WorldWideScience

Sample records for clinical laboratory information systems

  1. Specialized Laboratory Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangott, Bryan

    2016-03-01

    Some laboratories or laboratory sections have unique needs that traditional anatomic and clinical pathology systems may not address. A specialized laboratory information system (LIS), which is designed to perform a limited number of functions, may perform well in areas where a traditional LIS falls short. Opportunities for specialized LISs continue to evolve with the introduction of new testing methodologies. These systems may take many forms, including stand-alone architecture, a module integrated with an existing LIS, a separate vendor-supplied module, and customized software. This article addresses the concepts underlying specialized LISs, their characteristics, and in what settings they are found. PMID:26851663

  2. Customized laboratory information management system for a clinical and research leukemia cytogenetics laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, Sonal R; Shukla, Shilin N; Shah, Pankaj M

    2009-01-01

    We developed a Microsoft Access-based laboratory management system to facilitate database management of leukemia patients referred for cytogenetic tests in regards to karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The database is custom-made for entry of patient data, clinical details, sample details, cytogenetics test results, and data mining for various ongoing research areas. A number of clinical research laboratoryrelated tasks are carried out faster using specific "queries." The tasks include tracking clinical progression of a particular patient for multiple visits, treatment response, morphological and cytogenetics response, survival time, automatic grouping of patient inclusion criteria in a research project, tracking various processing steps of samples, turn-around time, and revenue generated. Since 2005 we have collected of over 5,000 samples. The database is easily updated and is being adapted for various data maintenance and mining needs. PMID:19252256

  3. INFORMATION SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY (ISTL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Background: The Naval Automated Information Laboratory (NAIL), consisting of Navy legacy and transitional systems, was established to emulate a typical command for...

  4. Integrated clinical information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brousseau, G

    1995-01-01

    SIDOCI (Système Informatisé de DOnnées Cliniques Intégrées) is a Canadian joint venture introducing newly-operating paradigms into hospitals. The main goal of SIDOCI is to maintain the quality of care in todayUs tightening economy. SIDOCI is a fully integrated paperless patient-care system which automates and links all information about a patient. Data is available on-line and instantaneously to doctors, nurses, and support staff in the format that best suits their specific requirements. SIDOCI provides a factual and chronological summary of the patient's progress by drawing together clinical information provided by all professionals working with the patient, regardless of their discipline, level of experience, or physical location. It also allows for direct entry of the patient's information at the bedside. Laboratory results, progress notes, patient history and graphs are available instantaneously on screen, eliminating the need for physical file transfers. The system, incorporating a sophisticated clinical information database, an intuitive graphical user interface, and customized screens for each medical discipline, guides the user through standard procedures. Unlike most information systems created for the health care industry, SIDOCI is longitudinal, covering all aspects of the health care process through its link to various vertical systems already in place. A multidisciplinary team has created a clinical dictionary that provides the user with most of the information she would normally use: symptoms, signs, diagnoses, allergies, medications, interventions, etc. This information is structured and displayed in such a manner that health care professionals can document the clinical situation at the touch of a finger. The data is then encoded into the patient's file. Once encoded, the structured data is accessible for research, statistics, education, and quality assurance. This dictionary complies with national and international nomenclatures. It also

  5. Laboratory information management system proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, B.; Schweitzer, S.; Adams, C.; White, S. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of this paper is design a user friendly information management system using a relational database in order to: allow customers direct access to the system; provide customers with direct sample tracking capabilities; provide customers with more timely, consistent reporting; better allocate costs for analyses to appropriate customers; eliminate cumbersome and costly papertrails; and enhance facility utilization by laboratory personnel. The resultant savings through increased efficiency provided by this system should more than offset its cost in the long-term.

  6. Laboratory information management system proposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, B.; Schweitzer, S.; Adams, C.; White, S. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1992-08-01

    The objectives of this paper is design a user friendly information management system using a relational database in order to: allow customers direct access to the system; provide customers with direct sample tracking capabilities; provide customers with more timely, consistent reporting; better allocate costs for analyses to appropriate customers; eliminate cumbersome and costly papertrails; and enhance facility utilization by laboratory personnel. The resultant savings through increased efficiency provided by this system should more than offset its cost in the long-term.

  7. Organizational innovation and the laboratory information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, B A; Mitchell, W

    1990-01-01

    There is an urgent need for more innovation in health care and in clinical laboratories. Innovation can be divided into five separate categories: core products, components of the core products, production processes, uses of products, and the organization of production. Organizational innovation is an important as technological advances in increasing the quality and efficiency of clinical laboratories. The use of a laboratory information system (LIS) can stimulate organizational innovation such as the assignment of computer-oriented tasks to personnel within individual clinical laboratories. The authors refer to such LIS support personnel as "hidden personnel" and suggest that such a shift of responsibility empowers laboratory professionals and makes them stakeholders in automated information processing.

  8. [International standardization of laboratory information systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigami, T

    1997-06-01

    The standardization of clinical laboratory information systems is one of the most difficult but important subjects for clinical laboratory community and laboratorians. International Standard Organization (ISO) has the projects in this field (JTC1/SC7) which is the part of approach to the international laboratory standardization (ISO/TC 212). US NCCLS and European CEN/TC 251 are working under ISO/TC 212. In the United States, the National Academy for Clinical Biochemistry (NACB) and the American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) had started recently to organize the international collaboration program on the subject. The Japan Society of Clinical Pathology (JSCP)'s Council of Laboratory Informatics had joined this program in 1995. NACB/AACC's Ad Hoc Committee which was organized in 1996 is now trying to collect the general opinions ("what and how") through their internet home page. The current status of the works on the standardization of clinical laboratory information systems in the U.S., Europe, and Japan is reviewed briefly in this article. HL7 electronic data exchange specification and clinical testing coding systems such as LOINC coding project and JSCP's coding project are also reviewed. PMID:9306712

  9. Laboratory Information Systems Management and Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucoranu, Ioan C

    2015-06-01

    The main mission of a laboratory information system (LIS) is to manage workflow and deliver accurate results for clinical management. Successful selection and implementation of an anatomic pathology LIS is not complete unless it is complemented by specialized information technology support and maintenance. LIS is required to remain continuously operational with minimal or no downtime and the LIS team has to ensure that all operations are compliant with the mandated rules and regulations.

  10. Information features laboratory information system «Uranium»

    OpenAIRE

    Zyablitsev, S. V.; Novoselskaya, V. V.; Chernobrivtsev, P. A.

    2013-01-01

    Determined the importance of the implementation of laboratory information system in the laboratory, the main principles of information on the characteristics of the laboratory information system «URANIUM».

  11. Clinical Information Support System (CISS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Clinical Information Support System (CISS) is a web-based portal application that provides a framework of services for the VA enterprise and supplies an integration...

  12. Laboratory automation in clinical bacteriology: what system to choose?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxatto, A; Prod'hom, G; Faverjon, F; Rochais, Y; Greub, G

    2016-03-01

    Automation was introduced many years ago in several diagnostic disciplines such as chemistry, haematology and molecular biology. The first laboratory automation system for clinical bacteriology was released in 2006, and it rapidly proved its value by increasing productivity, allowing a continuous increase in sample volumes despite limited budgets and personnel shortages. Today, two major manufacturers, BD Kiestra and Copan, are commercializing partial or complete laboratory automation systems for bacteriology. The laboratory automation systems are rapidly evolving to provide improved hardware and software solutions to optimize laboratory efficiency. However, the complex parameters of the laboratory and automation systems must be considered to determine the best system for each given laboratory. We address several topics on laboratory automation that may help clinical bacteriologists to understand the particularities and operative modalities of the different systems. We present (a) a comparison of the engineering and technical features of the various elements composing the two different automated systems currently available, (b) the system workflows of partial and complete laboratory automation, which define the basis for laboratory reorganization required to optimize system efficiency, (c) the concept of digital imaging and telebacteriology, (d) the connectivity of laboratory automation to the laboratory information system, (e) the general advantages and disadvantages as well as the expected impacts provided by laboratory automation and (f) the laboratory data required to conduct a workflow assessment to determine the best configuration of an automated system for the laboratory activities and specificities. PMID:26806135

  13. [Knowledge management system for laboratory work and clinical decision support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Masanori; Sato, Mayumi; Yoneyama, Akiko

    2011-05-01

    This paper discusses a knowledge management system for clinical laboratories. In the clinical laboratory of Toranomon Hospital, we receive about 20 questions relevant to laboratory tests per day from medical doctors or co-medical staff. These questions mostly involve the essence to appropriately accomplish laboratory tests. We have to answer them carefully and suitably because an incorrect answer may cause a medical accident. Up to now, no method has been in place to achieve a rapid response and standardized answers. For this reason, the laboratory staff have responded to various questions based on their individual knowledge. We began to develop a knowledge management system to promote the knowledge of staff working for the laboratory. This system is a type of knowledge base for assisting the work, such as inquiry management, laboratory consultation, process management, and clinical support. It consists of several functions: guiding laboratory test information, managing inquiries from medical staff, reporting results of patient consultation, distributing laboratory staffs notes, and recording guidelines for laboratory medicine. The laboratory test information guide has 2,000 records of medical test information registered in the database with flexible retrieval. The inquiry management tool provides a methos to record all questions, answer easily, and retrieve cases. It helps staff to respond appropriately in a short period of time. The consulting report system treats patients' claims regarding medical tests. The laboratory staffs notes enter a file management system so they can be accessed to aid in clinical support. Knowledge sharing using this function can achieve the transition from individual to organizational learning. Storing guidelines for laboratory medicine will support EBM. Finally, it is expected that this system will support intellectual activity concerning laboratory work and contribute to the practice of knowledge management for clinical work support

  14. [Knowledge management system for laboratory work and clinical decision support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Masanori; Sato, Mayumi; Yoneyama, Akiko

    2011-05-01

    This paper discusses a knowledge management system for clinical laboratories. In the clinical laboratory of Toranomon Hospital, we receive about 20 questions relevant to laboratory tests per day from medical doctors or co-medical staff. These questions mostly involve the essence to appropriately accomplish laboratory tests. We have to answer them carefully and suitably because an incorrect answer may cause a medical accident. Up to now, no method has been in place to achieve a rapid response and standardized answers. For this reason, the laboratory staff have responded to various questions based on their individual knowledge. We began to develop a knowledge management system to promote the knowledge of staff working for the laboratory. This system is a type of knowledge base for assisting the work, such as inquiry management, laboratory consultation, process management, and clinical support. It consists of several functions: guiding laboratory test information, managing inquiries from medical staff, reporting results of patient consultation, distributing laboratory staffs notes, and recording guidelines for laboratory medicine. The laboratory test information guide has 2,000 records of medical test information registered in the database with flexible retrieval. The inquiry management tool provides a methos to record all questions, answer easily, and retrieve cases. It helps staff to respond appropriately in a short period of time. The consulting report system treats patients' claims regarding medical tests. The laboratory staffs notes enter a file management system so they can be accessed to aid in clinical support. Knowledge sharing using this function can achieve the transition from individual to organizational learning. Storing guidelines for laboratory medicine will support EBM. Finally, it is expected that this system will support intellectual activity concerning laboratory work and contribute to the practice of knowledge management for clinical work support.

  15. Laboratory Information Management System Chain of Custody: Reliability and Security

    OpenAIRE

    Radosta, T.; W. Elliott-Smith; J. J. Tomlinson

    2006-01-01

    A chain of custody (COC) is required in many laboratories that handle forensics, drugs of abuse, environmental, clinical, and DNA testing, as well as other laboratories that want to assure reliability of reported results. Maintaining a dependable COC can be laborious, but with the recent establishment of the criteria for electronic records and signatures by US regulatory agencies, laboratory information management systems (LIMSs) are now being developed to fully automate COCs. The extent of a...

  16. Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharda AM

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory Information System (LIS streamlines workflow in the laboratory and eliminates timeconsumingpaperwork. The business today is getting increasingly pressured to be more productive andefficient with less traditional resources. If we look at a typical production process, for instance, the levelof automation and optimization that has permeated into the production floor is quite astounding. Manyindustries have had a tremendous impact in bringing to the market the automation and optimizationsolutions to streamline -the production floor. The other ends of the spectrum are the back-officetransaction oriented processes like Inventory Management, Materials Management, Financials and soon, Therefore a lab’s ability to process data quickly and its ability to disseminate that informationefficiently throughout the plant is vital for the success of the production process. Laboratory InformationManagement System (LIMS can help in managing the information flow within the lab and can be themodus operandi of connecting the lab with the rest of the organization. For instance, imagine all theinformation that is generated in a lab.

  17. Mining of hospital laboratory information systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søeby, Karen; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup; Werge, Thomas;

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: The knowledge of physiological fluctuation and variation of even commonly used biochemical quantities in extreme age groups and during development is sparse. This challenges the clinical interpretation and utility of laboratory tests in these age groups. To explore the utilit...

  18. [The analytical reliability of clinical laboratory information and role of the standards in its support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men'shikov, V V

    2012-12-01

    The article deals with the factors impacting the reliability of clinical laboratory information. The differences of qualities of laboratory analysis tools produced by various manufacturers are discussed. These characteristics are the causes of discrepancy of the results of laboratory analyses of the same analite. The role of the reference system in supporting the comparability of laboratory analysis results is demonstrated. The project of national standard is presented to regulate the requirements to standards and calibrators for analysis of qualitative and non-metrical characteristics of components of biomaterials.

  19. [Development of laboratory information system--quality standards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srenger, Vesna; Stavljenić-Rukavina, Ana; Cvorisćec, Dubravka; Brkljacić, Vera; Rogić, Dunja; Juricić, Ljiljana

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine structural modules of laboratory information system (LIS) for the application of new biomedical and information technologies by utilizing current organizational trends. The method used included definition of structural modules according to significant LIS properties, e.g., a large number of data, automation of analyses and rapid exchange of information, and according to the process of information establishment the collection, organization, selection, synthesis and distribution. Thus, outdated distributed software at the Clinical Institute of Laboratory Diagnosis has now been replaced by modular organization. Modules have been developed for the following: data input, online operation of laboratory instruments, preparation of results, compilation of medical documentation on quality assurance based on the application of quality standards, management of finances, and for point of care testing. The method of re-engineering as well as adherence to EN and ISO quality standards were utilized in planning the development of LIS based on the application of new information technologies and in shaping business processes. The application of re-engineering in LIS development results in quality improvement, reduces the cost and time necessary for performance of procedures, and improves relations in organizational structure.

  20. The aging of a clinical information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, Roy; Finley, Scott

    2004-10-01

    The senescence of a clinical information system is more likely to have administrative than technical bases. Supporting this claim is a case study of one aging oncology information system. The case study is qualitative, as behooves the subject matter. Content analysis of several documents suggests that the change in job description of the data coordinator led to a workflow breakdown. Next, twenty-two individuals were interviewed. Notes from the interviews were coded, and the resulting patterns led to partial support for the workflow breakdown conjecture, refutation of the hypothesis that users disliked the character-based, human-computer interface, support of the conjecture that political rather than technical factors drive the usage patterns of the system, and evidence that 'political' activity will determine the future of the information system. A stakeholder matrix is proposed that addresses administrative concerns. Also, the issue of the uniqueness of any oncology clinical information system is linked to the plans for this legacy system. PMID:15488746

  1. Horizontal and vertical integration in hospital laboratories and the laboratory information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, B A; Mitchell, W

    1990-09-01

    An understanding of horizontal and vertical integration and their quasi-integration variants is important for pathologists to formulate a competitive strategy for hospital clinical laboratories. These basic organizational concepts, in turn, are based on the need to establish control over critical laboratory inputs and outputs. The pathologist seeks greater control of mission-critical system inputs and outputs to increase the quality and efficiency of the laboratory operations. The LIS produces horizontal integration of the various hospital laboratories by integrating them vertically. Forward vertical quasi-integration of the laboratories is mediated primarily by the LIS through front-end valued-added features such as reporting of results and creating a long-term on-line test result archive. These features increase the value of the information product of pathology for clinicians and increase the cost of switching to another system. The LIS can also serve as a means for customizing the information product of the laboratories to appeal to new market segments such as hospital administrators.

  2. User requirements on the future laboratory information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brender, J; McNair, P

    1996-07-01

    Today numerous information technology solutions exist for the clinical laboratory which operate either as stand-alone functionalities or with ad hoc integration solutions. The OpenLabs (A2028) AIM Project puts emphasis on the design and specification of a framework for the interoperability of existing systems and new advanced services, and consequently concentrates on the issue of integration. The purpose of the OpenLabs open architecture is to serve as a functional solution to this integration. A basic principle for this open architecture is that each of the advanced services shall be able to function individually or in any combination with an existing Laboratory Information System (LIS), and that it shall enable new modular functionalities to be incorporated in a 'plug-and-play' fashion. The synthesis of the main user needs and requirements implies that the future IT solutions: (a) must be highly flexible and maximally customizable--by the users themselves; (b) are based on the concept of open systems, both technically and functionally, which enables modular functionalities from different vendors to co-operate forming a global LIS functionality; (c) are future viable and able to incorporate already installed IT functionalities; (d) support management of failure prevention, of repair, of success, and of change. The establishment of an open architecture implies that a market will develop for modular, scaleable, and cost-effective LIS features without today's dependence on individual manufacturers and hardware/software platforms. PMID:8875016

  3. Washington Clinical Laboratory Initiative: a vision for collaboration and strategic planning for an integrated laboratory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counts, J M

    2001-01-01

    This article addresses the importance of public health, hospital, and clinical laboratories in the role of patient care, disease prevention, and surveillance. It also focuses on the coordination and planning that needs to take place between these institutions in order to develop a more cost-effective and responsive laboratory delivery system. The Washington Clinical Laboratory Initiative is an innovative state initiative illustrating that coordinated and integrated strategic planning of public and private sector laboratories can be accomplished within a state. It also has increased interaction, collaboration, and communication between health practitioners, health plans, hospitals, laboratories, government agencies, and academicians. This accomplishment has enabled the establishment of public policy concerning laboratory reimbursement and development of standards of laboratory practice. PMID:11299913

  4. Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS): A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, Karen S.; Auping, Judith V.; Megargle, Robert G.

    1987-01-01

    In the late 70's, a refurbishment of the analytical laboratories serving the Materials Division at NASA Lewis Research Center was undertaken. As part of the modernization efforts, a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) was to be included. Preliminary studies indicated a custom-designed system as the best choice in order to satisfy all of the requirements. A scaled down version of the original design has been in operation since 1984. The LIMS, a combination of computer hardware, provides the chemical characterization laboratory with an information data base, a report generator, a user interface, and networking capabilities. This paper is an account of the processes involved in designing and implementing that LIMS.

  5. All-ceramic systems: laboratory and clinical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guess, Petra C; Schultheis, Stefan; Bonfante, Estevam A; Coelho, Paulo G; Ferencz, Jonathan L; Silva, Nelson R F A

    2011-04-01

    Several all-ceramic systems have been developed in dentistry to meet the increased expectations of patients and dentists for highly aesthetic, biocompatible, and long-lasting restorations. However, early bulk fractures or chippings have led the research community to investigate the mechanical performance of the all-ceramic systems. This overview explores the current knowledge of monolithic and bilayer dental all-ceramic systems, addressing composition and processing mechanisms, laboratory and clinical performance, and possible future trends for all-ceramic materials. PMID:21473997

  6. 78 FR 60245 - Privacy Act Systems of Records; LabWare Laboratory Information Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    ... Office of the Secretary Privacy Act Systems of Records; LabWare Laboratory Information Management System... is the LabWare Laboratory Information Management System, USDA-APHIS-19. This notice is necessary to... (USDA) is proposing to add a new system of records, entitled LabWare Laboratory Information...

  7. Building a Laboratory Information Management System Using Windows4GL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickens, M.A.; Shaieb, M.R.

    1996-05-01

    The system discussed is currently implemented at LLNL in the Environmental Services program which operates out of the Chemistry & Materials Science (C&MS) directorate. Responsibility is to provide the C&MS Environmental Services (CES) program with an enterprise-wide information system which will aid CES. The specific portion of the information system is the Sample Tracking, Analysis and Reporting System (STARS). Since CES was formed by merging two analytical laboratory organizations in May 1995, a new Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) had to be developed. The development of a LIMS in Windows4GL was found to be satisfactory. The product STARS was well received by the user community, and it has improved business practices and efficiency in CES. The CES management staff has seen increased personnel productivity since STARS was release. We look forward to upgrading to CA-OpenROAD and taking advantage of its many improved and innovative features to further enhance STARS.

  8. Quality Management Systems in the Clinical Laboratories in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzon, Alba C

    2015-11-01

    The implementation of management systems in accordance with standards like ISO 9001:2008 (1,2) in the clinical laboratories has conferred and added value of reliability and therefore a very significant input to patient safety. As we know the ISO 9001:2008 (1) a certification standard, and ISO 15189:2012 (2) an accreditation standard, both, at the time have generated institutional memory where they have been implemented, the transformation of culture focused on correct execution, control and following, evidence needed and the importance of register.

  9. Quality Management Systems in the Clinical Laboratories in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of management systems in accordance with standards like ISO 9001:2008 (1,2) in the clinical laboratories has conferred and added value of reliability and therefore a very significant input to patient safety. As we know the ISO 9001:2008 (1) a certification standard, and ISO 15189:2012 (2) an accreditation standard, both, at the time have generated institutional memory where they have been implemented, the transformation of culture focused on correct execution, control and following, evidence needed and the importance of register. PMID:27683495

  10. Quality Management Systems in the Clinical Laboratories in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzon, Alba C

    2015-11-01

    The implementation of management systems in accordance with standards like ISO 9001:2008 (1,2) in the clinical laboratories has conferred and added value of reliability and therefore a very significant input to patient safety. As we know the ISO 9001:2008 (1) a certification standard, and ISO 15189:2012 (2) an accreditation standard, both, at the time have generated institutional memory where they have been implemented, the transformation of culture focused on correct execution, control and following, evidence needed and the importance of register. PMID:27683495

  11. A laboratory information management system for DNA barcoding workflows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vu, D.; Eberhardt, U.; Szöke, S.; Groenewald, M.; Robert, V.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a laboratory information management system for DNA sequences (LIMS) created and based on the needs of a DNA barcoding project at the CBS-KNAW Fungal Biodiversity Centre (Utrecht, the Netherlands). DNA barcoding is a global initiative for species identification through simple DNA

  12. Implementation and Benefits of LIMS (Laboratory Information Management System to Laboratories – A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayush Karol

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory automation is termed as a utilization of technology to streamline process workflow and substitute manual error and interventions of equipment and process. Laboratory information management system is a basic tool to manage sample and test for analytical QC, R & D laboratories and quality assurance providing integrated solution to workflow. Main aim of this paper is to introduce the implementational benefits of LIMS to quality control laboratories by sorting and organizing test information from sample inception till report dispatch. Common features of LIMS for quality control and quality assurance are set-up and configuration, sample management, vendor monitoring, ERP integration, document management link.

  13. Laboratory information management system at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leggett, W.; Barth, D.; Ibsen, T.; Newman, B.

    1994-03-01

    In January of 1994 an important new technology was brought on line to help in the monumental waste management and environmental restoration work at the Hanford Site. Cleanup at the Hanford Site depends on analytical chemistry information to identify contaminates, design and monitor cleanup processes, assure worker safety, evaluate progress, and prove completion. The new technology, a laboratory information management system (LIMS) called ``LABCORE,`` provides the latest systems to organize and communicate the analytical tasks: track work and samples; collect and process data, prepare reports, and store data in readily accessible electronic form.

  14. Challenges in small screening laboratories: implementing an on-demand laboratory information management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmon, Vance P; Jia, Yuanyuan; Shi, Yan; Holbrook, S Douglas; Bixby, John L; Buchser, William

    2011-11-01

    The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, part of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, includes a laboratory devoted to High Content Analysis (HCA) of neurons. The goal of the laboratory is to uncover signaling pathways, genes, compounds, or drugs that can be used to promote nerve growth. HCA permits the quantification of neuronal morphology, including the lengths and numbers of axons. HCA of various libraries on primary neurons requires a team-based approach, a variety of process steps and complex manipulations of cells and libraries to obtain meaningful results. HCA itself produces vast amounts of information including images, well-based data and cell-based phenotypic measures. Documenting and integrating the experimental workflows, library data and extensive experimental results is challenging. For academic laboratories generating large data sets from experiments involving thousands of perturbagens, a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) is the data tracking solution of choice. With both productivity and efficiency as driving rationales, the Miami Project has equipped its HCA laboratory with an On Demand or Software As A Service (SaaS) LIMS to ensure the quality of its experiments and workflows. The article discusses how the system was selected and integrated into the laboratory. The advantages of a SaaS based LIMS over a client-server based system are described. PMID:21631415

  15. Challenges in small screening laboratories: implementing an on-demand laboratory information management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmon, Vance P; Jia, Yuanyuan; Shi, Yan; Holbrook, S Douglas; Bixby, John L; Buchser, William

    2011-11-01

    The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, part of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, includes a laboratory devoted to High Content Analysis (HCA) of neurons. The goal of the laboratory is to uncover signaling pathways, genes, compounds, or drugs that can be used to promote nerve growth. HCA permits the quantification of neuronal morphology, including the lengths and numbers of axons. HCA of various libraries on primary neurons requires a team-based approach, a variety of process steps and complex manipulations of cells and libraries to obtain meaningful results. HCA itself produces vast amounts of information including images, well-based data and cell-based phenotypic measures. Documenting and integrating the experimental workflows, library data and extensive experimental results is challenging. For academic laboratories generating large data sets from experiments involving thousands of perturbagens, a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) is the data tracking solution of choice. With both productivity and efficiency as driving rationales, the Miami Project has equipped its HCA laboratory with an On Demand or Software As A Service (SaaS) LIMS to ensure the quality of its experiments and workflows. The article discusses how the system was selected and integrated into the laboratory. The advantages of a SaaS based LIMS over a client-server based system are described.

  16. Monitoring and information management system at the Underground Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strobel, G.S.; Chernis, P.J.; Bushman, A.T.; Spinney, M.H.; Backer, R.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)

    1996-07-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has developed a customer oriented monitoring and information management system at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) near Lac du Bonnet, Manitoba. The system is used to monitor instruments and manage, process, and distribute data. It consists of signal conditioners and remote loggers, central schedule and control systems, computer aided design and drafting work centres, and the communications linking them. The monitoring and communications elements are designed to meet the harsh demands of underground conditions while providing accurate monitoring of sensitive instruments to rigorous quality assured specifications. These instruments are used for testing of the concept for the deep geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste as part of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. Many of the tests are done in situ and at full-scale. The monitoring and information management system services engineering, research, and support staff working to design, develop, and demonstrate and present the concept. Experience gained during development of the monitoring and information management system at the URL, can be directly applied at the final disposal site. (author)

  17. Liposomal drug delivery system from laboratory to clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshirsagar, N A; Pandya, S K; Kirodian, G B; Sanath, S

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of drug delivery systems is to deliver a drug effectively, specifically to the site of action and to achieve greater efficacy and minimise the toxic effects compared to conventional drugs. Amongst various carrier systems, liposomes have generated a great interest because of their versatility. Liposomes are vesicular concentric bilayered structures, which are biocompatible, biodegradable and nonimmumnogenic. They can control the delivery of drugs by targeting the drug to the site of action or by site avoidance drug delivery or by prolonged circulation of drugs. Amphotericin B (Amp B) remains the drug of choice in most systemic mycoses and also as a second line treatment for Kala azar. However, its toxic effects often limit its use. Although the liposome delivery system has been tried for several drugs, only a few have been used in patients due to the slow development of necessary large-scale pharmaceutical procedures. This paper reviews the development of the technique for liposomal Amphotericin B (L-Amp-LRC-1, Fungisome) drug delivery system in our laboratory in collaboration with the department of Biochemistry, Delhi University in India and proving the safety and efficacy of this preparation in clinical practice. It also attempts to compare the efficacy and benefits of our product for Indian patients with those of similar products and it includes facts from the publications that flowed from our work. As compared to conventional Amp B, Fungisome is infused over a much shorter period requiring a smaller volume and no premedication. It was found to be safe in patients who had developed serious unacceptable toxicity with conventional Amp B. In renal transplant patients, Fungisome did not produce any nephrotoxicity. Fungisome is effective in fungal infections resistant to fluconazole, conventional Amp B and in virgin and resistant cases of visceral leishmaniasis. The cost of any drug is of great significance, especially in India. We have therefore

  18. Liposomal drug delivery system from laboratory to clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kshirsagar N

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of drug delivery systems is to deliver a drug effectively, specifically to the site of action and to achieve greater efficacy and minimise the toxic effects compared to conventional drugs. Amongst various carrier systems, liposomes have generated a great interest because of their versatility. Liposomes are vesicular concentric bilayered structures, which are biocompatible, biodegradable and nonimmumnogenic. They can control the delivery of drugs by targeting the drug to the site of action or by site avoidance drug delivery or by prolonged circulation of drugs. Amphotericin B (Amp B remains the drug of choice in most systemic mycoses and also as a second line treatment for Kala azar. However, its toxic effects often limit its use. Although the liposome delivery system has been tried for several drugs, only a few have been used in patients due to the slow development of necessary large-scale pharmaceutical procedures. This paper reviews the development of the technique for liposomal Amphotericin B (L-Amp-LRC-1, FungisomeTM drug delivery system in our laboratory in collaboration with the department of Biochemistry, Delhi University in India and proving the safety and efficacy of this preparation in clinical practice. It also attempts to compare the efficacy and benefits of our product for Indian patients with those of similar products and it includes facts from the publications that flowed from our work. As compared to conventional Amp B, Fungisome is infused over a much shorter period requiring a smaller volume and no premedication. It was found to be safe in patients who had developed serious unacceptable toxicity with conventional Amp B. In renal transplant patients, Fungisome did not produce any nephrotoxicity. Fungisome is effective in fungal infections resistant to fluconazole, conventional Amp B and in virgin and resistant cases of visceral leishmaniasis. The cost of any drug is of great significance, especially in India

  19. A laboratory information management system for DNA barcoding workflows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Thuy Duong; Eberhardt, Ursula; Szöke, Szániszló; Groenewald, Marizeth; Robert, Vincent

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a laboratory information management system for DNA sequences (LIMS) created and based on the needs of a DNA barcoding project at the CBS-KNAW Fungal Biodiversity Centre (Utrecht, the Netherlands). DNA barcoding is a global initiative for species identification through simple DNA sequence markers. We aim at generating barcode data for all strains (or specimens) included in the collection (currently ca. 80 k). The LIMS has been developed to better manage large amounts of sequence data and to keep track of the whole experimental procedure. The system has allowed us to classify strains more efficiently as the quality of sequence data has improved, and as a result, up-to-date taxonomic names have been given to strains and more accurate correlation analyses have been carried out. PMID:22344310

  20. A laboratory information management system for DNA barcoding workflows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Thuy Duong; Eberhardt, Ursula; Szöke, Szániszló; Groenewald, Marizeth; Robert, Vincent

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a laboratory information management system for DNA sequences (LIMS) created and based on the needs of a DNA barcoding project at the CBS-KNAW Fungal Biodiversity Centre (Utrecht, the Netherlands). DNA barcoding is a global initiative for species identification through simple DNA sequence markers. We aim at generating barcode data for all strains (or specimens) included in the collection (currently ca. 80 k). The LIMS has been developed to better manage large amounts of sequence data and to keep track of the whole experimental procedure. The system has allowed us to classify strains more efficiently as the quality of sequence data has improved, and as a result, up-to-date taxonomic names have been given to strains and more accurate correlation analyses have been carried out.

  1. BIOPLUS: An eclectic laboratory information management system for the ORNL Radiobioassay Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, R.L.; Hwang, H.L.; Bishop, C.P.; Blair, R.L.; Cornett, R.L.; Gonzalez, B.D.; Hotchandani, M.; Keaton, J.A.; Miller, J.L.; Myers, R.D.; Ohnesorge, M.J.; Thein, M.

    1992-12-31

    Data management activities in analytical laboratories can include sample scheduling, logging, and tracking, as well as results collection and reporting. In the Radiobioassay Laboratory (RBL) such activities were formerly accomplished by entering data in log books and on forms followed by manual entry of data into a computer database. As sample load has increased and further emphasis has been placed on improving efficiency and on error reduction, it has become worthwhile to automate the laboratory`s information management. In addition, a Bioassay Data Management System (BDMS) has developed for use by all five of the DOE sites managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems in order to centralize bioassay data management for internal dosimetry purposes. BIOPLUS, the LIMS described in this paper, provides an interface with BDMS and automates RBL information management to a large extent. The system provides for downloading personnel data from a central computer, logging in samples, and bar-code sample tracking, as well as recording, reporting, archiving, and trending of analysis results. Sketches of the hardware and software are presented along with some details of the instrument interface modules.

  2. Management Information System for Clinics with Cloud Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen Quang Tan

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the problems associated with the development of information management systems clinics. Presentation model of the system, which is based on a platform of technology cloud computing IBM SmartCloud and mobile phones. Giving the composition and structure of the clinics information management system that successfully support for user in managing patient information, medical history of the patients, the images for the diagnosis, prescriptions.

  3. [Management of Personal Information in Clinical Laboratory Medicine:--Chairmen's Introductory Remarks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiroshi; Shimetani, Naoto

    2014-11-01

    The Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine has been running its own Medical Safety Committee, and holding a symposium on medical safety during the annual meeting. The medical world is filled with a considerable amount of personal information, including genetic information, the ultimate personal information. We, as medical staff, have to manage such personal information not only in times of peace but also during disasters or emergency situations. In Japan, the Act on the Protection of Personal Information is currently being implemented, but a number of problems remain. Human beings have entered the information technology era, including electrical medical record systems, which is useful for research and education besides medical practice. This is why personal information must be more effectively protected from leakage, misconception, and abuse. We should create a sound system to manage personal information, with the spirit of protecting patient information that originated from the Oath of Hippocrates. PMID:27509731

  4. Clinical and Management Requirements for Computerized Mental Health Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Levinton, Paula H.; Dunning, Tessa F.E.

    1980-01-01

    Information requirements of mental health providers are sufficiently different from those of other health care managers to warrant a different approach to the development of management information systems (MIS). Advances in computer technology and increased demands for fiscal accountability have led to developing integrated mental health information systems (MHIS) that support clinical and management requirements.

  5. BIOPLUS: An eclectic laboratory information management system for the ORNL Radiobioassay Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, R.L.; Hwang, H.L.; Bishop, C.P.; Blair, R.L.; Cornett, R.L.; Gonzalez, B.D.; Hotchandani, M.; Keaton, J.A.; Miller, J.L.; Myers, R.D.; Ohnesorge, M.J.; Thein, M.

