WorldWideScience

Sample records for clinical laboratory practice

  1. National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines for use of tumor markers in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturgeon, Catharine M; Hoffman, Barry R; Chan, Daniel W

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This report presents updated National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines summarizing quality requirements for the use of tumor markers. METHODS: One subcommittee developed guidelines for analytical quality relevant to serum and tissue-based tumor...

  2. Experimental Psychopathology: From laboratory studies to clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Philippot

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, David Barlow (2004, a pioneer in the field of anxiety disorders, has proposed that psychologists should abandon the concept of psychotherapy and rather use the one of “psychological treatment”. The provoking idea behind this proposal is that the concept of psychotherapy, relying on the notion of “therapeutic school” should be discarded by professional psychologists because it relies too much on conceptions based on pre-scientific models. Barlow (2004 insists that, today, psychology as an empirical science has gathered sufficient knowledge and know-how to found clinical practice. It is no longer necessary to rely on pre-scientific theories. Further, Barlow’s perspective opens clinical practice to the entire field of psychology, i.e. to the advances accomplished by research on emotion, cognition, learning, development, etc.

  3. A typology of evidence based practice research heuristics for clinical laboratory science curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibach, Elizabeth K; Russell, Barbara L

    2010-01-01

    A typology of EBP research heuristics was defined relative to clinical laboratory science levels of practice. Research skills requisite for CLS baccalaureate level are associated mainly with quality control of analytic processes. Research skills at master's level are associated with pre- and post-analytic investigations, as well. Doctoral level CLS practice portends to utilize research skills facilitating quality investigations at the systems level.

  4. The good laboratory practice and good clinical practice requirements for the production of radiopharmaceuticals in clinical research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vos, FJ; De Decker, M; Dierckx, RA

    2005-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals account for more than 95% of the group of sterile pharmaceutical products and should therefore be handled and produced with care. Since the introduction of the European directive, all pharmaceuticals used in clinical studies must be prepared under good manufacturing practice (GM

  5. Practical way to develop 10-color flow cytometry protocols for the clinical laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárnok, Attila; Bocsi, Jozsef

    2010-02-01

    The latest development of commercial routine flow cytometers (FCM) is that they are equipped with three (blue, red, violet) or more lasers and many PMT detectors. Nowadays routine clinical instruments are capable of detecting 10 or more fluorescence colors simultaneously. Thereby, presenting opportunities for getting detailed information on the single cell level for cytomics and systems biology for improve diagnostics and monitoring of patients. The University Leipzig, Germany) recently started a cluster of excellence to study the molecular background of life style and environment associated diseases, enrolling 25000 individuals (LIFE). To this end the most comprehensive FCM protocol has to be developed for this study. We aimed to optimize fluorochrome and antibody combinations to the characteristics of the instrument for successful 10-color FCM. Systematic review of issues related to sampling, preparation, instrument settings, spillover and compensation matrix, reagent performance, and general principles of panel construction was performed. 10-color FCM enables for increased accuracy in cell subpopulation identification, the ability to obtain detailed information from blood specimens, improved laboratory efficiency, and the means to consistently detect major and rare cell populations. Careful attention to details of instrument and reagent performance allows for the development of panels suitable for screening of samples from healthy and diseased donors. The characteristics of this technique are particularly well suited for the analysis of broad human population cohorts and have the potential to reach the everyday practice in a standardized way for the clinical laboratory.

  6. Nomenclature and basic concepts in automation in the clinical laboratory setting: a practical glossary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelopoulos, Angelos A; Dalamaga, Maria; Panoutsopoulos, Konstantinos; Dima, Kleanthi

    2013-01-01

    In the early 80s, the word automation was used in the clinical laboratory setting referring only to analyzers. But in late 80s and afterwards, automation found its way into all aspects of the diagnostic process, embracing not only the analytical but also the pre- and post-analytical phase. While laboratories in the eastern world, mainly Japan, paved the way for laboratory automation, US and European laboratories soon realized the benefits and were quick to follow. Clearly, automation and robotics will be a key survival tool in a very competitive and cost-concious healthcare market. What sets automation technology apart from so many other efficiency solutions are the dramatic savings that it brings to the clinical laboratory. Further standardization will assure the success of this revolutionary new technology. One of the main difficulties laboratory managers and personnel must deal with when studying solutions to reengineer a laboratory is familiarizing themselves with the multidisciplinary and technical terminology of this new and exciting field. The present review/glossary aims at giving an overview of the most frequently used terms within the scope of laboratory automation and to put laboratory automation on a sounder linguistic basis.

  7. Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Outpatient clinical laboratory services are paid based on a fee schedule in accordance with Section 1833(h) of the Social Security Act. The clinical laboratory fee...

  8. Lighting – laboratory practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Борис Васильевич Дзюндзюк

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article discussed one of the possible variants of the building study bench for laboratory work and practical lessons on the basic parameters of the study of artificial and natural lighting in the labour protection in accordance with the DBN V.2.5-28-2006. The model is on the latest LED components, which has high reliability, maintainability and eliminates the disadvantages of the existing laboratory stands.

  9. 78 FR 6330 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory... related to improvement in clinical laboratory quality and laboratory medicine practice and specific... laboratory services; revisions to the standards under which clinical laboratories are regulated; the...

  10. Historical milestones in measurement of HDL-cholesterol: impact on clinical and laboratory practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Michel R; Blaton, Victor H

    2006-07-23

    High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) comprises a family of particles with differing physicochemical characteristics. Continuing progress in improving HDL-C analysis has originated from two separate fields-one clinical, reflecting increased attention to HDL-C in estimating risk for coronary heart disease (CHD), and the other analytical, reflecting increased emphasis on finding more reliable and cost-effective HDL-C assays. Epidemiologic and prospective studies established the inverse association of HDL-C with CHD risk, a relationship that is consistent with protective mechanisms demonstrated in basic research and animal studies. Atheroprotective and less atheroprotective HDL subpopulations have been described. Guidelines on primary and secondary CHD prevention, which increased the workload in clinical laboratories, have led to a revolution in HDL-C assay technology. Many analytical techniques including ultracentrifugation, electrophoresis, chromatography, and polyanion precipitation methods have been developed to separate and quantify HDL-C and HDL subclasses. More recently developed homogeneous assays enable direct measurement of HDL-C on an automated analyzer, without the need for manual pretreatment to separate non-HDL. Although homogeneous assays show improved accuracy and precision in normal serum, discrepant results exist in samples with atypical lipoprotein characteristics. Hypertriglyceridemia and monoclonal paraproteins are important interfering factors. A novel approach is nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy that allows rapid and reliable analysis of lipoprotein subclasses, which may improve the identification of individuals at increased CHD risk. Apolipoprotein A-I, the major protein of HDL, has been proposed as an alternative cardioprotective marker avoiding the analytical limitations of HDL-C.

  11. National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry laboratory medicine practice guidelines for use of tumor markers in testicular, prostate, colorectal, breast, and ovarian cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturgeon, Catharine M; Duffy, Michael J; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Updated National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry (NACB) Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines for the use of tumor markers in the clinic have been developed. METHODS: Published reports relevant to use of tumor markers for 5 cancer sites--testicular, prostate, colorectal, breast...

  12. Clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common physical disability in early childhood. The worldwide prevalence of CP is approximately 2–2.5 per 1,000 live births. It has been clinically defined as a group of motor, cognitive, and perceptive impairments secondary to a non-progressive defect or lesion of the developing brain. Children with CP can have swallowing problems with severe drooling as one of the consequences. Malnutrition and recurrent aspiration pneumonia can increase the risk of morbidity ...

  13. Non-clinical studies in the process of new drug development - Part II: Good laboratory practice, metabolism, pharmacokinetics, safety and dose translation to clinical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.L. Andrade

    Full Text Available The process of drug development involves non-clinical and clinical studies. Non-clinical studies are conducted using different protocols including animal studies, which mostly follow the Good Laboratory Practice (GLP regulations. During the early pre-clinical development process, also known as Go/No-Go decision, a drug candidate needs to pass through several steps, such as determination of drug availability (studies on pharmacokinetics, absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination (ADME and preliminary studies that aim to investigate the candidate safety including genotoxicity, mutagenicity, safety pharmacology and general toxicology. These preliminary studies generally do not need to comply with GLP regulations. These studies aim at investigating the drug safety to obtain the first information about its tolerability in different systems that are relevant for further decisions. There are, however, other studies that should be performed according to GLP standards and are mandatory for the safe exposure to humans, such as repeated dose toxicity, genotoxicity and safety pharmacology. These studies must be conducted before the Investigational New Drug (IND application. The package of non-clinical studies should cover all information needed for the safe transposition of drugs from animals to humans, generally based on the non-observed adverse effect level (NOAEL obtained from general toxicity studies. After IND approval, other GLP experiments for the evaluation of chronic toxicity, reproductive and developmental toxicity, carcinogenicity and genotoxicity, are carried out during the clinical phase of development. However, the necessity of performing such studies depends on the new drug clinical application purpose.

  14. Non-clinical studies in the process of new drug development - Part II: Good laboratory practice, metabolism, pharmacokinetics, safety and dose translation to clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, E L; Bento, A F; Cavalli, J; Oliveira, S K; Schwanke, R C; Siqueira, J M; Freitas, C S; Marcon, R; Calixto, J B

    2016-12-12

    The process of drug development involves non-clinical and clinical studies. Non-clinical studies are conducted using different protocols including animal studies, which mostly follow the Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) regulations. During the early pre-clinical development process, also known as Go/No-Go decision, a drug candidate needs to pass through several steps, such as determination of drug availability (studies on pharmacokinetics), absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination (ADME) and preliminary studies that aim to investigate the candidate safety including genotoxicity, mutagenicity, safety pharmacology and general toxicology. These preliminary studies generally do not need to comply with GLP regulations. These studies aim at investigating the drug safety to obtain the first information about its tolerability in different systems that are relevant for further decisions. There are, however, other studies that should be performed according to GLP standards and are mandatory for the safe exposure to humans, such as repeated dose toxicity, genotoxicity and safety pharmacology. These studies must be conducted before the Investigational New Drug (IND) application. The package of non-clinical studies should cover all information needed for the safe transposition of drugs from animals to humans, generally based on the non-observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) obtained from general toxicity studies. After IND approval, other GLP experiments for the evaluation of chronic toxicity, reproductive and developmental toxicity, carcinogenicity and genotoxicity, are carried out during the clinical phase of development. However, the necessity of performing such studies depends on the new drug clinical application purpose.

  15. Laboratories practice to transducers study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleber Romero Felizardo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to gather a collection of practical laboratory experiences , to discover the physical principles of different types of electrical transducers , and to compare them with theoretical models.

  16. Automation in the clinical microbiology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Susan M; Marlowe, Elizabeth M

    2013-09-01

    Imagine a clinical microbiology laboratory where a patient's specimens are placed on a conveyor belt and sent on an automation line for processing and plating. Technologists need only log onto a computer to visualize the images of a culture and send to a mass spectrometer for identification. Once a pathogen is identified, the system knows to send the colony for susceptibility testing. This is the future of the clinical microbiology laboratory. This article outlines the operational and staffing challenges facing clinical microbiology laboratories and the evolution of automation that is shaping the way laboratory medicine will be practiced in the future.

  17. 75 FR 1063 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-08

    ... Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory... under which clinical laboratories are regulated; the impact on medical and laboratory practice of... Testing Workgroup and discussion of the Workgroup's proposals related to good laboratory practices...

  18. Risk Management in the Clinical Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njoroge, Sarah W

    2014-01-01

    Clinical laboratory tests play an integral role in medical decision-making and as such must be reliable and accurate. Unfortunately, no laboratory tests or devices are foolproof and errors can occur at pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical phases of testing. Evaluating possible conditions that could lead to errors and outlining the necessary steps to detect and prevent errors before they cause patient harm is therefore an important part of laboratory testing. This can be achieved through the practice of risk management. EP23-A is a new guideline from the CLSI that introduces risk management principles to the clinical laboratory. This guideline borrows concepts from the manufacturing industry and encourages laboratories to develop risk management plans that address the specific risks inherent to each lab. Once the risks have been identified, the laboratory must implement control processes and continuously monitor and modify them to make certain that risk is maintained at a clinically acceptable level. This review summarizes the principles of risk management in the clinical laboratory and describes various quality control activities employed by the laboratory to achieve the goal of reporting valid, accurate and reliable test results. PMID:24982831

  19. 76 FR 5379 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory..., revisions to the standards under which clinical laboratories are regulated; the impact on medical and laboratory practice of proposed revisions to the standards; and the modification of the standards...

  20. Computerizing clinical practice guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Karen Marie

    It is well described that hospitals have problems with sustaining high quality of care and expedient introduction of new medical knowledge. Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been promoted as a remedy to deal with these problems. It is, however, also well described that application and comp......It is well described that hospitals have problems with sustaining high quality of care and expedient introduction of new medical knowledge. Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been promoted as a remedy to deal with these problems. It is, however, also well described that application...... and compliance with CPGs in most areas of clinical practice are deficient. Computerization of CPGs has been brought forward as a method to disseminate and to support application of CPGs. Until now, CPG-computerization has focused on development of formal expressions of CPGs. The developed systems have, however......, not gained any extensive application in clinical practice. The basic assumption in this thesis is that the scanty penetration is due to an inappropriate design process when designing computerized CPGs for clinical work practice. This thesis examines the application of guidance within areas where CPG...

  1. Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) status of Asian countries and its implementation in non-clinical safety studies in pharmaceutical drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Madoka; Hinotsu, Shiro; Kawakami, Koji

    2009-10-01

    Non-clinical animal studies to assess the safety of compounds under development have to comply with Good Laboratory Practice (GLP). The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has established the Mutual Acceptance of Data (MAD) system in OECD member countries for the mutual acceptance of non-clinical safety study data. Since 1997 non-OECD-member countries have also been able to participate in the MAD system, if the country meets the level of standardized compliance with OECD GLP. Thus, several Asian non-OECD countries are trying to develop their GLP standards in order to become official members of the MAD system. Pharmaceutical companies face significant expense in the drug-development process, including the cost of non-clinical safety studies; in response, companies in Asian countries are seeking to establish GLP facilities to provide cost-effective services for drug development. To assess the quality and cost of GLP performance in Asian countries, in this study we approached GLP facilities in a number of Asian countries to obtain price and quality information on a 'virtual compound' to be assessed in non-clinical safety studies. Also, the development status of GLP in Asian countries in terms of policy and infrastructure was analyzed. We found that, among Asian countries, India and Singapore may be candidates for participation in te MAD system in terms of their compliance with GLP, language, and costs. These findings will be beneficial to pharmaceutical companies planning GLP studies in Asian countries.

  2. Computerizing clinical practice guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Karen Marie

    . The analysis focuses on the emergence of general clinical work practice demands on guidance • An analysis of guidance demands from clinical work practice and business strategy, focusing on implications for the design of computerised CPGs. In my research, I have applied observation studies, interviews...... is comprised by fieldwork in three oncology departments and a case study of advanced life support. Although close to all patients within oncology are treated according to a CPG, I found limited application of physical CPGs and web-based CPG portals. However, I found comprehensive application of activity...... feasible • Designed in a way that provides room for local adaptations of guidance • Designed with focus on specific business strategic aims Further, based on my findings, I will suggest that design of computerized CPGs should be based on: 1) scrutinization of the clinical work practice, 2) articulation...

  3. Putting New Laboratory Tests Into Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Putting New Laboratory Tests into Practice Share this page: Was this ... of articles that describe how different types of laboratory tests are developed, validated, and made available for ...

  4. Evidence-based laboratory medicine: is it working in practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Christopher P

    2012-02-01

    The principles of Evidence-Based Medicine have been established for about two decades, with the need for evidence-based clinical practice now being accepted in most health systems around the world. These principles can be employed in laboratory medicine. The key steps in evidence-based practice, namely (i) formulating the question; (ii) searching for evidence; (iii) appraising evidence; (iv) applying evidence; and (v) assessing the experience are all accepted but, as yet, translation into daily clinical and laboratory practice has been slow. Furthermore, the demand for evidence-based laboratory medicine (EBLM) has been slow to develop.There are many contrasting observations about laboratory medicine, for example (i) there is too much testing vs insufficient testing; (ii) testing is expensive vs laboratories are expected to generate income; and (iii) test results have little impact on outcomes vs test results are crucial to clinical decision making. However, there is little evidence to support any of these observations. Integrating the principles of EBLM into routine practice will help to resolve some of these issues by identifying (a) where laboratory medicine fits into the care pathway; (b) where testing is appropriate; (c) the nature and quality of evidence required to demonstrate the clinical utility of a test; (d) how the test result impacts on clinical actions; (e) where changes in the care pathway will occur; and (f) where benefit/value can be achieved. These answers will help to establish the culture of EBLM in clinical and laboratory practice.

  5. Comparative study of accuracy and clinical agreement of the CoaguChek XS portable device versus standard laboratory practice in unexperienced patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torreiro, Eduardo G; Fernández, Elizabeth Gómez; Rodríguez, Rosa Mariño; López, Carmen Vázquez; Núñez, Julia Barreal

    2009-05-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the accuracy and clinical agreement of the CoaguChek XS versus the standard laboratory practice. Forty-one patients on long-term anticoagulation with acenocumarol without previous experience in self-monitoring participated to obtain 218 pairs of data. Several methods for comparative statistics were applied to assess the possible disagreements between techniques as well as a range of previously published criteria of clinical agreement and the very recently described error-grid for INR comparison that we partially modify. The mean age was 52.1 and the indications for oral anticoagulation were prosthetic valves (36.59%), atrial fibrillation (34.15%), venous thromboembolic disease (21.95%) and others (7.31%) with a target range of 2-3 INR units (63.4%) or 2.5-3.5 (36.6%). Analyzing the whole series of data, the Pearsons rho correlation coefficient for precision between methods was 0.95 and the C(b) bias correction factor for accuracy 0.99 with a minimal bias of 0.1 INR units between methods applying the Bland-Altman plot. The linear regression procedure described by Passing and Bablok showed a minimal deviation from the best-fit line and a slope of 0.90. The mean of the absolute relative differences was 7% which is in the "very good" range of agreement. No results were found in the clinically "dangerous" D zone of the error-grids with 99% of data in the clinically irrelevant and low relevant areas A and B. In this study self-management with the CoaguChek XS was clinically safe and reliable.

  6. Best practices for use of the HEMOX analyzer in the clinical laboratory: quality control determination and choice of anticoagulant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhille, Derek L; Nussenzveig, Roberto H; Glezos, Christopher; Perkins, Sherrie; Agarwal, Archana M

    2012-09-01

    The HEMOX Analyzer (TCS Scientific) has been used to measure the full oxygen-dissociation curve (ODC) and to calculate P(50) and the Hill coefficient. The effects of different anticoagulants on sample stability and P(50) values have not been evaluated extensively for this instrument. We characterized an artificial hemoglobin (Equil QC463) for quality control (QC) and compared P(50) values for blood samples drawn into 3 different anticoagulants (acid citrate dextrose [ACD], heparin, and EDTA). P(50) values were not stable in ACD but were stable in heparin and EDTA anticoagulants for up to 4 days. Tests with Equil QC463 showed that P(50) values were quite sensitive to small variations in buffer pH. Use of the correct anticoagulant and strict control of buffer pH are 2 parameters that need to be accounted for in best-practices use of this hemoximeter and before determining P(50).

  7. Informatics and the clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Richard G; Johnson, Owen A; Batstone, Gifford

    2014-08-01

    The nature of pathology services is changing under the combined pressures of increasing workloads, cost constraints and technological advancement. In the face of this, laboratory systems need to meet new demands for data exchange with clinical electronic record systems for test requesting and results reporting. As these needs develop, new challenges are emerging especially with respect to the format and content of the datasets which are being exchanged. If the potential for the inclusion of intelligent systems in both these areas is to be realised, the continued dialogue between clinicians and laboratory information specialists is of paramount importance. Requirements of information technology (IT) in pathology, now extend well beyond the provision of purely analytical data. With the aim of achieving seamless integration of laboratory data into the total clinical pathway, 'Informatics' - the art and science of turning data into useful information - is becoming increasingly important in laboratory medicine. Informatics is a powerful tool in pathology - whether in implementing processes for pathology modernisation, introducing new diagnostic modalities (e.g. proteomics, genomics), providing timely and evidence-based disease management, or enabling best use of limited and often costly resources. Providing appropriate information to empowered and interested patients - which requires critical assessment of the ever-increasing volume of information available - can also benefit greatly from appropriate use of informatics in enhancing self-management of long term conditions. The increasing demands placed on pathology information systems in the context of wider developmental change in healthcare delivery are explored in this review. General trends in medical informatics are reflected in current priorities for laboratory medicine, including the need for unified electronic records, computerised order entry, data security and recovery, and audit. We conclude that there is a

  8. [Neuroethics in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, H

    2009-08-01

    In recent years the ability of neuroscience to identify and intervene in mental functions has progressed immensely, which raises several anthropologic and ethical questions. Meanwhile neuroethics arose as a new interdisciplinary field for critical analysis of neuroscientific actions and ethical reflection on the increasing knowledge of the human brain, with regard to society and politics. This article provides a survey of neuroethical implications for clinical practice.

  9. [Guidelines for clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vleugels, A M

    1997-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are systematically developed statements that are intended to support medical decision making in well-defined clinical situations. Essentially, their object is to reduce the variability in medical practice, to improve quality, and to make appropriated control of the financial resources possible. Internationally, ever more organisations, associations, and institutions are concerned with the development of guidelines in many different areas of care. Making implicit knowledge explicit is one of the associated advantages of guidelines: they have a potential utility in training, in process evaluation, and in the reevaluation of outcome studies. In liability issues, their existence has a double effect: they can be used to justify medical behaviour, and they constitute a generally accepted reference point. A derivative problem is the legal liability of the compilers of the guidelines. The principle of the guideline approach can be challenged academically: science cannot give a definition of optimal care with absolute certainty. What is called objectivity often rests on methodologically disputable analyses; also the opinion of opinion leaders is not always a guarantee for scientific soundness. Moreover, patients are not all identical: biological variability, situational factors, patient expectations, and other elements play a role in this differentiation. Clinicians are often hesitant with respect to clinical guidelines: they are afraid of cookbook medicine and curtailment of their professional autonomy. Patients fear reduction of individualization of care and the use of guidelines as a rationing instrument. The effects of the introduction of clinical practice guidelines on medical practice, on the results and on the cost of care vary but are generally considered to be favourable. The choice of appropriate strategies in development, dissemination, and implementation turns out to be of critical importance. The article ends with concrete

  10. Myocarditis in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinagra, Gianfranco; Anzini, Marco; Pereira, Naveen L; Bussani, Rossana; Finocchiaro, Gherardo; Bartunek, Jozef; Merlo, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Myocarditis is a polymorphic disease characterized by great variability in clinical presentation and evolution. Patients presenting with severe left ventricular dysfunction and life-threatening arrhythmias represent a demanding challenge for the clinician. Modern techniques of cardiovascular imaging and the exhaustive molecular evaluation of the myocardium with endomyocardial biopsy have provided valuable insight into the pathophysiology of this disease, and several clinical registries have unraveled the disease's long-term evolution and prognosis. However, uncertainties persist in crucial practical issues in the management of patients. This article critically reviews current information for evidence-based management, offering a rational and practical approach to patients with myocarditis. For this review, we searched the PubMed and MEDLINE databases for articles published from January 1, 1980, through December 31, 2015, using the following terms: myocarditis, inflammatory cardiomyopathy, and endomyocardial biopsy. Articles were selected for inclusion if they represented primary data or were review articles published in high-impact journals. In particular, a risk-oriented approach is proposed. The different patterns of presentation of myocarditis are classified as low-, intermediate-, and high-risk syndromes according to the most recent evidence on prognosis, clinical findings, and both invasive and noninvasive testing, and appropriate management strategies are proposed for each risk class.

  11. Dabigatran in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ageno, Walter; Eikelboom, John; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-01-01

    confirmed, but VKA use is complicated by need for regular monitoring of the international normalized ratio and multiple drug and food interactions. Dabigatran is an oral direct thrombin inhibitor that can be used with fixed doses, without the need for routine anticoagulation laboratory monitoring...... and the advantage of few drug or diet interactions. Dabigatran is effective for stroke and systemic thromboembolism in AF and for the prophylaxis and treatment of VTE. The drug has a good safety profile and consistently shows a reduction in intracranial hemorrhage risk compared to warfarin. A specific reversal...... agent for dabigatran has been approved by FDA and EU. This review provides a summary of publications assessing clinical utility of dabigatran for different indications....

  12. 关于胆红素升高的实验室检测与临床%Detection of bilirubin: from laboratory to clinical practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王豪

    2012-01-01

    Jaundice (abnormal elevation of bilirubin) is common in clinical practice.At present bilirubin is detected by measuring total bilirubin (TB) and direct bilirubin (DB) in hospital.Indirect bilirubin (IB) is the difference of TB and DB.Direct bilirubin reflects mainly the conjugated bilirubin but they are not all equivalent.Indirect bilirubin and unconjugated bilirubin are the same condition.In clinical practice,the proportion of DB (or IB) in TB is more significant than their level of elevation.The cause of jaundice could be roughly determined by analyzing the proportion of DB (or IB) in TB.The methodology and quality of bilirubin detection are quite different in hospitals in our country.The proportion of DB aud IB in TB in detection of bilirubin is also quite different in hospitals.It leads to a big puzzle to the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of jaundice for clinical doctors.It is suggested that the quality control of bilirubin detection should be strengthened in laboratory in hospital.On the bases of strict quality control of bilirubin detection,proper adjustment of the proportion of DB and IB as to make it consistiug with clinical practice and pathogenesis of diseases,and making the proportion stable for long time are also suggested.%黄疸即胆红素异常升高在临床上很常见.目前医院检测胆红素通常测定血中的总胆红素和直接胆红素,而以总胆红素减去直接胆红素得到间接胆红素的数值.直接胆红素主要反映结合胆红素,但二者并不完全等同.与此类似,间接胆红素主要反映非结合胆红素.在临床上,对黄疸的诊断和鉴别诊断,直接胆红素(或间接胆红素)占总胆红素的比例较之胆红素升高的幅度更有意义.通过分析直接或间接胆红素的比例,往往可以对黄疸的原因做出大致的诊断和鉴别诊断.但目前各家医院检测胆红素的方法和水平差别较大,不同疾病状态下所测出的直接或间接胆红素的比

  13. [Clinical laboratory in the 21st century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, T

    1991-03-01

    Alvin Toffler has predicted that the "Third Wave" will be a society which be decentralized, diversified and customized, computer-dependent. Medical care and also clinical laboratory will be revolutionalized in a more or less similar direction to that predicted by him. Laboratory physicians and scientists should try to improve laboratory services, particularly establishment of adequate normal values, common expression of various laboratory results, introduction of medical decision making and recommended guideline for laboratory use in primary health care.

  14. [Hydration in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maristany, Cleofé Pérez-Portabella; Segurola Gurruchaga, Hegoi

    2011-01-01

    Water is an essential foundation for life, having both a regulatory and structural function. The former results from active and passive participation in all metabolic reactions, and its role in conserving and maintaining body temperature. Structurally speaking it is the major contributer to tissue mass, accounting for 60% of the basis of blood plasma, intracellular and intersticial fluid. Water is also part of the primary structures of life such as genetic material or proteins. Therefore, it is necessary that the nurse makes an early assessment of patients water needs to detect if there are signs of electrolyte imbalance. Dehydration can be a very serious problem, especially in children and the elderly. Dehydrations treatment with oral rehydration solution decreases the risk of developing hydration disorders, but even so, it is recommended to follow preventive measures to reduce the incidence and severity of dehydration. The key to having a proper hydration is prevention. Artificial nutrition encompasses the need for precise calculation of water needs in enteral nutrition as parenteral, so the nurse should be part of this process and use the tools for calculating the patient's requirements. All this helps to ensure an optimal nutritional status in patients at risk. Ethical dilemmas are becoming increasingly common in clinical practice. On the subject of artificial nutrition and hydration, there isn't yet any unanimous agreement regarding hydration as a basic care. It is necessary to take decisions in consensus with the health team, always thinking of the best interests of the patient.

  15. Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technologists and Technicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Projected Employment, 2024 Change, 2014-24 Employment by Industry Percent Numeric SOURCE: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Employment Projections program Clinical laboratory technologists and technicians ...

  16. Clinical and Laboratory Diagnosis of Intestinal Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Chun Shi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: ITB is difficult to diagnose even with modern medical techniques due to its nonspecific clinical and laboratory features. At present, combination of clinical, endoscopic, radiological, and pathological features continues to be the key to the diagnosis of ITB.

  17. Evaluation of Practical Clinical Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrong, Joseph M.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The effectiveness of practical examinations in assessing the clinical competence of dental students is discussed. A grading system that derives a significant portion of the senior student's grade from this type of examination is described. The impact of practical clinical examinations on two consecutive graduating classes was analyzed. (Author/MLW)

  18. Photodynamic therapy in clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    E. V. Filonenko; L. G. Serova

    2016-01-01

    The review is on opportunities and possibilities of application of photodynamic therapy in clinical practice. The advantages of this method are the targeting of effect on tumor foci and high efficiency along with low systemic toxicity. The results of the set of recent Russian and foreign clinical trials are represented in the review. The method is successfully used in clinical practice with both radical (for early vulvar, cervical cancer and pre-cancer, central early lung cancer, esophageal a...

  19. Pharmacogenetics in clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derijks, Luc J. J.; Derijks, H. Jeroen; Touw, Daan J.; Conemans, Jean M. H.; Egberts, Antoine C. G.

    2008-01-01

    The availability of data from pharmacogenetic studies is reflected in therapeutic practice, and pharmacogenetics is slowly entering the medical arena. Preconditions for the utilisation of pharmacogenetic knowledge are that: 1) genetic variation and prevalence are known 2) pharmacological consequence

  20. Clinical Practice in Portuguese Sexology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcão, Violeta; Ribeiro, Sofia; Almeida, Joana; Giami, Alain

    2016-12-02

    Few studies explore the clinicians' knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding sexuality, despite their role in the sexual-health socialization process. This study focuses on Portuguese sexologists engaged in clinical practice. It aims to characterize sexologists' sex education and training and their clinical practices, including diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. This research followed the methodology of an European survey on sexology as a profession (Euro-Sexo). From the 91 respondents who completed questionnaires, 51 (56%) were active in clinical practice. Results indicate that the Portuguese clinical sexologist is significantly older, predominantly male, has had training in sexology, performs more scientific research, and is more engaged in teaching activities when compared to nonclinical working sexologists. This article describes the main sexual problems presented by patients to Portuguese clinical sexologists and highlights differences in the professional groups and approaches toward treating these problems by medical doctors and nonmedical professionals. Results reinforce the idea that there are intra-European differences in the educational background of sexologists and reveal important variations in Portuguese sexologists' education, training, and clinical practice. The representations and practices of the sexologists in Portugal, as in other European countries, are embedded in cultural scenarios and sexual cultures, with implications for the clinical practice.

  1. [Knowledge management system for laboratory work and clinical decision support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Masanori; Sato, Mayumi; Yoneyama, Akiko

    2011-05-01

    This paper discusses a knowledge management system for clinical laboratories. In the clinical laboratory of Toranomon Hospital, we receive about 20 questions relevant to laboratory tests per day from medical doctors or co-medical staff. These questions mostly involve the essence to appropriately accomplish laboratory tests. We have to answer them carefully and suitably because an incorrect answer may cause a medical accident. Up to now, no method has been in place to achieve a rapid response and standardized answers. For this reason, the laboratory staff have responded to various questions based on their individual knowledge. We began to develop a knowledge management system to promote the knowledge of staff working for the laboratory. This system is a type of knowledge base for assisting the work, such as inquiry management, laboratory consultation, process management, and clinical support. It consists of several functions: guiding laboratory test information, managing inquiries from medical staff, reporting results of patient consultation, distributing laboratory staffs notes, and recording guidelines for laboratory medicine. The laboratory test information guide has 2,000 records of medical test information registered in the database with flexible retrieval. The inquiry management tool provides a methos to record all questions, answer easily, and retrieve cases. It helps staff to respond appropriately in a short period of time. The consulting report system treats patients' claims regarding medical tests. The laboratory staffs notes enter a file management system so they can be accessed to aid in clinical support. Knowledge sharing using this function can achieve the transition from individual to organizational learning. Storing guidelines for laboratory medicine will support EBM. Finally, it is expected that this system will support intellectual activity concerning laboratory work and contribute to the practice of knowledge management for clinical work support.

  2. Alternative fiber optic conductor for laboratory practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon Ocampo, Juan F.; Jaramillo Florez, Samuel A.; Amaya Rodriguez, Juan C.

    1995-10-01

    Due to the high cost and difficulty in obtaining an optical fiber sample to be used in laboratory tests, we have given ourselves the task of looking for an adequate optical-fiber alternative for laboratory practices. We have as a result, found an object that can be used as an alternate optical conductor. This object called 'Venoclisis Hose', is a cylindrical plastic tube, hollow inside, whose main use has been in medical applications as a conveyor of liquids going in or coming out of the human body. In this document, the tests carried out and the results obtained to characterize the venoclisis as an optical fiber are described. This project was undertaken in order to propose the use of Venoclisis as an alternate optical fiber for laboratory work, due primarily to its low costs, as well as how easy it to acquire and measure its parameters as an optical fiber.

  3. Supply chain management in the clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Thomas M

    2006-01-31

    Between 15 and 45 percent of a clinical laboratory's operating budget is spent on supplies. Given the size of this expenditure, laboratory managers must pay close attention to the supply chain and develop effective strategies to manage their inventory. Areas that need analysis include the carrying cost of supplies, the cost to generate a purchase order, methods to efficiently count supplies on hand, processes to ensure that lot number items are used before their expiration, and detailed analysis of the inventory. At the University of California-San Francisco Medical Center, we investigated options to manage our inventory and implemented a computerized system. The system required modifications to existing practices, which initially seemed unwieldy. However, after a relatively short learning curve, the improvement to operations has been significant, with a reduction in wasted reagents, fewer staff hours used to count supplies, and the ability to provide prompt analysis of the inventory for audits and discussions with administration. Focusing on the supply chain has allowed us to reduce inventory expenses by approximately 8 percent, reduce waste, given us a more focused understanding of our operations, and provided us with the ability to analyze our inventory easily.

  4. Practical Clinical Training in Skills Labs: Theory and Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Bugaj, T. J.; Nikendei, C.

    2016-01-01

    Today, skills laboratories or “skills labs”, i.e. specific practical skill training facilities, are a firmly established part of medical education offering the possibility of training clinical procedures in a safe and fault-forging environment prior to real life application at bedside or in the operating room. Skills lab training follows a structured teaching concept, takes place under supervision and in consideration of methodological-didactic concepts, ideally creating an atmosphere that al...

  5. Error tracking in a clinical biochemistry laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szecsi, Pal Bela; Ødum, Lars

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We report our results for the systematic recording of all errors in a standard clinical laboratory over a 1-year period. METHODS: Recording was performed using a commercial database program. All individuals in the laboratory were allowed to report errors. The testing processes were cl...

  6. Observations on the 1996 clinical laboratory conferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisner, H J

    1997-01-01

    The author reviews five trends in the laboratory and diagnostic industries. The five trends are: consolidation of both the diagnostic companies and clinical laboratories (hospital and commercial); pressure to cut costs; robotics; implication of new technology; and the pressure to cut costs by transitioning certain tasks to nontechnical personnel while dealing with an abundant labor supply.

  7. Immunosensors in Clinical Laboratory Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justino, Celine I L; Duarte, Armando C; Rocha-Santos, Teresa A P

    2016-01-01

    The application of simple, cost-effective, rapid, and accurate diagnostic technologies for detection and identification of cardiac and cancer biomarkers has been a central point in the clinical area. Biosensors have been recognized as efficient alternatives for the diagnostics of various diseases due to their specificity and potential for application on real samples. The role of nanotechnology in the construction of immunological biosensors, that is, immunosensors, has contributed to the improvement of sensitivity, since they are based in the affinity between antibody and antigen. Other analytes than biomarkers such as hormones, pathogenic bacteria, and virus have also been detected by immunosensors for clinical point-of-care applications. In this chapter, we first introduced the various types of immunosensors and discussed their applications in clinical diagnostics over the recent 6 years, mainly as point-of-care technologies for the determination of cardiac and cancer biomarkers, hormones, pathogenic bacteria, and virus. The future perspectives of these devices in the field of clinical diagnostics are also evaluated.

  8. Bringing ayahuasca to the clinical research laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riba, Jordi; Barbanoj, Manel J

    2005-06-01

    Since the winter of 1999, the authors and their research team have been conducting clinical studies involving the administration of ayahuasca to healthy volunteers. The rationale for conducting this kind of research is twofold. First, the growing interest of many individuals for traditional indigenous practices involving the ingestion of natural psychotropic drugs such as ayahuasca demands the systematic study of their pharmacological profiles in the target species, i.e., human beings. The complex nature of ayahuasca brews combining a large number of pharmacologically active compounds requires that research be carried out to establish the safety and overall pharmacological profile of these products. Second, the authors believe that the study of psychedelics in general calls for renewed attention. Although the molecular and electrophysiological level effects of these drugs are relatively well characterized, current knowledge of the mechanisms by which these compounds modify the higher order cognitive processes in the way they do is still incomplete, to say the least. The present article describes the development of the research effort carried out at the Autonomous University of Barcelona, commenting on several methodological aspects and reviewing the basic clinical findings. It also describes the research currently underway in our laboratory, and briefly comments on two new studies we plan to undertake in order to further our knowledge of the pharmacology of ayahuasca.

  9. 数字化临床实验室建设的实践和探索%Practice and exploration of establishing digital clinical laboratory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾国浩; 邱骏

    2008-01-01

    数字化临床实验室(digital clinical laboratory,简称DCL)是以临床实验室信息管理系统(clinical laboratorial information management systems,简称CUMS或US)为基础,利用网络技术和数字化技术,全面整合临床实验室业务信息和管理信息,将临床实验室所有信息最大限度地采集、存储、处理、传输、提取、集成、利用和共享,建立临床实验室内部资源最有效地利用、业务流程最大限度的优化或标准化、动态实时在线监控的数字化管理体系。

  10. Ovum pick up, intracytoplasmic sperm injection and somatic cell nuclear transfer in cattle, buffalo and horses: from the research laboratory to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Cesare; Duchi, Roberto; Colleoni, Silvia; Lagutina, Irina; Lazzari, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Assisted reproductive techniques developed for cattle in the last 25 years, like ovum pick up (OPU), intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), and somatic cell nuclear transfer, have been transferred and adapted to buffalo and horses. The successful clinical applications of these techniques require both the clinical skills specific to each animal species and an experienced laboratory team to support the in vitro phase of the work. In cattle, OPU can be considered a consolidated technology that is rapidly outpacing conventional superovulation for embryo transfer. In buffalo, OPU represents the only possibility for embryo production to advance the implementation of embryo-based biotechnologies in that industry, although it is still mainly in the developmental phase. In the horse, OPU is now an established procedure for breeding from infertile and sporting mares throughout the year. It requires ICSI that in the horse, contrary to what happens in cattle and buffalo, is very efficient and the only option because conventional IVF does not work. Somatic cell nuclear transfer is destined to fill a very small niche for generating animals of extremely high commercial value. The efficiency is low, but because normal animals can be generated it is likely that advancing our knowledge in that field might improve the technology and reduce its cost.

  11. Walking the bridge: Nursing students' learning in clinical skill laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewertsson, Mona; Allvin, Renée; Holmström, Inger K; Blomberg, Karin

    2015-07-01

    Despite an increasing focus on simulation as a learning strategy in nursing education, there is limited evidence on the transfer of simulated skills into clinical practice. Therefore it's important to increase knowledge of how clinical skills laboratories (CSL) can optimize students' learning for development of professional knowledge and skills, necessary for quality nursing practice and for patient safety. Thus, the aim was to describe nursing students' experiences of learning in the CSL as a preparation for their clinical practice. Interviews with 16 students were analysed with content analysis. An overall theme was identified - walking the bridge - in which the CSL formed a bridge between the university and clinical settings, allowing students to integrate theory and practice and develop a reflective stance. The theme was based on categories: conditions for learning, strategies for learning, tension between learning in the skills laboratory and clinical settings, and development of professional and personal competence. The CSL prepared the students for clinical practice, but a negative tension between learning in CSL and clinical settings was experienced. However, this tension may create reflection. This provides a new perspective that can be used as a pedagogical approach to create opportunities for students to develop their critical thinking.

  12. Development of clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollon, Steven D; Areán, Patricia A; Craske, Michelle G; Crawford, Kermit A; Kivlahan, Daniel R; Magnavita, Jeffrey J; Ollendick, Thomas H; Sexton, Thomas L; Spring, Bonnie; Bufka, Lynn F; Galper, Daniel I; Kurtzman, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are intended to improve mental, behavioral, and physical health by promoting clinical practices that are based on the best available evidence. The American Psychological Association (APA) is committed to generating patient-focused CPGs that are scientifically sound, clinically useful, and informative for psychologists, other health professionals, training programs, policy makers, and the public. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) 2011 standards for generating CPGs represent current best practices in the field. These standards involve multidisciplinary guideline development panels charged with generating recommendations based on comprehensive systematic reviews of the evidence. The IOM standards will guide the APA as it generates CPGs that can be used to inform the general public and the practice community regarding the benefits and harms of various treatment options. CPG recommendations are advisory rather than compulsory. When used appropriately, high-quality guidelines can facilitate shared decision making and identify gaps in knowledge.

  13. Decision support for clinical laboratory capacity planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Merode, G G; Hasman, A; Derks, J; Goldschmidt, H M; Schoenmaker, B; Oosten, M

    1995-01-01

    The design of a decision support system for capacity planning in clinical laboratories is discussed. The DSS supports decisions concerning the following questions: how should the laboratory be divided into job shops (departments/sections), how should staff be assigned to workstations and how should samples be assigned to workstations for testing. The decision support system contains modules for supporting decisions at the overall laboratory level (concerning the division of the laboratory into job shops) and for supporting decisions at the job shop level (assignment of staff to workstations and sample scheduling). Experiments with these modules are described showing both the functionality and the validity.

  14. Mentoring for retention and advancement in the multigenerational clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudicina, R J

    2001-01-01

    Retention of recent graduates and other laboratory practitioners in the workplace will play a key role in addressing current and projected shortages of clinical laboratory scientists (CLS) and technicians (CLT). In addition, with overrepresentation of the aging Baby Boomer generation in laboratory supervisory and management positions, it is crucial not only to retain younger practitioners, but to prepare them for assuming these important functions in the future. Mentoring, a practice commonly employed in other professions, is widely considered to be useful in employee retention and career advancement. Mentoring has probably been used in the clinical laboratory profession, but has not been well documented. In the clinical laboratory environment, potential mentors are in the Veteran and Baby Boomer generations, and new practitioners who could benefit from mentoring are in Generation X. Generational differences among these groups may present challenges to the use of mentoring. This article will attempt to provide a better understanding of generational differences and show how mentoring can be applied in the setting of the clinical laboratory in order to increase retention and promote career advancement of younger practitioners. A panel of five laboratory managers provided examples of mentoring strategies. Definitions, benefits, and examples of mentoring are addressed in the accompanying article, "Passing the Torch: Mentoring the Next Generation of Laboratory Professionals".

  15. Clinical Practice. Postmenopausal Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Dennis M; Rosen, Clifford J

    2016-01-21

    Key Clinical Points Postmenopausal Osteoporosis Fractures and osteoporosis are common, particularly among older women, and hip fractures can be devastating. Treatment is generally recommended in postmenopausal women who have a bone mineral density T score of -2.5 or less, a history of spine or hip fracture, or a Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) score indicating increased fracture risk. Bisphosphonates (generic) and denosumab reduce the risk of hip, nonvertebral, and vertebral fractures; bisphosphonates are commonly used as first-line treatment in women who do not have contraindications. Teriparatide reduces the risk of nonvertebral and vertebral fractures. Osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical femur fractures have been reported with treatment but are rare. The benefit-to-risk ratio for osteoporosis treatment is strongly positive for most women with osteoporosis. Because benefits are retained after discontinuation of alendronate or zoledronic acid, drug holidays after 5 years of alendronate therapy or 3 years of zoledronic acid therapy may be considered for patients at lower risk for fracture.

  16. Miniaturization and globalization of clinical laboratory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Murilo R; Clark, Samantha; Barrio, Daniel

    2011-04-01

    Clinical laboratories provide an invaluable service to millions of people around the world in the form of quality diagnostic care. Within the clinical laboratory industry the impetus for change has come from technological development (miniaturization, nanotechnology, and their collective effect on point-of-care testing; POCT) and the increasingly global nature of laboratory services. Potential technological gains in POCT include: the development of bio-sensors, microarrays, genetics and proteomics testing, and enhanced web connectivity. In globalization, prospective opportunities lie in: medical tourism, the migration of healthcare workers, cross-border delivery of testing, and the establishment of accredited laboratories in previously unexplored markets. Accompanying these impressive opportunities are equally imposing challenges. Difficulty transitioning from research to clinical use, poor infrastructure in developing countries, cultural differences and national barriers to global trade are only a few examples. Dealing with the issues presented by globalization and the impact of developing technology on POCT, and on the clinical laboratory services industry in general, will be a daunting task. Despite such concerns, with appropriate countermeasures it will be possible to address the challenges posed. Future laboratory success will be largely dependent on one's ability to adapt in this perpetually shifting landscape.

  17. Capillary electrophoresis and the clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabeen, Rukhsana; Payne, Deborah; Wiktorowicz, John; Mohammad, Amin; Petersen, John

    2006-06-01

    Over the past 15 years, CE as an analytical tool has shown great promise in replacing many conventional clinical laboratory methods, such as electrophoresis and HPLC. CE's appeal was that it was fast, used very small amounts of sample and reagents, was extremely versatile, and was able to separate large and small analytes, whether neutral or charged. Because of this versatility, numerous methods have been developed for analytes that are of clinical interest. Other than molecular diagnostic and forensic laboratories CE has not been able to make a major impact in the United States. In contrast, in Europe and Japan an increasing number of clinical laboratories are using CE. Now that automated multicapillary instruments are commercially available along with cost-effective test kits, CE may yet be accepted as an instrument that will be routinely used in the clinical laboratories. This review will focus on areas where CE has the potential to have the greatest impact on the clinical laboratory. These include analyses of proteins found in serum and urine, hemoglobin (A1c and variants), carbohydrate-deficient transferrin, forensic and therapeutic drug screening, and molecular diagnostics.

  18. Good clinical practices in phase I studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decousus, H; Perpoint, B; Mismetti, P; Ollagnier, M; Queneau, P

    1990-01-01

    In France, official guidelines for good clinical practices in clinical trials were issued in 1987. In December 1988, a law was passed that fixed the requirements for carrying out experiments in healthy subjects. It will be completed by official guidelines for the structures in which experiments on healthy subjects (and patients as well, when the investigation would not benefit the health of the patients) may be conducted. Hence a battery of recent legal instructions precisely state what good clinical practices are in the setting of phase I studies. Of particular importance are: subject recruitment and selection methods and procedures; specific competence of the investigator, in particular to interpret the pre-trial data; necessary and sufficient facilities to guarantee the subjects' safety; careful quality control to check all laboratory procedures; necessity of written standard operating procedures.

  19. Pulse Pressure in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Parenica

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The review presents basic information about the pulse pressure. The variables related to pulse pressure are briefly explained - arterial stiffness, arterial compliance, pulse wave velocity, pulse pressure amplification and augmentation index. We present some recent trials and observational studies that show the importance of pulse pressure in clinical practice. Briefly the possibilities of influencing the pulse pressure are discussed.

  20. Clinical Practice Guidelines and Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajai R. Singh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this section we shall see what Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs should be and what they are, the recent case of Xigris and a thriller-like manipulation by the concerned company to enter a performance 'bundle', CPG effectiveness/cost effectiveness and other considerations, how they serve Industry needs, and what methods can possibly assist them actualise their enormous potential.Introduction From the early nineties, a number of Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs have been created and published by many different associations and organizations at considerable expense. CPGs are supposed to serve an important purpose. They offer objective consensus of expert opinion on treatment and hence are trusted by hospitals and practicing physicians alike. They can reduce the possibility of inappropriate care being delivered, while helping introduce new knowledge into clinical practice (Grimshaw and Russell, 1993; Merritt et al. , 1997; Woolf et al. , 1999. They are a distillate of biomedical wisdom at a certain point of time applied to better and more efficient patient care. Hence, rigorously developed guidelines can translate complicated research findings into actionable recommendations of clinical care (Shiffman et al. , 2003; Haines and Jones, 1994. Clinical practice guidelines have generally been accepted as an objective consensus on evidence (Baird, 2003. Practice guidelines approved by expert panels are intended to standardize care in such a way as to improve health outcomes (Eichacker et al. , 2006. Major hospitals and knowledge updated physicians feel reassured they are doing the very best by following CPGs. State of the art, and such other fancy labels, can be justifiably applied to them.McMaster et al., (2007 have talked recently of getting guidelines to work in practice. In an effort to make CPGs more effective, developers of such guidelines have started grouping evidence-based interventions into what are called 'bundles'. The justification for

  1. 检验专业课程考核体系改革与实践%Reform and practice of course assessment system in clinical laboratory medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑沁; 曾婷婷; 张崇唯; 余江; 金咏梅; 毛志刚; 粟军

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The traditional course assessment system had been reformed, in order to stimulate the interest of students to leam the knowledge, and meet overall quality and teaching objectives for university students. METHODS The "N+l" multiple course assessments system had been established, which was composed of more comprehensive assessment content including traditional assessment of theoretical knowledge and practical skills assessment, and diverse forms of assessment such as written test, operating skills, experiment report, case discussion, and so on. RESULTS The multiple course assessments system covered the whole semester continuously, encouraged students to autonomous learning. It effectively helped the students to combine classroom education and after-school programs, the theory and practice well. CONCLUSION The reform of course assessments system comply with the need of teaching reform in new period, improve the students' ability of autonomous learning and systematic thinking. It should be helpful to cultivate high-caliber talents of laboratory medicine.%目的 探索在传统课程考核方式基础上进行框架改革,激发学生学习知识、应用知识的兴趣,适应提高大学生综合素质的培养目标.方法 建立“N+1”多元型课程考核体系,使考核内容更全面系统包括传统的理论知识考核以及实际技能考核,使考核形式更灵活多样包括笔试、实验操作考核、实验报告、病案讨论、心得体会等.结果 变期末单一性考试为全学期形成性学习过程的综合评价,使考核体系体现出教学全程的动态性、连续性特征.变学生被动接受为主动学习,学生能渗入、参与、融合到教学的各个环节,使学习由课堂内延伸至课堂外,使知识从书本转向临床实际,使理论与实践紧密结合.结论 考核体系的改革与实践,使教与学的效果评价更加全面、客观、合理,顺应了新时期教学改革需要,锻炼和提高了学

  2. Total quality management in clinical virology laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbets, M W; Gomez, R; Kannangai, R; Sridharan, G

    2006-10-01

    The diagnostic laboratories in India are progressively promoting higher standards and are moving towards accreditation and international acceptance. Hence, the concept of "Quality" will need to be understood and implemented. Total quality management (TQM) in a laboratory is an integrated program involving all laboratory staff and management. TQM is a framework to operate and it is aiming for integration, consistency, increase in efficiency and a continuous drive for improvement. A well structured clinical virology service will include serology setup, cell culture facility and capacity for molecular diagnosis. The quality of results from the laboratory is significantly influenced by many pre-analytical and post-analytical factors which needed attention. The end goal of the TQM should be to provide the best care possible for the patient.

  3. Handbook of clinical nursing practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asheervath, J.; Blevins, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Written in outline format, this reference will help nurses further their understanding of advanced nursing procedures. Information is provided on the physiological, psychological, environmental, and safety considerations of nursing activities associated with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Special consideration is given to the areas of pediatric nursing, nursing assessment, and selected radiologic and nuclear medicine procedures for each system. Contents: Clinical Introduction. Clinical Nursing Practice: Focus on Basics. Focus on Cardiovascular Function. Focus on Respiratory Function. Focus on Gastrointestinal Function. Focus on Renal and Genito-Urological Function. Focus on Neuro-Skeletal and Muscular Function. Appendices.

  4. Antiphospholipid syndrome: a clinical and laboratorial challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luci Maria Santana Dusse

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is an acquired autoimmune thrombophilia characterized by the presence of a heterogeneous family of antibodies that bind to plasma proteins with affinity for phospholipid surfaces. The two major protein targets of antiphospholipid antibodies are prothrombin and β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI. APS leads to aprothrombotic state, and it is characterized by the occurrence of arterial, venous or microvascular thrombosis or recurrent fetal loss. The diagnosis of APS is based on a set of clinical criteria and the detection of lupus anticoagulant (LA, anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA or anti-β2GPI in plasma. Although laboratory tests are essential for APS diagnosis, these tests have limitations associated with the robustness, reproducibility and standardization. The standardization of diagnostic tests for detection of APLAs has been a challenge and a variety of results have been obtained using different commercial kits and in-house techniques. An increased sensitivity of the ELISA kits for detection of ACA effectively has contributed to APS diagnosis. However, the lack of specificity associated with a high number of false-positive results is a clinical and laboratorial challenge, since such results may lead to mistaken clinical decisions, such as prescription of oral anticoagulant, leading to the risk of hemorrhaging. Furthermore, clinicians are often unfamiliar with these tests and have difficulty interpreting them, requiring interaction between clinical and laboratory professionals in order to ensure their correct interpretation.

  5. Using Google+ for carrying laboratory practices in cooperation between universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Puig-Ortiz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This communication presents a proposal for cooperation among universities to improve curricula that require laboratory practices. It proposes a methodology to implement an innovative educational project of exchanging laboratory practices. The exchange of laboratory practices can be developed at different levels of interaction that require different levels of complexity in the assembly of practices. A first experience took place in the area of machine design. The social network chosen was Google+. Teaching material was shared through a community of Google+ (notes, videos, scripts practices .... And the practice was developed through Google Hangout. The final survey made shows students’ satisfaction about the development of the experience.

