two levels. Those at the first level contained both the second level data groups and the standardized data elements. The data groups were basically reusable information units that served as guidelines for building EMRS and that were used to rebuild a medical sheet and serve as templates for the clinical records. As a pilot study of health information standards in China, the development of EMR data groups combined international standards with Chinese national regulations and standards, and this was the most critical part of the research. The original medical sheets from hospitals contain first hand medical information, and some of their items reveal the data types characteristic of the Chinese socialist national health system

  9. 78 FR 13347 - Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Toxicology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Toxicology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces...

  10. Developing technology-enhanced active learning for medical education: challenges, solutions, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Lise; Pettit, Robin K; Lewis, Joy H; Bennett, Thomas; Carrasco, Noel; Brysacz, Stanley; Makin, Inder Raj S; Hutman, Ryan; Schwartz, Frederic N

    2015-04-01

    Growing up in an era of video games and Web-based applications has primed current medical students to expect rapid, interactive feedback. To address this need, the A.T. Still University-School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona (Mesa) has developed and integrated a variety of approaches using technology-enhanced active learning for medical education (TEAL-MEd) into its curriculum. Over the course of 3 years (2010-2013), the authors facilitated more than 80 implementations of games and virtual patient simulations into the education of 550 osteopathic medical students. The authors report on 4 key aspects of the TEAL-MEd initiative, including purpose, portfolio of tools, progress to date regarding challenges and solutions, and future directions. Lessons learned may be of benefit to medical educators at academic and clinical training sites who wish to implement TEAL-MEd activities. PMID:25830576

  11. “Heidelberg standard examination” and “Heidelberg standard procedures” – Development of faculty-wide standards for physical examination techniques and clinical procedures in undergraduate medical education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikendei, C.; Ganschow, P.; Groener, J. B.; Huwendiek, S.; Köchel, A.; Köhl-Hackert, N.; Pjontek, R.; Rodrian, J.; Scheibe, F.; Stadler, A.-K.; Steiner, T.; Stiepak, J.; Tabatabai, J.; Utz, A.; Kadmon, M.

    2016-01-01

    The competent physical examination of patients and the safe and professional implementation of clinical procedures constitute essential components of medical practice in nearly all areas of medicine. The central objective of the projects “Heidelberg standard examination” and “Heidelberg standard procedures”, which were initiated by students, was to establish uniform interdisciplinary standards for physical examination and clinical procedures, and to distribute them in coordination with all clinical disciplines at the Heidelberg University Hospital. The presented project report illuminates the background of the initiative and its methodological implementation. Moreover, it describes the multimedia documentation in the form of pocketbooks and a multimedia internet-based platform, as well as the integration into the curriculum. The project presentation aims to provide orientation and action guidelines to facilitate similar processes in other faculties.

  12. Activities for education at work for Medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna León Acebo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: the growing demands of a health professional that combines study and work, school with life and teaching-learning in primary and secondary health care constitute a current social problem for the country.Objective: to design a set of activities for education at work for first year medical students, from the family doctor's office, to contribute to health promotion and disease prevention in the community, favoring the integral formation of future doctors.Methods: the program was designed in work areas for the integrated teaching of biomedical disciplines for contributing to health promotion and disease prevention in "Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima” polyclinic in Las Tunas. It carried out the historic and graphical analysis of the problem; students’,  professors’ and community members’ behaviors were observed; interviews and surveys were applied to explore knowledge and experiences of students and health professionals on the promotion of health education at work; workshops on critical opinion and collective elaboration were carried out and permitted to  socialize with other teachers and health professionals the proposed program for its redesign based on collective criticism.Results: the shortcomings caused by the fragmentation of subject contents and biomedical disciplines in education at work were characterized and the plan to help to eliminate the inadequacies that occur in education at work was designed by work areas and determined by the general guidelines for its implementation, without specific indications.Conclusions: the clinical method was applied its pedagogical dimension, allowing the coordination between the traditional methods of teaching-learning and for diagnosing, to contribute to eliminate the spontaneous character in the development of education in the workplace. The program of activities was designed by work areas.

  13. Reframing medical education to support professional identity formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruess, Richard L; Cruess, Sylvia R; Boudreau, J Donald; Snell, Linda; Steinert, Yvonne

    2014-11-01

    Teaching medical professionalism is a fundamental component of medical education. The objective is to ensure that students understand the nature of professionalism and its obligations and internalize the value system of the medical profession. The recent emergence of interest in the medical literature on professional identity formation gives reason to reexamine this objective. The unstated aim of teaching professionalism has been to ensure the development of practitioners who possess a professional identity. The teaching of medical professionalism therefore represents a means to an end.The principles of identity formation that have been articulated in educational psychology and other fields have recently been used to examine the process through which physicians acquire their professional identities. Socialization-with its complex networks of social interaction, role models and mentors, experiential learning, and explicit and tacit knowledge acquisition-influences each learner, causing them to gradually "think, act, and feel like a physician."The authors propose that a principal goal of medical education be the development of a professional identity and that educational strategies be developed to support this new objective. The explicit teaching of professionalism and emphasis on professional behaviors will remain important. However, expanding knowledge of identity formation in medicine and of socialization in the medical environment should lend greater logic and clarity to the educational activities devoted to ensuring that the medical practitioners of the future will possess and demonstrate the qualities of the "good physician." PMID:25054423

  14. Autonomy support for autonomous motivation in medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi A. Kusurkar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medical students often study only to fare well in their examinations or pursue a specific specialty, or study only those topics that they perceive to be useful in medical practice. The motivation for study in these cases comes from external or internal pressures or from the desire to obtain rewards. Self-determination theory (SDT classifies this type of motivation as controlled motivation and the type of motivation that comes from genuine interest or personal value as autonomous motivation. Autonomous motivation, in comparison with controlled motivation, has been associated with better learning, academic success, and less exhaustion. SDT endorses autonomous motivation and suggests that autonomy support is important for autonomous motivation. The meaning of autonomy is misinterpreted by many. This article tries to focus on how to be autonomy-supportive in medical education. Discussion: Autonomy support refers to the perception of choice in learning. Some of the ways of supporting autonomy in medical education are small group teaching, problem-based learning, and gradual increase in responsibility of patients. Autonomy-supportive teaching behavior is not a trait and can be learned. Autonomy support in medical education is not limited to bringing in changes in the medical curriculum for students; it is about an overall change in the way of thinking and working in medical schools that foster autonomy among those involved in education. Research into autonomy in medical education is limited. Some topics that need to be investigated are the ideas and perceptions of students and teachers about autonomy in learning. Conclusion: Autonomy support in medical education can enhance autonomous motivation of students for medical study and practice and make them autonomy-supportive in their future medical practice and teaching.

  15. Understanding clinical nursing education: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlke, Sherry; O'Connor, Maureen; Hannesson, Teresa; Cheetham, Karleen

    2016-03-01

    Clinical experiences are recognized as a critical aspect of nursing education, highlighting the importance of the perspectives of those providing clinical instruction. The aim of this mixed methods descriptive study was to discover the knowledge and guidance needs of preceptors and clinical faculty who provide clinical instruction to Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) students. Fifteen clinical faculty and 17 preceptors were surveyed using a questionnaire developed and piloted by the researchers. Although preceptors and clinical faculty reported a high level of knowledge and confidence in their ability to guide student nurses, they also identified the need for additional support for their teaching roles. Analysis of the qualitative data provided insights into what helped and what hindered clinical instruction, as well as what could enhance clinical instruction. The development, implementation, and evaluation of formal education and mentorship processes for preceptors and clinical faculty are recommended in order to meet these knowledge and guidance gaps. Further research is also needed to explore how to clinical instruction could be tailored to the capacity of those engaged in the experiences and to clinical environments. PMID:26775165