    1992-01-01

    Data management activities in analytical laboratories can include sample scheduling, logging, and tracking, as well as results collection and reporting. In the Radiobioassay Laboratory (RBL) such activities were formerly accomplished by entering data in log books and on forms followed by manual entry of data into a computer database. As sample load has increased and further emphasis has been placed on improving efficiency and on error reduction, it has become worthwhile to automate the laboratory's information management. In addition, a Bioassay Data Management System (BDMS) has developed for use by all five of the DOE sites managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems in order to centralize bioassay data management for internal dosimetry purposes. BIOPLUS, the LIMS described in this paper, provides an interface with BDMS and automates RBL information management to a large extent. The system provides for downloading personnel data from a central computer, logging in samples, and bar-code sample tracking, as well as recording, reporting, archiving, and trending of analysis results. Sketches of the hardware and software are presented along with some details of the instrument interface modules.

  6. Medical expert systems developed in j.MD, a Java based expert system shell: application in clinical laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoof, Viviane; Wormek, Arno; Schleutermann, Sylvia; Schumacher, Theo; Lothaire, Olivier; Trendelenburg, Christian

    2004-01-01

    Growing complexity of diagnostic tests, combined with increased workload, stringent laboratory accreditation demands, continuous shortening of turn-around-time and budget restrictions have forced laboratories to automate most of their iterative tasks. Introduction of artificial intelligence by means of expert systems has gained an important place in this automation process. Different parts of clinical laboratory activity can benefit from their implementation and the present project deals with one aspect, namely the clinical interpretation of diagnostic tests. This paper describes how j.MD, a new Java based expert system shell, was used to reprogram the expert system for interpretation of amylase isoenzyme patterns that has been in use for many years in our laboratory, and that was originally programmed in Pro.MD, a Prolog based expert system shell. One of the most important advantages of the j.MD system is its bidirectional link with the laboratory information system. This project shows how expert systems for the interpretation of complex diagnostic tests that demand specific expertise can become an integrated part of the automated clinical chemistry lab.

  7. Use of artificial intelligence in analytical systems for the clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Place, J F; Truchaud, A; Ozawa, K; Pardue, H; Schnipelsky, P

    1995-01-01

    The incorporation of information-processing technology into analytical systems in the form of standard computing software has recently been advanced by the introduction of artificial intelligence (AI), both as expert systems and as neural networks.This paper considers the role of software in system operation, control and automation, and attempts to define intelligence. AI is characterized by its ability to deal with incomplete and imprecise information and to accumulate knowledge. Expert systems, building on standard computing techniques, depend heavily on the domain experts and knowledge engineers that have programmed them to represent the real world. Neural networks are intended to emulate the pattern-recognition and parallel processing capabilities of the human brain and are taught rather than programmed. The future may lie in a combination of the recognition ability of the neural network and the rationalization capability of the expert system.In the second part of the paper, examples are given of applications of AI in stand-alone systems for knowledge engineering and medical diagnosis and in embedded systems for failure detection, image analysis, user interfacing, natural language processing, robotics and machine learning, as related to clinical laboratories.It is concluded that AI constitutes a collective form of intellectual propery, and that there is a need for better documentation, evaluation and regulation of the systems already being used in clinical laboratories.

  8. Laboratory Information Management Systems for Forensic Laboratories: A White Paper for Directors and Decision Makers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony Hendrickson; Brian Mennecke; Kevin Scheibe; Anthony Townsend

    2005-10-01

    Modern, forensics laboratories need Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS) implementations that allow the lab to track evidentiary items through their examination lifecycle and also serve all pertinent laboratory personnel. The research presented here presents LIMS core requirements as viewed by respondents serving in different forensic laboratory capacities as well as different forensic laboratory environments. A product-development methodology was employed to evaluate the relative value of the key features that constitute a LIMS, in order to develop a set of relative values for these features and the specifics of their implementation. In addition to the results of the product development analysis, this paper also provides an extensive review of LIMS and provides an overview of the preparation and planning process for the successful upgrade or implementation of a LIMS. Analysis of the data indicate that the relative value of LIMS components are viewed differently depending upon respondents' job roles (i.e., evidence technicians, scientists, and lab management), as well as by laboratory size. Specifically, the data show that: (1) Evidence technicians place the most value on chain of evidence capabilities and on chain of custody tracking; (2) Scientists generally place greatest value on report writing and generation, and on tracking daughter evidence that develops during their analyses; (3) Lab. Managers place the greatest value on chain of custody, daughter evidence, and not surprisingly, management reporting capabilities; and (4) Lab size affects LIMS preference in that, while all labs place daughter evidence tracking, chain of custody, and management and analyst report generation as their top three priorities, the order of this prioritization is size dependent.

  9. LABKA. A real-time computer system for the clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, J U; Maruard, C D; Nielsen, H C

    1989-01-01

    This paper provides an introduction to the real-time clinical laboratory information system (LABKA), which is implemented on a Hewlett-Packard 1000 system. The system is optimized for fast data handling combined with easy control of on-line results, data flow, and linking of related information. The design of LABKA is based on the principle of having a short reporting time together with simplified working procedures. The system can be adjusted to small as well as very large laboratories. Data control is achieved by status information being returned to the operator in real-time, thus avoiding having to use matching lists. This information is presented immediately in response to the procedure which has caused the error. This method of early error detection simplifies working procedures, inhibits accumulation of errors, and increases the flexibility and speed of data reporting. As a result, the number of requested stat analyses has been reduced by 50 percent. Working lists are not generally used. Instead, requisition information is transferred on-line to the instruments on request. A fourth-generation program system for entry, calculation, and test of manually entered data, called RUCAT (1), has been developed. This system enables the user to define forms on vdu-terminals, specify calculations, and test all manually entered data. The LABKA system can also produce cumulative reporting as standard reporting, in real time, fast and in a very high print quality. The real-time demands have strongly influenced the design and layout of the lab files and system design. PMID:2772556

  10. Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Outpatient clinical laboratory services are paid based on a fee schedule in accordance with Section 1833(h) of the Social Security Act. The clinical laboratory fee...

  11. Informatics and the clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Richard G; Johnson, Owen A; Batstone, Gifford

    2014-08-01

    The nature of pathology services is changing under the combined pressures of increasing workloads, cost constraints and technological advancement. In the face of this, laboratory systems need to meet new demands for data exchange with clinical electronic record systems for test requesting and results reporting. As these needs develop, new challenges are emerging especially with respect to the format and content of the datasets which are being exchanged. If the potential for the inclusion of intelligent systems in both these areas is to be realised, the continued dialogue between clinicians and laboratory information specialists is of paramount importance. Requirements of information technology (IT) in pathology, now extend well beyond the provision of purely analytical data. With the aim of achieving seamless integration of laboratory data into the total clinical pathway, 'Informatics' - the art and science of turning data into useful information - is becoming increasingly important in laboratory medicine. Informatics is a powerful tool in pathology - whether in implementing processes for pathology modernisation, introducing new diagnostic modalities (e.g. proteomics, genomics), providing timely and evidence-based disease management, or enabling best use of limited and often costly resources. Providing appropriate information to empowered and interested patients - which requires critical assessment of the ever-increasing volume of information available - can also benefit greatly from appropriate use of informatics in enhancing self-management of long term conditions. The increasing demands placed on pathology information systems in the context of wider developmental change in healthcare delivery are explored in this review. General trends in medical informatics are reflected in current priorities for laboratory medicine, including the need for unified electronic records, computerised order entry, data security and recovery, and audit. We conclude that there is a

  12. An Information System to Support and Monitor Clinical Trial Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Luzi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The demand of transparency of clinical research results, the need of accelerating the process oftransferring innovation in the daily medical practice as well as assuring patient safety and product efficacymake it necessary to extend the functionality of traditional trial registries. These new systems shouldcombine different functionalities to track the information exchange, support collaborative work, manageregulatory documents and monitor the entire clinical investigation (CIV lifecycle. This is the approachused to develop MEDIS, a Medical Device Information System, described in this paper under theperspective of the business process, and the underlining architecture. Moreover, MEDIS was designed onthe basis of Health Level 7 (HL7 v.3 standards and methodology to make it interoperable with similarregistries, but also to facilitate information exchange between different health information systems.

  13. DB4US: A Decision Support System for Laboratory Information Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortas, Maria Luisa; Baena-García, Manuel; Lana-Linati, Jorge; González, Carlos; Redondo, Maximino; Morales-Bueno, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Background Until recently, laboratory automation has focused primarily on improving hardware. Future advances are concentrated on intelligent software since laboratories performing clinical diagnostic testing require improved information systems to address their data processing needs. In this paper, we propose DB4US, an application that automates information related to laboratory quality indicators information. Currently, there is a lack of ready-to-use management quality measures. This application addresses this deficiency through the extraction, consolidation, statistical analysis, and visualization of data related to the use of demographics, reagents, and turn-around times. The design and implementation issues, as well as the technologies used for the implementation of this system, are discussed in this paper. Objective To develop a general methodology that integrates the computation of ready-to-use management quality measures and a dashboard to easily analyze the overall performance of a laboratory, as well as automatically detect anomalies or errors. The novelty of our approach lies in the application of integrated web-based dashboards as an information management system in hospital laboratories. Methods We propose a new methodology for laboratory information management based on the extraction, consolidation, statistical analysis, and visualization of data related to demographics, reagents, and turn-around times, offering a dashboard-like user web interface to the laboratory manager. The methodology comprises a unified data warehouse that stores and consolidates multidimensional data from different data sources. The methodology is illustrated through the implementation and validation of DB4US, a novel web application based on this methodology that constructs an interface to obtain ready-to-use indicators, and offers the possibility to drill down from high-level metrics to more detailed summaries. The offered indicators are calculated beforehand so that they

  14. CliniProteus: A flexible clinical trials information management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathura, Venkatarajan S; Rangareddy, Mahendiranath; Gupta, Pankaj; Mullan, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Clinical trials involve multi-site heterogeneous data generation with complex data input-formats and forms. The data should be captured and queried in an integrated fashion to facilitate further analysis. Electronic case-report forms (eCRF) are gaining popularity since it allows capture of clinical information in a rapid manner. We have designed and developed an XML based flexible clinical trials data management framework in .NET environment that can be used for efficient design and deployment of eCRFs to efficiently collate data and analyze information from multi-site clinical trials. The main components of our system include an XML form designer, a Patient registration eForm, reusable eForms, multiple-visit data capture and consolidated reports. A unique id is used for tracking the trial, site of occurrence, the patient and the year of recruitment. Availability http://www.rfdn.org/bioinfo/CTMS/ctms.html. PMID:21670796

  15. Clinical decision support for perioperative information management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanderer, Jonathan P; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M

    2013-12-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) systems are being used to optimize the increasingly complex care that our health care system delivers. These systems have become increasingly important in the delivery of perioperative care for patients undergoing cardiac, thoracic, and vascular procedures. The adoption of perioperative information management systems (PIMS) has allowed these technologies to enter the operating room and support the clinical work flow of anesthesiologists and operational processes. Constructing effective CDS systems necessitates an understanding of operative work flow and technical considerations as well as achieving integration with existing information systems. In this review, we describe published examples of CDS for PIMS, including support for cardiopulmonary bypass separation physiological alarms, β-blocker guideline adherence, enhanced revenue capture for arterial line placement, and detection of hemodynamic monitoring gaps. Although these and other areas are amenable to CDS systems, the challenges of latency and data reliability represent fundamental limitations on the potential application of these tools to specific types of clinical issues. Ultimately, we expect that CDS will remain an important tool in our efforts to optimize the quality of care delivered.

  16. International Federation of Clinical Chemistry. Use of artificial intelligence in analytical systems for the clinical laboratory. IFCC Committee on Analytical Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Place, J F; Truchaud, A; Ozawa, K; Pardue, H; Schnipelsky, P

    1994-12-16

    The incorporation of information-processing technology into analytical systems in the form of standard computing software has recently been advanced by the introduction of artificial intelligence (AI) both as expert systems and as neural networks. This paper considers the role of software in system operation, control and automation and attempts to define intelligence. AI is characterized by its ability to deal with incomplete and imprecise information and to accumulate knowledge. Expert systems, building on standard computing techniques, depend heavily on the domain experts and knowledge engineers that have programmed them to represent the real world. Neural networks are intended to emulate the pattern-recognition and parallel-processing capabilities of the human brain and are taught rather than programmed. The future may lie in a combination of the recognition ability of the neural network and the rationalization capability of the expert system. In the second part of this paper, examples are given of applications of AI in stand-alone systems for knowledge engineering and medical diagnosis and in embedded systems for failure detection, image analysis, user interfacing, natural language processing, robotics and machine learning, as related to clinical laboratories. It is concluded that AI constitutes a collective form of intellectual property and that there is a need for better documentation, evaluation and regulation of the systems already being used widely in clinical laboratories.

  17. Laboratory information management system: an example of international cooperation in Namibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangeli, Patrizia; Ferrilli, Monica; Quaranta, Fabrizio; Malizia, Elio; Mbulu, Rosa-Stella; Mukete, Esther; Iipumbu, Lukas; Kamhulu, Anna; Tjipura-Zaire, Georgina; Di Francesco, Cesare; Lelli, Rossella; Scacchia, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe the project undertaken by the Istituto G. Caporale to provide a laboratory information management system (LIMS) to the Central Veterinary Laboratory (CVL) in Windhoek, Namibia. This robust laboratory management tool satisfies Namibia's information obligations under international quality standard ISO 17025:2005. The Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for Africa was designed to collect and manage all necessary information on samples, tests and test results. The system involves the entry of sample data on arrival, as required by Namibian sampling plans, the tracking of samples through the various sections of the CVL, the collection of test results, generation of test reports and monitoring of outbreaks through data interrogation functions, eliminating multiple registrations of the same data on paper records. It is a fundamental component of the Namibian veterinary information system.

  18. Laboratory information management system: an example of international cooperation in Namibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangeli, Patrizia; Ferrilli, Monica; Quaranta, Fabrizio; Malizia, Elio; Mbulu, Rosa-Stella; Mukete, Esther; Iipumbu, Lukas; Kamhulu, Anna; Tjipura-Zaire, Georgina; Di Francesco, Cesare; Lelli, Rossella; Scacchia, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe the project undertaken by the Istituto G. Caporale to provide a laboratory information management system (LIMS) to the Central Veterinary Laboratory (CVL) in Windhoek, Namibia. This robust laboratory management tool satisfies Namibia's information obligations under international quality standard ISO 17025:2005. The Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for Africa was designed to collect and manage all necessary information on samples, tests and test results. The system involves the entry of sample data on arrival, as required by Namibian sampling plans, the tracking of samples through the various sections of the CVL, the collection of test results, generation of test reports and monitoring of outbreaks through data interrogation functions, eliminating multiple registrations of the same data on paper records. It is a fundamental component of the Namibian veterinary information system. PMID:23038071

  19. Laboratory information management system: an example of international cooperation in Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Colangeli

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe the project undertaken by the Istituto G. Caporale to provide a laboratory information management system (LIMS to the Central Veterinary Laboratory (CVL in Windhoek, Namibia. This robust laboratory management tool satisfies Namibia’s information obligations under international quality standard ISO 17025:2005. The Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS for Africa was designed to collect and manage all necessary information on samples, tests and test results. The system involves the entry of sample data on arrival, as required by Namibian sampling plans, the tracking of samples through the various sections of the CVL, the collection of test results, generation of test reports and monitoring of outbreaks through data interrogation functions, eliminating multiple registrations of the same data on paper records. It is a fundamental component of the Namibian veterinary information system.

  20. Clinical information systems: cornerstone for an efficient hospital management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovis, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The university hospitals of Geneva are the largest consortium of public hospitals in Switzerland. This organization is born in 1995, after a political decision to merge the seven public and teaching hospitals of the Canton of Geneva. From an information technologies perspective, it took several years to reach a true unified vision of the complete organization. The clinical information system is deployed in all sites covering in- and outpatient cares. It is seen as the cornerstone of information management and flow in the organization, for direct patient care and decision support, but also for the management to drive, improve and leverage the activities, for better efficiency, quality and safety of care, but also to drive processes. As the system has become more important for the organization, it has required progressive changes in its governance. The high importance of interoperability and use of formal representation has become a major challenge in order to be able to reuse clinical information for real-time care and management activities, and for secondary usage such as billing, resource management, strategic planning and clinical research. This paper proposes a short overview of the tools allowing to leverage the management for physicians, nurses, human resources and hospital governance.

  1. Medicare Program; Medicare Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory Tests Payment System. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-23

    This final rule implements requirements of section 216 of the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014 (PAMA), which significantly revises the Medicare payment system for clinical diagnostic laboratory tests. This final rule also announces an implementation date of January 1, 2018 for the private payor rate-based fee schedule required by PAMA.

  2. Clinical laboratory analytics: Challenges and promise for an emerging discipline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian H Shirts

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical laboratory is a major source of health care data. Increasingly these data are being integrated with other data to inform health system-wide actions meant to improve diagnostic test utilization, service efficiency, and "meaningful use." The Academy of Clinical Laboratory Physicians and Scientists hosted a satellite meeting on clinical laboratory analytics in conjunction with their annual meeting on May 29, 2014 in San Francisco. There were 80 registrants for the clinical laboratory analytics meeting. The meeting featured short presentations on current trends in clinical laboratory analytics and several panel discussions on data science in laboratory medicine, laboratory data and its role in the larger healthcare system, integrating laboratory analytics, and data sharing for collaborative analytics. One main goal of meeting was to have an open forum of leaders that work with the "big data" clinical laboratories produce. This article summarizes the proceedings of the meeting and content discussed.

  3. QUALITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN CLINICAL LABORATORIES ACCORDING TO THE ISO 15189:2007 STANDARD - EVALUATION OF THE BENEFITS OF IMPLEMENTATION IN AN ASSISTED REPRODUCTION LABORATORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.D. Sialakouma

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Biomedical science is a sensitive discipline and presents unique challenges due to its social character, continuous development and competitiveness. The issue of quality management systems and accreditation is gaining increasing interest in this sector. All over Europe, Health Services Units have started to introduce quality management systems and harmonization of criteria for accreditation is of increasing importance. Moreover, clinical laboratories, like the Assisted Reproduction laboratories and biochemical laboratories are required to apply a Quality Management System in order to ensure their correct, scientific and effective operation. Ultimately, it is a moral obligation for every health care organisation to supply the best possible care for the patient. The specific features and the diversity of clinical laboratories led to the introduction (2003 and, recently to the revision (2007 of the international standard ISO 15189, which is the first international standard developed specifically to address the requirements for accreditation of this type of laboratory. The basic principles for the quality assurance in the clinical laboratories are: x Complete and unambiguous standardized operating procedures. x Complete and unambiguous directives of operation. x Obligatory detailed written documentation, i.e., how each action is done, who will do it, where will this action take place and when. x Suitable scheduling of calibration/control/preventive maintenance of laboratory equipment and recording of each activity. x Distribution of responsibilities among the staff and continuous education and briefing according to current scientific data. x Complete and informed record file keeping. x Continuous improvement which is monitored with the adoption of quantified indicators. x Internal and external audit of all activities. x Troubleshooting. All these principles should be supported by the Management in order that the necessary adaptations should be made

  4. ELAN - expert system supported information and management system for analytical laboratories. ELAN - Expertengestuetztes Informationssystem fuer die Laboranalytik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orth, H.; Zilly, G.

    1990-05-01

    The demand for high efficiency and short response time calls for the use of computer support in chemico-analytical laboratories. This is usually achieved by laboratory information and management systems covering the three levels of analytical instrument automation, laboratory operation support and laboratory management. The management component of the systems implemented up to now suffers from a lack of flexibility as far as unforeseen analytical investigations outside the laboratory routine work are concerned. Another drawback is the lack of adaptability with respect to structural changes in laboratory organization. It can be eliminated by the application of expert system structures and methods for the implementation of this system level. The ELAN laboratory information and management system has been developed on the basis of this concept. (orig.).

  5. In-Laboratory Experiments to Investigate Driver Behavior under Advanced Traveler Information Systems (ATIS)

    OpenAIRE

    Adler, Jeffrey L.; McNally, Michael G.

    1993-01-01

    In-laboratory experimentation with interactive microcomputer simulation is a useful tool for studying the dynamics of driver behavior in response to advanced traveler information systems. Limited real-world implementation of these information systems has made it difficult to observe and study how drivers seek, acquire, process, and respond to real-time information. This paper describes the design and preliminary testing of an interactive microcomputer-based animated simulator, developed at th...

  6. Clinical laboratory analytics: Challenges and promise for an emerging discipline

    OpenAIRE

    Brian H Shirts; Jackson, Brian R.; Baird, Geoffrey S.; Baron, Jason M.; Bryan Clements; Ricky Grisson; Ronald George Hauser; Taylor, Julie R.; Enrique Terrazas; Brad Brimhall

    2015-01-01

    The clinical laboratory is a major source of health care data. Increasingly these data are being integrated with other data to inform health system-wide actions meant to improve diagnostic test utilization, service efficiency, and "meaningful use." The Academy of Clinical Laboratory Physicians and Scientists hosted a satellite meeting on clinical laboratory analytics in conjunction with their annual meeting on May 29, 2014 in San Francisco. There were 80 registrants for the clinical laborator...

  7. Development of a clinical data warehouse from an intensive care clinical information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mul, Marleen; Alons, Peter; van der Velde, Peter; Konings, Ilse; Bakker, Jan; Hazelzet, Jan

    2012-01-01

    There are relatively few institutions that have developed clinical data warehouses, containing patient data from the point of care. Because of the various care practices, data types and definitions, and the perceived incompleteness of clinical information systems, the development of a clinical data warehouse is a challenge. In order to deal with managerial and clinical information needs, as well as educational and research aims that are important in the setting of a university hospital, Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, The Netherlands, developed a data warehouse incrementally. In this paper we report on the in-house development of an integral part of the data warehouse specifically for the intensive care units (ICU-DWH). It was modeled using Atos Origin Metadata Frame method. The paper describes the methodology, the development process and the content of the ICU-DWH, and discusses the need for (clinical) data warehouses in intensive care.

  8. End-to-End Information System design at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooke, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    Recognizing a pressing need of the 1980s to optimize the two-way flow of information between a ground-based user and a remote space-based sensor, an end-to-end approach to the design of information systems has been adopted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The objectives of this effort are to ensure that all flight projects adequately cope with information flow problems at an early stage of system design, and that cost-effective, multi-mission capabilities are developed when capital investments are made in supporting elements. The paper reviews the End-to-End Information System (EEIS) activity at the Laboratory, and notes the ties to the NASA End-to-End Data System program.

  9. What's right and what's wrong with laboratory information system requests for proposals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weilert, M

    1992-01-01

    Using a formal request for proposal (RFP) has been widely promoted as an essential phase of laboratory information system (LIS) selection and acquisition. Recently, stories of system or project failure--despite adherence to the RFP procedure--have increased. Case reports suggest that the RFP itself may sometimes hinder, rather than facilitate, the system selection process. As with any tool, the RFP has strengths and weaknesses, either of which may predominate depending on how the tool is used. Laboratories should be aware of alternatives to the formal RFP and should view the RFP as part of an integrated process of system evaluation and selection. PMID:10116939

  10. A Conceptual Study on Hospital Information System in Public Hospital of Bangladesh: Electronic Medical Record and Clinical Information System Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Mahmudul Haque; Saim Kayadibi; Khondakar S. Rafsanjani; Mabruk Billah

    2013-01-01

    The empirical data is used in organizations all over the world which require the integration of some informational systems like Electronic Medical Record (EMR) and Clinical Information System (CIS); these concepts will discover with new form of Bangladeshi public hospital’s improvement in Information Technology (IT) sector. The objective of this conceptual paper is to review critically and identify the gaps in current literature aligning with Hospital Information System (HIS) and Electronic M...

  11. [The clinical immunology laboratory in diagnosis and monitoring of systemic lupus erythematosus and connective tissue diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinico, R A; Radice, A

    2005-01-01

    The laboratory and particularly clinical immunology laboratories have an essential role in diagnosing and monitoring systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), as well as other connective tissue diseases. The role of the clinical immunology laboratory in these diseases is to confirm or exclude diagnosis, to monitor disease activity, and to identify subgroup of patients. To obtain the best results in terms of diagnostic performance and clinical usefulness, the following recommendations should be fulfilled: anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) determination by indirect immunofluorescence on Hep-2 cells is an effective screening assay in patients with clinical features of SLE. A negative ANA test makes the diagnosis of SLE unlikely. Anti-dsDNA antibodies are highly specific for SLE and are associated with renal involvement. The method of choice for anti-dsDNA is the Farr assay; however, the necessity of using radioactive materials reduces its applicability. As an alternative, immunofluorescence on Crithidia Luciliae can be used in the diagnostic phase due to its high specificity. The detection of antibodies to extractable nuclear antigens (ENA) and to phospholipids (lupus anticoagulant and anti-cardiolipin antibodies) is useful in identifying subgroups of patients at risk for some clinical manifestations. Anti-dsDNA measurement with a quantitative assay (the Farr assay or ELISA) is currently the best method to monitor disease activity along with complement levels. New assays (anti-C1q and anti-nucleosome antibodies) have been recently proposed for the diagnosis (anti-nucleosome) and monitoring of SLE patients (anti-C1q and anti-nucleosome antibodies), with promising results.

  12. Laboratory information management system for membrane protein structure initiative--from gene to crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troshin, Petr V; Morris, Chris; Prince, Stephen M; Papiz, Miroslav Z

    2008-12-01

    Membrane Protein Structure Initiative (MPSI) exploits laboratory competencies to work collaboratively and distribute work among the different sites. This is possible as protein structure determination requires a series of steps, starting with target selection, through cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and finally structure determination. Distributed sites create a unique set of challenges for integrating and passing on information on the progress of targets. This role is played by the Protein Information Management System (PIMS), which is a laboratory information management system (LIMS), serving as a hub for MPSI, allowing collaborative structural proteomics to be carried out in a distributed fashion. It holds key information on the progress of cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of proteins. PIMS is employed to track the status of protein targets and to manage constructs, primers, experiments, protocols, sample locations and their detailed histories: thus playing a key role in MPSI data exchange. It also serves as the centre of a federation of interoperable information resources such as local laboratory information systems and international archival resources, like PDB or NCBI. During the challenging task of PIMS integration, within the MPSI, we discovered a number of prerequisites for successful PIMS integration. In this article we share our experiences and provide invaluable insights into the process of LIMS adaptation. This information should be of interest to partners who are thinking about using LIMS as a data centre for their collaborative efforts. PMID:18991141

  13. Laboratory information management system for membrane protein structure initiative--from gene to crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troshin, Petr V; Morris, Chris; Prince, Stephen M; Papiz, Miroslav Z

    2008-12-01

    Membrane Protein Structure Initiative (MPSI) exploits laboratory competencies to work collaboratively and distribute work among the different sites. This is possible as protein structure determination requires a series of steps, starting with target selection, through cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and finally structure determination. Distributed sites create a unique set of challenges for integrating and passing on information on the progress of targets. This role is played by the Protein Information Management System (PIMS), which is a laboratory information management system (LIMS), serving as a hub for MPSI, allowing collaborative structural proteomics to be carried out in a distributed fashion. It holds key information on the progress of cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of proteins. PIMS is employed to track the status of protein targets and to manage constructs, primers, experiments, protocols, sample locations and their detailed histories: thus playing a key role in MPSI data exchange. It also serves as the centre of a federation of interoperable information resources such as local laboratory information systems and international archival resources, like PDB or NCBI. During the challenging task of PIMS integration, within the MPSI, we discovered a number of prerequisites for successful PIMS integration. In this article we share our experiences and provide invaluable insights into the process of LIMS adaptation. This information should be of interest to partners who are thinking about using LIMS as a data centre for their collaborative efforts.

  14. Making the case for a clinical information system: the chief information officer view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Carole M

    2007-03-01

    Adequate decision support for clinicians and other caregivers requires accessible and reliable patient information. Powerful societal and economic forces are moving us toward an integrated, patient-centered health care information system that will allow caregivers to exchange up-to-date patient health information quickly and easily. These forces include patient safety, potential health care cost savings, empowerment of consumers (and their subsequent demands for quality), new federal policies, and growing regional health care initiatives. Underspending on health care information technologies has gone on for many years; and the creation and implementation of a comprehensive clinical information system will entail many difficulties, particularly in regard to patients' privacy and control of their information, standardization of electronic health records, cost of adopting information technology, unbalanced financial incentives, and the varying levels of preparation across caregivers. There will also be potential effects on the physician-patient relationship. Ultimately, an integrated system will require a concerted transformation of the health care industry that is akin to what the banking industry has accomplished with electronic automation. Critical care units provide a good starting point for how information system technologies can be used and electronic patient information collected, although the robust systems designed for intensive care units are not always used to their potential. PMID:17371748

  15. Methodology of integration of a clinical data warehouse with a clinical information system: the HEGP case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapletal, Eric; Rodon, Nicolas; Grabar, Natalia; Degoulet, Patrice

    2010-01-01

    Clinical Data Warehouses (CDW) can complement current Clinical Information Systems (CIS) with functions that are not easily implemented by traditional operational database systems. Here, we describe the design and deployment strategy used at the Pompidou University Hospital in southwest Paris. Four realms are described: technological realm, data realm, restitution realm, and administration realm. The corresponding UML use cases and the mapping rules from the shared integrated electronic health records to the five axes of the i2b2 CDW star model are presented. Priority is given to the anonymization and security principles used for the 1.2 million patient records currently stored in the CDW. Exploitation of a CDW by clinicians and investigators can facilitate clinical research, quality evaluations and outcome studies. These indirect benefits are among the reasons for the continuous use of an integrated CIS.

  16. A Laboratory Test Expert System for Clinical Diagnosis Support in Primary Health Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Fernandez-Millan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Decision Support Systems have the potential to reduce lack of communication and errors in diagnostic steps in primary health care. Literature reports have showed great advances in clinical decision support systems in the recent years, which have proven its usefulness in improving the quality of care. However, most of these systems are focused on specific areas of diseases. In this way, we propose a rule-based expert system, which supports clinicians in primary health care, providing a list of possible diseases regarding patient’s laboratory tests results in order to assist previous diagnosis. Our system also allows storing and retrieving patient’s data and the history of patient’s analyses, establishing a basis for coordination between the various health care levels. A validation step and speed performance tests were made to check the quality of the system. We conclude that our system could improve clinician accuracy and speed, resulting in more efficiency and better quality of service. Finally, we propose some recommendations for further research.

  17. 75 FR 39028 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory... standards under which clinical laboratories are regulated; the impact on medical and laboratory practice of... laboratory information; and consideration of proposals from the CLIAC proficiency testing workgroup....

  18. The evolution of a LIMS (laboratory information management system). [Chemical analyses at BNFL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1992-04-01

    Changes in the world and United Kingdom markets for nuclear fuels during the 1990s have prompted British Nuclear Fuels (BNFL) to maximise cost effectiveness in its Chemical and Metallurgical Services department. A laboratory information management system (LIMS) was introduced in order to keep records of analytical techniques and equipment up to date by coordinating various computer systems. Wherever possible automated systems have replaced traditional, labour intensive techniques. So successful has the LIMS system been, that the team now hopes to expand into expert systems. (UK).

  19. Laboratory challenges in the scaling up of HIV, TB, and malaria programs: The interaction of health and laboratory systems, clinical research, and service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birx, Deborah; de Souza, Mark; Nkengasong, John N

    2009-06-01

    Strengthening national health laboratory systems in resource-poor countries is critical to meeting the United Nations Millennium Development Goals. Despite strong commitment from the international community to fight major infectious diseases, weak laboratory infrastructure remains a huge rate-limiting step. Some major challenges facing laboratory systems in resource-poor settings include dilapidated infrastructure; lack of human capacity, laboratory policies, and strategic plans; and limited synergies between clinical and research laboratories. Together, these factors compromise the quality of test results and impact patient management. With increased funding, the target of laboratory strengthening efforts in resource-poor countries should be the integrating of laboratory services across major diseases to leverage resources with respect to physical infrastructure; types of assays; supply chain management of reagents and equipment; and maintenance of equipment. PMID:19461092

  20. Wireless clinical alerts for physiologic, laboratory and medication data.

    OpenAIRE

    Shabot, M M; LoBue, M.; J. Chen

    2000-01-01

    A fully interfaced clinical information system (CIS) contains physiologic, laboratory, blood gas, medication and other data that can be used as the information base for a comprehensive alerting system. Coupled with an event driven rules engine, a CIS can generate clinical alerts which may both prevent medical errors and assist caregivers in responding to critical events in a timely way. The authors have developed a clinical alerting system which delivers alerts and reminders to clinicians in ...

  1. The Role of Simulation in Clinical Information Systems Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sanne; Lyng, Karen Marie; Nøhr, Christian

    2012-01-01

    systems. Simulation is especially well suited for the evaluation of human factors and organizational aspects in relation to application of information systems. In full-scale simulation tests it is possible to evaluate socio-technical interaction. A near to real life experience can be achieved by creating...

  2. QUALITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM IN CLINICAL LABORATORIES ACCORDING TO THE ISO 15189:2007 STANDARD - EVALUATION OF THE BENEFITS OF IMPLEMENTATION IN AN ASSISTED REPRODUCTION LABORATORY

    OpenAIRE

    A.D. Sialakouma; Palmer, G A; M. Botsaki; X. Papanikou; N.M. Vaxevanidis

    2011-01-01

    Biomedical science is a sensitive discipline and presents unique challenges due to its social character, continuous development and competitiveness. The issue of quality management systems and accreditation is gaining increasing interest in this sector. All over Europe, Health Services Units have started to introduce quality management systems and harmonization of criteria for accreditation is of increasing importance. Moreover, clinical laboratories, like the Assisted Reproduction laboratori...

  3. Leadership Principles for Developing a Statewide Public Health and Clinical Laboratory System

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, Steven A.; Brokopp, Charles D.; Size, Tim

    2010-01-01

    In 1999, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL), and the Federal Bureau of Investigation established the national Laboratory Response Network (LRN) for bioterrorism readiness. A more broad application of the LRN is the National Laboratory System (NLS), an effort to promote the 10 Essential Public Health Services and the Core Functions and Capabilities of State Public Health Laboratories (hereafter, Core Functions). State publ...