  6. Polycystic ovary syndrome: clinical and laboratory evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Yorghi Khoury; Edmund Chada Baracat; Dolores Perovano Pardini; Mauro Abi Haidar; Eduardo Leme Alves da Motta; Geraldo Rodrigues de Lima

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate clinically, and with laboratory, tests, women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCO). PATIENTS: One hundred and twelve women with PCO were studied. METHODS: The following data was recorded: Current age; age at menarche; menstrual irregularity, occurrence of similar cases in the family; fertility, obstetric history; body mass index (BMI); and presence of hirsutism. Serum measurements of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin, free testoster...

  7. Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annesley, Thomas M.; Cooks, Robert G.; Herold, David A.; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.

    2016-01-04

    Each year the journal Clinical Chemistry publishes a January special issue on a topic that is relevant to the laboratory medicine community. In January 2016 the topic is mass spectrometry, and the issue is entitled “Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine”. One popular feature in our issues is a Q&A on a topic, clearly in this case mass spectrometry. The journal is assembling a panel of 5-6 experts from various areas of mass spectrometry ranging from instrument manufacturing to practicing clinical chemists. Dick Smith is one of the scientist requested to participate in this special issue Q&A on Mass Spectrometry. The Q&A Transcript is attached

  8. [Systemic lupus erythematosus between clinical practice and the laboratory: state of the art and new findings on anti-DNA autoantibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusca, Ignazio; Corrao, Salvatore; Li Vigni, Piero; Sucato, Rosa; La Chiusa, Stella Maria

    2002-06-01

    Identification of autoantibodies directed against nuclear antigens is a very important finding in the assessment of autoimmune rheumatic diseases. In particular, the anti-DNA autoantibodies have assumed a fundamental importance, both speculative and clinical, in the study of the systemic lupus erythemathous. The aim of the present review is to focalize on anti-DNA the mechanisms of both induction and production of anti-DNA autoantibodies, pathophysiologic and diagnostic and clinical aspects. For this purpose, forty years of studies on this topic have been reviewed. Aspects on different conformational shapes of double-stranded DNA have been discussed such as related pathogenetic and diagnostic ones. Finally, the review has dealt with experimental therapies, focusing on both animal models and the most recent clinical trials according to Evidence Based Medicine.

  9. Photodynamic therapy in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Filonenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The review is on opportunities and possibilities of application of photodynamic therapy in clinical practice. The advantages of this method are the targeting of effect on tumor foci and high efficiency along with low systemic toxicity. The results of the set of recent Russian and foreign clinical trials are represented in the review. The method is successfully used in clinical practice with both radical (for early vulvar, cervical cancer and pre-cancer, central early lung cancer, esophageal and gastric cancer, bladder cancer and other types of malignant tumors, and palliative care (including tumor pleuritis, gastrointestinal tumors and others. Photodynamic therapy delivers results which are not available for other methods of cancer therapy. Thus, photodynamic therapy allows to avoid gross scars (that is very important, for example, in gynecology for treatment of patients of reproductive age with cervical and vulvar cancer, delivers good cosmetic effect for skin tumors, allows minimal trauma for intact tissue surrounding tumor. Photodynamic therapy is also used in other fields of medicine, such as otorhinolaryngology, dermatology, ophthalmology, orthopaedics, for treatment of papilloma virus infection and purulent wounds as antibacterial therapy.

  10. Are clinical practice guidelines impartial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joshua

    2004-01-01

    In A Theory of Justice, John Rawls demands from citizens who decide upon principles of justice and the rules derived from such principles that they abstract from all particularities that constitute their identity as unique individuals. This demand is unrealistic in policy settings where actual policy-makers convene to provide guidance, establish rules regarding public good, and enact legislation. In practice, I argue, policy-makers, legislators, and others involved in developing social rules that pertain to distributive justice formulate such rules as reasonably partial spectators. To illustrate, I show how clinical practice guidelines are established and mediated by a reasonably partial expert panel whose partial action is publicly justifiable, yet whose claims to impartiality are not.

  11. Proton therapy in clinical practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Liu; Joe Y. Chang

    2011-01-01

    Radiation dose escalation and acceleration improves local control but also increases toxicity. Proton radiation is an emerging therapy for localized cancers that is being sought with increasing frequency by patients. Compared with photon therapy, proton therapy spares more critical structures due to its unique physics. The physical properties of a proton beam make it ideal for clinical applications. By modulating the Bragg peak of protons in energy and time, a conformal radiation dose with or without intensity modulation can be delivered to the target while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Thus, proton therapy is ideal when organ preservation is a priority. However, protons are more sensitive to organ motion and anatomy changes compared with photons. In this article, we review practical issues of proton therapy, describe its image-guided treatment planning and delivery, discuss clinical outcome for cancer patients, and suggest challenges and the future development of proton therapy.

  12. Thai clinical laboratory responsible to economic crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirisali, K; Vattanaviboon, P; Manochiopinij, S; Ananskulwat, W

    1999-01-01

    Nowadays, Thailand encounters a serious economic crisis. A clear consensus has been made that a cost-saving system must be the important tool. Both private and government organizations are engaged in this situation. We studied the cost-saving in the clinical laboratory. A questionnaire was distributed to 45 hospital laboratories located in Bangkok. Results showed that efforts to control the cost are the essential policy. There was a variety of factors contributing to the cost-saving process. The usage of public utility, non-recycle material and unnecessary utility were reconsidered. Besides, capital cost (wages and salary) personnel incentive are assessed. Forty three of the 45 respondents had attempted to reduce the cost via curtailing the unnecessary electricity. Eliminating the needless usage of telephone-call. water and unnecessary material was also an effective strategy. A reduction of 86.9%, 80 % and 80.0% of the mentioned factors respectively, was reported. An inventory system of the reagent, chemical and supplies was focused. Most of the laboratories have a policy on cost-saving by decreased the storage. Twenty eight of the 45 laboratories considered to purchase the cheaper with similar quality reagents instead. And some one would purchase a bulky pack when it is the best bargain. A specific system "contact reagent with a free rent instrument" has been used widely (33.3%). Finally, a new personnel management system has been chosen. Workload has rearranged and unnecessary extra-hour work was abandoned.

  13. PRACTICAL ASPECTS OF APIXABAN USE IN CLINICAL PRACTICE: VIEW POINT OF CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGIST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Sychev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Apixaban is a "new" oral anticoagulant, direct Xa factor inhibitor with a good evidence base of the efficacy in the prevention of ischemic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. The article is devoted to apixaban use in clinical practice: examination before apixaban administration, clinical situation when laboratory control and monitoring are needed, drugs interactions (at the level of CYP3A4, P-gp, management of patients with bleeding because of apixaban therapy (including antidotes application, perioperative management of patients receiving apixaban.

  14. PRACTICAL ASPECTS OF APIXABAN USE IN CLINICAL PRACTICE: VIEW POINT OF CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGIST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Sychev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Apixaban is a "new" oral anticoagulant, direct Xa factor inhibitor with a good evidence base of the efficacy in the prevention of ischemic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. The article is devoted to apixaban use in clinical practice: examination before apixaban administration, clinical situation when laboratory control and monitoring are needed, drugs interactions (at the level of CYP3A4, P-gp, management of patients with bleeding because of apixaban therapy (including antidotes application, perioperative management of patients receiving apixaban.

  15. Molecular virology in the clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josko, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    As one can see by the tests listed at www.amp.org, molecular diagnostic techniques have enabled the laboratory professionals to play an integral role in the identification and quantitation of viral infectious agents. Viral loads can be determined for HIV, HBV, and HCV using a variety of molecular methods such as real-time PCR, TMA, NASBA, and bDNA. Determining the amount of viral particles in a sample can not only monitor the status and progression of the disease, but can also guide recommendations for antiviral therapy. Other assays listed include cytomegalovirus, enterovirus, and human metapneumovirus detection, HPV testing, influenza and respiratory virus panels, and West Nile virus detection in blood donations using a variety of molecular methodologies. The use of molecular methodologies in the detection of viral pathogens has grown at an astounding rate, especially in the past two decades. It is now widely accepted that PCR is the "gold standard" for nucleic acid detection in the clinical laboratory as well as in research facilities. This article only touched on some of the common, widely used assays and platforms used in the identification process. With more and more assays being developed, the cost behind molecular testing has decreased since there are more competitors on the market. At one point, laboratorians may have thought of routine molecular testing as the wave of the future. It is obvious the future is upon us. Molecular diagnostics has become part of the daily, routine workload in most clinical laboratories. The advent of fully automated systems with faster turn around times has given laboratory professionals the tools necessary to report out accurate and sensitive results to clinicians who can ultimately improve patient care and outcomes by rendering a correct and rapid diagnosis.

  16. Dry Laboratories in Science Education : Computer-based Practical Work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirschner, P.A.; Huisman, W.

    1998-01-01

    Practical (laboratory) work in science education has traditionally been used to allow students to rediscover already known concepts and ideas, to demonstrate concepts taught in the classroom or, in the case of inquirybased science curricula, to teach concepts. Often, these laboratory practicals do n

  17. [Excessive spending by misuse of clinical laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez-Arvizu, Gamaliel; Novelo-Garza, Bárbara; Mendoza-Valdez, Antonia Lorena; Galván-Cervantes, Jorge; Morales-Rojas, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Seventy five percent or more of a diagnosis comes from a proper medical history along with an excellent physical examination. This leaves to the clinical laboratory the function of supporting the findings, determining prognosis, classifying the diseases, monitoring the diseases and, in the minimum of cases, establishing the diagnosis. In recent years there has been a global phenomenon in which the allocation of resources to health care has grown in an excessive way; the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social is not an exception with an increase of 29 % from 2009 to 2011; therefore, it is necessary to set containment and reduction without compromising the quality of patient care.

  18. Ask the right question: a critical step for practicing evidence-based laboratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Christopher P; Christenson, Robert H

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of laboratory medicine is to facilitate better decision making in clinical practice and healthcare delivery. Decision making implies an unresolved issue, problem or unmet need. The most important criterion for any investigation to be of value in clinical practice is that it addresses an unmet need. The different ways in which laboratory investigations are utilized in patient care can be represented in the form of questions. It is important that these questions are articulated to highlight the variables that will impact on the effectiveness of the investigation in the scenario being considered. These variables include the characteristics of the patient (or population) and clinical setting, the nature of the decision and action taken on receipt of the test result and the expected outcome. Asking a question is the first step of the evidence-based laboratory medicine (EBLM) cycle, the other steps being acquiring the evidence, critically appraising the evidence, applying the evidence and auditing use of the evidence. Getting the question right determines the quality of the whole process, thus, defines the quality in practice of laboratory medicine. Whilst the main focus of the EBLM cycle is to provide a strong evidence base for use in clinical practice, it is clear that the five steps are equally applicable in commissioning, delivery and audit (performance management) of services. Asking the right question is crucial to improving the quality of evidence, and practice, in laboratory medicine, and should be used in routine laboratory medicine practice and management throughout healthcare.

  19. Laboratory research at the clinical trials of Veterinary medicinal Products

    OpenAIRE

    ZHYLA M.I.

    2011-01-01

    The article analyses the importance of laboratory test methods, namely pathomorfological at conduct of clinical trials. The article focuses on complex laboratory diagnostics at determination of clinical condition of animals, safety and efficacy of tested medicinal product.

  20. Hidden sources of mercury in clinical laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Chavez, C R; Federico-Perez, R A; Gomez-Alvarez, A; Velazquez-Contreras, L E; Perez-Rios, R

    2014-09-01

    The healthcare sector is an important contributor to mercury (Hg) pollution because of the potential presence of mercury in thermometers, blood pressure cuffs, amalgams, etc. There are also other potential sources of mercury in this sector which are used frequently and in high volumes where the presence of the metal is not obvious and which might be collectively contributing to pollution. For instance, some chemicals used for the clinical diagnosis of illness may contain mercury. The goal of this study was to investigate potential sources of mercury pollution, which originate from clinical laboratory discharges, using an exploratory approach. The focus was on the residue generated during automatic analysis of patients' bodily fluids at a medical center in Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico. This study shows an overview of what might be happening in the region or the country related to non-obvious sources of mercury in the healthcare sector. The results showed measurable levels of mercury in the residues coming from urine sediment analysis. These amounts do not exceed the maximum allowed by Mexican environmental regulations; nevertheless, the frequency and cumulative volume of residues generated, combined with the potential for persistence and the bioaccumulation of mercury in the environment, warrant attention. The work carried out in this study is being taken as a model for future studies for pollution prevention in the healthcare sector with the goal of measuring mercury emissions to the environment from clinical laboratory wastewater, including identifying sources which--while not obvious--could be important given the frequency and volume of their use in the clinical diagnosis.

  1. Polycystic ovary syndrome: clinical and laboratory evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Yorghi Khoury

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate clinically, and with laboratory, tests, women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCO. PATIENTS: One hundred and twelve women with PCO were studied. METHODS: The following data was recorded: Current age; age at menarche; menstrual irregularity, occurrence of similar cases in the family; fertility, obstetric history; body mass index (BMI; and presence of hirsutism. Serum measurements of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH, prolactin, free testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate were taken. RESULTS: All patients presented either oligomenorrhea (31 percent, periods of secondary amenorrhea (9 percent, or both alterations (60 percent. The majority of the patients were infertile (75.6 percent. The LH/FSH ratio was higher than 2:1 in 55 percent of the patients and higher than 3:1 in 26.2 percent. The ultrasonographic aspect of the ovaries was considered to be normal in 31 percent. CONCLUSION: The main clinical feature of the PCO is the irregularity of menses since menarche, and that the laboratory tests would be important to exclude other disorders such as hyperprolactinemia or hyperandrogenemia caused by late-onset congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

  2. Clinical and laboratory features of preleukemia patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施均; 邵宗鸿; 陈桂彬; 李克; 刘鸿; 张益枝; 和虹; 赵明峰; 何广胜; 张泓; 储榆林; 郝玉书

    2002-01-01

    Objective To explore prospective diagnostic criteria for preleukemia.Methods A case control study was done comparing the discrepancies on clinical and laboratory features between patients with preleukemia and those with chronic aplastic anemia (CAA) or atypical paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglubinuria (a-PNH).Results There were eight variables of significance: (1) lymphocytoid micromegakaryocytes in the bone marrow; (2) immature granulocytes in the peripheral blood; (3) ≥2.0% myeloblasts in the bone marrow; (4) positive periodic acid schiff (PAS) stained nucleated erythrocytes; (5) myeloid differentiation index ≥1.8; (6) typical colonal karyotypic abnormalities; (7) negative sister chromatid differentiation; (8) cluster/colony ratio of granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units (CFU-GM)>4.0. The following criteria were assigned: A: to meet variable one and at least two of the other seven variables and B: to meet at least four of the eight variables. All of the patients with preleukemia met either A or B and none of the patients with CAA or a-PNH did. Conclusions Preleukemia is different from CAA or a-PNH. It has its own clinical and laboratory features, which may be useful for its prospective diagnosis.

  3. Supernumerary teeth in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna K. Szkaradkiewicz

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hyperdontia is the condition of having supernumerary teeth, or teeth which appear in addition to the regular number of teeth. The prevalence rates of supernumerary teeth in the permanent dentition amounts 0.1-6.9%, and in deciduous dentition 0.4-0.8%. The presence of supernumerary teeth can be found in everyday dental practice.Case presentation: We describe 3 cases of patients with supernumerary teeth. First patient had supernumerary lateral incisor 12s, second - premolar fused, multicuspid, supernumerary deciduous tooth 64s of having several interconnected roots, and third - erupted odontoma between teeth 13 and 14. In all cases treatment involved the removal of the supernumerary tooth.Conclusions: The decision on proceeding with the supernumerary teeth should be based on the full clinical picture and interview. Early diagnosis and removal of supernumerary teeth allow to avoid or reduce possible complications.

  4. Clinical laboratory analytics: Challenges and promise for an emerging discipline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian H Shirts

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical laboratory is a major source of health care data. Increasingly these data are being integrated with other data to inform health system-wide actions meant to improve diagnostic test utilization, service efficiency, and "meaningful use." The Academy of Clinical Laboratory Physicians and Scientists hosted a satellite meeting on clinical laboratory analytics in conjunction with their annual meeting on May 29, 2014 in San Francisco. There were 80 registrants for the clinical laboratory analytics meeting. The meeting featured short presentations on current trends in clinical laboratory analytics and several panel discussions on data science in laboratory medicine, laboratory data and its role in the larger healthcare system, integrating laboratory analytics, and data sharing for collaborative analytics. One main goal of meeting was to have an open forum of leaders that work with the "big data" clinical laboratories produce. This article summarizes the proceedings of the meeting and content discussed.

  5. Body composition in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, Angela; Garaci, Francesco; Cafarelli, Francesco Pio; Guglielmi, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    Nutritional status is the results of nutrients intake, absorption and utilization, able to influence physiological and pathological conditions. Nutritional status can be measured for individuals with different techniques, such as CT Body Composition, quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Ultrasound, Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry and Bioimpendance. Because obesity is becoming a worldwide epidemic, there is an increasing interest in the study of body composition to monitor conditions and delay in development of obesity-related diseases. The emergence of these evidence demonstrates the need of standard assessment of nutritional status based on body weight changes, playing an important role in several clinical setting, such as in quantitative measurement of tissues and their fluctuations in body composition, in survival rate, in pathologic condition and illnesses. Since body mass index has been shown to be an imprecise measurement of fat-free and fat mass, body cell mass and fluids, providing no information if weight changes, consequently there is the need to find a better way to evaluate body composition, in order to assess fat-free and fat mass with weight gain and loss, and during ageing. Monitoring body composition can be very useful for nutritional and medical interventional. This review is focused on the use of Body Composition in Clinical Practice.

  6. Clinical and Laboratory Diagnosis of Intestinal Tuberculosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Chun Shi; Li-Fan Zhang; Yue-Qiu Zhang; Xiao-Qing Liu; Gui-Jun Fei

    2016-01-01

    Background:Tuberculosis (TB) remains a worldwide problem.Intestinal TB (ITB) constitutes a major public health problem in developing countries and has been associated with significant morbidity and mortality.The aim of this study was to characterize the clinical,radiological,endoscopic,and pathological features of ITB and to define the strategy for establishing the diagnosis.Methods:A retrospective study (from January 2000 to June 2015) was carried out in Peking Union Medical College Hospital and all hospitalized cases were diagnosed as ITB during the study period were included.The relevant clinical information,laboratory results,microbiological,and radiological investigations were recorded.Results:Of the 85 cases,61 cases (71.8%) were ranged from 20 to 50 years.The ileocecal region was involved in about 83.5% (71/85) of patients.About 41.2% (35/85) of patients had co-existing extra ITB,especially active pulmonary TB.Abdominal pain (82.4%) was the most common presenting symptom followed by weight loss (72.9%) and fever (64.7%).Both T-cell spot of TB test (T-SPOT.TB) and purified protein derivatives (PPD) tests were performed in 26 patients:20 (76.9%) positive T-SPOT.TB and 13 (50.0%) positive PPD were detected,with a statistical significant difference (P =0.046).Twenty cases (23.5%) were histopathology and/or pathogen confirmed TB;27 cases (31.8%) were diagnosed by clinical manifestation consistent with ITB and evidence of active extra ITB;38 cases (44.7%) were diagnosed by good response to diagnostic anti-TB therapy.Conclusions:ITB is difficult to diagnose even with modem medical techniques due to its nonspecific clinical and laboratory features.At present,combination of clinical,endoscopic,radiological,and pathological features continues to be the key to the diagnosis of ITB.

  7. PRACTICAL SIMULATION OF COMPOSTING IN THE LABORATORY

    Science.gov (United States)

    A closed incubation system was developed for laboratory simulation of composting conditions at the interior of a large compost pile. A conductive heat flux control system (CHFC) was used to adjust the temperature of the internal wall to that of the compost center and compensate f...

  8. The role of the clinical laboratory in the future of health care: lean microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Linoj; Novak-Weekley, Susan

    2014-06-01

    This commentary will introduce lean concepts into the clinical microbiology laboratory. The practice of lean in the clinical microbiology laboratory can remove waste, increase efficiency, and reduce costs. Lean, Six Sigma, and other such management initiatives are useful tools and can provide dividends but must be accompanied by organizational leadership commitment to sustaining the lean culture in the laboratory setting and providing resources and time to work through the process.

  9. Research and clinical practice relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashammakhi N

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To The Editor: I highly value and greet the authors for their editorial. Many important issues related to medical education and its future in Libya have been discussed in this paper [1]. One important point that has been addressed and I feel deserves attention is the “abnormal” relationship between clinical practice and research in Libya. From discussions with colleagues, this problem somehow has evolved from a misconception about educational and training systems that may have occurred in the past. It may also be related to the lack of attention to research that has long existed in Libya [2,3]. The other aspect, shared with many other developing countries, is the misconception of research as unimportant or a luxury aspect of medicine. When it comes to understanding how a system (including healthcare can be updated and developed, the answer is vague! One important reason is a lack of understanding of the impact that research has on developing methods. In developed countries, research is the main academic distinction that leads to appointments for coveted positions in the system and is an important factor for academic promotion. In Libya, there remain arguments about who will be awarded Chair of university clinical departments. Such a post should no doubt be given to those with established academic achievements. When highly qualified persons are at the top of the pyramid this leads to further progress and enhanced research and advancement. The authors have discussed the point of having proper search committees for leadership and faculty positions. I believe that it will help eliminate the current stagnation and help to create innovative solutions. This should lead to improved medical education, health services, and ultimately impact the quality of life of all Libyan citizens.

  10. Using the Revised Bloom's Taxonomy in the clinical laboratory: thinking skills involved in diagnostic reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Whei Ming; Osisek, Paul J; Starnes, Beth

    2005-01-01

    Achieving effective transfer of theoretical knowledge to clinical practice requires knowledge of thinking paradigms in relation to specific nursing content. It is a challenge to develop instructional designs for teaching and assessing implicit thought processes involved in clinical reasoning. The authors demonstrate the use of the Revised Bloom's Taxonomy to teach thinking skills involved in diagnostic reasoning in a clinical laboratory.

  11. Diagnostic discrepancies in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Victor Sarli; Dinardi, Layara Fernanda Lipari; Pereira, Thiago Vicente; de Almeida, Lyna Kyria Rodrigues; Barbosa, Thaisa Silveira; Benvenutti, Luiz Alberto; Ayub-Ferreira, Silvia Moreira; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Autopsies are the gold standard for diagnostic accuracy; however, no recent study has analyzed autopsies in heart failure (HF). We reviewed 1241 autopsies (January 2000–May 2005) and selected 232 patients with HF. Clinical and autopsy diagnoses were analyzed and discrepancies categorized according to their importance regarding therapy and prognosis. Mean age was 63.3 ± 15.9 years; 154 (66.4%) patients were male. The causes of death at autopsy were end-stage HF (40.9%), acute myocardial infarction (17.2%), infection (15.9), and pulmonary embolism 36 (15.5). Diagnostic discrepancies occurred in 191 (82.3%) cases; in 56 (24.1%), discrepancies were related to major diagnoses with potential influence on survival or treatment; pulmonary embolism was the cause of death for 24 (42.9%) of these patients. In 35 (15.1%), discrepancies were related to a major diagnosis with equivocal influence on survival or treatment; in 100 (43.1%), discrepancies did not influence survival or treatment. In multivariate analysis, age (OR: 1.03, 95% CI: 1.008–1.052, P = 0.007) and presence of diabetes mellitus (OR: 0.359, 95% CI: 0.168–0.767, P = 0.008) influenced the occurrence discrepancies. Diagnostic discrepancies with a potential impact on prognosis are frequent in HF. These findings warrant reconsideration in diagnostic and therapeutic practices with HF patients. PMID:28121951

  12. Practical Clinical Training in Skills Labs: Theory and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bugaj, T. J.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Today, skills laboratories or “skills labs”, i.e. specific practical skill training facilities, are a firmly established part of medical education offering the possibility of training clinical procedures in a safe and fault-forging environment prior to real life application at bedside or in the operating room. Skills lab training follows a structured teaching concept, takes place under supervision and in consideration of methodological-didactic concepts, ideally creating an atmosphere that allows the repeated, anxiety- and risk-free practice of targeted skills.In this selective literature review, the first section is devoted to (I the development and dissemination of the skills lab concept. There follows (II an outline of the underlying idea and (III an analysis of key efficacy factors. Thereafter, (IV the training method’s effectiveness and transference are illuminated, before (V the use of student tutors, in the sense of peer-assisted-learning, in skills labs is discussed separately. Finally, (VI the efficiency of the skills lab concept is analyzed, followed by an outlook on future developments and trends in the field of skills lab training.

  13. Clinical laboratory analytics: Challenges and promise for an emerging discipline

    OpenAIRE

    Brian H Shirts; Jackson, Brian R.; Baird, Geoffrey S.; Baron, Jason M.; Bryan Clements; Ricky Grisson; Ronald George Hauser; Taylor, Julie R.; Enrique Terrazas; Brad Brimhall

    2015-01-01

    The clinical laboratory is a major source of health care data. Increasingly these data are being integrated with other data to inform health system-wide actions meant to improve diagnostic test utilization, service efficiency, and "meaningful use." The Academy of Clinical Laboratory Physicians and Scientists hosted a satellite meeting on clinical laboratory analytics in conjunction with their annual meeting on May 29, 2014 in San Francisco. There were 80 registrants for the clinical laborator...

  14. A Critical Approach to Clinical Practice Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K Marshall

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The rate of publication of clinical practice guidelines for the management of common medical illnesses continues to accelerate. The appropriate dissemination and uptake of high quality practice guidelines can synthesize evidence, improve patient outcomes and enhance the efficiency of health care delivery. However, the methodological rigour and relevance of the growing number of publications labelled ’clinical practice guidelines’ vary widely. Health care payers, providers and advocates must learn to appraise and interpret guideline recommendations critically. A simple and practical nine-question approach to evaluating the quality, relevance and effectiveness of clinical practice guidelines is presented.

  15. Clinical practice guidelines in patient management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Kumar

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Efforts have always been made to evolve certain prin-ciples to reduce the variability in the management of patients and make medical care more appropriate. These efforts have become almost a movement since 1980s as evidenced in the development of clinical practice guide-lines in all medical disciplines. This article describes the need for clinical practice guidelines and their de-velopment methods and qualities. Advantages and limi-tations of clinical practice guidelines are enumerated. The salient features of various available clinical prac-tice guidelines in urology are also described.

  16. How GPs implement clinical guidelines in everyday clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Videbæk Le, Jette; Hansen, Helle P; Riisgaard, Helle;

    2015-01-01

    . Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and then analysed using systematic text condensation. RESULTS: Analysis of the interviews revealed three different approaches to the implementation of guidelines in clinical practice. In some practices the GPs prioritized time and resources on collective...

  17. Electrical measurements in the laboratory practice

    CERN Document Server

    Bartiromo, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the basic theory of electrical circuits, describes analog and digital instrumentation, and applies modern methods to evaluate uncertainties in electrical measurements. It is comprehensive in scope and is designed specifically to meet the needs of students in physics and electrical engineering who are attending laboratory classes in electrical measurements. The topics addressed in individual chapters include the analysis of continuous current circuits; sources of measurement uncertainty and their combined effect; direct current measurements; analysis of alternating current circuits; special circuits including resonant circuits, frequency filters and impedance matching networks; alternating current measurements; analog and digital oscilloscopes; non-sinusoidal waveforms and circuit excitation by pulses; distributed parameter components and transmission lines. Each chapter is equipped with a number of problems. A special appendix describes a series of nine experiments, in each case providing a p...

  18. Improving Student Laboratory Performance: How Much Practice Makes Perfect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Warren

    1985-01-01

    Analyzes three approaches (physical, mental, combined practice) to improving freshman chemistry psychomotor laboratory skills. Although no significant differences were found between treatments, there were significant differences when each was compared to the control sections. Mental practice appears to offer an efficient methods for reinforcement…

  19. The increasing impact of laboratory medicine on clinical cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerico, Aldo

    2003-07-01

    The practice of cardiology continues to evolve along with a better understanding of the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease and the development of new therapeutic procedures. Consequently, new demands are being made on the in vitro diagnostics industry to improve the performance of existing cardiac markers and to develop novel markers for new cardiac disease indications. Indeed, in the last 20 years there has been a progressive increase in new laboratory tests for markers of cardiac diseases. Several highly sensitive and/or specific assays for the detection of myocardial ischemic damage as well as some immunoassays for cardiac natriuretic hormones, now considered a reliable marker of myocardial function, have become commercially available. In parallel, a growing number of some novel risk factors, which can be assessed and monitored by laboratory methods, have been added to the classical risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Finally, the recent explosion of genetic analysis may soon place at the clinical cardiologist's disposal many laboratory tests for defining the diagnosis at the molecular level, assessing new risk factors, and better targeting the pharmaceutical approaches in patients with cardiovascular disease. In the present article, after a brief description of the analytical tests included in these four groups, each group's impact on clinical cardiology is discussed in detail.

  20. Correlation between the limit values of laboratory and clinical mycotoxicosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanov Igor M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of feed for the presence of fungi and mycotoxins is a request necessary to meet in order to ensure a healthy and economical production in livestock. These tests are related to legal regulation which prescribes the maximum legislated content (MLC, both for the presence of mycotoxins and the total number of fungi in certain feeds. Health problems that can occur during the production of animals are sometimes caused by the presence of mycotoxins in the feed. Laboratory testing is a good practice to confirm a suspicion, and allows timely treatment of contaminated feed. Potential problems arise under circumstances when there is a clinical outcome of mycotoxicosis and animal and laboratory findings suggest that the obtained values are below the level that is within the MLC. For these reasons, the subject of our research was to investigate the occurrence of mycotoxins and mold in feed, as well as the clinical presentation for animals that were fed with the feed with allowed values of these agents according to the recommended levels. The aim of this paper was to highlight the problems associated with clinical correlation of sick animals and laboratory findings, and suggest their overcoming. In the period of one year, a total of 176 samples of feed (complete mixture for broilers, corn and soy products were examined for the presence of fungi, 106 samples were examined for the presence of mycotoxins and 26 flocks of broilers and turkeys were clinically observed. Standard methods were used for isolation of molds and the ELISA test was used for the detection of mycotoxins. Clinical and pathomorphological observation of the flocks was done to determine the natural indicators of production. Studies indicated a problem because clinical and pathomorphological findings in some cases were not correlated with laboratory findings of molds and mycotoxins in the feed, and in some cases it did not necessarily mean that the animals were healthy. Synergism and

  1. Integrated management system best practices in radioecological laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Claudia Aparecida Zerbinatti de [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), SP (Brazil). Dept. da Qualidade], e-mail: clau.zerbina@gmail.com; Zouain, Desiree Moraes [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: dmzouain@ipen.br

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a Master dissertation advancements with the target of studying the best practices, in order to give support to an IMS conceptual model ?Integrated Management System (quality, environment, work safety and health), applied to radioecological laboratories. The planning of the proposed research comprises the following stages: first stage - the bibliographic and documental survey in IMS; a survey and study of the applied standards (QMS NBR ISO 9000 (2005), NBR ISO 9001 (2008), NBR ISO 9004 (2000), EMS 14001(2004) and OHSMS OHSAS 18001 (2007) and OHSAS 18002 (2008)); identification and characterization in radioecological laboratories processes; a methodological study of better practices and benchmarking is carried out. In the second stage of the research, the development of a case study is forecast (qualitative research, with electronic questionnaires and personal interviews, when possible), preceded by a survey and selection of international and national radioecological laboratories to be studied and, in sequence, these laboratories should be contacted and agree to participate in the research; in a third stage, the construction of a matrix of better practices, which incur in the results able to subside an IMS conceptual model proposition for radioecological laboratories; the fourth and last stage of the research comprises the construction of a conceptual proposal of an IMS structure for radioecological laboratories. The first stage of the research results are presented concisely, as well as a preliminary selection of laboratories to be studied. (author)

  2. 78 FR 44954 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-25

    ... ] medicine practice and specific questions related to possible revision of the CLIA standards. Examples... laboratories are regulated; the impact of proposed revisions to the standards on medical and laboratory... laboratory interoperability in health information technology will also be discussed. Agenda items are...

  3. Evidence-based clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine combines the patient's preferences with clinical experience and the best research evidence. Randomized clinical trials are considered the most valid research design for evaluating health-care interventions. However, empirical research shows that intervention effects may be...

  4. Clinical and laboratory features of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Cárdenas

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available

    The clinical presentation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC differs between patients in developing countries (African and Chinese populations from those in industrialized countries. In industrialized countries, HCC co-exists with symptomatic cirrhosis in 80% of cases and clinical manifestations are usually related to those of the underlying disease. On the other hand, patients from developing countries have HCC and cirrhosis in approximately 40% of cases. Underlying cirrhosis in many cases is not advanced and does not produce any symptoms or associated symptoms are masked by those of the tumor (right upper quadrant pain, mass in the upper abdomen, weight loss and weakness. In a subset of patients, there are no clinical manifestations as HCC may occur in the context of hepatitis B infection without cirrhosis.

    Clinical Manifestations

    In Western countries, nearly 35% percent of patients with HCC are asymptomatic. Some of the most common clinical manifestations include: abdominal pain (53-58% of patients, especially in epigastrium or right upper quadrant, abdominal mass (30%, weight loss, malaise, anorexia, cachexia, jaundice or fever.

    Physical Exam

    Physical findings vary with the stage of disease. The patient may exhibit slight or moderate wasting when first seen. In patients with cirrhosis, typical stigmata of chronic liver disease may be present. In advanced stages of HCC the liver may be enlarged and there is significant tenderness. An arterial bruit may be heard over the liver

  5. CHRONIC HEART FAILURE: CLINICAL GUIDELINES AND REAL CLINICAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. K. Shavarova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Expert assessment of real clinical practice compliance with national guidelines on management of patients with chronic heart failure (HF before the opening of the Expert Center of HF treatment.Material and methods. All patients admitted to 2 city clinical hospitals of Moscow with HF were included into the register. Clinical, demographic, laboratory and instrumental characteristics and medical treatment before and during hospitalization were evaluated, as well as recommendations contained in the discharge summary.Results. 300 patients with HF were included into the register. The mean age was 75 years (39, 95; the proportion of men – 44%. 95% of patients had HF IIIV (NYHA, among them 24% HF II, 61% HF III, 15% HF IV (NYHA. HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF was found in 45% of patients. 22% of the patients did not receive medical treatment before admission. 34% of patients with HFrEF received ACE inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs, of which only 23% in effective dose. β-blockers were prescribed in 41% of HFeEF patients, of which 22% in the target dose. A third of patients needed in mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRA received spironolactone. During hospitalization 81% of HFrEF patients received ACEI therapy, 12% – ARBs, 91% – β-blockers, 90% – MRA, 81% – loop diuretics and 13% – thiazide diuretics. According to the discharge summary 5% of patients did not receive post-discharge blocker of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system without explanation in the medical documentation. β-blocker with proven efficacy was prescribed to 70% of HFrEF patients. Spironolactone was recommended after discharge in 89% of HFrEF patients.Conclusion. Implementation of register of hospitalized patients with HF gives an opportunity to identify shortcomings in the provision of medical care both in outpatient and inpatient stages. 

  6. Positron emission tomography clinical practice

    CERN Document Server

    Valk, Peter E; Bailey, Dale L; Townsend, David W; Maisey, Michael N

    2006-01-01

    This book provides a contemporary reference to the science, technology and clinical applications of PET and PET/CT. The opening chapters summarize the scientific aspects of PET and PET/CT including physics, instrumentation, radiation dosimetry and radiation protection. A chapter on normal variants in FDG PET imaging serves as an introduction to the clinical chapters, which cover oncology applications and have been updated to include the impact of FDG PET/CT imaging in oncology. The book concludes with chapters on the use of PET and PET/CT in cardiology and neurology and PET imaging of infectio

  7. 42 CFR 414.510 - Laboratory date of service for clinical laboratory and pathology specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and pathology specimens. 414.510 Section 414.510 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... date of service for clinical laboratory and pathology specimens. The date of service for either a clinical laboratory test or the technical component of physician pathology service is as follows:...

  8. CT colonography. A guide for clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mang, Thomas [Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiology; Schima, Wolfgang [Krankenhaus Goettlicher Heiland, Wien (Austria). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Schwestern, Wien (Austria); Sankt-Josef-Krankenhaus, Wien (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    The book on CT colonography - a guide for clinical practice - covers the following issues: indications and contraindications, examination; Image interpretation; findings at CT colonography, how to generate a useful report, screening, how to train for CT colonography.

  9. Impella ventricular support in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burzotta, Francesco; Trani, Carlo; Doshi, Sagar N;

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical circulatory support represents an evolving field of clinical research and practice. Currently, several cardiac assist devices have been developed but, among different institutions and countries, a large variation in indications for use and device selection exists. The Impella platform ...

  10. Laboratory automation in clinical bacteriology: what system to choose?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxatto, A; Prod'hom, G; Faverjon, F; Rochais, Y; Greub, G

    2016-03-01

    Automation was introduced many years ago in several diagnostic disciplines such as chemistry, haematology and molecular biology. The first laboratory automation system for clinical bacteriology was released in 2006, and it rapidly proved its value by increasing productivity, allowing a continuous increase in sample volumes despite limited budgets and personnel shortages. Today, two major manufacturers, BD Kiestra and Copan, are commercializing partial or complete laboratory automation systems for bacteriology. The laboratory automation systems are rapidly evolving to provide improved hardware and software solutions to optimize laboratory efficiency. However, the complex parameters of the laboratory and automation systems must be considered to determine the best system for each given laboratory. We address several topics on laboratory automation that may help clinical bacteriologists to understand the particularities and operative modalities of the different systems. We present (a) a comparison of the engineering and technical features of the various elements composing the two different automated systems currently available, (b) the system workflows of partial and complete laboratory automation, which define the basis for laboratory reorganization required to optimize system efficiency, (c) the concept of digital imaging and telebacteriology, (d) the connectivity of laboratory automation to the laboratory information system, (e) the general advantages and disadvantages as well as the expected impacts provided by laboratory automation and (f) the laboratory data required to conduct a workflow assessment to determine the best configuration of an automated system for the laboratory activities and specificities.

  11. Custom software development for use in a clinical laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John H Sinard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In-house software development for use in a clinical laboratory is a controversial issue. Many of the objections raised are based on outdated software development practices, an exaggeration of the risks involved, and an underestimation of the benefits that can be realized. Buy versus build analyses typically do not consider total costs of ownership, and unfortunately decisions are often made by people who are not directly affected by the workflow obstacles or benefits that result from those decisions. We have been developing custom software for clinical use for over a decade, and this article presents our perspective on this practice. A complete analysis of the decision to develop or purchase must ultimately examine how the end result will mesh with the departmental workflow, and custom-developed solutions typically can have the greater positive impact on efficiency and productivity, substantially altering the decision balance sheet. Involving the end-users in preparation of the functional specifications is crucial to the success of the process. A large development team is not needed, and even a single programmer can develop significant solutions. Many of the risks associated with custom development can be mitigated by a well-structured development process, use of open-source tools, and embracing an agile development philosophy. In-house solutions have the significant advantage of being adaptable to changing departmental needs, contributing to efficient and higher quality patient care.

  12. Loop Diuretics in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se Won; Han, Sang Youb

    2015-06-01

    Diuretics are commonly used to control edema across various clinical fields. Diuretics inhibit sodium reabsorption in specific renal tubules, resulting in increased urinary sodium and water excretion. Loop diuretics are the most potent diuretics. In this article, we review five important aspects of loop diuretics, in particular furosemide, which must be considered when prescribing this medicine: (1) oral versus intravenous treatment, (2) dosage, (3) continuous versus bolus infusion, (4) application in chronic kidney disease patients, and (5) side effects. The bioavailability of furosemide differs between oral and intravenous therapy. Additionally, the threshold and ceiling doses of furosemide differ according to the particular clinical condition of the patient, for example in patients with severe edema or chronic kidney disease. To maximize the efficiency of furosemide, a clear understanding of how the mode of delivery will impact bioavailability and the required dosage is necessary.

  13. Corruption at the data capture stage and good laboratory practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziegler, E.; Lenk, H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kohlenforschung, Muelheim (Germany)

    1994-05-01

    Possible sources of data corruption at the data capture stage include errors from the analogue input signal to be sampled, incorrect timing of the realtime sampling, loss of data on the data transmission path, and malfunctions of hardware and software components. Hardware and software measures to avoid such errors and provisions to adhere to good laboratory practice rules are discussed. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Impella ventricular support in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burzotta, Francesco; Trani, Carlo; Doshi, Sagar N

    2015-01-01

    and the operative protocols, this working group attempted to establish the best clinical practice with the technology. The present paper reviews the main theoretical principles of Impella and provides an up-to-date summary of the best practical aspects of device use which may help others gain the maximal advantage...

  15. Social media in clinical practice

    CERN Document Server

    Meskó, Bertalan

    2013-01-01

    The number of patients using social media and the number of applications and solutions used by medical professionals online have been sky-rocketing in the past few years, therefore the rational behind creating a well-designed, clear and tight handbook of practical examples and case studies with simple pieces of suggestions about different social media platforms is evident. While the number of e-patients is rising, the number of web-savvy doctors who can meet the expectations of these new generations of patients is not, this huge gap can only be closed by providing medical professionals with ea

  16. A manifesto for clinical pharmacology from principles to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2010-07-01

    1. This is a manifesto for UK clinical pharmacology. 2. A clinical pharmacologist is a medically qualified practitioner who teaches, does research, frames policy, and gives information and advice about the actions and proper uses of medicines in humans and implements that knowledge in clinical practice. Those without medical qualifications who practise some aspect of clinical pharmacology could be described as, say, 'applied pharmacologists'. 3. Clinical pharmacology is operationally defined as a translational discipline in terms of the basic tools of human pharmacology (e.g. receptor pharmacology) and applied pharmacology (e.g. pharmacokinetics) and how they are used in drug discovery and development and in solving practical therapeutic problems in individuals and populations. 4. Clinical pharmacologists are employed by universities, health-care services, private organizations (such as drug companies), and regulatory agencies. They are mentors and teachers, teaching laboratory science, clinical science, and all aspects of practical drug therapy as underpinned by the science of pharmacology; they write and edit didactic and reference texts; researchers, covering research described by the operational definition; clinicians, practising general medicine, clinical toxicology, other medical specialties, and general practice; policy makers, framing local, national, and international medicines policy, including formularies, licensing of medicines and prescribing policies. 5. The future of clinical pharmacology depends on the expansion and maintenance of a central core of practitioners (employed by universities or health-care services), training clinical pharmacologists to practise in universities, health-care services, private organizations, and regulatory agencies, and training other clinicians in the principles and practice of clinical pharmacology.

  17. Evaluation of the status of laboratory practices and the need for continuing education in medical mycology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Eunice R; Reiss, Errol; Warren, Nancy G; Shadomy, H Jean; Lipman, Harvey B

    2002-08-01

    A survey to determine the need for training in medical mycology was sent to 605 US laboratories. Training needs were determined by comparing actual laboratory mycology practices with recommended practices, documenting the extent of mycology training reported by employees, and asking respondents to specify the fungi they considered most difficult to identify. The response rate was 56.7% (with only 316 laboratories providing sufficient information). Results showed a large degree of interlaboratory variation in practices and suggested that more judicious practices could lower costs and improve clinical relevance. Only 55.6% of laboratories reported that at least 1 employee attended a formal mycology continuing education program in the 4 years before the survey. Species of dermatophytes, dematiaceous fungi, and non-Candida yeasts were the most difficult to identify. Training may be needed in basic isolation procedures and in advanced topics such as identification of problematic molds and yeasts and antifungal susceptibility testing. Educators should consider clinical relevance and cost-containment without sacrificing quality when designing courses. Support for additional mycology training may improve if hospital and laboratory administrators are alerted to potential dangers and costs involved in treating patients with invasive fungal infections.

  18. Neuropsychiatric Lupus in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Alessi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a chronic autoimmune disease involving multiple organs, characterized by the production of autoantibodies and the development of tissue injury. The etiology of SLE is partially known, involving multiple genetic and environmental factors. As many as 50% of patients with SLE have neurological involvement during the course of their disease. Neurological manifestations are associated with impaired quality of life, and high morbidity and mortality rates. Nineteen neuropsychiatric syndromes have been identified associated with SLE, and can be divided into central and peripheral manifestations. This article reviews major neuropsychiatric manifestations in patients with SLE and discusses their clinical features, radiological findings and treatment options.

  19. Clinical Practice Guidelines for intestinal occlusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudis Miguel Monzón Rodríguez

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for intestinal occlusion. This document includes the main aspects related with classification, physiopathology, clinical diagnosis, complementary examinations and therapy aimed at the post-operatory treatment. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  20. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cerebral Abscess Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Barrueta Reyes

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cerebral Abscess Treatment. It has been defined as a festering process caused by any germ and placed inside the cerebral parenchyma; this is a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for surgeons and general doctors since the clinical and radiological manifestations are often imprecise. This document describes its etiological agents, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  1. Clinical guidelines: their implementation in general practice.

    OpenAIRE

    M Conroy; Shannon, W

    1995-01-01

    In recent years the development of clinical guidelines has received increasing attention from medical educators and those involved in standard setting, and has been initiated at both central and local levels. This review article outlines the current state of knowledge with regard to clinical guideline implementation in medical practice. It deals with the main aspects of the current guideline debate, such as, clinical freedom and doctor autonomy, the importance of ownership in guideline implem...

  2. [ISO 15189 accreditation in clinical microbiology laboratory: general concepts and the status in our laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyar, Işin

    2009-10-01

    One important trend in the laboratory profession and quality management is the global convergence of laboratory operations. The goal of an accredited medical laboratory is to continue "offering useful laboratory service for diagnosis and treatment of the patients and also aid to the health of the nation". An accredited clinical laboratory is managed by a quality control system, it is competent technically and the laboratory service meets the needs of all its patients and physicians by taking the responsibility of all the medical tests and therapies. For this purpose, ISO 15189 international standard has been prepared by 2003. ISO 15189 standard is originated from the arrangement of ISO 17025 and ISO 9001:2000 standards. Many countries such as England, Germany, France, Canada and Australia have preferred ISO 15189 as their own laboratory accreditation programme, meeting all the requirements of their medical laboratories. The accreditation performance of a clinical microbiology laboratory is mainly based on five essential points; preanalytical, analytical, postanalytical, quality control programmes (internal, external, interlaboratory) and audits (internal, external). In this review article, general concepts on ISO 15189 accreditation standards for the clinical microbiology laboratories have been summarized and the status of a private laboratory (Acibadem LabMed, Istanbul) in Turkey has been discussed.

  3. Clinical Practice Update: Pediculosis Capitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, Brittany; Evetts, Jessica; McClain, Kymberli; Rosenauer, Amanda; Stellitano, Emily

    2015-01-01

    A review of the current evidence on primary treatment modalities of head lice demonstrates increasing resistance to current regimens. New and alternative therapies are now available. A treatment algorithm was created to address safety and efficacy of treatments, as well as to guide clinicians through navigation of the regimens. Through an online journal search, 59 articles were selected for the review. Literature searches were performed through PubMed, Medline, Ebsco Host, and CINAHL, with key search words of "Pediculosis capitis" and "head lice" in the title, abstract, and index. Meta-analyses and controlled clinical trials were viewed with greater weight if they had a large sample size, were statistically significant, and did not allude to bias. When resistant infestations are well-documented in a locality, changes to the treatment regimen are indicated, and alternative treatments should be considered. Recent studies and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approvals have changed the available treatment options for Pediculosis capitis, including benzyl alcohol, topical ivermectin, spinosad, and the LouseBuster. Further, environmental management and prevention measures should be taken to avoid reinfestation and to prevent the spread of head lice. Continued study is recommended to establish long-term safety of new and alternative agents.

  4. Thrombophilia: clinical-practical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    No consensus exists as to who should be tested for thrombophilia, mainly due to the lack of good quality clinical outcome data in relationship to presence or absence of a given thrombophilia. Testing may be considered if (a) finding a thrombophilia predicts recurrent thrombosis and, thus, influences length of anticoagulation treatment decisions; (b) identifying a thrombophilia has implications on management of asymptomatic family members who are carriers of the detected thrombophilia; (c) a patient wishes to better understand why a thrombotic event occurred. Testing may be helpful in patients with venous thromboembolism at intermediate risk of recurrence in whom the finding of a strong thrombophilia can be one of the arguments for long-term anticoagulation--the "risk-of-recurrence-triangle" may be a useful aid in this decision process. Patients whose venous thromboembolism was provoked by a major transient risk factor should not be tested for thrombophilia. Thrombophilia tests should only be ordered by health care professionals who can provide the "4P": (a) appropriately select which patient to test, (b) provide pre-test counseling, (c) properly interpret the test results, and (d) provide education and advice to the patient. If testing is embarked on in patients with venous thromboembolism, it is advisable to be done at the time of decision making whether to stop or continue anticoagulation, i.e. typically after 3 months of anticoagulant therapy. Thrombophilia testing is best not done at the time of an acute thrombotic event and while a patient is on an anticoagulant.

  5. Review of clinical and laboratory features of human Brucellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantur B

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Brucella spp. continues to pose a human health risk globally despite strides in eradicating the disease from domestic animals. Brucellosis has been an emerging disease since the discovery of Brucella melitensis by Sir David Bruce in 1887. Although many countries have eradicated B. abortus from cattle, in some areas B. melitensis and B. suis have emerged as causes of this infection in cattle, leading to human infections. Currently B. melitensis remains the principal cause of human brucellosis worldwide including India. The recent isolation of distinct strains of Brucella from marine mammals as well as humans is an indicator of an emerging zoonotic disease. Brucellosis in endemic and non-endemic regions remains a diagnostic puzzle due to misleading non-specific manifestations and increasing unusual presentations. Fewer than 10% of human cases of brucellosis may be clinically recognized and treated or reported. Routine serological surveillance is not practiced even in Brucella - endemic countries and we suggest that this should be a part of laboratory testing coupled with a high index of clinical suspicion to improve the level of case detection. The screening of family members of index cases of acute brucellosis in an endemic area should be undertaken to pick up additional unrecognised cases. Rapid and reliable, sensitive and specific, easy to perform and automated detection systems for Brucella spp. are urgently needed to allow early diagnosis and adequate antibiotic therapy in time to decrease morbidity / mortality. The history of travel to endemic countries along with exposure to animals and exotic foods are usually critical to making the clinical diagnosis. Laboratory testing is indispensable for diagnosis. Therefore alertness of clinician and close collaboration with microbiologist are essential even in endemic areas to correctly diagnose and treat this protean human infection. Existing treatment options, largely based on

  6. Regulating the placebo effect in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tracey E

    2015-01-01

    Recent research and ethical analysis have forced a clinical and ethical reappraisal of the utility of placebos in medical practice. The main concern of ethics and law is that using placebos in health care involves deception, which is antithetical to patient autonomy and trust in the physician-patient relationship. This article reviews the various, more nuanced scientific conceptions of the placebo effect, and evaluates the ethical and legal objections to deploying placebos in clinical practice. It argues that the placebo effect may be legitimately accommodated on the basis that it does not engage the requirement for material or quasi-fiduciary disclosures of information, and may also be justified by therapeutic privilege. In addition, this reconceptualisation of the placebo effect offers a new justification for therapeutic privilege in these contexts. Notwithstanding this, using the placebo effect in clinical practice raises regulatory issues that will require special regulatory supervision.

  7. [CAP quality management system in clinical laboratory and its issue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazawa, Hiromitsu

    2004-03-01

    The CAP (College of American Pathologists) was established in 1962 and, at present, CAP-accredited laboratories include about 6000 institutions all over the world, mainly in the U.S. The essential purpose of CAP accreditation is high quality reservation and improvement of clinical laboratory services for patient care, and is based on seven points, listed below. (1) Establishment of a laboratory management program and laboratory techniques to assure accuracy and improve overall quality of laboratory services. (2) Maintenance and improvement of accuracy objectively by centering on a CAP survey. (3) Thoroughness in safety and health administration. (4) Reservation of the performance of laboratory services by personnel and proficiency management. (5) Provision of appropriate information to physicians, and contribution to improved quality of patient care by close communication with physicians (improvement in patient care). (6) Reduction of running costs and personnel costs based on evidence by employing the above-mentioned criteria. (7) Reduction of laboratory error. In the future, accreditation and/or certification by organizations such as CAP, ISO, etc., may become a requirement for providing any clinical laboratory services in Japan. Taking the essence of the CAP and the characteristics of the new international standard, ISO151589, into consideration, it is important to choose the best suited accreditation and/or certification depending of the purpose of clinical laboratory.

  8. Practical methodological guide for hydrometric inter-laboratory organisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, David; Bertrand, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    Discharge measurements performed by the French governmental hydrometer team feed a national database. This data is available for general river flows knowkedge, flood forecasting, low water survey, statistical calculations flow, control flow regulatory and many other uses. Regularly checking the measurements quality and better quantifying its accuracy is therefore an absolute need. The practice of inter-laboratory comparison in hydrometry particularly developed during the last decade. Indeed, discharge measurement can not easily be linked to a standard. Therefore, on-site measurement accuracy control is very difficult. Inter-laboratory comparison is thus a practical solution to this issue. However, it needs some regulations in order to ease its practice and legitimize its results. To do so, the French government hydrometrics teams produced a practical methodological guide for hydrometric inter-laboratory organisation in destination of hydrometers community in view of ensure the harmonization of inter-laboratory comparison practices for different materials (ADCP, current meter on wadind rod or gauging van, tracer dilution, surface speed) and flow range (flood, low water). Ensure the results formalization and banking. The realisation of this practice guide is grounded on the experience of the governmental teams & their partners (or fellows), following existing approaches (Doppler group especially). The guide is designated to validate compliance measures and identify outliers : Hardware, methodological, environmental, or human. Inter-laboratory comparison provides the means to verify the compliance of the instruments (devices + methods + operators) and provides methods to determine an experimental uncertainty of the tested measurement method which is valid only for the site and the measurement conditions but does not address the calibration or periodic monitoring of the few materials. After some conceptual definitions, the guide describes the different stages of an

  9. Introducing clinical audit into veterinary practice.

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    This project has been designed to increase our understanding of the clinical audit process, as it applies to veterinary practice in the UK, and to facilitate its introduction in a manner that brings maximum benefit to all stakeholders. It examines the medical scenario to define the process and glean any relevant information. It then takes the form of an action research project that examines in depth the introduction of the audit process into a small animal practice in outer NW London, in...