  16. The use of Facebook in medical education – A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pander, Tanja

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available [english] Background: The vogue of social media has changed interpersonal communication as well as learning and teaching opportunities in medical education. The most popular social media tool is Facebook. Its features provide potentially useful support for the education of medical students but it also means that some new challenges will have to be faced. Aims: This review aimed to find out how Facebook has been integrated into medical education. A systematical review of the current literature and grade of evidence is provided, research gaps are identified, links to prior reviews are drawn and implications for the future are discussed.Method: The authors searched six databases. Inclusion criteria were defined and the authors independently reviewed the search results. The key information of the articles included was methodically abstracted and coded, synthesized and discussed in the categories study design, study participants’phase of medical education and study content.Results: 16 articles met all inclusion criteria. 45-96% of health care professionals in all phases of their medical education have a Facebook profile. Most studies focused on Facebook and digital professionalism. Unprofessional behavior and privacy violations occurred in 0.02% to 16%. In terms of learning and teaching environment, Facebook is well accepted by medical students. It is used to prepare for exams, share online material, discuss clinical cases, organize face-to-face sessions and exchange information on clerkships. A few educational materials to teach Facebook professionalism were positively evaluated. There seems to be no conclusive evidence as to whether medical students benefit from Facebook as a learning environment on higher competence levels.Discussion: Facebook influences a myriad of aspects of health care professionals, particularly at undergraduate and graduate level in medical education. Despite an increasing number of interventions, there is a lack of

  17. Electronic Medical Records Optimize Clinical Data Management in the Outpatient Cardiological Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Dalmiani, Stefano; Morales, Maria Aurora; Carpeggiani, Clara; Macerata, Alberto; Marcheschi, Paolo

    2003-01-01

    A system based on a relational database with administrative and clinical information and integrated with an Information System, where the system covers the role of a Functional Island, is routinely used in our Institution. To analyze how Electronic Medical Records (EMR) may help physicians in organizing and reducing time waste in a busy outpatient clinic, a sample of 1000 reports were evaluated for system performance. The time needed for building new clinical histories or modifying the alread...

  18. Statistical trends in the Journal of the American Medical Association and implications for training across the continuum of medical education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren D Arnold

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Statistical training across the continuum of medical education may not have advanced at the pace of statistical reporting in the medical literature, yet a comprehensive understanding of statistical concepts most commonly presented in current research is critical to the effective practice of Evidence Based Medicine. The objective of this content analysis was to describe statistical techniques used in a leading medical journal, JAMA, across a 20-year period, with a focus on implications for medical education. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Two issues of JAMA published each month in 1990, 2000, and 2010 were randomly selected; from these, 361 articles were reviewed. Primary focus, study design, and statistical components were abstracted and examined by year of publication. The number of published RCTs and cohort studies differed significantly across years of interest, with an increasing trend of publication. The most commonly reported statistics over the 20-year period of interest included measures of morbidity and mortality, descriptive statistics, and epidemiologic outcomes. However, between 1990 and 2010, there was an increase in reporting of more advanced methods, such as multivariable regression, multilevel modeling, survival analysis, and sensitivity analysis. While this study is limited by a focus on one specific journal, a strength is that the journal examined is widely read by a range of clinical specialties and is considered a leading journal in the medical field, setting standards for published research. CONCLUSIONS: The increases in frequency and complexity of statistical reporting in the literature over the past two decades may suggest that moving beyond basic statistical concepts to a more comprehensive understanding of statistical methods is an important component of clinicians' ability to effectively read and use the medical research. These findings provide information to consider as medical schools and graduate medical education

  19. Social accountability of medical education: aspects on global accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Stefan; Karle, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Medical doctors constitute a profession which embraces trust from and accountability to society. This responsibility extends to all medical educational institutions. Social accountability of medical education means a willingness and ability to adjust to the needs of patients and health care systems both nationally and globally. But it also implies a responsibility to contribute to the development of medicine and society through fostering competence for research and improvement. Accreditation is a process by which a statutory body evaluates and recognises an educational institution and/or its programme with respect to meeting approved criteria. It is a means for quality assurance, but also a strong power to reinforce the need for improvement and reforms. It must be performed through internationally recognised and transparent standards and should foremost promote quality development. The social accountability of medical education must be included in all accreditation processes at all levels. The global standards programme by World Federation for Medical Education (WFME) provides tools for national or regional accreditation but also guidance for reforms and quality improvement. The standards are used worldwide and have been adopted to local needs in most parts of the world. They are framed to specify attainment at two levels: basic standards or minimum requirements and standards for quality development. The concept of social accountability is embedded in all parts of the WFME standards documents. In 2011, a revision of the standards for undergraduate education has been instituted. Strengthening of aspects on social accountability of medical education will be a particular concern. PMID:21774655

  20. Evaluation der ärztlichen Ausbildung [Evaluation of medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Bussche, Hendrik

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available [english] Background: The importance of evaluation is increasing, not only in medical education. Apart from giving feedback to the teachers the results of evaluations can be used for allocation of educational funds. At the medical faculty of the University of Hamburg the evaluation of medical education has been performed since ten years. Results: An analysis of the Hamburg experience in the standardized evaluation of medical education shows a series of problems. 1. The cumulative evaluation of curriculum parts tends to turn out different than the detailed evaluation of its consisting parts. 2. Theoretical courses tend to be assessed worse than clinical courses - irrespective of their real quality. The reason for this "handicap" of theoretical courses is that students tend to rate their benefit for clinical practice lower. 3. There are differences between prompt and delayed assessments of the same courses. 4. Students' assessment also depends on the stage of their training and on the didactic type of the evaluated course. Conclusion: Ranking of courses should be performed with caution. To improve reliability and validity of results the following suggestions are made: 1. Results of cumulative evaluation of curriculum parts should be interpreted with care. 2. Unequal opportunities of theoretical and clinical courses to gain good results should be considered. 3. Repeated assessments and longitudinal comparisons are essential. 4. Comparisons should be made only between similar didactical types of courses. 5. Results should be analysed with respect to their possible causes, preferably by mixed evaluation commissions. 6. It is recommended to evaluate aspects of process quality rather than of result quality. [german] Hintergrund: Die Evaluation von Lehrveranstaltungen und curricularen Abschnitten durch Studierende nimmt nicht nur in der ärztlichen Ausbildung zu. Neben der Rückmeldung an die Dozenten können die Ergebnisse eine wichtige Basis f

  1. Marketing to Increase Participation in a Web-Based Continuing Medical Education Cultural Competence Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Carlos A.; Krishnamoorthy, Periyakaruppan; Smith, Ann; Staton, Lisa; Korf, Michele J.; Allison, Jeroan J.; Houston, Thomas K.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: CME providers may be interested in identifying effective marketing strategies to direct users to specific content. Online advertisements for recruiting participants into activities such as clinical trials, public health programs, and continuing medical education (CME) have been effective in some but not all studies. The purpose of…

  2. Medical education in the United Kingdom: Numerous positive indicators leading to a thriving specialty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashim Z, Fahim N, Brewer H, Pathiraja A, Rana NA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, medical education always took a back seat and there was no impetus on clinical teachers to train as better teachers. However, attitudes have changed over the past couple of decades. Now, not only doctors and other health care professionals but also the General Medical Council (GMC and the National Health Service (NHS recognise the pivotal role that clinical teachers play in medical education and the constant need to update and improve teaching skills. There is now an increased drive for clinical teachers to not only attend courses and workshops to train as better teachers but also to acquire formal educational qualifications. Further, trainees are also taking time out of training to work as Teaching Fellows to develop their teaching skills. Medical education is advancing as a speciality and it is helped by a large growing global network of educational associations, conferences and journals. Finally, the Objective Structured Teaching Encounter (OSTE is being recognised as a good tool to develop teaching skills.

  3. Advancing medicine one research note at a time: the educational value in clinical case reports

    OpenAIRE

    Cabán-Martinez Alberto J; Beltrán Wilfredo F

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A case report—a brief written note that describes unique aspects of a clinical case—provides a significant function in medicine given its rapid, succinct, and educational contributions to scientific literature and clinical practice. Despite the growth of, and emphasis on, randomized clinical trials and evidenced-based medicine, case reports continue to provide novel and exceptional knowledge in medical education. The journal BMC Research Notes introduces a new “case reports” section ...