  4. The EnzymeTracker: an open-source laboratory information management system for sample tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triplet Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many laboratories, researchers store experimental data on their own workstation using spreadsheets. However, this approach poses a number of problems, ranging from sharing issues to inefficient data-mining. Standard spreadsheets are also error-prone, as data do not undergo any validation process. To overcome spreadsheets inherent limitations, a number of proprietary systems have been developed, which laboratories need to pay expensive license fees for. Those costs are usually prohibitive for most laboratories and prevent scientists from benefiting from more sophisticated data management systems. Results In this paper, we propose the EnzymeTracker, a web-based laboratory information management system for sample tracking, as an open-source and flexible alternative that aims at facilitating entry, mining and sharing of experimental biological data. The EnzymeTracker features online spreadsheets and tools for monitoring numerous experiments conducted by several collaborators to identify and characterize samples. It also provides libraries of shared data such as protocols, and administration tools for data access control using OpenID and user/team management. Our system relies on a database management system for efficient data indexing and management and a user-friendly AJAX interface that can be accessed over the Internet. The EnzymeTracker facilitates data entry by dynamically suggesting entries and providing smart data-mining tools to effectively retrieve data. Our system features a number of tools to visualize and annotate experimental data, and export highly customizable reports. It also supports QR matrix barcoding to facilitate sample tracking. Conclusions The EnzymeTracker was designed to be easy to use and offers many benefits over spreadsheets, thus presenting the characteristics required to facilitate acceptance by the scientific community. It has been successfully used for 20 months on a daily basis by over 50

  5. The EnzymeTracker: an open-source laboratory information management system for sample tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background In many laboratories, researchers store experimental data on their own workstation using spreadsheets. However, this approach poses a number of problems, ranging from sharing issues to inefficient data-mining. Standard spreadsheets are also error-prone, as data do not undergo any validation process. To overcome spreadsheets inherent limitations, a number of proprietary systems have been developed, which laboratories need to pay expensive license fees for. Those costs are usually prohibitive for most laboratories and prevent scientists from benefiting from more sophisticated data management systems. Results In this paper, we propose the EnzymeTracker, a web-based laboratory information management system for sample tracking, as an open-source and flexible alternative that aims at facilitating entry, mining and sharing of experimental biological data. The EnzymeTracker features online spreadsheets and tools for monitoring numerous experiments conducted by several collaborators to identify and characterize samples. It also provides libraries of shared data such as protocols, and administration tools for data access control using OpenID and user/team management. Our system relies on a database management system for efficient data indexing and management and a user-friendly AJAX interface that can be accessed over the Internet. The EnzymeTracker facilitates data entry by dynamically suggesting entries and providing smart data-mining tools to effectively retrieve data. Our system features a number of tools to visualize and annotate experimental data, and export highly customizable reports. It also supports QR matrix barcoding to facilitate sample tracking. Conclusions The EnzymeTracker was designed to be easy to use and offers many benefits over spreadsheets, thus presenting the characteristics required to facilitate acceptance by the scientific community. It has been successfully used for 20 months on a daily basis by over 50 scientists. The EnzymeTracker is

  6. Demography, clinical and laboratory features of systemic sclerosis in a Malaysian rheumatology centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagalavan, L; Ong, S G

    2007-06-01

    A six year retrospective study of the demography, clinical and laboratory features of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) was carried out in Selayang Hospital. There were 61 cases seen between January 2000 and December 2005. Of these, 55 (90.2%) were females and 6 (9.8%) were males. Twenty-eight (45.9%) were Malays, 24 (39.3%) were Chinese and 9 (14.8%) were Indians. The mean age of onset was 38.8 years. Thirty-nine (64.0%) had limited cutaneous SSc, 21 (34.4%) had diffuse cutaneous SSc and one had localized morphoea. Raynaud's phenomenon was present in 82.6%, telangiectasia in 45.9%, calcinosis in 11.5%, sclerodactyly in 83.6%, digital pitting scars in 42.6%, digital infarcts/ulcers/gangrene in 23.0%, arthralgia/arthritis in 49.2% and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in 47.5%. Forty-three (70.5%) patients had interstitial lung disease. Seven patients had associated myositis, 7 systemic lupus erythematosus and 2 rheumatoid arthritis. Three had two other connective tissue diseases. Antinuclear antibodies were positive in 83.6% and anti-Scl 70 antibodies in 34.4%. This study demonstrates that limited cutaneous SSc is more common and there is a high incidence of interstitial lung disease in our population. PMID:18705442

  7. A manual for a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for light stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, Tyler B.

    1998-01-01

    The reliability and accuracy of isotopic data can be improved by utilizing database software to (i) store information about samples, (ii) store the results of mass spectrometric isotope-ratio analyses of samples, (iii) calculate analytical results using standardized algorithms stored in a database, (iv) normalize stable isotopic data to international scales using isotopic reference materials, and (v) generate multi-sheet paper templates for convenient sample loading of automated mass-spectrometer sample preparation manifolds. Such a database program is presented herein. Major benefits of this system include (i) an increase in laboratory efficiency, (ii) reduction in the use of paper, (iii) reduction in workload due to the elimination or reduction of retyping of data by laboratory personnel, and (iv) decreased errors in data reported to sample submitters. Such a database provides a complete record of when and how often laboratory reference materials have been analyzed and provides a record of what correction factors have been used through time. It provides an audit trail for stable isotope laboratories. Since the original publication of the manual for LIMS for Light Stable Isotopes, the isotopes 3 H, 3 He, and 14 C, and the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-113, have been added to this program.

  8. 76 FR 9578 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory... Additional Information: Nancy Anderson, Chief, Laboratory Practice Standards Branch, Division of Laboratory Science and Standards, Laboratory Science, Policy and Practice Program Office, Office of...

  9. Practitioner-Customizable Clinical Information Systems: A Case Study to Ground Further Research and Development Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecily Morrison

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The uptake of electronic records and information technology support in intensive care medicine has been slower than many people predicted. One of the engineering challenges to overcome has been the subtle, but important, variation in clinical practice in different units. A relatively recent innovation that addresses this challenge is practitioner-customizable clinical information systems, allowing clinicians wide scope in adjusting their systems to suit their clinical practice. However, these systems present a significant design challenge, not only of added technical complexity, but in providing tools that support clinicians in doing many of the tasks of a software engineer. This paper reviews the use of a commercially available clinical information system that is intended to be practitioner-customizable, and considers the further design and development of tools to support healthcare practitioners doing end-user customization on their own clinical information systems.

  10. A computerized system for retrieval of case information in a veterinary diagnostic laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, J E; Burton, C H; Morehouse, L G; Mann, P C

    1979-03-01

    Morbidity and mortality data are necessary bases for the decision-making processes relevant to allocation of public funds for animal disease diagnoses and research. A system for information storage and retrieval capable of handling diagnostic data such as results of microbiology, parasitology, necropsy, and histopathology as well as demographic data such as owner, species, sex, breed, or geographic origin of the animal is described. This information is available to veterinarians, epidemiologists, herdsmen, and others involved in disease prevention or control efforts. The system described utilizes natural language, thus overcoming difficulties encountered in systems with numerical intermediates. Used and revised for the last 10 years, the system described has proved useful for annual administrative quantitation of services performed. In fact, the Concordance Index serves as the annual report of the University of Missouri Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory. Having accurate detailed information on individual cases, as well as a variety of composite data, has been extremely helpful in the documentation necessary for attracting funding for study of specific disease states. PMID:475103

  11. Understanding the dynamics of information technology implementation: a study of clinical information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paré, G; Elam, J J

    1995-01-01

    Health care institutions are considering a variety of emerging information technologies (ITs) in the hope of increasing efficiency, reducing costs, re-engineering work processes, and improving quality of care. The recent, rapid advances made in the use of innovative ITs in the health care field can present a plethora of problems to the administrative staff. Perhaps the most pressing of these concerns is the ability of today's hospitals to effectively create and utilize computer-based information systems. IT implementation has long been of great interest for information systems researchers. This branch of information system study seeks to identify those factors that are integral to optimizing the usage of IT. For example, researchers have advised practitioners that managerial support, high quality system design, commitment to advancing with the field, and extensive project planning are all key elements of successful system. In sum, previous research has produced a set of managerial proscriptions which, taken as a whole, constitute the "ideal" way to implement an IT system. Yet despite these normative principles and proscriptions, many health care institutions continue to find their attempts to make use of IT fraught with difficulty. Therefore, the objective of this study is to broaden and edify our understanding of IT implementation. More specifically, we seek to dispel the myth of the "ideal" system setup by exploring some of the alternative systems in use. We wish to investigate how and why the components of these alternative systems interact to produce utilization success (or failure). The study investigates the establishment and subsequent use of three clinical information systems (CIS) in a large tertiary care teaching hospital. The first case study is that of the hospital-wide implementation of a computer system that allows physicians to sign their medical records electronically. The second case examines the use of an electronic patient chart used to support

  12. The Protein Information Management System (PiMS): a generic tool for any structural biology research laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Chris; Pajon, Anne; Griffiths, Susanne L; Daniel, Ed; Savitsky, Marc; Lin, Bill; Diprose, Jonathan M; da Silva, Alan Wilter; Pilicheva, Katya; Troshin, Peter; van Niekerk, Johannes; Isaacs, Neil; Naismith, James; Nave, Colin; Blake, Richard; Wilson, Keith S; Stuart, David I; Henrick, Kim; Esnouf, Robert M

    2011-04-01

    The techniques used in protein production and structural biology have been developing rapidly, but techniques for recording the laboratory information produced have not kept pace. One approach is the development of laboratory information-management systems (LIMS), which typically use a relational database schema to model and store results from a laboratory workflow. The underlying philosophy and implementation of the Protein Information Management System (PiMS), a LIMS development specifically targeted at the flexible and unpredictable workflows of protein-production research laboratories of all scales, is described. PiMS is a web-based Java application that uses either Postgres or Oracle as the underlying relational database-management system. PiMS is available under a free licence to all academic laboratories either for local installation or for use as a managed service. PMID:21460443

  13. The Protein Information Management System (PiMS): a generic tool for any structural biology research laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Chris; Pajon, Anne; Griffiths, Susanne L.; Daniel, Ed; Savitsky, Marc; Lin, Bill; Diprose, Jonathan M.; Wilter da Silva, Alan; Pilicheva, Katya; Troshin, Peter; van Niekerk, Johannes; Isaacs, Neil; Naismith, James; Nave, Colin; Blake, Richard; Wilson, Keith S.; Stuart, David I.; Henrick, Kim; Esnouf, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    The techniques used in protein production and structural biology have been developing rapidly, but techniques for recording the laboratory information produced have not kept pace. One approach is the development of laboratory information-management systems (LIMS), which typically use a relational database schema to model and store results from a laboratory workflow. The underlying philosophy and implementation of the Protein Information Management System (PiMS), a LIMS development specifically targeted at the flexible and unpredictable workflows of protein-production research laboratories of all scales, is described. PiMS is a web-based Java application that uses either Postgres or Oracle as the underlying relational database-management system. PiMS is available under a free licence to all academic laboratories either for local installation or for use as a managed service. PMID:21460443

  14. The Protein Information Management System (PiMS): a generic tool for any structural biology research laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Chris; Pajon, Anne; Griffiths, Susanne L; Daniel, Ed; Savitsky, Marc; Lin, Bill; Diprose, Jonathan M; da Silva, Alan Wilter; Pilicheva, Katya; Troshin, Peter; van Niekerk, Johannes; Isaacs, Neil; Naismith, James; Nave, Colin; Blake, Richard; Wilson, Keith S; Stuart, David I; Henrick, Kim; Esnouf, Robert M

    2011-04-01

    The techniques used in protein production and structural biology have been developing rapidly, but techniques for recording the laboratory information produced have not kept pace. One approach is the development of laboratory information-management systems (LIMS), which typically use a relational database schema to model and store results from a laboratory workflow. The underlying philosophy and implementation of the Protein Information Management System (PiMS), a LIMS development specifically targeted at the flexible and unpredictable workflows of protein-production research laboratories of all scales, is described. PiMS is a web-based Java application that uses either Postgres or Oracle as the underlying relational database-management system. PiMS is available under a free licence to all academic laboratories either for local installation or for use as a managed service.

  15. Clinical laboratory evaluation of the Abbott MS-2 automated antimicrobial susceptibility testing system: report of a collaborative study.

    OpenAIRE

    Thornsberry, C; Anhalt, J P; Washington, J A; McCarthy, L R; Schoenknecht, F D; Sherris, J. C.; Spencer, H J

    1980-01-01

    The MS-2 system (Abbott Diagnostics, Division of Abbott Laboratories, Dallas, Tex.) was evaluated for its efficacy in determining the susceptibilities of both clinical and selected challenge (nonfastidious, facultative, and aerobic) isolates. The MS-2 results were compared with standard Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion and microdilution results by using fresh clinical isolates. For gram-positive isolates other than enterococci, overall agreement between MS-2 and reference results was 93 to 98%. Wit...

  16. Implementation and user satisfaction with forensic laboratory information systems in death investigation offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Bruce P

    2013-03-01

    The use of laboratory information management systems (LIMSs) in forensic pathology and death investigation systems has lagged behind the greater pathology community. Yet the logistical needs of a modern medical examiner or coroner office could be well served by a robust forensic LIMS, and the data stored in a forensic LIMS could be effectively mined for the protection of the public's health and safety.In spring 2007, the National Association of Medical Examiners conducted a survey of its members to determine the use of and satisfaction with forensic LIMS. This survey was repeated in the fall of 2011. The responses to the 2 surveys were compared to note any trends or changes to LIMS use by medical examiners and coroners.Although the use of LIMS has increased in the 4 1/2 years between surveys, 18% of death investigation systems still do not have a forensic LIMS. The percentage of offices with home-developed systems has increased, whereas the user's satisfaction with these systems has decreased. This may be due to limited budgets to either purchase or develop systems. The integration of images into these systems has increased, but not nearly to the level that should be present in an image-dependent field. Users of these systems are cognizant of the features that a forensic LIMS should have to ensure the smooth operation of a death investigation office. PMID:23361076

  17. Assessment of laboratory logistics management information system practice for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis laboratory commodities in selected public health facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desale, Adino; Taye, Bineyam; Belay, Getachew; Nigatu, Alemayehu

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Logistics management information system for health commodities remained poorly implemented in most of developing countries. To assess the status of laboratory logistics management information system for HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis laboratory commodities in public health facilities in Addis Ababa. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted from September 2010-January 2011 at selected public health facilities. A stratified random sampling method was used to include a total of 43 facilities which, were investigated through quantitative methods using structured questionnaires interviews. Focus group discussion with the designated supply chain managers and key informant interviews were conducted for the qualitative method. Results There exists a well-designed logistics system for laboratory commodities with trained pharmacy personnel, distributed standard LMIS formats and established inventory control procedures. However, majority of laboratory professionals were not trained in LMIS. Majority of the facilities (60.5%) were stocked out for at least one ART monitoring and TB laboratory reagents and the highest stock out rate was for chemistry reagents. Expired ART monitoring laboratory commodities were found in 25 (73.5%) of facilities. Fifty percent (50%) of the assessed hospitals and 54% of health centers were currently using stock/bin cards for all HIV/AIDS and TB laboratory commodities in main pharmacy store, among these only 25% and 20.8% of them were updated with accurate information matching with the physical count done at the time of visit for hospitals and health centers respectively. Conclusion Even though there exists a well designed laboratory LMIS, keeping quality stock/bin cards and LMIS reports were very low. Key ART monitoring laboratory commodities were stock out at many facilities at the day of visit and during the past six months. Based on findings, training of laboratory personnel's managing laboratory commodities and keeping

  18. Factors influencing outcomes of clinical information systems implementation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Dianne; Cummings, Greta G; LeBlanc, Lisa; Smith, Donna L

    2009-01-01

    Healthcare agencies spend significant resources to acquire or develop clinical information systems. However, implementation of clinical information systems often report significant failures. A systematic review of the research literature identified processes and outcomes of clinical information system implementation and factors that influenced success or failure. Of 124 original papers, 18 met the primary inclusion criteria-clinical systems implementation, healthcare facility, and outcome measures. Data extraction elements included study characteristics, outcomes, and implementation risk factors classified according to the Expanded Systems Life Cycle. The quality of each study was also assessed. Forty-nine outcomes of clinical information system implementation were identified. No single implementation strategy proved completely effective. The findings of this synthesis direct the attention of managers and decision makers to the importance of clinical context to successful implementation of clinical information systems. The highest number of factors influencing success or failure was reported during implementation and system "go-live." End-user support or lack thereof was the important factor in both successful and failed implementations, respectively. Following the Expanded Systems Life Cycle management model instead of a traditional project management approach may contribute to greater success over time, by paying particular attention to the underrecognized maintenance phase of implementation. PMID:19411944

  19. Clinical simulation and workflow by use of two clinical information systems, the electronic health record and digital dictation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koldby, Sven; Schou Jensen, Iben

    2013-01-01

    Clinical information systems do not always support clinician workflows. An increasing number of unintended clinical incidents might be related to implementation of clinical information systems and to a new registration praxis of unintended clinical incidents. Evidence of performing clinical simulations before implementation of new clinical information systems provides the basis for use of this method. The intention has been to evaluate patient safety issues, functionality, workflow, and usefulness of a new solution before implementation in the hospitals. Use of a solution which integrates digital dictation and the EHR (electronic health record) were simulated in realistic and controlled clinical environments. Useful information dealing with workflow and patient safety were obtained. The clinical simulation demonstrated that the EHR locks during use of the integration of digital dictation, thus making it impossible to use the EHR or connected applications during digital dictation. The results of the simulations showed that the tested and evaluated solution does not support the clinical workflow. Conducting the simulations enabled us to improve the solution before implementation, but further development is necessary before implementation of the solution.

  20. Automation in the clinical microbiology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Susan M; Marlowe, Elizabeth M

    2013-09-01

    Imagine a clinical microbiology laboratory where a patient's specimens are placed on a conveyor belt and sent on an automation line for processing and plating. Technologists need only log onto a computer to visualize the images of a culture and send to a mass spectrometer for identification. Once a pathogen is identified, the system knows to send the colony for susceptibility testing. This is the future of the clinical microbiology laboratory. This article outlines the operational and staffing challenges facing clinical microbiology laboratories and the evolution of automation that is shaping the way laboratory medicine will be practiced in the future.

  1. Importance of Public-Private Partnerships: Strengthening Laboratory Medicine Systems and Clinical Practice in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Ritu; Gadde, Renuka; Nkengasong, John N

    2016-04-15

    After the launch of the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief in 2003, it became evident that inadequate laboratory systems and services would severely limit the scale-up of human immunodeficiency virus infection prevention, care, and treatment programs. Thus, the Office of the US Global AIDS Coordinator, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Becton, Dickinson and Company developed a public-private partnership (PPP). Between October 2007 and July 2012, the PPP combined the competencies of the public and private sectors to boost sustainable laboratory systems and develop workforce skills in 4 African countries. Key accomplishments of the initiative include measurable and scalable outcomes to strengthen national capacities to build technical skills, develop sample referral networks, map disease prevalence, support evidence-based health programming, and drive continuous quality improvement in laboratories. This report details lessons learned from our experience and a series of recommendations on how to achieve successful PPPs. PMID:27025696

  2. Healthcare information systems: data mining methods in the creation of a clinical recommender system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, L.; Street, W. N.; Xu, E.

    2011-05-01

    Recommender systems have been extensively studied to present items, such as movies, music and books that are likely of interest to the user. Researchers have indicated that integrated medical information systems are becoming an essential part of the modern healthcare systems. Such systems have evolved to an integrated enterprise-wide system. In particular, such systems are considered as a type of enterprise information systems or ERP system addressing healthcare industry sector needs. As part of efforts, nursing care plan recommender systems can provide clinical decision support, nursing education, clinical quality control, and serve as a complement to existing practice guidelines. We propose to use correlations among nursing diagnoses, outcomes and interventions to create a recommender system for constructing nursing care plans. In the current study, we used nursing diagnosis data to develop the methodology. Our system utilises a prefix-tree structure common in itemset mining to construct a ranked list of suggested care plan items based on previously-entered items. Unlike common commercial systems, our system makes sequential recommendations based on user interaction, modifying a ranked list of suggested items at each step in care plan construction. We rank items based on traditional association-rule measures such as support and confidence, as well as a novel measure that anticipates which selections might improve the quality of future rankings. Since the multi-step nature of our recommendations presents problems for traditional evaluation measures, we also present a new evaluation method based on average ranking position and use it to test the effectiveness of different recommendation strategies.

  3. [Measures to prevent patient identification errors in blood collection/physiological function testing utilizing a laboratory information system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazu, Chisato; Hoshino, Satoshi; Furukawa, Taiji

    2013-08-01

    We constructed an integrated personal identification workflow chart using both bar code reading and an all in-one laboratory information system. The information system not only handles test data but also the information needed for patient guidance in the laboratory department. The reception terminals at the entrance, displays for patient guidance and patient identification tools at blood-sampling booths are all controlled by the information system. The number of patient identification errors was greatly reduced by the system. However, identification errors have not been abolished in the ultrasound department. After re-evaluation of the patient identification process in this department, we recognized that the major reason for the errors came from excessive identification workflow. Ordinarily, an ultrasound test requires patient identification 3 times, because 3 different systems are required during the entire test process, i.e. ultrasound modality system, laboratory information system and a system for producing reports. We are trying to connect the 3 different systems to develop a one-time identification workflow, but it is not a simple task and has not been completed yet. Utilization of the laboratory information system is effective, but is not yet perfect for patient identification. The most fundamental procedure for patient identification is to ask a person's name even today. Everyday checks in the ordinary workflow and everyone's participation in safety-management activity are important for the prevention of patient identification errors.

  4. Understanding information synthesis in oral surgery for the design of systems for clinical information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suebnukarn, Siriwan; Chanakarn, Piyawadee; Phisutphatthana, Sirada; Pongpatarat, Kanchala; Wongwaithongdee, Udom; Oupadissakoon, Chanekrid

    2015-12-01

    An understanding of the processes of clinical decision-making is essential for the development of health information technology. In this study we have analysed the acquisition of information during decision-making in oral surgery, and analysed cognitive tasks using a "think-aloud" protocol. We studied the techniques of processing information that were used by novices and experts as they completed 4 oral surgical cases modelled from data obtained from electronic hospital records. We studied 2 phases of an oral surgeon's preoperative practice including the "diagnosis and planning of treatment" and "preparing for a procedure". A framework analysis approach was used to analyse the qualitative data, and a descriptive statistical analysis was made of the quantitative data. The results showed that novice surgeons used hypotheticodeductive reasoning, whereas experts recognised patterns to diagnose and manage patients. Novices provided less detail when they prepared for a procedure. Concepts regarding "signs", "importance", "decisions", and "process" occurred most often during acquisition of information by both novices and experts. Based on these results, we formulated recommendations for the design of clinical information technology that would help to improve the acquisition of clinical information required by oral surgeons at all levels of expertise in their clinical decision-making.

  5. Medicine and clinical skills laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmohsen H Al-Elq

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the medical curriculum is to provide medical students with knowledge, skills and attitudes required for their practice. A decade ago, the UK Medical Council issued a report called "Tomorrow′s Doctors" [1] which called for the reduction in the factual content of the medical course with the promotion of problem-based and self-dedicated learning. This report was the basis for a move toward an extensive reform of the medical and nursing curricula. The new reformed curricula enhanced the integrated medical teaching and emphasized the teaching and learning of clinical skills. However, there were still concerns about the standards and appropriateness of the skills of new medical graduates. [2] The changes in the teaching and learning methods, the radical changes in the health care delivery and the rapid growth of technology challenged the traditional way of clinical skills development and led to the emergence of clinical skills laboratories (CSLs in the medical education of many medical and nursing schools. With the proliferation of the CSLs, it is important to evaluate and introduce the reader to their applications, bearing in mind the paucity of information on this subject particularly over the last couple of years. This article is based on literature review.

  6. Medicine and clinical skills laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Elq, Abdulmohsen H

    2007-05-01

    The main objective of the medical curriculum is to provide medical students with knowledge, skills and attitudes required for their practice. A decade ago, the UK Medical Council issued a report called "Tomorrow's Doctors"(1) which called for the reduction in the factual content of the medical course with the promotion of problem-based and self-dedicated learning. This report was the basis for a move toward an extensive reform of the medical and nursing curricula. The new reformed curricula enhanced the integrated medical teaching and emphasized the teaching and learning of clinical skills. However, there were still concerns about the standards and appropriateness of the skills of new medical graduates.(2)The changes in the teaching and learning methods, the radical changes in the health care delivery and the rapid growth of technology challenged the traditional way of clinical skills development and led to the emergence of clinical skills laboratories (CSLs) in the medical education of many medical and nursing schools. With the proliferation of the CSLs, it is important to evaluate and introduce the reader to their applications, bearing in mind the paucity of information on this subject particularly over the last couple of years. This article is based on literature review. PMID:23012147

  7. The Protein Information Management System (PiMS): a generic tool for any structural biology research laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Protein Information Management System (PiMS) is described together with a discussion of how its features make it well suited to laboratories of all sizes. The techniques used in protein production and structural biology have been developing rapidly, but techniques for recording the laboratory information produced have not kept pace. One approach is the development of laboratory information-management systems (LIMS), which typically use a relational database schema to model and store results from a laboratory workflow. The underlying philosophy and implementation of the Protein Information Management System (PiMS), a LIMS development specifically targeted at the flexible and unpredictable workflows of protein-production research laboratories of all scales, is described. PiMS is a web-based Java application that uses either Postgres or Oracle as the underlying relational database-management system. PiMS is available under a free licence to all academic laboratories either for local installation or for use as a managed service

  8. The Protein Information Management System (PiMS): a generic tool for any structural biology research laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Chris [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Pajon, Anne [Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton CB10 1SD (United Kingdom); Griffiths, Susanne L. [University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Daniel, Ed [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Savitsky, Marc [University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Lin, Bill [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Diprose, Jonathan M. [University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Wilter da Silva, Alan [Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton CB10 1SD (United Kingdom); Pilicheva, Katya [University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Troshin, Peter [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Niekerk, Johannes van [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Isaacs, Neil [University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Naismith, James [University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9ST, Scotland (United Kingdom); Nave, Colin; Blake, Richard [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Wilson, Keith S. [University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Stuart, David I. [University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); Henrick, Kim [Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton CB10 1SD (United Kingdom); Esnouf, Robert M., E-mail: robert@strubi.ox.ac.uk [University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7BN (United Kingdom); STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-01

    The Protein Information Management System (PiMS) is described together with a discussion of how its features make it well suited to laboratories of all sizes. The techniques used in protein production and structural biology have been developing rapidly, but techniques for recording the laboratory information produced have not kept pace. One approach is the development of laboratory information-management systems (LIMS), which typically use a relational database schema to model and store results from a laboratory workflow. The underlying philosophy and implementation of the Protein Information Management System (PiMS), a LIMS development specifically targeted at the flexible and unpredictable workflows of protein-production research laboratories of all scales, is described. PiMS is a web-based Java application that uses either Postgres or Oracle as the underlying relational database-management system. PiMS is available under a free licence to all academic laboratories either for local installation or for use as a managed service.

  9. Neural Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — As part of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and The Institute for System Research, the Neural Systems Laboratory studies the functionality of the...

  10. [Future roles of clinical laboratories and clinical laboratory technologists in university hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Hiromitsu; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2013-08-01

    Clinical laboratories in university hospitals should be operated with a good balance of medical practice, education, research, and management. The role of a clinical laboratory is to promptly provide highly reliable laboratory data to satisfy the needs of clinicians involved in medical practice and health maintenance of patients. Improvement and maintenance of the quality of the laboratory staff and environment are essential to achieve this goal. In order to implement these requirements efficiently, an appropriate quality management system should be introduced and established, and evaluated objectively by a third party (e.g. by obtaining ISO 15189 certification). ISO 15189 is an international standard regarding the quality and competence of clinical laboratories, and specifies a review of the efficient operational system and technical requirements such as competence in implementing practical tests and calibration. This means the results of laboratory tests reported by accredited laboratories withstand any international evaluation, which is very important to assure the future importance of the existence and management of clinical laboratories as well as internationalization of medical practice. "Education" and "research" have important implications in addition to "medical practice" and "management", as the roles that clinical laboratories should play in university hospitals. University hospital laboratories should be operated by keeping these four factors in good balance. Why are "education" and "research" required in addition to "medical practice" services? If individual clinical laboratory technologists can provide an appropriate response to this question, the importance of the existence of clinical laboratories would be reinforced, without being compromised. PMID:24218765

  11. Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This database contains the commercially marketed in vitro test systems categorized by the FDA since January 31, 2000, and tests categorized by the Centers for...

  12. Integrating clinical and laboratory data in genetic studies of complex phenotypes: a network-based data management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, F J; Thomas, C J; Koskela, R J; Breschel, T S; Hightower, T C; Rohrer, N; Savino, C; McInnis, M G; Simpson, S G; DePaulo, J R

    1998-05-01

    The identification of genes underlying a complex phenotype can be a massive undertaking, and may require a much larger sample size than thought previously. The integration of such large volumes of clinical and laboratory data has become a major challenge. In this paper we describe a network-based data management system designed to address this challenge. Our system offers several advantages. Since the system uses commercial software, it obviates the acquisition, installation, and debugging of privately-available software, and is fully compatible with Windows and other commercial software. The system uses relational database architecture, which offers exceptional flexibility, facilitates complex data queries, and expedites extensive data quality control. The system is particularly designed to integrate clinical and laboratory data efficiently, producing summary reports, pedigrees, and exported files containing both phenotype and genotype data in a virtually unlimited range of formats. We describe a comprehensive system that manages clinical, DNA, cell line, and genotype data, but since the system is modular, researchers can set up only those elements which they need immediately, expanding later as needed. PMID:9603614

  13. Integrating clinical and laboratory data in genetic studies of complex phenotypes: a network-based data management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, F J; Thomas, C J; Koskela, R J; Breschel, T S; Hightower, T C; Rohrer, N; Savino, C; McInnis, M G; Simpson, S G; DePaulo, J R

    1998-05-01

    The identification of genes underlying a complex phenotype can be a massive undertaking, and may require a much larger sample size than thought previously. The integration of such large volumes of clinical and laboratory data has become a major challenge. In this paper we describe a network-based data management system designed to address this challenge. Our system offers several advantages. Since the system uses commercial software, it obviates the acquisition, installation, and debugging of privately-available software, and is fully compatible with Windows and other commercial software. The system uses relational database architecture, which offers exceptional flexibility, facilitates complex data queries, and expedites extensive data quality control. The system is particularly designed to integrate clinical and laboratory data efficiently, producing summary reports, pedigrees, and exported files containing both phenotype and genotype data in a virtually unlimited range of formats. We describe a comprehensive system that manages clinical, DNA, cell line, and genotype data, but since the system is modular, researchers can set up only those elements which they need immediately, expanding later as needed.

  14. A CIS (Clinical Information System) Quality Evaluation Tool for Nursing Care Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seon Ah

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a tool to evaluate the quality of a clinical information system (CIS) conceived by nurses and conduct a pilot test with the developed tool as an initial assessment. CIS quality is required for successful implementation in information technology (IT) environments. The study started with the realization that…

  15. The Effects of Creating Psychological Ownership on Physicians' Acceptance of Clinical Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Paré, Guy; Sicotte, Claude; Jacques, Hélène

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Motivated by the need to push further our understanding of physicians' acceptance of clinical information systems, we propose a relatively new construct, namely, psychological ownership. We situated the construct within a nomological net using a prevailing and dominant information technology adoption behavior model as a logical starting point.

  16. Guidance on Evaluating Options for Representing Clinical Data within Health Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiker, Nicholas R; Hynes, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    The health information system PlunketPlus is a clinical initiative of Plunket (the Royal New Zealand Plunket Society) with a goal of further improving the health outcomes for children in New Zealand. The success of PlunketPlus depends heavily on how data is represented within the system. The purpose of the study described in this paper was to use PlunketPlus as a case study to inform the development of guidance on evaluating options for representing clinical data within health information systems, with a particular focus on automating existing informational processes. It has been possible to take some of the lessons learned to inform the development of initial more generic guidance that might be applicable across a range of domains. This paper concludes with a description of how Plunket applied the guidance as part of the development of PlunketPlus.

  17. Decision support for clinical laboratory capacity planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Merode, G G; Hasman, A; Derks, J; Goldschmidt, H M; Schoenmaker, B; Oosten, M

    1995-01-01

    The design of a decision support system for capacity planning in clinical laboratories is discussed. The DSS supports decisions concerning the following questions: how should the laboratory be divided into job shops (departments/sections), how should staff be assigned to workstations and how should samples be assigned to workstations for testing. The decision support system contains modules for supporting decisions at the overall laboratory level (concerning the division of the laboratory into job shops) and for supporting decisions at the job shop level (assignment of staff to workstations and sample scheduling). Experiments with these modules are described showing both the functionality and the validity.

  18. To what extent is clinical and laboratory information used to perform medication reviews in the nursing home setting? the CLEAR study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mestres Gonzalvo C

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Carlota Mestres Gonzalvo,1 Kim PGM Hurkens,2 Hugo AJM de Wit,3 Brigit PC van Oijen,1 Rob Janknegt,1 Jos MGA Schols,4 Wubbo J Mulder,5 Frans R Verhey,6 Bjorn Winkens,7 Paul-Hugo M van der Kuy1 1Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Orbis Medical Centre, Sittard, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Geriatric Medicine, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, 3Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Toxicology, Atrium Medical Centre, Heerlen, 4Department of Family Medicine and Department of Health Services Research, School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University, 5Department of Internal Medicine, Maastricht University Medical Centre, 6Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, Alzheimer Centre Limburg/School for Mental Health and Neurosciences, 7Department of Methodology and Statistics, School for Public Health and Primary Care, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate to what extent laboratory data, actual medication, medical history, and/or drug indication influence the quality of medication reviews for nursing home patients. Methods: Forty-six health care professionals from different fields were requested to perform medication reviews for three different cases. Per case, the amount of information provided varied in three subsequent stages: stage 1, medication list only; stage 2, adding laboratory data and reason for hospital admission; and stage 3, adding medical history/drug indication. Following a slightly modified Delphi method, a multidisciplinary team performed the medication review for each case and stage. The results of these medication reviews were used as reference reviews (gold standard. The remarks from the participants were scored, according to their potential clinical impact, from relevant to harmful on a scale of 3 to -1. A total score per case and stage was calculated and expressed as a percentage of the total score from the expert

  19. Use of a clinical information system to support the cancer pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mukai, Thomas; Vedsted, Peter; Bro, Flemming;

    satisfactorily. This may lead to diagnostic delay, delay in treatment, lack of continuity and seamless pathways and low patient satisfaction. Objective: Our aim is to clarify to which degree clinical information support systems can provide GPs and Our aim is to clarify to which degree clinical information...... support systems can provide GPs and patients with on-time and updated information about agreed care pathways and to examine the effect on delay, use of and adherence to guidelines and doctor and patient satisfaction. Subjects and Methods: We intend to conduct two randomized controlled trials to measure...... an electronic questionnaire compared to using a paper questionnaire to create an extended data and feedback system. Results: Different outcome measures will be analyzed: Use of health care services, clinical satisfaction, patient experienced continuity, use of further tests and adherence to guidelines....