  10. The use of placebo interventions in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, K

    2013-04-01

    Although a considerable number of mostly quantitative surveys have investigated the frequency and circumstances of the use of placebo interventions in clinical practice, it remains rather unclear what role placebo interventions really have outside clinical and laboratory research and why they are used. In this article I discuss two aspects which have to be taken into account when future research aims to provide further insights: (1) the different perspectives of patients, providers and scientists when it comes to decide whether a treatment is a placebo or not and (2) the fact that applying placebos intentionally is not only an ethical but also a professional problem.

  11. [Clinical laboratory approaches to parodontitis treatment optimization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soboleva, L A; Shul'diakov, A A; Oseeva, A O; Aleksandrova, E A

    2010-01-01

    In order to determine cycloferon liniment clinical-pathogenetic efficacy in comprehensive parodontitis therapy examination and treatment of 80 patients was done. It was determined that the cycloferon liniment use in comprehensive treatment of patients with parodontitis let to reduce infectious load in parodontal pockets and local inflammation intensity, to normalize the secretory immunoglobulin level and immune status indices that provided speed up of healing process and reduction relapse frequency.

  12. George Engel's Epistemology of Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraga, Michael; Fuks, Abraham; Boudreau, J Donald

    2014-01-01

    George Engel's (1913-1999) biopsychosocial model, one of the most significant proposals for the renewal of medicine in the latter half of the 20th century, has been understood primarily as a multi-factorial approach to the etiology of disease and as a call to re-humanize clinical practice. This common reading of Engel's model misses the central aspect of his proposal, that the biopsychosocial model is an epistemology for clinical work. By stating the simple fact that the clinician is not dealing directly with a body, but first, and inevitably, with a person, Engel challenged the epistemology implicit in the classical clinical method-a method predicated on the possibility of direct access to the body. Framed in epistemological terms, the issue at stake is not the need to complement medical science with humane virtues, but rather to acknowledge that the object of clinical practice is not the body but the patient.

  13. Clinical Practice Guidelines Infective Endocarditis Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lázaro de la Cruz Avilés

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Infective Endocarditis Treatment. Infectious disease affecting the endocardium produces vegetations and could also affect the septum, the chordae tendinae or mural endocardium. It includes concept, risk factors, classification (and special groups and an update and review of the main clinical aspects, complications and treatment stressing the antibiotic therapy. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  14. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Exogenous Poisoning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Díaz Mesa

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Exogenous Poisoning. Medical emergencies determined by the exposure to different substances (drugs, medicines, physical or chemical corrosive agents, etc. It includes the classification of toxic substances, clinical diagnosis (main syndromes, and description of therapeutic variations (vital support, antidotes, absorption measurements and increase of elimination and depuration of the toxic substance. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  15. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Acute Pulmonary Edema.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Rodríguez Díaz

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Acute Pulmonary Edema. It has been defined as an abrupt and severe failure of the left ventricular function which causes pulmonary edema or cardiac origin interfering with the normal oxygen exchange at pulmonary level. This document includes a review and update of the main clinical aspects allowing the early diagnosis and immediate therapeutic treatment. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  16. Clinical Practice Guidelines for cranioencephalic trauma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencio Pons Moscoso

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for cranioencephalic trauma. It has been defined as the lesion received in the cranium, its covers and the encephalic content as a result of the action of external forces. This document includes a review of the classification, clinical presentation and methods used in the diagnosis and main treatment alternatives, stressing the neuro-monitoring. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  17. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Potential Donors Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roque Nodal Arruebarrena

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Potential Donors Management. It has been defined as the patient in Glasgow coma with scale higher or equal to 8 who doesn´t present contradictions for transplant (possible donor and who has been diagnosed of encephalic death. This document reviews and updates concepts, lists indications and contraindications for different organs donation, clinical assessment of the donor and its treatment. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  18. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cardiogenic Shock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arelys Falcón Hernández

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cardiogenic Shock. It has been defined as the persistence of tissue hypoperfusion, usually associated to blood hypotension as the result of heart pumping failure. This document includes a review of the main aspects as concepts, aetiology, diagnosis and treatment. It includes the concept, risk factors, clinical presentations, diagnosis, and therapy based on the possibilities of our environment. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  19. Current safety practices in nano-research laboratories in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Can; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Guoyu

    2014-06-01

    China has become a key player in the global nanotechnology field, however, no surveys have specifically examined safety practices in the Chinese nano-laboratories in depth. This study reports results of a survey of 300 professionals who work in research laboratories that handle nanomaterials in China. We recruited participants at three major nano-research laboratories (which carry out research in diverse fields such as chemistry, material science, and biology) and the nano-chemistry session of the national meeting of the Chinese Chemical Society. Results show that almost all nano-research laboratories surveyed had general safety regulations, whereas less than one third of respondents reported having nanospecific safety rules. General safety measures were in place in most surveyed nano-research laboratories, while nanospecific protective measures existed or were implemented less frequently. Several factors reported from the scientific literature including nanotoxicology knowledge gaps, technical limitations on estimating nano-exposure, and the lack of nano-occupational safety legislation may contribute to the current state of affairs. With these factors in mind and embracing the precautionary principle, we suggest strengthening or providing nanosafety training (including raising risk awareness) and establishing nanosafety guidelines in China, to better protect personnel in the nano-workplace.

  20. Contextualizing practices across epistemic levels in the chemistry laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Aleixandre, María-Pilar; Reigosa, Carlos

    2006-07-01

    The process of construction of meanings for the concepts of concentration and neutralization is explored in terms of contextualizing practices (Lemke, 1990, Talking Science. Language, Learning and Values, Norwood, NJ: Ablex) creation of meanings through connections established among actions and their context. This notion is expanded to include the connections established among concepts and their context of use, a solving problem task in a laboratory. The purpose is to document the process of meaning construction for these concepts and their transformation from mere terms into decisions and practical actions in a chemistry laboratory. We sought to combine this analysis with an epistemological focus, examining the relative epistemic status of the contextualizing practices. The conversations and actions of four grade 10 students and their teacher (second author) were recorded while solving an open task: to find the concentration of an HCl solution. The results show a progression in the process of contextualization, from an initial inability to use the concepts as part of the resources to complete the titration task, to the transformation of definitions into shared meaningful concepts that allow to take actions, combining theoretical resources with physical ones to solve the problem. A frame for categorizing contextualizing practices across epistemic levels is proposed and applied to the data.

  1. Clinical laboratory technologist professional development in Camagüey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Caridad García González

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the results of research aimed at assessing the current conditions related to clinical laboratory technologist professional development. A descriptive cross study covering the period between November 2013 and January 2014 is presented. Several techniques for identifying and hierarchically arranging professional developmental related problems were used to study a sample at the Faculty of Health Technology of the Medical University “Carlos Juan Finlay”. The study involved heads of teaching departments and methodologists of health care technology specialties; moreover a survey and a content test were given graduate clinical laboratory technicians. The authors reached at the conclusion that clinical laboratory technologist professional development is limited and usually underestimate the necessities and interests of these graduates. Likewise, a lack of systematization and integration of the biomedical basic sciences contents and the laboratory diagnosis is noticeable.

  2. [Clinical microbiology laboratory and imported parasitic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Rabadán, Pablo; Martínez-Ruiz, Rocío; Cuadros, Juan; Cañavate, Carmen

    2010-12-01

    Imported parasitosis represents an increasingly frequent diagnostic challenge for microbiology laboratories. A surge in immigration and international travel has led to a rise in the number of imported cases of parasitosis, and this trend is expected to continue in the future. The present article addresses this challenge by reviewing recommended diagnostic approaches and tests. Currently, microscopy is always recommended when analysing blood samples for parasites. If malaria is suspected, rapid antigen testing (including at least HRP2 antigen) should also be performed. The work-up for suspected leishmaniasis should include serology, culture, and in selected cases detection of antigen in urine. In suspected Chagas disease, two different serological tests should be performed. PCR for blood protozoa is highly sensitive, although it cannot be used to rule out Chagas disease, since this condition may be present without parasitemia. Accurate diagnosis of intestinal amebiasis usually requires PCR or antigen detection tests. In helminthiasis, traditional microscopy may need to be complemented with other tests, such as agar plate culture for strongyloidiasis, Og4C3 antigen detection for bancroftian filariasis, and antibody detection test for filariasis and schistosomiasis.

  3. Introduction: Applying Clinical Psychological Science to Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Christine B; DiVasto, Katherine A

    2017-02-10

    Mental illness is a prevalent and extraordinarily complex phenomenon. Psychologists have developed distinct approaches toward understanding and treating mental illness, rooted in divergent epistemology. This introduction to the Special Issue on Clinical Psychological Science and Practice provides a brief overview of the scientist-practitioner gap, and explores one step (of many) toward bridging this divide. Seven compelling case illustrations featured in this Special Issue apply empirical findings to case formulation, treatment selection, and assessment across complex and varied clinical presentations. This issue thereby demonstrates the feasibility of integrating research and clinical expertise in mental healthcare.

  4. Clinical laboratory as an economic model for business performance analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buljanović, Vikica; Patajac, Hrvoje; Petrovečki, Mladen

    2011-01-01

    Aim To perform SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis of a clinical laboratory as an economic model that may be used to improve business performance of laboratories by removing weaknesses, minimizing threats, and using external opportunities and internal strengths. Methods Impact of possible threats to and weaknesses of the Clinical Laboratory at Našice General County Hospital business performance and use of strengths and opportunities to improve operating profit were simulated using models created on the basis of SWOT analysis results. The operating profit as a measure of profitability of the clinical laboratory was defined as total revenue minus total expenses and presented using a profit and loss account. Changes in the input parameters in the profit and loss account for 2008 were determined using opportunities and potential threats, and economic sensitivity analysis was made by using changes in the key parameters. The profit and loss account and economic sensitivity analysis were tools for quantifying the impact of changes in the revenues and expenses on the business operations of clinical laboratory. Results Results of simulation models showed that operational profit of €470 723 in 2008 could be reduced to only €21 542 if all possible threats became a reality and current weaknesses remained the same. Also, operational gain could be increased to €535 804 if laboratory strengths and opportunities were utilized. If both the opportunities and threats became a reality, the operational profit would decrease by €384 465. Conclusion The operational profit of the clinical laboratory could be significantly reduced if all threats became a reality and the current weaknesses remained the same. The operational profit could be increased by utilizing strengths and opportunities as much as possible. This type of modeling may be used to monitor business operations of any clinical laboratory and improve its financial situation by

  5. Clinical Practice Guidelines for paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandy Viera Valdés

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia. These are arrhythmias in which structures placed above the bifurcation of the bundle of His are involved; characterized by tachycardia with abrupt starting and ending. We comment its classification, common characteristics, general treatment and specific conduct for its different variables. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  6. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Critical Patients’ Nutrition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Patricia Casanova González

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Critical Patients’ Nutrition. This document includes a review and update of aspects related with nutritional assessment of patients in critical condition; indications, contraindications and procedures for enteral and parenteral nutrition and its follow up. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  7. Antiphospholipid antibody: laboratory, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ziglioli

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL represent a heterogeneous group of antibodies that recognize various antigenic targets including beta2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI, prothrombin (PT, activated protein C, tissue plasminogen activator, plasmin and annexin A2. The most commonly used tests to detect aPL are: lupus anticoagulant (LAC, a functional coagulation assay, anticardiolipin antibody (aCL and anti-β2GPI antibody (anti-β2GPI, which are enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA. Clinically aPL are associated with thrombosis and/or with pregnancy morbidity. Apparently aPL alone are unable to induce thrombotic manifestations, but they increase the risk of vascular events that can occur in the presence of another thrombophilic condition; on the other hand obstetrical manifestations were shown to be associated not only to thrombosis but mainly to a direct antibody effect on the trophoblast.

  8. 1.2.Clinical laboratory diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930212 Enzymatic analysis of serum total bileacids and clinical evaluation.WEI Youren (魏有仁),et al.Sino—Japan Friendship Hosp,Bei-jing,100029.CHin J Med Lab Technol 1993;16(1):11—14.An enzymatic colorimetric assay of serum to-tal bile acids (TBA) was reported for the firsttime in China.3 α-hydroxysteroid dehydroge-nase (3α-HSD) had been purified from pseu-domonas testosteroni in the sventies,and hadbeen used as a main enzyme reagent in the enzy-matic analysis of TBA.In this paper,the au-thors introduced a rapid,sensitive colorimetricassay using 3α-HSD,and a couple enzyme 5β-steroid Δ~4 dehydrogenase to imcrease the con-

  9. Laboratory medicine best practice guideline: vitamins a, e and the carotenoids in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Ronda F; Woollard, Gerald A; Hoad, Kirsten E; Walmsley, Trevor A; Johnson, Lambro A; Briscoe, Scott; Koetsier, Sabrina; Harrower, Tamantha; Gill, Janice P

    2014-05-01

    Despite apparent method similarities between laboratories there appear to be confounding factors inhibiting uniform reporting and standardisation of vitamin assays. The Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists (AACB) Vitamins Working Party, in conjunction with The Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia Quality Assurance Programs, has formulated a guideline to improve performance, reproducibility and accuracy of fat-soluble vitamin results. The aim of the guideline is to identify critical pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical components of the analysis of vitamins A, E and carotenoids in blood to promote best practice and harmonisation. This best practice guideline has been developed with reference to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) "Laboratory Medicine Best Practices: Developing an Evidence-Based Review and Evaluation Process". The CDC document cites an evaluation framework for generating best practice recommendations that are specific to laboratory medicine. These 50 recommendations proposed herein, were generated from a comprehensive literature search and the extensive combined experience of the AACB Vitamins Working Party members. They were formulated based on comparison between an impact assessment rating and strength of evidence and were classified as either: (1) strongly recommend, (2) recommend, (3) no recommendation for or against, or (4) recommend against. These best practice recommendations represent the consensus views, in association with peer reviewed evidence of the AACB Vitamins Working Party, towards best practice for the collection, analysis and interpretation of vitamins A, E and carotenoids in blood.

  10. Laboratory Medicine Best Practice Guideline: Vitamins A, E and the Carotenoids in Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Ronda F; Woollard, Gerald A; Hoad, Kirsten E; Walmsley, Trevor A; Johnson, Lambro A; Briscoe, Scott; Koetsier, Sabrina; Harrower, Tamantha; Gill, Janice P

    2014-01-01

    Despite apparent method similarities between laboratories there appear to be confounding factors inhibiting uniform reporting and standardisation of vitamin assays. The Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists (AACB) Vitamins Working Party, in conjunction with The Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia Quality Assurance Programs, has formulated a guideline to improve performance, reproducibility and accuracy of fat-soluble vitamin results. The aim of the guideline is to identify critical pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical components of the analysis of vitamins A, E and carotenoids in blood to promote best practice and harmonisation. This best practice guideline has been developed with reference to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) “Laboratory Medicine Best Practices: Developing an Evidence-Based Review and Evaluation Process”. The CDC document cites an evaluation framework for generating best practice recommendations that are specific to laboratory medicine. These 50 recommendations proposed herein, were generated from a comprehensive literature search and the extensive combined experience of the AACB Vitamins Working Party members. They were formulated based on comparison between an impact assessment rating and strength of evidence and were classified as either: (1) strongly recommend, (2) recommend, (3) no recommendation for or against, or (4) recommend against. These best practice recommendations represent the consensus views, in association with peer reviewed evidence of the AACB Vitamins Working Party, towards best practice for the collection, analysis and interpretation of vitamins A, E and carotenoids in blood. PMID:25210208

  11. [View of a Laboratory Physician on the Present and Future of Clinical Laboratories].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Shuji

    2014-10-01

    It is meaningful to discuss the "present and future of laboratories" for the development of laboratories and education of medical technologists. Laboratory staff must be able to perform urgent high-quality tests and take part in so-called team-based medicine and should be proud of devising systems that efficiently provide laboratory data for all medical staff. On the other hand, there may be staff with a poor sense of professionalism who work no more than is expected and too readily ask firms and commercial laboratories to solve problems. Overwork caused by providing team-based medicine and a decrease in numbers of clinical chemists are concerns. The following are hoped for in the future. Firstly, laboratory staff will become conscious of their own high-level abilities and expand their areas of work, for example, bioscience, proteomics, and reproductive medicine. Secondly, a consultation system for medical staff and patients will be established. Thirdly, clinical research will be advanced, such as investigating unknown pathophysiologies using laboratory data and samples, and developing new methods of measurement. Lastly, it is of overriding importance that staff of laboratory and educational facilities will cooperate with each other to train the next generation. In conclusion, each laboratory should be appreciated, attractive, positive regarding its contribution to society, and show individuality.

  12. Transferring Best Practice From Undergraduate Practical Teaching To Secondary Schools: The Dynamic Laboratory Manual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy G. Harrison

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Pre-laboratory work has been shown to be an effective investment at undergraduate level in chemistry at the University of Bristol. A Dynamic Laboratory Manual (DLM has been developed to allow undergraduate students to rehearse practicals using virtual experiments, video clips and a range of assessment support. The DLM has been shown to be highly successful in its goals. In this paper wedescribe the development and implementation of a DLM appropriate to post-16 students at school or college which also has applications in teacher training courses. First results from evaluation are presentedwhich show an improvement in practical skill and cognition.

  13. 75 FR 12554 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee: Notice of Charter Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory...-463) of October 6, 1972, that the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee, Centers for..., Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,...

  14. Characterization of mudrocks: a practical application of advanced laboratory testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard J.JARDINE

    2011-01-01

    An integrated approach to geomaterial characterization is advocated that combines geology, in-situ testing, fabric studies, routine index experiments and advanced laboratory testing. It is shown that advanced laboratory testing can explore features such as kinematic yielding and anisotropy in stiffness or shear strength that would otherwise be impossible to quantify. A detailed study performed in London clay at the new Heathrow Terminal 5 site is used to illustrate the arguments made. It is shown that the London clay has strong anisotropy in stiffness, is highly non-linear over the strain range of engineering interest, has markedly anisotropic shear strength characteristics and exhibits a pronounced degree of brittleness. These features can impact significantly on the practical design and analysis of civil engineering works including shallow and deep foundations, tunnels and excavations, and the stability of slopes.

  15. Using Provenance to support Good Laboratory Practice in Grid Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Ney, Miriam; Schreiber, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Conducting experiments and documenting results is daily business of scientists. Good and traceable documentation enables other scientists to confirm procedures and results for increased credibility. Documentation and scientific conduct are regulated and termed as "good laboratory practice." Laboratory notebooks are used to record each step in conducting an experiment and processing data. Originally, these notebooks were paper based. Due to computerised research systems, acquired data became more elaborate, thus increasing the need for electronic notebooks with data storage, computational features and reliable electronic documentation. As a new approach to this, a scientific data management system (DataFinder) is enhanced with features for traceable documentation. Provenance recording is used to meet requirements of traceability, and this information can later be queried for further analysis. DataFinder has further important features for scientific documentation: It employs a heterogeneous and distributed data...

  16. How to develop guidelines for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeschke, R; Jankowski, M; Brozek, J; Antonelli, M

    2009-09-01

    Recent decades have seen an explosion of clinical practice guidelines documents developed to inform clinicians about the best options for managing treatment, with the explicit intent to influence behaviour. As our exposure to guidelines has increased it has become clear that the process of guideline development should follow specific rules in order to avoid disagreement, misunderstanding, misleading recommendations, and confusion. In this article, we review the approach to developing clinical practice guidelines suggested by an international Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) workgroup. This approach suggests several steps for guideline development: 1. determine the purpose, scope, and intended audience; 2. select the panel of guideline authors; 3. specify the main focused clinical questions that the recommendations will address; 4. decide on the relative importance of outcomes; 5. find and summarize the evidence supporting each recommendation; 6. determine the quality of the available evidence; 7. evaluate the balance of desirable and undesirable consequences for a particular course of action; 8. formulate recommendations, including their strenght; and 9. consider a system for subsequent guideline implementation and evaluation. We aim to help the readers of practice guidelines asses those guidelines' quality and validity, as well as to assist the authors of future guidelines in systematically generating clinical recommendations.

  17. Clinical laboratory sciences curriculum redevelopment: an application of change theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Lillian; Vanik, Janet

    2007-01-01

    The Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science (RFUMS) experienced a steady decline in the number of applicants for the Clinical Laboratory Sciences (CLS) Program, even though the department regularly received inquiries from qualified students. The faculty recognized the undergraduate-degreed prospects' desires for both an advanced degree and the procurement of entry-level clinical laboratory knowledge and skills. To address this perceived need, the CLS department developed and implemented a new degree option, the entry-level master's. The new curriculum resulted from a transformational process incorporated into the normal developmental process of curriculum change. This article explores various change theories that were manifested during this transformation process, along with barriers to change and how to overcome them. In addition, the authors demonstrate the need for creation of this entry-level program and provide a curriculum outline.

  18. Clinical photography in the dermatology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witmer, William K; Lebovitz, Peter J

    2012-09-01

    Photography has been accepted for decades as a standard means for documenting dermatologic conditions and as an adjunct to their treatment, in both medical practice and research. The emergence of low-cost easy-to-use digital imaging systems has made good-quality photography more accessible to practitioners, while providing improved functionality in the clinical environment. Primary concerns are controlling lighting and positioning to provide a clear record of the patients skin condition and maintaining consistency over time to assure meaningful comparison of clinical end points.

  19. Clinical Decision Support Systems: A Useful Tool in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolostoumpis G.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of supporting in decision – making shows an increase in recent years. Based on mathematic simulation tools, knowledge databases, processing methods, medical data and methods, artificial intelligence for coding of the available knowledge and for resolving complex problems arising into clinical practice. Aim: the aim of this review is to present the development of new methods and modern services, in clinical practice and the emergence in their implementation. Data and methods: the methodology that was followed included research of articles that referred to health sector and modern technologies, at the electronic data bases “pubmed” and “medline”. Results: Is a useful tool for medical experts using characteristics and medical data used by the doctors. Constitute innovation for the medical community, and ensure the support of clinical decisions with an overall way by providing a comprehensive solution in the light of the integration of computational decision support systems into clinical practice. Conclusions: Decision Support Systems contribute to improving the quality of health services with simultaneous impoundment of costs (i.e. avoid medical errors

  20. Binge eating disorder: from clinical research to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goracci, Arianna; Casamassima, Francesco; Iovieno, Nadia; di Volo, Silvia; Benbow, Jim; Bolognesi, Simone; Fagiolini, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes the clinical course of a young woman suffering from binge eating disorder (BED) associated with obesity. It illustrates the efficacy of different medications in the treatment of BED and related conditions and is followed by the comments and clinical observations of 2 practicing psychiatrists. The issues described in this paper have important clinical implications and are topical, given that BED is now recognized as a specific disorder in the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition classification system, but neither the US Food and Drug Administration nor any other regulatory agency has yet approved a drug for treatment of this disease, despite its very prevalent and disabling nature. Growing evidence from the fields of psychopathology and neurobiology, including preclinical and clinical studies, converges to support the idea that "overeating" has much in common with other behavioral addictions, and substance abuse treatment agents may show promise for the treatment of BED.

  1. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Convulsive Condition Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Rene Navarro Machado

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Convulsive Condition Management. It has been redefined as the occurrence of two or more successive convulsions without conscience recuperation between them; or the occurrence of convulsive uninterrupted activity for more than 5 minutes, including focal crisis. This document includes a review and update of conceptual, etiological and classification aspects for diagnosis and treatment, stressing the various therapy trends. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  2. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Bacterial Meningoencephalitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belkys Rodríguez Llerena

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Bacterial Meningoencephalitis. It has been defined as an acute inflammatory process caused by bacteria, often purulent, which involves the meninges, subarachnoid space around the brain, spinal cord and usually includes the ventricles. It is caused in the 80% of the patients by three bacteria: Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitides and Streptococcus pneumonia. Concepts, classification, diagnosis and treatment were reviewed. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  3. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Hypovolemic Shock.

    OpenAIRE

    Alba Enseñat Álvarez; Omar Bárbaro Rojas Santana; Alexis Díaz Mesa; Ariamna Fleites Gómez

    2009-01-01

    Clinical Practice Guidelines for Hypovolemic Shock. It has been defined as the persistence of tissue hypoperfusion, usually associated to blood hypotension as the result of body fluids loss. This document includes a description of the concept and different stages of the disease, aetiological classification and comments about the main elements related with diagnosis and treatment, stressing volemic restoration. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accom...

  4. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Hypovolemic Shock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Enseñat Álvarez

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Hypovolemic Shock. It has been defined as the persistence of tissue hypoperfusion, usually associated to blood hypotension as the result of body fluids loss. This document includes a description of the concept and different stages of the disease, aetiological classification and comments about the main elements related with diagnosis and treatment, stressing volemic restoration. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  5. Best practices for veterinary toxicologic clinical pathology, with emphasis on the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Lindsay; Boone, Laura I; Ramaiah, Lila; Penraat, Kelley A; von Beust, Barbara R; Ameri, Mehrdad; Poitout-Belissent, Florence M; Weingand, Kurt; Workman, Heather C; Aulbach, Adam D; Meyer, Dennis J; Brown, Diane E; MacNeill, Amy L; Bolliger, Anne Provencher; Bounous, Denise I

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this paper by the Regulatory Affairs Committee (RAC) of the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ASVCP) is to review the current regulatory guidances (eg, guidelines) and published recommendations for best practices in veterinary toxicologic clinical pathology, particularly in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, and to utilize the combined experience of ASVCP RAC to provide updated recommendations. Discussion points include (1) instrumentation, validation, and sample collection, (2) routine laboratory variables, (3) cytologic laboratory variables, (4) data interpretation and reporting (including peer review, reference intervals and statistics), and (5) roles and responsibilities of clinical pathologists and laboratory personnel. Revision and improvement of current practices should be in alignment with evolving regulatory guidance documents, new technology, and expanding understanding and utility of clinical pathology. These recommendations provide a contemporary guide for the refinement of veterinary toxicologic clinical pathology best practices.

  6. Review of clinical medicine and religious practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, William C; Adams, Michelle P; Stewart, Jeanette A; Nelson, Lindsay A

    2013-03-01

    The purpose was to evaluate faith-based studies within the medical literature to determine whether there are ways to help physicians understand how religion affects patients’ lives and diseases. We reviewed articles that assessed the influence of religious practices on medicine as a primary or secondary variable in clinical practice. This review evaluated 49 articles and found that religious faith is important to many patients, particularly those with serious disease, and patients depend on it as a positive coping mechanism. The findings of this review can suggest that patients frequently practice religion and interact with God about their disease state. This spiritual interaction may benefit the patient by providing comfort, increasing knowledge about their disease, greater treatment adherence, and quality of life. The results of prayer on specific disease states appear inconsistent with cardiovascular disease but stronger in other disease states.

  7. Caring during clinical practice: Midwives’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mmajapi E. Chokwe

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caring forms the core of nursing and midwifery. Despite caring being an important emotional aspect of midwifery and nursing, there are general public complaints about uncaring behaviour in midwifery. Therefore, there is a need to explore caring from midwives’ point of view with the hope of identifying solutions and recommendations for midwifery practice. Furthermore, the study aimed to stimulate debate and discussion about the caring behaviour of midwives.Objective: To explore caring during clinical practice as perceived and experienced by midwives.Method: The study was contextual, exploratory and qualitative. The participants were midwives working in state and private hospitals in Tshwane,South Africa where BTech II and III midwifery learners were allocated for work integrated learning (WIL. Data collection was carried out through self-report using a questionnaire and focus group. Questionnaires were distributed to 40 midwives at private and state hospitals in Tshwane. This was followed by two focus group sessions to ensure that data is enriched. The hermeneutic interpretive approach was used to analyse data, and analysis continued until saturation.Results: Themes of caring and uncaring related to patient care and midwives emerged. Thefindings illustrated that the midwives had excellent theoretical knowledge of caring, but someof them did not display caring behaviour during clinical practice.Conclusion: Some of the midwives did not display caring behaviour. Implication for practicewas provided based on the research findings. Recommendations included measures of improving caring behaviours during midwifery practice.

  8. Genomics Virtual Laboratory: A Practical Bioinformatics Workbench for the Cloud.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enis Afgan

    Full Text Available Analyzing high throughput genomics data is a complex and compute intensive task, generally requiring numerous software tools and large reference data sets, tied together in successive stages of data transformation and visualisation. A computational platform enabling best practice genomics analysis ideally meets a number of requirements, including: a wide range of analysis and visualisation tools, closely linked to large user and reference data sets; workflow platform(s enabling accessible, reproducible, portable analyses, through a flexible set of interfaces; highly available, scalable computational resources; and flexibility and versatility in the use of these resources to meet demands and expertise of a variety of users. Access to an appropriate computational platform can be a significant barrier to researchers, as establishing such a platform requires a large upfront investment in hardware, experience, and expertise.We designed and implemented the Genomics Virtual Laboratory (GVL as a middleware layer of machine images, cloud management tools, and online services that enable researchers to build arbitrarily sized compute clusters on demand, pre-populated with fully configured bioinformatics tools, reference datasets and workflow and visualisation options. The platform is flexible in that users can conduct analyses through web-based (Galaxy, RStudio, IPython Notebook or command-line interfaces, and add/remove compute nodes and data resources as required. Best-practice tutorials and protocols provide a path from introductory training to practice. The GVL is available on the OpenStack-based Australian Research Cloud (http://nectar.org.au and the Amazon Web Services cloud. The principles, implementation and build process are designed to be cloud-agnostic.This paper provides a blueprint for the design and implementation of a cloud-based Genomics Virtual Laboratory. We discuss scope, design considerations and technical and logistical constraints

  9. Quality of Control of Clinical-Biochemical Laboratories – Serbian Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinko Peric

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last 20 years in medical laboratories, numerous activities regarding quality and accreditation system were taken. Approach to this problem in European countries is different, so the task of the Accreditation Work Group of the Confederation of European societies for clinical chemistry (EC 4 to help the efforts to harmonize this issue. External quality control in clinical-chemical laboratories imposed the need for the implementation of quality management system. »Good laboratory practice« and its principles were adopted by nominated bodies, both international and national. In the beginning, the standard ISO 9001 was applied for certification and for accreditation EN 45001 and ISO Guide 25, which are prepared for testing and calibration laboratories. Standard ISO 17025 is the successor of the previous documents and for now it is a reference for mentioned laboratories. Accreditation Work Group of the Confederation of European societies for clinical chemistry (EC 4 made an amendment of the requirements for medical laboratories, which this standard describes. Standard draft ISO 15189 was adopted on February 2003 as a final version with requirements for medical laboratories.

  10. AARC Clinical Practice Guideline. Surfactant replacement therapy: 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Brian K; Daigle, Brandon; DiBlasi, Robert M; Restrepo, Ruben D

    2013-02-01

    We searched the MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library databases for English-language randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, and articles investigating surfactant replacement therapy published between January 1990 and July 2012. By inspection of titles, references having no relevance to the clinical practice guideline were eliminated. The update of this clinical practice guideline is based on 253 clinical trials and systematic reviews, and 12 articles investigating surfactant replacement therapy. The following recommendations are made following the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation scoring system: 1: Administration of surfactant replacement therapy is strongly recommended in a clinical setting where properly trained personnel and equipment for intubation and resuscitation are readily available. 2: Prophylactic surfactant administration is recommended for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in which surfactant deficiency is suspected. 3: Rescue or therapeutic administration of surfactant after the initiation of mechanical ventilation in infants with clinically confirmed RDS is strongly recommended. 4: A multiple surfactant dose strategy is recommended over a single dose strategy. 5: Natural exogenous surfactant preparations are recommended over laboratory derived synthetic suspensions at this time. 6: We suggest that aerosolized delivery of surfactant not be utilized at this time.

  11. Understanding the interface between clinical and laboratory staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankie van den Broek

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The interface between clinicians and laboratory staff is where the two meet and work together to provide quality care to their clients (patients. Effectiveness of the interface depends on the way the two groups of professionals relate to and communicate with each other. The number and type of tests requested and the use of the test results for clinical decision making can be influenced by the interface between clinicians and laboratory staff. A model to understand the factors and dynamics around the interface is lacking.Objectives: To propose a new conceptual model to gain insight and analyse factors that influence the laboratory–clinical staff interface.Methods: To develop the conceptual model, a literature study was performed, regulatory guidelines and standards for laboratories were analysed and discussions were held with experts on the topic.Result: A conceptual model and analytical framework provided good guidance in understanding and assessing the organisational and personal factors shaping the interface. The model was based on three elements: (1 the three phases of communication (pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical; (2 the organisational and personal factors of interaction; and (3 the socio-political, economic and cultural context in which clinicians and laboratory staff operate.Conclusion: Assessment of the interface between clinicians and laboratory workers can be performed in a systematic way. Applying this model will provide information to managers of health institutions and heads of laboratories and clinical departments about what happens when clinicians and laboratory staff interact, thus aiding them in designing strategies to improve this interface. Normal 0 21 false false false NL X-NONE X-NONE

  12. Bioterrorism and the Role of the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagar, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Regular review of the management of bioterrorism is essential for maintaining readiness for these sporadically occurring events. This review provides an overview of the history of biological disasters and bioterrorism. I also discuss the recent recategorization of tier 1 agents by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Laboratory Response Network (LRN), and specific training and readiness processes and programs, such as the College of American Pathologists (CAP) Laboratory Preparedness Exercise (LPX). LPX examined the management of cultivable bacterial vaccine and attenuated strains of tier 1 agents or close mimics. In the LPX program, participating laboratories showed improvement in the level of diagnosis required and referral of isolates to an appropriate reference laboratory. Agents which proved difficult to manage in sentinel laboratories included the more fastidious Gram-negative organisms, especially Francisella tularensis and Burkholderia spp. The recent Ebola hemorrhagic fever epidemic provided a check on LRN safety processes. Specific guidelines and recommendations for laboratory safety and risk assessment in the clinical microbiology are explored so that sentinel laboratories can better prepare for the next biological disaster.

  13. Role modeling excellence in clinical nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, R N Beth

    2009-01-01

    Role modeling excellence in clinical nursing practice is the focus of this paper. The phenomenological research study reported involved a group of 8 nurses identified by their colleagues as exemplary. The major theme revealed in this study was that these exemplary nurses were also excellent role models in the clinical setting. This paper details approaches used by these nurses that made them excellent role models. Specifically, the themes of attending to the little things, making connections, maintaining a light-hearted attitude, modeling, and affirming others are presented. These themes are discussed within the framework of Watson [Watson, J., 1989. Human caring and suffering: a subjective model for health services. In: Watson, J., Taylor, R. (Eds.), They Shall Not Hurt: Human Suffering and Human Caring. Colorado University, Boulder, CO] "transpersonal caring" and [Bandura, A., 1997. Social Learning Theory. Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ] "Social Learning Theory." Particular emphasis in the discussion is on how positive role modeling by exemplary practitioners can contribute to the education of clinical nurses in the practice setting.

  14. Sweet syndrome: Clinical and Laboratory Findings of 31 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serap Güneş Bilgili

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Sweet syndrome is an inflammatory disease characterized by the abrupt onset of pain, red papules and plaques, fever, neutrophilic leukocytosis, and dermal neutrophilic infiltrate. There are not enough data about Sweet syndrome in Turkey. In this article, we studied clinical, laboratory, histopathological, and epidemiological characteristics of patients, who presented to our clinic, and compared the findings with the literature. Materials and Methods: All patients diagnosed with Sweet syndrome in our clinic between 2005 and 2011 were included in the study. The epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory findings were retrospectively evaluated. Results: A total of 31 patients with Sweet’s syndrome - 24 female (77.4%, 7 male (22.6%; aged 23-82 years – included in the study. The average age of the patients was 48 years. Cutaneous lesions were most frequently localized in the upper extremity. Conjunctivitis was the common systemic manifestation, followed by fever, arthralgia, and myalgia. The most common trigger factor was infections of the upper respiratory tract. In histopathological evaluations of skin biopsies, dense neutrophil infiltration compatible with Sweet syndrome was detected in the dermis. Also, findings of vasculitis were determined in 3 patients. Discussion: The clinical and laboratory findings in our study are mostly similar to those reported in the literature. We found evidence of vasculitis in 10% of cases, therefore, we think the presence of vasculitis does not necessarily rule out the diagnosis of Sweet syndrome

  15. Practical opto-electronics an illustrated guide for the laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Protopopov, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    This book explains how to create opto-electronic systems in a most efficient way, avoiding typical mistakes. It covers light detection techniques, imaging, interferometry, spectroscopy, modulation-demodulation, heterodyning, beam steering, and many other topics common to laboratory applications. The focus is made on self-explanatory figures rather than on words. The book guides the reader through the entire process of creating problem-specific opto-electronic systems, starting from optical source, through beam transportation optical arrangement, to photodetector and data acquisition system. The relevant basics of beam propagation and computer-based raytracing routines are also explained, and sample codes are listed. the book teaches important know-how and practical tricks that are never disclosed in scientific publications.  The book can become the reader's personal adviser in the world of opto-electronics and navigator in the ocean of the market of optical components and systems. Succinct, well-illustrate...

  16. [Asthma clinical practice guidelines: advantages and pitfalls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Vicente; Bellido-Casado, Jesús; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Rodrigo, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    The Clinical Practice Guidelines on asthma have contributed towards unifying concepts and reaching a consensus on performances between different professional groups. However, they have failed in the overall improvement in the management of asthma, the final objective that they are meant to achieve. Today, almost 20 years after they appeared, the majority of asthmatic patients are still inadequately controlled, partly due to lack of follow up by doctors and the rest of health care staff who have to look after them. This lack of follow up of these recommendations is probably associated with a lack of well structured planning in their circulation and implementation. Also, although the recommendations of these guidelines agree in what is essential, they differ in other aspects, which in turn could be determining factors in clinical practice. The purpose of this article has been to establish the main differences in the recommendations that the principal clinical practice guidelines on the disease propose on the diagnosis, classification and treatment of asthma. To do this we have compared, The British Guideline on the Management of Asthma 2007, The Global Strategy for Asthma Management and Prevention/Global Initiative for Asthma 2006 (GINA), the National Prevention program for Education on Asthma (Programa Nacional de Prevención para la Educación del Asma) (NAEPP), the Spanish Guide for the Management of Asthma (Guía Española para el Manejo del Asma 2003) (GEMA) and the ALAT y SEPAR guides, Latin-America and Spain. Recommendations for the Prevention and Treatment of Asthma Exacerbation (América Latina y España. Recomendaciones para la Prevención y el Tratamiento de la Exacerbación Asmática 2008) (ALERTA).

  17. A Study on Knowledge, Attitude And Practice of Laboratory Safety Measures Among Paramedical Staff of Laboratory Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansa M Goswami, Sumeeta T Soni, Sachin M Patel, Mitesh K Patel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: A lot of accidents occur in the laboratory due to lack of proper knowledge regarding laboratory safety measures, indifferent attitude & improper implementation of safe laboratory practices. In view of this, the present study on knowledge, Attitude & Practice (KAP of laboratory safety measures was carried out among paramedical staff of laboratory services of tertiary care teaching hospital, western India. Method: This was a comparative study which used a standardized, structured self-administered questionnaire to survey knowledge, attitude and practice of paramedical staff. The KAP study enrolled 81 respondents. Results: Regarding knowledge- the majority knew the very important issues related with laboratory safety like Post Exposure Prophylaxis (96.55% & discarding of blood samples (93.10% etc. In regard to attitude towards the scientific process, all are very much aware about importance of protective devices (i.e. Wearing Gloves and Biomedical waste management. In regard to the practice in laboratory, the entire study subject group (100% replied “YES” in each question that shows the good quality work of the laboratory. Conclusion: The induction training on Laboratory safety is very important and motivating exercise for improving the laboratory safety measures.

  18. Clinical practice guideline: screening and diagnosing autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, J

    2001-12-01

    The clinical practice guideline (CPG) reviewed in this month's column concerns the screening and diagnosis of autism. Autism is the third most common developmental disability and affects more than 1 in 500 children, or nearly 400,000 people in the United States, in some form. Primary care providers of children, including pediatric nurse practitioners (PNPs) and family nurse practitioners (FNPs), should reasonably expect to care for at least one child with autism (CWA). The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) has therefore developed guidelines to help healthcare providers facilitate the early identification of children with autism.

  19. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Severe Asthma Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddy Pereira Valdes

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Severe Asthma Treatment. This disease is characterized by an overreaction of the tracheobronchial tree with hyperactivity after certain stimulus consisting of a diffuse narrowing of the respiratory ways related with an excessive contraction of the bronchial smooth muscle, hyper-secretion of mucus and mucosa edema. It is spontaneously reversible or reversible after treatment. We include a review of its definition, classification and development, stressing those elements related with ventilation. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  20. The Sherlock Holmes method in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopeña, B

    2014-04-01

    This article lists the integral elements of the Sherlock Holmes method, which is based on the intelligent collection of information through detailed observation, careful listening and thorough examination. The information thus obtained is analyzed to develop the main and alternative hypotheses, which are shaped during the deductive process until the key leading to the solution is revealed. The Holmes investigative method applied to clinical practice highlights the advisability of having physicians reason through and seek out the causes of the disease with the data obtained from acute observation, a detailed review of the medical history and careful physical examination.

  1. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices; Energy Recovery in Laboratory Facilities (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-06-01

    This guide regarding energy recovery is one in a series on best practices for laboratories. It was produced by Laboratories for the 21st Century ('Labs 21'), a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy. Laboratories typically require 100% outside air for ventilation at higher rates than other commercial buildings. Minimum ventilation is typically provided at air change per hour (ACH) rates in accordance with codes and adopted design standards including Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Standard 1910.1450 (4 to 12 ACH - non-mandatory) or the 2011 American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Applications Handbook, Chapter 16 - Laboratories (6 to 12 ACH). While OSHA states this minimum ventilation rate 'should not be relied on for protection from toxic substances released into the laboratory' it specifically indicates that it is intended to 'provide a source of air for breathing and for input to local ventilation devices (e.g., chemical fume hoods or exhausted bio-safety cabinets), to ensure that laboratory air is continually replaced preventing the increase of air concentrations of toxic substances during the working day, direct air flow into the laboratory from non-laboratory areas and out to the exterior of the building.' The heating and cooling energy needed to condition and move this outside air can be 5 to 10 times greater than the amount of energy used in most office buildings. In addition, when the required ventilation rate exceeds the airflow needed to meet the cooling load in low-load laboratories, additional heating energy may be expended to reheat dehumidified supply air from the supply air condition to prevent over cooling. In addition to these low-load laboratories, reheat may also be required in adjacent spaces such as corridors that provide makeup air to replace air being pulled into negative-pressure laboratories

  2. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices; Energy Recovery in Laboratory Facilities (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-06-01

    This guide regarding energy recovery is one in a series on best practices for laboratories. It was produced by Laboratories for the 21st Century ('Labs 21'), a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy. Laboratories typically require 100% outside air for ventilation at higher rates than other commercial buildings. Minimum ventilation is typically provided at air change per hour (ACH) rates in accordance with codes and adopted design standards including Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Standard 1910.1450 (4 to 12 ACH - non-mandatory) or the 2011 American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Applications Handbook, Chapter 16 - Laboratories (6 to 12 ACH). While OSHA states this minimum ventilation rate 'should not be relied on for protection from toxic substances released into the laboratory' it specifically indicates that it is intended to 'provide a source of air for breathing and for input to local ventilation devices (e.g., chemical fume hoods or exhausted bio-safety cabinets), to ensure that laboratory air is continually replaced preventing the increase of air concentrations of toxic substances during the working day, direct air flow into the laboratory from non-laboratory areas and out to the exterior of the building.' The heating and cooling energy needed to condition and move this outside air can be 5 to 10 times greater than the amount of energy used in most office buildings. In addition, when the required ventilation rate exceeds the airflow needed to meet the cooling load in low-load laboratories, additional heating energy may be expended to reheat dehumidified supply air from the supply air condition to prevent over cooling. In addition to these low-load laboratories, reheat may also be required in adjacent spaces such as corridors that provide makeup air to replace air being pulled into negative-pressure laboratories

  3. Biosensors in Clinical Practice: Focus on Oncohematology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostino Cortelezzi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Biosensors are devices that are capable of detecting specific biological analytes and converting their presence or concentration into some electrical, thermal, optical or other signal that can be easily analysed. The first biosensor was designed by Clark and Lyons in 1962 as a means of measuring glucose. Since then, much progress has been made and the applications of biosensors are today potentially boundless. This review is limited to their clinical applications, particularly in the field of oncohematology. Biosensors have recently been developed in order to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients affected by hematological malignancies, such as the biosensor for assessing the in vitro pre-treatment efficacy of cytarabine in acute myeloid leukemia, and the fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based biosensor for assessing the efficacy of imatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia. The review also considers the challenges and future perspectives of biosensors in clinical practice.

  4. [Perspective for clinical laboratory management and its systematization--effects of the systematization of clinical laboratory management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, S

    1993-04-01

    There are a large number of ideas concerning the systematization of clinical laboratory management. Therefore many types of laboratory systems have been constructed. As our hospital is not large, we adopted a small scale laboratory system. In introducing it, we expected not only an increase in value-added labor productivity by automating laboratory tests, but also an improvement in technologist's cost awareness. Consequently, new system equipment has itself performed the former in many sections, but not the latter. Improvement in cost awareness was caused by the technologist's routine work in managing reagent and material stocks. We found that this soft-type systematization has been more important than the advanced hard-type system.

  5. Realistic modeling of clinical laboratory operation by computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, W; Braun, S L; Hanssmann, F; Liebl, F; Berchtold, G; Blaschke, H; Eckert, M; Hoffmann, G E; Klose, S

    1994-06-01

    An important objective of laboratory management is to adjust the laboratory's capability to the needs of patients' care as well as economy. The consequences of management may be changes in laboratory organization, equipment, or personnel planning. At present only one's individual experience can be used for making such decisions. We have investigated whether the techniques of operations research could be transferred to a clinical laboratory and whether an adequate simulation model of the laboratory could be realized. First we listed and documented the system design and the process flow for each single laboratory request. These input data were linked by the simulation model (programming language SIMSCRIPT II.5). The output data (turnaround times, utilization rates, and analysis of queue length) were validated by comparison with the current performance data obtained by tracking specimen flow. Congruence of the data was excellent (within +/- 4%). In planning experiments we could study the consequences of changes in order entry, staffing, and equipment on turnaround times, utilization, and queue lengths. We conclude that simulation can be a valuable tool for better management decisions.

  6. Clinical application of pharmacogenetics: focusing on practical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Matthew T; McCarthy, Jeanette J; Shin, Jaekyu

    2015-01-01

    Recent large-scale genetic-based studies have transformed the field of pharmacogenetics to identify, characterize and leverage genetic information to inform patient care. Genetic testing can be used to alter drug selection, optimize drug dosing and prevent unnecessary adverse events. As precision medicine becomes the mainstay in the clinic, it becomes critical for clinicians to utilize pharmacogenetics to guide patient care. One primary challenge is identifying patients where genetic tests that can potentially impact patient care. To address this challenge, our review highlights many practical issues clinicians may encounter: identifying candidate patients and clinical laboratories for pharmacogenetic testing, selecting highly curated resources to help asses test validity, reimbursing costs of pharmacogenetic tests, and interpreting of pharmacogenetic test results.

  7. The DSM and Professional Practice: Research, Clinical, and Institutional Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Michael

    2016-06-01

    How mental illnesses are defined has significant ramifications, given the substantial social and individual repercussions of these conditions. Using actor-network theory, I analyze how mental health professionals use the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) in their work. Drawing on observations of a neuropsychological laboratory and interviews with 27 professionals (i.e., psychiatrists, psychologists), I investigate how the DSM is used in research, clinical, and institutional work. In research, the DSM influences study design and exclusion/inclusion criteria. In the clinic, the DSM influences how disorders are conceptualized and diagnosed. Institutionally, the DSM aligns the patient-professional encounter to insurance and pharmaceutical interests. I conclude that the DSM operates as multiple, context-specific taxonomies that pervasively influence professional practices, such that all possible actions must orient to DSM criteria, with professionals both a source and an object of institutionalized gaze.

  8. Taking PDT into mainstream clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bown, Stephen G.

    2009-06-01

    Many individuals in the field are frustrated by the slow progress getting PDT established in mainstream clinical practice. The five key reasons are: 1. Lack of adequate evidence of safety and efficacy and optimization of dosimetry. These are fundamental. The number of randomized controlled studies is still small. For some cancer applications, it is difficult to get patients to agree to be randomised, so different approaches must be taken. Anecdotal results are not acceptable to sceptics and regulators. 2. The regulatory processes. The rules get more complex every day, but there is no choice, they must be met. The full bureaucratic strength of the pharmaceutical industry is needed to address these issues. 3. Conservatism of the medical profession. Established physicians are reluctant to change practice, especially if it means referring patients to different specialists. 4. Lack of education. It is amazing how few physicians have even heard of PDT and many that have, are sceptical. The profile of PDT to both the medical profession and the general public needs to be raised dramatically. Patient demand works wonders! 5. Money. Major investment is required to run clinical trials. Pharmaceutical companies may see PDT as a threat (eg reduced market for chemotherapy agents). Licensed photosensitisers are expensive. Why not reduce the price initially, to get the technique established and stimulate demand? PDT has the potential for enormous cost savings for health service providers. With appropriate motivation and resources these problems can be addressed. Possible routes forward will be suggested.

  9. The EC4 European syllabus for post-graduate training in clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieringa, Gijsbert; Zerah, Simone; Jansen, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Laboratory medicine's practitioners across the European community include medical, scientific and pharmacy trained specialists whose contributions to health and healthcare is in the application of diagnostic tests for screening and early detection of disease, differential diagnosis, monitoring...... in translating knowledge and skills into ability to practice. In a 'Specialist knowledge' division, the expectations from the individual disciplines of Clinical Chemistry/Immunology, Haematology/Blood Transfusion, Microbiology/ Virology, Genetics and In Vitro Fertilisation are described. Beyond providing...

  10. How to critically appraise a clinical practice guideline

    OpenAIRE

    Clubb, Adrian B.; Dahm, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Clinical practice guidelines play a critical role in guiding the evidence-based clinical practice of urology. We describe a systematic approach to critical appraisal of urology guidelines. Materials and Methods: Based on a focused clinical question derived from a clinical scenario, we identified a relevant clinical practice guideline that we critically appraised using the Users’ Guide to the Medical Literature framework as to whether the results are valid, what are the results, and c...

  11. [The challenges of standardization in clinical diagnostic laboratories of medical organizations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men'shikov, V V

    2013-04-01

    The generalized data concerning the conditions of application of regulations of national standards in clinical diagnostic laboratories of medical organizations is presented. The primary information was provided by 14 regions of 6 federal administrative okrugs of Russia. The causes of challenges of application of requirements of standards are presented. They are mostly related with insufficient financial support, lacking of manpower, difficulties with reagents supply, inadequate technical maintenance of devices and absence of support of administration of medical organizations. The recommendations are formulated concerning the necessity of publishing the document of Minzdrav of Russia to determine the need in application of standards in laboratory practice.

  12. Clinical practice on the horizon: personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwell, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of the human genome project, we have never known so much about the uniqueness of individuals. Personalized medicine is poised to use this genetic and genomic information along with the impact of environment and clinical presentation to provide healthcare from an individual perspective. This offers the opportunity to improve our ability to diagnose and predict disease, provide earlier intervention, identify new treatment regimens, and address the safety and efficacy of drug use. The impact of personalized medicine to our current model of healthcare delivery is tremendous, and although strides have been made, there are still challenges and barriers to overcome before personalized medicine can be fully implemented. Advanced practice nurses may not be fully aware of the personalized medicine initiative or may not be well versed on genetic and genomic content, which is a key concept of personalized medicine. The role of advanced practice nurses is an integral part of the healthcare system, and as such, they are poised to be key providers and contributors to personalized medicine. The personalized medicine initiative is discussed along with examples of genetic and genomic information that lend to our understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of disease, as well as the role and responsibilities of advanced practice nurses. Resources for personalized medicine and genetic and genomic content are provided.

  13. ASVCP quality assurance guidelines: control of preanalytical, analytical, and postanalytical factors for urinalysis, cytology, and clinical chemistry in veterinary laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn-Christie, Rebekah G; Flatland, Bente; Friedrichs, Kristen R; Szladovits, Balazs; Harr, Kendal E; Ruotsalo, Kristiina; Knoll, Joyce S; Wamsley, Heather L; Freeman, Kathy P

    2012-03-01

    In December 2009, the American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ASVCP) Quality Assurance and Laboratory Standards committee published the updated and peer-reviewed ASVCP Quality Assurance Guidelines on the Society's website. These guidelines are intended for use by veterinary diagnostic laboratories and veterinary research laboratories that are not covered by the US Food and Drug Administration Good Laboratory Practice standards (Code of Federal Regulations Title 21, Chapter 58). The guidelines have been divided into 3 reports: (1) general analytical factors for veterinary laboratory performance and comparisons; (2) hematology, hemostasis, and crossmatching; and (3) clinical chemistry, cytology, and urinalysis. This particular report is one of 3 reports and documents recommendations for control of preanalytical, analytical, and postanalytical factors related to urinalysis, cytology, and clinical chemistry in veterinary laboratories and is adapted from sections 1.1 and 2.2 (clinical chemistry), 1.3 and 2.5 (urinalysis), 1.4 and 2.6 (cytology), and 3 (postanalytical factors important in veterinary clinical pathology) of these guidelines. These guidelines are not intended to be all-inclusive; rather, they provide minimal guidelines for quality assurance and quality control for veterinary laboratory testing and a basis for laboratories to assess their current practices, determine areas for improvement, and guide continuing professional development and education efforts.