  4. Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Radiation Oncology (French Ed.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of radiation in human health, for both diagnosis and treatment of disease, is an important component of the work of the IAEA. The responsibility for the increasing technical aspects of this work is undertaken by the medical physicist. To ensure good practice in this vital area structured clinical training programmes are required to complement academic learning. This publication is intended to be a guide to the practical implementation of such a programme for radiation therapy. There is a general and growing awareness that radiation medicine is increasingly dependant on well trained medical physicists that are based in the clinical setting. However an analysis of the availability of medical physicists indicates a large shortfall of qualified and capable professionals. This is particularly evident in developing countries. While strategies to increase academic educational opportunities are critical to such countries, the need for guidance on structured clinical training was recognised by the members of the Regional Cooperative Agreement (RCA) for research, development and training related to nuclear sciences for Asia and the Pacific. Consequently a technical cooperation regional project (RAS6038) under the RCA programme was formulated to address this need in the Asia Pacific region by developing suitable material and establishing its viability. Development of a clinical training guide for medical physicists specialising in radiation therapy was started in 2005 with the appointment of a core drafting committee of regional and international experts. Since 2005 the IAEA has convened two additional consultant group meetings including additional experts to prepare the present publication. The publication drew heavily, particularly in the initial stages, from the experience and documents of the Clinical Training Programme for Radiation Oncology Medical Physicists as developed by the Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine. Their

  5. Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Radiation Oncology (Spanish Ed.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of radiation in human health, for both diagnosis and treatment of disease, is an important component of the work of the IAEA. The responsibility for the increasing technical aspects of this work is undertaken by the medical physicist. To ensure good practice in this vital area structured clinical training programmes are required to complement academic learning. This publication is intended to be a guide to the practical implementation of such a programme for radiation therapy. There is a general and growing awareness that radiation medicine is increasingly dependant on well trained medical physicists that are based in the clinical setting. However an analysis of the availability of medical physicists indicates a large shortfall of qualified and capable professionals. This is particularly evident in developing countries. While strategies to increase academic educational opportunities are critical to such countries, the need for guidance on structured clinical training was recognised by the members of the Regional Cooperative Agreement (RCA) for research, development and training related to nuclear sciences for Asia and the Pacific. Consequently a technical cooperation regional project (RAS6038) under the RCA programme was formulated to address this need in the Asia Pacific region by developing suitable material and establishing its viability. Development of a clinical training guide for medical physicists specialising in radiation therapy was started in 2005 with the appointment of a core drafting committee of regional and international experts. Since 2005 the IAEA has convened two additional consultant group meetings including additional experts to prepare the present publication. The publication drew heavily, particularly in the initial stages, from the experience and documents of the Clinical Training Programme for Radiation Oncology Medical Physicists as developed by the Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine. Their

  6. Clinical Training of Medical Physicists Specializing in Radiation Oncology (Russian Ed.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of radiation in human health, for both diagnosis and treatment of disease, is an important component of the work of the IAEA. The responsibility for the increasing technical aspects of this work is undertaken by the medical physicist. To ensure good practice in this vital area structured clinical training programmes are required to complement academic learning. This publication is intended to be a guide to the practical implementation of such a programme for radiation therapy. There is a general and growing awareness that radiation medicine is increasingly dependant on well trained medical physicists that are based in the clinical setting. However an analysis of the availability of medical physicists indicates a large shortfall of qualified and capable professionals. This is particularly evident in developing countries. While strategies to increase academic educational opportunities are critical to such countries, the need for guidance on structured clinical training was recognised by the members of the Regional Cooperative Agreement (RCA) for research, development and training related to nuclear sciences for Asia and the Pacific. Consequently a technical cooperation regional project (RAS6038) under the RCA programme was formulated to address this need in the Asia Pacific region by developing suitable material and establishing its viability. Development of a clinical training guide for medical physicists specialising in radiation therapy was started in 2005 with the appointment of a core drafting committee of regional and international experts. Since 2005 the IAEA has convened two additional consultant group meetings including additional experts to prepare the present publication. The publication drew heavily, particularly in the initial stages, from the experience and documents of the Clinical Training Programme for Radiation Oncology Medical Physicists as developed by the Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine. Their

  7. Role and Development of Perceptual Skills in Medical Education

    OpenAIRE

    Jarodzka, Halszka; Balslev, Thomas; Holmqvist, Kenneth; Nyström, Marcus; Scheiter, Katharina; Gerjets, Peter; Eika, Berit

    2011-01-01

    Jarodzka, H., Balslev, T., Holmqvist, K., Nyström, M., Scheiter, K., Gerjets, P., & Eika, B. (2010, May). Role and Development of Perceptual Skills in Medical Education. The Scandinavian Workshop on Applied Eye-Tracking (SWAET), Lund, Sweden.

  8. Medical students' emotional development in early clinical experience: a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmich, Esther; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Laan, Roland; Dornan, Tim; Koopmans, Raymond

    2014-08-01

    Dealing with emotions is a critical feature of professional behaviour. There are no comprehensive theoretical models, however, explaining how medical students learn about emotions. We aimed to explore factors affecting their emotions and how they learn to deal with emotions in themselves and others. During a first-year nursing attachment in hospitals and nursing homes, students wrote daily about their most impressive experiences, explicitly reporting what they felt, thought, and did. In a subsequent interview, they discussed those experiences in greater detail. Following a grounded theory approach, we conducted a constant comparative analysis, collecting and then interpreting data, and allowing the interpretation to inform subsequent data collection. Impressive experiences set up tensions, which gave rise to strong emotions. We identified four 'axes' along which tensions were experienced: 'idealism versus reality', 'critical distance versus adaptation', 'involvement versus detachment' and 'feeling versus displaying'. We found many factors, which influenced how respondents relieved those tensions. Their personal attributes and social relationships both inside and outside the medical community were important ones. Respondents' positions along the different dimensions, as determined by the balance between attributes and tensions, shaped their learning outcomes. Medical students' emotional development occurs through active participation in medical practice and having impressive experiences within relationships with patients and others on wards. Tensions along four dimensions give rise to strong emotions. Gaining insight into the many conditions that influence students' learning about emotions might support educators and supervisors in fostering medical students' emotional and professional development. PMID:23949724

  9. Appraising the performance of medical technologists in a clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorpade, J; Chen, M M

    1997-01-01

    Medical technologists and their coworkers serve as a critical link in the delivery of health care, yet their performance typically is appraised in a traditional way, causing stress for both managers and workers. Drawing on Total Quality Management concepts, this article proposes a framework for appraising performance in a clinical laboratory context and shows how it can be used to address the problems that managers face in providing constructive appraisals to laboratory personnel. PMID:10166906

  10. Extending Medical Center Computer Application to Rural Health Clinics

    OpenAIRE

    Gottfredson, Douglas K.

    1983-01-01

    A paper entitled “A COMPUTER DATA BASE FOR CLINICIANS, MANAGERS AND RESEARCHERS,” presented during the 1981 SCAMC, described the Salt Lake VA Medical Center computer system. Since that time, two Rural Health Clinics each about 150 miles from Salt Lake City were established by the SL VAMC to reduce traveling distances and improve services for Veterans. Although many existing computer applications were available with no modifications, additional software was needed to support unique needs of th...