  20. Clinical laboratory accreditation in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handoo, Anil; Sood, Swaroop Krishan

    2012-06-01

    Test results from clinical laboratories must ensure accuracy, as these are crucial in several areas of health care. It is necessary that the laboratory implements quality assurance to achieve this goal. The implementation of quality should be audited by independent bodies,referred to as accreditation bodies. Accreditation is a third-party attestation by an authoritative body, which certifies that the applicant laboratory meets quality requirements of accreditation body and has demonstrated its competence to carry out specific tasks. Although in most of the countries,accreditation is mandatory, in India it is voluntary. The quality requirements are described in standards developed by many accreditation organizations. The internationally acceptable standard for clinical laboratories is ISO15189, which is based on ISO/IEC standard 17025. The accreditation body in India is the National Accreditation Board for Testing and Calibration Laboratories, which has signed Mutual Recognition Agreement with the regional cooperation the Asia Pacific Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation and with the apex cooperation the International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation. PMID:22727005

  1. Tactical Systems Integration Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Tactical Systems Integration Laboratory is used to design and integrate computer hardware and software and related electronic subsystems for tactical vehicles....

  2. Engineered Natural Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — With its pressure vessels that simulate the pressures and temperatures found deep underground, NETL’s Engineered Natural Systems Laboratory in Pittsburgh, PA, gives...

  3. Clinical and Laboratory Findings That Differentiate Herpes Simplex Virus Central Nervous System Disease from Enteroviral Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanaee, Layli; Taljaard, Monica; Karnauchow, Tim; Perry, Jeffrey J

    2016-01-01

    Background. It can be difficult for clinicians to distinguish between the relatively benign enteroviral (EnV) meningitis and potentially lethal herpes simplex virus (HSV) central nervous system (CNS) disease. Very limited evidence currently exists to guide them. Objective. This study sought to identify clinical features and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings associated with HSV CNS disease. Methods. Given that PCR testing often is not immediately available, this chart review study sought to identify clinical and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings associated with HSV meningitis over a 6-year period. In cases where PCR was not performed, HSV and EnV were assigned based on clinical criteria. Results. We enrolled 166 consecutive patients: 40 HSV and 126 EnV patients. HSV patients had a mean 40.4 versus 31.3 years for EnV, p = 0.005, seizures 21.1% versus 1.6% for EnV, p meningitis. HSV cases had lower CSF neutrophils, higher lymphocytes, and higher protein levels. PMID:27563314

  4. [Strategy Development for International Cooperation in the Clinical Laboratory Field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Yoshiko; Osawa, Susumu

    2015-10-01

    The strategy of international cooperation in the clinical laboratory field was analyzed to improve the quality of intervention by reviewing documents from international organizations and the Japanese government. Based on the world development agenda, the target of action for health has shifted from communicable diseases to non-communicable diseases (NCD). This emphasizes the importance of comprehensive clinical laboratories instead of disease-specific examinations in developing countries. To achieve this goal, the World Health Organization (WHO) has disseminated to the African and Asian regions the Laboratory Quality Management System (LQMS), which is based on the same principles of the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) 15189. To execute this strategy, international experts must have competence in project management, analyze information regarding the target country, and develop a strategy for management of the LQMS with an understanding of the technical aspects of laboratory work. However, there is no appropriate pre- and post-educational system of international health for Japanese international workers. Universities and academic organizations should cooperate with the government to establish a system of education for international workers. Objectives of this education system must include: (1) training for the organization and understanding of global health issues, (2) education of the principles regarding comprehensive management of clinical laboratories, and (3) understanding the LQMS which was employed based on WHO's initiative. Achievement of these objectives will help improve the quality of international cooperation in the clinical laboratory field. PMID:26897850

  5. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma in Chinese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yan-Fang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma (S-ALCL is a rare disease with a highly variable prognosis and no standard chemotherapy regimen. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK has been reported as an important prognostic factor correlated with S-ALCL in many but not all studies. In our study, we retrospectively analyzed 92 patients with S-ALCL from the Peking University Lymphoma Center for clinical and molecular prognostic factors to make clear the role of ALK and other prognostic factors in Han Chinese S-ALCL. Results The majority of Chinese S-ALCL patients were young male patients (median age 26, male/female ratio 1.7 and the median age was younger than previous reports regardless of ALK expression status. The only statistically significant different clinical characteristic in S-ALCL between ALK positive (ALK+ and ALK negative (ALK- was age, with a younger median age of 22 for ALK+ compared with 30 for ALK-. However, when pediatric patients (≤18 were excluded, there was no age difference between ALK+ and ALK-. The groups did not differ in the proportion of males, those with clinical stage III/IV (49 vs 51% or those with extranodal disease (53 vs 59%. Of 73 evaluable patients, the 3-year and 5-year survival rates were 60% and 47%, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that three factors: advanced stage III/IV, lack of expression of ALK, and high Ki-67 expression, were associated with treatment failure in patients with S-ALCL. However, ALK expression correlated with improved survival only in patients younger than 14 years, while not in adult patients. In multivariate analysis, only clinical stage was an independent prognostic factor for survival. Expressions of Wilms tumor 1 (WT1 and B-cell lymphoma 2 protein (BCL-2 correlated with the expression of ALK, but they did not have prognostic significance. High Ki-67 expression was also a poor prognostic factor. Conclusions Our results show that ALK expression alone is not

  6. Reducing communication delays and improving quality of care with a tuberculosis laboratory information system in resource poor environments: a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín A Blaya

    Full Text Available Lost, delayed or incorrect laboratory results are associated with delays in initiating treatment. Delays in treatment for Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB can worsen patient outcomes and increase transmission. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of a laboratory information system in reducing delays and the time for MDR-TB patients to culture convert (stop transmitting.78 primary Health Centers (HCs in Lima, Peru. Participants lived within the catchment area of participating HCs and had at least one MDR-TB risk factor. The study design was a cluster randomized controlled trial with baseline data. The intervention was the e-Chasqui web-based laboratory information system. Main outcome measures were: times to communicate a result; to start or change a patient's treatment; and for that patient to culture convert.1671 patients were enrolled. Intervention HCs took significantly less time to receive drug susceptibility test (DST (median 11 vs. 17 days, Hazard Ratio 0.67 [0.62-0.72] and culture (5 vs. 8 days, 0.68 [0.65-0.72] results. The time to treatment was not significantly different, but patients in intervention HCs took 16 days (20% less time to culture convert (p = 0.047.The eChasqui system reduced the time to communicate results between laboratories and HCs and time to culture conversion. It is now used in over 259 HCs covering 4.1 million people. This is the first randomized controlled trial of a laboratory information system in a developing country for any disease and the only study worldwide to show clinical impact of such a system.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01201941.

  7. Information systems for administration, clinical documentation and quality assurance in an Austrian disease management programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Peter; Truskaller, Thomas; Rakovac, Ivo; Bruner, Fritz; Zanettin, Dominik; Pieber, Thomas R

    2009-01-01

    5.9% of the Austrian population is affected by diabetes mellitus. Disease Management is a structured treatment approach that is suitable for application to the diabetes mellitus area and often is supported by information technology. This article describes the information systems developed and implemented in the Austrian disease management programme for type 2 diabetes. Several workflows for administration as well as for clinical documentation have been implemented utilizing the Austrian e-Health infrastructure. De-identified clinical data is available for creating feedback reports for providers and programme evaluation.

  8. Clinical laboratories: production industry or medical services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plebani, Mario

    2015-06-01

    The current failure to evidence any link between laboratory tests, clinical decision-making and patient outcomes, and the scarcity of financial resources affecting healthcare systems worldwide, have put further pressure on the organization and delivery of laboratory services. Consolidation, merger, and laboratory downsizing have been driven by the need to deliver economies of scale and cut costs per test while boosting productivity. Distorted economics, based on payment models rewarding volume and efficiency rather than quality and clinical effectiveness, have underpinned the entrance of clinical laboratories into the production industry thus forcing them to relinquish their original mission of providing medical services. The sea change in laboratory medicine in recent years, with the introduction of ever newer and ever more complex tests, including 'omics', which impact on clinical decision-making, should encourage clinical laboratories to return to their original mission as long as payments models are changed. Rather than being considered solely in terms of costs, diagnostic testing must be seen in the context of an entire hospital stay or an overall payment for a care pathway: the testing process should be conceived as a part of the patient's entire journey. PMID:25405721

  9. The clinical adoption meta-model: a temporal meta-model describing the clinical adoption of health information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Morgan; Lau, Francis

    2014-01-01

    Health information systems (HISs) hold the promise to transform health care; however, their adoption is challenged. We have developed the Clinical Adoption Meta-Model (CAMM) to help describe processes and possible challenges with clinical adoption. The CAMM, developed through an action research study to evaluate a provincial HIS, is a temporal model with four dimensions: availability, use, behaviour changes, and outcome changes. Seven CAMM archetypes are described, illustrating classic trajectories of adoption of HISs over time. Each archetype includes an example from the literature. The CAMM and its archetypes can support HIS implementers, evaluators, learners, and researchers. PMID:24884588

  10. Leveraging a clinical research information system to assist biospecimen data and workflow management: a hybrid approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Large multi-center clinical studies often involve the collection and analysis of biological samples. It is necessary to ensure timely, complete and accurate recording of analytical results and associated phenotypic and clinical information. The TRIBE-AKI Consortium http://www.yale.edu/tribeaki supports a network of multiple related studies and sample biorepository, thus allowing researchers to take advantage of a larger specimen collection than they might have at an individual institution. Description We describe a biospecimen data management system (BDMS) that supports TRIBE-AKI and is intended for multi-center collaborative clinical studies that involve shipment of biospecimens between sites. This system works in conjunction with a clinical research information system (CRIS) that stores the clinical data associated with the biospecimens, along with other patient-related parameters. Inter-operation between the two systems is mediated by an interactively invoked suite of Web Services, as well as by batch code. We discuss various challenges involved in integration. Conclusions Our experience indicates that an approach that emphasizes inter-operability is reasonably optimal in allowing each system to be utilized for the tasks for which it is best suited. PMID:21884570

  11. Ubiquitous Diabetes Management System via Interactive Communication Based on Information Technologies: Clinical Effects and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jae-Hyoung; Kim, Hun-Sung; Han, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Jin-Hee; Oh, Jeong-Ah; Choi, Yoon-Hee

    2010-01-01

    New diabetes management systems based on interactive communication have been introduced recently, accompanying rapid advances in information technology; these systems are referred to as "ubiquitous diabetes management systems." In such ubiquitous systems, patients and medical teams can communicate via Internet or telecommunications, with patients uploading their glucose data and personal information, and medical teams sending optimal feedback. Clinical evidence from both long-term and short-term trials has been reported by some researchers. Such systems appear to be effective not only in reducing the levels of HbA1c but also in stabilizing glucose control. However, most notably, evidence for the cost-effectiveness of such a system should be demonstrated before it can be propagated out to the general population in actual clinical practice. To establish a cost-effective model, various types of clinical decision supporting software designed to reduce the labor time of physicians must first be developed. A number of sensors and devices for monitoring patients' data are expected to be available in the near future; thus, methods for automatic interconnections between devices and web charts were also developed. Further investigations to demonstrate the clinical outcomes of such a system should be conducted, hopefully leading to a new paradigm of diabetes management. PMID:21076573

  12. [Quality use of commercial laboratory for clinical testing services - considering laboratory's role].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Shinji

    2014-12-01

    The number of commercial laboratories for clinical testing in Japan run privately has decreased to about 30 companies, and their business is getting tougher. Branch Lab. and FMS businesses have not expanded recently due to the new reimbursement system which adds an additional sample management fee, becoming effective in 2010. This presentation gives an outline of each role for hospital and commercial laboratories, and their pros & cons considering the current medical situation. Commercial laboratories have investigated how to utilize ICT systems for sharing test information between hospitals and our facilities. It would be very helpful to clarify issues for each hospital. We will develop and create new values for clinical laboratory testing services and forge mutually beneficial relationships with medical institutions. (Review). PMID:25823243

  13. T.I.M.S: TaqMan Information Management System, tools to organize data flow in a genotyping laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albion Tim

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP genotyping is a major activity in biomedical research. The Taqman technology is one of the most commonly used approaches. It produces large amounts of data that are difficult to process by hand. Laboratories not equipped with a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS need tools to organize the data flow. Results We propose a package of Visual Basic programs focused on sample management and on the parsing of input and output TaqMan files. The code is written in Visual Basic, embedded in the Microsoft Office package, and it allows anyone to have access to those tools, without any programming skills and with basic computer requirements. Conclusion We have created useful tools focused on management of TaqMan genotyping data, a critical issue in genotyping laboratories whithout a more sophisticated and expensive system, such as a LIMS.

  14. Where is information quality lost at clinical level? A mixed-method study on information systems and data quality in three urban Kenyan ANC clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Hahn

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Well-working health information systems are considered vital with the quality of health data ranked of highest importance for decision making at patient care and policy levels. In particular, health facilities play an important role, since they are not only the entry point for the national health information system but also use health data (and primarily for patient care. Design: A multiple case study was carried out between March and August 2012 at the antenatal care (ANC clinics of two private and one public Kenyan hospital to describe clinical information systems and assess the quality of information. The following methods were developed and employed in an iterative process: workplace walkthroughs, structured and in-depth interviews with staff members, and a quantitative assessment of data quality (completeness and accurate transmission of clinical information and reports in ANC. Views of staff and management on the quality of employed information systems, data quality, and influencing factors were captured qualitatively. Results: Staff rated the quality of information higher in the private hospitals employing computers than in the public hospital which relies on paper forms. Several potential threats to data quality were reported. Limitations in data quality were common at all study sites including wrong test results, missing registers, and inconsistencies in reports. Feedback was seldom on content or quality of reports and usage of data beyond individual patient care was low. Conclusions: We argue that the limited data quality has to be seen in the broader perspective of the information systems in which it is produced and used. The combination of different methods has proven to be useful for this. To improve the effectiveness and capabilities of these systems, combined measures are needed which include technical and organizational aspects (e.g. regular feedback to health workers and individual skills and motivation.

  15. Brunn: An open source laboratory information system for microplates with a graphical plate layout design process

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson Rolf; Spjuth Ola; Andersson Claes; Alvarsson Jonathan; Wikberg Jarl ES

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Compound profiling and drug screening generates large amounts of data and is generally based on microplate assays. Current information systems used for handling this are mainly commercial, closed source, expensive, and heavyweight and there is a need for a flexible lightweight open system for handling plate design, and validation and preparation of data. Results A Bioclipse plugin consisting of a client part and a relational database was constructed. A multiple-step plate ...

  16. Moriah Wind System Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The Moriah Wind System Laboratory provides in-service support for the more than 50 U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard and Military Sealift Command ships on which...

  17. Space Systems Laboratory (SSL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Space Systems Laboratory (SSL) is part of the Aerospace Engineering Department and A. James Clark School of Engineering at the University of Maryland in College...

  18. Cultures in hospitals and their influence on attitudes to, and satisfaction with, the use of clinical information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callen, Joanne L; Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Westbrook, Johanna I

    2007-08-01

    Studies have identified the importance of hospitals' organisational culture in clinical information system diffusion, but few have quantified its role. This study measured organisational culture in two Australian hospitals to explore whether clinicians' perceptions of culture related to their attitudes to, and satisfaction with, a computerised provider order entry system (CPOE). Data were collected using the Organisational Culture Inventory and a user-satisfaction survey administered to a population of 249 clinicians from the two hospitals. One hospital used CPOE to order clinical laboratory and radiology tests and view results, and the other used the test viewing function only, the ordering facility being planned for later implementation. We found a relationship between culture and clinicians' attitudes, with those in the constructive culture hospital more likely to express positive attitudes towards CPOE, whereas those in the aggressive/defensive hospital were more likely to be negative. The relationship between culture and attitudes towards clinical information systems should be taken into account when planning for their adoption. PMID:17475380

  19. MicroArray Facility: a laboratory information management system with extended support for Nylon based technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beaudoing Emmanuel

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High throughput gene expression profiling (GEP is becoming a routine technique in life science laboratories. With experimental designs that repeatedly span thousands of genes and hundreds of samples, relying on a dedicated database infrastructure is no longer an option. GEP technology is a fast moving target, with new approaches constantly broadening the field diversity. This technology heterogeneity, compounded by the informatics complexity of GEP databases, means that software developments have so far focused on mainstream techniques, leaving less typical yet established techniques such as Nylon microarrays at best partially supported. Results MAF (MicroArray Facility is the laboratory database system we have developed for managing the design, production and hybridization of spotted microarrays. Although it can support the widely used glass microarrays and oligo-chips, MAF was designed with the specific idiosyncrasies of Nylon based microarrays in mind. Notably single channel radioactive probes, microarray stripping and reuse, vector control hybridizations and spike-in controls are all natively supported by the software suite. MicroArray Facility is MIAME supportive and dynamically provides feedback on missing annotations to help users estimate effective MIAME compliance. Genomic data such as clone identifiers and gene symbols are also directly annotated by MAF software using standard public resources. The MAGE-ML data format is implemented for full data export. Journalized database operations (audit tracking, data anonymization, material traceability and user/project level confidentiality policies are also managed by MAF. Conclusion MicroArray Facility is a complete data management system for microarray producers and end-users. Particular care has been devoted to adequately model Nylon based microarrays. The MAF system, developed and implemented in both private and academic environments, has proved a robust solution for

  20. PIMS sequencing extension: a laboratory information management system for DNA sequencing facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldwin Stephen A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Facilities that provide a service for DNA sequencing typically support large numbers of users and experiment types. The cost of services is often reduced by the use of liquid handling robots but the efficiency of such facilities is hampered because the software for such robots does not usually integrate well with the systems that run the sequencing machines. Accordingly, there is a need for software systems capable of integrating different robotic systems and managing sample information for DNA sequencing services. In this paper, we describe an extension to the Protein Information Management System (PIMS that is designed for DNA sequencing facilities. The new version of PIMS has a user-friendly web interface and integrates all aspects of the sequencing process, including sample submission, handling and tracking, together with capture and management of the data. Results The PIMS sequencing extension has been in production since July 2009 at the University of Leeds DNA Sequencing Facility. It has completely replaced manual data handling and simplified the tasks of data management and user communication. Samples from 45 groups have been processed with an average throughput of 10000 samples per month. The current version of the PIMS sequencing extension works with Applied Biosystems 3130XL 96-well plate sequencer and MWG 4204 or Aviso Theonyx liquid handling robots, but is readily adaptable for use with other combinations of robots. Conclusions PIMS has been extended to provide a user-friendly and integrated data management solution for DNA sequencing facilities that is accessed through a normal web browser and allows simultaneous access by multiple users as well as facility managers. The system integrates sequencing and liquid handling robots, manages the data flow, and provides remote access to the sequencing results. The software is freely available, for academic users, from http://www.pims-lims.org/.

  1. PIMS sequencing extension: a laboratory information management system for DNA sequencing facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Facilities that provide a service for DNA sequencing typically support large numbers of users and experiment types. The cost of services is often reduced by the use of liquid handling robots but the efficiency of such facilities is hampered because the software for such robots does not usually integrate well with the systems that run the sequencing machines. Accordingly, there is a need for software systems capable of integrating different robotic systems and managing sample information for DNA sequencing services. In this paper, we describe an extension to the Protein Information Management System (PIMS) that is designed for DNA sequencing facilities. The new version of PIMS has a user-friendly web interface and integrates all aspects of the sequencing process, including sample submission, handling and tracking, together with capture and management of the data. Results The PIMS sequencing extension has been in production since July 2009 at the University of Leeds DNA Sequencing Facility. It has completely replaced manual data handling and simplified the tasks of data management and user communication. Samples from 45 groups have been processed with an average throughput of 10000 samples per month. The current version of the PIMS sequencing extension works with Applied Biosystems 3130XL 96-well plate sequencer and MWG 4204 or Aviso Theonyx liquid handling robots, but is readily adaptable for use with other combinations of robots. Conclusions PIMS has been extended to provide a user-friendly and integrated data management solution for DNA sequencing facilities that is accessed through a normal web browser and allows simultaneous access by multiple users as well as facility managers. The system integrates sequencing and liquid handling robots, manages the data flow, and provides remote access to the sequencing results. The software is freely available, for academic users, from http://www.pims-lims.org/. PMID:21385349

  2. Communications and Information Sharing (CIS) Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — TheCommunications and Information Sharing (CIS) Laboratory is a Public Safety interoperable communications technology laboratory with analog and digital radios, and...

  3. PROTEOMER: A workflow-optimized laboratory information management system for 2-D electrophoresis-centered proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebrich, Grit; Herrmann, Marion; Hartl, Daniela; Diedrich, Madeleine; Kreitler, Thomas; Wierling, Christoph; Klose, Joachim; Giavalisco, Patrick; Zabel, Claus; Mao, Lei

    2009-04-01

    In recent years proteomics became increasingly important to functional genomics. Although a large amount of data is generated by high throughput large-scale techniques, a connection of these mostly heterogeneous data from different analytical platforms and of different experiments is limited. Data mining procedures and algorithms are often insufficient to extract meaningful results from large datasets and therefore limit the exploitation of the generated biological information. In our proteomic core facility, which almost exclusively focuses on 2-DE/MS-based proteomics, we developed a proteomic database custom tailored to our needs aiming at connecting MS protein identification information to 2-DE derived protein expression profiles. The tools developed should not only enable an automatic evaluation of single experiments, but also link multiple 2-DE experiments with MS-data on different levels and thereby helping to create a comprehensive network of our proteomics data. Therefore the key feature of our "PROTEOMER" database is its high cross-referencing capacity, enabling integration of a wide range of experimental data. To illustrate the workflow and utility of the system, two practical examples are provided to demonstrate that proper data cross-referencing can transform information into biological knowledge. PMID:19259999

  4. [Challenges for pathologists in clinical laboratory medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezuka, F

    2001-06-01

    The number of pathologists in hospitals has been increasing and they are responsible for both surgical pathology and clinical laboratory medicine. In the future they will also play important roles in the modernized reform of the central laboratory as it establishes its own importance in improving the quality and safety of medical activities. As a pathologist, the author reports on challenges faced since assuming the present directorship of the department of laboratory medicine in 1995 including (a) establishing a decision-making system in collaboration with technologists, (b) improving expertise in the department through joining a variety of seminars, conferences and research activities, (c) publishing an annual department report, and (d) introducing both internal and external quality assessment. In the future, for young pathologists training in both pathology and laboratory medicine will be essential. PMID:11452548

  5. RadOnc: An Integrated Clinical Database and Information Retrieval System Implemented by HyperCard

    OpenAIRE

    Michael, Patricia A.; Foxlee, R. Heath

    1989-01-01

    RadOnc is a prototype hypermedia program designed for the resident physician which integrates a radiation oncology clinical database with reference information. Basic and clinical science information relevant to radiation oncology with pertinent literature reviews are linked to patient records which contain a clinical summary of the presentation, treatment and results. RadOnc's features include a dictionary, search capability, navigational aids, information printing and archiving, and graphic...

  6. Standardizing clinical laboratory data for secondary use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhyankar, Swapna; Demner-Fushman, Dina; McDonald, Clement J

    2012-08-01

    Clinical databases provide a rich source of data for answering clinical research questions. However, the variables recorded in clinical data systems are often identified by local, idiosyncratic, and sometimes redundant and/or ambiguous names (or codes) rather than unique, well-organized codes from standard code systems. This reality discourages research use of such databases, because researchers must invest considerable time in cleaning up the data before they can ask their first research question. Researchers at MIT developed MIMIC-II, a nearly complete collection of clinical data about intensive care patients. Because its data are drawn from existing clinical systems, it has many of the problems described above. In collaboration with the MIT researchers, we have begun a process of cleaning up the data and mapping the variable names and codes to LOINC codes. Our first step, which we describe here, was to map all of the laboratory test observations to LOINC codes. We were able to map 87% of the unique laboratory tests that cover 94% of the total number of laboratory tests results. Of the 13% of tests that we could not map, nearly 60% were due to test names whose real meaning could not be discerned and 29% represented tests that were not yet included in the LOINC table. These results suggest that LOINC codes cover most of laboratory tests used in critical care. We have delivered this work to the MIMIC-II researchers, who have included it in their standard MIMIC-II database release so that researchers who use this database in the future will not have to do this work. PMID:22561944

  7. Role of the New South Wales Department of Primary Industries' Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) in the 2007 equine influenza emergency animal disease response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, M G; Fraser, G C; Gaul, W N

    2011-07-01

    A Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) was used to manage the laboratory data and support planning and field activities as part of the response to the equine influenza outbreak in Australia in 2007. The database structure of the LIMS and the system configurations that were made to best handle the laboratory implications of the disease response are discussed. The operational aspects of the LIMS and the related procedures used at the laboratory to process the increased sample throughput are reviewed, as is the interaction of the LIMS with other corporate systems used in the management of the response. Outcomes from this tailored configuration and operation of the LIMS resulted in effective provision and control of the laboratory and laboratory information aspects of the response. The extent and immediate availability of the information provided from the LIMS was critical to some of the activities of key operatives involved in controlling the response. PMID:21711289

  8. Role of the New South Wales Department of Primary Industries' Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) in the 2007 equine influenza emergency animal disease response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, M G; Fraser, G C; Gaul, W N

    2011-07-01

    A Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) was used to manage the laboratory data and support planning and field activities as part of the response to the equine influenza outbreak in Australia in 2007. The database structure of the LIMS and the system configurations that were made to best handle the laboratory implications of the disease response are discussed. The operational aspects of the LIMS and the related procedures used at the laboratory to process the increased sample throughput are reviewed, as is the interaction of the LIMS with other corporate systems used in the management of the response. Outcomes from this tailored configuration and operation of the LIMS resulted in effective provision and control of the laboratory and laboratory information aspects of the response. The extent and immediate availability of the information provided from the LIMS was critical to some of the activities of key operatives involved in controlling the response.

  9. The successful implementation of a licensed data management interface between a Sunquest® laboratory information system and an AB SCIEX TM mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah French

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Interfacing complex laboratory equipment to laboratory information systems (LIS has become a more commonly encountered problem in clinical laboratories, especially for instruments that do not have an interface provided by the vendor. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry is a great example of such complex equipment, and has become a frequent addition to clinical laboratories. As the testing volume on such instruments can be significant, manual data entry will also be considerable and the potential for concomitant transcription errors arises. Due to this potential issue, our aim was to interface an AB SCIEX TM mass spectrometer to our Sunquest® LIS. Materials and Methods: We licensed software for the data management interface from the University of Pittsburgh, but extended this work as follows: The interface was designed so that it would accept a text file exported from the AB SCIEX TM × 5500 QTrap® mass spectrometer, pre-process the file (using newly written code into the correct format and upload it into Sunquest® via file transfer protocol. Results: The licensed software handled the majority of the interface tasks with the exception of converting the output from the Analyst® software to the required Sunquest® import format. This required writing of a "pre-processor" by one of the authors which was easily integrated with the supplied software. Conclusions: We successfully implemented the data management interface licensed from the University of Pittsburgh. Given the coding that was required to write the pre-processor, and alterations to the source code that were performed when debugging the software, we would suggest that before a laboratory decides to implement such an interface, it would be necessary to have a competent computer programmer available.

  10. The successful implementation of a licensed data management interface between a Sunquest® laboratory information system and an AB SCIEX™ mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Deborah; Terrazas, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Background: Interfacing complex laboratory equipment to laboratory information systems (LIS) has become a more commonly encountered problem in clinical laboratories, especially for instruments that do not have an interface provided by the vendor. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry is a great example of such complex equipment, and has become a frequent addition to clinical laboratories. As the testing volume on such instruments can be significant, manual data entry will also be considerable and the potential for concomitant transcription errors arises. Due to this potential issue, our aim was to interface an AB SCIEX™ mass spectrometer to our Sunquest® LIS. Materials and Methods: We licensed software for the data management interface from the University of Pittsburgh, but extended this work as follows: The interface was designed so that it would accept a text file exported from the AB SCIEX™ × 5500 QTrap® mass spectrometer, pre-process the file (using newly written code) into the correct format and upload it into Sunquest® via file transfer protocol. Results: The licensed software handled the majority of the interface tasks with the exception of converting the output from the Analyst® software to the required Sunquest® import format. This required writing of a “pre-processor” by one of the authors which was easily integrated with the supplied software. Conclusions: We successfully implemented the data management interface licensed from the University of Pittsburgh. Given the coding that was required to write the pre-processor, and alterations to the source code that were performed when debugging the software, we would suggest that before a laboratory decides to implement such an interface, it would be necessary to have a competent computer programmer available. PMID:23599901

  11. Clinical information systems end user satisfaction: the expectations and needs congruencies effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Faezeh; Poo, Danny C C; Tan, Yung Ming

    2015-02-01

    Prior research on information systems (IS) shows that users' attitudes and continuance intentions are associated with their satisfaction with information systems. As such, the increasing amount of investments in clinical information systems (CIS) signifies the importance of understanding CIS end users' (i.e., clinicians) satisfaction. In this study, we develop a conceptual framework to identify the cognitive determinants of clinicians' satisfaction formation. The disconfirmation paradigm serves as the core of the framework. The expectations and needs congruency models are the two models of this paradigm, and perceived performance is the basis of the comparisons in the models. The needs and expectations associated with the models are also specified. The survey methodology is adopted in this study to empirically validate the proposed research model. The survey is conducted at a public hospital and results in 112 and 203 valid responses (56% and 98% response rates) from doctors and nurses respectively. The partial least squares (PLS) method is used to analyze the data. The results of the study show that perceived CIS performance is the most influential factor on clinicians' (i.e., doctors and nurses) satisfaction. Doctors' expectations congruency is the next significant determinant of their satisfaction. Contrary to most previous findings, nurses' expectations and expectations congruency do not show a significant effect on their satisfaction. However, the needs congruency is found to significantly affect nurses' satisfaction. PMID:25542853

  12. Vitamin D status in children with systemic lupus erythematosus and its association with clinical and laboratory parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSaleem, Alhanouf; AlE'ed, Ashwaq; AlSaghier, Afaf; Al-Mayouf, Sulaiman M

    2015-01-01

    To assess serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH vitamin D) status in Saudi children with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and determined its association with clinical, laboratory variables and disease activity. This cross-sectional study comprised children with SLE who are followed at Pediatric Lupus Clinic. All patients reviewed for demographic data, age of first disease manifestations, and disease duration. All included patients evaluated for disease activity, which is completed by using the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) and laboratory parameters included a vitamin D profile, bone markers at enrollment and 3 months later. All patients treated with Cholecalciferol (vitamin D3 2000 IU daily) and calcium supplement (Caltrate 600 mg twice daily). Twenty-eight patients (26 female) with mean age of 9.7 years completed the evaluation. Fifteen patients had more than one major organ involvement. Most of the patients are on daily vitamin D3 supplement (800 IU) prior enrollment. The baseline assessment revealed 24 patients had low levels of serum 25-OH vitamin D levels, with a mean of 51.1 ± 33.6 nmol/L; 25 patients had high autoantibodies; and 18 patients had high protein/creatinine ratio, with a mean of 0.9 ± 1.7. Bone density was subnormal with a mean of 0.9 ± 1. The mean disease activity was 6 ± 5.6. Levels of 25-OH vitamin D correlated inversely with autoantibodies and SLEDAI and positively with bone density but not statistically significant. After 3 months, treatment of vitamin D3 (2000 IU daily) and Caltrate (600 mg twice daily), 17 patients had improvement in SLEDAI score and autoimmune markers. Disease activity of childhood SLE is probably linked with low serum 25-OH vitamin D levels. Accordingly, high daily vitamin D3 supplement could potentially impact disease activity of childhood SLE. Further follow up and more patients needed to confirm this finding.

  13. Thai clinical laboratory responsible to economic crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirisali, K; Vattanaviboon, P; Manochiopinij, S; Ananskulwat, W

    1999-01-01

    Nowadays, Thailand encounters a serious economic crisis. A clear consensus has been made that a cost-saving system must be the important tool. Both private and government organizations are engaged in this situation. We studied the cost-saving in the clinical laboratory. A questionnaire was distributed to 45 hospital laboratories located in Bangkok. Results showed that efforts to control the cost are the essential policy. There was a variety of factors contributing to the cost-saving process. The usage of public utility, non-recycle material and unnecessary utility were reconsidered. Besides, capital cost (wages and salary) personnel incentive are assessed. Forty three of the 45 respondents had attempted to reduce the cost via curtailing the unnecessary electricity. Eliminating the needless usage of telephone-call. water and unnecessary material was also an effective strategy. A reduction of 86.9%, 80 % and 80.0% of the mentioned factors respectively, was reported. An inventory system of the reagent, chemical and supplies was focused. Most of the laboratories have a policy on cost-saving by decreased the storage. Twenty eight of the 45 laboratories considered to purchase the cheaper with similar quality reagents instead. And some one would purchase a bulky pack when it is the best bargain. A specific system "contact reagent with a free rent instrument" has been used widely (33.3%). Finally, a new personnel management system has been chosen. Workload has rearranged and unnecessary extra-hour work was abandoned.

  14. 78 FR 6330 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory... related to improvement in clinical laboratory quality and laboratory medicine practice and specific... laboratory services; revisions to the standards under which clinical laboratories are regulated; the...

  15. [Clinical laboratory in the 21st century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, T

    1991-03-01

    Alvin Toffler has predicted that the "Third Wave" will be a society which be decentralized, diversified and customized, computer-dependent. Medical care and also clinical laboratory will be revolutionalized in a more or less similar direction to that predicted by him. Laboratory physicians and scientists should try to improve laboratory services, particularly establishment of adequate normal values, common expression of various laboratory results, introduction of medical decision making and recommended guideline for laboratory use in primary health care.

  16. Expert systems for clinical pathology reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Glenn A

    2008-08-01

    * Conventional automated interpretative reporting systems use standard or "canned" comments for patient reports. These are result-specific and do not generally refer to the patient context. * Laboratory information systems (LIS) are limited in their application of patient-specific content of reporting. * Patient-specific interpretation requires extensive cross-referencing to other information contained in the LIS such as previous test results, other related tests, and clinical notes, both current and previous. * Expert systems have the potential to improve reporting quality by enabling patient-specific reporting in clinical laboratories.

  17. Extracting laboratory test information from biomedical text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanna Shen Kang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: No previous study reported the efficacy of current natural language processing (NLP methods for extracting laboratory test information from narrative documents. This study investigates the pathology informatics question of how accurately such information can be extracted from text with the current tools and techniques, especially machine learning and symbolic NLP methods. The study data came from a text corpus maintained by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, containing a rich set of information on laboratory tests and test devices. Methods: The authors developed a symbolic information extraction (SIE system to extract device and test specific information about four types of laboratory test entities: Specimens, analytes, units of measures and detection limits. They compared the performance of SIE and three prominent machine learning based NLP systems, LingPipe, GATE and BANNER, each implementing a distinct supervised machine learning method, hidden Markov models, support vector machines and conditional random fields, respectively. Results: Machine learning systems recognized laboratory test entities with moderately high recall, but low precision rates. Their recall rates were relatively higher when the number of distinct entity values (e.g., the spectrum of specimens was very limited or when lexical morphology of the entity was distinctive (as in units of measures, yet SIE outperformed them with statistically significant margins on extracting specimen, analyte and detection limit information in both precision and F-measure. Its high recall performance was statistically significant on analyte information extraction. Conclusions: Despite its shortcomings against machine learning methods, a well-tailored symbolic system may better discern relevancy among a pile of information of the same type and may outperform a machine learning system by tapping into lexically non-local contextual information such as the document structure.