  14. Clinical laboratories, the select agent program, and biological surety (biosurety).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastel, Ross H; Demmin, Gretchen; Severson, Grant; Torres-Cruz, Rafael; Trevino, Jorge; Kelly, John; Arrison, Jay; Christman, Joy

    2006-06-01

    The threat of bioterrorism has led to increased concerns over the availability of biological select agents and toxins (BSAT). Congress has implemented several public laws that have led to the development of federal regulations by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the US Department of Agriculture. The CDC regulation 42 CFR 73 has a direct impact on all clinical laboratories that may at some time identify BSAT in a clinical specimen. The Department of Defense has imposed a more stringent layer of regulation called biological surety (biosurety) on top of the requirements of 42 CFR 73 for military laboratories that possess BSAT. However,42 CFR 73 falls into the framework of biosurety. Both sets of regulations have four pillars (safety, physical security, agent account-ability, and personnel reliability) that are built on a foundation of training and covered by a roof of management (operations and plans).

  15. Verification and validation of diagnostic laboratory tests in clinical virology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabenau, Holger F; Kessler, Harald H; Kortenbusch, Marhild; Steinhorst, Andreas; Raggam, Reinhard B; Berger, Annemarie

    2007-10-01

    This review summarizes major issues of verification and validation procedures and describes minimum requirements for verification and validation of diagnostic assays in clinical virology including instructions for CE/IVD-labeled as well as for self-developed ("home-brewed") tests or test systems. It covers techniques useful for detection of virus specific antibodies, for detection of viral antigens, for detection of viral nucleic acids, and for isolation of viruses on cell cultures in the routine virology laboratory.

  16. Evaluation of Neonatal Hemolytic Jaundice: Clinical and Laboratory Parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Anet Papazovska Cherepnalkovski; Vjekoslav Krzelj; Beti Zafirovska-Ivanovska; Todor Gruev; Josko Markic; Natasa Aluloska; Nikolina Zdraveska; Katica Piperkovska

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neonatal jaundice that occurs in ABO or Rhesus issoimunisation has been recognized as one of the major risk factors for development of severe hyperbilirubinemia and bilirubin neurotoxicity. AIM: Aim of our study was to investigate clinical and laboratory parameters associated with hemolytic jaundice due to Rh and ABO incompatibility and compare results with the group of unspecific jaundice. MATERIAL AND METHODS: One hundred sixty seven (167) neonatal hyperbilirubinemia cas...

  17. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of Achromobacter xylosoxidans infection.

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans was isolated from six patients. The organism causes opportunistic infections in patients who are compromised. A. xylosoxidans is a catalase- and oxidase-positive, motile, gram-negative rod that oxidizes xylose and glucose. The organism exists in a water environment and may be confused with Pseudomonas species. Unlike pseudomonas, achromobacter has peritrichous flagella. The clinical and laboratory characteristics of A. xylosoxidans are presented.

  18. Clinical Laboratory Stressors Used to Study Alcohol–Stress Relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Suzanne; Bacon, Amy K.; Sinha, Rajita; Uhart, Magdalena; Adinoff, Bryon

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the biologic systems that underlie the relationship between stress and alcohol consumption may lead to better prevention efforts and more effective treatments for alcoholism. Clinical laboratory studies offer a unique opportunity to examine these relationships by using a controlled environment to study how an acute stressor affects alcohol drinking and alcohol craving, how individuals in recovery or those at risk for alcoholism may respond differently to stressors relative to co...

  19. Practical recommendations for strengthening national and regional laboratory networks in Africa in the Global Health Security era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Best

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The role of national health laboratories in support of public health response has expanded beyond laboratory testing to include a number of other core functions such as emergency response, training and outreach, communications, laboratory-based surveillance and data management. These functions can only be accomplished by an efficient and resilient national laboratory network that includes public health, reference, clinical and other laboratories. It is a primary responsibility of the national health laboratory in the Ministry of Health to develop and maintain the national laboratory network in the country. In this article, we present practical recommendations based on 17 years of network development experience for the development of effective national laboratory networks. These recommendations and examples of current laboratory networks, are provided to facilitate laboratory network development in other states. The development of resilient, integrated laboratory networks will enhance each state’s public health system and is critical to the development of a robust national laboratory response network to meet global health security threats.

  20. [The practical medicine and its reformation in XVII-XIX centuries, report 2: the becoming of clinical medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The article deals with the becoming of clinical medicine in chronologic scope from 1800 to middle 1870s. The major scientific achievements related to the application of practical medicine such methods as clinical anatomical comparison, laboratory experiment, chemical analysis, physical, instrumental, functional, laboratory diagnostics are discussed.

  1. Open soundcard as a platform for practical, laboratory study of digital audio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrov, Smilen; Serafin, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates how lacking suitable platforms for laboratory exercises becomes a learning problem, limiting the practical experience students gain. In engineering education, laboratory demonstration difficulty of issues like real-time streaming in digital signal and audio processing is...

  2. Self-compassion in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germer, Christopher K; Neff, Kristin D

    2013-08-01

    Self-compassion is conceptualized as containing 3 core components: self-kindness versus self-judgment, common humanity versus isolation, and mindfulness versus overidentification, when relating to painful experiences. Research evidence demonstrates that self-compassion is related to psychological flourishing and reduced psychopathology. Mindful Self-Compassion (MSC) is an 8-week training program, meeting 2.5 hours each week, designed to help participants cultivate self-compassion. MSC contains a variety of meditations (e.g., loving-kindness, affectionate breathing) as well as informal practices for use in daily life (e.g., soothing touch, self-compassionate letter writing). A detailed clinical case illustrates the journey of a client through the 8 weeks of MSC training, describing the key features of each session and the client's response.

  3. [Toxoplasmosis in pregnancy - questions in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geleneky, Markéta

    2013-06-01

    Toxoplasmosis acquired during pregnancy is a serious disease that may significantly affect fetal development and cause irreversible or therapeutically hardly influenced damage to the newborn. Early and correct diagnosis of the disease in the mother is essential for determining prognosis and further diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The case study combines a number of factors to be encountered in clinical practice which may complicate diagnostic considerations. One of them is the existence of a rare phenomenon of reinfection - its possible effects on prenatal screening and other interpretations of such findings. Another problem is the evaluation of the origin of sonographically confirmed fetopathy in relation to Toxoplasma etiology and the choice of next steps that should follow in this situation. Finally, the text discusses the selection of postnatal examinations so that they sufficiently contribute to decision-making about the newborn's treatment initiation.

  4. Clinical, laboratorial and radiographic predictors of Bordetella pertussis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Vieira Bellettini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify clinical, laboratorial and radiographic predictors for Bordetella pertussis infection.METHODS: This was a retrospective study, which analyzed medical records of all patients submitted to a molecular dignosis (qPCR for B. pertussis from September 2011 to January 2013. Clinical and laboratorial data were reviewed, including information about age, sex, signs/symptoms, length of hospitalization, blood cell counts, imaging findings, coinfection with other respiratory pathogens and clinical outcome.RESULTS: 222 cases were revised. Of these, 72.5% had proven pertussis, and 60.9% were under 1 year old. In patients aging up to six months, independent predictors for B. pertussisinfection were (OR 8.0, CI 95% 1.8-36.3; p=0.007 and lymphocyte count >104/µL (OR 10.0, CI 95% 1.8-54.5; p=0.008. No independent predictors of B. pertussisinfection could be determined for patients older than six months. Co-infection was found in 21.4% of patients, of which 72.7% were up to six months of age. Adenovirus was the most common agent (40.9%. In these patients, we were not able to identify any clinical features to detect patients presenting with a respiratory co-infection, even though longer hospital stay was observed in patients with co-infections (12 vs. 6 days; p=0.009.CONCLUSIONS: Cyanosis and lymphocytosis are independent predictors for pertussis in children up to 6 months old.

  5. Liposomal drug delivery system from laboratory to clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kshirsagar N

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of drug delivery systems is to deliver a drug effectively, specifically to the site of action and to achieve greater efficacy and minimise the toxic effects compared to conventional drugs. Amongst various carrier systems, liposomes have generated a great interest because of their versatility. Liposomes are vesicular concentric bilayered structures, which are biocompatible, biodegradable and nonimmumnogenic. They can control the delivery of drugs by targeting the drug to the site of action or by site avoidance drug delivery or by prolonged circulation of drugs. Amphotericin B (Amp B remains the drug of choice in most systemic mycoses and also as a second line treatment for Kala azar. However, its toxic effects often limit its use. Although the liposome delivery system has been tried for several drugs, only a few have been used in patients due to the slow development of necessary large-scale pharmaceutical procedures. This paper reviews the development of the technique for liposomal Amphotericin B (L-Amp-LRC-1, FungisomeTM drug delivery system in our laboratory in collaboration with the department of Biochemistry, Delhi University in India and proving the safety and efficacy of this preparation in clinical practice. It also attempts to compare the efficacy and benefits of our product for Indian patients with those of similar products and it includes facts from the publications that flowed from our work. As compared to conventional Amp B, Fungisome is infused over a much shorter period requiring a smaller volume and no premedication. It was found to be safe in patients who had developed serious unacceptable toxicity with conventional Amp B. In renal transplant patients, Fungisome did not produce any nephrotoxicity. Fungisome is effective in fungal infections resistant to fluconazole, conventional Amp B and in virgin and resistant cases of visceral leishmaniasis. The cost of any drug is of great significance, especially in India

  6. Role of the clinical pathology laboratory in the evaluation of endometrial carcinomas for Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Bojana; Broaddus, Russell R

    2014-05-01

    Molecular diagnostic testing of endometrial carcinomas in the pathology laboratory has recently emerged as a key component of the clinical evaluation of Lynch syndrome in many centers. Testing modalities involve immunohistochemical and PCR-based analyses. This article outlines the routine application of these analyses, provides a practical guide for troubleshooting some of the common technical issues related to their performance, and reviews common pitfalls in their interpretation. Discrepancies between tissue testing and genetic testing results are discussed in the context of the current understanding of endometrial cancer biology. The merits of universal versus targeted tissue testing based on clinical patient history and histological tumor appearance are also addressed.

  7. Clinical Practice Guidelines: Whose Practice Are We Guiding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Morgan; Bowe, Sarah N; Laury, Adrienne M

    2016-09-01

    The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) has just released an update to the clinical practice guideline (CPG) on otitis media with effusion. This common condition is frequently managed by primary care providers; however, their awareness and utilization of the AAO-HNSF CPGs are unknown. We performed a cross-sectional survey to assess familiarity with otologic diagnoses, evaluation skills, and guidelines. Only 38.5% of respondents use pneumatic otoscopy, and roughly 50% utilize a CPG for management of otitis media or for referral for tympanostomy tube insertion. Providers predominantly use the acute otitis media guideline from the American Academy of Pediatrics. In this single-institution study, providers are largely unaware of the AAO-HNSF CPGs and could benefit from additional training, including workshops taught by otolaryngologists within individual health care systems or development of a national otolaryngology medical student curriculum. A more immediate option includes referencing our CPGs on specialty societies' websites or newsletters.

  8. Acute tramadol poisoning and its clinical and laboratory findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Hamid Reza; Soltaninejad, Kambiz; Shadnia, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tramadol is a centrally acting analgesic with opioid and nonopioid properties, which extensively used in the relief of mild to moderate pain. Tramadol poisoning is a common cause of acute pharmaceutical poisoning in Iran. There are a few studies about clinical and laboratory findings related to acute tramadol poisoning. Therefore, the aim of this study was to demonstrate the clinical and laboratory findings in tramadol acute poisoning cases. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective descriptive study of patients with acute tramadol poisoning who referred to Loghman Hakim Hospital Poison Center during January to April 2012. Data such as patient's age, sex, time of ingestion, ingested dose, cause of poisoning, mean duration of hospitalization, patient's clinical presentations, laboratory findings, therapeutic measures, and patient's outcome have collected in a predesigned checklist. Results: A total of 144 patients including 111 men (77%) and 33 women (23%) with acute tramadol poisoning was included in this study. The mean ingested dose was 1971.2 mg (100-20000 mg). Seizure (47.91%) was the most frequent clinical symptom. Blood gas on admission showed pH (7.3 ± 0.1), PCO2 (49.7 ± 8.6 mmHg) and HCO3− (24.1 ± 3.8 mEq/L), indicating pure acute respiratory acidosis may be occurred in tramadol-intoxicated patients. There were significant differences between tramadol-intoxicated cases with and without a seizure with regard to the time interval between ingestion and admission on hospital, ingested dose and PCO2. Conclusion: Seizure and rise of PCO2 were the most findings in this study. PMID:25535500

  9. [The purpose of clinical laboratory accreditation in transplantation medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegar-Mestrić, Zlata; Nazor, Aida; Perkov, Sonja; Surina, Branka; Siftar, Zoran; Ozvald, Ivan; Vidas, Zeljko

    2011-09-01

    Although transplantation of solid organs has become a more standardized method of treatment, liver transplantation represents an exceptional multidisciplinary clinical procedure requiring understanding of specific pathophysiological changes that occur in the end stage of liver disease. Liver transplantation has been performed at Merkur University Hospital since 1998, with 360 transplantations performed to date. The most common indications are alcohol liver disease, cirrhosis caused by hepatitis B and C virus, hepatocellular carcinoma and cryptogenetic liver cirrhosis. Laboratory tests required for liver transplantation are performed at Department of Clinical Chemistry, Merkur University Hospital, accredited according to ISO 15189 in 2007 for the areas of clinical chemistry, laboratory hematology and coagulation, laboratory immunology-cell immunophenotyping, and molecular diagnosis. The complexity of liver transplant patients requires constant interaction between the anesthesiologist team and clinical laboratory, which has to ensure fast and efficient intraoperative monitoring of biochemical and liver profile: electrolytes and acid-base status, complete blood count, coagulation profile and monitoring of graft function according to the individual patient's health status. Dynamics of intraoperative changes is measured in whole arterial blood samples on a Nova Biomedical Stat Profile Critical Care Xpress mobile acid-base analyzer. Frequent monitoring of ionized calcium and magnesium levels is very important because of citrated blood transfusion and for appropriate therapeutic procedure. During anhepatic stage, there is a progressive increase in lactate level concentration. After reperfusion, a rapid increase in lactate clearance is an excellent indicator of stable graft initial function and its adequate size. During the transplantation procedure, there is usually a biphasic acid-base disturbance characterized by metabolic acidosis and then by metabolic alkalosis. The

  10. Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease: Clinical and laboratory characteristics and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease is an uncommon disorder with worldwide distribution, characterized by fever and benign enlargement of the lymph nodes, primarily affecting young adults. Awareness about this disorder may help prevent misdiagnosis and inappropriate investigations and treatment. The objective of the study was to evaluate the clinical and laboratory characteristics of histopathologically confirmed cases of Kikuchi′s disease from a tertiary care center in southern India. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of all adult patients with histopathologically confirmed Kikuchi′s disease from January 2007 to December 2011 in a 2700-bed teaching hospital in South India was done. The clinical and laboratory characteristics and outcome were analyzed. Results: There were 22 histopathologically confirmed cases of Kikuchi′s disease over the 5-year period of this study. The mean age of the subjects′ was 29.7 years (SD 8.11 and majority were women (Male: female- 1:3.4. Apart from enlarged cervical lymph nodes, prolonged fever was the most common presenting complaint (77.3%. The major laboratory features included anemia (54.5%, increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate (31.8%, elevated alanine aminotransferase (27.2% and elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH (31.8%. Conclusion: Even though rare, Kikuchi′s disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of young individuals, especially women, presenting with lymphadenopathy and prolonged fever. Establishing the diagnosis histopathologically is essential to avoid inappropriate investigations and therapy.

  11. SMARTWheel: From concept to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Rory A

    2009-09-01

    Wheelchair prescription is complex with thousands of choices and options. Theoretically, a higher quality or innovative wheelchair that is appropriately matched to the user and their unique needs will increase participation. It is well accepted that there is an alarmingly high incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome, and rotator cuff injuries among manual wheelchair users. Since the initial conceptualization, the SMART(Wheel) was intended to better understand the physiological and physical effects of wheelchair propulsion on the body. Initially, little was known about wheelchair propulsion and the SMART(Wheel) transformed the nascent field of wheelchair propulsion biomechanics. Although still an important area of clinical research, the SMART(Wheel) has been critical to the study of the relationship between the type of wheelchair, set-up, activity, technique, anatomy, and physiology and repetitive strain injury. There has been growing evidence that the wheelchair-user interaction explains a substantial portion of the risk of developing a degenerative injury and on community participation. A noteworthy contribution of this work was the release of the clinical practice guideline, entitled, Preservation of Upper Limb Function Following Spinal Cord Injury in 2005. The SMART(Wheel) has been used by other scientists in areas that were not originally envisioned to be applications. It has been used to support the design of tools for developing a trail mapping rating and description system. It has also supported the design of accessible pedestrian walkways standards, accessible playground surfaces, and to evaluate carpets for wheelchair accessibility. It is likely that there are more new areas of exploration to emerge. This article describes the evolution of the SMART(Wheel) as new technologies became available and its applications in the field of wheelchair biomechanics and clinical service delivery.

  12. Management of stress and stress-related diseases: Emerging computer-based technologies and the rationale for clinical laboratory assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Ezekiel Uba Nwose; Ross Stuart Richards

    2009-01-01

    Background : Over the years, the issue of stress management in mental health has been discussed without reference to the clinical laboratory perspectives. Translational research and the vast array of emerging diagnostic technologies in alternative medical practice are now bridging the gap. While it would be scientific arrogance for the clinical practitioner and scientist to ignore the trend, the new technologies seeking clinical acceptability necessarily require expatiation of the scientific ...

  13. Neocollagenesis and Neoelastinogenesis: From the Laboratory to the Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta-Ambalal, Sujata R

    2016-01-01

    An internet search was made looking for articles about chemical and physical modalities that are known to induce collagen and elastin formation. Textbooks, independent articles, journals and books on pathology, biochemistry, aesthetic medicine and cosmetic and plastic surgery were used as references. Here, we take a look at various studies, in vitro and in vivo, that lend credence to the products and procedures used in clinical practice to induce neocollagenesis and neoelastinogenesis.

  14. The importance of practice guidelines in clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciarra, Erica

    2012-01-01

    This position paper is a brief review of the importance of practice guidelines in clinical use. Emphasis is placed on evidence-based practice guidelines and research. This position paper attests to the importance of the use of guidelines that direct clinical nursing practice.

  15. An innovative clinical practicum to teach evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancato, Vera C

    2006-01-01

    A clinical practicum was successfully implemented for RN to BSN students to apply evidence-based practice to actual clinical problems affecting nursing practice. The author describes how this practicum was implemented and the requisite resources and support systems. This senior-level capstone course enabled students to understand and value a lifelong learning approach to evidence-based practice.

  16. Clinical Practice Patterns of Canadian Couple/Marital/Family Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton, John; Dienhart, Anna; Schmidt, Jonathan; Turner, Jean

    2009-01-01

    This clinical practice pattern survey had two unique aspects. It was a national survey of American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) members in Canada that included all AAMFT membership categories, including student, affiliate, associate, clinical, and supervisor. It compared practice pattern data for clinical members from Canada…

  17. Redefinition of gestational diabetes mellitus: implications for laboratory practice in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovrenčić, Marijana Vučić; Honović, Lorena; Kralik, Saša; Matica, Jasminka; Prašek, Manja; Pape-Medvidović, Edita; Ivanišević, Marina; Đelmiš, Josip

    2013-01-01

    An increasing prevalence of gestational diabetes has become a very challenging task in prenatal care worldwide. International Association of Diabetes and Pregnancy Study Groups (IADPSG) has recently issued recommendations on the diagnosis and classification of hyperglycaemia in pregnancy. These recommendations, the first to provide harmonised, evidence-based criteria for the diagnosis and classification of diabetes in pregnancy, are currently being discussed and accepted worldwide by the relevant authorities. As the acceptance of the proposed criteria has major implications for both clinical and laboratory settings, a concerted action towards necessary changes in practice has to be carefully planned and adjusted to national health-care specificities. IADPSG criteria have been strongly advocated by the Croatian Perinatology Society, resulting in a new strategy for the detection and diagnosis of hyperglycaemic disorders in pregnancy. To address the respective laboratory requirements, in April 2012, the Croatian Chamber of Medical Biochemists appointed a Working Group to provide a standardised procedure for the diagnosis of gestational diabetes, applicable to all laboratories involved in prenatal care, in both primary and specialised health-care facilities. In this paper we discuss key laboratory-related issues regarding succesful implementation of the IADPSG criteria in Croatia. PMID:23457760

  18. On the improvement of blood sample collection at clinical laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Blood samples are usually collected daily from different collection points, such hospitals and health centers, and transported to a core laboratory for testing. This paper presents a project to improve the collection routes of two of the largest clinical laboratories in Spain. These routes must be designed in a cost-efficient manner while satisfying two important constraints: (i) two-hour time windows between collection and delivery, and (ii) vehicle capacity. Methods A heuristic method based on a genetic algorithm has been designed to solve the problem of blood sample collection. The user enters the following information for each collection point: postal address, average collecting time, and average demand (in thermal containers). After implementing the algorithm using C programming, this is run and, in few seconds, it obtains optimal (or near-optimal) collection routes that specify the collection sequence for each vehicle. Different scenarios using various types of vehicles have been considered. Unless new collection points are added or problem parameters are changed substantially, routes need to be designed only once. Results The two laboratories in this study previously planned routes manually for 43 and 74 collection points, respectively. These routes were covered by an external carrier company. With the implementation of this algorithm, the number of routes could be reduced from ten to seven in one laboratory and from twelve to nine in the other, which represents significant annual savings in transportation costs. Conclusions The algorithm presented can be easily implemented in other laboratories that face this type of problem, and it is particularly interesting and useful as the number of collection points increases. The method designs blood collection routes with reduced costs that meet the time and capacity constraints of the problem. PMID:24406140

  19. Improving consistency in large laboratory courses: a design for a standardized practical exam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinnian; Graesser, Donnasue; Sah, Megha

    2015-06-01

    Laboratory courses serve as important gateways to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education. One of the challenges in assessing laboratory learning is to conduct meaningful and standardized practical exams, especially for large multisection laboratory courses. Laboratory practical exams in life sciences courses are frequently administered by asking students to move from station to station to answer questions, apply knowledge gained during laboratory experiments, interpret data, and identify various tissues and organs using various microscopic and gross specimens. This approach puts a stringent time limit on all questions regardless of the level of difficulty and also invariably increases the potential risk of cheating. To avoid potential cheating in laboratory courses with multiple sections, the setup for practical exams is often changed in some way between sections. In laboratory courses with multiple instructors or teaching assistants, practical exams may be handled inconsistently among different laboratory sections, due to differences in background knowledge, perceptions of the laboratory goals, or prior teaching experience. In this article, we describe a design for a laboratory practical exam that aims to align the assessment questions with well-defined laboratory learning objectives and improve the consistency among all laboratory sections.

  20. Quality Management Systems in the Clinical Laboratories in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of management systems in accordance with standards like ISO 9001:2008 (1,2) in the clinical laboratories has conferred and added value of reliability and therefore a very significant input to patient safety. As we know the ISO 9001:2008 (1) a certification standard, and ISO 15189:2012 (2) an accreditation standard, both, at the time have generated institutional memory where they have been implemented, the transformation of culture focused on correct execution, control and following, evidence needed and the importance of register. PMID:27683495

  1. Quality Management Systems in the Clinical Laboratories in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzon, Alba C

    2015-11-01

    The implementation of management systems in accordance with standards like ISO 9001:2008 (1,2) in the clinical laboratories has conferred and added value of reliability and therefore a very significant input to patient safety. As we know the ISO 9001:2008 (1) a certification standard, and ISO 15189:2012 (2) an accreditation standard, both, at the time have generated institutional memory where they have been implemented, the transformation of culture focused on correct execution, control and following, evidence needed and the importance of register.

  2. Development of an internal dynamic web site to promote quality assurance in a clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernet, Pascal; Mario, Nathalie; Vaubourdolle, Michel

    2004-01-01

    In clinical laboratories, one challenging quality assurance objective is to maintain standardized practices. Meeting this objective entails ensuring information flow, which is necessary to smooth running of the laboratory. To facilitate information flow, we developed an internal quality Web site on our local network. The dynamic generated pages of the site were constructed with EasyPHP v.1.6, a complete freeware package providing PHP dynamic language and databases. The site comprises various sections: general news, specific laboratory units news, documents (quality manual, guidelines, emergency processes), schedules, National Quality Control results, forum, etc. Five to 10 pages are updated each week. This work was facilitated by the use of PHP-written pages and data tables, which enable us to record in real time the operation of our assurance quality project and to improve traceability. This approach could be extended to other aspects of quality management and could help meet the future IS015189 standard requirements.

  3. Accreditation of medical laboratories in Croatia--experiences of the Institute of Clinical Chemistry, University Hospital "Merkur", Zagreb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegar-Mestrić, Zlata; Nazor, Aida; Perkov, Sonja; Surina, Branka; Kardum-Paro, Mirjana Mariana; Siftar, Zoran; Sikirica, Mirjana; Sokolić, Ivica; Ozvald, Ivan; Vidas, Zeljko

    2010-03-01

    Since 2003 when the international norm for implementation of quality management in medical laboratories (EN ISO 15189, Medical laboratories--Particular requirements for quality and competence) was established and accepted, accreditation has become practical, generally accepted method of quality management and confirmation of technical competence of medical laboratories in the whole world. This norm has been translated into Croatian and accepted by the Croatian Institute for Norms as Croatian norm. Accreditation is carried out on voluntary basis by the Croatian Accreditation Agency that has up to now accredited two clinical medical biochemical laboratories in the Republic of Croatia. Advantages of accredited laboratory lie in its documented management system, constant improvement and training, reliability of test results, establishing users' trust in laboratory services, test results comparability and interlaboratory (international) test results acceptance by adopting the concept of metrological traceability in laboratory medicine.

  4. Clinical microbiology: Should microbiology be a clinical or a laboratory speciality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Sanjay

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Clinical microbiology is a specific combination of knowledge, attitude and practice aimed at direct clinical involvement in infectious disease management using the core principles of medical microbiology and clinical medicine. In this article certain areas in microbiology, where a more proactive approach could make a significant difference in clinical outcome has been delineated. The article reiterates the role of a medical microbiologist in a hospital setting. The practices described are the norm in well-organized hospitals. These areas include management of positive blood cultures, management of patients in intensive care units (ICUs, hospital infection control and public health microbiology, development of hospital and community anti-infective policy, organization of clinical-microbiological meetings and provision of emergency out-of-hours service. The implementation of this clinical approach and increased engagement with direct patient care would require changes in existing training structure and working patterns of medical and technical staffs in microbiology.

  5. Clinical anatomy as practiced by ancient Egyptians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukas, Marios; Hanna, Michael; Alsaiegh, Nada; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Tubbs, R Shane

    2011-05-01

    Egypt is famously known for its Nile and pyramids, yet not many people know that Egypt made possible the origin of the anatomical sciences. Several ancient papyri guide us through the Egyptians' exploration of the human body and how they applied anatomical knowledge to clinical medicine to the best of their knowledge. It is through records, such as the Edwin Smith, Ebers, and Kahun papyri and other literature detailing the work of the Egyptian embalmers, physicians, and Greek anatomists, that we are able to take a glimpse into the evolution of the anatomical sciences from 3000 B.C. to 250 B.C. It is through the Egyptian embalmer that we were able to learn of some of the first interactions with human organs and their detailed observation. The Egyptian physician's knowledge, being transcribed into the Ebers and Edwin Smith papyri, enabled future physicians to seek reference to common ailments for diagnosing and treating a variety of conditions ranging from head injuries to procedures, such as trans-sphenoidal surgery. In Alexandria, Herophilus, and Erasistratus made substantial contributions to the anatomical sciences by beginning the practice of human dissection. For instance, Herophilus described the anatomy of the heart valves along with Erasistratus who demonstrated how blood was prevented from flowing retrograde under normal conditions. Hence, from various records, we are able to unravel how Egypt paved the road for study of the anatomical sciences.

  6. Clinical practice guideline: Bell's Palsy executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, Reginald F; Basura, Gregory J; Ishii, Lisa E; Schwartz, Seth R; Drumheller, Caitlin Murray; Burkholder, Rebecca; Deckard, Nathan A; Dawson, Cindy; Driscoll, Colin; Gillespie, M Boyd; Gurgel, Richard K; Halperin, John; Khalid, Ayesha N; Kumar, Kaparaboyna Ashok; Micco, Alan; Munsell, Debra; Rosenbaum, Steven; Vaughan, William

    2013-11-01

    The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) has published a supplement to this issue featuring the new Clinical Practice Guideline: Bell's Palsy. To assist in implementing the guideline recommendations, this article summarizes the rationale, purpose, and key action statements. The 11 recommendations developed encourage accurate and efficient diagnosis and treatment and, when applicable, facilitate patient follow-up to address the management of long-term sequelae or evaluation of new or worsening symptoms not indicative of Bell's palsy. There are myriad treatment options for Bell's palsy; some controversy exists regarding the effectiveness of several of these options, and there are consequent variations in care. In addition, there are numerous diagnostic tests available that are used in the evaluation of patients with Bell's palsy. Many of these tests are of questionable benefit in Bell's palsy. Furthermore, while patients with Bell's palsy enter the health care system with facial paresis/paralysis as a primary complaint, not all patients with facial paresis/paralysis have Bell's palsy. It is a concern that patients with alternative underlying etiologies may be misdiagnosed or have an unnecessary delay in diagnosis. All of these quality concerns provide an important opportunity for improvement in the diagnosis and management of patients with Bell's palsy.

  7. Assessing Practical Laboratory Skills in Undergraduate Molecular Biology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Lynne; Koenders, Annette; Gynnild, Vidar

    2012-01-01

    This study explored a new strategy of assessing laboratory skills in a molecular biology course to improve: student effort in preparation for and participation in laboratory work; valid evaluation of learning outcomes; and students' employment prospects through provision of evidence of their skills. Previously, assessment was based on written…

  8. [Laboratory unification: advantages and disadvantages for clinical microbiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu, Antonia; Matas, Lurdes

    2010-10-01

    This article aims to reflect on which areas or tasks of microbiology laboratories could be unified with those of clinical biochemistry, hematology, immunology or pathology laboratories to benefit patients and the health system, as well as the areas that should remain independent since their amalgamation would not only fail to provide a benefit but could even jeopardize the quality of microbiological diagnosis, and consequently patient care. To do this, the distinct analytic phases of diagnosis are analyzed, and the advantages and disadvantages of amalgamation are evaluated in each phase. The pros and cons of the unification of certain areas such as the computer system, occupational risk units, customer service, purchasing logistics, and materials storage, etc, are also discussed. Lastly, the effect of unification on urgent microbiology diagnosis is analyzed. Microbiological diagnosis should be unique. The microbiologist should perform an overall evaluation of the distinct techniques used for a particular patient, both those that involve direct diagnosis (staining, culture, antigen detection techniques or molecular techniques) and indirect diagnosis (antibody detection). Moreover, the microbiology laboratory should be independent, with highly trained technicians and specialists in microbiology that provide added value as experts in infection and as key figures in the process of establishing a correct etiological diagnosis.

  9. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of women with uterine leiomiyoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür ÖZKUL

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare clinical and laboratory findings of women with or without uterine leiomyoma.Study group consisted of 82 women with uterine leiomyoma and the control group comprised 42 healthy women. Women’s age, gravity, parity, blood groups, pattern of menstrual cycles, complaints at presentation, fertility, ultrasonographical findings, surgical operations and thyroid function tests were evaluated.There were no significant differences in blood group distribution, gravity, parity and thyroid function test results between the patients and the control subjects (P>0.05. A significant difference was found in the complaints at presentation between two groups (P<0.001. Mentrual cycles irregularity was more frequently found in the patients compared with the controls (57.3% vs. 42.9%, respectively, P=0.009. Although no infertile woman was found in the control group, 8.5% of patients were found to have infertility. The sensitivity of ultrasonography was found to be 97.6%. Except for the existence of higher infertility rate and the menstrual cycles irregularities, no significant difference was found in the clinical and laboratory findings between women with or without uterine leiomyoma. Therefore, physical examination and imaging methods are remained as the most important diagnostic tools for uterine leiomyoma.

  10. [Advanced data analysis and visualization for clinical laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Masanori; Yoneyama, Akiko

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes visualization techniques that help identify hidden structures in clinical laboratory data. The visualization of data is helpful for a rapid and better understanding of the characteristics of data sets. Various charts help the user identify trends in data. Scatter plots help prevent misinterpretations due to invalid data by identifying outliers. The representation of experimental data in figures is always useful for communicating results to others. Currently, flexible methods such as smoothing methods and latent structure analysis are available owing to the presence of advanced hardware and software. Principle component analysis, which is a well-known technique used to reduce multidimensional data sets, can be carried out on a personal computer. These methods could lead to advanced visualization with regard to exploratory data analysis. In this paper, we present 3 examples in order to introduce advanced data analysis. In the first example, a smoothing spline was fitted to a time-series from the control chart which is not in a state of statistical control. The trend line was clearly extracted from the daily measurements of the control samples. In the second example, principal component analysis was used to identify a new diagnostic indicator for Graves' disease. The multi-dimensional data obtained from patients were reduced to lower dimensions, and the principle components thus obtained summarized the variation in the data set. In the final example, a latent structure analysis for a Gaussian mixture model was used to draw complex density functions suitable for actual laboratory data. As a result, 5 clusters were extracted. The mixed density function of these clusters represented the data distribution graphically. The methods used in the above examples make the creation of complicated models for clinical laboratories more simple and flexible.

  11. Socio-demographic, Clinical and Laboratory Features of Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in Children Treated in Pediatric Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Azemi, Mehmedali; Berisha, Majlinda; Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora; Kolgeci, Selim; Avdiu, Muharrem; Jakupi, Xhevat; Hoxha, Rina; Hoxha-Kamberi, Teuta

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of work was presentation of several socio-demographic, clinical and laboratory characteristics of gastroenteritis caused by rotavirus. The examinees and methods: The examinees were children under the age of five years treated at the Pediatric Clinic due to acute gastroenteritis caused by rotavirus. Rotavirus is isolated by method chromatographic immunoassay by Cer Test Biotec. Results: From the total number of patients (850) suffering from acute gastroenteritis, feces test on bac...

  12. Prognostic characteristics of asthma diagnosis in early childhood in clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever-Hess, J; Kouwenberg, JM; Duiverman, EJ; Hermans, J; Wever, AMJ

    1999-01-01

    A registration study from clinical practice was set up to assess the prognostic value of symptoms and laboratory data at first visit for doctor-diagnosed 'asthma' in early childhood. A total of 419 children aged 0-4 y, who were newly referred to the outpatient department of the Juliana Children's Ho

  13. Lean-Agile Adaptations in Clinical Laboratory Accredited ISO 15189

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Vilaplana Pérez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It’s introduced Lean techniques in a Clinical Laboratory to improve the operability and the efficiency in continuous processes of analysis, failsafe systems, analysis of areas of value pursuit of zero defects and reduction of waste, and it promote continuous improvement in presented difficulties in adapting to the changing needs of the healthcare environment. Whereas it is necessary to incorporate certification and accreditation, note that the adaptability of the clinical laboratory to the changing needs of physicians in obtaining analytical information is reduced. The application of an agile methodology on analytical systems can provide a line of work that allows the incorporation of planning short work cycles on equips quickly with operational autonomy on the basis of demand and respecting the accreditation requirements and flexibility to ensure adequate performance as the intercomparison of results from the different units analytics, analytical quality and turnaround times. Between 2012 and 2014, a process of analysis and improvement was applied to circuits, a 5 s system, transportation of samples, inventory of reactive and samples, motion of personal and samples, reductions of waiting and delays, overproduction, over processing, and defects of results and reports. At last it seems necessary to apply the Agile methodology to adapt to the evolving necessities in time and the different origins of the samples. It’s have used modular systems where the modules of this study are programmed with immunoassay techniques and it has reduced the operative modules depending on the required activity, ensuring the goals of turnaround times, analytic quality, service, health care continuity, and keeping up with the ISO 15189 accreditation requirements. The results of applying the concept of Lean-Agile to a modular system allows us to reduce the associated costs to the seasonal variation of the health care demand and to adapt the system to the changes on

  14. Glycogen storage disease type I: clinical and laboratory profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berenice L. Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To characterize the clinical, laboratory, and anthropometric profile of a sample of Brazilian patients with glycogen storage disease type I managed at an outpatient referral clinic for inborn errors of metabolism. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional outpatient study based on a convenience sampling strategy. Data on diagnosis, management, anthropometric parameters, and follow-up were assessed. RESULTS: Twenty-one patients were included (median age 10 years, range 1-25 years, all using uncooked cornstarch therapy. Median age at diagnosis was 7 months (range, 1-132 months, and 19 patients underwent liver biopsy for diagnostic confirmation. Overweight, short stature, hepatomegaly, and liver nodules were present in 16 of 21, four of 21, nine of 14, and three of 14 patients, respectively. A correlation was found between height-for-age and BMI-for-age Z-scores (r = 0.561; p = 0.008. CONCLUSIONS: Diagnosis of glycogen storage disease type I is delayed in Brazil. Most patients undergo liver biopsy for diagnostic confirmation, even though the combination of a characteristic clinical presentation and molecular methods can provide a definitive diagnosis in a less invasive manner. Obesity is a side effect of cornstarch therapy, and appears to be associated with growth in these patients.

  15. Pre-analytical phase in clinical chemistry laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neogi SS

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The laboratory testing process is divided into the pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical phases. For obtaining reliable test results, the prevention and detection of errors at all steps is required. While analytical standards have been developed by recognized quality control criteria, there is a scarcity in the development of standards for the preanalytical phase. This phase is most prone to errors as the steps involved are directly dependent on humans and are out of direct control of the laboratory. Such errors in preanalytical stage often only become apparent in the analytical or post-analytical phase. The development of a pre-analytical quality manual is essential in achieving total quality control. Correct practices and strategies of error prevention can reduce preanalytical errors. This review focuses on prevention of pre-analytical errors that occur while collecting a specimen of blood, urine and cerebrospinal fluid. Most of these can be easily prevented with understanding and education of the personnel involved in and responsible for executing this crucial pre-analytical phase.

  16. Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) / Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) Review and Applicability for Chemical Security Enhancements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iveson, Steven W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). International Chemical Security Threat Reduction

    2014-11-01

    Global chemical security has been enhanced through the determined use and integration of both voluntary and legislated standards. Many popular standards contain components that specifically detail requirements for the security of materials, facilities and other vital assets. In this document we examine the roll of quality management standards and how they affect the security culture within the institutions that adopt these standards in order to conduct business within the international market place. Good manufacturing practices and good laboratory practices are two of a number of quality management systems that have been adopted as law in many nations. These standards are designed to protect the quality of drugs, medicines, foods and analytical test results in order to provide the world-wide consumer with safe and affective products for consumption. These standards provide no established security protocols and yet manage to increase the security of chemicals, materials, facilities and the supply chain via the effective and complete control over the manufacturing, the global supply chains and testing processes. We discuss the means through which these systems enhance security and how nations can further improve these systems with additional regulations that deal specifically with security in the realm of these management systems. We conclude with a discussion of new technologies that may cause disruption within the industries covered by these standards and how these issues might be addressed in order to maintain or increase the level of security within the industries and nations that have adopted these standards.

  17. [For the improvement of management and assurance in clinical laboratories of education hospitals--from the meeting of clinical laboratory members of public university or college hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2004-03-01

    Clinical laboratory members, composed of medical doctors, laboratory technologists and office staff from 8 public university or college hospitals and one medical center, have an annual meeting, in which achievements including tested numbers, income, outsourcing ratio, and so on were reported and various agendas from each institution were discussed. The number of agendas for general discussion and in the technologist division has been increasing, which reflects that variables, including management in clinical laboratories, needing solutions have been increasing. Information obtained through discussion could help in the determination of management and the improvement of education and quality assurance in clinical laboratories.

  18. IT support for administrative planning of clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florin, Jan; Joustra-Enquist, Ingrid; Hedberg, Lars

    2006-01-01

    The administration of clinical practice placements for nursing students is a highly complex and information driven task. This demonstration is intended to give insight into the web based system KliPP (a Swedish acronym for Clinical Practice Planning) and to discuss the possibilities for further development and use.

  19. Narcissistic interpersonal problems in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kealy, David; Ogrodniczuk, John S

    2011-01-01

    Pathological narcissism is associated with significant interpersonal problems, which are unlikely to be acknowledged by narcissistic patients as clinical issues. Although a substantial clinical and theoretical literature deals with narcissism, a succinct overview of core narcissistic interpersonal problems is lacking, particularly in terms of their presentation in clinical settings. This article provides a descriptive overview of the major types of interpersonal problems associated with pathological narcissism: dominance, vindictiveness, and intrusiveness. We outline how these problems can manifest in patients' relations with others and in treatment situations. Clinical vignettes are provided to highlight the presentation of narcissistic interpersonal dysfunction in various types of clinical encounters, and to facilitate discussion of treatment implications.

  20. [Clinical, laboratory and therapeutics aspects of Sheehan's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Débora Vieira; Conceição, Flávia Lúcia; Vaisman, Mário

    2008-07-01

    Sheehan's syndrome is characterized by hypopituitarism that occurs as a result of ischemic pituitary necrosis due to severe postpartum hemorrhage. Nowadays it is not usually seen in developed countries because of the improvements in obstetric care. However, in developing countries it is still frequent and probably one of the most common causes of hypopituitarism. Most patients usually present it months to years later, with a history of failure of postpartum lactation, failure to resume menses and other signs of panhypopituitarism. In mild forms of the disease, patients may remain undetected and do not receive treatment for many years. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are important to reduce the morbimortality of the patients with Sheehan's syndrome. The aim of this review is to describe clinical, laboratory and therapeutic aspects of Sheehan's syndrome, including our experience in the replacement of recombinant GH in these patients.

  1. Clinical laboratory stressors used to study alcohol-stress relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Suzanne; Bacon, Amy K; Sinha, Rajita; Uhart, Magdalena; Adinoff, Bryon

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the biologic systems that underlie the relationship between stress and alcohol consumption may lead to better prevention efforts and more effective treatments for alcoholism. Clinical laboratory studies offer a unique opportunity to examine these relationships by using a controlled environment to study how an acute stressor affects alcohol drinking and alcohol craving, how individuals in recovery or those at risk for alcoholism may respond differently to stressors relative to control subjects, and how alcohol differentially affects stress reactivity in these groups. This article reviews some of the most common physical, psychological, and pharmacological stressors used in stress-induction studies designed to reveal details about the relationship between stress reactivity and alcohol use and abuse.

  2. Current research on cigarette toxicity: critical appraisal in view of clinical laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prajwal Gyawali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking has been implicated as a potential risk factor for development and progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and cardiovascular disease (CVD, including ischemic heart disease. Although, several methods are in existence to measuring cigarette toxicity, evidence regarding adoption of a gold standard technique is still imprecise. In this study, we reviewed articles describing methods of measuring cigarette toxicity in relation to clinical laboratory practice. A critical analysis of the benefits and limitations of each method in relation to low-middle income countries is discussed. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(6.000: 1785-1793

  3. Evaluation of clinical and laboratory correlates of sickle leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madu, Anazoeze Jude; Ubesie, Agozie; Madu, Kenechi Anthony; Okwor, Bismarck; Anigbo, Chukwudi

    2013-01-01

    The exact mechanism for the occurrence of sickle leg ulcers (SLUs) has not been fully explained, although, popular opinion supports a multifactorial etio-pathogenetic process. Leg ulceration in sickle cell is a chronic and debilitating condition which is difficult to treat and may worsen the psychosocial impact of this illness. This study aims to evaluate the laboratory and clinical correlates of SLUs. One hundred sixty-seven patients who had been diagnosed with sickle cell anemia (homozygous S) had their steady-state hemoglobin concentration (Hb), hematocrit, white cell count, platelet count, serum bilirubin, and aspartate transaminase (AST) as well as frequency of crisis per annum evaluated with respect to their relationship to the occurrence of leg ulcers. They were aged 6-53 years (mean age 24.3 years), and prevalence of leg ulcer was found to be 2.75 per 1000 (2.54 per 1000 in females and 2.83 per 1000 in males). The independent sample t-test showed a significant difference in the serum AST levels in those with SLU (p = 0.029), though a positive correlation did not exist. Other predictors of disease severity found to have positive relationship with each other were the AST and total serum bilirubin 0.207 (p = 0.012); Hb and age 0.130 (p = 0.035); Hb and white cell count -0.159 (p = 0.010), white cell count and age -0.113 (p = 0.018). SLUs do not occur in patients with severe disease in sickle cell. The clinical and laboratory indicators of severe sickle cell disease do not correlate positively with the occurrence of SLU. Serum AST may have a relationship with leg ulceration in these patients. Environmental factors most likely play a major part in the etiopathogenesis of leg ulcer and this may require further studies in different sociocultural settings.

  4. Librarian contributions to clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruse, Peggy; Protzko, Shandra

    2014-01-01

    Librarians have become more involved in developing high quality systematic reviews. Evidence-based practice guidelines are an extension of systematic reviews and offer another significant area for librarian involvement. This column highlights opportunities and challenges for the librarian working on guideline panels and provides practical considerations for meaningful contributions to the guideline creation process.

  5. Trancranial Doppler: value in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, O; Benedetti-Valentini, F

    2009-08-01

    The value of TCD in clinical practice is well established since it can be used to measure cerebral vasomotor reactivity and to detect and grade vasospasm (VSP) following subarachnoid haemorrhage and cerebral blood perfusion consequences of extracranial ICA stenosis or occlusion. Intracranial steno-occlusive disease can be detected more reliably by transcranial color-coded imaging (TCCI) that provides a two-dimensional imaging of parenchymal and vascular anatomy of brain too. In patients with suspected brain TCD diagnostic criteria for brain death have a sensitivity of 91 to 100% and specificity of 97 to 100% and they are particularly useful when clinical and EEG evaluations are difficult. TCD is a sensitive technique for real time detection of microembolic signals (MES) from prosthetic cardiac valves, myocardial infarction site, atrial fibrillation, aortic arch atheroma and this suggests the use of TCD for monitoring response to antithrombotic therapy. There is also a high correlation between contrast-enhanced TCD and trans-esophageal echocardiography for detecting paradoxical embolism through right-to-left cardiac or pulmonary shunts. Microembolization detected by TCD monitoring may confirm features of unstable carotid artery plaques as imaged by Duplex scanning and there is an increasing evidence that asymptomatic MES from unstable carotid plaques are an independent factor for ischemic stroke. TCD can be used as a monitoring tool during cardiac surgery and cerebrovascular operations to determine critical hemodynamic changes in cerebral arteries and to identify high-intensity transients referred to air or particulate emboli. Several research studies of the past 10 years have shown that MES may be detected by TCD during all phases of CEA and CAS and that sustained microembolism after carotid flow restoration is an indication of impending postoperative or post-procedural occlusion. Our series showed a clear difference between the number of patients with MES and the

  6. A Practical Polymerase Chain Reaction Laboratory for Introductory Biology Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowlus, R. David; Grether, Susan C.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) laboratory exercise that can be performed by introductory biology students in 1 45- to 55-minute class period. Includes a general description of the polymerase chain reaction, materials needed, procedure, and details of interest to teachers. (JRH)

  7. THE LABORATORY WOOD DRIER - FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela ŞOVA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the principle of similarity, the wood drying process can be investigated on a scale model, which is the laboratory drier, instead of the full-size industrial drier. Thus, the investigation is simplified and the drying time reduced. The laboratory drying kiln, developed by the research team, is a controlled climate air duct with closed circuit, fitted with a rectangular test section. The air flow is circulated by a centrifugal fan and the air heating is carried out by a set of electric resistances. The selection of the fan and of the heating resistances was performed according to the aerodynamic and thermal calculations, presented in the paper. For the air humidification, in accordance to the drying schedule requirements, the drier has a steam generator that prepares steam which is injected in the air. The wood sample is placed within the drier on a device conceived for both sample support and vertical motion and also, for continuous weighing. By applying the principle of similarity for both, the industrial kiln and the laboratory drier, the required air velocity for the laboratory drier is determined, for constant values of the temperature and relative humidity of air. Different invariants,characteristic to the drying schedule that was applied, have been also calculated.

  8. Students Integrate Knowledge Acquisition and Practical Work in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agüera, E. I.; Sánchez-Hermosín, P.; Díz-Pérez, J.; Tovar, P.; Camacho, R.; Escribano, B. M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to transfer a wider concept of teamwork and self-learning to the laboratory, encouraging students' capabilities when seeking, acquiring, and processing knowledge. This educational innovation was carried out with a total of 38 students (fourth year of degree in Biology) in the area of physiology (Advances in…

  9. Best practice in clinical facilitation of undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, Judith; McMurray, Anne; Shaban, Ramon Z

    2016-09-01

    Clinical facilitation is critical to successful student clinical experience. The research reported in this paper used an interpretive case study to explore perspectives of clinical facilitators on what constitutes best practice in clinical facilitation of undergraduate nursing students. Eleven clinical facilitators from South East Queensland, Australia, participated in focus groups, interviews and a concept mapping exercise to gather their perspectives on best practice. The data gathered information regarding their prior and current experiences as registered nurses and facilitators, considering reasons they became clinical facilitators, their educational background and self-perceived adequacy of their knowledge for clinical facilitation. Analysis was through constant comparison. Findings of the study provided in-depth insight into the role of clinical facilitators, with best practice conceptualised via three main themes; 'assessing', 'learning to facilitate' and 'facilitating effectively'. While they felt there was some autonomy in the role, the clinical facilitators sought a closer liaison with academic staff and feedback about their performance, in particular their assessment of the students. Key strategies identified for improving best practice included educational support for the clinical facilitators, networking, and mentoring from more experienced clinical facilitators. When implemented, these strategies will help develop the clinical facilitators' skills and ensure quality clinical experiences for undergraduate nursing students.

  10. EFFECTIVENESS OF MRSA DETECTION METHODS IN THE LABORATORY PRACTICE – A BRIEF REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neli M. Ermenlieva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA are bacteria, responsible for severe and hard-to-manage infections in human. They are resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics – penicillins (methicillin, dicloxacillin, nafcillin, and oxacillin, cephalosporins and carbapenems, but can also be resistant to the new-generation MRSA-active cephalosporins (such as ceftaroline or other groups of antibiotics, including aminoglycosides, macrolides, clindamycin, amphenicols, quinolones and tetracyclines. MRSA bacteria are pandemic and are often isolated in medical practice and nosocomial infections. The MRSA detection is a challenge to any clinical microbiology laboratory and demands implementation of strict protocols for active screening. While more expensive molecular techniques have the potential of offering highly sensitive and rapid results, the cultural methods require longer time but can achieve a comparable sensitivity for lower price.

  11. District nurse clinics: accountability and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Richard; Tengnah, Cassam

    2013-02-01

    The numbers of district nurse clinics are continuing to grow in primary care and they provide timely and more cost effective intervention for patients. The clinics provide exciting opportunities for district nurses but also carry an increased risk of exposure to liability. This article discusses some of the key areas of accountability underpinning the duty of care of district nurses working in nurse-led clinics.

  12. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of children with Kawasaki disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Akın

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we aimed to evaluate clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients with Kawasaki disease (KD in Konya region of Turkey. Methods: The hospital records of patients who were hospitalized with the diagnosis of KD in the Pediatrics Clinics of Konya Training and Research Hospital between May 2010 and June 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. Results: Seven cases were found to have the diagnosis of KD, two of whom were incomplete KD. Oropharynx changes were the most common (100% feature in our patients. Five (71% patients had bulbar conjunctivitis. Three (43% patients had erythema at the site of BCG inoculation. Adenopathy was present in all of our patients with the classical form. A desquamation was observed in one case at the seventh day of fever. No cardiac manifestation was seen. Elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and thrombocytosis were present in all patients. All of the patients were received intravenous immunoglobulin in the first ten days of the fever. Conclusion: KD should be considered as a possible diagnosis in any child presenting with prolonged fever. BCG reaction can be attributed as a diagnostic criterion for incomplete form of the disease especially in countries where BCG vaccination is routinely performed. Early treatment is essential to prevent cardiovascular complications.

  13. Clinical and laboratory diagnosis of dengue fever in travelers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Khokhlova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the analysis of clinical and laboratory symptoms in 35 adult patients with denger fever, Novosibirsk residents, which travelled in endemic countries, mostly Tailand. The classic form of the disease was determined in all cases. The moderate form was in 71,5% patients, the severe form was in the rest ones. The diagnosis of dengue was verified by detection of specific immunoglobulin M and in some cases immunoglobulin G and also virus dengue NS1 antigen by immunochromatography. The dominant clinical symptoms in observed patients were fever for 3–8 days (100%, mostly high one (71,4%, asthenia (97,1%, anorexia (100%, myalgia or/and arthralgia (77,1%, exantema (60%, hepatomegaly (62,8%. The gematologic indicators were represented with thrombocytopenia in 91,4% patients (from 167 to 20×109/l и leucopenia in 85,7% patients (from 3,9 to 1,1×109/l. The cytolitic syndrom was revealed in 80% patients with predominance of aspartate aminotransferase activity in early period of the disease. 

  14. Laboratories for the 21st Century Best Practices: Energy Recovery in Laboratory Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-06-01

    Laboratories typically require 100% outside air for ventilation at higher rates than other commercial buildings. Minimum ventilation is typically provided at air change per hour (ACH) rates in accordance with codes and adopted design standards including Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Standard 1910.1450 (4 to 12 ACH – non-mandatory) or the 2011 American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Applications Handbook, Chapter 16 – Laboratories (6 to 12 ACH). While OSHA states this minimum ventilation rate “should not be relied on for protection from toxic substances released into the laboratory” it specifically indicates that it is intended to “provide a source of air for breathing and for input to local ventilation devices (e.g., chemical fume hoods or exhausted bio-safety cabinets), to ensure that laboratory air is continually replaced preventing the increase of air concentrations of toxic substances during the working day, direct air flow into the laboratory from non-laboratory areas and out to the exterior of the building.” The heating and cooling energy needed to condition and move this outside air can be 5 to 10 times greater than the amount of energy used in most office buildings. In addition, when the required ventilation rate exceeds the airflow needed to meet the cooling load in low-load laboratories, additional heating energy may be expended to reheat dehumidified supply air from the supply air condition to prevent over cooling. In addition to these low-load laboratories, reheat may also be required in adjacent spaces such as corridors that pro-vide makeup air to replace air being pulled into negative-pressure laboratories.