  11. Automated patient and medication payment method for clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yawn BP

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Barbara P Yawn,1 Suzanne Madison,1 Susan Bertram,1 Wilson D Pace,2 Anne Fuhlbrigge,3 Elliot Israel,3 Dawn Littlefield,1 Margary Kurland,1 Michael E Wechsler41Olmsted Medical Center, Department of Research, Rochester, MN, 2UCDHSC, Department of Family Medicine, University of Colorado Health Science Centre, Aurora, CO, 3Brigham and Women's Hospital, Pulmonary and Critical Care Division, Boston, MA, 4National Jewish Medical Center, Division of Pulmonology, Denver, CO, USABackground: Published reports and studies related to patient compensation for clinical trials focus primarily on the ethical issues related to appropriate amounts to reimburse for patient's time and risk burden. Little has been published regarding the method of payment for patient participation. As clinical trials move into widely dispersed community practices and more complex designs, the method of payment also becomes more complex. Here we review the decision process and payment method selected for a primary care-based randomized clinical trial of asthma management in Black Americans.Methods: The method selected is a credit card system designed specifically for clinical trials that allows both fixed and variable real-time payments. We operationalized the study design by providing each patient with two cards, one for reimbursement for study visits and one for payment of medication costs directly to the pharmacies.Results: Of the 1015 patients enrolled, only two refused use of the ClinCard, requesting cash payments for visits and only rarely a weekend or fill-in pharmacist refused to use the card system for payment directly to the pharmacy. Overall, the system has been well accepted by patients and local study teams. The ClinCard administrative system facilitates the fiscal accounting and medication adherence record-keeping by the central teams. Monthly fees are modest, and all 12 study institutional review boards approved use of the system without concern for patient

  12. A Diagnostic Aid for Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Richard B.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Computer diagnosis has been shown in a University of Wisconsin study with medical students to assist the clinician through its ability to present a detailed diagnostic analysis of data collected on a patient. It can also document clearly the logic behind its differential diagnosis, making it a good tool for teaching medical decision-making. (LBH)

  13. Medical education in Malta : an update

    OpenAIRE

    Vassallo, Josanne

    2009-01-01

    Another academic year has come to an end, a year that has seen the finalisation of a new collective agreement for academic staff at the University of Malta, the initiation of a revamping exercise of the medical curriculum and the launching of the Foundation Program as well as Postgraduate Training Programmes in a number of medical specialities.

  14. The Medical Record Review and Resident Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, Arthur B.; Stotz, Ronald

    1977-01-01

    With data from mother-infant pairs during the puerperium as an example, three possibilities for using the medical record review are discussed: (1) as a means of specifying objectives for patient care and trainee competence; (2) for assessing trainee progress and teaching program effectiveness; and (3) for assessing the effects of medical science…

  15. Curriculum Mapping with Academic Analytics in Medical and Healthcare Education

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Komenda; Martin Víta; Christos Vaitsis; Daniel Schwarz; Andrea Pokorná; Nabil Zary; Ladislav Dušek

    2015-01-01

    Background No universal solution, based on an approved pedagogical approach, exists to parametrically describe, effectively manage, and clearly visualize a higher education institution’s curriculum, including tools for unveiling relationships inside curricular datasets. Objective We aim to solve the issue of medical curriculum mapping to improve understanding of the complex structure and content of medical education programs. Our effort is based on the long-term development and implementation...

  16. Patient Safety in Medical Education: Students’ Perceptions, Knowledge and Attitudes

    OpenAIRE

    Bahram Nabilou; Aram Feizi; Hesam Seyedin

    2015-01-01

    Patient safety is a new and challenging discipline in the Iranian health care industry. Among the challenges for patient safety improvement, education of medical and paramedical students is intimidating. The present study was designed to assess students' perceptions of patient safety, and their knowledge and attitudes to patient safety education. This cross-sectional analytical study was conducted in 2012 at Urmia University of Medical Sciences, West Azerbaijan province, Iran. 134 students st...

  17. An overview of infusing service-learning in medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Trae; Wubbena, Zane

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To identify and review existing empirical research about service-learning and medical education and then to develop a framework for infusing service-learning in Doctor of Medicine or Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine curricula. Methods We selected literature on service-learning and medical education. Articles were screened with a protocol for inclusion or exclusion at two separate stages. At stage one, articles were screened according to their titles, abstracts, and keywords. The seco...

  18. Clinical Pharmacy Education in China

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Melody; Shao, Hong; Yang, Li; Nie, Xiao-Yan; Zhai, Suo-Di; Shi, Lu-Wen; Lubawy, William C.

    2008-01-01

    Pharmacy education in China focuses on pharmaceutical sciences, with the bachelor of science (BS) of pharmacy as the entry-level degree. Pharmacy practice curricula in these programs are centered on compounding, dispensing, pharmacy administration, and laboratory experiences, which are the traditional responsibilities for pharmacists. Additional graduate-level training is available at the master of science (MS) and the doctor of philosophy (PhD) levels, most of which concentrate on drug disco...

  19. Medical School Hotline: The Evolution of the Japanese Medical Education System: A Historical Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Kuwabara, Norimitsu; Yamashita, Miu; Yee, Keolamau; Kurahara, David

    2015-01-01

    The Japanese Medical Education system has been influenced by political events throughout the country's history. From long periods of isolation from the western world to the effect of world wars, Japan's training system for physicians has had to adapt in many ways and will continue to change. The Japanese medical education system was recently compared to the “Galapagos Islands” for its unusual and singular evolution, in a speech by visiting professor Dr. Gordon L. Noel at the University of Tok...

  20. Lack of research aptitude in medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Students are attracted towards the medical profession to become a doctor and not to be a researcher. According to a recent study there are about 1,00,000 undergraduate medical students in India at a given point of time, out of them only 0.9% of the students have shown research aptitude. During their training period of graduation in medical sciences, they are so much burdened with the work load of exams, practicals, ward duties and tutorials. In such an over burdened situation very few of them can think about research. A study had shown that training in research methodology received early in medical school helps students to develop a positive attitude towards research. So changes in the undergraduate and postgraduate curriculum are required to promote research among medical students. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(1.000: 247-248

  1. Students' medical ethics rounds: a combinatorial program for medical ethics education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigy, Maani; Pishgahi, Ghasem; Moghaddas, Fateme; Maghbouli, Nastaran; Shirbache, Kamran; Asghari, Fariba; Abolfat-H Zadeh, Navid

    2016-01-01

    It has long been a common goal for both medical educators and ethicists to develop effective methods or programs for medical ethics education. The current lecture-based courses of medical ethics programs in medical schools are demonstrated as insufficient models for training "good doctors''. In this study, we introduce an innovative program for medical ethics education in an extra-curricular student-based design named Students' Medical Ethics Rounds (SMER). In SMER, a combination of educational methods, including theater-based case presentation, large group discussion, expert opinions, role playing and role modeling were employed. The pretest-posttest experimental design was used to assess the impact of interventions on the participants' knowledge and attitude regarding selected ethical topics. A total of 335 students participated in this study and 86.57% of them filled the pretest and posttest forms. We observed significant improvements in the knowledge (P educational methods were reported as helpful. We found that SMER might be an effective method of teaching medical ethics. We highly recommend the investigation of the advantages of SMER in larger studies and interdisciplinary settings. PMID:27471586

  2. Andragogy and medical education: are medical students internally motivated to learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misch, Donald A

    2002-01-01

    Andragogy - the study of adult education - has been endorsed by many medical educators throughout North America. There remains, however, considerable controversy as to the validity and utility of adult education principles as espoused by the field's founder, Malcolm Knowles. Whatever the utility of andragogic doctrine in general education settings, there is reason to doubt its wholesale applicability to the training of medical professionals. Malcolm Knowles' last tenet of andragogy holds that adult learners are more motivated by internal than by external factors. The validity of this hypothesis in medical education is examined, and it is demonstrated that medical students' internal and external motivation are context-dependent, not easily distinguishable, and interrelate with one another in complex ways. Furthermore, the psychological motivation for medical student learning is determined by a variety of factors that range from internal to external, unconscious to conscious, and individual to societal. The andragogic hypothesis of increased internal motivation to learn on the part of adults in general, and medical trainees in particular, is rejected as simplistic, misleading, and counterproductive to developing a greater understanding of the forces that drive medical students to learn. PMID:12075147