  18. Space Food Systems Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchonok, Michele; Russo, Dane M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Space Food Systems Laboratory (SFSL) is a multipurpose laboratory responsible for space food and package research and development. It is located on-site at Johnson Space Center in Building 17. The facility supports the development of flight food, menus, packaging and food related hardware for Shuttle, International Space Station, and Advanced Life Support food systems. All foods used to support NASA ground tests and/or missions must meet the highest standards before they are 'accepted' for use on actual space flights. The foods are evaluated for nutritional content, sensory acceptability, safety, storage and shelf life, and suitability for use in micro-gravity. The food packaging is also tested to determine its functionality and suitability for use in space. Food Scientist, Registered Dieticians, Packaging Engineers, Food Systems Engineers, and Technicians staff the Space Food Systems Laboratory.

  19. Clinical Simulation and Workflow by use of two Clinical Information Systems, the Electronic Health Record and Digital Dictation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou Jensen, Iben; Koldby, Sven

    2013-01-01

    digital dictation and the EHR (electronic health record) were simulated in realistic and controlled clinical environments. Useful information dealing with workflow and patient safety were obtained. The clinical simulation demonstrated that the EHR locks during use of the integration of digital dictation......, thus making it impossible to use the EHR or connected applications during digital dicta-tion. The results of the simulations showed that the tested and evaluated solution does not support the clinical workflow. Conducting the simulations enabled us to improve the solution before implementation...

  20. Recruit--An Ontology Based Information Retrieval System for Clinical Trials Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrão, Diogo F C; Oleynik, Michel; Massicano, Felipe; Morassi Sasso, Ariane

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials are studies designed to assess whether a new intervention is better than the current alternatives. However, most of them fail to recruit participants on schedule. It is hard to use Electronic Health Record (EHR) data to find eligible patients, therefore studies rely on manual assessment, which is time consuming, inefficient and requires specialized training. In this work we describe the design and development of an information retrieval system with the objective of finding eligible patients for cancer trials. The Recruit system has been in use at A. C. Camargo Cancer Center since August/2014 and contains data from more than 500,000 patients and 9 databases. It uses ontologies to integrate data from several sources and represent medical knowledge, which helps enhance results. One can search both in structured data and inside free text reports. The preliminary quality assessments shows excellent recall rates. Recruit proved to be an useful tool for researchers and its modular design could be applied to other clinical conditions and hospitals.

  1. Essential attributes identified in the design of a Laboratory Information Management System for a high throughput siRNA screening laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean, Geoffrey; Graham, Ryan; Bartholomeusz, Geoffrey

    2011-11-01

    In recent years high throughput screening operations have become a critical application in functional and translational research. Although a seemingly unmanageable amount of data is generated by these high-throughput, large-scale techniques, through careful planning, an effective Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) can be developed and implemented in order to streamline all phases of a workflow. Just as important as data mining and analysis procedures at the end of complex processes is the tracking of individual steps of applications that generate such data. Ultimately, the use of a customized LIMS will enable users to extract meaningful results from large datasets while trusting the robustness of their assays. To illustrate the design of a custom LIMS, this practical example is provided to highlight the important aspects of the design of a LIMS to effectively modulate all aspects of an siRNA screening service. This system incorporates inventory management, control of workflow, data handling and interaction with investigators, statisticians and administrators. All these modules are regulated in a synchronous manner within the LIMS. PMID:21631413

  2. Essential attributes identified in the design of a Laboratory Information Management System for a high throughput siRNA screening laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean, Geoffrey; Graham, Ryan; Bartholomeusz, Geoffrey

    2011-11-01

    In recent years high throughput screening operations have become a critical application in functional and translational research. Although a seemingly unmanageable amount of data is generated by these high-throughput, large-scale techniques, through careful planning, an effective Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) can be developed and implemented in order to streamline all phases of a workflow. Just as important as data mining and analysis procedures at the end of complex processes is the tracking of individual steps of applications that generate such data. Ultimately, the use of a customized LIMS will enable users to extract meaningful results from large datasets while trusting the robustness of their assays. To illustrate the design of a custom LIMS, this practical example is provided to highlight the important aspects of the design of a LIMS to effectively modulate all aspects of an siRNA screening service. This system incorporates inventory management, control of workflow, data handling and interaction with investigators, statisticians and administrators. All these modules are regulated in a synchronous manner within the LIMS.

  3. Using VA Software to Create an Integrated Clinical Information System in Non-VA Medical Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Kolodner, R.M.; Morton, R.L.; Fowler, D.R.; Cannon, D.S.; Stewart, R S

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports the use of the VA's Decentralized Hospital Computer Program software to integrate clinical data stored on 3 separate computers installed in a public County Hospital. Clinical access to the data on all three systems is currently available only in limited areas in the hospital and requires the use of at least two different terminals. The linking system, written in MUMPS, has been installed on a 80386-based microcomputer located in the Outpatient Psychiatry Clinic in the facil...

  4. Reservation System for machine time in the laboratories of the University of Information Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Mar Cornelio

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In organizations that many people have access to services of machine time, it requires proper planning and control. At the University of Computer Sciences, is done through pre-printed models which generates an inefficient management and poor quality service. In this paper we describe the solution of this problem from the computerization of the process for which was coded using a programming language such as PHP5 on Eclipse Integrated Development Environment with CodeIgniter framework, MySQL as a delivery system database. The system also has a set of reports that facilitate decision making to managers such as availability, location number reserved among others.

  5. Clinical and Laboratory Diagnosis of Intestinal Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiao-Chun; Zhang, Li-Fan; Zhang, Yue-Qiu; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Fei, Gui-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a worldwide problem. Intestinal TB (ITB) constitutes a major public health problem in developing countries and has been associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to characterize the clinical, radiological, endoscopic, and pathological features of ITB and to define the strategy for establishing the diagnosis. Methods: A retrospective study (from January 2000 to June 2015) was carried out in Peking Union Medical College Hospital and all hospitalized cases were diagnosed as ITB during the study period were included. The relevant clinical information, laboratory results, microbiological, and radiological investigations were recorded. Results: Of the 85 cases, 61 cases (71.8%) were ranged from 20 to 50 years. The ileocecal region was involved in about 83.5% (71/85) of patients. About 41.2% (35/85) of patients had co-existing extra ITB, especially active pulmonary TB. Abdominal pain (82.4%) was the most common presenting symptom followed by weight loss (72.9%) and fever (64.7%). Both T-cell spot of TB test (T-SPOT.TB) and purified protein derivatives (PPD) tests were performed in 26 patients: 20 (76.9%) positive T-SPOT.TB and 13 (50.0%) positive PPD were detected, with a statistical significant difference (P = 0.046). Twenty cases (23.5%) were histopathology and/or pathogen confirmed TB; 27 cases (31.8%) were diagnosed by clinical manifestation consistent with ITB and evidence of active extra ITB; 38 cases (44.7%) were diagnosed by good response to diagnostic anti-TB therapy. Conclusions: ITB is difficult to diagnose even with modern medical techniques due to its nonspecific clinical and laboratory features. At present, combination of clinical, endoscopic, radiological, and pathological features continues to be the key to the diagnosis of ITB. PMID:27231171

  6. A guide for the laboratory information management system (LIMS) for light stable isotopes--Versions 7 and 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, Tyler B.

    2000-01-01

    The reliability and accuracy of isotopic data can be improved by utilizing database software to (i) store information about samples, (ii) store the results of mass spectrometric isotope-ratio analyses of samples, (iii) calculate analytical results using standardized algorithms stored in a database, (iv) normalize stable isotopic data to international scales using isotopic reference materials, and (v) generate multi-sheet paper templates for convenient sample loading of automated mass-spectrometer sample preparation manifolds. Such a database program, the Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for Light Stable Isotopes, is presented herein. Major benefits of this system include (i) a dramatic improvement in quality assurance, (ii) an increase in laboratory efficiency, (iii) a reduction in workload due to the elimination or reduction of retyping of data by laboratory personnel, and (iv) a decrease in errors in data reported to sample submitters. Such a database provides a complete record of when and how often laboratory reference materials have been analyzed and provides a record of what correction factors have been used through time. It provides an audit trail for laboratories. LIMS for Light Stable Isotopes is available for both Microsoft Office 97 Professional and Microsoft Office 2000 Professional as versions 7 and 8, respectively. Both source code (mdb file) and precompiled executable files (mde) are available. Numerous improvements have been made for continuous flow isotopic analysis in this version (specifically 7.13 for Microsoft Access 97 and 8.13 for Microsoft Access 2000). It is much easier to import isotopic results from Finnigan ISODAT worksheets, even worksheets on which corrections for amount of sample (linearity corrections) have been added. The capability to determine blank corrections using isotope mass balance from analyses of elemental analyzer samples has been added. It is now possible to calculate and apply drift corrections to isotopic

  7. Error tracking in a clinical biochemistry laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szecsi, Pal Bela; Ødum, Lars

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We report our results for the systematic recording of all errors in a standard clinical laboratory over a 1-year period. METHODS: Recording was performed using a commercial database program. All individuals in the laboratory were allowed to report errors. The testing processes were......-technicians collected blood samples. CONCLUSIONS: Each clinical laboratory should record errors in a structured manner. A relation database is a useful tool for the recording and extraction of data, as the database can be structured to reflect the workflow at each individual laboratory....

  8. Building a medical multimedia database system to integrate clinical information: an application of high-performance computing and communications technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, H J; Buchanan, B G; Cooper, G F; Vries, J K

    1995-01-01

    The rapid growth of diagnostic-imaging technologies over the past two decades has dramatically increased the amount of nontextual data generated in clinical medicine. The architecture of traditional, text-oriented, clinical information systems has made the integration of digitized clinical images with the patient record problematic. Systems for the classification, retrieval, and integration of clinical images are in their infancy. Recent advances in high-performance computing, imaging, and networking technology now make it technologically and economically feasible to develop an integrated, multimedia, electronic patient record. As part of The National Library of Medicine's Biomedical Applications of High-Performance Computing and Communications program, we plan to develop Image Engine, a prototype microcomputer-based system for the storage, retrieval, integration, and sharing of a wide range of clinically important digital images. Images stored in the Image Engine database will be indexed and organized using the Unified Medical Language System Metathesaurus and will be dynamically linked to data in a text-based, clinical information system. We will evaluate Image Engine by initially implementing it in three clinical domains (oncology, gastroenterology, and clinical pathology) at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

  9. Building a medical multimedia database system to integrate clinical information: an application of high-performance computing and communications technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, H J; Buchanan, B G; Cooper, G F; Vries, J K

    1995-01-01

    The rapid growth of diagnostic-imaging technologies over the past two decades has dramatically increased the amount of nontextual data generated in clinical medicine. The architecture of traditional, text-oriented, clinical information systems has made the integration of digitized clinical images with the patient record problematic. Systems for the classification, retrieval, and integration of clinical images are in their infancy. Recent advances in high-performance computing, imaging, and networking technology now make it technologically and economically feasible to develop an integrated, multimedia, electronic patient record. As part of The National Library of Medicine's Biomedical Applications of High-Performance Computing and Communications program, we plan to develop Image Engine, a prototype microcomputer-based system for the storage, retrieval, integration, and sharing of a wide range of clinically important digital images. Images stored in the Image Engine database will be indexed and organized using the Unified Medical Language System Metathesaurus and will be dynamically linked to data in a text-based, clinical information system. We will evaluate Image Engine by initially implementing it in three clinical domains (oncology, gastroenterology, and clinical pathology) at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. PMID:7703940

  10. Development of an open source laboratory information management system for 2-D gel electrophoresis-based proteomics workflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toda Tosifusa

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the post-genome era, most research scientists working in the field of proteomics are confronted with difficulties in management of large volumes of data, which they are required to keep in formats suitable for subsequent data mining. Therefore, a well-developed open source laboratory information management system (LIMS should be available for their proteomics research studies. Results We developed an open source LIMS appropriately customized for 2-D gel electrophoresis-based proteomics workflow. The main features of its design are compactness, flexibility and connectivity to public databases. It supports the handling of data imported from mass spectrometry software and 2-D gel image analysis software. The LIMS is equipped with the same input interface for 2-D gel information as a clickable map on public 2DPAGE databases. The LIMS allows researchers to follow their own experimental procedures by reviewing the illustrations of 2-D gel maps and well layouts on the digestion plates and MS sample plates. Conclusion Our new open source LIMS is now available as a basic model for proteome informatics, and is accessible for further improvement. We hope that many research scientists working in the field of proteomics will evaluate our LIMS and suggest ways in which it can be improved.

  11. Alkaline phosphatase activity: new assay for the Reflotron system. Results of the evaluation in eight clinical laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, G; Dominick, H C; Hellmann, D; Klauke, R; Möckesch, M; Stekel, H; von Schenck, H; Kraft, M; Nagel, R; Hänseler, E

    2001-01-01

    A new reagent carrier, Reflotron ALP, has been developed for the Reflotron system, allowing easy and rapid measurement (in less than 3 minutes) of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in capillary blood, venous blood, heparinized plasma or serum. The evaluation of the analytical performance of the assay was carried out at eight clinical laboratories. The study of the imprecision using the measurements in human samples resulted in coefficients of variation ranging from 1.3% to 4.6% (within-run) and from 3.2% to 4.0% (day-to-day). The analytical specificity of the Reflotron ALP assay agrees well with ALP methods using a N-methyl-D-glucamine buffer solution. The calibration of the Reflotron ALP assay, however, is related to the reference intervals for ALP methods using a diethanolamine buffer solution. Method comparisons were performed with the ALP method on Hitachi instruments using diethanolamine buffer. Reflotron ALP measurements in blood and plasma in 157 randomly selected split samples showed excellent agreement (slope: 0.99; intercept: 0.7 U/l; median bias: 2.3%; median difference from the comparison method: -0.3%). Specimens from pregnant women and adolescents were excluded from this study. Differing values were obtained in a method comparison using 48 samples containing predominantly the ALP bone isoform (slope: 0.81; intercept: 31.5 U/l; median bias: 5.7%; median difference from the comparison method: -12.2%). Regression analysis of the results from 21 sera with prevailing placental ALP gave a slope of 1.51, and an intercept of -41.1 U/l (median bias: 8.6%; median difference from the comparison method: 35.6%). Reflotron ALP was compared with three different wet chemistry procedures using different buffer compounds: N-methyl-D-glucamine or diethanolamine or 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol. In samples containing predominantly ALP isoforms not of liver origin, the measurements with N-methyl-D-glucamine buffer gave the best fit with respect to Reflotron. In an

  12. [External quality assessment for clinical microbiology and good laboratory management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumasaka, K

    1998-02-01

    The Tokyo Metropolitan external quality assessment (EQA) program has revealed some serious problems in private independent microbiology laboratories in Tokyo since 1982. The poor performance in the EQA surveys closely related to poor laboratory managements, the type of training, experience of the medical technologists or technicians, and supervisory ability of the consultant physicians in independent laboratories. Social factors impede the reform of the quality assurance of clinical microbiology. Such factors include poor infrastructure of continuing education for small private laboratories, closure of the central clinical laboratories in the hospitals and outsourcing of laboratory tests due to restructuring in response to economic problems, and limited numbers of certified clinical pathologists of the Japan Society of Clinical Pathology (JSCP). Therefore, the Tokyo Metropolitan EQA Scheme is still confidential and its main role is educational. Good two way communication between participants and the organizers' clinical pathologists is essential, if the quality of laboratory tests is to be improved. The new JSCP edition of the postgraduate training requirement in clinical pathology includes "Laboratory Administration and Management". Good laboratory management(GLM) is an increasingly important component of good laboratory practice. The practice activities of clinical pathologists must include general management in addition to exercising there specialized knowledge in medicine and technology. Whereas leadership of a good clinical pathologist provides the direction of where a good laboratory is going, good management provides the steps of how to get there. And I believe quality system models from business and industry may provide us with strong guidance to build a quality system for the good laboratory that will endure into the next century. PMID:9528335

  13. User Resistance and Trust in a Clinical RFID Employee Location Tracking Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wilson

    2013-01-01

    User resistance has been identified as a factor in information systems implementation failures in the health care industry. RFID, radio frequency identification, is being incorporated into new health care information systems in order to effect cost reductions by tracking, identifying and monitoring individuals and medical items. This is the first…

  14. The Relative Frequency, Clinical and Laboratory Findings of Adult Glomerulonephritidies in Tehran

    OpenAIRE

    Afsoon Emami Naini; A Amini Harandi; S Ossareh; A. Ghods; Bastani, B; Taheri, S

    2006-01-01

    Background: Renal diseases information is population-based and has great geographic variability. Due to the lack of national renal data registry system, there is no information on the prevalence rate, and clinical and laboratory features of various glomerulonephritidies (GNs) in Iran. Methods: In a retrospective cross sectional study, we analyzed 462 adult renal biopsies in Hashemi Nejad hospital, Tehran, Iran. We determined the prevalence rate and the frequency of different clinical and...

  15. Infections acquired in clinical laboratories in Utah.

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobson, J.T.; Orlob, R B; Clayton, J L

    1985-01-01

    We reviewed laboratory-acquired infections occurring in Utah from 1978 through 1982. Written and telephone interviews of supervisors of 1,191 laboratorians revealed an estimated annual incidence of 3 laboratory-acquired infections per 1,000 employees. Infections, in order of frequency, included hepatitis B (clinical cases), shigellosis, pharyngitis, cellulitis, tuberculosis (skin test conversion), conjunctivitis, and non-A, non-B hepatitis. One-half of large laboratories (over 25 employees), ...

  16. Risk Management in the Clinical Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njoroge, Sarah W

    2014-01-01

    Clinical laboratory tests play an integral role in medical decision-making and as such must be reliable and accurate. Unfortunately, no laboratory tests or devices are foolproof and errors can occur at pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical phases of testing. Evaluating possible conditions that could lead to errors and outlining the necessary steps to detect and prevent errors before they cause patient harm is therefore an important part of laboratory testing. This can be achieved through the practice of risk management. EP23-A is a new guideline from the CLSI that introduces risk management principles to the clinical laboratory. This guideline borrows concepts from the manufacturing industry and encourages laboratories to develop risk management plans that address the specific risks inherent to each lab. Once the risks have been identified, the laboratory must implement control processes and continuously monitor and modify them to make certain that risk is maintained at a clinically acceptable level. This review summarizes the principles of risk management in the clinical laboratory and describes various quality control activities employed by the laboratory to achieve the goal of reporting valid, accurate and reliable test results. PMID:24982831

  17. 实验室信息管理系统应用体会%The Application of Laboratory Information Management System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩刚

    2012-01-01

    The paper summarized the experience of the laboratory information management system in establishment, using and maintenance process, clarified the positive role of the laboratory information management system, and pointed out its limitations.%介绍了疾控机构实验室信息管理系统对实验室管理的重要作用,分析了实验室信息管理系统的建立、使用及维护等情况,阐明了实验室信息管理系统的积极作用,并指出了其不足.

  18. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up. Efforts

  19. Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay P Gore; Robert Kramer; Timothee L Pourpoint; P. V. Ramachandran; Arvind Varma; Yuan Zheng

    2011-12-28

    The Hydrogen Systems Laboratory in a unique partnership between Purdue University's main campus in West Lafayette and the Calumet campus was established and its capabilities were enhanced towards technology demonstrators. The laboratory engaged in basic research in hydrogen production and storage and initiated engineering systems research with performance goals established as per the USDOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. In the chemical storage and recycling part of the project, we worked towards maximum recycling yield via novel chemical selection and novel recycling pathways. With the basic potential of a large hydrogen yield from AB, we used it as an example chemical but have also discovered its limitations. Further, we discovered alternate storage chemicals that appear to have advantages over AB. We improved the slurry hydrolysis approach by using advanced slurry/solution mixing techniques. We demonstrated vehicle scale aqueous and non-aqueous slurry reactors to address various engineering issues in on-board chemical hydrogen storage systems. We measured the thermal properties of raw and spent AB. Further, we conducted experiments to determine reaction mechanisms and kinetics of hydrothermolysis in hydride-rich solutions and slurries. We also developed a continuous flow reactor and a laboratory scale fuel cell power generation system. The biological hydrogen production work summarized as Task 4.0 below, included investigating optimal hydrogen production cultures for different substrates, reducing the water content in the substrate, and integrating results from vacuum tube solar collector based pre and post processing tests into an enhanced energy system model. An automated testing device was used to finalize optimal hydrogen production conditions using statistical procedures. A 3 L commercial fermentor (New Brunswick, BioFlo 115) was used to finalize testing of larger samples and to consider issues related to scale up

  20. 76 FR 5379 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory... Clinical Laboratory Workforce; the National Institutes of Health Genetic Test Registry design and responses..., revisions to the standards under which clinical laboratories are regulated; the impact on medical...

  1. Formalize clinical processes into electronic health information systems: Modelling a screening service for diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguzkiza, Aitor; Trigo, Jesús Daniel; Martínez-Espronceda, Miguel; Serrano, Luis; Andonegui, José

    2015-08-01

    Most healthcare services use information and communication technologies to reduce and redistribute the workload associated with follow-up of chronic conditions. However, the lack of normalization of the information handled in and exchanged between such services hinders the scalability and extendibility. The use of medical standards for modelling and exchanging information, especially dual-model based approaches, can enhance the features of screening services. Hence, the approach of this paper is twofold. First, this article presents a generic methodology to model patient-centered clinical processes. Second, a proof of concept of the proposed methodology was conducted within the diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening service of the Health Service of Navarre (Spain) in compliance with a specific dual-model norm (openEHR). As a result, a set of elements required for deploying a model-driven DR screening service has been established, namely: clinical concepts, archetypes, termsets, templates, guideline definition rules, and user interface definitions. This model fosters reusability, because those elements are available to be downloaded and integrated in any healthcare service, and interoperability, since from then on such services can share information seamlessly.

  2. [Postgraduates' training as laboratory physicians/clinical pathologists in Japan--board certification of JSLM as a mandatory requirement for chairpersons of laboratory medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumasaka, Kazunari

    2002-04-01

    The educational committee of the Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine(JSLM) proposed a revised laboratory medicine residency curriculum in 1999 and again in 2001. The committee believes that present undergraduate clinical training is insufficient and that Japanese medical graduates need clinical training for two years after graduation. This two years training should be a precondition for further postgraduate training in laboratory medicine and should include fundamental clinical skills(communication skills, physical examination and common laboratory procedures such as Gram's stain, Wright-Giemsa stain and urinalysis). After the two years training, the minimal training period of laboratory medicine should be three years, and should include: 1) Principles, instrumentation and techniques of each discipline including clinical chemistry, clinical hematology, clinical microbiology, clinical immunology, blood banking and other specific areas. 2) The use of laboratory information in a medical setting. 3) Interaction of the laboratory physician with laboratory staff, physicians and patients. With good on-the-job training and 24 hours on-call duties, laboratory physicians are expected to perform their tasks, including laboratory management, effectively. They should have appropriate educational background and should be well motivated. The background and duties of the laboratory physicians often reflect the institutional needs and personal philosophy of the chairperson of their department. At the moment, few senior physicians in Japan have qualifications in laboratory medicine and are unable, therefore, to provide the necessary guidance to help the laboratory physicians in their work. I therefore believe that the board certification of JSLM should be regarded as mandatory for chairpersons of laboratory medicine. Our on-call service system can enhance the training in laboratory medicine, and improve not only laboratory quality assurance but patients' care as well. PMID

  3. A web-based laboratory information system to improve quality of care of tuberculosis patients in Peru: functional requirements, implementation and usage statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yale Gloria

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis patients in resource-poor settings experience large delays in starting appropriate treatment and may not be monitored appropriately due to an overburdened laboratory system, delays in communication of results, and missing or error-prone laboratory data. The objective of this paper is to describe an electronic laboratory information system implemented to alleviate these problems and its expanding use by the Peruvian public sector, as well as examine the broader issues of implementing such systems in resource-poor settings. Methods A web-based laboratory information system "e-Chasqui" has been designed and implemented in Peru to improve the timeliness and quality of laboratory data. It was deployed in the national TB laboratory, two regional laboratories and twelve pilot health centres. Using needs assessment and workflow analysis tools, e-Chasqui was designed to provide for improved patient care, increased quality control, and more efficient laboratory monitoring and reporting. Results Since its full implementation in March 2006, 29,944 smear microscopy, 31,797 culture and 7,675 drug susceptibility test results have been entered. Over 99% of these results have been viewed online by the health centres. High user satisfaction and heavy use have led to the expansion of e-Chasqui to additional institutions. In total, e-Chasqui will serve a network of institutions providing medical care for over 3.1 million people. The cost to maintain this system is approximately US$0.53 per sample or 1% of the National Peruvian TB program's 2006 budget. Conclusion Electronic laboratory information systems have a large potential to improve patient care and public health monitoring in resource-poor settings. Some of the challenges faced in these settings, such as lack of trained personnel, limited transportation, and large coverage areas, are obstacles that a well-designed system can overcome. e-Chasqui has the

  4. A system architecture for sharing de-identified, research-ready brain scans and health information across clinical imaging centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervenak, Ann L; van Erp, Theo G M; Kesselman, Carl; D'Arcy, Mike; Sobell, Janet; Keator, David; Dahm, Lisa; Murry, Jim; Law, Meng; Hasso, Anton; Ames, Joseph; Macciardi, Fabio; Potkin, Steven G

    2012-01-01

    Progress in our understanding of brain disorders increasingly relies on the costly collection of large standardized brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data sets. Moreover, the clinical interpretation of brain scans benefits from compare and contrast analyses of scans from patients with similar, and sometimes rare, demographic, diagnostic, and treatment status. A solution to both needs is to acquire standardized, research-ready clinical brain scans and to build the information technology infrastructure to share such scans, along with other pertinent information, across hospitals. This paper describes the design, deployment, and operation of a federated imaging system that captures and shares standardized, de-identified clinical brain images in a federation across multiple institutions. In addition to describing innovative aspects of the system architecture and our initial testing of the deployed infrastructure, we also describe the Standardized Imaging Protocol (SIP) developed for the project and our interactions with the Institutional Review Board (IRB) regarding handling patient data in the federated environment. PMID:22941984

  5. Protective Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory is a 40 by 28 by 9 foot facility that is equipped with tools for the development of various items of control technology related to the transmission...

  6. PEHS - Architecture of a Pervasive Information System for Clinical Activities Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Fighera Vicentini

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the efficiency increasing in the access to patient information, electronic healthcare systems are rejected by the clinicians, because the dynamic characteristics of their activities are not adequately addressed by these systems. This paper presents the architecture of a pervasive healthcare system called pEHS, which uses concepts and technologies of ubiquitous computing to approach the computational systems to the way how the clinician conducts its activities. The requirements of pEHS are: adapted to the activities of medical professionals, personalization through composition/programming tasks, context awareness and pervasive access to the patient's health history.

  7. [ISO 15189 accreditation in clinical microbiology laboratory: general concepts and the status in our laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyar, Işin

    2009-10-01

    One important trend in the laboratory profession and quality management is the global convergence of laboratory operations. The goal of an accredited medical laboratory is to continue "offering useful laboratory service for diagnosis and treatment of the patients and also aid to the health of the nation". An accredited clinical laboratory is managed by a quality control system, it is competent technically and the laboratory service meets the needs of all its patients and physicians by taking the responsibility of all the medical tests and therapies. For this purpose, ISO 15189 international standard has been prepared by 2003. ISO 15189 standard is originated from the arrangement of ISO 17025 and ISO 9001:2000 standards. Many countries such as England, Germany, France, Canada and Australia have preferred ISO 15189 as their own laboratory accreditation programme, meeting all the requirements of their medical laboratories. The accreditation performance of a clinical microbiology laboratory is mainly based on five essential points; preanalytical, analytical, postanalytical, quality control programmes (internal, external, interlaboratory) and audits (internal, external). In this review article, general concepts on ISO 15189 accreditation standards for the clinical microbiology laboratories have been summarized and the status of a private laboratory (Acibadem LabMed, Istanbul) in Turkey has been discussed. PMID:20084925

  8. [ISO 15189 accreditation in clinical microbiology laboratory: general concepts and the status in our laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyar, Işin

    2009-10-01

    One important trend in the laboratory profession and quality management is the global convergence of laboratory operations. The goal of an accredited medical laboratory is to continue "offering useful laboratory service for diagnosis and treatment of the patients and also aid to the health of the nation". An accredited clinical laboratory is managed by a quality control system, it is competent technically and the laboratory service meets the needs of all its patients and physicians by taking the responsibility of all the medical tests and therapies. For this purpose, ISO 15189 international standard has been prepared by 2003. ISO 15189 standard is originated from the arrangement of ISO 17025 and ISO 9001:2000 standards. Many countries such as England, Germany, France, Canada and Australia have preferred ISO 15189 as their own laboratory accreditation programme, meeting all the requirements of their medical laboratories. The accreditation performance of a clinical microbiology laboratory is mainly based on five essential points; preanalytical, analytical, postanalytical, quality control programmes (internal, external, interlaboratory) and audits (internal, external). In this review article, general concepts on ISO 15189 accreditation standards for the clinical microbiology laboratories have been summarized and the status of a private laboratory (Acibadem LabMed, Istanbul) in Turkey has been discussed.

  9. Conceptual Model of Clinical Governance Information System for Statistical Indicators by Using UML in Two Sample Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeddi, Fatemeh Rangraz; Farzandipoor, Mehrdad; Arabfard, Masoud; Hosseini, Azam Haj Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was investigating situation and presenting a conceptual model for clinical governance information system by using UML in two sample hospitals. Background: However, use of information is one of the fundamental components of clinical governance; but unfortunately, it does not pay much attention to information management. Material and Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted in October 2012- May 2013. Data were gathered through questionnaires and interviews in two sample hospitals. Face and content validity of the questionnaire has been confirmed by experts. Data were collected from a pilot hospital and reforms were carried out and Final questionnaire was prepared. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics and SPSS 16 software. Results: With the scenario derived from questionnaires, UML diagrams are presented by using Rational Rose 7 software. The results showed that 32.14 percent Indicators of the hospitals were calculated. Database was not designed and 100 percent of the hospital’s clinical governance was required to create a database. Conclusion: Clinical governance unit of hospitals to perform its mission, do not have access to all the needed indicators. Defining of Processes and drawing of models and creating of database are essential for designing of information systems. PMID:27147804

  10. Medical Service Clinical Laboratory Procedures--Bacteriology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of the Army, Washington, DC.

    This manual presents laboratory procedures for the differentiation and identification of disease agents from clinical materials. Included are procedures for the collection of specimens, preparation of culture media, pure culture methods, cultivation of the microorganisms in natural and simulated natural environments, and procedures in…

  11. Propulsion Systems Laboratory, Bldg. 125

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) is NASAs only ground test facility capable of providing true altitude and flight speed simulation for testing full scale gas...

  12. Outcomes of Health System Structures, Highly Pertinent Clinical Information, Idea Stimulators, Clinical Reviews, and Prediction Tools: JABFM Exemplified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Marjorie A; Neale, Anne Victoria; Seehusen, Dean A

    2016-01-01

    This issue exemplifies the types of articles that JABFM publishes to advance family medicine. We have articles on the implications of health system organizational structures. Three of these are international articles at the level of the national health system (1 from China) and systematic local health interventions (1 from Canada and 1 from Netherlands). Inside the United States, where there are more family physicians, there is less obesity, and designation as a Patient Centered Medical Home is related to increased rates of colorectal cancer screening. Review articles on common clinical topics discuss treatments that are changing (acne in pregnancy) or lack consensus (distal radial fractures). We have articles on making life easier in the office, such as for predicting Vitamin D levels, osteoporosis, and pre-diabetes in normal weight adults. There are articles to raise awareness of the "newest" testing or treatments, that is, auditory brainstem implants. "Reminder" articles highlight known entities that need to be reinforced to prevent over-/underdiagnosis or treatment, for example, "cotton fever." Another article discusses the increased risk for postoperative complications with sleep apnea. We also provide "thought" pieces, in this case about the terminology we are using to extend our concept of patient-centered medical homes.

  13. Outcomes of Health System Structures, Highly Pertinent Clinical Information, Idea Stimulators, Clinical Reviews, and Prediction Tools: JABFM Exemplified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Marjorie A; Neale, Anne Victoria; Seehusen, Dean A

    2016-01-01

    This issue exemplifies the types of articles that JABFM publishes to advance family medicine. We have articles on the implications of health system organizational structures. Three of these are international articles at the level of the national health system (1 from China) and systematic local health interventions (1 from Canada and 1 from Netherlands). Inside the United States, where there are more family physicians, there is less obesity, and designation as a Patient Centered Medical Home is related to increased rates of colorectal cancer screening. Review articles on common clinical topics discuss treatments that are changing (acne in pregnancy) or lack consensus (distal radial fractures). We have articles on making life easier in the office, such as for predicting Vitamin D levels, osteoporosis, and pre-diabetes in normal weight adults. There are articles to raise awareness of the "newest" testing or treatments, that is, auditory brainstem implants. "Reminder" articles highlight known entities that need to be reinforced to prevent over-/underdiagnosis or treatment, for example, "cotton fever." Another article discusses the increased risk for postoperative complications with sleep apnea. We also provide "thought" pieces, in this case about the terminology we are using to extend our concept of patient-centered medical homes. PMID:26957371

  14. Clinical laboratory comparison of the 10-ml isolator blood culture system with BACTEC radiometric blood culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, J A; Manzella, J P; McConville, J H

    1984-10-01

    The efficiency of the 10-ml Isolator (E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc.) for recovery of pathogens from blood was compared with that of BACTEC 6B and 7C media (Johnston Laboratories) by using 4,195 cultures from 1,662 patients. During the first phase of the study, BACTEC bottles were inoculated with 3 ml of blood; in the second phase, bottles were inoculated with 5 ml. The objectives were to compare results with similar blood volumes used for the detection of anaerobes as well as similar overall volumes and to determine the relative sensitivity of BACTEC media inoculated with the minimum and maximum volumes suggested by the manufacturer. From 180 patients, 391 significant isolates were recovered, 354 (91%) with the Isolator and 304 (78%) with the bottles. Isolators recovered 31 (15%) and 19 (18%) more pathogens overall than did the two-bottle system inoculated with 3 and 5 ml of blood, respectively, including 30 (36%) and 10 (34%) more Enterobacteriaceae. Recovery of anaerobes was greater in the BACTEC anaerobic medium, but only when its inoculum was increased to 5 ml. No significant differences existed between the two systems in pathogen detection times or detection of polymicrobic bacteremia. The Isolator contamination rate (8.3%) was approximately 4 times that of the bottles. The number of CFU of pathogen per milliliter of blood, blood volume sampled, and number of Isolators collected were more important than antimicrobial agent pretreatment in contributing to patient bacteremia of fungemia undetected by the Isolator. The Isolator appeared to be a practical alternative for recovery of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic pathogens from the blood. PMID:6386871

  15. 76 FR 39879 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory... to the standards under which clinical laboratories are regulated; the impact on medical and laboratory practice of proposed revisions to the standards; and the modification of the standards...