  15. Acute Viral Hepatitis A – Clinical, Laboratory and Epidemiological Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda HORVAT

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Infection with hepatitis A virus is still one of the most common causes of hepatitis worldwide. The clinical manifestation of acute hepatitis A (AHA in adults can vary greatly, ranging from asymptomatic infection to severe and fulminant hepatitis. The aim of this study was to describe the demographic, clinical characteristics, laboratory features and hospital outcome of adult patients with AHA over a consecutive period of 4 years within an area from Eastern European country. Methods: Two hundred and two adult patients diagnosed with AHA were retrospective, observational and analytic analized over a period of 4 years. Based on prothrombin time less than 50, the study group was stratified in medium (79.2% and severe forms (20.8%. We investigated the clinical, laboratory and epidemiological features. Statistical analysis were applied to compare the medium and severe forms of AHA. Results: Most patients (72.7% were younger than 40 years. The main symptoms included: dyspepsia (72.07%, jaundice (86.63%, asteno-adynamia (86.72%, and flu-like symptoms (53.46%. The hemorrhagic cutaneous-mucous manifestations (6.93% associated with the severe forms of AHA (OR =12.19, 95%CI -3.59 - 41.3, p =0.001. We found statistically significant differences for PT (p <0.001, INR (p <0.001, TQ (p <0.001, ALAT (p <0.001, ASAT (p <0.001, ALP (p <0.001 and platelets (p =0.009 between severe and medium AHA forms. We found that TQ, INR, ALAT and ASAT have the highest diagnostic values, statistically significant (p <0.05 for severe AHA forms with AUC (0.99, 0.99, 0.72, 0.70 at values of sensitivity (95%, 90.5%, 89%, 95% and specificity (98%, 99%, 88%,94%. Conclusions Medium severity AHA forms were found in most of the study group patients (79.2%. The severe AHA forms were associated with hemorrhagic cutaneous-mucous manifestations (OR =12.19, p =0.001. The univariate analysis proved a negatively statistically significant correlation between IP and ALAT

  16. Vagus nerve stimulation in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Adam D; Albu-Soda, Ahmed; Aziz, Qasim

    2016-11-02

    The diverse array of end organ innervations of the vagus nerve, coupled with increased basic science evidence, has led to vagus nerve stimulation becoming a management option in a number of clinical disorders. This review discusses methods of electrically stimulating the vagus nerve and its current and potential clinical uses.

  17. Good clinical practice : Historical background and key aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otte, A; Maier-Lenz, H; Dierckx, RA

    2005-01-01

    Clinical research trials (both academic and industry sponsored) are increasingly playing a role in various medical disciplines, including younger fields of clinical trial interest, such as nuclear medicine research. Knowledge for and compliance with good clinical practice (GCP) is essential for anyo

  18. Good clinical practice: Historical background and key aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otte, A.; Maier-Lenz, H.; Dierckx, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    Clinical research trials (both academic and industry sponsored) are increasingly playing a role in various medical disciplines, including younger fields of clinical trial interest, such as nuclear medicine research. Knowledge for and compliance with good clinical practice (GCP) is essential for anyo

  19. 78 FR 59704 - Medicare, Medicaid, and CLIA Programs; Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    ... Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 Exemption of Laboratories Licensed by the State of Washington... requirements of the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (CLIA) for a period of 6 years. DATES... Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 (CLIA) (Pub. L. 100-578), which was enacted on October 31,...

  20. Complement analysis 2016: Clinical indications, laboratory diagnostics and quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prohászka, Zoltán; Nilsson, Bo; Frazer-Abel, Ashley; Kirschfink, Michael

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, complement analysis of body fluids and biopsies, going far beyond C3 and C4, has significantly enhanced our understanding of the disease process. Such expanded complement analysis allows for a more precise differential diagnosis and for critical monitoring of complement-targeted therapy. These changes are a result of the growing understanding of the involvement of complement in a diverse set of disorders. To appreciate the importance of proper complement analysis, it is important to understand the role it plays in disease. Historically, it was the absence of complement as manifested in severe infection that was noted. Since then complement has been connected to a variety of inflammatory disorders, such as autoimmune diseases and hereditary angioedema. While the role of complement in the rejection of renal grafts has been known longer, the significant impact of complement. In certain nephropathies has now led to the reclassification of some rare kidney diseases and an increased role for complement analysis in diagnosis. Even more unexpected is that complement has also been implicated in neural, ophtalmological and dermatological disorders. With this level of involvement in some varied and impactful health issues proper complement testing is clearly important; however, analysis of the complement system varies widely among laboratories. Except for a few proteins, such as C3 and C4, there are neither well-characterized standard preparations nor calibrated assays available. This is especially true for the inter-laboratory variation of tests which assess classical, alternative, or lectin pathway function. In addition, there is a need for the standardization of the measurement of complement activation products that are so critical in determining whether clinically relevant complement activation has occurred in vivo. Finally, autoantibodies to complement proteins (e.g. anti-C1q), C3 and C4 convertases (C3 and C4 nephritic factor) or to regulatory proteins

  1. Dentistry proteomics: from laboratory development to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Taia M B; Lima, Stella M F; Petriz, Bernardo A; Silva, Osmar N; Freire, Mirna S; Franco, Octávio L

    2013-12-01

    Despite all the dental information acquired over centuries and the importance of proteome research, the cross-link between these two areas only emerged around mid-nineties. Proteomic tools can help dentistry in the identification of risk factors, early diagnosis, prevention, and systematic control that will promote the evolution of treatment in all dentistry specialties. This review mainly focuses on the evolution of dentistry in different specialties based on proteomic research and how these tools can improve knowledge in dentistry. The subjects covered are an overview of proteomics in dentistry, specific information on different fields in dentistry (dental structure, restorative dentistry, endodontics, periodontics, oral pathology, oral surgery, and orthodontics) and future directions. There are many new proteomic technologies that have never been used in dentistry studies and some dentistry areas that have never been explored by proteomic tools. It is expected that a greater integration of these areas will help to understand what is still unknown in oral health and disease.

  2. Change in stated clinical practice associated with participation in the Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Richman, Joshua S; Qvist, Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    Clinical researchers have attempted many methods to translate scientific evidence into routine clinical practice, with varying success. Practice-based research networks (PBRNs) provide an important, practitioner-friendly venue to test these methods. Dentist practitioner-investigators from the Den...

  3. Analysis of search in an online clinical laboratory manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blechner, Michael; Kish, Joshua; Chadaga, Vivek; Dighe, Anand S

    2006-08-01

    Online laboratory manuals have developed into an important gateway to the laboratory. Clinicians increasingly expect up-to-date laboratory test information to be readily available online. During the past decade, sophisticated Internet search technology has developed, permitting rapid and accurate retrieval of a wide variety of content. We studied the role of search in an online laboratory manual. We surveyed the utilization of search technology in publicly available online manuals and examined how users interact with the search feature of a laboratory handbook. We show how a laboratory can improve its online handbook through insights gained by collecting information about each user's activity. We also discuss future applications for search-related technologies and the potential role of the online laboratory manual as the primary laboratory information portal.

  4. Reporting unit size and measurement uncertainty: current Australian practice in clinical chemistry and haematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Robert C; Badrick, Tony

    2015-08-01

    In this study we aimed to compare the reporting unit size used by Australian laboratories for routine chemistry and haematology tests to the unit size used by learned authorities and in standard laboratory textbooks and to the justified unit size based on measurement uncertainty (MU) estimates from quality assurance program data. MU was determined from Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia (RCPA) - Australasian Association of Clinical Biochemists (AACB) and RCPA Haematology Quality Assurance Program survey reports. The reporting unit size implicitly suggested in authoritative textbooks, the RCPA Manual, and the General Serum Chemistry program itself was noted. We also used published data on Australian laboratory practices.The best performing laboratories could justify their chemistry unit size for 55% of analytes while comparable figures for the 50% and 90% laboratories were 14% and 8%, respectively. Reporting unit size was justifiable for all laboratories for red cell count, >50% for haemoglobin but only the top 10% for haematocrit. Few, if any, could justify their mean cell volume (MCV) and mean cell haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) reporting unit sizes.The reporting unit size used by many laboratories is not justified by present analytical performance. Using MU estimates to determine the reporting interval for quantitative laboratory results ensures reporting practices match local analytical performance and recognises the inherent error of the measurement process.

  5. 76 FR 1212 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-07

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Eligibility of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and... areas of biomedical, behavioral and clinical science research. The panel meeting will be open to...

  6. 76 FR 79273 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Eligibility of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and... biomedical, behavioral, and clinical science research. The panel meeting will be open to the public...

  7. Biosafety Practices and Emergency Response at the Idaho National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank F. Roberto; Dina M. Matz

    2008-03-01

    Strict federal regulations govern the possession, use, and transfer of pathogens and toxins with potential to cause harm to the public, either through accidental or deliberate means. Laboratories registered through either the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture (USDA), or both, must prepare biosafety, security, and incident response plans, conduct drills or exercises on an annual basis, and update plans accordingly. At the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), biosafety, laboratory, and emergency management staff have been working together for 2 years to satisfy federal and DOE/NNSA requirements. This has been done through the establishment of plans, training, tabletop and walk-through exercises and drills, and coordination with local and regional emergency response personnel. Responding to the release of infectious agents or toxins is challenging, but through familiarization with the nature of the hazardous biological substances or organisms, and integration with laboratory-wide emergency response procedures, credible scenarios are being used to evaluate our ability to protect workers, the public, and the environment from agents we must work with to provide for national biodefense.

  8. [Evidence-based clinical guidelines in dental practice 6. Guidelines for clinical practice in dental education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sanden, W J M; Gorter, R; Tams, J

    2015-09-01

    In response to the initiatives of the Kennisinstituut Mondzorg (Institute for Knowledge Translation in Oral Care), the importance of effective education in the area of guidelines is increasing. Future dentists will, after all, be confronted with new guidelines and need to be able to integrate them in their daily practice. Various guidelines and protocols have been established within the 3 dental schools. For students and instructors, however, the motivation for these guidelines and protocols is not always sufficiently clear. In addition, the terms guideline, clinical practice guideline and protocol are used interchangeably, resulting in terminological confusion. Embedding within and coordination with theoretical education is also still limited in all programmes and it is proposed that the 3 dental schools collaborate on this issue. Finally, it is advised to replace the term 'evidence-based' with 'evidence-informed' because this indicates more clearly that other factors (patients opinion, available financial means, etc.) play a role in the final choice of treatment in a specific situation.

  9. Laboratory aspects of clinically significant rapidly growing mycobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Set

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenic potential of the rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM has started being recognized. This is due to more sensitive and specific techniques in the laboratory. The RGM are generally defined as nontuberculous species of mycobacteria that show visible growth on agar media within 7 days. RGM are widely distributed in nature and have been isolated from natural water, tap water, and soil. Several biochemical tests, high performance liquid chromatography, and molecular techniques have been developed for rapid identification of these species. The American Thoracic Society and the Infectious Disease Society of America recommend that RGM should be identified to the species level using a recognized acceptable methodology such as polymerase chain reaction restriction enzyme analysis or biochemical testing and routine susceptibility testing of RGM should include amikacin, imipenem, doxycycline, the fluorinated quinolones, a sulphonamide or trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole, cefoxitin, clarithromycin, linezolid, and tobramycin. The diseases caused by these organisms have varied manifestations. They have been responsible for a number of healthcare-associated outbreaks and pseudo-outbreaks. For recognition of outbreaks, it is important to be familiar with the causative organisms like RGM which are most frequently involved in healthcare-associated outbreaks and pseudo outbreaks. It is essential to intervene as soon as possible to interrupt this transmission. Large gaps still exist in our knowledge of RGM. Unquestionably more studies are required. Through this review, we wish to emphasize that reporting of RGM from clinical settings along with their sensitivity patterns is an absolute need of the hour.

  10. Prepare, Do, Review: A Skills-Based Approach for Laboratory Practical Classes in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Peter; Ludwig, Martha; Castelli, Joane; Kirkwood, Paul; Attwood, Paul

    2016-01-01

    A new laboratory practical system is described which is comprised of a number of laboratory practical modules, each based around a particular technique or set of techniques, related to the theory part of the course but not designed to be dependent on it. Each module comprises an online recorded pre-lab lecture, the laboratory practical itself and…

  11. Canadian Laboratory Standards for Sexually Transmitted Infections: Best Practice Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max A Chernesky

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Sexually transmitted infections (STI continue to spread, and show no international boundaries. Diseases such as gonorrhea and syphilis, which we thought were under control in Canadian populations, have increased in incidence. Sexually transmitted or associated syndromes such as cervicitis, enteric infections, epididymitis, genital ulcers, sexually related hepatitis, ophthalmia neonatorum, pelvic inflammatory disease, prostatitis and vulvovaginitis present a challenge for the physician to identify the microbial cause, treat the patient and manage contacts. During the past 10 years, new technologies developed for the diagnosis of STIs have provided a clearer understanding of the real accuracy of traditional tests for the diagnosis of infections caused by Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Treponema pallidum, herpes simplex viruses, hepatitis B virus, human papillomaviruses, HIV, Haemophilus ducreyi, Trichomonas vaginalis and mycoplasmas. This has presented a major challenge to the diagnostic laboratory, namely, selecting the most sensitive and specific test matched with the most appropriate specimens to provide meaningful and timely results to facilitate optimal patient care.

  12. Drain Back Systems in Laboratory and in Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perers, Bengt; Furbo, Simon; Fan, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Drain Back systems with ETC collectors are tested and analyzed in a Danish - Chinese cooperation project. Experiences from early work at DTU, with drain back, low flow systems, was used to design two systems: 1) One laboratory system at DTU. 2) One demonstration system in a single family house...... in Sorö Denmark. Detailed monitoring and modelling/validation of the system in the DTU lab is done, to be able to generalize the results, to other climates and loads by simulation and to make design optimizations. The advantage with drain back, low flow systems, is that the system can be made more simple...... with less components and that the performance can be enhanced. Also problems with long term degradation of glycol collector loops are totally avoided. A combination of the drain back and system expansion vessel was tested successfully. It is very important to achieve a continuous slope for the pipes...

  13. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in Clinical Urological Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Tommaso; Mazzoli, Sandra; Lanzafame, Paolo;

    2016-01-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) is a common clinical condition that often leads to unnecessary antimicrobial use. The reduction of antibiotic overuse for ABU is consequently an important issue for antimicrobial stewardship and to reduce the emergence of multidrug resistant strains. There are two i...... a protective role in preventing symptomatic recurrence, particularly when Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) has been isolated....

  14. Pharmacy Administration and Clinical Practice Research Agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, Charles D.

    1987-01-01

    Research needs for pharmacy administration and clinical pharmacy include study of the relationship of pharmacists and society, management methods for providing health care services, pharmacist training and socialization, competence evaluation, formative and summative research on drug use control, and organizational decision making. (MSE)

  15. A brain cancer pathway in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Emilie Lund; Rasmussen, Birthe Krogh

    2012-01-01

    Danish healthcare seeks to improve cancer survival through improved diagnostics, rapid treatment and increased focus on cancer prevention and early help-seeking. In neuro-oncology, this has resulted in the Integrated Brain Cancer Pathway (IBCP). The paper explores how the pathway works...... in the initial phase in a clinical setting with emphasis on pathway criteria....

  16. Clinical practice: swallowing problems in cerebral palsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erasmus, C.E.; Hulst, K. van; Rotteveel, J.J.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Jongerius, P.H.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common physical disability in early childhood. The worldwide prevalence of CP is approximately 2-2.5 per 1,000 live births. It has been clinically defined as a group of motor, cognitive, and perceptive impairments secondary to a non-progressive defect or lesion of the

  17. Direct oral anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents. Clinical relevance and options for laboratory testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbing, D; Spannagl, M

    2014-01-01

    Oral anticoagulants and platelet receptor blockers are widely used in clinical practice with the aim of reducing the risk of thrombotic complications in patients with cardiovascular diseases. Their regular intake and adequate antithrombotic action is vital and this is way numerous assays have been developed for laboratory testing and monitoring of these agents. Available assays can be stratified into pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic assays. Such assays are increasingly used in clinical routine and their daily use is triggered by the advent of the novel direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) as an alternative for vitamin K antagonist (VKA) treatment, which are dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban, and by the advent of prasugrel or ticagrelor as an alternative for clopidogrel with regard to platelet P2Y12 receptor inhibition. In this review the most important and most commonly used laboratory assays are summarized as well as their clinical implications with the focus on DOACs as an alternative for VKAs and the different P2Y12 receptor blockers for antiplatelet treatment.

  18. A Postdoctoral Fellowship in Industrial Clinical Pharmacy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Joseph; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A postdoctoral pharmacy fellowship is described that provides training in industrial clinical pharmacy practice and related tasks associated with the development of new pharmaceuticals, through experience in industrial and hospital settings and in research projects. (MSE) PUBTYPE[141

  19. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring – Clinical Practice Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Mako

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM became a subject of considerable scientific interest. Due to the increasing use of the ABPM in everyday clinical practice it is important that all the users have a correct knowledge on the clinical indications, the methodology of using the device including some technical issues and the interpretation of results. In the last years several guidelines and position papers have been published with recommendations for the monitoring process, reference values, for clinical practice and research. This paper represents a summary of the most important aspects related to the use of ABPM in daily practice, being a synthesis of recommendations from the recent published guidelines and position papers. This reference article presents the practical and technical issues of ABPM, the use of this method in special situations, the clinical interpretation of measured values including the presentation of different ABPM patterns, derived parameters, the prognostic significance and the limitations of this method.

  20. Clinical applications of laser therapy on the dental practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.

    2004-09-01

    Dental practice consists of a series of laboring procedures which demands the use of several types of equipment and materials. Usually patient"s fears brings additional burden to the Dentists. The use of Lasers for treating and diagnosis in Dentistry is quite new comparing to other medical areas. Initially Laser technology was used as an alternative method for treating dental caries in order to substitute the use of the drill. Lately surgical Lasers have shown themselves very useful for treating several pathologies and began to be used as a powerful tool on the treatment of several conditions affecting the maxillofacial complex and later on, the era of the use of Laser therapy began. The advent of the diode Lasers made possible the introduction of small units at the dental office and Laser therapy was used to improve healing and later included also caries diagnosis. This paper discuss the use of Laser therapy on Restorative Dentistry, Periodondology, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Oral implantology and other. Clinical and laboratorial experience has demonstrated that Laser therapy does improve the healing of both mineralized and soft tissues, reduces pain and inflammation, and also reduces both cost and length of the dental treatment.

  1. Risk management in clinical practice. Part 10. Periodontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, P; Needleman, I

    2010-12-11

    A sizeable proportion of patients in clinical practice will have some form of periodontal disease and most of these patients can be well managed in primary care. Unfortunately, dento-legal claims regarding inappropriate periodontal care are increasing rapidly and are now one of the most common reasons for litigation in dentistry. In this paper we will look at aspects of contemporary management of periodontal disease in clinical practice and offer guidance for examination, management and referral.

  2. eLearning Hands-On: Blending Interactive eLearning with Practical Engineering Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiravu, Cheddi; Yanev, Kamen M.; Tunde, Moses O.; Jeffrey, Anna M.; Schoenian, Dirk; Renner, Ansel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Integrating laboratory work into interactive engineering eLearning contents augments theory with practice while simultaneously ameliorating the apparent theory-practice gap in traditional eLearning. The purpose of this paper is to assess and recommend media that currently fulfil this desirable dual pedagogical goal.…

  3. Reflective Practice: A Place in Enhancing Learning in the Undergraduate Bioscience Teaching Laboratory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Damian; Walsh, Cathy; Larsen, Carl; Hogan, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    Bioscience employers demand graduates with better practical competence. It is our supposition that, although undesirable, student learning is assessment driven and this is leading students to simply go through the motions in the practical setting (whether field work or laboratory based). In this intervention a Critical Incident Report was…

  4. [Impact of digital technology on clinical practices: perspectives from surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Liu, X J

    2016-04-09

    Digital medical technologies or computer aided medical procedures, refer to imaging, 3D reconstruction, virtual design, 3D printing, navigation guided surgery and robotic assisted surgery techniques. These techniques are integrated into conventional surgical procedures to create new clinical protocols that are known as "digital surgical techniques". Conventional health care is characterized by subjective experiences, while digital medical technologies bring quantifiable information, transferable data, repeatable methods and predictable outcomes into clinical practices. Being integrated into clinical practice, digital techniques facilitate surgical care by improving outcomes and reducing risks. Digital techniques are becoming increasingly popular in trauma surgery, orthopedics, neurosurgery, plastic and reconstructive surgery, imaging and anatomic sciences. Robotic assisted surgery is also evolving and being applied in general surgery, cardiovascular surgery and orthopedic surgery. Rapid development of digital medical technologies is changing healthcare and clinical practices. It is therefore important for all clinicians to purposefully adapt to these technologies and improve their clinical outcomes.

  5. [Hypnotic communication and hypnosis in clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrli, Hans

    2014-07-02

    In addition to usual medical care it is often critical to consider the patient's inner world in order to sensitively differentiate between harmful and helpful suggestive elements. The respective abilities in terms of hypnotic communication can be easily learned. Confident, empathic attention and a calm, understanding and figurative language narrowing the focus on positive emotions and positive change, which have been shown to improve the patient's chances of healing, are of particular importance. Proper clinical hypnosis goes one step further: it makes explicit use of suggestions, trance, and trance phenomena. The major clinical indications for hypnosis include psychosomatic disorders, anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorders, depression, and pain syndromes. Hypnosis can also be employed as an adjunct for surgical therapy.

  6. Mandatory Clinical Practice for Dental and Dental Hygiene Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Cheryl A.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Dental and dental hygiene faculty should maintain their clinical skills through regular practice, to improve their ability to relate to students through instruction, provide an additional source of income, and improve their image in the community. Institutional policies fostering and regulating faculty practice plans are suggested. (Author/MSE)

  7. Shared decision making: a model for clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elwyn, G.; Frosch, D.; Thomson, R.; Joseph-Williams, N.; Lloyd, A.; Kinnersley, P.; Cording, E.; Tomson, D.; Dodd, C.; Rollnick, S.; Edwards, A.; Barry, M.

    2012-01-01

    The principles of shared decision making are well documented but there is a lack of guidance about how to accomplish the approach in routine clinical practice. Our aim here is to translate existing conceptual descriptions into a three-step model that is practical, easy to remember, and can act as a

  8. Characteristics and Clinical Practices of Rural Marriage and Family Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, James

    2007-01-01

    This report presents a subset of data collected from the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) Practice Research Network project conducted in 2002. A sample of 47 clinical members of AAMFT who indicated they practiced in a rural community provided descriptive information on demographic characteristics, training, clinical…

  9. Active Interventions in Clinical Practice: Contributions of Gestalt Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammert, Marilyn; Dolan, Mary M.

    1983-01-01

    Describes two dimensions of Gestalt therapy that can enhance clinical practice--orientation to the present and active-experimental style--and examines them in relation to some traditional principles of practice. Gestalt theory offers a method of discovery that is a combination of phenomenology and behaviorism. (JAC)

  10. Variability of CSF Alzheimer's disease biomarkers: implications for clinical practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie J B Vos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers are increasingly being used for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the influence of CSF intralaboratory and interlaboratory variability on diagnostic CSF-based AD classification of subjects and identified causes of this variation. METHODS: We measured CSF amyloid-β (Aβ 1-42, total tau (t-tau, and phosphorylated tau (p-tau by INNOTEST enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assays (ELISA in a memory clinic population (n = 126. Samples were measured twice in a single or two laboratories that served as reference labs for CSF analyses in the Netherlands. Predefined cut-offs were used to classify CSF biomarkers as normal or abnormal/AD pattern. RESULTS: CSF intralaboratory variability was higher for Aβ1-42 than for t-tau and p-tau. Reanalysis led to a change in biomarker classification (normal vs. abnormal of 26% of the subjects based on Aβ1-42, 10% based on t-tau, and 29% based on p-tau. The changes in absolute biomarker concentrations were paralleled by a similar change in levels of internal control samples between different assay lots. CSF interlaboratory variability was higher for p-tau than for Aβ1-42 and t-tau, and reanalysis led to a change in biomarker classification of 12% of the subjects based on Aβ1-42, 1% based on t-tau, and 22% based on p-tau. CONCLUSIONS: Intralaboratory and interlaboratory CSF variability frequently led to change in diagnostic CSF-based AD classification for Aβ1-42 and p-tau. Lot-to-lot variation was a major cause of intralaboratory variability. This will have implications for the use of these biomarkers in clinical practice.

  11. Literature and medicine: contributions to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charon, R; Banks, J T; Connelly, J E; Hawkins, A H; Hunter, K M; Jones, A H; Montello, M; Poirer, S

    1995-04-15

    Introduced to U.S. medical schools in 1972, the field of literature and medicine contributes methods and texts that help physicians develop skills in the human dimensions of medical practice. Five broad goals are met by including the study of literature in medical education: 1) Literary accounts of illness can teach physicians concrete and powerful lessons about the lives of sick people; 2) great works of fiction about medicine enable physicians to recognize the power and implications of what they do; 3) through the study of narrative, the physician can better understand patients' stories of sickness and his or her own personal stake in medical practice; 4) literary study contributes to physicians' expertise in narrative ethics; and 5) literary theory offers new perspectives on the work and the genres of medicine. Particular texts and methods have been found to be well suited to the fulfillment of each of these goals. Chosen from the traditional literary canon and from among the works of contemporary and culturally diverse writers, novels, short stories, poetry, and drama can convey both the concrete particularity and the metaphorical richness of the predicaments of sick people and the challenges and rewards offered to their physicians. In more than 20 years of teaching literature to medical students and physicians, practitioners of literature and medicine have clarified its conceptual frameworks and have identified the means by which its studies strengthen the human competencies of doctoring, which are a central feature of the art of medicine.

  12. Sex and gender considerations in Canadian clinical practice guidelines: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannenbaum, Cara; Clow, Barbara; Haworth-Brockman, Margaret; Voss, Patrice

    2017-01-01

    Background: The importance of sex and gender in the diagnosis and management of health conditions is well established, but the extent to which this evidence is integrated into clinical practice guidelines remains unknown. We aimed to determine the proportion of Canadian clinical practice guidelines that integrate evidence on sex and gender considerations. Methods: We searched the Canadian Medical Association's CPG Infobase, PubMed, all provincial/territorial websites and websites of professional organizations for English- and French-language Canadian clinical practice guidelines published between January 2013 and June 2015 on selected conditions identified as priorities by policy-makers and practitioners. Citations and text were searched electronically using keyword terms related to sex and gender. Three investigators independently analyzed and categorized the content of text-positive clinical practice guidelines based on clinical relevance for practitioners. Results: Of the 118 clinical practice guidelines that met the inclusion criteria, 79 (66.9%) were text-positive for sex and/or gender keywords; 8 (10%) of the 79 used the keywords only in relation to pregnancy. Of the remaining 71 guidelines, 25 (35%) contained sex-related diagnostic or management recommendations. An additional 5 (7%) contained recommendations for sex-specific laboratory reference values, 29 (41%) referred to differences in epidemiologic features or risk factors only, and 12 (17%) contained nonrelevant mentions of search keywords. Twenty-five (35%) of the text-positive guidelines used the terms "sex" and/or "gender" correctly. Interpretation: Recommendations related to sex and gender are inconsistently reported in Canadian clinical practice guidelines. Guidelines such as the Sex and Gender Equity in Research guidelines may help inform the meaningful inclusion of sex and gender evidence in the development of clinical practice guidelines.

  13. Serum amyloid a in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Dijana B.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Serum amyloid A (SAA is an acute phase first class protein discovered a quarter of the century ago. Its concentration depends on clinical findings of the patient, illness activity and the therapy applied. SAA increases moderately to markedly (100-1000 mg/l in bacterial and fungal infections, invasive malignant diseases, tissue injuries in the acute myocardial infarction and autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and vasculitis. Mild elevation (10-100 mg/l is often seen in viral infections, systemic lupus erythematosus and localized inflammation or tissue injuries in cystitis and cerebral infarction. SAA as sensitive, non-invasive parameter is used in organ transplantation where early and correct diagnosis is needed as well as where prompt therapy is required. Besides acute kidney allograft rejection, SAA is used in the diagnosis of rejection after liver transplantation, simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation and also in bone marrow transplantation (acute „graft vs. host disease". Simultaneous determination of C-reactive protein (CRP and SAA may point to acute kidney allograft rejection. Standard immunosuppressive therapy with cyclosporine A and prednisolone significantly suppresses the acute phase CRP reaction both in operation itself and acute rejection, but not in infection. On the other hand, SAA rejection in operation, acute allograft rejection and infection is present in spite of cyclosporine A and steroids therapy. Different reaction of SAA and CRP in transplant patients to cyclosporine A therapy helps in differentiation between the infection and rejection. Although CRP and SAA are sensitive and acute phase reactants, their serum concentrations cannot be valued as prognostic and diagnostic criteria without creatinine serum concentration and clinical findings. In addition, they offer important information for clinical diagnosis as well as the kind of therapy.

  14. [Obsessions before Freud: history and clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The article analyses the significance of the concept of "obsession" in nineteenth-century alienism. From a clinical point of view, Esquirol's description was completed by other authors (Jules Falret, Legrand du Saulle). In the area of psychopathological studies, French alienism, with Morel's emotional delirium or Janet's psychasthenia, defended the emotional theory, as opposed to the intellectual disorder proposed by German doctors. Lastly, the importance of the cultural framework is stressed in the appearance of obsessive symptoms and their interpretation. Along these lines, the article discusses the relationship of religious scruples to melancholy or the appearance of diagnostic categories subject to fin de siècle codes and mentalities.

  15. Improving Clinical Practices for Children with Language and Learning Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhi, Alan G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This lead article of the Clinical Forum addresses some of the gaps that exist between clinical practice and current knowledge about instructional factors that influence learning and language development. Method: Topics reviewed and discussed include principles of learning, generalization, treatment intensity, processing interventions,…

  16. Digoxin in clinical practice: sorting out the facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, S A; Landless, P N

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this review is to sort out from the huge amount of facts related to digoxin in the literature those pertinent to current clinical practice. Seven aspects of digoxin are discussed: its mechanism of action, therapeutic controversy, clinical efficacy, avoidance of toxicity, manifestations of toxicity, indications, and its use in coronary artery disease.

  17. The importance of fluid balance in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales, Katie; Pilsworth, Julie

    This article reviews the physiology that underpins normal fluid balance and discusses how fluid balance can be affected by illness. Clinical assessment of hydration and the importance of fluid balance record keeping are explained. Recommendations are made to improve fluid balance management in clinical practice and the professional importance of record keeping is highlighted.

  18. Communication course for midwives teaching students in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annegrethe; Pedersen, Pernille Mølholt

    2016-01-01

    taking place in clinical practice and try to align the educational efforts in school and clinical settings for the benefit of the students PERSPECTIVES It is known that students in medical education find that clinical learning experiences do not reinforce the communication skills they learn pre......BACKGROUND The course was initiated by the midwifery department at University College North Denmark in cooperation with the leaders of the maternity units where the affiliated students have their clinical education. The purpose of the course was to enhance the quality of communication education......-clinically (Rosenbaum et al. 2013) and our own experience teaching Danish midwifery students indicates the same problem in our program. Providing an opportunity for the clinical teachers to learn, discuss and practice communication issues with each other and with theoretical teachers can represent an important...

  19. Portal of Clinical Practice Guidelines: Digital Strategy for the Dissemination of Clinical Practice Guidelines Developed in Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Suárez Obando, Fernando; Médico, MSc. Miembro del Departamento de Epidemiología y Bioestadística, así como del Instituto de Genética Humana, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia.; Gómez Restrepo, Carlos; Médico MSc. Miembro del Departamento de Epidemiología y Bioestadística, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia.; Camacho Sánchez, Jhon Jairo; MSc. Miembro del Departamento de Epidemiología y Bioestadística Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia.; De La Hoz Bradford, Ana Maria; Médico MSc. Miembro del Departamento de Epidemiología y Bioestadística, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia.; Ruiz Morales, Álvaro; Médico MSc. Miembro del Departamento de Epidemiología Clínica y Bioestadística, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia.; Maldonado Rivera, Patricia; Médico. Miembro del Departamento de Epidemiología y Bioestadística, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia.; López, Pilar; Médico. Miembro del Departamento de Epidemiología y Bioestadística, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In response to the necessity of concise,accurate and practical information to supportclinical decision making, the Colombian government,in partnership with universities and scientificsocieties, has heavily invested in the developmentof clinical practice guidelines (CPG). Objectives:To develop a Web portal for the dissemination andcommunication of CPG and its clinical recommendations.Methodology: Development of the ColombianGPC web portal based on the principlesof adult learning,...

  20. Clinical Activity in General Practice and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjertholm, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS Cancer is a common, serious disease and early diagnosis is a cornerstone in the effort to improve the outcome from cancer disease. The general practitioner (GP) plays a crucial role in achieving this goal. Little is known about GPs’ suspicion of cancer and the activities the GPs...... institute in relation to such suspicion. Knowledge is also sparse on any effects of different diagnostic activities in general practice. The overall aims of this thesis were therefore: -to describe how often Danish GPs suspected cancer or other serious diseases and how they acted on the suspicion......, and to analyse how a suspicion influenced the demand for health care services and predicted a future diagnosis of serious disease - to investigate whether variation in GPs’ diagnostic activity influences cancer patients’ prognosis in relation to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing and prostate cancer...

  1. Present Status of Radiotherapy in Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duehmke, Eckhart

    Aims of radiation oncology are cure from malignant diseases and - at the same time preservation of anatomy (e.g. female breast, uterus, prostate) and organ functions (e.g. brain, eye, voice, sphincter ani). At present, methods and results of clinical radiotherapy (RT) are based on experiences with natural history and radiobiology of malignant tumors in properly defined situations as well as on technical developments since World War II in geometrical and biological treatment planning in teletherapy and brachytherapy. Radiobiological research revealed tolerance limits of healthy tissues to be respected, effective total treatment doses of high cure probability depending on histology and tumor volume, and - more recently - altered fractionation schemes to be adapted to specific growth fractions and intrinsic radiosensitivities of clonogenic tumor cells. In addition, Biological Response Modifiers (BRM), such as cis-platinum, oxygen and hyperthermia may steepen cell survival curves of hypoxic tumor cells, others - such as tetrachiordekaoxid (TCDO) - may enhance repair of normal tissues. Computer assisted techniques in geometrical RT-planning based on individual healthy and pathologic anatomy (CT, MRT) provide high precision RT for well defined brain lesions by using dedicated linear accelerators (Stereotaxy). CT-based individual tissue compensators help with homogenization of distorted dose distributions in magna field irradiation for malignant lymphomas and with total body irradiation (TBI) before allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, e.g. for leukemia. RT with fast neutrons, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), RT with protons and heavy ions need to be tested in randomized trials before implementation into clinical routine.

  2. Clinical Practice Guideline for Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D and its metabolites have clinical significance because they play a critical function in calcium homeostasis and bone metabolism. Although not all of the pathologic mechanisms have been adequately described, vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency, as measured by low levels of 25-OH vitamin D, are associated with a variety of clinical conditions including osteoporosis, falls and fractures in the elderly, decreased immune function, bone pain, and possibly colon cancer and cardiovascular health.2 Apart from inadequate dietary intake, patients may present with low levels of vitamin D if they receive inadequate sunlight. The astronaut population is potentially vulnerable to low levels of vitamin D for several reasons. Firstly, they may train for long periods in Star City, Russia, which by virtue of its northern latitude receives less sunlight in winter months. Secondly, astronauts are deprived of sunlight while aboard the International Space Station (ISS). In addition, ISS crew members are exposed to microgravity for prolonged durations and are likely to develop low bone mineral density despite the use of countermeasures. Therefore, closely monitoring and maintaining adequate vitamin D levels is important for the astronaut corps.

  3. Exploring accountability of clinical ethics consultants: practice and training implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, Kathryn L; Daly, Barbara J

    2014-01-01

    Clinical ethics consultants represent a multidisciplinary group of scholars and practitioners with varied training backgrounds, who are integrated into a medical environment to assist in the provision of ethically supportable care. Little has been written about the degree to which such consultants are accountable for the patient care outcome of the advice given. We propose a model for examining degrees of internally motivated accountability that range from restricted to unbounded accountability, and support balanced accountability as a goal for practice. Finally, we explore implications of this model for training of clinical ethics consultants from diverse academic backgrounds, including those disciplines that do not have a formal code of ethics relating to clinical practice.

  4. Onsite Distributed Generation Systems For Laboratories, Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-09-01

    This guide provides general information on implementing onsite distributed generation systems in laboratory environments. Specific technology applications, general performance information, and cost data are provided to educate and encourage laboratory energy managers to consider onsite power generation or combined heat and power (CHP) systems for their facilities. After conducting an initial screening, energy managers are encouraged to conduct a detailed feasibility study with actual cost and performance data for technologies that look promising. Onsite distributed generation systems are small, modular, decentralized, grid-connected, or off-grid energy systems. These systems are located at or near the place where the energy is used. These systems are also known as distributed energy or distributed power systems. DG technologies are generally considered those that produce less than 20 megawatts (MW) of power. A number of technologies can be applied as effective onsite DG systems, including: (1) Diesel, natural gas, and dual-fuel reciprocating engines; (2) Combustion turbines and steam turbines; (3) Fuel cells; (4) Biomass heating; (5) Biomass combined heat and power; (6) Photovoltaics; and (7) Wind turbines. These systems can provide a number of potential benefits to an individual laboratory facility or campus, including: (1) High-quality, reliable, and potentially dispatchable power; (2) Low-cost energy and long-term utility cost assurance, especially where electricity and/or fuel costs are high; (3) Significantly reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Typical CHP plants reduce onsite GHG by 40 to 60 percent; (4) Peak demand shaving where demand costs are high; (5) CHP where thermal energy can be used in addition to electricity; (6) The ability to meet standby power needs, especially where utility-supplied power is interrupted frequently or for long periods and where standby power is required for safety or emergencies; and (7) Use for standalone or off

  5. Applying HIV testing guidelines in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Megan R; Fogler, Jess; Weber, Shannon; Goldschmidt, Ronald H

    2009-12-15

    An estimated one fourth of persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are not aware they are infected. Early diagnosis of HIV has the potential to ensure optimal outcomes for infected persons and to limit the spread of the virus. Important barriers to testing among physicians include insufficient time, reimbursement issues, and lack of patient acceptance. Current HIV testing guidelines address many of these barriers by making the testing process more streamlined and less stigmatizing. The opt-out consent process has been shown to improve test acceptance. Formal pretest counseling and written consent are no longer recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nevertheless, pretest discussions provide an opportunity to give information about HIV, address fears of discrimination, and identify ongoing high-risk activities. With increased HIV screening in the primary care setting, more persons with HIV could be identified earlier, receive timely and appropriate care, and get treatment to prevent clinical progression and transmission.

  6. Clinical practice: swallowing problems in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erasmus, Corrie E; van Hulst, Karen; Rotteveel, Jan J; Willemsen, Michel A A P; Jongerius, Peter H

    2012-03-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common physical disability in early childhood. The worldwide prevalence of CP is approximately 2-2.5 per 1,000 live births. It has been clinically defined as a group of motor, cognitive, and perceptive impairments secondary to a non-progressive defect or lesion of the developing brain. Children with CP can have swallowing problems with severe drooling as one of the consequences. Malnutrition and recurrent aspiration pneumonia can increase the risk of morbidity and mortality. Early attention should be given to dysphagia and excessive drooling and their substantial contribution to the burden of a child with CP and his/her family. This review displays the important functional and anatomical issues related to swallowing problems in children with CP based on relevant literature and expert opinion. Furthermore, based on our experience, we describe a plan for approach of investigation and treatment of swallowing problems in cerebral palsy.

  7. [Clinical presentation of tuberculosis in routine practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinser, R; Frerix, M; Müller-Ladner, U

    2012-10-01

    Since the beginning of the biologics era tuberculosis is known to be a potential life-threatening complication during treatment of patients with rheumatic diseases. National and international societies have developed recommendations for tuberculosis screening and treatment of patients at risk for development of tuberculosis. Owing to the relative rareness of overt tuberculosis in patients with rheumatic diseases, the experience of individual rheumatologists with this complication is limited. Therefore, we have analyzed the tuberculosis cases from 2006-2011 in our rheumatology referral center (treating more than 1,500 inpatient and 8,000 outpatient cases every year) to obtain a real-life picture more than 10 years after initiation of the first application of biologics outside of controlled clinical trials. We identified 4 cases that illustrate the difficulties of diagnosis and treatment.

  8. Implications of the introduction of laboratory demand management at primary care clinics in South Africa on laboratory expenditure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozayr H. Mahomed

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diagnostic health laboratory services are regarded as an integral part of the national health infrastructure across all countries. Clinical laboratory tests contribute substantially to health system goals of increasing quality of care and improving patient outcomes.Objectives: This study aimed to analyse current laboratory expenditures at the primary healthcare (PHC level in South Africa as processed by the National Health Laboratory Service and to determine the potential cost savings of introducing laboratory demand management.Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional analysis of laboratory expenditures for the 2013/2014 financial year across 11 pilot National Health Insurance health districts was conducted. Laboratory expenditure tariff codes were cross-tabulated to the PHC essential laboratory tests list (ELL to determine inappropriate testing. Data were analysed using a Microsoft Access database and Excel software.Results: Approximately R35 million South African Rand (10% of the estimated R339 million in expenditures was for tests that were not listed within the ELL. Approximately 47% of expenditure was for laboratory tests that were indicated in the algorithmic management of patients on antiretroviral treatment. The other main cost drivers for non-ELL testing included full blood count and urea, as well as electrolyte profiles usually requested to support management of patients on antiretroviral treatment.Conclusions: Considerable annual savings of up to 10% in laboratory expenditure are possible at the PHC level by implementing laboratory demand management. In addition, to achieve these savings, a standardised PHC laboratory request form and some form of electronic gatekeeping system that must be supported by an educational component should be implemented.

  9. [External quality assessment in clinical biochemistry laboratories: pilot study in 11 laboratories of Lomé (Togo)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouassi, Kafui; Fétéké, Lochina; Assignon, Selom; Dorkenoo, Ameyo; Napo-Koura, Gado

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the performance of a few biochemistry analysis and make recommendations to the place of the stakeholders. It is a cross-sectional study conducted between the October 1(st), 2012 and the July 31, 2013 bearing on the results of 5 common examinations of clinical biochemistry, provided by 11 laboratories volunteers opening in the public and private sectors. These laboratories have analysed during the 3 cycles, 2 levels (medium and high) of serum concentration of urea, glucose, creatinine and serum aminotransferases. The performance of laboratories have been determined from the acceptable limits corresponding to the limits of total errors, defined by the French Society of Clinical Biology (SFBC). A system of internal quality control is implemented by all laboratories and 45% of them participated in international programs of external quality assessment (EQA). The rate of acceptable results for the entire study was of 69%. There was a significant difference (p<0.002) between the performance of the group of laboratories engaged in a quality approach and the group with default implementation of the quality approach. Also a significant difference was observed between the laboratories of the central level and those of the peripheral level of our health system (p<0.047). The performance of the results provided by the laboratories remains relatively unsatisfactory. It is important that the Ministry of Health put in place a national program of EQA with mandatory participation.

  10. [Scientific, practical and educational aspects of clinical epidemiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briko, N I

    2012-01-01

    This article defines clinical epidemiology and describes its goal and objectives. The author claims that clinical epidemiology is a section of epidemiology which underlies the development of evidence-based standards for diagnostics, treatment and prevention and helps to select the appropriate algorithm for each clinical case. The study provides a comprehensive overview of the relationship between clinical epidemiology and evidence-based medicine. Epidemiological research is shown to be methodological basis of clinical epidemiology and evidence-based medicine with randomized controlled trials being the "gold standard" for obtaining reliable data. The key stages in the history of clinical epidemiology are discussed and further development of clinical epidemiology and the integration of courses on clinical epidemiology in education is outlined for progress in medical research and health care practice.

  11. First-Year Residents' Caring, Medical Knowledge, and Clinical Judgment in Relation to Laboratory Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnold, Paul R.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A study of 36 first-year Northwestern University (Illinois) medical residents found that students' medical knowledge was a predictor of increased laboratory test use, that clinical judgment was a predictor of decreased laboratory use, and that level of caring was statistically unrelated to amount of laboratory use. (Author/MSE)

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL RISK ASSESSMENT OF SOME COPPER BASED FUNGICIDES ACCORDING TO THE REQUIREMENTS OF GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marga GRĂDILĂ

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents data demonstrating the functionality of biological systems reconstituted with aquatic organisms developed under Good Laboratory Practice testing facility within Research - Development Institute for Plant Protection Bucharest for environmental risk assessment of four fungicides based on copper, according to Good Laboratory Practice requirements. For risk assessment, according to GLP were made the following steps: Good Laboratory Practice test facility was established, we have ensured adequate space for growth, acclimatization and testing for each test species, it was installed a complex water production instalation needed to perform tests, it was achieved control system for checking environmental conditions and have developed specific operating procedures that have been accredited according to Good Laboratory Practice.The results showed that biological systems model of the Good Laboratory Practice test facility in Research - Development Institute for Plant Protection meet the requirements of Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Guidelines regarding GLP, and after testing copper-based fungicides in terms of acute toxicity Cyprinus carpio and to Daphnia magna revealed that three of them (copper oxychloride, copper hydroxide and copper sulphate showed ecological efficiency, ie low toxicity. Metallic copper based fungicides showed a higher toxicity, resulting in fish toxicity symptoms: sleep, sudden immersion, faded, weakness, swimming in spiral, lack of balance, breathing slow and cumbersome, spasms and mortality.

  13. The practice of clinical chemistry in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Gerard T; Beastall, Graham H; Kohse, Klaus P; Zérah, Simone; Jansen, Rob; Köller, Ursula; Blaton, Vic; Lund, Erik; Parviainen, Markku; Charret, Jo; Gurr, Eberhard; Nicholou, Hara; Kenny, Desmond; Pazzagli, Mario; Opp, Matthias; Willems, Hans; Martins, Maria do Carmo; Queraltó, José M; Landin, Britta; Yu, Anna; McMurray, Janet

    2002-02-01

    The European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemistry has been actively engaged in raising the level of clinical chemistry in the European Union. Closer contacts between the national societies for clinical chemistry have resulted in more comparable programs for postgraduate training of clinical chemists, closer similarity of contents and practice of the profession in the different countries, and the official registration of professionals. This article reviews some of the characteristics of professional organisation, practice, and regulation in the fifteen European Union countries. Many similarities appear. In half of the countries microbiology, blood-banking and transfusion medicine fall within the domain of clinical chemistry. The minimum number of years for training (university and postgraduate) is eight, but in practice this will extend to 10 or more years. Official regulation of the profession by law exists in a minority of countries. Continuing education and re-registration have not been officially instituted yet in any country, but these issues will be the next steps forward. In those countries that prepare themselves for entering the European Union, training and practice of clinical chemistry are moving towards the common standards of the European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemistry.

  14. Yeast identification in the clinical microbiology laboratory: phenotypical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freydiere, A M; Guinet, R; Boiron, P

    2001-02-01

    Emerging yeast pathogens are favoured by increasing numbers of immunocompromised patients and by certain current medical practices. These yeasts differ in their antifungal drug susceptibilities, and rapid species identification is imperative. A large variety of methods have been developed with the aim of facilitating rapid, accurate yeast identification. Significant recent commercial introductions have included species-specific direct enzymatic colour tests, differential chromogenic isolation plates, direct immunological tests, and enhanced manual and automated biochemical and enzymatic panels. Chromogenic isolation media demonstrate better detection rates of yeasts in mixed cultures than traditional media, and allow the direct identification of Candida albicans by means of colony colour. Comparative evaluation of rapid methods for C. albicans identification, including the germ tube test, shows that chromogenic media may be economically advantageous. Accurate tests for single species include the Bichrolatex Albicans and Krusei Color tests, both immunologically based, as well as the Remel Rapid Trehalose Assimilation Broth for C. glabrata. Among broad-spectrum tests, the RapID Yeast Plus system gives same-day identification of clinical yeasts, but performance depends on inoculum density and geographic isolate source. The API 20 C AUX system is considered a reference method, but newer systems such as Auxacolor and Fungichrom are as accurate and are more convenient. Among automated systems, the ID 32 C strip, the Vitek Yeast Biochemical Card and the Vitek 2 ID-YST system correctly identify >93% of common yeasts, but the ID-YST is the most accurate with uncommon yeasts, including C. dubliniensis. Spectroscopic methods such as Fourier transformed-infrared spectroscopy offer potential advantages for the future. Overall, the advantages of rapid yeast identification methods include relative simplicity and low cost. For all rapid methods, meticulous, standardized

  15. Performance of the tutorial function in the Professor of Hematology, specialty: Clinical Laboratory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriol Meneses Echemendia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the battle of ideas, arises the career, degree in health technology, imposing new challenges to the medical university context, inserting new actors to the teaching - learning process and with them the professor-tutor's figure. For that reason , an evaluative project was developed in the hematology profile in the specialty of clinical laboratory, with the purpose of elaborating a strategy for the improvement of the teaching tutorial, on the base of systematic-structural-functional model; giving answer to the main detected problems. To carry out the study was used a qualitative focus, selecting the integrated paradigm. It was done an investigation action in the seven municipal university headquarters of the county where the process of teaching-learning of the new pedagogic model is developed in the profile. once selecting the scale of priority of the detected difficulties using the interaction and the interdependence among investigator and investigated, the "methodological strategy for the improvement of the teaching tutorial in hematology of clinical laboratory" was designed to propose three strategic actions, valued positively by the expert ones who endorsed the feasibility and effectiveness of their setting in practice to contribute to the improvement of the teaching tutorial in the formation of health technologies.

  16. Indirect laryngeal surgery in the clinical voice laboratory: the renewal of a lost art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogikyan, N D; Pynnonen, M

    2000-05-01

    Since the advent of precision instruments and safe techniques for direct laryngoscopic surgery under general anesthesia, indirect laryngeal surgery has become very uncommon. A review of the recent literature finds that few authors advocate indirect surgery under topical anesthesia, and many otolaryngologists dismiss this technique as being either of only historical interest or an idiosyncratic method practiced only by a handful of clinicians. The societal mandate for cost-effective healthcare and the availability of relatively low-cost, high-quality endoscopes and video equipment warrant a renewed and broader interest in this type of surgery. In this article, we review a series of 27 indirect surgical procedures performed under topical anesthesia in the clinical voice laboratory. We discuss the indications, outcomes, advantages, and disadvantages of this surgery, and we present a brief analysis of its cost-effectiveness. We conclude that indirect laryngeal surgery in the clinical voice laboratory is an effective, safe, efficient, and less costly alternative to some procedures routinely performed under general anesthesia.

  17. 77 FR 26069 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-02

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... following three panels of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science... review by the Board involve a wide range of medical specialties within the general areas of...

  18. Daptomycin, a lipopeptide antibiotic in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Florian; Beiras-Fernandez, Andres; Schelling, Gustav

    2008-08-01

    Gram-positive cocci are one of the leading causes of infections in clinical medicine. Since the invention of antibiotic substances, multidrug resistance is a major problem in the treatment of such infections. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is responsible for 60% of nosocomial infections in the US. The first-choice drug used in these cases is the glycopeptide vancomycin; however, vancomycin is associated with a significant number of adverse side effects, such as nephro- and ototoxicity. Thus, the discovery of new drugs against MRSA and other multidrug-resistant cocci is of utmost interest. Daptomycin, a lipopeptide, is one of these new drugs and has been successfully used in the treatment of complicated skin and skin-structure infections and right-sided endocarditis. Because of its potency and pharmacological profile, it is increasingly used for new indications not yet approved by the FDA. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of daptomycin, with particular emphasis on potential new indications for which it could be used in the future.

  19. Clinical practice: Obstructive renal candidiasis in infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisht, Veena; Voort, Judith VanDer

    2011-10-01

    Renal candidiasis is an increasingly common condition affecting predominantly premature infants receiving neonatal intensive care or term infants with urogenital tract anomalies. Multiple risk factors are usually present. Although rare, some infants develop an obstructive uropathy due to fungal balls, and this requires prompt detection and intervention to preserve kidney function. The management of obstructive renal bezoars is challenging and not well summarised in the past. This is mainly due to scarce literature confined to case reports or case series only. This review clarifies various definitions used in relation to renal candidiasis and identifies infants particularly at risk of obstruction. Clinical presentation, diagnosis and the role of imaging are discussed. A summary of the recent literature is provided to outline the range of existing treatment options available with published drug dosages and mode of delivery used. No single approach is successful in all cases and clinicians need to be aware of the different options available: apart from adequate urinary drainage and use of systemic +/- local antifungal agents, additional treatment with fibrinolytic agents and/or endoscopic or open surgical removal may be required. A new simplified algorithm for use in management is proposed. We hope this review will help clinicians in their management of patients presenting with this complex and challenging diagnosis.

  20. The path to clinical proteomics research: integration of proteomics, genomics, clinical laboratory and regulatory science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boja, Emily S; Rodriguez, Henry

    2011-04-01

    Better biomarkers are urgently needed to cancer detection, diagnosis, and prognosis. While the genomics community is making significant advances in understanding the molecular basis of disease, proteomics will delineate the functional units of a cell, proteins and their intricate interaction network and signaling pathways for the underlying disease. Great progress has been made to characterize thousands of proteins qualitatively and quantitatively in complex biological systems by utilizing multi-dimensional sample fractionation strategies, mass spectrometry and protein microarrays. Comparative/quantitative analysis of high-quality clinical biospecimen (e.g., tissue and biofluids) of human cancer proteome landscape has the potential to reveal protein/peptide biomarkers responsible for this disease by means of their altered levels of expression, post-translational modifications as well as different forms of protein variants. Despite technological advances in proteomics, major hurdles still exist in every step of the biomarker development pipeline. The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer initiative (NCI-CPTC) has taken a critical step to close the gap between biomarker discovery and qualification by introducing a pre-clinical "verification" stage in the pipeline, partnering with clinical laboratory organizations to develop and implement common standards, and developing regulatory science documents with the US Food and Drug Administration to educate the proteomics community on analytical evaluation requirements for multiplex assays in order to ensure the safety and effectiveness of these tests for their intended use.