  3. The Shortcomings of Medical Education Highlighted through Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Pranav

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this report are to highlight the shortcomings in medical education. To use a student made short film as an example of how issues that cause medical student distress can be displayed. To show that the process of film-making is a useful tool in reflection. To display that film is an effective device in raising awareness. (Contains 3…

  4. A Multidisciplinary Approach to Sexual Dysfunction in Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Sallie; Wittmann, Daniela; Balon, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Addressing sexual health concerns in medical practice has been an emerging concept for the past two decades. However, there have been very few educational opportunities in medical training that would prepare future physicians for such a responsibility. Since assessing and treating sexual problems requires knowledge that encompasses many…

  5. Transforming Vietnam's Medical Education through E-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churton, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    The costs for providing medical school education and services in Vietnam's universities continue to increase. Through a collaborative project between the Government of the Netherlands and Vietnam's Ministry of Health, a five year experimental program to develop in-country capacity and reduce the dependence upon a foreign medical service delivery…

  6. A CRITICAL REIVEW ON STRESS IN MEDICAL EDUCATION IN INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Devindrappa Mahadevappa; S. L Hiremath

    2015-01-01

    Much has been written about stress in medical education. This review reports the causes and period of stress, gender issues, coping strategies, stress management techniques and their effects. It also highlights the fact that stress may not be unique or specific to the medical profession. Perhaps it is hyped because we expect a medical student not to be affected by stress or capable of handling it. Another important factor for consideration is that since stress is reported world over it sho...

  7. Applying the learning theories to medical education: A commentary

    OpenAIRE

    Sivalingam Nalliah; Nazimah Idris

    2014-01-01

    Medical education of today continues to evolve to meet the challenges of the stakeholders. Medical professionals today are expected to play multiple roles besides being experts. Thus, the curriculum has to be developed in a manner that facilitates learners to achieve the intended goal of becoming a medical professional with multiple competencies. The understanding of learning theories will be helpful in designing and delivering the curriculum to meet the demands of ...

  8. Recommendations of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) on Education in Health and Medical Informatics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Arokiasamy, J.; Ball, M.; Barnett, D.; Bearman, M.; Bemmel van, J.; Douglas, J.; Fisher, P.; Garrie, R.; Gatewood, L.; Goossen, W.; Grant, A.; Hales, J.; Hasman, A.; Haux, R.; Hovenga, E.; Johns, M.; Knaup, P.; Leven, F. J.; Lorenzi, N.; Murray, P.; Neame, R.; Protti, D.; Power, M.; Richard, J.; Schuster, E.; Swinkels, W.; Yang, J.; Zelmer, L.; Zvárová, Jana

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 5 (2001), s. 267-277. ISSN 0026-1270 Institutional research plan: AV0Z1030915 Keywords : health informatics * medical informatics * education * recommendations * International Medical Informatics Association * IMIA Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 1.254, year: 2001

  9. Clinical Immersion and Biomedical Engineering Design Education: "Engineering Grand Rounds".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Matthew; Churchwell, André L

    2016-03-01

    Grand Rounds is a ritual of medical education and inpatient care comprised of presenting the medical problems and treatment of a patient to an audience of physicians, residents, and medical students. Traditionally, the patient would be in attendance for the presentation and would answer questions. Grand Rounds has evolved considerably over the years with most sessions being didactic-rarely having a patient present (although, in some instances, an actor will portray the patient). Other members of the team, such as nurses, nurse practitioners, and biomedical engineers, are not traditionally involved in the formal teaching process. In this study we examine the rapid ideation in a clinical setting to forge a system of cross talk between engineers and physicians as a steady state at the praxis of ideation and implementation. PMID:26857015

  10. 'Soft and fluffy': Medical students' attitudes towards psychology in medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Gallagher, Stephen; Wallace, Sarah; Nathan, Yoga; McGrath, Deirdre

    2015-01-01

    peer-reviewed Psychology is viewed by medical students in a negative light. In order to understand this phenomenon, we interviewed 19 medical students about their experiences of psychology in medical education. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. Four main themes were generated: attitudes, teaching culture, curriculum factors and future career path; negative attitudes were transmitted by teachers to students and psychology was associated with students...

  11. Medical student attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies in medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Kron Frederick W; Gjerde Craig L; Sen Ananda; Fetters Michael D

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Studies in K-12 and college students show that their learning preferences have been strongly shaped by new media technologies like video games, virtual reality environments, the Internet, and social networks. However, there is no known research on medical students' game experiences or attitudes towards new media technologies in medical education. This investigation seeks to elucidate medical student experiences and attitudes, to see whether they warrant the development of ...

  12. An Investigation of Participating to Continuous Medical Education Programs of Medical Staff at A State Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Şeyda Ferah Tuygar

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study was planned to determine the frequency, funding and effectiveness of continuous medical education programs which the medical staff at a state hospital attended. Method: This descriptive research was performed on 87 medical staff working at a state hospital (doctor, nurse, midwife, health officer, health technician, and pharmacist) who were accepted to participate in the study. The data were collected through face to face interviews with a questionnaire. Their answers assessed ...

  13. Medical Education in the Islamic Republic of Iran: Three Decades of Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Azizi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nMedical education has undergone vast reform following the Islamic Revolution in the last three decades, with remarkable qualitative and quantitative progress having been achieved following the establishment of the Ministry of Health and Medi­cal Education in 1985. There have been rises in the number of medical, dentistry and pharmacy schools from 7 to 36, 3 to 15 and 3 to 11, respectively, and in the numbers of student admissions in all programmes of medical sciences from 3630 to 6177 and teaching staff from 1573 to 13108, in the decades mentioned. The numbers of students in clinical subspecialty and PhD degrees have increased from zero to 268 and 350, respectively. The quality of medical education has improved with increasing field and ambulatory care training, with more emphasis on teaching preventive medicine and a significant rise in the research activities. In conclusion, Islamic Republic of Iran has been successful in upgrading medical education and re­search by the unification of health services and medical education into one ministry.

  14. "Teaching as a Competency": competencies for medical educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Malathi; Li, Su-Ting T; Meyers, Fredrick J; Pratt, Daniel D; Collins, John B; Braddock, Clarence; Skeff, Kelley M; West, Daniel C; Henderson, Mark; Hales, Robert E; Hilty, Donald M

    2011-10-01

    Most medical faculty receive little or no training about how to be effective teachers, even when they assume major educational leadership roles. To identify the competencies required of an effective teacher in medical education, the authors developed a comprehensive conceptual model. After conducting a literature search, the authors met at a two-day conference (2006) with 16 medical and nonmedical educators from 10 different U.S. and Canadian organizations and developed an initial draft of the "Teaching as a Competency" conceptual model. Conference participants used the physician competencies (from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education [ACGME]) and the roles (from the Royal College's Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists [CanMEDS]) to define critical skills for medical educators. The authors then refined this initial framework through national/regional conference presentations (2007, 2008), an additional literature review, and expert input. Four core values grounded this framework: learner engagement, learner-centeredness, adaptability, and self-reflection. The authors identified six core competencies, based on the ACGME competencies framework: medical (or content) knowledge; learner- centeredness; interpersonal and communication skills; professionalism and role modeling; practice-based reflection; and systems-based practice. They also included four specialized competencies for educators with additional programmatic roles: program design/implementation, evaluation/scholarship, leadership, and mentorship. The authors then cross-referenced the competencies with educator roles, drawing from CanMEDS, to recognize role-specific skills. The authors have explored their framework's strengths, limitations, and applications, which include targeted faculty development, evaluation, and resource allocation. The Teaching as a Competency framework promotes a culture of effective teaching and learning. PMID:21869655

  15. Effects on Deaf Patients of Medication Education by Pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyoguchi, Naomi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kubota, Toshio; Shimazoe, Takao