  16. A generic, web-based clinical information system architecture using HL7 CDA: successful implementation in dermatological routine care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, Thilo; Boeker, Martin; Klar, Rüdiger; Müller, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    The requirements of highly specialized clinical domains are often underrepresented in hospital information systems (HIS). Common consequences are that documentation remains to be paper-based or external systems with insufficient HIS integration are used. This paper presents a solution to overcome this deficiency in the form of a generic framework based on the HL7 Clinical Document Architecture. The central architectural idea is the definition of customized forms using a schema-controlled XML language. These flexible form definitions drive the user interface, the data storage, and standardized data exchange. A successful proof-of-concept application in a dermatologic outpatient wound care department has been implemented, and is well accepted by the clinicians. Our work with HL7 CDA revealed the need for further practical research in the health information standards realm. PMID:17911755

  17. Use of a computerised maternity information system to improve clinical effectiveness: thromboprophylaxis at caesarean section

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, G.; Mckenzie, C.; Mires, G.

    2000-01-01

    An audit of the introduction of a protocol for thromboprophylaxis at caesarean section revealed over treatment of low risk women and the under treatment of high risk women. A routine computer generated risk assessment profile was introduced as part of a maternity information system. Reaudit showed a significant improvement in adherence to the thromboprophylaxis protocol in all risk groups.


Keywords: thromboprophylaxis; caesarean section; computerised assessment

  18. Standardizing clinical laboratory data for secondary use

    OpenAIRE

    Abhyankar, Swapna; Demner-Fushman, Dina; McDonald, Clement J.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical databases provide a rich source of data for answering clinical research questions. However, the variables recorded in clinical data systems are often identified by local, idiosyncratic, and sometimes redundant and/or ambiguous names (or codes) rather than unique, well-organized codes from standard code systems. This reality discourages research use of such databases, because researchers must invest considerable time in cleaning up the data before they can ask their first research que...

  19. Lean-Agile Adaptations in Clinical Laboratory Accredited ISO 15189

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Vilaplana Pérez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It’s introduced Lean techniques in a Clinical Laboratory to improve the operability and the efficiency in continuous processes of analysis, failsafe systems, analysis of areas of value pursuit of zero defects and reduction of waste, and it promote continuous improvement in presented difficulties in adapting to the changing needs of the healthcare environment. Whereas it is necessary to incorporate certification and accreditation, note that the adaptability of the clinical laboratory to the changing needs of physicians in obtaining analytical information is reduced. The application of an agile methodology on analytical systems can provide a line of work that allows the incorporation of planning short work cycles on equips quickly with operational autonomy on the basis of demand and respecting the accreditation requirements and flexibility to ensure adequate performance as the intercomparison of results from the different units analytics, analytical quality and turnaround times. Between 2012 and 2014, a process of analysis and improvement was applied to circuits, a 5 s system, transportation of samples, inventory of reactive and samples, motion of personal and samples, reductions of waiting and delays, overproduction, over processing, and defects of results and reports. At last it seems necessary to apply the Agile methodology to adapt to the evolving necessities in time and the different origins of the samples. It’s have used modular systems where the modules of this study are programmed with immunoassay techniques and it has reduced the operative modules depending on the required activity, ensuring the goals of turnaround times, analytic quality, service, health care continuity, and keeping up with the ISO 15189 accreditation requirements. The results of applying the concept of Lean-Agile to a modular system allows us to reduce the associated costs to the seasonal variation of the health care demand and to adapt the system to the changes on

  20. [Cystic Fibrosis Cloud database: An information system for storage and management of clinical and microbiological data of cystic fibrosis patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Claudia I; Palau, María J; Martina, Pablo; Achiary, Carlos; Achiary, Andrés; Bettiol, Marisa; Montanaro, Patricia; Cazzola, María L; Leguizamón, Mariana; Massillo, Cintia; Figoli, Cecilia; Valeiras, Brenda; Perez, Silvia; Rentería, Fernando; Diez, Graciela; Yantorno, Osvaldo M; Bosch, Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiological and clinical management of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients suffering from acute pulmonary exacerbations or chronic lung infections demands continuous updating of medical and microbiological processes associated with the constant evolution of pathogens during host colonization. In order to monitor the dynamics of these processes, it is essential to have expert systems capable of storing and subsequently extracting the information generated from different studies of the patients and microorganisms isolated from them. In this work we have designed and developed an on-line database based on an information system that allows to store, manage and visualize data from clinical studies and microbiological analysis of bacteria obtained from the respiratory tract of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis. The information system, named Cystic Fibrosis Cloud database is available on the http://servoy.infocomsa.com/cfc_database site and is composed of a main database and a web-based interface, which uses Servoy's product architecture based on Java technology. Although the CFC database system can be implemented as a local program for private use in CF centers, it can also be used, updated and shared by different users who can access the stored information in a systematic, practical and safe manner. The implementation of the CFC database could have a significant impact on the monitoring of respiratory infections, the prevention of exacerbations, the detection of emerging organisms, and the adequacy of control strategies for lung infections in CF patients.

  1. [Cystic Fibrosis Cloud database: An information system for storage and management of clinical and microbiological data of cystic fibrosis patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Claudia I; Palau, María J; Martina, Pablo; Achiary, Carlos; Achiary, Andrés; Bettiol, Marisa; Montanaro, Patricia; Cazzola, María L; Leguizamón, Mariana; Massillo, Cintia; Figoli, Cecilia; Valeiras, Brenda; Perez, Silvia; Rentería, Fernando; Diez, Graciela; Yantorno, Osvaldo M; Bosch, Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiological and clinical management of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients suffering from acute pulmonary exacerbations or chronic lung infections demands continuous updating of medical and microbiological processes associated with the constant evolution of pathogens during host colonization. In order to monitor the dynamics of these processes, it is essential to have expert systems capable of storing and subsequently extracting the information generated from different studies of the patients and microorganisms isolated from them. In this work we have designed and developed an on-line database based on an information system that allows to store, manage and visualize data from clinical studies and microbiological analysis of bacteria obtained from the respiratory tract of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis. The information system, named Cystic Fibrosis Cloud database is available on the http://servoy.infocomsa.com/cfc_database site and is composed of a main database and a web-based interface, which uses Servoy's product architecture based on Java technology. Although the CFC database system can be implemented as a local program for private use in CF centers, it can also be used, updated and shared by different users who can access the stored information in a systematic, practical and safe manner. The implementation of the CFC database could have a significant impact on the monitoring of respiratory infections, the prevention of exacerbations, the detection of emerging organisms, and the adequacy of control strategies for lung infections in CF patients. PMID:26895996

  2. Sharing clinical information across care settings: the birth of an integrated assessment system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrard Jean-Claude

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Population ageing, the emergence of chronic illness, and the shift away from institutional care challenge conventional approaches to assessment systems which traditionally are problem and setting specific. Methods From 2002, the interRAI research collaborative undertook development of a suite of assessment tools to support assessment and care planning of persons with chronic illness, frailty, disability, or mental health problems across care settings. The suite constitutes an early example of a "third generation" assessment system. Results The rationale and development strategy for the suite is described, together with a description of potential applications. To date, ten instruments comprise the suite, each comprising "core" items shared among the majority of instruments and "optional" items that are specific to particular care settings or situations. Conclusion This comprehensive suite offers the opportunity for integrated multi-domain assessment, enabling electronic clinical records, data transfer, ease of interpretation and streamlined training.

  3. Obstructive sleep apnea. Clinical and laboratory studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, T; Vasconcelos, P; Leitão, A N; Andrea, M

    1994-12-01

    Our study included 42 patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSAS) confirmed by polysomnography. In these patients we investigated the clinical manifestations, the results of the laboratory examinations, including polysomnography, ORL observations and tests of pulmonary function, as well as the therapeutic results. Our patients presented a serious set of symptoms which included excessive daytime sleepiness, snoring, obesity, craniofacial abnormalities, systemic hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, incapacity to work with precocious retirement, marital conflicts and high incidence of accidents, namely traffic accidents. An adequate treatment, mostly with nasal CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure), induced marked relief of the symptoms; some patients had an advantage in surgical treatment and weight reduction. OSAS is a frequent entity, affecting mostly male adults after the 5th decade. The lack of knowledge about this entity and the common social acceptance of some of its cardinal symptoms induces considerable delays in its diagnosis. The severity of the symptoms, the personal and social risks of excessive daytime sleepiness, the cardiocirculatory effects and the risk of sudden death during sleep justify an early diagnosis in order to prevent the severe evolution of the disease. Its complex physiopathology and multiple etiological factors justify a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:7653280

  4. Communication Systems Analysis Laboratory (CSAL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — CSAL conducts electronic warfare investigations of radio frequency communication systems with respect to current and emerging electronic warfare threats. CSAL uses...

  5. Developing Medicare Competitive Bidding: A Study of Clinical Laboratories

    OpenAIRE

    Hoerger, Thomas J.; Meadow, Ann

    1997-01-01

    Competitive bidding to derive Medicare fees promises several advantages over administered fee systems. The authors show how incentives for cost savings, quality, and access can be incorporated into bidding schemes, and they report on a study of the clinical laboratory industry conducted in preparation for a bidding demonstration. The laboratory industry is marked by variable concentration across geographic markets and, among firms themselves, by social and economic heterogeneity. The authors ...

  6. Survey of CF mutations in the clinical laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Myers Angela; Nersesian Rhea; Mirkovic Borka; Huber Klaus; Saiki Randall; Bauer Kurt

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background Since it is impossible to sequence the complete CFTR gene routinely, clinical laboratories must rely on test systems that screen for a panel of the most frequent mutations causing disease in a high percentage of patients. Thus, in a cohort of 257 persons that were referred to our laboratory for analysis of CF gene mutations, reverse line probe assays for the most common CF mutations were performed. These techniques were evaluated as routine first-line analyses of the CFTR ...

  7. 基于ASP.NET的实验室信息管理系统开发%Development of Laboratory Information Management System Based on ASP.NET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵欣茹; 肖世德; 吴昊

    2013-01-01

    Efficient laboratory management is an important part of digital campus,the laboratory information management system based on ASP.NET was designed to deal with the affairs in the laboratory management in local colleges. This system was devel-oped by the use of the stage of Microsoft's. NET platform,ASP.NET technology,B/S mode,and SQL Sever2005 database as backstage,and the data was input by using the technology of visiting based on ADO.NET. The system provides the service of fast-editing, searching and modifying in laboratory information management. And this system will make laboratory administra-tion to be more convenient in colleges.%  高效的实验室管理是实现实验室信息化中重要的一环,基于ASP.NET的实验室信息管理系统是专门针对高校实验室管理工作而开发的管理系统。该系统主要采用微软的.NET平台,ASP.NET技术,基于B/S的开发模式,后台采用SQL Sever2005数据库进行设计,采用基于ADO.NET的数据库访问技术对数据实现录入,实现了教学和科研信息等的快速发布、查询和修改。

  8. Understanding Clinician Information Demands and Synthesis of Clinical Documents in Electronic Health Record Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farri, Oladimeji Feyisetan

    2012-01-01

    Large quantities of redundant clinical data are usually transferred from one clinical document to another, making the review of such documents cognitively burdensome and potentially error-prone. Inadequate designs of electronic health record (EHR) clinical document user interfaces probably contribute to the difficulties clinicians experience while…

  9. Risk Management in Clinical Laboratory: from Theory to Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza David Remona

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinical laboratory tests ensure approximately 70% of the medical decisions, so that the time until the release of the results and its accuracy are critical for the diagnosis and the efficiency of the treatment [1]. Risk management involves both the anticipation of what could happen erroneous and the assessment of errors’ frequency as well as the consequences or the severity of the effects caused by it, and finally to decide what can be done in order to reduce the risk to an acceptable clinical level. For this reason, organizations should not see the risk management as a compliance issue, but as an integral part of the decision-making process. EP23-A is a guideline of CLSI that introduces the risk management principles in the clinical laboratory and encourages the laboratories to develop plans of risk management which are addressed to the risks of each laboratory. EP18-A2 proposes 2 techniques for identifying and controlling the errors in the laboratory: FMEA (Failure Mode and Effects Analysis and FRACAS (Failure Reporting, Analysis and Corrective Action System. The European Committee of Experts and Management of Safety and Quality in Health Care proposed to use the quality indicators to identify the critical stages of each process, thus being possible to assess continuously the medical processes with the aim of identifying the errors when they occur. This review summarizes the principles of the risk management in the clinical laboratory, thus it can achieve its aims to report valid, accurate and reliable test results

  10. [Perspective for clinical laboratory management and its systematization--effects of the systematization of clinical laboratory management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, S

    1993-04-01

    There are a large number of ideas concerning the systematization of clinical laboratory management. Therefore many types of laboratory systems have been constructed. As our hospital is not large, we adopted a small scale laboratory system. In introducing it, we expected not only an increase in value-added labor productivity by automating laboratory tests, but also an improvement in technologist's cost awareness. Consequently, new system equipment has itself performed the former in many sections, but not the latter. Improvement in cost awareness was caused by the technologist's routine work in managing reagent and material stocks. We found that this soft-type systematization has been more important than the advanced hard-type system.

  11. Hidden sources of mercury in clinical laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Chavez, C R; Federico-Perez, R A; Gomez-Alvarez, A; Velazquez-Contreras, L E; Perez-Rios, R

    2014-09-01

    The healthcare sector is an important contributor to mercury (Hg) pollution because of the potential presence of mercury in thermometers, blood pressure cuffs, amalgams, etc. There are also other potential sources of mercury in this sector which are used frequently and in high volumes where the presence of the metal is not obvious and which might be collectively contributing to pollution. For instance, some chemicals used for the clinical diagnosis of illness may contain mercury. The goal of this study was to investigate potential sources of mercury pollution, which originate from clinical laboratory discharges, using an exploratory approach. The focus was on the residue generated during automatic analysis of patients' bodily fluids at a medical center in Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico. This study shows an overview of what might be happening in the region or the country related to non-obvious sources of mercury in the healthcare sector. The results showed measurable levels of mercury in the residues coming from urine sediment analysis. These amounts do not exceed the maximum allowed by Mexican environmental regulations; nevertheless, the frequency and cumulative volume of residues generated, combined with the potential for persistence and the bioaccumulation of mercury in the environment, warrant attention. The work carried out in this study is being taken as a model for future studies for pollution prevention in the healthcare sector with the goal of measuring mercury emissions to the environment from clinical laboratory wastewater, including identifying sources which--while not obvious--could be important given the frequency and volume of their use in the clinical diagnosis.

  12. An integrated clinical computer system: implications for a medical information services department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, N S

    1994-12-01

    The hybrid record--both paper and electronic--is a cumbersome byproduct of the evolution to the computer-based patient record. Nancy Walker describes how William Beaumont Hospital managed its information services with this mixed media record. Her article provides practical solutions for health information managers including downtime procedures, report distribution plans, release of information steps, and audit procedures for maintaining confidentiality. PMID:10138514

  13. Clinical and laboratory features of preleukemia patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施均; 邵宗鸿; 陈桂彬; 李克; 刘鸿; 张益枝; 和虹; 赵明峰; 何广胜; 张泓; 储榆林; 郝玉书

    2002-01-01

    Objective To explore prospective diagnostic criteria for preleukemia.Methods A case control study was done comparing the discrepancies on clinical and laboratory features between patients with preleukemia and those with chronic aplastic anemia (CAA) or atypical paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglubinuria (a-PNH).Results There were eight variables of significance: (1) lymphocytoid micromegakaryocytes in the bone marrow; (2) immature granulocytes in the peripheral blood; (3) ≥2.0% myeloblasts in the bone marrow; (4) positive periodic acid schiff (PAS) stained nucleated erythrocytes; (5) myeloid differentiation index ≥1.8; (6) typical colonal karyotypic abnormalities; (7) negative sister chromatid differentiation; (8) cluster/colony ratio of granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units (CFU-GM)>4.0. The following criteria were assigned: A: to meet variable one and at least two of the other seven variables and B: to meet at least four of the eight variables. All of the patients with preleukemia met either A or B and none of the patients with CAA or a-PNH did. Conclusions Preleukemia is different from CAA or a-PNH. It has its own clinical and laboratory features, which may be useful for its prospective diagnosis.

  14. Understanding the interface between clinical and laboratory staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankie van den Broek

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The interface between clinicians and laboratory staff is where the two meet and work together to provide quality care to their clients (patients. Effectiveness of the interface depends on the way the two groups of professionals relate to and communicate with each other. The number and type of tests requested and the use of the test results for clinical decision making can be influenced by the interface between clinicians and laboratory staff. A model to understand the factors and dynamics around the interface is lacking.Objectives: To propose a new conceptual model to gain insight and analyse factors that influence the laboratory–clinical staff interface.Methods: To develop the conceptual model, a literature study was performed, regulatory guidelines and standards for laboratories were analysed and discussions were held with experts on the topic.Result: A conceptual model and analytical framework provided good guidance in understanding and assessing the organisational and personal factors shaping the interface. The model was based on three elements: (1 the three phases of communication (pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical; (2 the organisational and personal factors of interaction; and (3 the socio-political, economic and cultural context in which clinicians and laboratory staff operate.Conclusion: Assessment of the interface between clinicians and laboratory workers can be performed in a systematic way. Applying this model will provide information to managers of health institutions and heads of laboratories and clinical departments about what happens when clinicians and laboratory staff interact, thus aiding them in designing strategies to improve this interface. Normal 0 21 false false false NL X-NONE X-NONE

  15. The reliability of manual reporting of clinical events in an anesthesia information management system (AIMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpao, Allan F; Pruitt, Eric Y; Cook-Sather, Scott D; Gurnaney, Harshad G; Rehman, Mohamed A

    2012-12-01

    Manual incident reports significantly under-report adverse clinical events when compared with automated recordings of intraoperative data. Our goal was to determine the reliability of AIMS and CQI reports of adverse clinical events that had been witnessed and recorded by research assistants. The AIMS and CQI records of 995 patients aged 2-12 years were analyzed to determine if anesthesia providers had properly documented the emesis events that were observed and recorded by research assistants who were present in the operating room at the time of induction. Research assistants recorded eight cases of emesis during induction that were confirmed with the attending anesthesiologist at the time of induction. AIMS yielded a sensitivity of 38 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 8.5-75.5 %), while the sensitivity of CQI reporting was 13 % (95 % CI 0.3-52.7 %). The low sensitivities of the AIMS and CQI reports suggest that user-reported AIMS and CQI data do not reliably include significant clinical events. PMID:22618299

  16. The reliability of manual reporting of clinical events in an anesthesia information management system (AIMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpao, Allan F; Pruitt, Eric Y; Cook-Sather, Scott D; Gurnaney, Harshad G; Rehman, Mohamed A

    2012-12-01

    Manual incident reports significantly under-report adverse clinical events when compared with automated recordings of intraoperative data. Our goal was to determine the reliability of AIMS and CQI reports of adverse clinical events that had been witnessed and recorded by research assistants. The AIMS and CQI records of 995 patients aged 2-12 years were analyzed to determine if anesthesia providers had properly documented the emesis events that were observed and recorded by research assistants who were present in the operating room at the time of induction. Research assistants recorded eight cases of emesis during induction that were confirmed with the attending anesthesiologist at the time of induction. AIMS yielded a sensitivity of 38 % (95 % confidence interval [CI] 8.5-75.5 %), while the sensitivity of CQI reporting was 13 % (95 % CI 0.3-52.7 %). The low sensitivities of the AIMS and CQI reports suggest that user-reported AIMS and CQI data do not reliably include significant clinical events.

  17. 42 CFR 414.510 - Laboratory date of service for clinical laboratory and pathology specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... date of service for clinical laboratory and pathology specimens. The date of service for either a clinical laboratory test or the technical component of physician pathology service is as follows: (a... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Laboratory date of service for clinical...

  18. CMDX©-based single source information system for simplified quality management and clinical research in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Histopathological evaluation of prostatectomy specimens is crucial to decision-making and prediction of patient outcomes in prostate cancer (PCa). Topographical information regarding PCa extension and positive surgical margins (PSM) is essential for clinical routines, quality assessment, and research. However, local hospital information systems (HIS) often do not support the documentation of such information. Therefore, we investigated the feasibility of integrating a cMDX-based pathology report including topographical information into the clinical routine with the aims of obtaining data, performing analysis and generating heat maps in a timely manner, while avoiding data redundancy. Methods We analyzed the workflow of the histopathological evaluation documentation process. We then developed a concept for a pathology report based on a cMDX data model facilitating the topographical documentation of PCa and PSM; the cMDX SSIS is implemented within the HIS of University Hospital Muenster. We then generated a heat map of PCa extension and PSM using the data. Data quality was assessed by measuring the data completeness of reports for all cases, as well as the source-to-database error. We also conducted a prospective study to compare our proposed method with recent retrospective and paper-based studies according to the time required for data analysis. Results We identified 30 input fields that were applied to the cMDX-based data model and the electronic report was integrated into the clinical workflow. Between 2010 and 2011, a total of 259 reports were generated with 100% data completeness and a source-to-database error of 10.3 per 10,000 fields. These reports were directly reused for data analysis, and a heat map based on the data was generated. PCa was mostly localized in the peripheral zone of the prostate. The mean relative tumor volume was 16.6%. The most PSM were localized in the apical region of the prostate. In the retrospective study, 1623 paper

  19. Development and Application of Laboratory Information System%实验室信息管理系统的开发与应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙媛; 张西亚

    2011-01-01

    本文结合我院实验室信息系统的开发实践,根据实验室对信息系统的需求,建立了实验室信息系统的框架模型,分析了各种数据在实验室信息管理系统中的流程,以及系统的功能和解决方案,为相关系统的开发和研究提供了范例.%Combining with the development of Laboratory Information System (LIS) in our hospital, we developed the framework model of LIS, and analyzed the proresa of various datas in US and the system funcions, thus to provide example for related system development and research.

  20. COMBINED MEASUREMENTS WITH THREE-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN INFORMATION VERIFICATION SYSTEM AND GAMMA RAY IMAGING - A COLLABORATIVE EFFORT BETWEEN OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY, LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY, AND THE JOINT RESEARCH CENTER AT ISPRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihailescu, L; Vetter, K; Ruhter, W; Chivers, D; Dreicer, M; Coates, C; Smith, S; Hines, J; Caiado, A R; Sequeira, V; Fiocco, M; Goncalves, J G

    2006-06-14

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have jointly performed tests to demonstrate combined measurements with a three-dimensional (3D) design information verification (DIV) system and a gamma-ray imager for potential safeguard applications. The 3D DIV system was made available by the European Commission's Joint Research Center to ORNL under a collaborative project between the U.S. Department of Energy and the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM). The system is able to create 3D maps of rooms and objects and of identifying changes in positions and modifications with a precision on the order of millimeters. The gamma ray imaging system consists of a 4{pi} field-of-view Compton imaging system which has two fully operational DSSD (Double-Sided Segment Detector) High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors developed at LLNL. The Compton imaging instrument not only provides imaging capabilities, but provides excellent energy resolution which enables the identification of radioisotopes and nuclear materials. Joint Research Center was responsible to merge gamma-ray images with the 3D range maps. The results of preliminary first measurements performed at LLNL demonstrate, for the first time, mapping of panoramic gamma-ray images into 3D range data.

  1. A clinical information systems strategy for a large integrated delivery network.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuperman, G. J.; Spurr, C.; Flammini, S.; Bates, D.; Glaser, J.

    2000-01-01

    Integrated delivery networks (IDNs) are an emerging class of health care institutions. IDNs are formed from the affiliation of individual health care institutions and are intended to be more efficient in the current fiscal health care environment. To realize efficiencies and support their strategic visions, IDNs rely critically on excellent information technology (IT). Because of its importance to the mission of the IDN, strategic decisions about IT are made by the top leadership of the IDN. ...

  2. Clinical Decision Support System to Enhance Quality Control of Spirometry Using Information and Communication Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Burgos Rincón, Felip; Melia, Umberto Sergio Pio; Vallverdú Ferrer, Montserrat; Velickovski, Filip; Lluch-Ariet, Magí; Caminal Magrans, Pere; Roca-Torrent, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Background: We recently demonstrated that quality of spirometry in primary care could markedly improve with remote offline support from specialized professionals. It is hypothesized that implementation of automatic online assessment of quality of spirometry using information and communication technologies may significantly enhance the potential for extensive deployment of a high quality spirometry program in integrated care settings. Objective: The objective of the study was to elaborate a...

  3. Next generation information systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limback, Nathan P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Medina, Melanie A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Silva, Michelle E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The Information Systems Analysis and Development (ISAD) Team of the Safeguards Systems Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been developing web based information and knowledge management systems for sixteen years. Our vision is to rapidly and cost effectively provide knowledge management solutions in the form of interactive information systems that help customers organize, archive, post and retrieve nonproliferation and safeguards knowledge and information vital to their success. The team has developed several comprehensive information systems that assist users in the betterment and growth of their organizations and programs. Through our information systems, users are able to streamline operations, increase productivity, and share and access information from diverse geographic locations. The ISAD team is also producing interactive visual models. Interactive visual models provide many benefits to customers beyond the scope of traditional full-scale modeling. We have the ability to simulate a vision that a customer may propose, without the time constraints of traditional engineering modeling tools. Our interactive visual models can be used to access specialized training areas, controlled areas, and highly radioactive areas, as well as review site-specific training for complex facilities, and asset management. Like the information systems that the ISAD team develops, these models can be shared and accessed from any location with access to the internet. The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on the capabilities of information systems and interactive visual models as well as consider the possibility of combining the two capabilities to provide the next generation of infonnation systems. The collection, processing, and integration of data in new ways can contribute to the security of the nation by providing indicators and information for timely action to decrease the traditional and new nuclear threats. Modeling and simulation tied to comprehensive

  4. Next generation information systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Information Systems Analysis and Development (ISAD) Team of the Safeguards Systems Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been developing web based information and knowledge management systems for sixteen years. Our vision is to rapidly and cost effectively provide knowledge management solutions in the form of interactive information systems that help customers organize, archive, post and retrieve nonproliferation and safeguards knowledge and information vital to their success. The team has developed several comprehensive information systems that assist users in the betterment and growth of their organizations and programs. Through our information systems, users are able to streamline operations, increase productivity, and share and access information from diverse geographic locations. The ISAD team is also producing interactive visual models. Interactive visual models provide many benefits to customers beyond the scope of traditional full-scale modeling. We have the ability to simulate a vision that a customer may propose, without the time constraints of traditional engineering modeling tools. Our interactive visual models can be used to access specialized training areas, controlled areas, and highly radioactive areas, as well as review site-specific training for complex facilities, and asset management. Like the information systems that the ISAD team develops, these models can be shared and accessed from any location with access to the internet. The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on the capabilities of information systems and interactive visual models as well as consider the possibility of combining the two capabilities to provide the next generation of infonnation systems. The collection, processing, and integration of data in new ways can contribute to the security of the nation by providing indicators and information for timely action to decrease the traditional and new nuclear threats. Modeling and simulation tied to comprehensive

  5. Sweet syndrome: Clinical and Laboratory Findings of 31 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serap Güneş Bilgili

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Sweet syndrome is an inflammatory disease characterized by the abrupt onset of pain, red papules and plaques, fever, neutrophilic leukocytosis, and dermal neutrophilic infiltrate. There are not enough data about Sweet syndrome in Turkey. In this article, we studied clinical, laboratory, histopathological, and epidemiological characteristics of patients, who presented to our clinic, and compared the findings with the literature. Materials and Methods: All patients diagnosed with Sweet syndrome in our clinic between 2005 and 2011 were included in the study. The epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory findings were retrospectively evaluated. Results: A total of 31 patients with Sweet’s syndrome - 24 female (77.4%, 7 male (22.6%; aged 23-82 years – included in the study. The average age of the patients was 48 years. Cutaneous lesions were most frequently localized in the upper extremity. Conjunctivitis was the common systemic manifestation, followed by fever, arthralgia, and myalgia. The most common trigger factor was infections of the upper respiratory tract. In histopathological evaluations of skin biopsies, dense neutrophil infiltration compatible with Sweet syndrome was detected in the dermis. Also, findings of vasculitis were determined in 3 patients. Discussion: The clinical and laboratory findings in our study are mostly similar to those reported in the literature. We found evidence of vasculitis in 10% of cases, therefore, we think the presence of vasculitis does not necessarily rule out the diagnosis of Sweet syndrome

  6. 大连市兽医实验室信息管理系统的建立%Development of Veterinary Laboratory Information Management System in Dalian City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈明非; 李广焱; 程淑晶; 李巍; 王德强; 刘佳; 赵怡雯; 苍真伟

    2015-01-01

    当前我国兽医实验室工作任务繁杂,管理工作面临挑战,实验室管理系统(LIMS)的引进势在必行.本文以大连市动物疫病预防控制中心建立的兽医实验室管理系统为例,阐述了管理系统的设计思路,结合日常工作介绍了管理系统的运转情况,分析了管理系统对实验室检测结果关键因素的控制作用,总结了管理系统在提高实验室管理水平方面的优势.%At present, the veterinary laboratories in China are heavily loaded and their management faces great chal-lenges. It is imperative to introduce the Laboratory Information Management System(LIMS). The LIMS design idea was described in this paper taking the LIMS developed by Dalian Animal Disease Prevention and Control Center as an example,the veterinary laboratory operation through LIMS based on the routine work was presented and the control effect of the LIMS on the critical factors influencing the test results was analyzed. The advantages of the LIMS in pro-moting laboratory management were summarized and some advices about the development and application of LIMS in veterinary laboratories were put forward.

  7. Study and Application of Agricultural Laboratory Information Management System%农业实验室信息管理系统的研究及应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄家怿; 谢秋波; 郭佩佩

    2014-01-01

    本文讨论了农业实验室管理信息系统的建设与应用,主要对该系统技术架构的设计以及功能模块的建立进行了详细阐述,其中功能模块包括样品受理、检验分析、质量监控、资源管理以及系统管理五大块。最后以农业机械管理和畜产品实验室为例,说明了该系统的实用性。%This article discussed the construction and application of agricultural laboratory management informa-tion system (LIMS). Focus of the study was to design the system architecture and build its functional modules, which included five parts, namely, sample acceptance, examination and analysis, quality control, resource man-agement, and system management. Finally, the usefulness of the agricultural LIMS was described by the man-agement of agricultural machinery and testing laboratory of animal husbandry products.

  8. Guidelines (1988) for training in clinical laboratory management

    OpenAIRE

    Cediel, N.; Fraser, C G; Deom, A.; Josefsson, L.; Worth, H. G. J.; Zinder, O.

    1989-01-01

    Trainees in laboratory medicine must develop skills in laboratory management. Guidelines are detailed for laboratory staff in training, directors responsible for staff development and professional bodies wishing to generate material appropriate to their needs. The syllabus delineates the knowledge base required and includes laboratory planning and organization, control of operations, methodology and instrumentation, data management and statistics, financial management, clinical use of tests, ...

  9. Rotavirus infection in children: clinical and laboratory features and catamnesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhailova E.V.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose is to study the clinical, laboratory and instrumental characteristics of the course of rotavirus infection in children up to 3 years in the acute phase and during the convalescence period. Material and methods. A clinical, laboratory and instrumental examination of 320 children up to 3 years with moderate to severe rotavirus infection. Results. The presence of long-term persistence of rotavirus recovering from rotavirus infection. Identified functional disorders of the digestive system in the acute period and the period of convalescence in children up to 3 years with rotavirus infection. Conclusion. For a long period (up to 3 months, almost half of patients may experience intestinal dysfunction, possibly related to the long-term persistence of rotavirus.

  10. Realistic modeling of clinical laboratory operation by computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, W; Braun, S L; Hanssmann, F; Liebl, F; Berchtold, G; Blaschke, H; Eckert, M; Hoffmann, G E; Klose, S

    1994-06-01

    An important objective of laboratory management is to adjust the laboratory's capability to the needs of patients' care as well as economy. The consequences of management may be changes in laboratory organization, equipment, or personnel planning. At present only one's individual experience can be used for making such decisions. We have investigated whether the techniques of operations research could be transferred to a clinical laboratory and whether an adequate simulation model of the laboratory could be realized. First we listed and documented the system design and the process flow for each single laboratory request. These input data were linked by the simulation model (programming language SIMSCRIPT II.5). The output data (turnaround times, utilization rates, and analysis of queue length) were validated by comparison with the current performance data obtained by tracking specimen flow. Congruence of the data was excellent (within +/- 4%). In planning experiments we could study the consequences of changes in order entry, staffing, and equipment on turnaround times, utilization, and queue lengths. We conclude that simulation can be a valuable tool for better management decisions.

  11. Evaluation of the enterovirus laboratory surveillance system in Denmark, 2010 to 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Condell, Orla; Midgley, Sofie; Christiansen, Claus Bohn;

    2016-01-01

    -transmission in a timely manner. We evaluate the national EV laboratory surveillance, to generate recommendations for system strengthening. The system was analysed for completeness of viral typing analysis and clinical information and timeliness of specimen collection, laboratory results and reporting of clinical......The primary aim of the Danish enterovirus (EV) surveillance system is to document absence of poliovirus infection. The conflict in Syria has left many children unvaccinated and movement from areas with polio cases to Europe calls for increased awareness to detect and respond to virus......-confirmed cases, clinical information was available for 63.1% (903/1,430). Primary diagnostic results were available after a median of 1.4 days, typing results after 17 days, detailed clinical information after 33 days. The large number of samples typed demonstrated continued monitoring of EV...

  12. Data Systems vs. Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Amatayakul, Margret K.

    1982-01-01

    This paper examines the current status of “hospital information systems” with respect to the distinction between data systems and information systems. It is proposed that the systems currently existing are incomplete data dystems resulting in ineffective information systems.

  13. The deployment of a World Wide Web (W3) based medical information system.

    OpenAIRE

    Willard, K E; Hallgren, J. H.; Sielaff, B.; Connelly, D. P.

    1995-01-01

    The development of Web technologies has revolutionized information dissemination on the Internet. The University of Minnesota Hospital and Clinic's Web Clinical Information System (CIS) demonstrates the use of the Web as an infrastructure for deploying a medical information system at a fraction of the developmental cost of more traditional client server systems. This Web CIS has been deployed since December 1994. It makes available laboratory results, including a radically improved clinical m...

  14. 基于Portal技术的实验室信息管理系统研究%Research of The Laboratory Information Management System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨博

    2012-01-01

    Lims(实验室信息管理系统,Laboratory Information Management System)是对实验室产生的各种信息进行管理的软件系统.通过该系统可以切实提高实验室管理工作效率,大大减轻实验室人员工作负担,从而提升服务水平,充分发挥实验室各种资源的作用,通顺实验室及其相关工作的业务流程.该文介绍的就是一个基于portal技术上的Lims系统.