  1. Clinical evaluation of analytical variations in serum creatinine measurements: why laboratories should abandon Jaffe techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drion Iefke

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-equivalence in serum creatinine (SCr measurements across Dutch laboratories and the consequences hereof on chronic kidney disease (CKD staging were examined. Methods National data from the Dutch annual external quality organization of 2009 were used. 144 participating laboratories examined 11 pairs of commutable, value-assigned SCr specimens in the range 52–262 μmol/L, using Jaffe or enzymatic techniques. Regression equations were created for each participating laboratory (by regressing values as measured by participating laboratories on the target values of the samples sent by the external quality organization; area under the curves were examined and used to rank laboratories. The 10th and 90th percentile regression equation were selected for each technique separately. To evaluate the impact of the variability in SCr measurements and its eventual clinical consequences in a real patient population, we used a cohort of 82424 patients aged 19–106 years. The SCr measurements of these 82424 patients were introduced in the 10th and 90th percentile regression equations. The newly calculated SCr values were used to calculate an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR using the 4-variable Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry traceable Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula. Differences in CKD staging were examined, comparing the stratification outcomes for Jaffe and enzymatic SCr techniques. Results Jaffe techniques overestimated SCr: 21%, 12%, 10% for SCr target values 52, 73 and 94 μmol/L, respectively. For enzymatic assay these values were 0%, -1%, -2%, respectively. eGFR using the MDRD formula and SCr measured by Jaffe techniques, staged patients in a lower CKD category. Downgrading to a lower CKD stage occurred in 1-42%, 2-37% and 12–78.9% of patients for the 10th and 90th percentile laboratories respectively in CKD categories 45–60, 60–90 and >90 ml/min/1.73 m2. Using enzymatic techniques, downgrading

  2. Reexamination of the ethics of placebo use in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Atsushi; Kadooka, Yasuhiro

    2013-05-01

    A placebo is a substance or intervention believed to be inactive, but is administered by the healthcare professional as if it was an active medication. Unlike standard treatments, clinical use of placebo usually involves deception and is therefore ethically problematic. Our attitudes toward the clinical use of placebo, which inevitably includes deception or withholding information, have a tremendous effect on our practice regarding truth-telling and informed consent. A casual attitude towards it weakens the current practice based on shared decision-making and mutual trust between patients and healthcare professionals. Issues concerning the clinical use of placebo are thus intimately related to patient-provider relationships, the public's trust in medicine, and medical education. A review of recent survey studies suggests that the clinical use of placebo appears to be fairly well accepted among healthcare professionals and is common in clinical settings in various countries. However, we think that an ethical discussion is urgently needed because of its controversial nature. If judged to be ethically wrong, the practice should end. In the present paper, we discuss the ethicality of the clinical use of placebo with deception and argue against it, concluding that it is unethical and should be banned. We will show that most arguments in favor of the clinical use of placebo can be refuted and are therefore incorrect or weak. These arguments will be presented and examined individually. Finally, we will briefly consider issues relevant to the clinical use of placebo without deception.

  3. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of adolescents with platelet function disorders and heavy menstrual bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amesse Lawrence S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platelet function disorders (PFDs have emerged as an important etiology of heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB in adolescents. However, neither clinical nor laboratory data have been methodically analyzed in this population subset. The objective of this study was to evaluate these parameters in order to distinguish characteristics of the disorder that in turn will lead to earlier diagnosis and therapy initiation. Methods Retrospective review of medical records from postmenarcheal adolescents with documented PFDs referred to a hemophilia treatment center and university faculty practices for bleeding diatheses with their clinical and laboratory data evaluated. Results Of 63 teens with documented PFDs, HMB was the most common clinical manifestation of PFD (43; 68.3%. Of these, 37 (86% were diagnosed with PFD either at or after menarche with the diagnosis based on HMB symptoms alone. Only 6 (14% were diagnosed with a PFD prior to menarche, based on associated bleeding, i.e., epistaxis, ecchymosis, and all developed HMB after menstruation onset. Interestingly, 20 girls were diagnosed with a PFD prior to menarche and of these, only 6 (30% went on to develop HMB after pubertal transition, while the majority (14; 70% did not. The average age-at-PFD diagnosis was 14.5yrs, significantly differing from the 10.9yrs average age-at-PFD diagnosis in their counterparts that, after menarche, did not develop HMB (PP P Conclusions Adolescents with PFDs and HMB appear to be clinically distinct from their non-HMB counterparts. This group of girls is characterized by HMB the major bleeding symptom, significantly high incidences of blood group O and the δ-SPD with a PFD diagnosed well after menarche. High false negative standard platelet function study results indicate additional diagnostic strategies, particularly for δ-SPD, should be considered.

  4. The National Market for Medicare Clinical Laboratory Testing

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Current Medicare payment policy for outpatient laboratory services is outdated. Future reforms, such as competitive bidding, should consider the characteristics of...

  5. DYNAMICALLY EVOLVING CLINICAL PRACTICES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PREDICTING MEDICAL DECISIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHEN, JONATHAN H; GOLDSTEIN, MARY K; ASCH, STEVEN M; ALTMAN, RUSS B

    2015-01-01

    Automatically data-mining clinical practice patterns from electronic health records (EHR) can enable prediction of future practices as a form of clinical decision support (CDS). Our objective is to determine the stability of learned clinical practice patterns over time and what implication this has when using varying longitudinal historical data sources towards predicting future decisions. We trained an association rule engine for clinical orders (e.g., labs, imaging, medications) using structured inpatient data from a tertiary academic hospital. Comparing top order associations per admission diagnosis from training data in 2009 vs. 2012, we find practice variability from unstable diagnoses with rank biased overlap (RBO)0.6. Predicting admission orders for future (2013) patients with associations trained on recent (2012) vs. older (2009) data improved accuracy evaluated by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC) 0.89 to 0.92, precision at ten (positive predictive value of the top ten predictions against actual orders) 30% to 37%, and weighted recall (sensitivity) at ten 2.4% to 13%, (P<10−10). Training with more longitudinal data (2009-2012) was no better than only using recent (2012) data. Secular trends in practice patterns likely explain why smaller but more recent training data is more accurate at predicting future practices. PMID:26776186

  6. Academic physiatry. Balancing clinical practice and academic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabois, M

    1992-04-01

    The need for continued and diversified growth of both scholarly and clinical activities within academic physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R) departments is discussed with reference to the demands placed on academic departments by the various components of their mission, such as administration, clinical service, education and research. The expansion and improvement of clinical services should include the following components: program development, resources needed, finances required and marketing. Clinical subspecialization of faculty and solid affiliation with nonacademic hospitals and rehabilitation facilities is essential for academic PM&R. The faculty should include three categories: clinical faculty, clinical-research faculty and research faculty. Adequate financial resources must comprise an appropriate balance of academic funds, clinical income and grant sources. Clinical funds will play a greater role as other sources of funds diminish. Any practice plan must recognize the equality of the differing faculty members' practices, whether their interests are clinical, educational or research-oriented. The expansion and intensification of clinical programs by academy PM&R departments could increase competition in the medical community. Sensitivity to the perceptions of other practitioners and institutions, careful planning and cooperation will help the field grow and improve levels of care for the patients we serve in light of the changing medical care environment.

  7. Dual Perspectives on Theory in Clinical Practice: Practice Makes Perfect: The Incompatibility of Practicing Speech and Meaningful Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhi, Alan G.

    2000-01-01

    This article uses a case study to suggest that some children view speech-language therapy as a separate situation for learning practicing new sounds and language forms whereas the purpose of talking outside of therapy is meaningful communication. Clinical implications of this potential incompatibility between practicing speech and communicating…

  8. Developing an advanced practice nurse-led liver clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAfee, Jean L

    2012-01-01

    End-stage liver disease (ESLD) is a leading cause of digestive disease deaths in the United States and continues to increase exponentially every year. Best practice does not currently recognize or utilize a clinic practice model for ESLD management. Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) can impact ESLD disease management by implementing an outpatient clinic care model to focus on treatment compliance, patient education, improvement of patient outcomes, and reduction in hospital admission rates for ESLD patients. A review of 15 research articles was completed to determine the impact APRNs can make on chronic care of ESLD patients. Results from the review support APRN analysis, assessment, diagnosis, treatment, intervention, and evaluation of ESLD patients. The literature reviewed also demonstrates that ESLD patients have improved symptom management when maintained in an outpatient setting, allowing for decreased hospital and insurance expenditures. Following evaluation of the evidence, it was concluded that an APRN-led ESLD clinic merits further study.

  9. Feedback: an essential element of student learning in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clynes, Mary P; Raftery, Sara E C

    2008-11-01

    Clinical practice is an essential component of the nursing curriculum. In order for the student to benefit fully from the experience regular performance feedback is required. Feedback should provide the student with information on current practice and offer practical advice for improved performance. The importance of feedback is widely acknowledged however it appears that there is inconsistency in its provision to students. The benefits of feedback include increased student confidence, motivation and self-esteem as well as improved clinical practice. Benefits such as enhanced interpersonal skills and a sense of personal satisfaction also accrue to the supervisor. Barriers to the feedback process are identified as inadequate supervisor training and education, unfavourable ward learning environment and insufficient time spent with students. In addition to the appropriate preparation of the supervisor effective feedback includes an appreciation of the steps of the feedback process, an understanding of the student response to feedback and effective communication skills.

  10. Nursing students learning to utilize nursing research in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Lea-Riitta; Eriksson, Elina

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the significance of a learning assignment in relation to research skills and learning of nursing students in clinical practice. The learning assignment included an oral presentation of a nursing research article, which the students gave to their fellow students and ward nurses. The students also chaired the discussion after the presentation. The target group for the study was nursing students of a Finnish polytechnic who had been studying for 2-2 1/2 years and had accomplished a minimum of 120 ECTS credits of the total of 210 ECTS credits. When participating in the study, the students were completing a six-week clinical practice of optional studies. The data were collected with a questionnaire designed for the study. It consisted of six open-ended questions. Three of the questions were related to learning of research skills. Two questions were concerned with learning during the ongoing clinical practice. The final question inquired the students' views on the development of the learning assignment. The students received the questionnaire before the commencement of their clinical practice, and they returned it to the other researcher after their clinical practice. The questionnaire was given to 80 students, of which 50 returned it; the response rate was 63%. The data were analysed by content analysis question by question. According to the results, the learning assignment advanced the understanding of research concepts for the majority of the students. In particular, the students reported that the oral presentation clarified the research concepts, and the structure of a scientific article was also elucidated. The students stated that the assignment generated ideas concerning the development of nursing care. In relation to the ongoing clinical practice, the assignment advanced patient encounters and interaction, and bearing responsibility the most. Proposals for the further development of the learning assignment were expressed by

  11. Utilization of FibroScan in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonder, Alan; Afdhal, Nezam

    2014-02-01

    The evaluation of liver fibrosis is critical, particularly to rule out cirrhosis. Novel non-invasive tests such as transient ultrasound elastography are widely used to stage liver fibrosis as an alternative to liver biopsy, and this technology has recently been approved in the US. In this review, we discuss the performance characteristics of elastography for a variety of liver diseases and highlight practical appropriate suggestions for how to incorporate this technology into clinical practice.

  12. Conditions for building a community of practice in an advanced physics laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Irving, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we explore the theory of communities of practice in the context of a physics college course and in particular the classroom environment of an advanced laboratory. We introduce the idea of elements of a classroom community being able to provide students with the opportunity to have an accelerated trajectory towards being a more central participant of the community of practice of physicists. This opportunity is a result of structural features of the course and a primary instructional choice which result in the development of a learning community with several elements that encourage students to engage in more authentic practices of a physicist. A jump in accountable disciplinary knowledge is also explored as a motivation for enculturation into the community of practice of physicists. In the advanced laboratory what students are being assessed on as counting as physics is significantly different and so they need to assimilate in order to succeed.

  13. Benefits of nurse teachers returning to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glossop, D; Hoyles, A; Lees, S; Pollard, C

    This article outlines an action research study developed to facilitate nurse teachers returning to clinical practice. The article explores how the teachers established partnerships with clinicians through which they were able to share the experience of returning to an area of nursing that they had previously only visited. It discusses four categories: expectations of self and others; entering someone else's world; more awareness of student needs; and teaching theory and practising nursing. These categories emerged following the analysis of journals, focus group interviews and individual interviews and led to a number of recommendations concerning the implications for other teachers wishing to return to clinical practice.

  14. The psychiatric cultural formulation: translating medical anthropology into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Neil Krishan

    2012-03-01

    This article reviews proposed revisions to the DSM-IV Outline for Cultural Formulation for clinical practice. The author begins by exploring the theoretical development of and assumptions involved in the Cultural Formulation. A case presentation is then used to demonstrate shortcomings in the current implementation of the Cultural Formulation based on older definitions of culture. Finally, the author recommends practical questions based on the growing anthropological literature concerning the interpersonal elements of culture and the social course of illness. A simple clear format that clinically translates social science concepts has the potential to increase use of the Cultural Formulation by all psychiatrists, not just those specializing in cultural psychiatry.

  15. [Specific clinical, epidemiological patterns and laboratory diagnostics of enterovirus infection in the Republic of Belarus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amvros'eva, T V; Poklonskaia, N V; Bogush, Z F; Kazinets, O N; Germanovich, F A; Fisenko, E G; Titov, L P; Kvacheva, Z B; Bezruchko, A A; Scheslenok, E P

    2005-01-01

    The clinical and epidemiological patterns as well as the results of the laboratory verification of the outbreak of enterovirus infection (EVI) in Minsk during the period of summer-autumn, 2000, are presented. During this outbreak a variety of clinical forms were observed, the serous meningitis being prevalent (57.5%). Practically simultaneous occurrence of infection on the territory of all administrative districts of the city, the predominant involvement of children aged up to 14 years into the outbreak, a high proportion of simultaneous casualities in the multiple foci. A number of circulating enteroviruses (EV)--ECHO 30, ECHO 6 of three serotypes and Coxsackie B5--were simultaneously isolated from clinical material. EV of the same serotypes were isolated from tap drinking water, and neutralizing antibodies to these serotypes were often detected in the patients blood sera. Infectious EV were also present in samples of bottled water and in water reservoirs used for bathing. The routes of EV transmission and the improvement of EVI control are discussed.

  16. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary and Cerebral Resuscitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Rene Navarro Machado

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary and Cerebral Resuscitation. It is the group of procedures that should be accomplished to restore circulation and ventilation in a patient with cardiac arrest, including actions to reintegrate upper neurological functions after restoring cardiac function. This document includes a review of concepts, aetiology and updates the main clinical aspects related with diagnosis and treatment aimed at the post-resuscitation syndrome. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  17. Integrating research, clinical practice and translation: the Singapore experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiang; Wong, Damon Wing Kee; Zhang, Zhuo; Lee, Beng-Hai; Gao, Xinting; Yin, Fengshou; Zhang, Jielin; Htoo, Min Thet

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the experiences of the Singapore ocular imaging team, iMED, in integrating image processing and computer-aided diagnosis research with clinical practice and knowledge, towards the development of ocular image processing technologies for clinical usage with potential impact. In this paper, we outline key areas of research with their corresponding image modalities, as well as providing a systematic introduction of the datasets used for validation.

  18. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pre-eclampsia and Eclampsia Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Carlos Alvarez Li

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pre-eclampsia and Eclampsia Treatment. This disease is part of a group of conditions known as hypertensive disease in pregnancy that have in common the existence of high blood pressure. This document includes a review and update of the main clinical aspects, concepts, classification and treatment stressing the use of drugs that cause hypotension and magnesium sulphate. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  19. A model for ethical practices in clinical phonetics and linguistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Thomas W

    2007-01-01

    The emergence of clinical phonetics and linguistics as an area of scientific inquiry gives rise to the need for guidelines that define ethical and responsible conduct. The diverse membership of the International Clinical Phonetics and Linguistics Association (ICPLA) and the readership of this journal are uniquely suited to consider ethical issues from diverse perspectives. Accordingly, this paper introduces a multi-tiered six-factor model for ethical practices to stimulate discussion of ethical issues.

  20. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Vascular Catheter Infections Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belkys Rodríguez Llerena

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Vascular Catheter Infections Treatment. It has been defined as the presence of local or systemic signs without other obvious infection site, plus the microbiologic evidence involving the catheter. This document includes a review and update of concepts, main clinical aspects, and treatment and stresses the importance of prophylactic treatment. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  1. A wellness framework for pediatric nursing clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurr, Shelley; Bally, Jill; Ogenchuk, Marcella; Peternelj-Taylor, Cindy

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a proposed holistic Framework for Exploring Adolescent Wellness specific to the discipline of nursing. Conceptualized as a practical adolescent wellness assessment tool, the framework attends to the physical, spiritual, psychological and social dimensions of adolescent health. Through the discussion of a reconstructed case study the framework's application to nursing practice is illustrated. Nurses are distinctly positioned to promote adolescent wellness. This approach facilitates the exploration of the multiple influences on the health of adolescents, across a variety of clinical practice specialties and settings, by nurses of varying experiences.

  2. Good Clinical Practice Guidance and Pragmatic Clinical Trials: Balancing the Best of Both Worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentz, Robert J; Hernandez, Adrian F; Berdan, Lisa G; Rorick, Tyrus; O'Brien, Emily C; Ibarra, Jenny C; Curtis, Lesley H; Peterson, Eric D

    2016-03-01

    Randomized, clinical trials are commonly regarded as the highest level of evidence to support clinical decisions. Good Clinical Practice guidelines have been constructed to provide an ethical and scientific quality standard for trials that involve human subjects in a manner aligned with the Declaration of Helsinki. Originally designed to provide a unified standard of trial data to support submission to regulatory authorities, the principles may also be applied to other studies of human subjects. Although the application of Good Clinical Practice principles generally led to improvements in the quality and consistency of trial operations, these principles have also contributed to increasing trial complexity and costs. Alternatively, the growing availability of electronic health record data has facilitated the possibility for streamlined pragmatic clinical trials. The central tenets of Good Clinical Practice and pragmatic clinical trials represent potential tensions in trial design (stringent quality and highly efficient operations). In the present article, we highlight potential areas of discordance between Good Clinical Practice guidelines and the principles of pragmatic clinical trials and suggest strategies to streamline study conduct in an ethical manner to optimally perform clinical trials in the electronic age.

  3. Contributions of Analytical Chemistry to the Clinical Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skogerboe, Kristen J.

    1988-01-01

    Highlights several analytical techniques that are being used in state-of-the-art clinical labs. Illustrates how other advances in instrumentation may contribute to clinical chemistry in the future. Topics include: biosensors, polarization spectroscopy, chemiluminescence, fluorescence, photothermal deflection, and chromatography in clinical…

  4. Vestibular migraine in children and adolescents: clinical findings and laboratory tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thyra eLanghagen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vestibular migraine (VM is the most common cause of episodic vertigo in children. We summarize the clinical findings and of laboratory test results in a cohort of children and adolescents with VM. We discuss the limitations of current classification criteria for dizzy children. Methods: A retrospective chart analysis was performed on 118 children with suspected VM at a tertiary care center. Patients with complaints related to migraine and who presented with vertigo/dizziness were grouped in the following categories: (1 definite vestibular migraine (dVM; (2 probable vestibular migraine (pVM; (3 suspected vestibular migraine (sVM; (4 benign paroxysmal vertigo (BPV; and (5 migraine with/without aura (oM according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd edition (beta version. Results: The mean age of all patients was 12±3 years (range 3-18 years, 70 females. 36 patients (30% fulfilled criteria for dVM, 33 (28% for pVM, 34 (29% for sVM, 7 (6% for BPV, and 8 (7% for oM. Somatoform vertigo co-occurred in 27% patients. Episodic syndromes were reported in 8%; the family history of migraine was positive in 65%. Mild central ocular motor signs were found in 24% (most frequently horizontal saccadic pursuit. Laboratory tests showed that about 20% had pathological function of the horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex, and almost 50% had abnormal postural sway patterns. Conclusion: Patients with definite, probable, and suspected VM do not differ in the frequency of ocular motor, vestibular, or postural abnormalities. VM is the best explanation for their symptoms. It is essential to establish diagnostic criteria in clinical studies. In clinical practice, however, the most reasonable diagnosis should be made in order to begin treatment. Such a procedure also minimizes the fear of the parents and children, reduces the need to interrupt leisure time and school activities, and prevents the development of somatoform vertigo.

  5. Evaluation of Neonatal Hemolytic Jaundice: Clinical and Laboratory Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anet Papazovska Cherepnalkovski

    2015-12-01

    CONCLUSIONS: The laboratory profile in ABO/Rh isoimmunisation cases depicts hemolytic mechanism of jaundice. These cases carry a significant risk for early and severe hyperbilirubinemia and are eligible for neurodevelopmental follow-up. Hematological parameters and blood grouping are simple diagnostic methods that assist the etiological diagnosis of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

  6. [Quality assurance and quality improvement in medical practice. Part 3: Clinical audit in medical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godény, Sándor

    2012-02-01

    The first two articles in the series were about the definition of quality in healthcare, the quality approach, the importance of quality assurance, the advantages of quality management systems and the basic concepts and necessity of evidence based medicine. In the third article the importance and basic steps of clinical audit are summarised. Clinical audit is an integral part of quality assurance and quality improvement in healthcare, that is the responsibility of any practitioner involved in medical practice. Clinical audit principally measures the clinical practice against clinical guidelines, protocols and other professional standards, and sometimes induces changes to ensure that all patients receive care according to principles of the best practice. The clinical audit can be defined also as a quality improvement process that seeks to identify areas for service improvement, develop and carry out plans and actions to improve medical activity and then by re-audit to ensure that these changes have an effect. Therefore, its aims are both to stimulate quality improvement interventions and to assess their impact in order to develop clinical effectiveness. At the end of the article key points of quality assurance and improvement in medical practice are summarised.

  7. The Brave New World of clinical cancer research: Adaptive biomarker-driven trials integrating clinical practice with clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Donald A

    2015-05-01

    Clinical trials are the final links in the chains of knowledge and for determining the roles of therapeutic advances. Unfortunately, in an important sense they are the weakest links. This article describes two designs that are being explored today: platform trials and basket trials. Both are attempting to merge clinical research and clinical practice.

  8. Following the Rules Set by Accreditation Agencies and Governing Bodies to Maintain In-Compliance Status: Applying Critical Thinking Skills When Evaluating the Need for Change in the Clinical Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Karen M; Levy, Kimberly Y; Reese, Erika M

    2016-05-01

    Maintaining an in-compliance clinical laboratory takes continuous awareness and review of standards, regulations, and best practices. A strong quality assurance program and well informed leaders who maintain professional networks can aid in this necessary task. This article will discuss a process that laboratories can follow to interpret, understand, and comply with the rules and standards set by laboratory accreditation bodies.

  9. A Simple Laboratory Practical to Illustrate RNA Mediated Gene Interference Using Drosophila Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buluwela, Laki; Kamalati, Tahereh; Photiou, Andy; Heathcote, Dean A.; Jones, Michael D.; Ali, Simak

    2010-01-01

    RNA mediated gene interference (RNAi) is now a key tool in eukaryotic cell and molecular biology research. This article describes a five session laboratory practical, spread over a seven day period, to introduce and illustrate the technique. During the exercise, students working in small groups purify PCR products that encode "in vitro"…

  10. Recommended practices for the management of embryology, andrology, and endocrinology laboratories: a committee opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    This document provides a general overview for physicians of the qualities and conditions necessary for good management practices within the endocrinology, andrology, and embryology laboratories in the United States. It is intended as an addendum to previously published guidelines that further detail these responsibilities.

  11. A New Approach for the Construction of Practical Laboratory and Field Work Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, V.; Prakach, Ved

    1978-01-01

    The tradition in India of practical/laboratory field work carried out by students individually or in small groups is reviewed, and recommendations for assessing such work are outlined, including such skills as recording observations, interpreting results, planning procedures and techniques for solving special problems. (LBH)

  12. The clinical practice of interventional radiology: a European perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keeling, Aoife N

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the current clinical environment in which interventional radiology (IR) is practiced throughout Europe. A survey, comprising 12 questions on IR clinical practice, was sent to 1800 CIRSE members. Members were asked to return one survey per department. Two hundred seventy-four departments returned completed questionnaires, 22% from the United Kingdom (n = 60), 11% from Germany (n = 30), 8% from Austria (n = 23), and the remainder spread over Europe. Experts, with more than 10 years of IR experience, comprised 74% of the survey group. Almost one-third of the radiologists dedicated more than 80% of their clinical sessions to IR alone (27%; n = 75), with two-thirds practicing in a university teaching hospital setting (66%; n = 179). Few institutions have dedicated IR inpatient hospital beds (17%; n = 46), however, to compensate, day case beds are available (31%), IR admitting rights are in place (64% overall, 86% for in-patients, and 89% for day cases), and elective IR admissions can be made through other clinicians (87%). IR outpatient clinics are run at 26% of departments, with an average of two sessions per week. Dedicated nurses staff the majority of IR suites (82%), but clinical junior doctors are lacking (46%). Hospital management\\'s refusing access to beds was the most commonly cited reason for not developing a clinical IR service (41%). In conclusion, there is marked variation across European centers in the current practice of IR. Half do not have dedicated junior doctors and only a small minority have inpatient hospital beds. If IR is to be maintained as a dedicated clinical specialty, these issues need to be addressed urgently.

  13. Impact of the Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative on Clinical Pharmacy Specialist Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, Judith; Ray, Shaunta'; Danelich, Ilya; Dodds Ashley, Elizabeth; Eckel, Stephen; Guharoy, Roy; Militello, Michael; O'Donnell, Paul; Sam, Teena; Crist, Stephanie M; Smidt, Danielle

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes the goals of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists' Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative (PPMI) and its recommendations for health-system pharmacy practice transformation to meet future patient care needs and elevate the role of pharmacists as patient care providers. PPMI envisions a future in which pharmacists have greater responsibility for medication-related outcomes and technicians assume greater responsibility for product-related activities. Although the PPMI recommendations have elevated the level of practice in many settings, they also potentially affect existing clinical pharmacists, in general, and clinical pharmacy specialists, in particular. Moreover, although more consistent patient care can be achieved with an expanded team of pharmacist providers, the role of clinical pharmacy specialists must not be diminished, especially in the care of complex patients and populations. Specialist practitioners with advanced training and credentials must be available to model and train pharmacists in generalist positions, residents, and students. Indeed, specialist practitioners are often the innovators and practice leaders. Negotiation between hospitals and pharmacy schools is needed to ensure a continuing role for academic clinical pharmacists and their contributions as educators and researchers. Lessons can be applied from disciplines such as nursing and medicine, which have developed new models of care involving effective collaboration between generalists and specialists. Several different pharmacy practice models have been described to meet the PPMI goals, based on available personnel and local goals. Studies measuring the impact of these new practice models are needed.

  14. Multiple sclerosis brain lesion measurements in clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Jain S., Smeets D., Sima D., Van Hecke W., Loeckx D., Van Huffel S., Maes F., ''Multiple sclerosis brain lesion measurements in clinical practice'', European journal of neurology, vol. 21 suppl. s1, pp. 345, 2014 (Joint congress of European neurology, May 31 - June 3, 2014, Istanbul, Turkey).

  15. The use of bone age in clinical practice - Part 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, D.D.; Caliebe, J.; Binder, Gitte Sommer

    2011-01-01

    This review examines the role of skeletal maturity ('bone age', BA) assessment in clinical practice. BA is mainly used in children with the following conditions: short stature (addressed in part 1 of this review), tall stature, early or late puberty, and congenital adrenal hyperplasia (all...

  16. Multifunction laser systems in clinical and resort practice

    OpenAIRE

    ZABULONOV, Yuriy; Vladimirov, Alexander; Chukhraiev, Nikolay; Elmehsenawi, Yousry; Zukow, Walery

    2016-01-01

    SHUPYKNATIONALMEDICALACADEMY OF POSTGRADUATE EDUCATION UKRAINIANSOCIETY OFPHYSICAL AND REHABILITATION MEDICINE RADOM UNIVERSITY       Yuriy Zabulonov, Alexander Vladimirov, Nikolay Chukhraiev, Yousry Elmehsenawi, Walery Zukow       MULTIFUNCTION LASER SYSTEMS IN CLINICAL AND RESORT PRACTICE   Edited by Yuriy Zabulonov, Alexander Vladimirov, Nikolay Chukhraiev, Yousry Elmehsenawi, Walery Zukow  ...

  17. WhatsApp in Clinical Practice: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, Maurice; Scott, Richard E

    2016-01-01

    Several spontaneous telemedicine services using WhatsApp Messenger have started in South Africa raising issues of confidentiality, data security and storage, record keeping and reporting. This study reviewed the literature on WhatsApp in clinical practice, to determine how it is used, and users' satisfaction.

  18. Supporting Clinical Practice Candidates in Learning Community Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJarnette, Nancy K.; Sudeck, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative research study was to monitor pre-service teacher candidates' progression and implementation of the learning community philosophy along with classroom management strategies. The study took place during their final semester of clinical practice. Data were collected from self-reports, surveys, university supervisor…

  19. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Transfusion of Patients in Critical Condition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Alejandro Gómez Baute

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Transfusion of Patients in Critical Condition. We stress transfusion criteria (blood cells, platelets, granulocyte concentrations, plasma and cryoprecipitate, doses, diagnosis and treatment of post-transfusion reactions. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  20. The Use of Bone Age in Clinical Practice - Part 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.D. Martin; J.M. Wit; Z.E. Hochberg; L. Sävendahl; R.R. van Rijn; O. Fricke; N. Cameron; J. Caliebe; T. Hertel; D. Kiepe; K. Albertsson-Wikland; H.H. Thodberg; G. Binder; M.B. Ranke

    2011-01-01

    This review examines the role of skeletal maturity ('bone age', BA) assessment in clinical practice. BA is mainly used in children with the following conditions: short stature (addressed in part 1 of this review), tall stature, early or late puberty, and congenital adrenal hyperplasia (all addressed

  1. Diagnostic value of urinary dysmorphic erythrocytes in clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Crop (Meindert); Y.B. de Rijke (Yolanda); P.C.M.S. Verhagen (Paul); K. Cransberg (Karlien); R. Zietse (Bob)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In clinical practice, discriminating between glomerular and nonglomerular causes of hematuria is often difficult. Dysmorphic red blood cells (dRBC) in the urinary sediment are claimed to be effective, but the cutoff points in the literature vary. This follow-up study aimed to

  2. Best practices for clinical pathology testing in carcinogenicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jamie K; Hall, Robert L; O'Brien, Peter; Strauss, Volker; Vahle, John L

    2011-02-01

    The Society of Toxicologic Pathology (STP) and American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology (ASCVP) convened a Clinical Pathology in Carcinogenicity Studies Working Group to recommend best practices for inclusion of clinical pathology testing in carcinogenicity studies. Regulatory guidance documents and literature were reviewed, and veterinary pathologists from North America, Japan, and Europe were surveyed regarding current practices, perceived value, and recommendations for clinical pathology testing in carcinogenicity studies. For two-year rodent carcinogenicity studies, the Working Group recommends that clinical pathology testing be limited to collection of blood smears at scheduled and unscheduled sacrifices to be examined only if indicated to aid in the diagnosis of possible hematopoietic neoplasia following histopathologic evaluation. Additional clinical pathology testing is most appropriately used to address specific issues from prior toxicity studies or known test article-related class effects. Inadequate data were available to make a recommendation concerning clinical pathology testing for alternative six-month carcinogenicity assays using genetically modified mice, although the Working Group suggests that it may be appropriate to use the same approach as for two-year carcinogenicity studies since the study goal is the same.

  3. Customer satisfaction survey with clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Young Rae; Kim, Shine Young; Kim, In Suk; Chang, Chulhun L; Lee, Eun Yup; Son, Han Chul; Kim, Hyung Hoi

    2014-09-01

    We performed customer satisfaction surveys for physicians and nurses regarding clinical laboratory services, and for outpatients who used phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level to evaluate our clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. Thus, we wish to share our experiences with the customer satisfaction survey for clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. Board members of our laboratory designed a study procedure and study population, and developed two types of questionnaire. A satisfaction survey for clinical laboratory services was conducted with 370 physicians and 125 nurses by using an online or paper questionnaire. The satisfaction survey for phlebotomy services was performed with 347 outpatients who received phlebotomy services by using computer-aided interviews. Mean satisfaction scores of physicians and nurses was 58.1, while outpatients' satisfaction score was 70.5. We identified several dissatisfactions with our clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. First, physicians and nurses were most dissatisfied with the specimen collection and delivery process. Second, physicians and nurses were dissatisfied with phlebotomy services. Third, molecular genetic and cytogenetic tests were found more expensive than other tests. This study is significant in that it describes the first reference survey that offers a survey procedure and questionnaire to assess customer satisfaction with clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level.

  4. Using pathology-specific laboratory profiles in Clinical Pathology to reduce inappropriate test requesting: two completed audit cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baricchi Roberto

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systematic reviews have shown that, although well prepared, the Consensus Guidelines have failed to change clinical practice. In the healthcare district of Castelnovo né Monti (Reggio Emilia, Italy, it became necessary for the GPs and Clinical Pathologists to work together to jointly define laboratory profiles. Methods Observational study with two cycles of retrospective audit on test request forms, in a primary care setting. Objectives of the study were to develop pathology-specific laboratory profiles and to increase the number of provisional diagnoses on laboratory test request forms. A Multiprofessional Multidisciplinary Inter-hospital Work Team developed pathology-specific laboratory profiles for more effective test requesting. After 8 training sessions that used a combined strategy with multifaceted interventions, the 23 General Practitioners (GPs in the trial district (Castelnovo nè Monti tested the profiles; the 21 GPs in the Puianello district were the control group; all GPs in both districts participated in the trial. All laboratory tests for both healthcare districts are performed at the Laboratory located in the trial district. A baseline and a 1-year audit were performed in both districts on the GPs’ request forms. Results Seven pathology-specific laboratory profiles for outpatients were developed. In the year after the first audit cycle: 1 the number of tests requested in the trial district was distinctly lower than that in the previous year, with a decrease of about 5% (p  Conclusions The first audit cycle showed a significant decrease in the number of tests ordered only in the trial district. The combined strategy used in this study improved the prescriptive compliance of most of the GPs involved. The presence of the clinical pathologist is seen as an added value.

  5. The frontline clinical manager identifying direct reports' level of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, M Anne; Roussel, Linda; Pennington, Sandra L; Hoying, Cheryl

    2013-01-01

    Patricia Benner applied the Dreyfus Model of Skill Acquisition to describe and interpret skill acquisition and clinical judgment in nursing practice. Operational definitions for the 5 levels of her original Novice to Expert Theory were used by the study participants in a large Midwestern pediatric hospital to self-identify their level of practice. The frontline clinical managers of these direct care registered nurses (RNs) used the same tool to rate their direct reports. The aim of this portion of a larger study was to determine if the clinical manager's perception of their direct reports was the same as that of the RNs. The results of this study are being used by one study unit's clinical managers as the basis for implementing the Hersey and Blanchard Situational Leadership Model. The clinical managers work with their direct reports depending on the level of practice and the details of the task to be performed. One example is creating therapeutic relationships with each other and with families to ensure a safe environment for all.

  6. Grading journals in clinical practice: a delicate issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, V

    1997-12-01

    Offering students opportunities to gain a strong sense of self, a positive professional image, and a chance to articulate their clinical practice is a challenge for nurse educators. Writing journals in clinical placements is one way in which students can create a dialogue with their teacher and reflect upon and explore their clinical experiences in the context in which these experiences occur. However, grading journals according to numerous predetermined criteria can sabotage the benefits and opportunities of writing journals. Judgment and control are two aspects of evaluation and subsequent grading that can sabotage the benefits. Limiting predetermined criteria and not assigning grades to students' journals are two answers to this delicate issue. To function as competent practitioners, nursing students must be able to meet standards of practice; they must achieve a strong sense of self and a positive professional image. Clinical placements offer students the opportunity to explore the experience of clinical nursing and the context in which these experiences unfold. As students acquire skills and explore the practice of nursing, they also face the reality that their instructors will award a judgment of worth to their efforts. This evaluation is necessary to determine whether students have met the required standards. Evaluation and subsequent grades, therefore, must be an integral part of the students' clinical experience. Writing journals is often used as a method of exploring experiences in clinical nursing. Journals are also used as a method of clinical evaluation. Assigning a grade to student journals has a detrimental effect on the purpose of the assignment. An emphasis on exploring the purpose of writing journals and an analysis of the impact that grading has on this exercise will expose the incompatibility between writing and grading journals.

  7. Blood collection procedures in hematology: knowledge and practice among laboratory personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Sujata; Suri, Vaishali; Pant, Ishita; Rusia, Usha

    2006-07-01

    Blood collection is an important preanalytical component of haematological testing. This questionnaire based study was conducted on laboratory personnel to elicit their knowledge and practice regarding blood collection procedures for haematological testing. Questionnaire comprised of 37 multiple choice questions, of which 10 questions each were related to essential and desirable knowledge, 10 to practice and 7 to educational and job profile. Ninety four laboratory personnel participated in the study. Analysis was done on SPSS software. Percentages of unsatisfactory scores were 42.6%, 4.3%, 17% and 6% in the essential knowledge, desirable knowledge, practice and total scoring respectively. 91.5%, however, had a satisfactory total score. Importance needs to be given to blood collection procedures both, individually and collectively. The study highlights the deficient areas which need to addressed by all laboratorians. Such studies should also be conducted among nursing and resident staff- the other groups concerned with blood collection.

  8. MALDI-TOF MS in the clinical microbiology laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Jenne Mimica

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Traditional methods for microbial identification are often very laborious and time consuming. A new mass spectrometry based technique, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF, has been described as a rapid, practical and low-cost method for this purpose. In this article, primary and possible future applications of this tool are briefly discussed.

  9. 76 FR 39879 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... on current practices in gynecologic cytology testing. Agenda items are subject to change as.... Providing Oral or Written Comments: It is the policy of CLIAC to accept written public comments and provide a brief period for oral public comments whenever possible. Oral Comments: In general,...

  10. Effectiveness of Practices for Improving the Diagnostic Accuracy of Non-ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction in the Emergency Department: A Laboratory Medicine Best Practices Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layfield, Christopher; Rose, John; Alford, Aaron; Snyder, Susan R.; Apple, Fred S.; Chowdhury, Farah M.; Kontos, Michael C.; Newby, L. Kristin; Storrow, Alan B.; Tanasijevic, Milenko; Leibach, Elizabeth; Liebow, Edward B.; Christenson, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This article presents evidence from a systematic review of the effectiveness of four practices (assay selection, decision point cardiac troponin (cTn) threshold selection, serial testing, and point of care testing) for improving the diagnostic accuracy for Non-ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction (NSTEMI) in the Emergency Department. Design and Methods The CDC-funded Laboratory Medicine Best Practices (LMBP™) Initiative systematic review A6 Method for Laboratory Best Practices was used. Results The current guidelines (e.g., ACC/AHA) recommend using cardiac troponin assays with a 99th percentile upper reference limit (URL) diagnostic threshold to diagnose NSTEMI. The evidence in this systematic review indicates that contemporary sensitive cTn assays meet the assay profile requirements (sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV) to more accurately diagnose NSTEMI than alternate tests. Additional biomarkers did not increase diagnostic effectiveness of cTn assays. Sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive value (NPV) were consistently high and low positive predictive value (PPV) improved with serial sampling. Evidence for use of cTn point of care testing (POCT) was insufficient to make recommendations, though some evidence suggests cTn POCT may result in reduction to patient length of stay and costs. Conclusions Two best practice recommendations emerged from the systematic review and meta-analysis of literature conducted using the LMBP™ A6 Method criteria: Testing with cardiac troponin assays, using the 99th percentile URL as the clinical diagnostic threshold for the diagnosis of NSTEMI and without additional biomarkers, is recommended. Also recommended is serial cardiac troponin sampling with one sample at presentation and at least one additional sample taken a minimum of 6 hours later to identify a rise or fall in the troponin level. Testing with high-sensitivity cardiac troponin assays, at presentation and again within 6 hours, is the

  11. [Recommendations for implementing the UNE-EN-ISO 15189 quality standard in the clinical microbiology laboratory: bacteriology and serology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo, María Dolores; Aguiar, Juan Manuel; Cercenado, Emilia; de Ory, Fernando; de la Rosa, Manuel

    2010-11-01

    The UNE-EN-ISO 15189:2007 standard specifies the management and technical requirements that clinical microbiology laboratories must meet to achieve optimal quality when performing microbiological analyses. With implementation of this standard, a laboratory can receive the accreditation and formal recognition of an authorized body, certifying that it is apt for performing an assay or group of assays. In Spain, laboratories that apply these standards can be accredited by the Entidad Nacional de Acreditación (ENAC, Spanish accreditation body). The purpose of this review is to familiarize clinical microbiology laboratory specialists with the UNE-EN-ISO 15189:2007 standard through a practical approach focussed on bacteriology and serology studies. We briefly define the scope and specify the requisites required for managing the quality of the procedures and processes involved in performing tests on human specimens, for document control, and for management of instruments and equipment, personnel, information systems, supply systems, and external services. Lastly, evaluation approaches are indicated to achieve continuing improvement of the processes carried out and the services the laboratory provides.

  12. Reflections on Speech-Language Therapists' Talk: Implications for Clinical Practice and Education. Clinical Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Alison; Armstrong, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Background: Research into the practices of speech-language therapists in clinical sessions is beginning to identify the way communication in clinical interactions both facilitates and potentially impedes the achievement of therapy goals. Aims: This target article aims to raise the issues that arise from critical reflections on the communication of…

  13. The clinical laboratory in the investigation of hemoglobin disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Lais Pinto de Almeida; Annelise Corrêa Wengerkievicz; Nilceia Maria Viviani; Dulcinéia Martins Albuquerque; Maria Elizabete Mendes; Nairo Massakazu Sumita

    2011-01-01

    As alterações na síntese da hemoglobina resultam em um grupo de distúrbios hereditários, os quais podem ser classificados como hemoglobina variante, se a alteração tiver origem em uma mutação no gene da hemoglobina, produzindo cadeias anormais, ou como talassemias, se a estrutura é normal, porém a síntese ocorre em quantidade alterada. Este trabalho tem como objetivo descrever a condução do diagnóstico laboratorial de quatro casos de distúrbios da hemoglobina, a fim de ilustrar o papel do lab...

  14. Molecular pathology of solid tumours: some practical suggestions for translating research into clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Tomlinson, I P M; Ilyas, M

    2001-01-01

    “Molecular pathology” can be broadly defined as the use of genetic data, in addition to the standard pathological parameters, to optimise diagnosis and to indicate treatment and prognosis. The benefit to be gained from the exploitation of molecular techniques to provide additional information to aid patient management is potentially vast. Currently, molecular pathology is rarely used in clinical practice, although it is anticipated that it will eventually become a part of routine practice. Ho...

  15. Clinical and laboratory findings in 220 children with recurrent abdominal pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Gijsbers; M.A. Benninga; H.R. Büller

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the clinical and laboratory findings in children with recurrent abdominal pain (RAP). Methods: Consecutive patients with RAP (Apley criteria), age 4-16 years, referred to a secondary medical centre were evaluated by a standardized history, physical examination and laboratory test

  16. Clinical, laboratory and electrophysiological features of Morvan's fibrillary chorea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Will; Day, Timothy J; Williams, David R

    2013-09-01

    Morvan's Fibrillary Chorea (MFC) is a rare autoimmune disorder causally associated with auto-antibodies directed at the voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC-Abs). It classically presents with sleep disturbances, neuromyotonia and dysautonomia. We aimed to systematically characterise the features of MFC by describing a patient and reviewing published literature. Case notes of 27 patients with MFC (one from our clinic and 26 from the literature) were reviewed and clinical data were extracted and analysed. We found that MFC mainly affects men (96%) and runs a subacute course over months. Neoplasia (56%), VGKC-Abs positivity (79%) and autoimmunity (41%) are frequent associations. Myokymia, insomnia and hyperhidrosis were almost universally described. Other autonomic features were present in 63% with the most common being cardiovascular and bowel disturbances. Clinical, radiological or electroencephalographical features of limbic encephalitis were present in 19% of patients. Outcome was fair with an overall recovery rate of 78%. All patients with malignancies underwent surgery. Immunotherapies including corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulins and plasma exchange were instituted in 22 patients and 19 (86%) responded. Of all symptomatic treatments tried, carbamazepine, phenytoin, sodium valproate, levetiracetam and niaprazine were found to be effective. The broad clinical spectrum of VGKC-Abs diseases can make early recognition of MFC difficult. Myokymia, insomnia and hyperhidrosis are invariably present. There may be abnormalities on cerebrospinal fluid testing and VGKC-Abs can occasionally be absent. Early initiation of immunotherapies and malignancy screening are important to prevent adverse outcomes in a condition that generally responds favourably to treatment.

  17. Laboratory and clinical tests of a prototype pressure sensor for clincial assessment of prosthetic socket fit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polliack, A A; Craig, D D; Sieh, R C; Landsberger, S; Mcneal, D R

    2002-04-01

    Lower limb prosthetic socket fabrication is a highly refined process relying on the prosthetist's skill and experience. Despite their best efforts, patients often return with complications. Additionally, clinical application of technological advances for the quantification of biomechanical factors at the socket interface has not changed in practice. Measuring pressure levels at the stump/socket interface could provide valuable information in the process of prosthetic socket fabrication, fit and modification. This paper presents findings on the performance of a prototype capacitance pressure sensor designed for prosthetic socket use. Bench tests using compressed air were performed to measure accuracy, hysteresis and drift responses in both a flatbed chamber and a custom-modified pressure vessel. For the contoured testing, the sensors were placed on nine sites on a positive trans-tibial stump mould and enveloped with a silicone liner. Additionally, a preliminary clinical evaluation was performed with two trans-tibial amputee subjects at the nine sites during normal ambulation. Bench test results showed that the prototype capacitance sensor performed well in all categories, exhibiting a 2.42% (flatbed) and 9.96% (contoured) accuracy error, a 12.93% (flatbed) and 12.95% (contoured) hysteresis error, and a 4.40% (flatbed) and 6.20% (contoured) drift error. The clinical study showed that after three hours of continual use, no noticeable sensor drift occurred between pre and post-test calibration values. The results from this study were encouraging and the authors hope to conduct further laboratory and clinical trials to assess the influence of shear force and dynamic loading on sensor response.

  18. Psychiatrists' Comfort Using Computers and Other Electronic Devices in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Farifteh F; Fochtmann, Laura J; Clarke, Diana E; Barber, Keila; Hong, Seung-Hee; Yager, Joel; Mościcki, Eve K; Plovnick, Robert M

    2016-09-01

    This report highlights findings from the Study of Psychiatrists' Use of Informational Resources in Clinical Practice, a cross-sectional Web- and paper-based survey that examined psychiatrists' comfort using computers and other electronic devices in clinical practice. One-thousand psychiatrists were randomly selected from the American Medical Association Physician Masterfile and asked to complete the survey between May and August, 2012. A total of 152 eligible psychiatrists completed the questionnaire (response rate 22.2 %). The majority of psychiatrists reported comfort using computers for educational and personal purposes. However, 26 % of psychiatrists reported not using or not being comfortable using computers for clinical functions. Psychiatrists under age 50 were more likely to report comfort using computers for all purposes than their older counterparts. Clinical tasks for which computers were reportedly used comfortably, specifically by psychiatrists younger than 50, included documenting clinical encounters, prescribing, ordering laboratory tests, accessing read-only patient information (e.g., test results), conducting internet searches for general clinical information, accessing online patient educational materials, and communicating with patients or other clinicians. Psychiatrists generally reported comfort using computers for personal and educational purposes. However, use of computers in clinical care was less common, particularly among psychiatrists 50 and older. Information and educational resources need to be available in a variety of accessible, user-friendly, computer and non-computer-based formats, to support use across all ages. Moreover, ongoing training and technical assistance with use of electronic and mobile device technologies in clinical practice is needed. Research on barriers to clinical use of computers is warranted.

  19. Theory-practice integration in selected clinical situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Davhana-Maselesele

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The current changes in health care systems challenge knowledgeable, mature and independent practitioners to integrate theoretical content with practice. The aim of this study was to investigate the problems of integrating theory with practice in selected clinical nursing situations. The study focused on rendering of family planning services to clients as a component of Community Nursing Science. Structured observation schedules were used to observe the theoretical content of the curriculum as well as the practical application of what has been taught in the clinical area. The findings of the study revealed that there was a need for an integrated holistic curriculum, which would address the needs of the community. It was concluded that a problem-based and community-based curriculum, intersectoral collaboration between college and hospital managements and student involvement in all processes of teaching and learning would improve the integration of theory and practice. There also appeared to be a need for tutors to be more involved in clinical teaching and accompaniment.

  20. Contribution of biomechanics to clinical practice in orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Savio L-Y

    2004-01-01

    Biomechanics is a field that has a very long history. It was described in ancient Chinese and Greek literature as early as 400-500 BC. The foundation of biomechanics, however, was laid during a period between the 1500's to 1700's by renowned personalities, da Vinci, Galileo, Borelli, Hooke, Newton, and so (Fung, Y.C., Biomechanics: Mechanical Properties of Living Tissues, 2nd Ed. Springer Verlag, Chapter 1, 1993). Beginning in the 1950's, Muybridge, Steindler, Inman, Lissner, and Hirsch performed the pioneering work on musculoskeletal biomechanics and the foundation of orthopaedic biomechanics was formed. For the following two decades, the field has blossomed and significant contributions in the biomechanics of bone, articular cartilage, soft tissues, upper and lower extremities, spine and so on has been made. More sophisticated equipment, coupled with mathematical modeling and better engineering design, has enabled us to make great strides. Bioengineers, in collaboration with orthopaedic surgeons, have translated many laboratory discoveries into clinical practice, leading to improved patient treatment and outcome. In the past 30 years, my colleagues and I have focused our research on the biomechanics of musculoskeletal soft tissues, ligaments and tendons, in particular. Therefore, in this lecture, the function of knee ligaments, the associated homeostatic responses secondary to immobilization and exercise, and healing of the ligaments will be reviewed. Examples of scientific findings that help to guide the surgical management of injury to ligaments will be given. New ideas on functional tissue engineering to improve the healing of knee ligaments and tendons will be presented. We have learned that tendons and ligaments are indeed complex biological tissues. To fully understand their behavior, healing and remodelling processes, this author advocates major efforts be made to bring molecular biologists, morphologists, biochemists, bioengineers, physical therapists and

  1. Semi-spontaneous oral text production: measurements in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Marianne; Kristoffersen, Kristian Emil; Moen, Inger; Simonsen, Hanne Gram

    2009-12-01

    Functionally relevant assessment of the language production of speakers with aphasia should include assessment of connected speech production. Despite the ecological validity of everyday conversations, more controlled and monological types of texts may be easier to obtain and analyse in clinical practice. This article discusses some simple measurements for the analysis of semi-spontaneous oral text production by speakers with aphasia. Specifically, the measurements are related to the production of verbs and nouns, and the realization of different sentence types. The proposed measurements should be clinically relevant, easily applicable, and linguistically meaningful. The measurements have been applied to oral descriptions of the 'Cookie Theft' picture by eight monolingual Norwegian speakers, four with an anomic type of aphasia and four without any type of language impairment. Despite individual differences in both the clinical and the non-clinical group, most of the measurements seem to distinguish between speakers with and without aphasia.

  2. The clinical practice of emergency medicine in Mahajanga, Madagascar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay C. Kannan

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: This is the first descriptive study of the clinical practice of emergency medicine in Mahajanga, Madagascar. It provides both the Malagasy and international medical communities with an objective analysis of the practice of emergency care in Madagascar from both diagnostic and therapeutic standpoints. Emergency care here focuses on the management of traumatic injury and infectious disease. The diagnostic imaging, pharmacologic and procedural therapeutic interventions reflect the burdens placed upon this institution by these diseases. We hope this study will provide guidance for the further development of Malagasy-specific emergency care systems.

  3. Implementation of a companion diagnostic in the clinical laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mancini, Irene; Pinzani, Pamela; Simi, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    A companion diagnostic test provides information that is essential for the safe and effective use of a corresponding therapeutic product as indicated in the drug instructions. The implementation of a companion diagnostic follows the rules of a molecular test for somatic mutations in a routine...... of mutation under study, the sample to be assayed and its preparation procedure. In addition, the results of a molecular assay require a complex interpretation process of the analytical data as the patient's genotype, the translation of the identified variant into a predicted phenotype and knowledge......, as an example, the BRAF genotype analysis in tumor tissue samples for identification of melanoma patients that can benefit treatment with BRAF inhibitors. The manuscript is focused on the following aspects: i) medical rationale, ii) methodologies of analysis, iii) laboratory performance evaluation and iv...

  4. Genetic, Clinical, and Laboratory Markers for DOCK8 Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremiah C. Davis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DOCK8 immunodeficiency syndrome (DIDS is a combined immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent viral infections, severe atopy, and early onset malignancy. Genetic studies revealed large, unique deletions in patients from different families and ethnic backgrounds. Clinical markers of DIDS include atopic dermatitis, allergies, cutaneous viral infections, recurrent respiratory tract infections, and malignancy. Immune assessments showed T cell lymphopenia, hyper-IgE, hypo-IgM, and eosinophilia. The impaired lymphocyte functions in DIDS patients appear central for disease pathogenesis.