    2016-10-01

    Deaf people often experience difficulty in understanding medication information provided by pharmacists due to communication barriers. We held medication education lectures for deaf and hard of hearing (HH) individuals and examined the extent to which deaf participants understood medication-related information as well as their attitude about medication. We used two questionnaires to compare the results from the deaf participants with those from the HH and hearing participants. We found that before the lecture, the deaf participants' understanding of medication use was lower than that of the HH and hearing participants. The deaf participants' knowledge increased after the lecture, but did not improve to the level exhibited by the HH participants. However, the deaf participants felt confident using medication despite their low comprehension levels. In conclusion, adjusting the medication information provided by pharmacists according to the recipient's reading level could help improve deaf patients' knowledge; however, such measures might not increase deaf patients' comprehension levels sufficiently. PMID:27262170

  16. Diagnostic imaging in undergraduate medical education: an expanding role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiologists have been involved in anatomy instruction for medical students for decades. However, recent technical advances in radiology, such as multiplanar imaging, 'virtual endoscopy', functional and molecular imaging, and spectroscopy, offer new ways in which to use imaging for teaching basic sciences to medical students. The broad dissemination of picture archiving and communications systems is making such images readily available to medical schools, providing new opportunities for the incorporation of diagnostic imaging into the undergraduate medical curriculum. Current reforms in the medical curriculum and the establishment of new medical schools in the UK further underline the prospects for an expanding role for imaging in medical education. This article reviews the methods by which diagnostic imaging can be used to support the learning of anatomy and other basic sciences

  17. Podcasts from the journal Medical Education. Personality factors and medical training: a review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Doherty, Eva M; Eva, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    It has been acknowledged that certain personality characteristics influence both medical students’ and doctors’ performance. With regard to medical students, studies have been concerned with the role of personality, and performance indicators such as academic results and clinical competence. Eva Doherty (Director of human factors and patient safety, National Surgical Training Centre, The Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin, Ireland) speaks to Kevin Eva, Editor in Chief of Medical Edu...

  18. Remember Your MEDS: Medication Education Delivers Success

    OpenAIRE

    Kelsey M. Rife, PharmD Candidate; Sarah E. Ginty, PharmD Candidate; Elizabeth M. Hohner, PharmD Candidate; Heather R. Stamper, PharmD Candidate; Kristen F. Sobota, PharmD,BCPS; David R. Bright, PharmD, BCACP

    2012-01-01

    Background: Medication adherence is one of the largest barriers to better patient outcomes today. As pharmacists and student pharmacists expand their roles with community outreach projects, they have the potential to make a huge impact on improving adherence. Objective: To improve medication adherence through patient counseling and constructive resources, and to determine patient preferences of adherence tools. Methods: Student pharmacists partnered with a 340B pharmacy to promote the importa...

  19. Medical ethics and education for social responsibility.

    OpenAIRE

    Roemer, M I

    1980-01-01

    The physician, said Henry Sigerist in 1940, has been acquiring an increasingly social role. For centuries, however, codes of medical ethics have concentrated on proper behavior toward individual patients and almost ignored the doctor's responsibilities to society. Major health service reforms have come principally from motivated lay leadership and citizen groups. Private physicians have been largely hostile toward movements to equalize the economic access for people to medical care and improv...

  20. Ethnographic nexus analysis in clinical nursing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Malene

    2016-01-01

    Purpose;Internationally, student nurses' attrition after clinical practice is an increasing problem (Hamshire, Willgoss, & Wibberley, 2012; Pilegård Jensen, 2006). A better understanding of 'becoming a nurse' as situated practice in the hospital wards might help avoid pitfalls in the clinical...... practice. Thus a thorough insight into the field is necessary in order to change it. The purpose of this paper is to show and discuss how it is possible methodologically to do ethnographic research in clinical education and how the field of clinical nursing education in the hospital wards might be improved...... after insights obtained through ethnographic research.Design/methodology/approach;Using nexus analysis (Scollon & Scollon, 2004, 2007) as an ethnographic framework in four Danish hospital wards, a study of the development of a professional identity among student nurses in Denmark was conducted. Scollon...

  1. Incorporating Environmental Health into Pediatric Medical and Nursing Education

    OpenAIRE

    McCurdy, Leyla Erk; Roberts, James; Rogers, Bonnie; Love, Rebecca; Etzel, Ruth; Paulson, Jerome; Witherspoon, Nsedu Obot; Dearry, Allen

    2004-01-01

    Pediatric medical and nursing education currently lacks the environmental health content necessary to appropriately prepare pediatric health care professionals to prevent, recognize, manage, and treat environmental-exposure–related disease. Leading health institutions have recognized the need for improvements in health professionals’ environmental health education. Parents are seeking answers about the impact of environmental toxicants on their children. Given the biologic, psychological, and...

  2. Assessment in Medical Education; What Are We Trying to Achieve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Helena; O'Flynn, Dermot

    2015-01-01

    Within the arena of medical education, it is generally acknowledged that assessment drives learning. Assessment is one of the most significant influences on a student's experience of higher education and improving assessment has a huge impact on the quality of learning (Liu, N. and Carless, D, 2006). Ideally we want to enhance student's capacity…

  3. Competency-based medical education : theory to practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank, Jason R.; Snell, Linda S.; Ten Cate, Olle; Holmboe, Eric S.; Carraccio, Carol; Swing, Susan R.; Harris, Peter; Glasgow, Nicholas J.; Campbell, Craig; Dath, Deepak; Harden, Ronald M.; Iobst, William; Long, Donlin M.; Mungroo, Rani; Richardson, Denyse L.; Sherbino, Jonathan; Silver, Ivan; Taber, Sarah; Talbot, Martin; Harris, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    Although competency-based medical education (CBME) has attracted renewed interest in recent years among educators and policy-makers in the health care professions, there is little agreement on many aspects of this paradigm. We convened a unique partnership - the International CBME Collaborators - to

  4. Ethical practice and clinical legal education

    OpenAIRE

    Duncan, N. J.

    2005-01-01

    This article is designed to explore a variety of ways in which clinical methods can achieve the goals of educators and the professions in the preparation of student lawyers. In particular I intend to show how clinical methods assist in the development of: - a deeper understanding of the law, and the law in context; - general transferable skills; - legal professional skills; - a sound values basis for ethical practice. In addition, I hope to show that there are ways of using cli...

  5. Managing medical images and clinical information: InCor's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuie, Sergio S; Rebelo, Marina S; Moreno, Ramon A; Santos, Marcelo; Bertozzo, Nivaldo; Motta, Gustavo H M B; Pires, Fabio A; Gutierrez, Marco A

    2007-01-01

    Patients usually get medical assistance in several clinics and hospitals during their lifetime, archiving vital information in a dispersed way. Clearly, a proper patient care should take into account that information in order to check for incompatibilities, avoid unnecessary exams, and get relevant clinical history. The Heart Institute (InCor) of São Paulo, Brazil, has been committed to the goal of integrating all exams and clinical information within the institution and other hospitals. Since InCor is one of the six institutes of the University of São Paulo Medical School and each institute has its own information system, exchanging information among the institutes is also a very important aspect that has been considered. In the last few years, a system for transmission, archiving, retrieval, processing, and visualization of medical images integrated with a hospital information system has been successfully created and constitutes the InCor's electronic patient record (EPR). This work describes the experience in the effort to develop a functional and comprehensive EPR, which includes laboratory exams, images (static, dynamic, and three dimensional), clinical reports, documents, and even real-time vital signals. A security policy based on a contextual role-based access control model was implemented to regulate user's access to EPR. Currently, more than 10 TB of digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) images have been stored using the proposed architecture and the EPR stores daily more than 11 GB of integrated data. The proposed storage subsystem allows 6 months of visibility for rapid retrieval and more than two years for automatic retrieval using a jukebox. This paper addresses also a prototype for the integration of distributed and heterogeneous EPR. PMID:17249400

  6. Self-regulation theory: applications to medical education: AMEE Guide No. 58.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandars, John; Cleary, Timothy J