  15. Use of phase information with a stepper motor to control frequency for tuning system of the Front End Test Stand Radio Frequency Quadrupole at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsari, S., E-mail: s.alsari@imperial.ac.uk; Aslaninejad, M.; Pozimski, J.

    2015-03-01

    For the Front End Test Stand (FETS) linear accelerator project at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK, a 4 m, 4 vanes Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) with a resonant frequency of 324 MHz has been designed. The RF power feeding the RFQ gives rise to the temperature increase in the RFQ, which in turn, results in shifting the resonant frequency of the RFQ. The frequency shift and the stability in the RFQ frequency can be maintained based on the reflected power or signal phase information. We have, however, investigated restoration of the RFQ nominal frequency based on the RF signal phases driving a stepper motor. The concept and the system set-up and electronics are described in detail. Results of the measurements indicating the full restoration of the RFQ nominal frequency based on the RF signal phases and stepper motor are presented. Moreover, measured sensitivity of tuner with respect to its position is given.

  16. Use of phase information with a stepper motor to control frequency for tuning system of the Front End Test Stand Radio Frequency Quadrupole at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the Front End Test Stand (FETS) linear accelerator project at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK, a 4 m, 4 vanes Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) with a resonant frequency of 324 MHz has been designed. The RF power feeding the RFQ gives rise to the temperature increase in the RFQ, which in turn, results in shifting the resonant frequency of the RFQ. The frequency shift and the stability in the RFQ frequency can be maintained based on the reflected power or signal phase information. We have, however, investigated restoration of the RFQ nominal frequency based on the RF signal phases driving a stepper motor. The concept and the system set-up and electronics are described in detail. Results of the measurements indicating the full restoration of the RFQ nominal frequency based on the RF signal phases and stepper motor are presented. Moreover, measured sensitivity of tuner with respect to its position is given

  17. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This developmental effort clearly shows that a Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory System is a worthwhile and achievable goal. The RTAL is designed to fully analyze (radioanalytes, and organic and inorganic chemical analytes) 20 samples per day at the highest levels of quality assurance and quality control. It dramatically reduces the turnaround time for environmental sample analysis from 45 days (at a central commercial laboratory) to 1 day. At the same time each RTAL system will save the DOE over $12 million per year in sample analysis costs compared to the costs at a central commercial laboratory. If RTAL systems were used at the eight largest DOE facilities (at Hanford, Savannah River, Fernald, Oak Ridge, Idaho, Rocky Flats, Los Alamos, and the Nevada Test Site), the annual savings would be $96,589,000. The DOE's internal study of sample analysis needs projects 130,000 environmental samples requiring analysis in FY 1994, clearly supporting the need for the RTAL system. The cost and time savings achievable with the RTAL system will accelerate and improve the efficiency of cleanup and remediation operations throughout the DOE complex

  18. ms_lims, a simple yet powerful open source laboratory information management system for MS-driven proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsens, Kenny; Colaert, Niklaas; Barsnes, Harald; Muth, Thilo; Flikka, Kristian; Staes, An; Timmerman, Evy; Wortelkamp, Steffi; Sickmann, Albert; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Gevaert, Kris; Martens, Lennart

    2010-03-01

    MS-based proteomics produces large amounts of mass spectra that require processing, identification and possibly quantification before interpretation can be undertaken. High-throughput studies require automation of these various steps, and management of the data in association with the results obtained. We here present ms_lims (http://genesis.UGent.be/ms_lims), a freely available, open-source system based on a central database to automate data management and processing in MS-driven proteomics analyses. PMID:20058248

  19. Handling Large and Complex Data in a Photovoltaic Research Institution Using a Custom Laboratory Information Management System

    OpenAIRE

    White, Robert R.; Munch, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-five years ago the desktop computer started becoming ubiquitous in the scientific lab. Researchers were delighted with its ability to both control instrumentation and acquire data on a single system, but they were not completely satisfied. There were often gaps in knowledge that they thought might be gained if they just had more data and they could get the data faster. Computer technology has evolved in keeping with Moore's Law meeting those desires; however those improvement have of l...

  20. ms_lims, a simple yet powerful open source laboratory information management system for MS-driven proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsens, Kenny; Colaert, Niklaas; Barsnes, Harald; Muth, Thilo; Flikka, Kristian; Staes, An; Timmerman, Evy; Wortelkamp, Steffi; Sickmann, Albert; Vandekerckhove, Joël; Gevaert, Kris; Martens, Lennart

    2010-03-01

    MS-based proteomics produces large amounts of mass spectra that require processing, identification and possibly quantification before interpretation can be undertaken. High-throughput studies require automation of these various steps, and management of the data in association with the results obtained. We here present ms_lims (http://genesis.UGent.be/ms_lims), a freely available, open-source system based on a central database to automate data management and processing in MS-driven proteomics analyses.

  1. The Earth Resources Laboratory Applications Software (ELAS) in university research and education: An operator oriented geobased information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, B. L.; Kind, T. C.; Smith, W. F., Jr.; Weber, N. V.

    1981-01-01

    Created for analyzing and processing digital data such as that collected by multispectral scanners or digitized from maps, ELAS is designed for ease of user operation and includes its own FORTRAN operating monitor and an expandable set of application modules which are FORTRAN overlays. On those machines that do not support FORTRAN overlaying, the modules exist as subprograms. The subsystem can be implemented on most 16-bit or 32-bit machines and is capable of, but not limited to, operating on low-cost minicomputer systems. The recommended hardware configuration for ELAS and a representative listing of some operating and application modules are presented.

  2. Medical Service Clinical Laboratory Procedure--Hematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of the Army, Washington, DC.

    Presented are laboratory studies focusing on blood cells and the complete scheme of blood coagulation. Formed is the basis for the following types of laboratory operations: (1) distinguishing the morphology of normal and abnormal blood cells; (2) measuring the concentrations or number of blood cells; (3) measuring concentration and detecting…

  3. Game Information System

    OpenAIRE

    Spits Warnars

    2010-01-01

    In this Information system age many organizations consider information system as their weapon to compete or gain competitive advantage or give the best services for non profit organizations. Game Information System as combining Information System and game is breakthrough to achieve organizations' performance. The Game Information System will run the Information System with game and how game can be implemented to run the Information System. Game is not only for fun and entertainment, but will ...

  4. Information workstations in clinical pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spackman, K A

    1991-03-01

    Multitasking operating systems and expanding networks now permit smooth access to remote computers, peripherals, data, and information resources. Graphic user interfaces and productivity-enhancing software packages reduce the need for training and memorization of commands. New models of desktop computers based on "data-centered" software architecture can enhance workstation usefulness even more. Pathologists need to consider how these tools might improve access to and management of information and knowledge.

  5. The deployment of a World Wide Web (W3) based medical information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, K E; Hallgren, J H; Sielaff, B; Connelly, D P

    1995-01-01

    The development of Web technologies has revolutionized information dissemination on the Internet. The University of Minnesota Hospital and Clinic's Web Clinical Information System (CIS) demonstrates the use of the Web as an infrastructure for deploying a medical information system at a fraction of the developmental cost of more traditional client server systems. This Web CIS has been deployed since December 1994. It makes available laboratory results, including a radically improved clinical microbiology reporting system, ad hoc laboratory order entry, and an embedded expert system protocol laboratory ordering system. It provides these services to any physician or patient care area with TCP (or SLIP/PPP) connection to our hospital network backbone, whether the client computer is running MS Windows, the Macintosh OS, or X-Windows. A formal evaluation of one of this systems subcomponents, the display of clinical microbiology information, demonstrated a significant savings in clinician time (43% p vs 15 p < .01).

  6. AMIA Conference 2006 “Partnerships in Innovation”: Intermountain Healthcare and GE Healthcare—Partnering to Build a World-Class Clinical Information System

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Intermountain Healthcare, one of the leading integrated delivery networks in the country, has established a software development partnership with GE Healthcare’s Integrated IT Solutions business to create the next-generation clinical information system. The 10-year development deal focuses primarily on electronic medical records, with additional work being done on decision support, data warehousing, and hospital and clinic automation—all with the goal of improving patient care. Headquartered ...

  7. Geographical information system (GIS) as a new tool to evaluate epidemiology based on spatial analysis and clinical outcomes in acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naves, Luciana Ansaneli; Porto, Lara Benigno; Rosa, João Willy Corrêa; Casulari, Luiz Augusto; Rosa, José Wilson Corrêa

    2015-02-01

    Geographical information systems (GIS) have emerged as a group of innovative software components useful for projects in epidemiology and planning in Health Care System. This is an original study to investigate environmental and geographical influences on epidemiology of acromegaly in Brazil. We aimed to validate a method to link an acromegaly registry with a GIS mapping program, to describe the spatial distribution of patients, to identify disease clusters and to evaluate if the access to Health Care could influence the outcome of the disease. Clinical data from 112 consecutive patients were collected and home addresses were plotted in the GIS software for spatial analysis. The buffer spatial distribution of patients living in Brasilia showed that 38.1% lived from 0.33 to 8.66 km, 17.7% from 8.67 to 18.06 km, 22.2% from 18.07 to 25.67 km and 22% from 25.68 to 36.70 km distant to the Reference Medical Center (RMC), and no unexpected clusters were identified. Migration of 26 patients from 11 others cities in different regions of the country was observed. Most of patients (64%) with adenomas bigger than 25 mm lived more than 20 km away from RMC, but no significant correlation between the distance from patient's home to the RMC and tumor diameter (r = 0.45 p = 0.20) nor for delay in diagnosis (r = 0.43 p = 0.30) was found. The geographical distribution of diagnosed cases did not impact in the latency of diagnosis or tumor size but the recognition of significant migration denotes that improvements in the medical assistance network are needed.

  8. Ubiquitous Multicriteria Clinic Recommendation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Toly

    2016-05-01

    Advancements in information, communication, and sensor technologies have led to new opportunities in medical care and education. Patients in general prefer visiting the nearest clinic, attempt to avoid waiting for treatment, and have unequal preferences for different clinics and doctors. Therefore, to enable patients to compare multiple clinics, this study proposes a ubiquitous multicriteria clinic recommendation system. In this system, patients can send requests through their cell phones to the system server to obtain a clinic recommendation. Once the patient sends this information to the system, the system server first estimates the patient's speed according to the detection results of a global positioning system. It then applies a fuzzy integer nonlinear programming-ordered weighted average approach to assess four criteria and finally recommends a clinic with maximal utility to the patient. The proposed methodology was tested in a field experiment, and the experimental results showed that it is advantageous over two existing methods in elevating the utilities of recommendations. In addition, such an advantage was shown to be statistically significant.

  9. Ubiquitous Multicriteria Clinic Recommendation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Toly

    2016-05-01

    Advancements in information, communication, and sensor technologies have led to new opportunities in medical care and education. Patients in general prefer visiting the nearest clinic, attempt to avoid waiting for treatment, and have unequal preferences for different clinics and doctors. Therefore, to enable patients to compare multiple clinics, this study proposes a ubiquitous multicriteria clinic recommendation system. In this system, patients can send requests through their cell phones to the system server to obtain a clinic recommendation. Once the patient sends this information to the system, the system server first estimates the patient's speed according to the detection results of a global positioning system. It then applies a fuzzy integer nonlinear programming-ordered weighted average approach to assess four criteria and finally recommends a clinic with maximal utility to the patient. The proposed methodology was tested in a field experiment, and the experimental results showed that it is advantageous over two existing methods in elevating the utilities of recommendations. In addition, such an advantage was shown to be statistically significant. PMID:26984357

  10. Introducing a Method for Achieving Standardization and Harmonization in Clinical and Research Laboratory Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dastmardi, M. (MSc

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Proficiency testing schemes as a part of quality system in clinical and research laboratory centers provides the opportunity to evaluate the quality of test results. In this paper, we try to introduce the proficiency testing schemes as a useful method for achieving standardization and homogenization of test results in clinical and research laboratory centers. Keywords: Proficiency Testing Schemes; Quality Improvement; Laboratory Centers

  11. U.S. Ebola Treatment Center Clinical Laboratory Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelden, Katelyn C; Iwen, Peter C; Herstein, Jocelyn J; Biddinger, Paul D; Kraft, Colleen S; Saiman, Lisa; Smith, Philip W; Hewlett, Angela L; Gibbs, Shawn G; Lowe, John J

    2016-04-01

    Fifty-five hospitals in the United States have been designated Ebola treatment centers (ETCs) by their state and local health authorities. Designated ETCs must have appropriate plans to manage a patient with confirmed Ebola virus disease (EVD) for the full duration of illness and must have these plans assessed through a CDC site visit conducted by an interdisciplinary team of subject matter experts. This study determined the clinical laboratory capabilities of these ETCs. ETCs were electronically surveyed on clinical laboratory characteristics. Survey responses were returned from 47 ETCs (85%). Forty-one (87%) of the ETCs planned to provide some laboratory support (e.g., point-of-care [POC] testing) within the room of the isolated patient. Forty-four (94%) ETCs indicated that their hospital would also provide clinical laboratory support for patient care. Twenty-two (50%) of these ETC clinical laboratories had biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) containment. Of all respondents, 34 (72%) were supported by their jurisdictional public health laboratory (PHL), all of which had available BSL-3 laboratories. Overall, 40 of 44 (91%) ETCs reported BSL-3 laboratory support via their clinical laboratory and/or PHL. This survey provided a snapshot of the laboratory support for designated U.S. ETCs. ETCs have approached high-level isolation critical care with laboratory support in close proximity to the patient room and by distributing laboratory support among laboratory resources. Experts might review safety considerations for these laboratory testing/diagnostic activities that are novel in the context of biocontainment care. PMID:26842705

  12. Robotics and Autonomous Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides an environment for developing and evaluating intelligent software for both actual and simulated autonomous vehicles. Laboratory computers provide...

  13. 42 CFR 493.2001 - Establishment and function of the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Consultations § 493.2001 Establishment and function of the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee. (a) HHS will establish a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee to.... (b) The Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee will be comprised of individuals...

  14. Aeronautical Information System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Aeronautical Information System (AIS) is a leased weather automated system that provides a means of collecting and distributing aeronautical weather information...

  15. A Software Tool for Removing Patient Identifying Information from Clinical Documents

    OpenAIRE

    Friedlin, F. Jeff; McDonald, Clement J.

    2008-01-01

    We created a software tool that accurately removes all patient identifying information from various kinds of clinical data documents, including laboratory and narrative reports. We created the Medical De-identification System (MeDS), a software tool that de-identifies clinical documents, and performed 2 evaluations. Our first evaluation used 2,400 Health Level Seven (HL7) messages from 10 different HL7 message producers. After modifying the software based on the results of this first evaluati...

  16. [Laboratory unification: advantages and disadvantages for clinical microbiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu, Antonia; Matas, Lurdes

    2010-10-01

    This article aims to reflect on which areas or tasks of microbiology laboratories could be unified with those of clinical biochemistry, hematology, immunology or pathology laboratories to benefit patients and the health system, as well as the areas that should remain independent since their amalgamation would not only fail to provide a benefit but could even jeopardize the quality of microbiological diagnosis, and consequently patient care. To do this, the distinct analytic phases of diagnosis are analyzed, and the advantages and disadvantages of amalgamation are evaluated in each phase. The pros and cons of the unification of certain areas such as the computer system, occupational risk units, customer service, purchasing logistics, and materials storage, etc, are also discussed. Lastly, the effect of unification on urgent microbiology diagnosis is analyzed. Microbiological diagnosis should be unique. The microbiologist should perform an overall evaluation of the distinct techniques used for a particular patient, both those that involve direct diagnosis (staining, culture, antigen detection techniques or molecular techniques) and indirect diagnosis (antibody detection). Moreover, the microbiology laboratory should be independent, with highly trained technicians and specialists in microbiology that provide added value as experts in infection and as key figures in the process of establishing a correct etiological diagnosis.

  17. Design of information security laboratory E-learning teaching system%信息安全实验室E-learning教学系统的设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋中云

    2012-01-01

    在分析信息安全实验教学的作用和特点的基础上,设计了一个具有信息安全课程特色的网络化E-leaming教学系统,从而改变了传统的“说教式”教学方法.该E-learning教学系统使教学能够跨越时间和空间的限制,展现出极大的灵活性和交互性,是支持新型的教师指导下学生自主学习方式的最有力工具.%By analyzing the roles and characteristics of information security experiment teaching, a laboratory E-learning teaching system was designed. It changes the traditional didactic teaching methods, makes the teaching overcome the limit by time and space, shows great flexibility and interactivity. It is the most powerful tool that supports students self-learning under the guidance of teachers.

  18. A Map for Clinical Laboratories Management Indicators in the Intelligent Dashboard

    OpenAIRE

    Azadmanjir, Zahra; Torabi, Mashallah; Safdari, Reza; Bayat, Maryam; Golmahi, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: management challenges of clinical laboratories are more complicated for educational hospital clinical laboratories. Managers can use tools of business intelligence (BI), such as information dashboards that provide the possibility of intelligent decision-making and problem solving about increasing income, reducing spending, utilization management and even improving quality. Critical phase of dashboard design is setting indicators and modeling causal relations between them. The pa...

  19. A novel 1050nm handheld OCT imaging system for pediatric retinoblastoma patients: translation from laboratory bench to clinical study (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadiarnykh, Oleg; Moll, Annette C.; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate a novel optical coherence tomography system specifically developed and validated for clinical imaging of retinoblastoma tumors in pediatric patients. The existing treatment options for this malignant tumor of the retina aim at reduction of tumor (re)growth risks, and vision preservation. The choice of optimal treatment strongly depends on skilled and detailed clinical assessment. Currently, the patients at risk are periodically monitored with retinal imaging for possible morphological changes over time, and new tumor seedings, as the existing real-time diagnostic tools are limited. Three-dimensional visualization of tissue layer and microvasculature at improved axial and lateral resolution of interference-based OCT imaging provides sensitivity for detection of vital tumor tissue concurrent with local treatment. Our METC-approved system accommodates for the range of optical parameters of infants' eyes, and uses the 1050nm wavelength to access the deeper choroid layers of retina. The prototype is designed for patients in supine position under general anesthesia, where ergonomic handheld module is connected to fiber-based optical setup via umbilical cord. The system conforms to clinical safety requirements, including fully isolated low-voltage electric circuit. Focusing is performed with a mechanically tunable lens, where resolution is 6 µm axially, and varies with focusing at 10-18µm laterally. We will present optical design, performance limitations, and results of the ongoing clinical study, including the increased OCT diagnostic sensitivity in three dimensions in comparison with the established clinical imaging modalities. We will discuss images of early, active, and treated tumors, as well as follow-up on patients after local and systemic treatments.

  20. Impact of the Patient-Reported Outcomes Management Information System (PROMIS) upon the Design and Operation of Multi-center Clinical Trials: a Qualitative Research Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diener, Lawrence W.; Nahm, Meredith; Weinfurt, Kevin P.

    2013-01-01

    New technologies may be required to integrate the National Institutes of Health’s Patient Reported Outcome Management Information System (PROMIS) into multi-center clinical trials. To better understand this need, we identified likely PROMIS reporting formats, developed a multi-center clinical trial process model, and identified gaps between current capabilities and those necessary for PROMIS. These results were evaluated by key trial constituencies. Issues reported by principal investigators fell into two categories: acceptance by key regulators and the scientific community, and usability for researchers and clinicians. Issues reported by the coordinating center, participating sites, and study subjects were those faced when integrating new technologies into existing clinical trial systems. We then defined elements of a PROMIS Tool Kit required for integrating PROMIS into a multi-center clinical trial environment. The requirements identified in this study serve as a framework for future investigators in the design, development, implementation, and operation of PROMIS Tool Kit technologies. PMID:20703765

  1. Modelling of Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Hausman, Halina

    1982-01-01

    The article discusses selected problems in methodology of designing comprehensive information systems. Main emphasis has been laid on modelling of information systems for companies. Presentation of bases for construction of models and description of their main types provides a basis allowing the author to draw conclusions concerning their application. Modelling of information systems is treated as one of stages in designing information systems.

  2. Design an Information System

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Libor

    2016-01-01

    Main object of this thesis is design information system for warehouse management for Fi & Ho Trading Company, which will be accessible through web. Warehouse will be based on portal technology and connected with E-shop. In this thesis will be described elements of information system, resources used for realization, processes coverage by information system and complex evaluation of this information system.

  3. Information Systems Security Audit

    OpenAIRE

    Gheorghe Popescu; Veronica Adriana Popescu; Cristina Raluca Popescu

    2007-01-01

    The article covers:Defining an information system; benefits obtained by introducing new information technologies; IT management;Defining prerequisites, analysis, design, implementation of IS; Information security management system; aspects regarding IS security policy; Conceptual model of a security system; Auditing information security systems and network infrastructure security.

  4. Information Systems Security Audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Popescu

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The article covers:Defining an information system; benefits obtained by introducing new information technologies; IT management;Defining prerequisites, analysis, design, implementation of IS; Information security management system; aspects regarding IS security policy; Conceptual model of a security system; Auditing information security systems and network infrastructure security.

  5. Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technologists and Technicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... More Sources of Data Publications Latest Publications » The Economics Daily Monthly Labor Review Beyond the Numbers Spotlight on Statistics Reports & Bulletins Commissioner's Corner Career Outlook Occupational Outlook Handbook Handbook of Methods Research Papers Copyright Information Contact & ...

  6. Coryneform bacteria in infectious diseases: clinical and laboratory aspects.

    OpenAIRE

    Coyle, M B; Lipsky, B A

    1990-01-01

    Coryneform isolates from clinical specimens frequently cannot be identified by either reference laboratories or research laboratories. Many of these organisms are skin flora that belong to a large number of taxonomic groups, only 40% of which are in the genus Corynebacterium. This review provides an update on clinical presentations, microbiological features, and pathogenic mechanisms of infections with nondiphtheria Corynebacterium species and other pleomorphic gram-positive rods. The early l...

  7. GAME INFORMATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spits Warnars

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this Information system age many organizations consider information system as their weapon tocompete or gain competitive advantage or give the best services for non profit organizations. GameInformation System as combining Information System and game is breakthrough to achieveorganizations’ performance. The Game Information System will run the Information System with gameand how game can be implemented to run the Information System. Game is not only for fun andentertainment, but will be a challenge to combine fun and entertainment with Information System. TheChallenge to run the information system with entertainment, deliver the entertainment with informationsystem all at once. Game information system can be implemented in many sectors as like the informationsystem itself but in difference’s view. A view of game which people can joy and happy and do theirtransaction as a fun things.

  8. Mentoring for retention and advancement in the multigenerational clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudicina, R J

    2001-01-01

    Retention of recent graduates and other laboratory practitioners in the workplace will play a key role in addressing current and projected shortages of clinical laboratory scientists (CLS) and technicians (CLT). In addition, with overrepresentation of the aging Baby Boomer generation in laboratory supervisory and management positions, it is crucial not only to retain younger practitioners, but to prepare them for assuming these important functions in the future. Mentoring, a practice commonly employed in other professions, is widely considered to be useful in employee retention and career advancement. Mentoring has probably been used in the clinical laboratory profession, but has not been well documented. In the clinical laboratory environment, potential mentors are in the Veteran and Baby Boomer generations, and new practitioners who could benefit from mentoring are in Generation X. Generational differences among these groups may present challenges to the use of mentoring. This article will attempt to provide a better understanding of generational differences and show how mentoring can be applied in the setting of the clinical laboratory in order to increase retention and promote career advancement of younger practitioners. A panel of five laboratory managers provided examples of mentoring strategies. Definitions, benefits, and examples of mentoring are addressed in the accompanying article, "Passing the Torch: Mentoring the Next Generation of Laboratory Professionals". PMID:15633495

  9. Designing information systems

    CERN Document Server

    Blethyn, Stanley G

    2014-01-01

    Designing Information Systems focuses on the processes, methodologies, and approaches involved in designing information systems. The book first describes systems, management and control, and how to design information systems. Discussions focus on documents produced from the functional construction function, users, operators, analysts, programmers and others, process management and control, levels of management, open systems, design of management information systems, and business system description, partitioning, and leveling. The text then takes a look at functional specification and functiona

  10. Autoverification in a core clinical chemistry laboratory at an academic medical center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Krasowski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autoverification is a process of using computer-based rules to verify clinical laboratory test results without manual intervention. To date, there is little published data on the use of autoverification over the course of years in a clinical laboratory. We describe the evolution and application of autoverification in an academic medical center clinical chemistry core laboratory. Subjects and Methods: At the institution of the study, autoverification developed from rudimentary rules in the laboratory information system (LIS to extensive and sophisticated rules mostly in middleware software. Rules incorporated decisions based on instrument error flags, interference indices, analytical measurement ranges (AMRs, delta checks, dilution protocols, results suggestive of compromised or contaminated specimens, and ′absurd′ (physiologically improbable values. Results: The autoverification rate for tests performed in the core clinical chemistry laboratory has increased over the course of 13 years from 40% to the current overall rate of 99.5%. A high percentage of critical values now autoverify. The highest rates of autoverification occurred with the most frequently ordered tests such as the basic metabolic panel (sodium, potassium, chloride, carbon dioxide, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, calcium, glucose; 99.6%, albumin (99.8%, and alanine aminotransferase (99.7%. The lowest rates of autoverification occurred with some therapeutic drug levels (gentamicin, lithium, and methotrexate and with serum free light chains (kappa/lambda, mostly due to need for offline dilution and manual filing of results. Rules also caught very rare occurrences such as plasma albumin exceeding total protein (usually indicative of an error such as short sample or bubble that evaded detection and marked discrepancy between total bilirubin and the spectrophotometric icteric index (usually due to interference of the bilirubin assay by immunoglobulin (Ig M monoclonal

  11. Geographical information system (GIS) as a new tool to evaluate epidemiology based on spatial analysis and clinical outcomes in acromegaly

    OpenAIRE

    Naves, Luciana Ansaneli; Porto, Lara Benigno; Rosa, João Willy Corrêa; Casulari, Luiz Augusto; Rosa, José Wilson Corrêa

    2013-01-01

    Geographical information systems (GIS) have emerged as a group of innovative software components useful for projects in epidemiology and planning in Health Care System. This is an original study to investigate environmental and geographical influences on epidemiology of acromegaly in Brazil. We aimed to validate a method to link an acromegaly registry with a GIS mapping program, to describe the spatial distribution of patients, to identify disease clusters and to evaluate if the access to Hea...

  12. The State Public Health Laboratory System

    OpenAIRE

    Inhorn, Stanley L.; Astles, J. Rex; Gradus, Stephen; Malmberg, Veronica; Snippes, Paula M.; Wilcke, Burton W.; White, Vanessa A.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the development since 2000 of the State Public Health Laboratory System in the United States. These state systems collectively are related to several other recent public health laboratory (PHL) initiatives. The first is the Core Functions and Capabilities of State Public Health Laboratories, a white paper that defined the basic responsibilities of the state PHL. Another is the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Laboratory System (NLS) initiative, the go...

  13. The integration of risk management and six sigma into the quality management system for clinical laboratory%风险管理及6 sigma体系与临床实验室质量管理的整合

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝晓柯; 曾宪飞

    2014-01-01

    临床医学的发展要求临床实验室持续改进质量管理体系,几乎达到检验报告无风险或零缺陷的目标.因此,应该不断更新实验室质量管理的理念和方法,从而保证患者医疗安全.本文旨在阐述风险管理和6 sigma管理体系与临床实验室质量管理体系的整合.%In present,clinical laboratory is required to continuously improve the quality management system for providing almost perfect reports and services.The new conception and methodology of quality management in clinical laboratory should be constantly updated in order to ensure the patient safety.The article focuses on the integration of risk management and six sigma,into the quality management system for clinical laboratory.

  14. An Overview of Clinical Studies on Fiber Post Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idil Dikbas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Intraradicular posts are useful adjuncts in the restoration of endodontically treated teeth. These systems have undergone a significant evolution in recent years, and fiber-reinforced systems have started to be incorporated into routine clinical care more frequently. Despite the high number of laboratory studies pertaining to the characteristics of fiber posts, clinical studies evaluating their general success rates are rather limited. Since clinical investigations are reliable means to achieve information about the general behavior pattern of materials or techniques, assessment of this data will be beneficial to have a better understanding of fiber-reinforced intraradicular post systems. The purpose of this paper was to make a summary of clinical studies regarding various fiber posts. A PubMed search was conducted and articles dating back to 1990 were retrieved. The paper provides an overview of clinical studies on fiber posts specifically in the last decade as well as commentary analysis.

  15. Multicenter comparative evaluation of six commercial systems and the national committee for clinical laboratory standards m27-a broth microdilution method for fluconazole susceptibility testing of Candida species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morace, G; Amato, G; Bistoni, F; Fadda, G; Marone, P; Montagna, M T; Oliveri, S; Polonelli, L; Rigoli, R; Mancuso, I; La Face, S; Masucci, L; Romano, L; Napoli, C; Tatò, D; Buscema, M G; Belli, C M C; Piccirillo, M M; Conti, S; Covan, S; Fanti, F; Cavanna, C; D'Alò, F; Pitzurra, L

    2002-08-01

    Fluconazole susceptibility among 800 clinical Candida isolates (60% C. albicans) and two control strains (C. krusei ATCC 6258 and C. parapsilosis ATCC 22019) was tested with the NCCLS M27-A method (gold standard) and six commercial products (Candifast, disk, Etest, Fungitest, Integral System Yeasts, and Sensititre YeastOne). Results were classified as susceptible, susceptible-dose dependent, or resistant using M27-A breakpoints or, for Fungitest, Integral System Yeasts, and Candifast, as susceptible, intermediate, or resistant, according to the manufacturers' instructions. Concordance with NCCLS M27-A results was analyzed with the chi(2) test. Intra- and interlaboratory reproducibility was also evaluated. NCCLS M27-A (90.1%), Etest (93.1%), Sensititre YeastOne (93.1%), disk (96.7%), Fungitest (92.6%), Integral System Yeasts (40.6%), and Candifast (6.0%) classified the indicated percentages of C. albicans isolates as susceptible. Among non-C. albicans strains, the percentages of susceptible isolates were as follows: NCCLS M27-A, 74.0%; Etest, 83.8%; Sensititre YeastOne, 64.1%; disk, 60.6%; Fungitest, 76.6%; Integral System Yeasts, 28.3%; and Candifast, 27.4%. All methods except Candifast and Integral System Yeasts showed good agreement with NCCLS M27-A results for both C albicans and non-C. albicans isolates. Intralaboratory reproducibility was excellent for NCCLS M27-A, Etest, Sensititre YeastOne, disk, and Fungitest (88 to 91%). Similar results emerged from the interlaboratory reproducibility evaluation. Our findings indicate that some commercial methods can be useful for fluconazole susceptibility testing of clinical Candida isolates. Those characterized by a lack of medium standardization and/or objective interpretative criteria should be avoided. Particular caution is necessary when testing is being done for clinical and epidemiological purposes. PMID:12149358

  16. Dynamics of Information Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hirsch, Michael J; Murphey, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of information and information dynamics has outgrown classical information theory. This book presents the research explaining the importance of information in the evolution of a distributed or networked system. It presents techniques for measuring the value or significance of information within the context of a system

  17. NETLab: An Online Laboratory Management System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananda Maiti

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Online hardware-based educational laboratories are increasingly being deployed in traditional on-campus as well as Web-based distance-learning courses around the world. An online laboratory generally will consist of several hardware-based remote experiments. However, one particular experiment can be performed at a time by an individual student or a group of students which require a careful scheduling of the experiments. For the proper implementation of an online laboratory an efficient laboratory management system (LMS is thus essential. Also for an online laboratory, the students need to fully understand the experimental system setup and feel comfortable as in an actual laboratory environment which, however, can be effectively done by adding suitable videos and animations etc. Besides, the students should be able to run the remote experiments, extract, save and analyze the data and submit laboratory reports online. The front end of the laboratory management system should be made browser-based so that one can use the laboratory facility from anywhere. Also, for the teachers, the laboratory management system should include an online evaluation for the quiz/viva-voce, checking experimental data, grading of submitted laboratory reports and feedback for the students. In this paper, we describe the design and prototype implementation of an online laboratory management system (for use with shared hardware-based remote laboratory resources which may be employed for running internet-based online laboratory courses for geographically dispersed Institutions.

  18. Applications for detection of acute kidney injury using electronic medical records and clinical information systems: workgroup statements from the 15(th) ADQI Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Matthew T; Hobson, Charles E; Darmon, Michael; Mohan, Sumit; Hudson, Darren; Goldstein, Stuart L; Ronco, Claudio; Kellum, John A; Bagshaw, Sean M

    2016-01-01

    Electronic medical records and clinical information systems are increasingly used in hospitals and can be leveraged to improve recognition and care for acute kidney injury. This Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) workgroup was convened to develop consensus around principles for the design of automated AKI detection systems to produce real-time AKI alerts using electronic systems. AKI alerts were recognized by the workgroup as an opportunity to prompt earlier clinical evaluation, further testing and ultimately intervention, rather than as a diagnostic label. Workgroup members agreed with designing AKI alert systems to align with the existing KDIGO classification system, but recommended future work to further refine the appropriateness of AKI alerts and to link these alerts to actionable recommendations for AKI care. The consensus statements developed in this review can be used as a roadmap for development of future electronic applications for automated detection and reporting of AKI. PMID:26925245

  19. The Relative Frequency, Clinical and Laboratory Findings of Adult Glomerulonephritidies in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsoon Emami Naini

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Renal diseases information is population-based and has great geographic variability. Due to the lack of national renal data registry system, there is no information on the prevalence rate, and clinical and laboratory features of various glomerulonephritidies (GNs in Iran. Methods: In a retrospective cross sectional study, we analyzed 462 adult renal biopsies in Hashemi Nejad hospital, Tehran, Iran. We determined the prevalence rate and the frequency of different clinical and laboratory findings in patients with different GNs. We also compared our results with the reports from other countries. Results: There were 267(57.8% males and 195(42.2% females. The mean age (± SD was 33.6 ± 15.7 (range, 13-75 years old. After exclusion of 55 biopsies with pathologies other than GNs and in the remaining 407 biopsies, membranous glomerulopathy (MGN was the most common GN (23.6%, followed by IgAN (13.5%, membranoproliferative GN (11.5%, systemic lupus nephritis (10.6%, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (10.3%, and minimal change disease (9.8%. These 6 GNs comprised the majority (79.4% of all GNs. Conclusion: MGN is the most common form of GN, followed by IgAN, MPGN, SLE-GN, FSGS and MCD in adult patients in our study. The multi-center studies with a larger sample size are needed for more comprehensive data in Iranian population. Key words: Glomerulonephritidies, Epidemiology, Renal Biopsy, Glomeulopathy

  20. Clinical laboratory technologist professional development in Camagüey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Caridad García González

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the results of research aimed at assessing the current conditions related to clinical laboratory technologist professional development. A descriptive cross study covering the period between November 2013 and January 2014 is presented. Several techniques for identifying and hierarchically arranging professional developmental related problems were used to study a sample at the Faculty of Health Technology of the Medical University “Carlos Juan Finlay”. The study involved heads of teaching departments and methodologists of health care technology specialties; moreover a survey and a content test were given graduate clinical laboratory technicians. The authors reached at the conclusion that clinical laboratory technologist professional development is limited and usually underestimate the necessities and interests of these graduates. Likewise, a lack of systematization and integration of the biomedical basic sciences contents and the laboratory diagnosis is noticeable.