  5. Practicing biology: Undergraduate laboratory research, persistence in science, and the impact of self-efficacy beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkes, Elizabeth

    As undergraduate laboratory research internships become more popular and universities devote considerable resources towards promoting them, it is important to clarify what students specifically gain through involvement in these experiences and it is important to understand their impact on the science pipeline. By examining recent findings describing the primary benefits of undergraduate research participation, along with self-efficacy theory, this study aims to provide more explanatory power to the anecdotal and descriptive accounts regarding the relationship between undergraduate research experiences and interest in continuing in science. Furthermore, this study characterizes practices that foster students' confidence in doing scientific work with detailed description and analysis of the interactions of researchers in a laboratory. Phase 1 of the study, a survey of undergraduate biology majors (n=71) at a major research university, investigates the relationships among participation in biology laboratory research internships, biology laboratory self-efficacy strength, and interest in persisting in science. Phase 2 of the study, a two-year investigation of a university biology research laboratory, investigates how scientific communities of practice develop self-efficacy beliefs. The findings suggest that participation in lab internships results in increased interest in continuing in life science/biology graduate school and careers. They also suggest that a significant proportion of that interest is related to the students' biology laboratory self-efficacy. The findings of this study point to two primary ways that undergraduate research participation might work to raise self-efficacy strength. First, university research laboratory communities can provide students with a variety of resources that scaffold them into biology laboratory mastery experiences. Second, university research laboratory communities can provide students with coping and mastery Discourse models

  6. Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Practice Guidelines: Customized for Iranian Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajavi, Zhale; Safi, Sare; Javadi, Mohammad Ali; Azarmina, Mohsen; Moradian, Siamak; Entezari, Morteza; Nourinia, Ramin; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Shirvani, Armin; Shahraz, Saeid; Ramezani, Alireza; Dehghan, Mohammad Hossein; Shahsavari, Mohsen; Soheilian, Masoud; Nikkhah, Homayoun; Ziaei, Hossein; Behboudi, Hasan; Farrahi, Fereydoun; Falavarjani, Khalil Ghasemi; Parvaresh, Mohammad Mehdi; Fesharaki, Hamid; Abrishami, Majid; Shoeibi, Nasser; Rahimi, Mansour; Javadzadeh, Alireza; Karkhaneh, Reza; Riazi-Esfahani, Mohammad; Manaviat, Masoud Reza; Maleki, Alireza; Kheiri, Bahareh; Golbafian, Faegheh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To customize clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for management of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in the Iranian population. Methods: Three DR CPGs (The Royal College of Ophthalmologists 2013, American Academy of Ophthalmology [Preferred Practice Pattern 2012], and Australian Diabetes Society 2008) were selected from the literature using the AGREE tool. Clinical questions were designed and summarized into four tables by the customization team. The components of the clinical questions along with pertinent recommendations extracted from the above-mentioned CPGs; details of the supporting articles and their levels of evidence; clinical recommendations considering clinical benefits, cost and side effects; and revised recommendations based on customization capability (applicability, acceptability, external validity) were recorded in 4 tables, respectively. Customized recommendations were sent to the faculty members of all universities across the country to score the recommendations from 1 to 9. Results: Agreed recommendations were accepted as the final recommendations while the non-agreed ones were approved after revision. Eventually, 29 customized recommendations under three major categories consisting of screening, diagnosis and treatment of DR were developed along with their sources and levels of evidence. Conclusion: This customized CPGs for management of DR can be used to standardize the referral pathway, diagnosis and treatment of patients with diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27994809

  7. The practical epistemologies of the classroom: A study of laboratory work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickman, Per-Olof

    2004-05-01

    The practical epistemologies of university students during laboratory work in chemistry are analyzed to enhance understanding of how teaching practices interact with learners. The purpose is to develop a theoretical framework of learning as action that can be used by educational researchers to examine meaning-making, but also by teachers in close association with their daily work to understand the course learning takes in their own classrooms. Here this framework is adopted to demonstrate how the sequence of learning may affect the subject content learnt. It is also demonstrated how learning can be understood in terms of habits, and how observations of such habits could be used by a teacher to inform her/his teaching. The theory of practical epistemologies is based on the later Wittgenstein, pragmatics, and sociocultural approaches identifying learning with talk, action, and habits situated in practices.

  8. Utility and necessity of repeat testing of critical values in the clinical chemistry laboratory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aijun Niu

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Routine repeat testing of critical values is a long-standing practice in many clinical laboratories; however, its usefulness and necessity remain to be empirically established and no regulatory requirements yet exist for verification of the critical value results obtained by repeat analysis. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether repeat testing of critical values is useful and necessary in a clinical chemistry laboratory. METHODS: A total of 601 chemistry critical values (potassium, n = 255; sodium, n = 132; calcium, n = 108; glucose, n = 106 obtained from 72,259 routine clinical chemistry specimens were repeat tested. The absolute value and the percentage of difference between the two testing runs were calculated for each of the four critical values and then compared with the allowable error limit put forth in the College of American Pathologists (CAP. RESULTS: Among the repeat data for the 601 critical values, a total of 24 showed large differences between the initial result and the repeated result which exceeded the CAP limits for allowable error. The number and rates (% of large differences for within and outside the analytical measurement range (AMR were 12 (2.1% and 12 (41.4%, respectively. For the 572 critical values within the AMR for each test category, the mean absolute difference (mmol/L and difference(% between the two testing runs were: potassium, 0.1 mmol/L (2.7%; sodium, 2.1 mmol/L (1.7%; calcium, 0.05 mmol/L (3.0%; glucose, 0.18 mmol/L (2.6%. CONCLUSIONS: When the initial chemistry critical values are within the AMR, repeated testing does not improve accuracy and is therefore unnecessary. When the initial chemistry critical values are outside the AMR, however, the benefit of repeated testing justifies its performance and makes it necessary. Performing repeat clinical testing on a case-by-case, rather than routine, basis can improve patient care by delivering critical values more rapidly while providing savings

  9. Concept maps: linking nursing theory to clinical nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, B J

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to offer a different methodology for teaching and learning in continuing nursing education and staff development. This article describes a qualitative research study that analyzed how linkages are made between theoretical material and clinical nursing practice. Findings indicate that nursing students did not link the elements of nursing process together, that clinical preparation was not linked to theoretical material, that the meaning students made of the information was different than the instructors' and that concepts from the basic sciences were not incorporated into student meaning structures. Implications for the use of concept maps as an educational strategy in continuing nursing education are drawn.

  10. Clinical practice guideline: acute otitis externa executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Richard M; Schwartz, Seth R; Cannon, C Ron; Roland, Peter S; Simon, Geoffrey R; Kumar, Kaparaboyna Ashok; Huang, William W; Haskell, Helen W; Robertson, Peter J

    2014-02-01

    The American Academy of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) has published a supplement to this issue featuring the updated Clinical Practice Guideline: Acute Otitis Externa, as a supplement to Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. To assist in implementing the guideline recommendations, this article summarizes the rationale, purpose, and key action statements. The 8 recommendations developed address appropriate diagnosis of acute otitis externa (AOE) and the use of oral and topical antimicrobials and highlight the need for adequate pain relief. An updated guideline is needed due to new clinical trials, new systematic reviews, and the lack of consumer participation in the initial guideline development group.

  11. ORIGINAL ARTICLE: Identification of Practical Pharmacology Skills Useful for Good Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Shilpa, R. Divya

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Awareness about animal ethics is increasing everywhere. This increased awareness coupled with strict regulations discouraging the use of animals for routine experiments have tied the hands of many pharmacologists. They are now forced to develop alternative experiments without using animals. At present, there is acute need to come out with more innovative and useful practical exercises for pharmacology practical sessions. In this background, the present study was undertaken to develop the much-needed alternative experiments. Aims and Objective: To identify new pharmacological practical skills useful for good clinical practice. Material and Methods: A pre-tested questionnaire was administered to 110 doctors of different categories like house surgeons, postgraduate students, assistant professors and professors who are working in a tertiary care hospital. They were asked to give their suggestions regarding new pharmacology practical skills useful for good clinical practice. Statistical analysis: Responses of the participants to the questions asked were tabulated and analyzed. Suggestions given by them were listed out and studied. Results: Use of emergency drugs, dosage calculation, drugs used in pregnancy, case discussions and prescription writing exercises received a lot of support from the participants. Research methodology, cost calculation, animal experiments and interpretation of data of animal experiments did not receive support from the participants. Suggestions given by the participants regarding useful pharmacological skills belonged to the areas like therapeutics, safe use of drugs, recent advances, analysis of information given by the medical representatives and analyzing articles in journals for knowing the efficacy of drugs. Conclusion: Exercises relevant to the clinical practice, as identified in this study, can be introduced as practical pharmacology exercises. Steps are to be taken to highlight the importance of research

  12. Sesame seed allergy: Clinical manifestations and laboratory investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazlollahi MR.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plant-origin foods are among the most important sources of food allergic reactions. An increase in the incidence of sesame seed allergy among children and adults has been reported in recent years. The aim of this preliminary study was to investigate the prevalence, importance and clinical manifestations of sesame allergy among Iranian patients.Methods: In a cross-sectional survey, 250 patients with suspected IgE-mediated food allergies completed a questionnaire and underwent skin prick tests with sesame extract as well as cross-reacting foods (walnut, soya and peanut. Total IgE and sesame-specific IgE levels were measured. Patients with positive skin test reactions and/or IgE specific for sesame without clinical symptoms were considered sensitive to sesame. The patients who also had clinical symptoms with sesame consumption were diagnosed as allergic to sesame.Results: Of the 250 patients enrolled in this study, 129 were male and 121 female, with a mean age of 11.7 years. The most common food allergens were cow's milk, egg, curry, tomato and sesame. Sesame sensitivity was found in 35 patients (14.1%. Only five patients (2% had sesame allergy. Sesame-sensitive patients had a significantly higher frequency of positive prick test to cross-reacting foods when compared to non-sensitized patients (p=0.00. The type of symptom was independent of gender and age of the patients, but urticaria and dermatitis-eczema were significantly more frequent in sensitized patients (p=0.008.Conclusions: This is the first study addressing the prevalence of sesame seed allergy in Iranian population. We found sesame to be a common and important cause of food allergy. The panel of foods recommended for use in diagnostic allergy tests should be adjusted.

  13. Socio-demographic, Clinical and Laboratory Features of Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in Children Treated in Pediatric Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azemi, Mehmedali; Berisha, Majlinda; Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora; Kolgeci, Selim; Avdiu, Muharrem; Jakupi, Xhevat; Hoxha, Rina; Hoxha-Kamberi, Teuta

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of work was presentation of several socio-demographic, clinical and laboratory characteristics of gastroenteritis caused by rotavirus. The examinees and methods: The examinees were children under the age of five years treated at the Pediatric Clinic due to acute gastroenteritis caused by rotavirus. Rotavirus is isolated by method chromatographic immunoassay by Cer Test Biotec. Results: From the total number of patients (850) suffering from acute gastroenteritis, feces test on bacteria, viruses. protozoa and fungi was positive in 425 (49.76%) cases. From this number the test on bacteria was positive in 248 (58.62%) cases, on viruses it was positive in 165 (39.0%), on protozoa in 9 (2.12%) cases and on fungi only one case. Rotavirus was the most frequent one in viral test, it was isolated in 142 (86.06%) cases, adenoviruses were found in 9 (5.45%) cases and noroviruses in only one case. The same feces sample that contained rotavirus and adenoviruses were isolated in five cases, whereas rotavirus with bacteria was isolated in the same feces sample in five cases. The biggest number of cases 62 (43.66%) were of the age 6-12 months, whereas the smallest number 10 (7.04%) cases were of the age 37-60 months. There were 76 (53.52%) of cases of male gender, from rural areas there were 81 (57.04%) cases and there were 58 (40.80%) cases during the summer period. Among the clinical symptoms the most prominent were diarrhea, vomiting, high temperature, whereas the different degree of dehydration were present in all cases (the most common one was moderate dehydration). The most frequent one was isonatremic dehydration in 91 (64.08%) cases, less frequent one was hypernatremic dehydration in 14 (9.85%) cases. The majority of cases (97.89%) had lower blood pH values, whereas 67 (47.17%) cases had pH values that varied from 7.16 -7.20 (curve peak), normal values were registered in only 3 (2.11%) cases. Urea values were increased in 45 (31.07%) cases (the maximum value

  14. Promoting a Strategic Approach to Clinical Nurse Leader Practice Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Marjory; Avolio, Alice E; Ott, Karen M; Miltner, Rebecca S

    2016-01-01

    The Office of Nursing Services of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) piloted implementation of the clinical nurse leader (CNL) into the care delivery model and established a strategic goal in 2011 to implement the CNL role across the VA health care system. The VA Office of Nursing Services CNL Implementation and Evaluation (CNL I&E) Service was created as one mechanism to facilitate that goal in response to a need identified by facility nurse executives for consultative support for CNL practice integration. This article discusses strategies employed by the CNL I&E consultative team to help facility-level nursing leadership integrate CNLs into practice. Measures of success include steady growth in CNL practice capacity as well as positive feedback from nurse executives about the value of consultative engagement. Future steps to better integrate CNL practice into the VA include consolidation of lessons learned, collaboration to strengthen the evidence base for CNL practice, and further exploration of the transformational potential of CNL practice across the care continuum.

  15. Antipsychotics from theory to practice: integrating clinical and basic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, R; Milner, K; Jibson, M D

    1999-01-01

    The recent introduction of the atypical antipsychotics into the treatment arena for psychoses and related disorders comes with justifiable excitement. These newer antipsychotics offer several clinical benefits over the conventional antipsychotics, which have been the mainstays of care thus far. The primary advantage of these atypical agents is their superior side effect profiles, particularly with regard to extrapyramidal side effects (EPS). The implications from a reduction in EPS touch on virtually every aspect of pathology in schizophrenic illness, including short- and long-term movement disorders, negative symptoms, noncompliance, cognitive dysfunction, and dysphoria. It should be emphasized that while atypical antipsychotics share many clinical attributes, there are also substantial differences among them. This review will examine the pharmacology, clinical efficacy, and side effect profiles of the atypical antipsychotics and attempt to relate the attributes observed in clinical practice and clinical trials to their basic pharmacologic profiles. There is a fair, but not perfect, correspondence between the pharmacologic profiles of the different atypical antipsychotics and their respective clinical attributes. After a comparative overview of their receptor-binding profiles, a brief pharmacokinetic summary will be provided. Finally, the clinical profiles of these agents will be summarized with regard to both their efficacy and adverse effects.

  16. The Frequency of the Accidental Contamination with Laboratory Samples in Yazd Clinical Laboratories’ personnel in 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafari, AA. (PhD

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: laboratory personnel have always accidental exposure to clinical samples, which can cause the transmission of infection. This threat can be prevented and controlled by education for the use of safety instruments. The purpose was to determine the frequency of accidental exposure to laboratory samples among Yazd laboratory personnel in 2011. Material and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 100 of Yazd clinical laboratory personnel. The data was collected, using a valid and reliable questioner, via interview and analyzed by means of SPSS software. Results: Eighty-six percent of the subjects reported an experience of accidental exposure to clinical samples, such as blood, serum and urine. The causes were carelessness (41% and work overload (29%. Needle- stick was the most prevalent injury (52% particularly in sampler workers (51% and in their hands (69%. There wasn’t significant relationship between accidental exposure to laboratory samples and the variables such as private and governmental laboratories (p=0.517, kind of employment (p=0.411, record of services (p=0.439 and academic degree (p=0.454. The subjects aged 20-29 (p=0.034 and worked in sampling unit had the highest accidental exposure. Conclusion: based on the results, inexperience of the personnel especially in sampling room, overload at work and ignorance of applying safety instruments are known as the most important reasons for accidental exposure to clinical samples. Keywords: Contamination; accidental Exposure; Infectious agents; laboratory; personnel

  17. [The analytical reliability of clinical laboratory information and role of the standards in its support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men'shikov, V V

    2012-12-01

    The article deals with the factors impacting the reliability of clinical laboratory information. The differences of qualities of laboratory analysis tools produced by various manufacturers are discussed. These characteristics are the causes of discrepancy of the results of laboratory analyses of the same analite. The role of the reference system in supporting the comparability of laboratory analysis results is demonstrated. The project of national standard is presented to regulate the requirements to standards and calibrators for analysis of qualitative and non-metrical characteristics of components of biomaterials.

  18. Risk management in clinical practice. Part 4. Endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, J

    2010-08-28

    Endodontic procedures are challenging and technically demanding. In the UK standards of treatment have been shown to have fallen short of acceptable guidelines, laying many dentists open to litigation on questions of clinical negligence by patients who understand and know what should be considered as current best practice in this area. Failure to communicate with patients about the procedure and not obtaining consent for treatment is a key area of complaint, as is inadequate record keeping. When treatment is undertaken within the framework of accepted guidelines it would be very difficult for a patient to open a claim for clinical negligence should a failure occur. This article looks at potential dento-legal problems in endodontics and how, through compliance with best practice, they may be avoided.

  19. Participatory design for computerization of clinical practice guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng, Karen Marie; Pedersen, B. S.

    2011-01-01

    There have been made many attempts on computerization of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs), none have, however achieved any general application in clinical work practice. The objective of this paper is: (1) to raise awareness about the impact the design method used for computerization of CPGs......: PD as a design philosophy, PD as a toolbox and PD as a way to create a shared realm of understanding among IT-designers and health professionals as these are areas of utmost relevance for the design of computerized CPGs. Additionally, the application of PD for computerization of CPGs is illustrated...... by two cases. We conclude that PD is a beneficial approach for design of computerized CPGs. © 2011 Elsevier Inc....

  20. Linear and Nonlinear Heart Rate Variability Indexes in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buccelletti Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological organisms have intrinsic control systems that act in response to internal and external stimuli maintaining homeostasis. Human heart rate is not regular and varies in time and such variability, also known as heart rate variability (HRV, is not random. HRV depends upon organism's physiologic and/or pathologic state. Physicians are always interested in predicting patient's risk of developing major and life-threatening complications. Understanding biological signals behavior helps to characterize patient's state and might represent a step toward a better care. The main advantage of signals such as HRV indexes is that it can be calculated in real time in noninvasive manner, while all current biomarkers used in clinical practice are discrete and imply blood sample analysis. In this paper HRV linear and nonlinear indexes are reviewed and data from real patients are provided to show how these indexes might be used in clinical practice.

  1. The EC4 European syllabus for post-graduate training in clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine: version 4--2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieringa, Gijsbert; Zerah, Simone; Jansen, Rob; Simundic, Ana-Maria; Queralto, José; Solnica, Bogdan; Gruson, Damien; Tomberg, Karel; Riittinen, Leena; Baum, Hannsjörg; Brochet, Jean-Philippe; Buhagiar, Gerald; Charilaou, Charis; Grigore, Camelia; Johnsen, Anders H; Kappelmayer, Janos; Majkic-Singh, Nada; Nubile, Giuseppe; O'Mullane, John; Opp, Matthias; Pupure, Silvija; Racek, Jaroslav; Reguengo, Henrique; Rizos, Demetrios; Rogic, Dunja; Špaňár, Július; Štrakl, Greta; Szekeres, Thomas; Tzatchev, Kamen; Vitkus, Dalius; Wallemacq, Pierre; Wallinder, Hans

    2012-08-01

    Laboratory medicine's practitioners across the European community include medical, scientific and pharmacy trained specialists whose contributions to health and healthcare is in the application of diagnostic tests for screening and early detection of disease, differential diagnosis, monitoring, management and treatment of patients, and their prognostic assessment. In submitting a revised common syllabus for post-graduate education and training across the 27 member states an expectation is set for harmonised, high quality, safe practice. In this regard an extended 'Core knowledge, skills and competencies' division embracing all laboratory medicine disciplines is described. For the first time the syllabus identifies the competencies required to meet clinical leadership demands for defining, directing and assuring the efficiency and effectiveness of laboratory services as well as expectations in translating knowledge and skills into ability to practice. In a 'Specialist knowledge' division, the expectations from the individual disciplines of Clinical Chemistry/Immunology, Haematology/Blood Transfusion, Microbiology/ Virology, Genetics and In Vitro Fertilisation are described. Beyond providing a common platform of knowledge, skills and competency, the syllabus supports the aims of the European Commission in providing safeguards to increasing professional mobility across European borders at a time when demand for highly qualified professionals is increasing and the labour force is declining. It continues to act as a guide for the formulation of national programmes supplemented by the needs of individual country priorities.

  2. A comparison of designer activity using core design situations in the laboratory and practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cash, Philip; Hicks, Ben J.; Culley, Steve J.

    2013-01-01

    In 2011 one quarter of all articles published in Design Studies and the Journal of Engineering Design used experimental studies. However, there is little work exploring the relationship between laboratory and practice. This paper addresses this by detailing an analysis of designer activity in three...... situations commonly studied by design researchers: information seeking, ideation and design review. This comparison is instantiated through three complementary studies: an observational study of practice and two experimental studies. These reveal a range of similarities and differences that are described...

  3. Clinical Practice Guidelines for postoperative period of thoracic surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Carlos Alvarez Li

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for postoperative period of thoracic surgery. It is the period between the suture of the surgical wound and the total rehabilitation of the patient, which usually occurs in the Intensive Care Unit. This document includes a review and update of the main aspects such as classification, postoperative treatment, stressing the actions to face any complication. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  4. Human Motion Video Analysis in Clinical Practice (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    V.V. Borzikov; N.N. Rukina; O.V. Vorobyova; A.N. Kuznetsov; A. N. Belova

    2015-01-01

    The development of new rehabilitation approaches to neurological and traumatological patients requires understanding of normal and pathological movement patterns. Biomechanical analysis of video images is the most accurate method of investigation and quantitative assessment of human normal and pathological locomotion. The review of currently available methods and systems of optical human motion analysis used in clinical practice is presented here. Short historical background is provi...

  5. Clinical practice of risk assessment of sexual violence

    OpenAIRE

    Judge, Joseph Gerard

    2012-01-01

    Background: Risk assessment of sexual violence involves evidence based evaluation of the risks posed by sexual offenders. It informs risk management; the provision of treatment that reduces the risk of future sexual violence. Previous research has focused on assessment of the predictive accuracy of different risk assessment tools, as well as the identification of risk factors that are associated with recidivism. In contrast, the clinical practice of risk assessment is a research a...

  6. A new generation of reliable clinical practice guidelines through MAGIC

    OpenAIRE

    Olav Vandvik, Per; Department of Medicine, Innnandet Hospital Trust, Gjøvik, Noruega. Norwegian Knowledge Centre for Health Services, Oslo, Noruega. Institute for Health and Society, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo. Noruega. Médico. Ph.D.; Fog Heen, Anja; Department of Medicine, Innnandet Hospital Trust, Gjøvik, Noruega. Médico. Ph.D.; Brandt, Linn; Department of Medicine, Innnandet Hospital Trust, Gjøvik, Noruega. Institute for Health and Society, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo. Noruega. Médico.

    2014-01-01

    Safe and effective disease diagnosis and treatment requires that health personnel can access the best evidence, preferably through reliable clinical practice guidelines. Most guidelines have methodological weaknesses, suboptimal reporting formats, and frequently fail to update content. New standards developed by the US Institute of Medicine and the Guidelines International Network and Systems for Trustworthy Guidelines offer better opportunities for success in the development of guidelines, b...

  7. Clinical Decision Support for Vascular Disease in Community Family Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavjee, K; Holbrook, AM; Lau, E; Esporlas-Jewer, I; Troyan, S

    2006-01-01

    The COMPETE III Vascular Disease Tracker (C3VT) is a personalized, Web-based, clinical decision support tool that provides patients and physicians access to a patient’s 16 individual vascular risk markers, specific advice for each marker and links to best practices in vascular disease management. It utilizes the chronic care model1 so that physicians can better manage patients with chronic diseases. Over 1100 patients have been enrolled into the COMPETE III study to date.

  8. REMAXOL: MECHANISMS OF ACTION AND APPLICATION IN REAL CLINICAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yu. Ilchenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main pathogenic effects of the original nativedrug — remaxol combining properties of balanced polyionic solution (methionine, inosine, nicotinamide and succinic acid were introduced additionally, antioxidant, antihypoxant and hepatotropic agent are considered in review. The results of its application in clinical practice among patients with alcoholic fatty liver disease, metabolic disorders, viral hepatitis, drug hepatotoxicity and in the perioperative period are presented.

  9. Excellence in clinical laboratories: the standard ISO 15189:2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Scipioni

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available I laboratori clinici operano in stretto contatto con i pazienti e collaborano direttamente alla loro cura, in modo corresponsabile con i medici e i reparti ospedalieri. L’importanza della loro attività per la salute pubblica rende obbligatoria l’esplicitazione di alcuni punti finora spesso considerati ovvii. Ai pazienti dev’essere infatti garantito che: - i metodi di analisi utilizzati siano stati preliminarmente valutati, per confermare la loro rispondenza agli obiettivi dell’analisi stessa, verificati, per controllarne l’effettiva efficacia e, se necessario, validati per garantire che siano appropriati allo scopo; - il personale che esegue le analisi sia stato adeguatamente formato e quindi tecnicamente competente; - il laboratorio assicuri un’adeguata consulenza allo staff clinico che richiede le analisi, allo scopo di ottenere una sinergia tra il laboratorio e il clinico che ha in cura il paziente, sia nella fase di prelievo di materiale biologico, sia nella fase di interpretazione dei risultati. Tutto ciò è necessario per dimostrare ai pazienti

  10. Percutaneous renal graft biopsy: a clinical, laboratory and pathological analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilda Mazzali

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Renal allograft biopsies have been used as a good method for monitoring the evolution of kidney transplants for at least 20 years.1 Histological analysis permits differential diagnosis of the causes of allograft dysfunction to be made. OBJECTIVES: To correlate the data of urinalysis and serum creatinine with histological diagnosis of renal graft in a group of renal transplant patients. DESIGN: Accuracy study, retrospective analysis. SETTING: A university terciary referral center. SAMPLE: 339 percutaneous allograft biopsies obtained from 153 patients. Blood and urine samples were obtained before the graft biopsy. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Laboratory evaluation and hystological analysis (light microscopy, imunofluorescent eletronic microscopy. RESULTS: Most of the biopsies (58.9% were performed during the first month post-transplant. An increase in serum creatinine was associated with acute tubular and/or cortical necrosis. Proteinuria and normal serum creatinine were associated with glomerular lesions. Non-nephrotic range proteinuria and an increase in serum creatinine were associated with chronic rejection. CONCLUSIONS: Evaluation of serum creatinine and urinalysis can be useful in suggesting the histological graft diagnosis.

  11. [Teaching design and practice of human blood type traits in genetics comprehensive laboratory course].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Hu, Dongmei; Yu, Dade; Dong, Mingliang; Li, Yun; Fan, Yingming; Wang, Yanwei; Zhang, Jinfeng

    2016-05-01

    Comprehensive laboratory courses, which enable students to aptly apply theoretic knowledge and master experiment skills, play an important role in the present educational reform of laboratory courses. We utilized human ABO blood type as the experimental subject, and designed the experiment--"Molecular Genotyping of Human ABO Blood Type and Analysis of Population Genetic Equilibrium". In the experiment, DNA in mucosal cells is extracted from students' saliva, and each student's genotype is identified using a series of molecular genetics technologies, including PCR amplification of target fragments, enzymatic digestion, and electrophoretic separation. Then, taking the whole class as an analogous Mendel population, a survey of genotype frequency of ABO blood type is conducted, followed with analyses of various population genetic parameters using Popgene. Through the open laboratory course, students can not only master molecular genetic experimental skills, but also improve their understanding of theoretic knowledge through independent design and optimization of molecular techniques. After five years of research and practice, a stable experimental system of molecular genetics has been established to identify six genotypes of ABO blood types, namely I(A)I(A), I(A)i, I(B)I(B), I(B)i, I(A)I(B) and ii. Laboratory courses of molecular and population genetics have been integrated by calculating the frequencies of the six genotypes and three multiple alleles and testing population genetic equilibrium. The goal of the open laboratory course with independent design and implementation by the students has been achieved. This laboratory course has proved effective and received good reviews from the students. It could be applied as a genetics laboratory course for the biology majors directly, and its ideas and methods could be promoted and applied to other biological laboratory courses.

  12. MODERN APPROACHES TO CLINICAL AND LABORATORY DIAGNOSTICS OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS EARLY ONSET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Rekalov

    2013-10-01

    methods of diagnosis of RA. Describes the diagnostic capabilities of the periarticular soft tissue changes at different stages. Provides information about using US of joints as a methodology for monitoring patients with eRA. The data presents the diagnostic capabilities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in patients with eRA by using different modes of MRI and radiopaque substance with a strong tropism to the synovial membrane. Conclusion: For the purpose of early diagnosis and prognosis of joint erosions appropriate set of laboratory monitoring indicators (ESR, CRP, RF and ACPA anti-MCV characterize the pathological changes of the articular structure in patients with eRA. The introduction into the routine clinical practice US of joints allows to reach high accuracy of the diagnosis of eRA (before the erosive and destructive changes of bone tissue, which significantly improvement prognosis of the patients. Instrumental examination using MRI (especially in the study of small joints and muscles function T1 fs-fat is essential for the study of the pathophysiology of objectification of patients with eRA. When conducting MRI in patients with very eRA - is diagnostic and prognostic factor in the rapid progression to erosive and destructive arthritis.

  13. Development and Use of Challenge Exams for Clinical Laboratory Nursing 2: Part 2 Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattstaedt, Mary Jane; Isaac, Margaret M.

    The report describes the development of a set of equivalency tests for students in Nursing 2 who have had prior clinical laboratory training or experience in pediatrics, obstetrics, or geriatrics. For each of the three areas the examination packet includes: the course clinical objectives, the challenge examination objectives, a self-study guide, a…

  14. An Enzymatic Clinical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment Incorporating an Introduction to Mathematical Method Comparison Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duxbury, Mark

    2004-01-01

    An enzymatic laboratory experiment based on the analysis of serum is described that is suitable for students of clinical chemistry. The experiment incorporates an introduction to mathematical method-comparison techniques in which three different clinical glucose analysis methods are compared using linear regression and Bland-Altman difference…

  15. 78 FR 28292 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... areas of biomedical, behavioral and clinical science research. The panel meetings will be open to the... location changes have been made for the following panel meetings of the of the Joint Biomedical...

  16. Application of self-efficacy theory in dental clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakudate, N; Morita, M; Fukuhara, S; Sugai, M; Nagayama, M; Kawanami, M; Chiba, I

    2010-11-01

    In clinical practice, self-efficacy refers to how certain a patient feels about his or her ability to take the necessary action to improve the indicators and maintenance of health. It is assumed that the prognosis for patient behaviour can be improved by assessing the proficiency of their self-efficacy through providing psychoeducational instructions adapted for individual patients, and promoting behavioural change for self-care. Therefore, accurate assessment of self-efficacy is an important key in daily clinical preventive care. The previous research showed that the self-efficacy scale scores predicted patient behaviour in periodontal patients and mother's behaviour in paediatric dental practice. Self-efficacy belief is constructed from four principal sources of information: enactive mastery experience, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion, and physiological and affective states. Thus, self-efficacy can be enhanced by the intervention exploiting these sources. The previous studies revealed that behavioural interventions to enhance self-efficacy improved oral-care behaviour of patients. Therefore, assessment and enhancement of oral-care specific self-efficacy is important to promote behaviour modification in clinical dental practice. However, more researches are needed to evaluate the suitability of the intervention method.

  17. Clinical Nurse Leader Integration Into Practice: Developing Theory To Guide Best Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Numerous policy bodies have identified the clinical nurse leader (CNL) as an innovative new role for meeting higher health care quality standards. Although there is growing evidence of improved care environment and patient safety and quality outcomes after redesigning care delivery microsystems to integrate CNL practice, significant variation in CNL implementation has been noted across reports, making it difficult to causally link CNL practice to reported outcomes. This variability reflects the overall absence in the literature of a well-defined CNL theoretical framework to help guide standardized application in practice. To address this knowledge gap, an interpretive synthesis with a grounded theory analysis of CNL narratives was conducted to develop a theoretical model for CNL practice. The model clarifies CNL practice domains and proposes mechanisms by which CNL-integrated care delivery microsystems improve health care quality. The model highlights the need for a systematic approach to CNL implementation including a well-thought out strategy for care delivery redesign; a consistent, competency-based CNL workflow; and sustained macro-to-micro system leadership support. CNL practice can be considered an effective approach to organizing nursing care that maximizes the scope of nursing to influence the ways care is delivered by all professions within a clinical microsystem.

  18. Exploring nursing students’ experience of peer learning in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravanipour, Maryam; Bahreini, Masoud; Ravanipour, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peer learning is an educational process wherein someone of the same age or level of experience level interacts with other students interested in the same topic. There is limited evidence specifically focusing on the practical use of peer learning in Iran. The aim of this study was to explore nursing students’ experiences of peer learning in clinical practice. Materials and Methods: A qualitative content analysis was conducted. Focus groups were used to find the students’ experiences about peerlearning. Twenty-eight baccalaureate nursing students at Bushehr University of Medical Sciences were selected purposively, and were arranged in four groups of seven students each. The focus group interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview schedule. All interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using conventional content analysis method. Results: The analysis identified four themes: Paradoxical dualism, peer exploitation, first learning efficacy, and socialization practice. Gained advantages and perceived disadvantages created paradoxical dualism, and peer exploitation resulted from peer selection and peer training. Conclusion: Nursing students reported general satisfaction concerning peer learning due to much more in-depth learning with little stress than conventional learning methods. Peer learning is a useful method for nursing students for practicing educational leadership and learning the clinical skills before they get a job. PMID:26097860

  19. [Assessment of the quality of laboratory diagnosis of intestinal parasitic diseases by the laboratories participating in the Federal System of External Quality Assessment of Clinical Laboratory Testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakhov, V N; Dovgalev, A S; Astanina, S Iu; Serdiuk, A P

    2014-01-01

    In 2010-2013, the quality of microscopic detection of the causative agents ofparasitic diseases in the feces has been assessed by the specialists of the laboratories of the therapeutic-and-prophylactic institutions (TPIs) and Hygiene and Epidemiology Centers, Russian Inspectorate for the Protection of Consumer Rights and Human Welfare, which are participants of the Federal System of External Quality Assessment of Clinical Laboratory Testing. Thirty-two specimens containing 16 species of human helminths and 4 species of enteric protozoa in different combinations were examined. The findings suggest that the quality of microscopic detection of the causative agents of parasitic diseases is low in the laboratories of health care facilities and that the specialists of the laboratories of TPIs and Hygiene and Epidemiology Centers, Russian Inspectorate for the Protection of Consumer Rights and Human Welfare, do not not possess the knowledge and skills necessary to make a laboratory diagnosis of helminths and enteric protozoa. The average detection rates of helminths and protozoa were at a level of 64 and 36%, respectively. The correct results showed that the proportion of helminths and protozoa were 94.5 and 5.5%, respectively. According to the biological and epidemiological classification of helminths, there were higher detection rates for contact group parasites (Enterobius vermicularis and Hymenolepis nana) and geohelminths (Ascaris, Trichuris trichiura, and others). Biohelminths (Opisthorchis, tapeworms, and others) Were detectable slightly worse.

  20. Detection of intestinal protozoa in the clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHardy, Ian H; Wu, Max; Shimizu-Cohen, Robyn; Couturier, Marc Roger; Humphries, Romney M

    2014-03-01

    Despite recent advances in diagnostic technology, microscopic examination of stool specimens remains central to the diagnosis of most pathogenic intestinal protozoa. Microscopy is, however, labor-intensive and requires a skilled technologist. New, highly sensitive diagnostic methods have been developed for protozoa endemic to developed countries, including Giardia lamblia (syn. G. intestinalis/G. duodenalis) and Cryptosporidium spp., using technologies that, if expanded, could effectively complement or even replace microscopic approaches. To date, the scope of such novel technologies is limited and may not include common protozoa such as Dientamoeba fragilis, Entamoeba histolytica, or Cyclospora cayetanensis. This minireview describes canonical approaches for the detection of pathogenic intestinal protozoa, while highlighting recent developments and FDA-approved tools for clinical diagnosis of common intestinal protozoa.

  1. The European Register of Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine: guide to the Register, version 3-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMurray, Janet; Zérah, Simone; Hallworth, Michael;

    2010-01-01

    In 1997, the European Communities Confederation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EC4) set up a Register for European Specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. The operation of the Register is undertaken by a Register Commission (EC4RC). During the last 12 years, more...... than 2200 specialists in Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine have joined the Register. In 2007, EC4 merged with the Forum of European Societies of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (FESCC) to form the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFCC). Two previous...

  2. Management of stress and stress-related diseases: Emerging computer-based technologies and the rationale for clinical laboratory assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezekiel Uba Nwose

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Over the years, the issue of stress management in mental health has been discussed without reference to the clinical laboratory perspectives. Translational research and the vast array of emerging diagnostic technologies in alternative medical practice are now bridging the gap. While it would be scientific arrogance for the clinical practitioner and scientist to ignore the trend, the new technologies seeking clinical acceptability necessarily require expatiation of the scientific aspects of their products. Aims : This commentary builds on a comparative critical review to further our hypothesis that oxidative stress is the biochemical basis of the emerging computer-based diagnostic technologies. Materials & Method : The available information on Computer Meridian Diagnostics, Neuropattern and Virtual Scanning technologies were critically reviewed. The differences and similarities were articulated. Results : The technologies seem different, but have similarities that have not been articulated before. The seemingly different theories are traceable to Russian scientists and are based upon stress-induced adrenal secretions and the associated effect on glucose metabolism. The therapeutic effects of antioxidant nutrition, exercise or relaxation that are inherent in the technologies are highlighted. Conclusion : This commentary furthers explanation of the alterations in antioxidant activities as a result of biofeedback, oxidative stress and/or physiological effects as the biochemical basis of the technologies. The place for antioxidant indices and whole blood viscosity are also highlighted. This provides a rationale for the evaluation of available clinical diagnostic tests both to validate the technologies and as clinical laboratory correlates in stress management.

  3. Examining an ethical dilemma: a case study in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narrigan, Deborah

    2004-01-01

    When clients and health care providers differ in their understanding of what is right or wrong, an ethical dilemma may arise. Such dilemmas occur in everyday clinical practice. Health care providers have the professional responsibility to analyze these dilemmas. A clinical case study of an ethical dilemma that occurred in a cross-cultural context is examined. The language of the client and provider differed, and no interpreter service was available. Given these conditions, the provider's ethical dilemma was whether, and if so how, to give safe, satisfying care that respected the needs of a client with limited English proficiency. Measuring the morality of the provider's decisions and actions using Rawls' ethical theory of social justice finds deficits. A 10-step Bioethical Decision-Making Model by Thompson is used to demonstrate one method for analyzing the moral dimension of a clinical scenario focusing on the decisions and actions taken by a midwife. Scrutinizing ethically challenging clinical encounters will result in better understanding of the moral dimensions of practice.

  4. SELF WOUND MANAGEMENT PRACTICES BEFORE ATTENDING ANTIRABIES VACCINE CLINIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Mishra, Smita Panda, Prakash Chandra Panda

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In INDIA almost 20000 people die (40% of world death each year from rabies. Most of these deaths could be prevented by post exposure prophylaxis with wound washing, rabies immunoglobulin & vaccination. Local wound management alone can reduce viral load by up to 80%. Objective: To study self-wound management practices in animal exposure patients before attending a tertiary level ARV clinic. Methodology: Data regarding wound management was collected by individual interview of patients attending the ARV clinic during OCT 2011 to MAR 2012. The data collected in the form of a questionnaire. Analysis of data was done in the Department Of Community Medicine, V.S.S. Medical College, Burla. Results: Total 493 cases of animal exposure were attended during the study period. Most common biting animal was dog (94.5%. 31% of cases were under the age of 10 years & 23% belongs to the age of 10-19 years. Male to female ratio was 3:1. Most of the cases (91% were of category III exposure. Immediate management of wound was practiced by 63-77% of cases before visiting ARV clinic; only 2% wash the wound with running water & soap for 15 minutes. 39% of cases applied Dettol/savlon at the wound side & other 38% applied turmeric, red chilli, kerosene, Band-Aid & ghee locally. Most cases (61% reported to ARV clinic within 24hours.

  5. Infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis: a review of cases in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Dominic

    2010-11-01

    Infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) is a painful ocular disease affecting cattle worldwide. The publications documenting this condition focus on what is the accepted cause of IBK--Moraxella bovis. This article draws on experience and recorded data made at the time of the initial examination and follow-up visits. Laboratory culture of ocular swabs was undertaken where appropriate. Diagnosis of IBK is usually based on clinical signs, environment, and history. Misdiagnosis of the organisms involved is a genuine possibility. This article focuses on recent outbreaks of bovine ocular disease in the United Kingdom in three counties over a 12-month period.

  6. Transition questions in clinical practice - validity and reproducibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik Hein

    2008-01-01

    of construct validity and reproducibility of a TQ and make proposals for standardised use. One-hundred-and-ninety-one patients with low back pain and/or leg pain were followed over an 8-week period receiving 3 disability and 2 pain questionnaires together with a 7-point TQ. Reproducibility was determined using...... are reproducible in patients with low back pain and/or leg pain. Despite critique of several biases, our results have reinforced the construct validity of TQ’s as an outcome measure since only 1 hypothesis was rejected. On the basis of our findings we have outlined a proposal for a standardised use of transition......Transition questions in CLINICAL practice - validity and reproducibility Lauridsen HH1, Manniche C3, Grunnet-Nilsson N1, Hartvigsen J1,2 1   Clinical Locomotion Science, Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. e-mail: hlauridsen...

  7. Clinical application of plasma thermograms. Utility, practical approaches and considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbett, Nichola C; Mekmaysy, Chongkham S; DeLeeuw, Lynn; Chaires, Jonathan B

    2015-04-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies of blood plasma are part of an emerging area of the clinical application of DSC to biofluid analysis. DSC analysis of plasma from healthy individuals and patients with various diseases has revealed changes in the thermal profiles of the major plasma proteins associated with the clinical status of the patient. The sensitivity of DSC to the concentration of proteins, their interactions with other proteins or ligands, or their covalent modification underlies the potential utility of DSC analysis. A growing body of literature has demonstrated the versatility and performance of clinical DSC analysis across a range of biofluids and in a number of disease settings. The principles, practice and challenges of DSC analysis of plasma are described in this article.

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and whole genome sequencing: a practical guide and online tools available for the clinical microbiologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satta, G; Atzeni, A; McHugh, T D

    2017-02-01

    Whole genome sequencing (WGS) has the potential to revolutionize the diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection but the lack of bioinformatic expertise among clinical microbiologists is a barrier for adoption. Software products for analysis should be simple, free of charge, able to accept data directly from the sequencer (FASTQ files) and to provide the basic functionalities all-in-one. The main aim of this narrative review is to provide a practical guide for the clinical microbiologist, with little or no practical experience of WGS analysis, with a specific focus on software products tailor-made for M. tuberculosis analysis. With sequencing performed by an external provider, it is now feasible to implement WGS analysis in the routine clinical practice of any microbiology laboratory, with the potential to detect resistance weeks before traditional phenotypic culture methods, but the clinical microbiologist should be aware of the limitations of this approach.

  9. Neurobrucellosis: Clinical and laboratory findings in 22 patients

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    Rasoolinejad M

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is a multisystem disease with diverse clinical presentations and involvement of the nervous system is considered to 5 to be 10% in adult patients and 1% in children. The presentations of neurobrucellosis includes meningoencephalitis, subarachnoid haemorrhage, myelitis, radiculoneuritis, intracerebral and epidural abscess, psychosis and vascular syndrome. Twenty-two patients with neurobrucellosis are described. Ten patients had meningoencephalitis, seven patients had meningitis, three patients had polyradiculopathy and one patient presented with spinal epidural abscess and one patient had brain abscess. Results of an agglutination test for Brucella in serum were positive for all patients (>1:160; eight of 15 patients had positive agglutination test in CSF. Five patients had positive blood cultures, 3 patients had positive bone marrow cultures and 2 of 15 patients had positive CSF cultures. All of cultures were Brucella Mellitensis. Antimicrobial treatment included concurrent administration of Doxycycline, Rifampin and Trimethoprim-Sulfametoxazole. Four patients received Dexamethason concurrently. In conclusion, nervous system involvement is a serious manifestation of brucellosis. As brucellosis is an endemic disease in Iran we suggest that brucellosis be investigated with neurological symptoms and signs.

  10. Sheehan syndrome: clinical and laboratory evaluation of 20 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Yusuf; Colak, Ramis

    2005-06-01

    Sheehan syndrome (SS) or post-partum pituitary necrosis is a pituitary insufficiency secondary to excessive post-partum blood losses. SS is a very significant cause of maternal morbidity and mortality in developing countries although it is a rarity in developed countries in which obstetrical care has been improved. In this study, we reviewed 20 cases retrospectively who were diagnosed as SS in our clinic. The patients aged 40 to 65 years with a mean age of 51.12 +/- 9.44 years (mean +/- SD). Time to make a definitive diagnosis of the disease ranged between 5 and 25 years with a mean of 16.35 +/- 4.74 years. Three of our patient (15%) had a previous diagnosis of SS. Three patients (15%) were referred to emergency service for hypoglycemia, three patients (15%) for hypothyroidism and one patient (5%) for hyponatremia. Dynamic examination of the pituitary revealed GH, Prolactin, FSH, TSH and ACTH insufficiency in all of the patients. One of our patients had a sufficient LH response to LHRH challenge. All of the patients were imaged with pituitary MRI. Eleven patients had empty sella and 9 patients had partial empty sella. SS is still a common problem in our country, especially in rural areas. Considering the duration of disease, important delays occur in diagnosis and treatment of the disease.

  11. [Vasculitic Peripheral Neuropathies: Clinical Features and Diagnostic Laboratory Tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Katsuhisa

    2016-03-01

    Vasculitic peripheral neuropathy (VPN) occurs due to ischemic changes of peripheral nerves, resulting from a deficit of vascular blood supply due to damaged vasa nervorum leading to vasculitis. VPN usually manifests as sensorimotor or sensory disturbances accompanied by pain, presenting as a type of multiple mononeuropathy, with a scattered distribution in distal limbs. VPN may also present as a mononeuropathy, distal symmetric polyneuropathy, plexopathy, or radiculopathy. The rapidity of VPN is variable, ranging from days to months, with symptoms occasionally changing with the appearance of new lesions. Careful history taking and neurological examination provides an exact diagnosis. The most common cause of VPN is primary vasculitis predominantly affecting small vessels, including vasa nervorum, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, and polyarteritis nodosa. Similar vasculitic processes can also result from a systemic collagen disorder or secondary vasculitis. Electrophysiological studies and pathological investigation of biopsied peripheral nerves and muscles are important for diagnosis of vasculitis. Serological tests, including ANCA, are useful for diagnosis of vasculitis. Accurate neurological examinations are essential for diagnosis and evaluation of clinical course.

  12. Nanotechnology: A new frontier in virus detection in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Researchers are expanding the applications of nanotechnology in the field of medicine since mid-2000. These technologies include nanoarrays, protein arrays, nanopore technology, nanoparticles as a contrivance in immunoassays and nanosensors, among others. Nanobiotechnologies are clinically applicable and possess the potential to be useful in laboratory diagnosis of infections in general and viral infections in particular. Nanotechnology is a significant advance in molecular diagnostics. The technology strengthens and expands the DNA and protein microarray methods. In particular, the waveguide technology is an emergent area with many diagnostic applications. Nanosensors are the new contrivance for detection of bioterrorism agents. All these new technologies would have to be evaluated in clinical settings before their full import is appreciated and accepted.

  13. [The issues and basic principles of training of physicians of clinical laboratory diagnostics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, V T; Naumova, E V

    2012-07-01

    The article considers the main positions concerning the clinical laboratory diagnostics as an independent clinical specialty and the principles of professional training and improvement of specialists. The basic issues complicating the training and improvement of personnel to be kept in line with actual needs of laboratory service of public health system are discussed. Among them are the availability of laboratory academic sub disciplines demanding a profound special theoretical education and technical skills; the need to account in the process of professional training the variety of forms, sizes and types of laboratory structures in different medical institutions; the need of special training programs for numerous specialists with non-medical basic education. The combination of the present system of postgraduate training of specialists on chairs of state educational organizations with initiative involvement of specialists in various public forms of permanent professional improvement (professional scientific societies meetings, research conferences, internet seminars, etc.) is supported Along with a positive appraisal of the existing system of training in the state educational institutions and corresponding regulation documents, a critique is expressed regarding certain actual documents which improperly limit the administrative functions of physicians of clinical laboratory diagnostics and complicate training of bacteriologists for clinical laboratories.

  14. Best Practices in Clinical Supervision: another step in delineating effective supervision practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borders, L Dianne

    2014-01-01

    Across the helping professions, we have arrived at a point where it is possible to create statements of best practices in supervision that are based on available empirical research; credentialing, ethical, and legal guidelines; and consensus opinion. Best practices are different from, but certainly complementary to, statements of supervision competencies. In this paper, I highlight the differences between competencies and best practices, and then describe the development and content of one comprehensive statement, the Best Practices in Clinical Supervision created for the field of counseling and counselor education. I then illustrate the applicability of the Best Practices across disciplines and countries through a comparison and contrast with several other existing documents. I conclude with a brief look at the development of supervisor expertise, which requires not only declarative knowledge (competencies) and procedural knowledge (statements of best practices), but also reflective knowledge. The latter is composed of insights built over years of supervision education, experience, and self-reflection regarding necessary adaptions and improvisations that inform an individualized approach to supervision practice.

  15. [Relevance of nutrition knowledge on clinical practice: medical opinion survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvares, Luísa; Moreira, Isabel; Oliveira, António

    2007-01-01

    Although previous studies show that physicians generally agree that nutrition knowledge is important for their daily clinical practice, several other studies report their poor knowledge of the subject. One of the strongest reasons given for this is the non-incorporation of Nutrition as a compulsory subject for the medical sciences degree. Dietary counselling and assessment of the patients' nutritional status don't seem to be systematic. The aim of this study is to asses how relevant physicians consider Nutrition to be in the successful running of a good practice. The study was undertaken at the general hospital of Vila Real/Peso da Régua (CHVR/PR) by distribution of a self- administered questionnaire to 153 of the physicians of the clinical body. Mean values were compared with the Student's t test and proportions with the Chi-square test. Of the 153 physicians, 108 replies were received (70,6%). Of these 108 replies, 53,3% consider nutrition knowledge important although 29,6% state their knowledge is poor. More than half say that Clinical Nutrition should be a compulsory subject of the Medical Sciences syllabus, and 99,1% deem it important to assess the patient's nutritional status. About 95% stated they provided written or verbal nutritional guidance, and most of the physicians had already sought the assistance of a nutritionist. This study shows that the clinical body of the CHVR/PR is aware of the importance nutrition knowledge has in their daily practice. It must be noted, though, that although almost one third of the physicians rate their nutrition knowledge poor, most of them provide nutritional guidance to their patients.

  16. Clinical and Laboratory Findings of Patients with Breath Holding Spells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Özdemir

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics; physical findings, cardiological, hematological and neurological problems; treatment approaches; and the prognosis of children with breath holding spells.Materials and Method: Seventhy patients were included in this study. All patients were evaluated with detailed history and physical examination. Complete blood count, serum iron and iron binding capacity were studied; cardiological (telecardiography, electrocardiography, if necessary echocardiography and event recorder and neurological investigations (electroencephalography were done during the admission. Patients with iron deficiency anemia and iron deficiency were treated with ferrous sulphate orally. In patients with normal hematological values, no medication was used. After a two-month treatment period patients underwent control hematological evaluation. Frequency of the spells, age of disappearance of spells (defined as 6 months without spells, disappearance ratios between the three groups were compared. Results: The percentage of cyanotic, palloric and mixt type of breath holding spells of 70 patients included in the study were 67.1, 14.3 and 18.6, respectively. It was determined that psychogenic factors played a role in 77.1% of our patients. There were iron deficiency anemia in 39 (55.7%, iron deficiency in 12 (17.2% and normal hematological parameters in 19 (27.1% of 70 patients. The QTc values were normal in all of them. EEG’s were normal in 56 (80%, dysrhythmic in 11 (15.7% and pathologic in (4.3%. There was a positive family history of breath holding spells in 44.3% of those with breath holding spells. Conclusion: We determined that there was a correlation between the iron levels and the frequency of spells. The lower the iron levels the higher the frequency of spells. There was a dramatic decrease of 92% in spells with low doses of iron supplementation especially in the anemic group. (Journal of

  17. PNH revisited: Clinical profile, laboratory diagnosis and follow-up

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    Gupta P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is characterized by intravascular hemolysis, marrow failure, nocturnal hemoglobinuria and thrombophila. This acquired disease caused by a deficiency of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchored proteins on the hematopoietic cells is uncommon in the Indian population. Materials and Methods: Data of patients diagnosed with PNH in the past 1 year were collected. Clinical data (age, gender, various presenting symptoms, treatment information and follow-up data were collected from medical records. Results of relevant diagnostic tests were documented i.e., urine analysis, Ham′s test, sucrose lysis test and sephacryl gel card test (GCT for CD55 and CD59. Results: A total of 5 patients were diagnosed with PNH in the past 1 year. Presenting symptoms were hemolytic anemia (n=4 and bone marrow failure (n=1. A GCT detected CD59 deficiency in all erythrocytes in 4 patients and CD55 deficiency in 2 patients. A weak positive PNH test for CD59 was seen in 1 patient and a weak positive PNH test for CD55 was seen in 3 patients. All patients were negative by sucrose lysis test. Ham′s test was positive in two cases. Patients were treated with prednisolone and/or androgen and 1 patient with aplastic anemia was also given antithymocyte globulin. A total of 4 patients responded with a partial recovery of hematopoiesis and 1 patient showed no recovery. None of the patients received a bone marrow transplant. Conclusion: The study highlights the diagnostic methods and treatment protocols undertaken to evaluate the PNH clone in a developing country where advanced methods like flowcytometry immunophenotyping (FCMI and bone marrow transplants are not routinely available.