    2011-01-01

    Self-regulation theory, as applied to medical education, describes the cyclical control of academic and clinical performance through several key processes that include goal-directed behaviour, use of specific strategies to attain goals, and the adaptation and modification to behaviours or strategies to optimise learning and performance. Extensive research across a variety of non-medical disciplines has highlighted differences in key self-regulation processes between high- and low-achieving learners and performers. Structured identification of key self-regulation processes can be used to develop specific remediation approaches that can improve performance in academic and complex psycho-motor skills. General teaching approaches that are guided by a self-regulation perspective can also enhance academic performance. Self-regulation theory offers an exciting potential for improving academic and clinical performance in medical education. PMID:22022899

  7. Students’ medical ethics rounds: a combinatorial program for medical ethics education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigy, Maani; Pishgahi, Ghasem; Moghaddas, Fateme; Maghbouli, Nastaran; Shirbache, Kamran; Asghari, Fariba; Abolfat-h Zadeh, Navid

    2016-01-01

    It has long been a common goal for both medical educators and ethicists to develop effective methods or programs for medical ethics education. The current lecture-based courses of medical ethics programs in medical schools are demonstrated as insufficient models for training “good doctors’’. In this study, we introduce an innovative program for medical ethics education in an extra-curricular student-based design named Students’ Medical Ethics Rounds (SMER). In SMER, a combination of educational methods, including theater-based case presentation, large group discussion, expert opinions, role playing and role modeling were employed. The pretest-posttest experimental design was used to assess the impact of interventions on the participants’ knowledge and attitude regarding selected ethical topics. A total of 335 students participated in this study and 86.57% of them filled the pretest and posttest forms. We observed significant improvements in the knowledge (P teaching medical ethics. We highly recommend the investigation of the advantages of SMER in larger studies and interdisciplinary settings.

  8. Tacit knowledge and visual expertise in medical diagnostic reasoning: implications for medical education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg Engel, Peter Johan

    2008-01-01

    focused on the specialty of intern medicine, while specialties with other skills, i.e. perceptive skills within pathology and radiology, have been ignored. AIMS: To show that the concept of tacit knowledge is important in medical education-at all levels and in medical diagnostic reasoning. METHODS......: Describing how tacit knowledge according to Michael Polany, is experienced and expressed in day-to-day life, it is shown that there is a tacit dimension to all knowledge. Reviewing recent literature on medical diagnostic reasoning, it is shown that tacit knowledge is recognized in connection with concepts...... such as "non-analytical reasoning" and "dual process of reasoning." CONCLUSION: It is important that educators are trained in how explicit and implicit knowledge is attained and that tacit knowledge is included in educational programmes of all medical specialties....

  9. The ethics of conducting graduate medical education research on residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keune, Jason D; Brunsvold, Melissa E; Hohmann, Elizabeth; Korndorffer, James R; Weinstein, Debra F; Smink, Douglas S

    2013-04-01

    The field of graduate medical education (GME) research is attracting increased attention and broader participation. The authors review the special ethical and methodological considerations pertaining to medical education research. Because residents are at once a convenient and captive study population, a risk of coercion exists, making the provision of consent important. The role of the institutional review board (IRB) is often difficult to discern because GME activities can have multiple simultaneous purposes, educational activities may go forward with or without a research component, and the subjects of educational research studies are not patients. The authors provide a road map for researchers with regard to research oversight by the IRB and also address issues related to research quality. The matters of whether educational research studies should have educational value for the study subject and whether to use individual information obtained when residents participate as research subjects are explored. PMID:23425981

  10. Virtual glaucoma clinics: patient acceptance and quality of patient education compared to standard clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Court JH

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer H Court,1 Michael W Austin1,21Department of Ophthalmology, Singleton Hospital, Swansea, Wales, UK; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Neath Port Talbot Hospital, Swansea, Wales, UKPurpose: Virtual glaucoma clinics allow rapid, reliable patient assessment but the service should be acceptable to patients and concordance with treatment needs to be maintained with adequate patient education. This study compares experiences and understanding of patients reviewed via the virtual clinic versus the standard clinic by way of an extended patient satisfaction questionnaire (PSQ.Patients and methods: One hundred PSQs were given to consecutive patients attending glaucoma clinics in October 2013. All 135 patients reviewed via the virtual clinic from April 2013 until August 2013 were sent postal PSQs in September 2013. Data were obtained for demographics, understanding of glaucoma, their condition, satisfaction with their experience, and quality of information. Responses were analyzed in conjunction with the clinical records.Results: Eighty-five percent of clinic patients and 63% of virtual clinic patients responded to the PSQ. The mean satisfaction score was over 4.3/5 in all areas surveyed. Virtual clinic patients’ understanding of their condition was very good, with 95% correctly identifying their diagnosis as glaucoma, 83% as ocular hypertension and 78% as suspects. There was no evidence to support inferior knowledge or self-perceived understanding compared to standard clinic patients. Follow-up patients knew more about glaucoma than new patients. Over 95% of patients found our information leaflet useful. Forty percent of patients sought additional information but less than 20% used the internet for this.Conclusion: A substantial proportion of glaucoma pathway patients may be seen by non-medical staff supervised by glaucoma specialists via virtual clinics. Patients are accepting of this format, reporting high levels of satisfaction and non

  11. Do Clinical Librarians Matter? The First Randomized Controlled Trial in Librarianship. A review of: Marshall, Joanne Gard, and Victor R. Neufeld. “A Randomized Controlled Trial of Librarian Educational Participation in Clinical Settings.” Journal of Medical Education 56.5 (1981: 409‐16.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Eldredge

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives – To determine whether clinical librarian services cause healthcare providers to change their information seeking behaviors. To evaluate librarians’ educational roles for clinicians, patients, and patients’ families.Design – Randomized controlled trial.Setting – An academic, health‐sciences center, teaching hospital in Canada.Subjects – A total of eight teams, each consisting of at least eight members who represented at least three different types of health professionals. Four teams (rheumatology, obstetrics, neurology, and pediatrics were randomized into the intervention group to receive clinical librarian services for a six‐month period,and four teams (hematology, diabetic day care, pain clinic, and community psychiatry were randomized into the control group that did not receive clinical librarian services.Methods – Two half‐time clinical librarians attended the intervention groups’ rounds, clinics, and conferences identified as having educational components or where questions would likely arise related to patient care. The two clinical librarians handled 600perceived or actual information requests, delivered 1,200 documents, and provided over 3,000 references during the twelve month study period of September 1978 to August 1979. The typical service consisted of the clinical librarian securing one or two articles relevant to the question raised along with pertinent references placed in a “hot topics” ring binder located in the clinical wards. Healthcare providers were alerted to or reminded about the clinical librarian service through a brochure and an exhibit. The brochure also advertised the clinical librarian service to patients or their families. Approximately 24% of all information requests fielded by the clinical librarians originated from patients or their families. The remaining information requests originated from physicians (40%, allied health professionals (21%, and nurses (15% belonging to these

  12. Determinants of Noncompliance to Clinic Appointments and Medications among Nigerian Children with Epilepsy: Experience in a Tertiary Health Facility in Enugu, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibekwe, Roland Chidi; Ndukuba, Appolos Chidi; Aronu, Ann Ebele; Eke, Christopher Bismarck; Ibekwe, MaryAnn Ugochi; Ojinnaka, Ngozi Chinyelu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the frequency and determinants of noncompliance to clinic appointment and medication among Nigerian children with epilepsy. Method. This is a cross-sectional survey of noncompliance to clinic appointments and medication among 113 consecutive children with epilepsy attending the Paediatric Neurology Clinic of University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu, southeastern Nigeria. Results. Noncompliance to clinic appointment and medication was 23% and 15.3%, respectively. The major reasons given were lack of finance, clashing with school time, and forgetting to take the drugs. Children whose mothers were less educated and unemployed were more likely to miss clinic appointments. Noncompliance to medication was associated with poor seizure control. Children that were on phenobarbitone were more likely to be noncompliant with medication than those on sodium valproate and/or carbamazepine. Conclusion. Missed clinic appointment and medication noncompliance are common among Nigerian children with epilepsy and financial constraint is the most common reason. PMID:26997756

  13. [Health Literacy and patient education in medical rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitzer, Eva Maria; Spörhase, U

    2015-09-01

    Medical rehabilitation in Germany has a long tradition. It is covered by the statutory sickness funds and pension schemes, and is aimed at the prevention of work disability and need for nursing care due to chronic conditions. Chronically ill but health-literate patients - patients capable of making good health-related decisions, or of participating strongly in this decision making - have better health outcomes. To enhance health literacy and participation, medical rehabilitation relies heavily on patient education. This article describes health literacy from the perspective of educational research, outlines the basics of learning principles, and draws conclusions for developing patient education programmes in medical rehabilitation. Implementing a constructivist learning paradigm promotes changes within the trainer team and within the rehabilitation institution - turning it into a health-literate health care organisation. Health literacy in medical rehabilitation is aimed at neither turning the patient into a physician nor replacing evidence-based recommendations through subjective preferences. Medical rehabilitation reaches patients best by using modern health education programmes based on findings from education research, theoretically founded and directed towards building competencies. Furthermore, an educationally qualified training team and a rehabilitation institution are essential in enabling formal and informal learning processes. PMID:26153473

  14. Doctors or technicians: assessing quality of medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayyab Hasan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Tayyab HasanPAPRSB Institute of Health Sciences, University Brunei Darussalam, Bandar Seri Begawan, BruneiAbstract: Medical education institutions usually adapt industrial quality management models that measure the quality of the process of a program but not the quality of the product. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the impact of industrial quality management models on medical education and students, and to highlight the importance of introducing a proper educational quality management model. Industrial quality management models can measure the training component in terms of competencies, but they lack the educational component measurement. These models use performance indicators to assess their process improvement efforts. Researchers suggest that the performance indicators used in educational institutions may only measure their fiscal efficiency without measuring the quality of the educational experience of the students. In most of the institutions, where industrial models are used for quality assurance, students are considered as customers and are provided with the maximum services and facilities possible. Institutions are required to fulfill a list of recommendations from the quality control agencies in order to enhance student satisfaction and to guarantee standard services. Quality of medical education should be assessed by measuring the impact of the educational program and quality improvement procedures in terms of knowledge base development, behavioral change, and patient care. Industrial quality models may focus on academic support services and processes, but educational quality models should be introduced in parallel to focus on educational standards and products.Keywords: educational quality, medical education, quality control, quality assessment, quality management models

  15. Continuing Medical Education, Maintenance of Certification, and Physician Reentry

    OpenAIRE

    Luchtefeld, Martin; Kerwel, Therese G.

    2012-01-01

    Continuing medical education serves a central role in the licensure and certification for practicing physicians. This chapter explores the different modalities that constitute CME along with their effectiveness, including simulation and best education practices. The evolution to maintenance of certification and the requirements for both the American Board of Surgery and the American Board of Colon and Rectal Surgery are delineated. Further progress in the education of practicing surgeons is e...

  16. Open Labyrinth – a Web Application for Medical Education Using Virtual Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudor CĂLINICI

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present an application, implemented and used at “Iuliu Hatieganu” University of Medicine and Pharmacy Cluj Napoca for medical education, The application, called Open Labyrinth is an open source, web based application, developed using ASP technology, very useful for medical education using virtual patients technology. All the virtual patients developed using this application are MedBiquitos compliant. This application was implemented at University of Medicine and Pharmacy “Iuliu Haţieganu” Cluj-Napoca, part of eVip Project. There were developed four virtual patients, three of them were included in eVip database. The user friendly interface, the compliance with the standards, the level of IT knowledge request for the case developers make this application a useful tool for medical education at the clinical level.

  17. Teaching first-year medical students in basic clinical and procedural skills − A novel course concept at a medical school in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mileder, Lukas; Wegscheider, Thomas; Dimai, Hans Peter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Clerkships are still the main source for undergraduate medical students to acquire necessary skills. However, these educational experiences may not be sufficient, as there are significant deficiencies in the clinical experience and practical expertise of medical students. Project description: An innovative course teaching basic clinical and procedural skills to first-year medical students has been implemented at the Medical University of Graz, aiming at preparing students for clerkships and clinical electives. The course is based on several didactic elements: standardized and clinically relevant contents, dual (theoretical and virtual) pre-course preparation, student peer-teaching, small teaching groups, hands-on training, and the use of medical simulation. This is the first course of its kind at a medical school in Austria, and its conceptual design as well as the implementation process into the curriculum shall be described. Evaluation: Between November 2011 and January 2013, 418 students have successfully completed the course. Four online surveys among participating students have been performed, with 132 returned questionnaires. Students’ satisfaction with all four practical course parts was high, as well as the assessment of clinical relevance of contents. Most students (88.6%) strongly agreed/agreed that they had learned a lot throughout the course. Two thirds of the students were motivated by the course to train the acquired skills regularly at our skills laboratory. Narrative feedbacks revealed elements contributing most to course success. Conclusions: First-year medical students highly appreciate practical skills training. Hands-on practice, peer-teaching, clinically relevant contents, and the use of medical simulation are valued most. PMID:24575157

  18. THE ALGORITHM OF THE CASE FORMATION DURING THE DEVELOPMENT OF CLINICAL DISCIPLINES IN MEDICAL SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey A. Garanin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to develop the algorithm of formation of the case on discipline «Clinical Medicine». Methods. The methods involve the effectiveness analysis of the self-diagnosed levels of professional and personal abilities of students in the process of self-study. Results. The article deals with the organization of independent work of students of case-method, which is one of the most important and complex active learning methods. When implementing the method of case analysis in the educational process the main job of the teacher focused on the development of individual cases. While developing the case study of medical character the teacher needs to pay special attention to questions of pathogenesis and pathological anatomy for students’ formation of the fundamental clinical thinking allowing to estimate the patient’s condition as a complete organism, taking into account all its features, to understand the relationships of cause and effect arising at development of a concrete disease, to master new and to improve the available techniques of statement of the differential diagnosis. Scientific novelty and practical significance. The structure of a medical case study to be followed in the development of the case on discipline «Clinical Medicine» is proposed. Unification algorithm formation cases is necessary for the full implementation of the introduction in the educational process in the higher medical school as one of the most effective active ways of learning – method of case analysis, in accordance with the requirements that apply to higher professional education modern reforms and, in particular, the introduction of new Federal State Educational Standards. 

  19. An identity crisis: the need for core competencies in undergraduate medical education

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrey B. Russ; McKenney, Anna Sophia; Patel, Ankit B.

    2013-01-01

    A medical student perspective on the role of core competencies in undergraduate medical education in light of medical education reform associated with recent Flexner II.Keywords: undergraduate medical education; core competency; Flexner II(Published: 29 April 2013)Citation: Med Educ Online 2013, 18: 21028 - http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/meo.v18i0.21028

  20. Clinical research and the development of medical therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antman, Elliott M

    2014-01-01

    Clinical research plays a central role in the development of medical therapeutics, but the current system is estimated to take 10-15 years from initial discovery to regulatory approval, at a cost of approximately US$1 billion. Contrast the paths by which 2 anticoagulant options for atrial fibrillation were discovered and ultimately established as treatment options in clinical medicine. Warfarin was discovered by serendipity and compared with placebo in relatively small trials; this was associated with a low cost of development. The new oral anticoagulants were synthesized to provide highly specific, targeted inhibition of critical steps in the coagulation system. They were compared with warfarin for prevention of stroke and systemic embolic events in large, phase 3 trials; this resulted in very expensive development programs. Neither of these paths is desirable for future development of therapeutics. We need to focus on innovative approaches at the preclinical level (systems approach, greater use of inducible pluripotent stem cells, use of novel bioengineering platforms) and clinical trial level (adaptive design, greater use of new and emerging technology). Focusing on disruptive innovations for development of medical therapeutics has the potential to bring us closer to the goal of precision medicine where safer, more effective treatments are discovered in a more efficient system. PMID:24837573