  18. STUDY OF CLINICAL AND LABORATORY PROFILE OF MALARIA

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    Vishwanath

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Malaria is a major health concern across the world and is endemic in our country. It is imperative for us to know the varied manifestations and lab features both classically described and rare features for early detection of this disease and further treatment. This study was undertaken to study the clinical features, lab features and complications of malaria in a tertiary care centre. METHODOLOGY: It is a retrospective study done on 75 cases of confirmed and treated cases of malaria for a period of one year in KIMS hospital, Bangalore. Detailed history examination and lab features of these patients were recorded and analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 75 cases of confirmed malaria were treated during study period of which 57[76%] were males Out of 75 cases 46[61%] had vivax malaria infection, 10[13%] had falciparum infection and 19[26%] had mixed infections of falciparum and vivax. In all 3 groups more number of cases was seen in age group of 18 – 40 years. fever was the major presentation (100% in the patients and Pain abdomen along with fever seen in 15 [20%] patients. Head ache was another predominant complaint in 35[46.6%] On examination Icterus was seen in 11 [14.6%] patients Pallor was seen in 13[17.3%] patients Systolic BP of 2ULN was seen in 9[12%] patients Out of these 6[8%] patients had severe malaria as defined by WHO category of severe malaria. CONCLUSIONS: Being more vigilant and well versed with the varied presentations/lab features of malaria and anticipating complications early, effective treatment can be instituted thus reducing the morbidity and mortality of this endemic disease.

  19. Effects of clinical practice environments on clinical teacher and nursing student outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babenko-Mould, Yolanda; Iwasiw, Carroll L; Andrusyszyn, Mary-Anne; Laschinger, Heather K S; Weston, Wayne

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to use a cross-sectional survey design, with an integrated theoretical perspective, to examine clinical teachers' (n = 64) and nursing students' (n = 352) empowerment, teachers' and students' perceptions of teachers' use of empowering teaching behaviors, students' perceptions of nurses' practice behaviors, and students' confidence for practice in acute care settings. In this study, teachers and students were moderately empowered. Teachers reported using a high level of empowering teaching behaviors, which corresponded with students' perceptions of teachers' use of such behaviors. Teachers' empowerment predicted 21% of their use of empowering teaching behaviors. Students reported nurses as using a high level of professional practice behaviors. Students felt confident for professional nursing practice. The findings have implications for practice contexts related to empowering teaching-learning environments and self-efficacy.

  20. International Society for Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) flow cytometry shared resource laboratory (SRL) best practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsky, Lora W; Black, Michele; Cochran, Matthew; Daniel, Benjamin J; Davies, Derek; DeLay, Monica; Gardner, Rui; Gregory, Michael; Kunkel, Desiree; Lannigan, Joanne; Marvin, James; Salomon, Robert; Torres, Carina; Walker, Rachael

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this document is to define minimal standards for a flow cytometry shared resource laboratory (SRL) and provide guidance for best practices in several important areas. This effort is driven by the desire of International Society for the Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) members in SRLs to define and maintain standards of excellence in flow cytometry, and act as a repository for key elements of this information (e.g. example SOPs/training material, etc.). These best practices are not intended to define specifically how to implement these recommendations, but rather to establish minimal goals for an SRL to address in order to achieve excellence. It is hoped that once these best practices are established and implemented they will serve as a template from which similar practices can be defined for other types of SRLs. Identification of the need for best practices first occurred through discussions at the CYTO 2013 SRL Forum, with the most important areas for which best practices should be defined identified through several surveys and SRL track workshops as part of CYTO 2014. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  1. Figures in clinical trial reports: current practice & scope for improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travison Thomas G

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most clinical trial publications include figures, but there is little guidance on what results should be displayed as figures and how. Purpose To evaluate the current use of figures in Trial reports, and to make constructive suggestions for future practice. Methods We surveyed all 77 reports of randomised controlled trials in five general medical journals during November 2006 to January 2007. The numbers and types of figures were determined, and then each Figure was assessed for its style, content, clarity and suitability. As a consequence, guidelines are developed for presenting figures, both in general and for each specific common type of Figure. Results Most trial reports contained one to three figures, mean 2.3 per article. The four main types were flow diagram, Kaplan Meier plot, Forest plot (for subgroup analyses and repeated measures over time: these accounted for 92% of all figures published. For each type of figure there is a considerable diversity of practice in both style and content which we illustrate with selected examples of both good and bad practice. Some pointers on what to do, and what to avoid, are derived from our critical evaluation of these articles' use of figures. Conclusion There is considerable scope for authors to improve their use of figures in clinical trial reports, as regards which figures to choose, their style of presentation and labelling, and their specific content. Particular improvements are needed for the four main types of figures commonly used.

  2. Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines for the Molecular Diagnosis of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome During an Outbreak in Korea in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ki, Chang Seok; Lee, Hyukmin; Sung, Heungsup; Kim, Sinyoung; Seong, Moon Woo; Yong, Dongeun; Kim, Jae Seok; Lee, Mi Kyung; Kim, Mi Na; Choi, Jong Rak; Kim, Jeong Ho

    2016-05-01

    For two months between May and July 2015, a nationwide outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) occurred in Korea. On June 3, 2015, the Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine (KSLM) launched a MERS-CoV Laboratory Response Task Force (LR-TF) to facilitate clinical laboratories to set up the diagnosis of MERS-CoV infection. Based on the WHO interim recommendations, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of United States guidelines for MERS-CoV laboratory testing, and other available resources, the KSLM MERS-CoV LR-TF provided the first version of the laboratory practice guidelines for the molecular diagnosis of MERS-CoV to the clinical laboratories on June 12, 2015. The guidelines described here are an updated version that includes case definition, indications for testing, specimen type and protocols for specimen collection, specimen packing and transport, specimen handling and nucleic acid extraction, molecular detection of MERS-CoV, interpretation of results and reporting, and laboratory safety. The KSLM guidelines mainly focus on the molecular diagnosis of MERS-CoV, reflecting the unique situation in Korea and the state of knowledge at the time of publication.

  3. [From classificational medicine to clinical medicine (the end of the XVIII century to 1870s). Communication 3. The second stage of clinical medicine development: introduction of methods of laboratory experiment and chemical analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stochik, A M; Zatravkin, S N

    2011-01-01

    The article concerns the end stage of clinical medicine establishment covering the period from early 1840s to the middle 1870s of the XIX century. Basic scientific achievements related to introduction into practical medicine of the methods of laboratory experiment and chemical analysis are reviewed.

  4. Identifying the Clinical Laboratory Tests from Unspecified "Other Lab Test" Data for Secondary Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xuequn; Cimino, James J

    2015-01-01

    Clinical laboratory results are stored in electronic health records (EHRs) as structured data coded with local or standard terms. However, laboratory tests that are performed at outside laboratories are often simply labeled "outside test" or something similar, with the actual test name in a free-text result or comment field. After being aggregated into clinical data repositories, these ambiguous labels impede the retrieval of specific test results. We present a general multi-step solution that can facilitate the identification, standardization, reconciliation, and transformation of such test results. We applied our approach to data in the NIH Biomedical Translational Research Information System (BTRIS) to identify laboratory tests, map comment values to the LOINC codes that will be incorporated into our Research Entities Dictionary (RED), and develop a reference table that can be used in the EHR data extract-transform-load (ETL) process.

  5. 2011 Clinical Practice Guidelines for Type 2 Diabetes in Korea

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    Seung-Hyun Ko

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available As in other countries, type 2 diabetes is major health concern in Korea. A dramatic increase in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and its chronic complications has led to an increase in health costs and economic burdens. Early detection of high risk individuals, hidden diabetic patients, and improvement in the quality of care for the disease are the first steps to mitigate the increase in prevalence. The Committee of Clinical Practice Guidelines of the Korean Diabetes Association revised and updated the '3rd Clinical Practice Guidelines' at the end of 2010. In the guidelines, the committee recommended active screening of high risk individuals for early detection and added the hemoglobin A1c level to the diagnostic criteria for type 2 diabetes based on clinical studies performed in Korea. Furthermore, the committee members emphasized that integrating patient education and self-management is an essential part of care. The drug treatment algorithm based on the degree of hyperglycemia and patient characteristics were also updated.

  6. The importance of Good Clinical Practice guidelines and its role in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayananthan, A; Nawawi, O

    2008-01-01

    Good Clinical Practice (GCP) is an international ethical and scientific quality standard for the design, conduct, performance, monitoring, auditing, recording, analyses and reporting of clinical trials. It also serves to protect the rights, integrity and confidentiality of trial subjects. It is very important to understand the background of the formation of the ICH-GCP guidelines as this, in itself, explains the reasons and the need for doing so. In this paper, we address the historical background and the events that led up to the formation of these guidelines. Today, the ICH-GCP guidelines are used in clinical trials throughout the globe with the main aim of protecting and preserving human rights.

  7. Preferred information sources for clinical practice by nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figen Çalışkan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the knowledge sources that nurses working in inpatient treatment institutions use in their practices. It is inevitable for nurses to base their nursing practices on evidence from knowledge sources in order to improve the quality of nursing care. In this context, it is necessary for the nurses to gain skill in using knowledge sources effectively during their basic education and to further develop this skill after graduation in order provide qualified and safe care. This study utilised descriptive design. The study sample consisted of 296 nurses who work in general training and research hospitals that serve in all regions of Istanbul and are subsidiary to the Ministry of Health. A demographic questionnaire and a Knowledge Source Scale for nurses were used for data collection. Data were analysed with Cruncher Statistical System (NCSS 2007&2008 Statistical Software (Utah USA package programme. The following figures are from the demographic questionnaires: mean age of study participants, 31.69±6.03 years; females, 91.6%; married, 65.2%; bachelor’s degree, 39.9%; worked in surgical units, 56.8%; and worked as clinic nurse, 74.7%. One of the main knowledge sources used in nursing practice is the knowledge acquired in nursing school. Basic nursing education plays an ongoing role as a source of practice knowledge. These knowledge sources should be renewed and updated with continuing education courses or short-term training programs. This research can be used to guide development of continuing education programs and underscores the sources of knowledge about general nursing practice. This study can serve as an impetus to further study the use and highlight education needs of practicing nurses.

  8. [Akita University Graduate School of Medicine: status of clinical laboratory medicine education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Wataru; Chihara, Junichi

    2010-03-01

    Education in laboratory medicine is important. However, many medical students and doctors cannot understand this importance. This problem may be caused by the unclear character of laboratory medicine in research as well as hospital work, resulting in a lack of staff in the Department of Laboratory Medicine. One of the characters of laboratory medicine is its all-inclusive actions unrestrained by medical specialty. Thus, we tell medical students that the staff of laboratory medicine are suitable members of the infection control team (ICT) and nutrition support team (NST) in lectures. Moreover, we also teach allergy, immunology, infection, and sex-specific medicine, which are some subjects the topics of research. Many students in Akita University recognize that the staff of the Department of Laboratory Medicine are specialists of infection and allergy. On the other hand, young doctors can also receive postgraduate clinical training and conduct research not restricted to allergy and infection. We have a policy whereby the Department of Laboratory Medicine always opens its door widely to everyone including students and doctors. Nine staff joined the Department of Laboratory Medicine of Akita University about ten years, and now, can fully provide students with medical education. To solve some problems regarding education in laboratory medicine, we should promote our roles in medical education as well as in hospitals, and increase the number of staff.

  9. Clinical ethics and values: how do norms evolve from practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spranzi, Marta

    2013-02-01

    Bioethics laws in France have just undergone a revision process. The bioethics debate is often cast in terms of ethical principles and norms resisting emerging social and technological practices. This leads to the expression of confrontational attitudes based on widely differing interpretations of the same principles and values, and ultimately results in a deadlock. In this paper I would like to argue that focusing on values, as opposed to norms and principles, provides an interesting perspective on the evolution of norms. As Joseph Raz has convincingly argued, "life-building" values and practices are closely intertwined. Precisely because values have a more indeterminate meaning than norms, they can be cited as reasons for action by concerned stakeholders, and thus can help us understand how controversial practices, e.g. surrogate motherhood, can be justified. Finally, norms evolve when the interpretations of the relevant values shift and cause a change in the presumptions implicit in the norms. Thus, norms are not a prerequisite of the ethical solution of practical dilemmas, but rather the outcome of the decision-making process itself. Struggling to reach the right decision in controversial clinical ethics situations indirectly causes social and moral values to change and principles to be understood differently.

  10. [General Strategies for Implementation of Clinical Practice Guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela-Flores, Adriana Abigail; Viniegra-Osorio, Arturo; Torres-Arreola, Laura Laura

    2015-01-01

    The need to use clinical practice guidelines (CPG) arises from the health conditions and problems that public health institutions in the country face. CPG are informative documents that help improve the quality of care processes and patient safety; having among its objectives, to reduce the variability of medical practice. The Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social designed a strategic plan for the dissemination, implementation, monitoring and control of CPG to establish an applicable model in the medical units in the three levels of care at the Instituto. This paper summarizes some of the strategies of the plan that were made with the knowledge and experience of clinicians and managers, with which they intend to promote the adoption of the key recommendations of the guidelines, to promote a sense of belonging for health personnel, and to encourage changes in organizational culture.

  11. Rufinamide from clinical trials to clinical practice in the United States and Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Trevor; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Brown, Lawrence W; Flamini, Robert; Kerr, Michael; Kluger, Gerhard; Kothare, Sanjeev; Philip, Sunny; Harrison, Miranda; Narurkar, Milind

    2011-05-01

    Rufinamide is a triazole derivative structurally unrelated to other antiepileptic drugs that is indicated for the adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) in patients aged ≥4 years. Originally granted orphan drug status, marketing authorisation was obtained on the basis of a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial conducted in 138 LGS patients. An open-label extension study subsequently demonstrated that rufinamide's efficacy and tolerability were maintained over the longer term (median duration of treatment, 432 days). Recently published reports from Europe and the United States have described the use of adjunctive rufinamide to treat LGS in clinical practice. These data complement the clinical trial results, by providing information on the efficacy and tolerability of rufinamide when used on an individualised basis in real-world practice, under less tightly restricted conditions in terms of patient population and dosing strategies. A comparison of the data reveals that a "lower and slower" dosing strategy tends to be adopted in clinical practice, in comparison with the clinical trial, which does not appear to compromise efficacy, but may provide improvements in tolerability. Individual case reports provide additional valuable information on how rufinamide is being used to treat different seizure types associated with LGS. Since clinical experience with rufinamide is currently at an early stage, there are still unanswered questions relating to its use, and it is likely that its place in the adjunctive treatment of LGS will evolve as further data emerge.

  12. Ten practical, theory-based tips for clinical course planners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, T.; Westphall, I.; Blichfeldt, S.

    2008-01-01

    A list of practical advice and examples are given based on the literature. E-learning with cliffhanger text-cases can activate prior knowledge, and selected examination skills can be trained with simulated patients. Patient video recordings can be used to train clinical reasoning skills, including...... pattern recognition and hypothetic-deductive approaches. Interactive approaches, for example, questioning, quizzes or buzz groups imply active involvement and participation. Quizzes and MCQ-testing can provide a formative 'check-up' on learning and point to gaps in understanding for the teachers...

  13. Grounded theory for radiotherapy practitioners: Informing clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, N.A., E-mail: Nadia.Walsh@gstt.nhs.u [Medical Physics Department, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, St Thomas' Hospital, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-15

    Radiotherapy practitioners may be best placed to undertake qualitative research within the context of cancer, due to specialist knowledge of radiation treatment and sensitivity to radiotherapy patient's needs. The grounded theory approach to data collection and analysis is a unique method of identifying a theory directly based on data collected within a clinical context. Research for radiotherapy practitioners is integral to role expansion within the government's directive for evidence-based practice. Due to the paucity of information on qualitative research undertaken by radiotherapy radiographers, this article aims to assess the potential impact of qualitative research on radiotherapy patient and service outcomes.

  14. Scandinavian clinical practice guidelines on general anaesthesia for emergency situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gadegaard Jensen, Anders; Callesen, T; Hagemo, J S;

    2010-01-01

    Emergency patients need special considerations and the number and severity of complications from general anaesthesia can be higher than during scheduled procedures. Guidelines are therefore needed. The Clinical Practice Committee of the Scandinavian Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care...... Medicine appointed a working group to develop guidelines based on literature searches to assess evidence, and a consensus meeting was held. Consensus opinion was used in the many topics where high-grade evidence was unavailable. The recommendations include the following: anaesthesia for emergency patients...

  15. Antiplatelet agents and Anticoagulants: from pharmacology to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoumani, Maria E; Tselepis, Alexandros D

    2017-01-24

    Thrombosis is the formation of potentially deadly blood clots in the artery (arterial thrombosis) or vein (venous thrombosis). Since thrombosis is one of the main causes of death worldwide, the development of antithrombotic agents is a global medical priority. They are subdivided into antiplatelet agents and anticoagulants. Antiplatelet agents inhibit clot formation by preventing platelet activation and aggregation, while anticoagulants primarily inhibit the coagulation cascade and fibrin formation. Therapeutics within each category differs with respect to the mechanism of action, time to onset, duration of effect and route of administration. In this review, we critically discuss their main pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic characteristics as well as recent advances in daily clinical practice.

  16. Do evidence-based guidelines change clinical practice patterns?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Erngaard, Ditte; Flesner, Per;

    2017-01-01

    In 2013, the Danish Health and Medicines Authorities published a National Clinical Guideline on the treatment of age-related cataracts. The guideline provided evidence-based recommendations on the indication for cataract surgery, cataract surgery in patients with age-related macular degeneration...... sequential bilateral cataract surgery and on the postoperative check-up of patients. A questionnaire was sent to all members of the Danish Ophthalmological Society before and after publication of the guideline. The responses showed that the guideline had changed practice patterns so that surgeons were more...

  17. Relevance of guideline-based ICD indications to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jefairi, Nora; Burri, Haran

    2014-01-01

    The implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) has established itself as life-saving therapy in patients at risk for sudden cardiac death. Remarkable technological advances have made ICDs easier and safer to implant, with improved therapeutic and diagnostic functions and reduced morbidity. Guidelines on ICD indications have been proposed by American and European scientific societies since a number of years, based upon trials and expert opinion. In the context of variable economic and political constraints, it is questionable whether these guidelines may be applied to all settings. This review discusses the guideline-based indications, critically examines their applicability to clinical practice, and discusses alternatives to ICD therapy.

  18. Experience of isolated sleep paralysis in clinical practice in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohaeri, J U

    1992-06-01

    The supernatural fears associated with the experience of isolated sleep paralysis in the culture of developing countries is sometimes associated with the evolution of somatic symptoms of psychological origin in patients predisposed to neurotic illness. Patients rarely spontaneously volunteer these fears and doctors pay them scant attention. Illustrative case histories that demonstrate the dynamics of the clinical presentation, as well as the treatment approach, are highlighted. It is hoped that doctors in general medical practice and in psychological medicine in developing countries where belief in supernatural causation of illness is rife will consider these factors in order to provide more effective treatment.

  19. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Valvular Prostheses Dysfunction Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lázaro De la Cruz Avilés

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Valve Prostheses Dysfunction Treatment. The introduction of an artificial valve allows improving life quality and expectancy of an important number of patients and can be considered a common treatment within advanced heart valve disease. However, persons with this kind of prosthesis usually present another disease caused by the potential complications associated with the uses of anti-clotting medications. This document includes the different classifications of artificial heart valves and different kinds of dysfunctions, and updates those aspects related with treatment stressing the appropriate behaviour when valve or prosthesis thrombosis occurs. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  20. Challenges and promises for translating computational tools into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Woo-Young; Busemeyer, Jerome R

    2016-10-01

    Computational modeling and associated methods have greatly advanced our understanding of cognition and neurobiology underlying complex behaviors and psychiatric conditions. Yet, no computational methods have been successfully translated into clinical settings. This review discusses three major methodological and practical challenges (A. precise characterization of latent neurocognitive processes, B. developing optimal assays, C. developing large-scale longitudinal studies and generating predictions from multi-modal data) and potential promises and tools that have been developed in various fields including mathematical psychology, computational neuroscience, computer science, and statistics. We conclude by highlighting a strong need to communicate and collaborate across multiple disciplines.

  1. Implementation of External Quality Assessment Scheme in Clinical Chemistry for District Laboratories in Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamtsho, Rixin; Nuchpramool, Wilairat

    2012-07-01

    External Quality Assessment Scheme (EQAS) involves evaluation of a number of laboratories by an outside agency on the performance of a number of laboratories based on their analytical performance of tests on samples supplied by the external agency. In developing countries, establishment of national EQAS by preparing homemade quality control material is a useful scheme in terms of resources and time to monitor the laboratory performance. The objective of this study is to implement an EQAS to monitor the analytical performance of the district laboratories in Bhutan. Baseline information was collected through questionnaires. Lyophilized human serum including normal and abnormal levels were prepared and distributed to 19 participating laboratories. Nine routine analytes were included for the study. Their results were evaluated using Variance index scores (VIS) and Coefficient of variations (CV) was compared with Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act (CLIA) Proficiency Testing Criteria (PT) for each analyte. There was significant decrease in CV at the end of the study. The percentages of results in acceptable VIS as 'A' were 63, 60, 66, 69, 73 and 74, 75, 76 and 79 % in November 2009-July 2010 respectively. From our results, we concluded that, establishment of EQAS through distribution of home-made quality control material could be the useful scheme to monitor the laboratory performance in clinical chemistry in Bhutan.

  2. Clinical uses of the medicinal leech: A practical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B S Porshinsky

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The medicinal leech, Hirudo medicinalis, is an excellent example of the use of invertebrates in the treatment of human disease. Utilized for various medical indications since the ancient times, the medicinal leech is currently being used in a narrow range of well-defined and scientifically-grounded clinical applications. Hirudotherapy is most commonly used in the setting of venous congestion associated with soft tissue replantations and free flap-based reconstructive surgery. This is a comprehensive review of current clinical applications of hirudotherapy, featuring a comprehensive search of all major medical search engines (i.e. PubMed, Google Scholar, ScientificCommons and other cross-referenced sources. The authors focus on indications, contraindications, practical application/handling of the leech, and therapy-related complications.

  3. Curvature affects Doppler investigation of vessels: implications for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbis, S; Roatta, S; Guiot, C

    2005-01-01

    In clinical practice, blood velocity estimations from Doppler examination of curved vascular segments are normally different from those of nearby straight segments. The observed "accelerations," sometimes considered as a sort of stochastic disturbances, can actually be related to very specific physical effects due to vessel curvature (i.e., the development of nonaxial velocity [NAV] components) and the spreading of the axial velocity direction in the Doppler sample volume with respect to the insonation axis. The relevant phenomena and their dependence on the radius of curvature of the vessels and on the insonation angle are investigated with a beam-vessel geometry as close as possible to clinical setting, with the simplifying assumptions of steady flow, mild vessel curvature, uniform ultrasonic beam and complete vessel insonation. The insonation angles that minimize the errors are provided on the basis of the study results.

  4. From asthma severity to control: a shift in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren

    2009-01-01

    Variability is a characteristic feature of asthma, and the aim of asthma management is to eliminate or minimise disease variability. Controlled asthma shows little or no variability, and is achievable and sustainable in the majority of patients. New international guidelines recommend control...... involves the control of several outcomes. Its assessment should include components relevant to achievement of best possible clinical control and reduction of future risk of adverse outcomes. Focusing on a single or a few outcomes can lead to incorrect control assessment and increased risk of under......-treatment. Several validated asthma control assessment tools have been developed to facilitate correct assessment of the level of control in clinical practice. It is hoped that focusing on control will reduce the frequency of sub-optimal treatment in the primary care setting. Further validation of the best way...

  5. A JAVA-based multimedia tool for clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maojo, V; Herrero, C; Valenzuela, F; Crespo, J; Lazaro, P; Pazos, A

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a specific language for the representation of Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) and Windows C++ and platform independent JAVA applications for multimedia presentation and edition of electronically stored CPGs. This approach facilitates translation of guidelines and protocols from paper to computer-based flowchart representations. Users can navigate through the algorithm with a friendly user interface and access related multimedia information within the context of each clinical problem. CPGs can be stored in a computer server and distributed over the World Wide Web, facilitating dissemination, local adaptation, and use as a reference element in medical care. We have chosen the Agency for Health Care and Policy Research's heart failure guideline to demonstrate the capabilities of our tool.

  6. Effects of healing touch in clinical practice: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Joel G; Taylor, Ann Gill

    2011-09-01

    Hands-on healing and energy-based interventions have been found in cultures throughout history around the world. These complementary therapies, rooted in ancient Eastern healing practices, are becoming mainstream. Healing Touch, a biofield therapy that arose in the nursing field in the late 1980s, is used in a variety of settings (i.e., pain centers, surgical settings, and private practices) with reported benefits (i.e., decreased anxiety, pain, and depressive behaviors; increased relaxation and a sense of well-being). However, clinical trial data concerning the effectiveness of Healing Touch have not been evaluated using a systematic, evidence-based approach. Thus, this systematic review is aimed at critically evaluating the data from randomized clinical trials examining the clinical efficacy of Healing Touch as a supportive care modality for any medical condition.

  7. Scientific biography, cognitive deficits, and laboratory practice. James McKeen Cattell and early American experimental psychology, 1880-1904.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokal, Michael M

    2010-09-01

    Despite widespread interest in individual life histories, few biographies of scientists make use of insights derived from psychology, another discipline that studies people, their thoughts, and their actions. This essay argues that recent theoretical work in psychology and tools developed for clinical psychological practice can help biographical historians of science create and present fuller portraits of their subjects' characters and temperaments and more nuanced analyses of how these traits helped shape their subjects' scientific work. To illustrate this thesis, the essay examines the early career of James McKeen Cattell--an influential late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century experimental psychologist--through a lens offered by psychology and argues that Cattell's actual laboratory practices derived from an "accommodation" to a long-standing "cognitive deficit." These practices in turn enabled Cattell to achieve more precise experimental results than could any of his contemporaries; and their students readily adopted them, along with their behavioral implications. The essay concludes that, in some ways, American psychology's early twentieth-century move toward a behavioral understanding of psychological phenomena can be traced to Cattell's personal cognitive deficit. It closes by reviewing several "remaining general questions" that this thesis suggests.

  8. Comparative genomic hybridization: technical development and cytogenetic aspects for routine use in clinical laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapierre, J M; Cacheux, V; Da Silva, F; Collot, N; Hervy, N; Wiss, J; Tachdjian, G

    1998-01-01

    Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) offers a new global approach for detection of chromosomal material imbalances of the entire genome in a single experiment without cell culture. In this paper, we discuss the technical development and the cytogenetic aspects of CGH in a clinical laboratory. Based only on the visual inspection of CGH metaphase spreads, the correct identification of numerical and structural anomalies are reported. No commercial image analysis software was required in these experiments. We have demonstrated that this new technology can be set up easily for routine use in a clinical cytogenetics laboratory.

  9. Unannounced in situ simulations: integrating training and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Susanna T; Sevdalis, Nick; McKay, Anthony; Lambden, Simon; Gautama, Sanjay; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Vincent, Charles

    2013-06-01

    Simulation-based training for healthcare providers is well established as a viable, efficacious training tool, particularly for the training of non-technical team-working skills. These skills are known to be critical to effective teamwork, and important in the prevention of error and adverse events in hospitals. However, simulation suites are costly to develop and releasing staff to attend training is often difficult. These factors may restrict access to simulation training. We discuss our experiences of 'in situ' simulation for unannounced cardiac arrest training when the training is taken to the clinical environment. This has the benefit of decreasing required resources, increasing realism and affordability, and widening multidisciplinary team participation, thus enabling assessment and training of non-technical team-working skills in real clinical teams. While there are practical considerations of delivering training in the clinical environment, we feel there are many potential benefits compared with other forms of simulation training. We are able to tailor the training to the needs of the location, enabling staff to see a scenario that is relevant to their practice. This is particularly useful for staff who have less exposure to cardiac arrest events, such as radiology staff. We also describe the important benefit of risk assessment for a clinical environment. During our simulations we have identified a number of issues that, had they occurred during a real resuscitation attempt, may have led to patient harm or patient death. For these reasons we feel in situ simulation should be considered by every hospital as part of a patient safety initiative.

  10. Study of Clinical Practical Model of Urinary System Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In order to improve the clinical treatment level of urinary system injury, it is necessary to build up an animal model of urinary system wound, which is not only analogous to real clinical practice, but also simple and practical. Methods: We have developed the third generation of firearm fragment wound generator based on the first and the second producer. The best explosive charge of the blank cartridge was selected by gradient powder loading experiments. The firearm fragment injuries were made to the bulbous urethra of 10 New Zealand male rabbits. One week preoperatively and 2, 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively, all the animals underwent urethroscopy and urethrography. At 2, 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively, two animals were randomly selected and killed, and the urethra was cut off for pathological examination. Results: The shooting distance of the third generation of firearm fragment wound generator is 2 cm. The best explosive charge of the blank cartridge is 1 g of nitrocotton. All rabbits survived the procedures and stayed alive until they were killed. Injuries were limited to bulbous urethra and distal urethra. Round damaged areas, 1-1.5 cm in length, on the ventral wall were observed. Ureteroscopy results showed that canal diameter gradually shrank by over 50% in 9 rabbits. The rate of success was 90%. Urethrography result noted that a 1-1.3 cm stricture was formed at the bulbous urethra. Histology results of injured stricture urethra showed that fibrous connective tissue hyperplasia and hyaline degeneration caused further stricture in the canal. Conclusions: The third generation of firearm fragment wound generator imitates the bullet firing process and is more accurate and repeatable. The corresponding rabbit model of traumatic complex urethral stricture simulates the real complex clinical conditions. This animal model provides a standardized platform for clinical researches on treating traumatic injuries to the urinary system.

  11. Designing a clinical skills training laboratory with focus on video for better learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik Hein; Toftgård, Rie Castella; Nørgaard, Cita

    of the skills training laboratory was made. The principles included video in different instructional designs: 1. Teacher-produced video podcasts 2. Group work using video 3. Formative assessment using video 4. Practicing skills using video Each principle was described using a template focusing on (a) objectives...

  12. Computer validation in toxicology: historical review for FDA and EPA good laboratory practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodish, D L

    1998-01-01

    The application of computer validation principles to Good Laboratory Practice is a fairly recent phenomenon. As automated data collection systems have become more common in toxicology facilities, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have begun to focus inspections in this area. This historical review documents the development of regulatory guidance on computer validation in toxicology over the past several decades. An overview of the components of a computer life cycle is presented, including the development of systems descriptions, validation plans, validation testing, system maintenance, SOPs, change control, security considerations, and system retirement. Examples are provided for implementation of computer validation principles on laboratory computer systems in a toxicology facility.

  13. Person-centric clinical trials: an opportunity for the good clinical practice (GCP)-practice-based research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curro, Frederick A; Robbins, Dennis A; Millenson, Michael L; Fox, Chester H; Naftolin, Frederick

    2013-10-01

    Practice-based research networks (PBRNs) can function as a platform for delivery of patient-centered care consistent with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Patient-centered (centric) clinical studies encourage the patient to be an integral part of study design and outcome. The patient's electronic health record contributes to the shared national health care data set. PBRNs integrate health care data in real time at the point of care and reflect the full context of the person's health. PBRNs designed under the principles of good clinical practice (GCP) validate studies related to comparative effectiveness research and drug development. PBRNs can generate large amounts of data from known patient histories so that side effects can be assessed in their totality. The larger and more diverse number of patients recruited suggests that point-of-care-data, where both provider and patient participate in the treatment, may be more robust in that side effects, drug-drug interactions and number of concomitant medications used may be identified earlier in the development process. The GCP PBRN concept affords continuous patient information for both care and research purposes. These all contribute to an ethical approach for the pharmaceutical industry to generate clinical research data for regulatory submission and to contribute to a HIPAA-compliant national database that could contribute to improved health care delivery and pharmacovigilance.

  14. Clinical pharmacy practice in developing countries: Focus on India and Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Akshaya Srikanth Bhagavathula; Barun Ranjan Sarkar; Isha Patel

    2014-01-01

    Clinical pharmacy practice is undergoing unprecedented changes as standard profession of pharmacy practice by means of pharmaceutical care. Although, the clinical pharmacy is well recognized in developed countries, but the implementation of clinical pharmacy practice is still at nascent stage in developing countries. Hence, this article is focused on the variations in implementation of clinical pharmacy education and practice in developing countries, specially focusing on highly populous coun...

  15. Practical Bioremediation Course – Laboratory Exercises on Biodegradation of Cationic Surfactant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Ivankovic

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available 0 From the perspective of the lab exercises leader and teaching assistant for the Bioremediation course, it was very difficult to design and conduct a set of exercises that would fit the course curriculum and satisfactorily demonstrate bioremediation basics through practical laboratory work. Thus, Bioremediation course students designed the experiment with the help of the teaching assistant; a simulation of possible bioremediation of “Jarun” lake in Zagreb, Croatia, if contaminated with cationic surfactant. The experiment nicely showed how natural bioremediation differs from engineered bioremediation and the levels of success between different types of engineered bioremediation. The laboratory exercises were designed to be interesting and the results perceivable to the students.  Editor's Note:The ASM advocates that students must successfully demonstrate the ability to explain and practice safe laboratory techniques. For more information, read the laboratory safety section of the ASM Curriculum Recommendations: Introductory Course in Microbiology and the Guidelines for Biosafety in Teaching Laboratories, available at www.asm.org. The Editors of JMBE recommend that adopters of the protocols included in this article follow a minimum of Biosafety Level 2 practices. Normal 0 21 false false false HR X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Cambria","serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  16. [Investigation on HPV DNA detection and genotyping practices used in French laboratories in 2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, Isabelle; Favre, Michel; Fihman, Valentine

    2011-01-01

    The French National reference Laboratory for Human papillomavirus (HPV) performed in 2009 a national study in order to review the methods used to detect and identify HR HPV genotypes in microbiology laboratories. Results from this study show a great diversity in volumes of samples treated in laboratories. Among clinical indications, the most frequent is a result of ASC-US at a Pap smear. This indication in the only one covered by the National Public Insurance System and is mostly performed in laboratories from private sector. Other indications mainly correspond to research programs and are performed in public Hospitals. This study allowed also to review the adequacy between the liquid based cytology samples and the assays used for direct detection of HR HPV or identification of the genotypes present in the sample. The right tests were not carried in the right solution storage according to the recommendations from different HPV testing assays. National recommendations should be elaborated in order to improve the performance of the test used.

  17. Pressure Ulcers in Adults: Prediction and Prevention. Clinical Practice Guideline Number 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    This package includes a clinical practice guideline, quick reference guide for clinicians, and patient's guide to predicting and preventing pressure ulcers in adults. The clinical practice guideline includes the following: overview of the incidence and prevalence of pressure ulcers; clinical practice guideline (introduction, risk assessment tools…

  18. [Still the social factor: crisis in the clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzano, Fernando J

    2014-01-01

    Consultations in our hospital center are problematic, mainly due to the poor living situation which patients come from (the suburbs of Buenos Aires). The housing situation, the environment and the economic or political conditions of these patients frame "the social" emergency that sets the context and the impact in the different psychopathological symptoms that they present. These conditions should also be reviewed from our theoretical assessment together with the clinical approach that our assistance practice studies. From a perception viewpoint we observe that "self-perception is far from any ideals. The perception of their environment is threatening and has no future". We constantly note the loss of the value of words and speech, when we hear our patients, wo have turned language into just an abject joy, as in the word of the addict. These issues must be studied from a theoretical point of view to be applied clinically. Such analysis reveals that our practice takes place in a context of failure. However, we cannot move backwards in "potential treatment" as Lacan states in the ethics as regards psychosis.

  19. Usefulness of Rajka & Langeland Eczema Severity Score in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gånemo, Agneta; Svensson, Åke; Svedman, Cecilia; Grönberg, Britt-Marie; Johansson, Ann-Charlotte Öhman; Wahlgren, Carl-Fredrik

    2016-05-01

    Simple, validated eczema severity scores are required for the evaluation of interventions. The Rajka & Langeland (R&L) scale is based on 3 domains (extent, course, and intensity); however, its validity is not yet confirmed. The aim of this study was to investigate the quality aspects of the R&L scale in clinical practice. In the first part of the study, experts and consumers judged the content validity of the scale. The second part of the study was performed with 87 children during a 4-month eczema school. Construct validity, internal consistency, sensitivity to change, time consumption and health-related quality of life variables were investigated. The content of the R&L scale was considered valid by 45 panellists. Inter- and intra-observer reliability was very good. Divergent construct validity was adequate, while convergent construct validity and internal consistency were inadequate. The R&L scale was able to define a significant improvement in eczema during the eczema school. The time required for completing the R&L assessment was significantly shorter than for objective Severity Scoring of Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD). The R&L scale is a simple, fast, valid, reliable and sensitive tool for scoring of atopic dermatitis in everyday clinical practice.

  20. The prevalence of adrenal incidentaloma in routine clinical practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davenport, Colin

    2011-03-10

    The prevalence of adrenal incidentaloma (AI) on computed tomography (CT) in the general population has been reported to be as high as 4.2%. However, many of the previous studies in this field utilised a prospective approach with analysis of CT scans performed by one or more radiologists with a specialist interest in adrenal tumours and a specific focus on identifying the presence of an adrenal mass. A typical radiology department, with a focus on the patient\\'s presenting complaint as opposed to the adrenal gland, may not be expected to diagnose as many adrenal incidentalomas as would be identified in a dedicated research protocol. We hypothesised that the number of AI reported in routine clinical practice is significantly lower than the published figures would suggest. We retrospectively reviewed the reports of all CT thorax and abdomen scans performed in our hospital over a 2 year period. 3,099 patients underwent imaging, with 3,705 scans performed. The median age was 63 years (range 18-98). Thirty-seven true AI were diagnosed during the time period studied. Twenty-two were diagnosed by CT abdomen (22\\/2,227) and 12 by CT thorax (12\\/1,478), a prevalence of 0.98 and 0.81% with CT abdomen and thorax, respectively, for AI in routine clinical practice.

  1. The prevalence of adrenal incidentaloma in routine clinical practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davenport, Colin

    2012-02-01

    The prevalence of adrenal incidentaloma (AI) on computed tomography (CT) in the general population has been reported to be as high as 4.2%. However, many of the previous studies in this field utilised a prospective approach with analysis of CT scans performed by one or more radiologists with a specialist interest in adrenal tumours and a specific focus on identifying the presence of an adrenal mass. A typical radiology department, with a focus on the patient\\'s presenting complaint as opposed to the adrenal gland, may not be expected to diagnose as many adrenal incidentalomas as would be identified in a dedicated research protocol. We hypothesised that the number of AI reported in routine clinical practice is significantly lower than the published figures would suggest. We retrospectively reviewed the reports of all CT thorax and abdomen scans performed in our hospital over a 2 year period. 3,099 patients underwent imaging, with 3,705 scans performed. The median age was 63 years (range 18-98). Thirty-seven true AI were diagnosed during the time period studied. Twenty-two were diagnosed by CT abdomen (22\\/2,227) and 12 by CT thorax (12\\/1,478), a prevalence of 0.98 and 0.81% with CT abdomen and thorax, respectively, for AI in routine clinical practice.

  2. Laboratory projects using inquiry-based learning: an application to a practical inorganic course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José G. Carriazo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports how laboratory projects (LP coupled to inquiry-based learning (IBL were implemented in a practical inorganic chemistry course. Several coordination compounds have been successfully synthesised by students according to the proposed topics by the LP-IBL junction, and the chemistry of a number of metals has been studied. Qualitative data were collected from written reports, oral presentations, lab-notebook reviews and personal discussions with the students through an experimental course with undergraduate second-year students at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia during the last 5 years. Positive skills production was observed by combining LP and IBL. Conceptual, practical, interpretational, constructional (questions, explanations, hypotheses, communicational, environmental and application abilities were revealed by the students throughout the experimental course.

  3. Design of a Flexible Hardware Interface for Multiple Remote Electronic practical Experiments of Virtual Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Said

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to present a new design of a Flexible Hardware Interface (FHI based on PID control techniques to use in a virtual laboratory. This flexible hardware interface allows the easy implementation of different and multiple remote electronic practical experiments for undergraduate engineering classes. This interface can be viewed as opened hardware architecture to easily develop simple or complex remote experiments in the electronic domain. The philosophy of the use of this interface can also be expanded to many other domains as optic experiments for instance. It is also demonstrated that software can be developed to enable remote measurements of electronic circuits or systems using only Web site Interface. Using standard browsers (such as Internet explorer, Firefox, Chrome or Safari, different students can have a remote access to different practical experiments at a time.

  4. Practical guidelines for setting up neurosurgery skills training cadaver laboratory in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Suri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Though the necessity of cadaver dissection is felt by the medical fraternity, and described as early as 600 BC, in India, there are no practical guidelines available in the world literature for setting up a basic cadaver dissection laboratory for neurosurgery skills training. Hands-on dissection practice on microscopic and endoscopic procedures is essential in technologically demanding modern neurosurgery training where ethical issues, cost constraints, medico-legal pitfalls, and resident duty time restrictions have resulted in lesser opportunities to learn. Collaboration of anatomy, forensic medicine, and neurosurgery is essential for development of a workflow of cadaver procurement, preservation, storage, dissection, and disposal along with setting up the guidelines for ethical and legal concerns.

  5. Measles Outbreak in Macedonia: Epidemiological, Clinical and Laboratory Findings and Identification of Susceptible Cohorts

    OpenAIRE

    Irena T Kondova; Zvonko Milenkovic; Sanja P Marinkovic; Golubinka Bosevska; Gordana Kuzmanovska; Goran Kondov; Sonja Alabakovska; Muller, Claude P.; Hübschen, Judith M

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Despite a 92-99% national vaccination coverage since 2000, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia experienced a large measles outbreak between 2010 and 2011. Here we investigate the characteristics of patients hospitalized during this outbreak at the Clinic of Infectious Diseases in Skopje. METHODS: Epidemiological, clinical and laboratory data of 284 measles patients, including 251 from Skopje (43.80% of the 573 reported cases) and 33 from elsewhere in Macedonia were collected...

  6. Clinical Practice of Steroid Avoidance in Pediatric Kidney Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehus, E; Liu, C; Hooper, D K; Macaluso, M; Kim, M-O

    2015-08-01

    Steroid-avoidance protocols have recently gained popularity in pediatric kidney transplantation. We investigated the clinical practice of steroid avoidance among 9494 kidney transplant recipients at 124 transplant centers between 2000 and 2012 in the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network database. The practice of steroid avoidance increased during the study period and demonstrated significant variability among transplant centers. From 2008 to 2012, 39% of transplant centers used steroid avoidance in avoidance in 10-40% of transplant recipients, and 40% of transplant centers used steroid avoidance in >40% of discharged patients. Children receiving steroid avoidance more frequently received induction with lymphocyte-depleting agents. Repeat kidney transplants were the least likely to receive steroid avoidance. Children who received a deceased donor kidney, underwent pretransplant dialysis, were highly sensitized, or had glomerular kidney disease or delayed graft function were also less likely to receive steroid avoidance. The variation in practice between centers remained highly significant (p avoidance among transplant centers remain unexplained and may reflect uncertainty about the safety and efficacy of steroid-avoidance protocols.

  7. Incorporating new materials and techniques into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, N B; Drummond, J; Guggenberger, R; Ferrillo, P; Johnston, S

    2013-11-01

    This article outlines the subjects presented and discussed at the December 2012 IADR Dental Materials Innovation Workshop held at King's College London. Incorporating new materials and techniques into clinical practice was considered from 4 perspectives: (1) Accelerating the "research to regulatory approval" process was presented with current developments in the United States, with the National Institutes of Health/Food and Drug Administration process as a working example; (2) intellectual property and regulatory requirements were discussed across the well-established US and EU frameworks, as well as the more recently developed procedures across Brazil, Russia, India, and China; (3) the challenges and opportunities of incorporating innovations into dental education were considered with reference to the future needs of both students and faculty; and (4) the key but difficult and unpredictable step of translating such innovations into routine dental practice was then explored. Constructive and far-ranging discussion among the broadly based Workshop participants (from dental research, education, practice, and industry, as well as environmental organizations and the World Health Organization) mapped out key issues for the future. The focus was on facilitating the more timely adoption of improvements in both materials and techniques to improve patient health and health systems, while minimizing environmental impact.

  8. What impact does anatomy education have on clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Claire France; Mathias, Haydn Socrates

    2011-01-01

    There is continuing debate regarding doctors' knowledge of anatomy as an appropriate preparation for professional practice. This exploratory case study examined alumni's experiences of learning anatomy. The aim was to inform curriculum development and to gain a better understanding of how anatomy knowledge is applied in practice. A total of 140 medical student alumni from the University of Southampton participated in this study (49% males, 51% females). Participants completed a Likert scale questionnaire with free comment sections. Descriptive results found that: using cadaveric material was an effective way of learning anatomy; assessment was a major motivator; and around half of students forgot a lot of anatomy but that knowledge came back easily. Statistical analysis revealed associations between certain positive and negative factors in learning. Links were also seen with current job role, revealing that those who responded to positive factors were involved in careers which involved a great deal of anatomy and vice versa. To facilitate learning, anatomy should be taught throughout the curriculum and use human cadavers. Relating knowledge to practice requires transformation of knowledge and is best facilitated by the learning being situated in clinical contexts.

  9. Clinical symptoms and laboratory findings supporting early diagnosis of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafavi, Ehsan; Pourhossein, Behzad; Chinikar, Sadegh

    2014-07-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a zoonotic disease, which is usually transmitted to humans by tick bites or contact with blood or other infected tissues of livestock. Patients suffering from CCHF demonstrate an extensive spectrum of clinical symptoms. As it can take considerable time from suspecting the disease in hospital until reaching a definitive diagnosis in the laboratory, understanding the clinical symptoms and laboratory findings of CCHF patients is of paramount importance for clinicians. The data were collected from patients who were referred to the Laboratory of Arboviruses and Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers at the Pasteur institute of Iran with a primary diagnosis of CCHF between 1999 and 2012 and were assessed by molecular and serologic tests. Referred patients were divided into two groups: patients with a CCHF positive result and patients with a CCHF negative result. The laboratory and clinical findings of these two groups were then compared. Two-thousand five hundred thirty-six probable cases of CCHF were referred to the laboratory, of which 871 cases (34.3%) were confirmed to be CCHF. Contact with infected humans and animals increased the CCHF infection risk (P important role in patient survival and the application of the findings of this study can prove helpful as a key for early diagnosis.

  10. Incorporation of pharmacogenomics into routine clinical practice: the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) guideline development process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudle, Kelly E; Klein, Teri E; Hoffman, James M; Muller, Daniel J; Whirl-Carrillo, Michelle; Gong, Li; McDonagh, Ellen M; Sangkuhl, Katrin; Thorn, Caroline F; Schwab, Matthias; Agundez, Jose A G; Freimuth, Robert R; Huser, Vojtech; Lee, Ming Ta Michael; Iwuchukwu, Otito F; Crews, Kristine R; Scott, Stuart A; Wadelius, Mia; Swen, Jesse J; Tyndale, Rachel F; Stein, C Michael; Roden, Dan; Relling, Mary V; Williams, Marc S; Johnson, Samuel G

    2014-02-01

    The Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) publishes genotype-based drug guidelines to help clinicians understand how available genetic test results could be used to optimize drug therapy. CPIC has focused initially on well-known examples of pharmacogenomic associations that have been implemented in selected clinical settings, publishing nine to date. Each CPIC guideline adheres to a standardized format and includes a standard system for grading levels of evidence linking genotypes to phenotypes and assigning a level of strength to each prescribing recommendation. CPIC guidelines contain the necessary information to help clinicians translate patient-specific diplotypes for each gene into clinical phenotypes or drug dosing groups. This paper reviews the development process of the CPIC guidelines and compares this process to the Institute of Medicine's Standards for Developing Trustworthy Clinical Practice Guidelines.

  11. Obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI): Canada's national clinical practice guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coroneos, Christopher J; Voineskos, Sophocles H; Christakis, Marie K; Thoma, Achilleas; Bain, James R; Brouwers, Melissa C

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to establish an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the primary management of obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI). This clinical practice guideline addresses 4 existing gaps: (1) historic poor use of evidence, (2) timing of referral to multidisciplinary care, (3) Indications and timing of operative nerve repair and (4) distribution of expertise. Setting The guideline is intended for all healthcare providers treating infants and children, and all specialists treating upper extremity injuries. Participants The evidence interpretation and recommendation consensus team (Canadian OBPI Working Group) was composed of clinicians representing each of Canada's 10 multidisciplinary centres. Outcome measures An electronic modified Delphi approach was used for consensus, with agreement criteria defined a priori. Quality indicators for referral to a multidisciplinary centre were established by consensus. An original meta-analysis of primary nerve repair and review of Canadian epidemiology and burden were previously completed. Results 7 recommendations address clinical gaps and guide identification, referral, treatment and outcome assessment: (1) physically examine for OBPI in newborns with arm asymmetry or risk factors; (2) refer newborns with OBPI to a multidisciplinary centre by 1 month; (3) provide pregnancy/birth history and physical examination findings at birth; (4) multidisciplinary centres should include a therapist and peripheral nerve surgeon experienced with OBPI; (5) physical therapy should be advised by a multidisciplinary team; (6) microsurgical nerve repair is indicated in root avulsion and other OBPI meeting centre operative criteria; (7) the common data set includes the Narakas classification, limb length, Active Movement Scale (AMS) and Brachial Plexus Outcome Measure (BPOM) 2 years after birth/surgery. Conclusions The process established a new network of opinion leaders and researchers for further

  12. Laboratory Practicals. A New Approach to its Use as an Organizational Form of the Teaching Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Cecilia Williams Serrano

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Economic actions against Cuba since the 90´s have had a negative impact on laboratory practicals in the Basic Sciences, leading to changes in the curriculum. This paper reviews the feasibility of rescuing and improving such activities related to the Physiology content inserted in the discipline of Morphophysiology. The objective was to identify the Physiology content to be taught in the practicals and define the means and innovations necessary to complete them. The practicals that can be carried out with the available means are presented and characterized. It is concluded that the exercises and topics covered in the practicals coincide with the Physiology content corresponding to Morphophysiology I, III, V and VI and that they can be carried out with the existing resources as well as other innovated by the authors. This way of proceeding saves resources by replacing media or reagents and leads to more effective learning, plus better preparation of teachers to meet the challenges posed by the curriculum D.

  13. Clinical practice guidelines in pediatric and newborn medicine: implications for their use in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, T A; Palmer, D; Bergman, D A; Shiono, P H

    1997-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are becoming pervasive in pediatrics and newborn medicine. They have spanned a wide range of primary care practice parameters from treating otitis media with effusion, to performing complex surgery for congenital heart disease, and management of respiratory distress syndrome and coordinating discharge from the neonatal intensive care unit. Administrators believe that using clinical practice parameters reduces health care costs, improves quality of care, and limits malpractice liability. Practice parameters and guidelines have grown in use because powerful interests-third-party payers, insurers, and health maintenance organizations, as well as hospital administrators bent on reducing variable costs of care and contracting for capitated care-champion their development, implementation, and monitoring. Economic credentialing of physicians with excessive variances without risk-adjusting for other than average patients is problematic and remains unchecked partly because of the fundamental characteristics of the evolving health care industry in which costs are more easily measured than quality. For highly autonomus physicians this standardization of medical decision making may represent a difficult transition into corporate practice by realigning traditional values of the doctor-patient relationship. However, because guidelines are almost certainly here to stay, pediatricians and neonatologists need to think critically about how their content and method of implementation, monitoring, and modification may influence medical teaching and decision making in the future. If guidelines are introduced primarily as a cost savings or containment tool that ignores the impact on the quality of care and restricts necessary care for infants and children, especially those with chronic illness or who are developmentally at risk, then neonatologists and pediatricians must be quick and determined to challenge the potentially damaging use of practice parameters

  14. Bridging the gap between clinical failure and laboratory fracture strength tests using a fractographic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aboushelib, M.N.; Feilzer, A.J.; Kleverlaan, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze and to compare the fracture type and the stress at failure of clinically fractured zirconia-based all ceramic restorations with that of morphologically similar replicas tested in a laboratory setup. Methods: Replicas of the same shape and dimensions we

  15. The value of clinical and laboratory diagnostics for chest pain patients at the emergency department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jellema, Laurens-Jan C.; Backus, Barbra E.; Six, A. Jacob; Braam, Richard; Groenemeijer, Bjorn; van der Zaag-Loonen, Hester J.; Tio, Rene; van Suijlen, Jeroen D. E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The focus during the diagnostic process for patients with acute chest pain is to discriminate patients who can be safely discharged from those who are at risk for an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). In this study the diagnostic value of the clinical examination is compared with laboratory

  16. The role of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in the clinical laboratory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Ouweland, Johannes M. W.; Kema, Ido P.

    2012-01-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) is increasingly used as a routine methodology in clinical laboratories for the analysis of low molecular weight molecules. The high specificity in combination with high sensitivity and multi-analyte potential makes it an attractive comple

  17. 76 FR 38342 - Medicare Program; Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule: Signature on Requisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-30

    ...; Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule: Signature on Requisition AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services... calendar year 2011 Physician Fee Schedule final rule with comment period that requires the signature of a... the prior policy that the signature of a physician or qualified non-physician practitioner is...

  18. Examination of the specific clinical symptoms and laboratory findings of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cetin Kilinc

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusion: It was inferred that certain clinical symptoms and laboratory findings such as fever, headache, widespread body pain, fatigue, leucopenia, nausea, vomiting, high CK levels, thrombocytopenia, AST/ ALT elevation and elevated LDH levels are highly specific and are required to be considered in the definitive diagnosis of CCHF, particularly in regions where this infection is observed as endemic.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of sacroiliitis in early seronegative spondylarthropathy. Abnormalities correlated to clinical and laboratory findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puhakka, K B; Jurik, A G; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare a new MRI scoring system of the sacroiliac joints (SIJs) in early spondylarthropathy (SpA) with clinical and laboratory parameters. METHODS: Forty-one patients (24 males, 17 females) with a median age of 26 yr and a median duration of inflammatory low back pain of 19 months...

  20. Clinical and laboratory findings of 97 pediatric brucellosis patients in central Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoldas, Tamer; Tezer, Hasan; Ozkaya-Parlakay, Aslinur; Sayli, Tulin Revide

    2015-08-01

    Brucellosis is a disease transmitted to humans by consumption of unpasteurized animal milk, or through direct contact with infected animals. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical, laboratory findings of pediatric patients with brucellosis. Data of 97 patients diagnosed with brucellosis between January 2000 and December 2010 were evaluated retrospectively.