  1. End-to-End Information System design at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. [data transmission between user and space-based sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooke, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    In recognition of a pressing need of the 1980s to optimize the two-way flow of information between a ground-based user and a remote-space-based sensor, an end-to-end approach to the design of information systems has been adopted at the JPL. This paper reviews End-to-End Information System (EEIS) activity at the JPL, with attention given to the scope of the EEIS transfer function, and functional and physical elements of the EEIS. The relationship between the EEIS and the NASA End-to-End Data System program is discussed.

  2. 1.2.Clinical laboratory diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930212 Enzymatic analysis of serum total bileacids and clinical evaluation.WEI Youren (魏有仁),et al.Sino—Japan Friendship Hosp,Bei-jing,100029.CHin J Med Lab Technol 1993;16(1):11—14.An enzymatic colorimetric assay of serum to-tal bile acids (TBA) was reported for the firsttime in China.3 α-hydroxysteroid dehydroge-nase (3α-HSD) had been purified from pseu-domonas testosteroni in the sventies,and hadbeen used as a main enzyme reagent in the enzy-matic analysis of TBA.In this paper,the au-thors introduced a rapid,sensitive colorimetricassay using 3α-HSD,and a couple enzyme 5β-steroid Δ~4 dehydrogenase to imcrease the con-

  3. Antiphospholipid antibody: laboratory, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ziglioli

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL represent a heterogeneous group of antibodies that recognize various antigenic targets including beta2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI, prothrombin (PT, activated protein C, tissue plasminogen activator, plasmin and annexin A2. The most commonly used tests to detect aPL are: lupus anticoagulant (LAC, a functional coagulation assay, anticardiolipin antibody (aCL and anti-β2GPI antibody (anti-β2GPI, which are enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA. Clinically aPL are associated with thrombosis and/or with pregnancy morbidity. Apparently aPL alone are unable to induce thrombotic manifestations, but they increase the risk of vascular events that can occur in the presence of another thrombophilic condition; on the other hand obstetrical manifestations were shown to be associated not only to thrombosis but mainly to a direct antibody effect on the trophoblast.

  4. [What is the ideal attainment of clinical laboratory works?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, S

    1993-01-01

    This is the specified address delivered at the 20th meeting of the Chugoku-Shikoku District of the Japanese Society of Clinical Pathologists (JSCP). More than 40 years have elapsed since the incipient epoch of clinical pathology in this country, when physicians, surgeons and pathologists gathered, for the first time, to institute a scientific medical association (JSCP) for the purpose of elevating daily medical services to the modernized level through active use of clinical laboratory examination. Since then the laboratory examination has undergone a rapid progress and many new techniques have appeared. Excellent equipments and reagents are being supplied from the engineering and pharmaceutical companies. Thus, the clinical laboratories have assumed an out-look of a big factory equipped with a variety of automatic analysers and a large number of computers, and the figures of many laboratory staffs are peeped among them. In this situation there arose several problems urgently needed for control to hole the laboratory ideal in service to the medical doctors as well as to the patients. 1. Management of personnels (medical technologists and others) who are dissatisfied with daily robot-like works and discordant human relations. 2. Report sheets sent to the medical doctors are not employed adequately for the care of patients, because they are handed over in uncooked style without clinical laboratory interpretation and recommendation. Therefore, the laboratory medical doctors are ranked below the medical doctors on the wards and outpatient clinic. 3. Too many tests are ordered to the laboratory without adequate recognition of their usefulness.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8355410

  5. Clinical laboratory as an economic model for business performance analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buljanović, Vikica; Patajac, Hrvoje; Petrovečki, Mladen

    2011-01-01

    Aim To perform SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis of a clinical laboratory as an economic model that may be used to improve business performance of laboratories by removing weaknesses, minimizing threats, and using external opportunities and internal strengths. Methods Impact of possible threats to and weaknesses of the Clinical Laboratory at Našice General County Hospital business performance and use of strengths and opportunities to improve operating profit were simulated using models created on the basis of SWOT analysis results. The operating profit as a measure of profitability of the clinical laboratory was defined as total revenue minus total expenses and presented using a profit and loss account. Changes in the input parameters in the profit and loss account for 2008 were determined using opportunities and potential threats, and economic sensitivity analysis was made by using changes in the key parameters. The profit and loss account and economic sensitivity analysis were tools for quantifying the impact of changes in the revenues and expenses on the business operations of clinical laboratory. Results Results of simulation models showed that operational profit of €470 723 in 2008 could be reduced to only €21 542 if all possible threats became a reality and current weaknesses remained the same. Also, operational gain could be increased to €535 804 if laboratory strengths and opportunities were utilized. If both the opportunities and threats became a reality, the operational profit would decrease by €384 465. Conclusion The operational profit of the clinical laboratory could be significantly reduced if all threats became a reality and the current weaknesses remained the same. The operational profit could be increased by utilizing strengths and opportunities as much as possible. This type of modeling may be used to monitor business operations of any clinical laboratory and improve its financial situation by

  6. Ground Systems Concepts Laboratory (GSCL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — GSCL consists of high-performance CAD stations and associated software located in a secure facility. Capabilities: The GSCL provides infrastructure that allows the...

  7. Measuring Mortality Information in Clinical Data Warehouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Barrett; Vawdrey, David K

    2015-01-01

    The ability to track and report long-term outcomes, especially mortality, is essential for advancing clinical research. The purpose of this study was to present a framework for assessing the quality of mortality information in clinical research databases. Using the clinical data warehouse (CDW) at Columbia University Medical Center as a case study, we measured: 1) agreement in vital status between our institution's patient registration system and the U.S. Social Security Administration's Death Master File (DMF), 2) the proportion of patients marked as deceased according to the DMF records who had subsequent visits to our institution, and 3) the proportion of patients still living according to Columbia's CDW who were over 100 and 120 years of age. Of 33,295 deaths recorded in our institution's patient registration system, 13,167 (39.5%) did not exist in the DMF. Of 315,037 patients in our CDW who marked as deceased according to the DMF, 2.1% had a subsequent clinical encounter at our institution. The proportion of patients still living according to Columbia's CDW who were over 100 and 120 years of age was 43.6% and 43.1%, respectively. These measures may be useful to other clinical research investigators seeking to assess the quality of mortality data (1-4).

  8. Clinical and laboratory features of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Cárdenas

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available

    The clinical presentation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC differs between patients in developing countries (African and Chinese populations from those in industrialized countries. In industrialized countries, HCC co-exists with symptomatic cirrhosis in 80% of cases and clinical manifestations are usually related to those of the underlying disease. On the other hand, patients from developing countries have HCC and cirrhosis in approximately 40% of cases. Underlying cirrhosis in many cases is not advanced and does not produce any symptoms or associated symptoms are masked by those of the tumor (right upper quadrant pain, mass in the upper abdomen, weight loss and weakness. In a subset of patients, there are no clinical manifestations as HCC may occur in the context of hepatitis B infection without cirrhosis.

    Clinical Manifestations

    In Western countries, nearly 35% percent of patients with HCC are asymptomatic. Some of the most common clinical manifestations include: abdominal pain (53-58% of patients, especially in epigastrium or right upper quadrant, abdominal mass (30%, weight loss, malaise, anorexia, cachexia, jaundice or fever.

    Physical Exam

    Physical findings vary with the stage of disease. The patient may exhibit slight or moderate wasting when first seen. In patients with cirrhosis, typical stigmata of chronic liver disease may be present. In advanced stages of HCC the liver may be enlarged and there is significant tenderness. An arterial bruit may be heard over the liver

  9. [Information on nosocomial infections in hospitals without microbiological laboratories: effective data utilization through outsourcing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikata, Rie; Hosoi, Susumu; Tsuruoka, Takashi

    2010-06-01

    To implement hospital-acquired infection control, sharing information, including the most recent data, is vital. With the current crisis in community healthcare and a subsequent lack of hospital laboratories, increasing numbers of clinical tests, unprofitable microbiological tests in particular, have been outsourced. At present, most medium- and small-scale hospitals in Japan do not conduct microbiological testing themselves, and so the outsourcing of these tests is essential for the promotion of infection control, including the provision of data on microbial detection. Our hospital, a central and the only general hospital with 160 beds in our area, usually outsources microbiological testing. With the aim of enhancing infection prevention and other clinical support services and promoting hospital infection control, were developing a system, led by the Department of Inspection, to provide appropriate information on nosocomial infections in collaboration with other departments within the hospital and partner organizations.

  10. 75 FR 12554 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee: Notice of Charter Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory...-463) of October 6, 1972, that the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee, Centers for..., Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,...

  11. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finger, S.M. [Engineering Computer Optecnomics, Inc., Annapolis, MD (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The goal of the Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) Project is the development and demonstration of a system to meet the unique needs of the DOE for rapid, accurate analysis of a wide variety of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface waters. This laboratory system has been designed to provide the field and laboratory analytical equipment necessary to detect and quantify radionuclides, organics, heavy metals and other inorganic compounds. The laboratory system consists of a set of individual laboratory modules deployable independently or as an interconnected group to meet each DOE site`s specific needs.

  12. Survey of CF mutations in the clinical laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myers Angela

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since it is impossible to sequence the complete CFTR gene routinely, clinical laboratories must rely on test systems that screen for a panel of the most frequent mutations causing disease in a high percentage of patients. Thus, in a cohort of 257 persons that were referred to our laboratory for analysis of CF gene mutations, reverse line probe assays for the most common CF mutations were performed. These techniques were evaluated as routine first-line analyses of the CFTR gene status. Methods DNA from whole blood specimens was extracted and subjected to PCR amplification of 9 exons and 6 introns of the CFTR gene. The resulting amplicons were hybridised to probes for CF mutations and polymorphisms, immobilised on membranes supplied by Roche Molecular Systems, Inc. and Innogenetics, Inc.. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequencing of suspicious fragments indicating mutations were done with CF exon and intron specific primers. Results Of the 257 persons tested over the last three years (referrals based on 1 clinical symptoms typical for/indicative of CF, 2 indication for in vitro fertilisation, and 3 gene status determination because of anticipated parenthood and partners or relatives affected by CF, the reverse line blots detected heterozygote or homozygote mutations in the CFTR gene in 68 persons (26%. Eighty-three percent of those affected were heterozygous (47 persons or homozygous (10 persons for the ΔF508 allele. The only other CF-alleles that we found with these tests were the G542X allele (3 persons, the G551D allele (3 persons, the 3849+10kb C-T allele (2 persons the R117H allele (2 persons and the 621+1G-T allele (1 person. Of the fifteen IVS8-5T-polymorphisms detected in intron 8, seven (47% were found in males referred to us from IVF clinics. These seven 5T-alleles were all coupled with a heterozygous ΔF508 allele, they make up 35% of the males with fertility problems (20 men referred to us. Conclusions

  13. Mission Medical Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.; Joe, John C.; Follansbee, Nicole M.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the Mission Medical Information System (MMIS). The topics include: 1) What is MMIS?; 2) MMIS Goals; 3) Terrestrial Health Information Technology Vision; 4) NASA Health Information Technology Needs; 5) Mission Medical Information System Components; 6) Electronic Medical Record; 7) Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health (LSAH); 8) Methods; and 9) Data Submission Agreement (example).

  14. Geographical information systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Möller, Bernd

    2004-01-01

    The chapter gives an introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) with particular focus on their application within environmental management.......The chapter gives an introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS) with particular focus on their application within environmental management....

  15. [External quality assessment in clinical biochemistry laboratories: pilot study in 11 laboratories of Lomé (Togo)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouassi, Kafui; Fétéké, Lochina; Assignon, Selom; Dorkenoo, Ameyo; Napo-Koura, Gado

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the performance of a few biochemistry analysis and make recommendations to the place of the stakeholders. It is a cross-sectional study conducted between the October 1(st), 2012 and the July 31, 2013 bearing on the results of 5 common examinations of clinical biochemistry, provided by 11 laboratories volunteers opening in the public and private sectors. These laboratories have analysed during the 3 cycles, 2 levels (medium and high) of serum concentration of urea, glucose, creatinine and serum aminotransferases. The performance of laboratories have been determined from the acceptable limits corresponding to the limits of total errors, defined by the French Society of Clinical Biology (SFBC). A system of internal quality control is implemented by all laboratories and 45% of them participated in international programs of external quality assessment (EQA). The rate of acceptable results for the entire study was of 69%. There was a significant difference (p<0.002) between the performance of the group of laboratories engaged in a quality approach and the group with default implementation of the quality approach. Also a significant difference was observed between the laboratories of the central level and those of the peripheral level of our health system (p<0.047). The performance of the results provided by the laboratories remains relatively unsatisfactory. It is important that the Ministry of Health put in place a national program of EQA with mandatory participation.

  16. Brief Analysis of Virtualization Technologies of Clinical Information System Architecture%临床信息系统架构虚拟化技术初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄清; 杨杰; 陈红

    2013-01-01

    本文从服务器虚拟化、存储虚拟化、网络虚拟化、桌面虚拟化、应用虚拟化五个方面介绍了临床信息系统架构虚拟化技术,旨在为医疗云的实现提供相关信息。%This paper describes the virtualization technologies of clinical information system architecture in the aspects of server virtualization, storage virtualization, network virtualization, desktop virtualization and application virtualization in order to provide relevant information for the implementation of medical cloud.

  17. Information System Design

    OpenAIRE

    Sedlák, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The diploma thesis focuses on design of the information system for the department of medical transport service, which is part of the hospital. This thesis describes the theoretical knowledge necessary for analysis and custom design, is also concerned with the analysis of the current state of processes and information system. Last but not least, based on the analysis and the requirements lays down suggestions for improvement of the information system and design of optimal information system, t...

  18. Airports Geographic Information System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Airports Geographic Information System maintains the airport and aeronautical data required to meet the demands of the Next Generation National Airspace System....

  19. Review of clinical and laboratory features of human Brucellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantur B

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Brucella spp. continues to pose a human health risk globally despite strides in eradicating the disease from domestic animals. Brucellosis has been an emerging disease since the discovery of Brucella melitensis by Sir David Bruce in 1887. Although many countries have eradicated B. abortus from cattle, in some areas B. melitensis and B. suis have emerged as causes of this infection in cattle, leading to human infections. Currently B. melitensis remains the principal cause of human brucellosis worldwide including India. The recent isolation of distinct strains of Brucella from marine mammals as well as humans is an indicator of an emerging zoonotic disease. Brucellosis in endemic and non-endemic regions remains a diagnostic puzzle due to misleading non-specific manifestations and increasing unusual presentations. Fewer than 10% of human cases of brucellosis may be clinically recognized and treated or reported. Routine serological surveillance is not practiced even in Brucella - endemic countries and we suggest that this should be a part of laboratory testing coupled with a high index of clinical suspicion to improve the level of case detection. The screening of family members of index cases of acute brucellosis in an endemic area should be undertaken to pick up additional unrecognised cases. Rapid and reliable, sensitive and specific, easy to perform and automated detection systems for Brucella spp. are urgently needed to allow early diagnosis and adequate antibiotic therapy in time to decrease morbidity / mortality. The history of travel to endemic countries along with exposure to animals and exotic foods are usually critical to making the clinical diagnosis. Laboratory testing is indispensable for diagnosis. Therefore alertness of clinician and close collaboration with microbiologist are essential even in endemic areas to correctly diagnose and treat this protean human infection. Existing treatment options, largely based on

  20. Lofar information system design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentijn, E.; Belikov, A. N.

    2009-01-01

    The Lofar Information System is a solution for Lofar Long Term Archive that is capable to store and handle PBs of raw and processed data. The newly created information system is based on Astro-WISE - the information system for wide field astronomy. We review an adaptation of Astro-WISE for the new t

  1. Medical Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kent A.

    1986-01-01

    Description of information services from the National Library of Medicine (NLM) highlights a new system for retrieving information from NLM's databases (GRATEFUL MED); a formal Regional Medical Library Network; DOCLINE; the Unified Medical Language System; and Integrated Academic Information Management Systems. Research and development and the…

  2. Research System Integration Laboratory (SIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The VEA Research SIL (VRS) is essential to the success of the TARDEC 30-Year Strategy. The vast majority of the TARDEC Capability Sets face challenging electronics...

  3. Practical way to develop 10-color flow cytometry protocols for the clinical laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tárnok, Attila; Bocsi, Jozsef

    2010-02-01

    The latest development of commercial routine flow cytometers (FCM) is that they are equipped with three (blue, red, violet) or more lasers and many PMT detectors. Nowadays routine clinical instruments are capable of detecting 10 or more fluorescence colors simultaneously. Thereby, presenting opportunities for getting detailed information on the single cell level for cytomics and systems biology for improve diagnostics and monitoring of patients. The University Leipzig, Germany) recently started a cluster of excellence to study the molecular background of life style and environment associated diseases, enrolling 25000 individuals (LIFE). To this end the most comprehensive FCM protocol has to be developed for this study. We aimed to optimize fluorochrome and antibody combinations to the characteristics of the instrument for successful 10-color FCM. Systematic review of issues related to sampling, preparation, instrument settings, spillover and compensation matrix, reagent performance, and general principles of panel construction was performed. 10-color FCM enables for increased accuracy in cell subpopulation identification, the ability to obtain detailed information from blood specimens, improved laboratory efficiency, and the means to consistently detect major and rare cell populations. Careful attention to details of instrument and reagent performance allows for the development of panels suitable for screening of samples from healthy and diseased donors. The characteristics of this technique are particularly well suited for the analysis of broad human population cohorts and have the potential to reach the everyday practice in a standardized way for the clinical laboratory.

  4. SeqReporter: automating next-generation sequencing result interpretation and reporting workflow in a clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Somak; Durso, Mary Beth; Wald, Abigail; Nikiforov, Yuri E; Nikiforova, Marina N

    2014-01-01

    A wide repertoire of bioinformatics applications exist for next-generation sequencing data analysis; however, certain requirements of the clinical molecular laboratory limit their use: i) comprehensive report generation, ii) compatibility with existing laboratory information systems and computer operating system, iii) knowledgebase development, iv) quality management, and v) data security. SeqReporter is a web-based application developed using ASP.NET framework version 4.0. The client-side was designed using HTML5, CSS3, and Javascript. The server-side processing (VB.NET) relied on interaction with a customized SQL server 2008 R2 database. Overall, 104 cases (1062 variant calls) were analyzed by SeqReporter. Each variant call was classified into one of five report levels: i) known clinical significance, ii) uncertain clinical significance, iii) pending pathologists' review, iv) synonymous and deep intronic, and v) platform and panel-specific sequence errors. SeqReporter correctly annotated and classified 99.9% (859 of 860) of sequence variants, including 68.7% synonymous single-nucleotide variants, 28.3% nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variants, 1.7% insertions, and 1.3% deletions. One variant of potential clinical significance was re-classified after pathologist review. Laboratory information system-compatible clinical reports were generated automatically. SeqReporter also facilitated quality management activities. SeqReporter is an example of a customized and well-designed informatics solution to optimize and automate the downstream analysis of clinical next-generation sequencing data. We propose it as a model that may envisage the development of a comprehensive clinical informatics solution. PMID:24220144

  5. Comprehensive evaluation and validation of targeted next-generation sequencing performance in two clinical laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Pedro; Dang, Jennifer; Kim, James Wansoo; Lee, Sharon; Yoon, Jun-Hee; Kim, Thomas; Sailey, Charles J; Jablons, David M; Kim, Il-Jin

    2016-07-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has led to breakthroughs for genetic and genomic analyses and personalized medicine approaches for many diseases. More and more clinical laboratories are using NGS as a genetic screening tool for providing mutation information that is used to select the best treatment regimens for cancer patients. However, several obstacles prevent the routine implementation of NGS technology into the clinical molecular diagnosis setting: the sophisticated sample preparation process, high cost, time-consuming data analyses, as well as the reproducibility and accuracy of interpretation. To systematically evaluate the performance and quality of targeted NGS cancer panel analyses in clinical laboratories, we performed three different tests: i) laboratory-to-laboratory accuracy test, ii) intra-laboratory precision validation, and iii) limit of detection test, using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cancer tissue specimens, cell lines and mutation positive DNA. A laboratory-to-laboratory accuracy test performed using 51 samples showed 100% sensitivity and 99.97% specificity. For the intra-laboratory precision test, 100% reproducibility was observed. For the limit of detection test, KRAS mutations from samples diluted from 70 to 2% of mutant allele frequencies were detected correctly. We believe that the present study demonstrated the feasibility of clinical implementation of a targeted NGS cancer panel analysis for personalized medicine. PMID:27121194

  6. Simulation-Based System Design Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The research objective is to develop, test, and implement effective and efficient simulation techniques for modeling, evaluating, and optimizing systems in order to...

  7. Rules for the certification of good practices in clinical laboratories. No regulation. 3-2009. Good Laboratory Practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulation for Certification of Good Practices in clinical laboratories, hereinafter Regulation establishes the methodology and procedures for clinical laboratories to demonstrate their state of compliance with good practices, according to Regulation 3-2009, and that the CECMED can verify.

  8. Implications of the introduction of laboratory demand management at primary care clinics in South Africa on laboratory expenditure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozayr H. Mahomed

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diagnostic health laboratory services are regarded as an integral part of the national health infrastructure across all countries. Clinical laboratory tests contribute substantially to health system goals of increasing quality of care and improving patient outcomes.Objectives: This study aimed to analyse current laboratory expenditures at the primary healthcare (PHC level in South Africa as processed by the National Health Laboratory Service and to determine the potential cost savings of introducing laboratory demand management.Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional analysis of laboratory expenditures for the 2013/2014 financial year across 11 pilot National Health Insurance health districts was conducted. Laboratory expenditure tariff codes were cross-tabulated to the PHC essential laboratory tests list (ELL to determine inappropriate testing. Data were analysed using a Microsoft Access database and Excel software.Results: Approximately R35 million South African Rand (10% of the estimated R339 million in expenditures was for tests that were not listed within the ELL. Approximately 47% of expenditure was for laboratory tests that were indicated in the algorithmic management of patients on antiretroviral treatment. The other main cost drivers for non-ELL testing included full blood count and urea, as well as electrolyte profiles usually requested to support management of patients on antiretroviral treatment.Conclusions: Considerable annual savings of up to 10% in laboratory expenditure are possible at the PHC level by implementing laboratory demand management. In addition, to achieve these savings, a standardised PHC laboratory request form and some form of electronic gatekeeping system that must be supported by an educational component should be implemented.

  9. Information systems project management

    CERN Document Server

    Olson, David

    2014-01-01

    Information Systems Project Management addresses project management in the context of information systems. It deals with general project management principles, with focus on the special characteristics of information systems. It is based on an earlier text, but shortened to focus on essential project management elements.This updated version presents various statistics indicating endemic problems in completing information system projects on time, within budget, at designed functionality. While successful completion of an information systems project is a challenge, there are some things that ca

  10. Clinical information system services and capabilities desired for scalable, standards-based, service-oriented decision support: consensus assessment of the Health Level 7 clinical decision support Work Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Kensaku; Jacobs, Jason; Welch, Brandon M; Huser, Vojtech; Paterno, Marilyn D; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Shields, David; Strasberg, Howard R; Haug, Peter J; Liu, Zhijing; Jenders, Robert A; Rowed, David W; Chertcoff, Daryl; Fehre, Karsten; Adlassnig, Klaus-Peter; Curtis, A Clayton

    2012-01-01

    A standards-based, service-oriented architecture for clinical decision support (CDS) has the potential to significantly enhance CDS scalability and robustness. To enable such a CDS architecture, the Health Level 7 CDS Work Group reviewed the literature, hosted multi-stakeholder discussions, and consulted domain experts to identify and prioritize the services and capabilities required from clinical information systems (CISs) to enable service-oriented CDS. In addition, relevant available standards were identified. Through this process, ten CIS services and eight CIS capabilities were identified as being important for enabling scalable, service-oriented CDS. In particular, through a survey of 46 domain experts, five services and capabilities were identified as being especially critical: 1) the use of standard information models and terminologies; 2) the ability to leverage a Decision Support Service (DSS); 3) support for a clinical data query service; 4) support for an event subscription and notification service; and 5) support for a user communication service. PMID:23304315

  11. Clinical Information System Services and Capabilities Desired for Scalable, Standards-Based, Service-oriented Decision Support: Consensus Assessment of the Health Level 7 Clinical Decision Support Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Kensaku; Jacobs, Jason; Welch, Brandon M.; Huser, Vojtech; Paterno, Marilyn D.; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Shields, David; Strasberg, Howard R.; Haug, Peter J.; Liu, Zhijing; Jenders, Robert A.; Rowed, David W.; Chertcoff, Daryl; Fehre, Karsten; Adlassnig, Klaus-Peter; Curtis, A. Clayton

    2012-01-01

    A standards-based, service-oriented architecture for clinical decision support (CDS) has the potential to significantly enhance CDS scalability and robustness. To enable such a CDS architecture, the Health Level 7 CDS Work Group reviewed the literature, hosted multi-stakeholder discussions, and consulted domain experts to identify and prioritize the services and capabilities required from clinical information systems (CISs) to enable service-oriented CDS. In addition, relevant available standards were identified. Through this process, ten CIS services and eight CIS capabilities were identified as being important for enabling scalable, service-oriented CDS. In particular, through a survey of 46 domain experts, five services and capabilities were identified as being especially critical: 1) the use of standard information models and terminologies; 2) the ability to leverage a Decision Support Service (DSS); 3) support for a clinical data query service; 4) support for an event subscription and notification service; and 5) support for a user communication service. PMID:23304315

  12. Clinical information system services and capabilities desired for scalable, standards-based, service-oriented decision support: consensus assessment of the Health Level 7 clinical decision support Work Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Kensaku; Jacobs, Jason; Welch, Brandon M; Huser, Vojtech; Paterno, Marilyn D; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Shields, David; Strasberg, Howard R; Haug, Peter J; Liu, Zhijing; Jenders, Robert A; Rowed, David W; Chertcoff, Daryl; Fehre, Karsten; Adlassnig, Klaus-Peter; Curtis, A Clayton

    2012-01-01

    A standards-based, service-oriented architecture for clinical decision support (CDS) has the potential to significantly enhance CDS scalability and robustness. To enable such a CDS architecture, the Health Level 7 CDS Work Group reviewed the literature, hosted multi-stakeholder discussions, and consulted domain experts to identify and prioritize the services and capabilities required from clinical information systems (CISs) to enable service-oriented CDS. In addition, relevant available standards were identified. Through this process, ten CIS services and eight CIS capabilities were identified as being important for enabling scalable, service-oriented CDS. In particular, through a survey of 46 domain experts, five services and capabilities were identified as being especially critical: 1) the use of standard information models and terminologies; 2) the ability to leverage a Decision Support Service (DSS); 3) support for a clinical data query service; 4) support for an event subscription and notification service; and 5) support for a user communication service.

  13. Biomedical mass spectrometry in today's and tomorrow's clinical microbiology laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Belkum, Alex; Welker, Martin; Erhard, Marcel; Chatellier, Sonia

    2012-05-01

    Clinical microbiology is a conservative laboratory exercise where base technologies introduced in the 19th century remained essentially unaltered. High-tech mass spectrometry (MS) has changed that. Within a few years following its adaptation to microbiological diagnostics, MS has been introduced, embraced, and broadly accepted by clinical microbiology laboratories throughout the world as an innovative tool for definitive bacterial species identification. Herein, we review the current state of the art with respect to this exciting new technology and discuss potential future applications. PMID:22357505

  14. The Design and Development of Laboratory Management Information System Based on Web%基于Web的实验室管理信息系统设计与实现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冼进; 贾德良

    2011-01-01

    A kind of laboratory management information system is developed based on the Internet in the laboratory. A user can use web browser to manage experiment equipment, staff, experiment project, experiment information, laboratory file and experiment schedule which can be expediently input, memorized, updated and searched. The system will improve the laboratory management benefit and standard which makes the laboratory data shared safely.%以实验室现有的网络为依托,开发一套适合实验室内部管理的信息系统,用户通过网络浏览器操作界面,实现对学院实验室设备、人员、实验项目、实验信息、实验室文件、实验课程开设情况、实验课程安排等信息的输入、存储、更新和查询.提高实验室管理效率及管理水平,实现实验室数据安全共享.

  15. International cooperative information systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Developing countries need mechanisms by which the information they generate themselves and development information from the rest of the world can be retrieved. The international cooperative information system is such a mechanism. Delegates to the Seminar on International Cooperative Information Systems were informed about various existing systems (INIS, AGRIS, INFOTERRA, TCDC/INRES, POPIN, DEVSIS, and INPADROC), some specialized information systems and services (CDS/ISIS and the Cassava Information Centre), and computer programs for information processing (INIS/AGRIS, CDS/ISIS, and MINISIS). The participants suggested some changes that should be made on both the national and the international levels to ensure that these systems meet the needs of developing countries more effectively. (LL)

  16. Sweet syndrome: Clinical and Laboratory Findings of 31 Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Serap Güneş Bilgili; Ayşe Serap Karadağ; Ömer Çalka; İrfan Bayram

    2013-01-01

    Background and Design: Sweet syndrome is an inflammatory disease characterized by the abrupt onset of pain, red papules and plaques, fever, neutrophilic leukocytosis, and dermal neutrophilic infiltrate. There are not enough data about Sweet syndrome in Turkey. In this article, we studied clinical, laboratory, histopathological, and epidemiological characteristics of patients, who presented to our clinic, and compared the findings with the literature. Materials and Methods: All patients diagno...

  17. Electronic access to care system: improving patient's access to clinical information through an Interactive Voice Response (IVR) system and Web portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Nhan; Marinkovich, Andre; Koisch, John; Wheeler, Gary

    2003-01-01

    Our clinical providers spend an estimated four hours weekly answering phone messages from patients. Our nurses spend five to ten hours weekly on returning phone calls. Most of this time is spent conveying recent clinical results, reviewing with patients the discharge instructions such as consults or studies ordered during the office visits, and handling patients' requests for medication renewals. Over time this will lead to greater patients' dissatisfaction because of lengthy waiting time and lack of timely access to their medical information. This would also lead to greater nursing and providers' dissatisfaction because of unreasonable work load. PMID:14728335

  18. Information system metaphors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazendam, Henk W.M.

    1999-01-01

    Metaphors are useful because they are efficient: they transfer a complex of meaning in a few words. Information systems are social constructs. Therefore, metaphors seem to be especially useful for explaining the space of possible meaning complexes or designs of information systems. Three information

  19. Mobile Student Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Muhammad; Krogstie, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A mobile student information system (MSIS) based on mobile computing and context-aware application concepts can provide more user-centric information services to students. The purpose of this paper is to describe a system for providing relevant information to students on a mobile platform. Design/methodology/approach: The research…

  20. Technical Information on the Carbonation of the EBR-II Reactor, Summary Report Part 1: Laboratory Experiments and Application to EBR-II Secondary Sodium System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven R. Sherman

    2005-04-01

    Residual sodium is defined as sodium metal that remains behind in pipes, vessels, and tanks after the bulk sodium metal has been melted and drained from such components. The residual sodium has the same chemical properties as bulk sodium, and differs from bulk sodium only in the thickness of the sodium deposit. Typically, sodium is considered residual when the thickness of the deposit is less than 5-6 cm. This residual sodium must be removed or deactivated when a pipe, vessel, system, or entire reactor is permanently taken out of service, in order to make the component or system safer and/or to comply with decommissioning regulations. As an alternative to the established residual sodium deactivation techniques (steam-and-nitrogen, wet vapor nitrogen, etc.), a technique involving the use of moisture and carbon dioxide has been developed. With this technique, sodium metal is converted into sodium bicarbonate by reacting it with humid carbon dioxide. Hydrogen is emitted as a by-product. This technique was first developed in the laboratory by exposing sodium samples to humidified carbon dioxide under controlled conditions, and then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) secondary cooling system, followed by the primary cooling system, respectively. The EBR-II facility is located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho, U.S.A. This report is Part 1 of a two-part report. It is divided into three sections. The first section describes the chemistry of carbon dioxide-water-sodium reactions. The second section covers the laboratory experiments that were conducted in order to develop the residual sodium deactivation process. The third section discusses the application of the deactivation process to the treatment of residual sodium within the EBR-II secondary sodium cooling system. Part 2 of the report, under separate cover, describes the application of the technique to residual sodium

  1. Evaluation of Ambulatory Care Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Simborg, Donald W.; Whiting-O'Keefe, Quinn E.

    1980-01-01

    The central purpose of an ambulatory care information system is to communicate information to the practitioner to facilitate clinical decision making. The clinical decision can be considered the dependent output variable in a process having the information system, the patient, clinician characteristics, and the environment as the independent input variables. Evaluation approaches using patient outcomes are problematic because of the indirect relationship between the information system and pat...

  2. Micro Information Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulslev Pedersen, Rasmus; Kühn Pedersen, Mogens

    2014-01-01

    such as medical and manufacturing. These new sensor applications have implications for information systems (IS) and, the authors visualize this new class of information systems as fractals growing from an established class of systems; namely that of information systems (IS). The identified applications...... and implications are used as an empirical basis for creating a model for these small new information systems. Such sensor systems are called embedded systems in the technical sciences, and the authors want to couple it with general IS. They call the merger of these two important research areas (IS and embedded...... systems) for micro information systems (micro-IS). It is intended as a new research field within IS research. An initial framework model is established, which seeks to capture both the possibilities and constraints of this new paradigm, while looking simultaneously at the fundamental IS and ICT aspects...

  3. The Cardiology Information System: the need for data standards for integration of systems for patient care, registries and guidelines for clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L. Simoons (Maarten); N.H.J.J. van der Putten; D. Wood; J-P. Bassand (Jean-Pierre); H. Boersma (Eric)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe building blocks come together, finally! Already three decades ago we were dreaming of the complete Cardiology Information System. However, at that time the computer programmers explained that it was too early. In the subsequent year information tech- nology (IT) specialists, replacin

  4. Identifying organizational capacities and incentives for clinical data-sharing: the case of a regional perinatal information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korst, Lisa M; Signer, Jordana M K; Aydin, Carolyn E; Fink, Arlene

    2008-01-01

    The development of regional data-sharing among healthcare organizations is viewed as an important step in the development of health information technology (HIT), but little is known about this complex task. This is a case study of a regional perinatal data system that involved four hospitals, together responsible for over 10,000 births annually. Using standard qualitative methods, we chronicled project milestones, and identified 31 "critical incidents" that delayed or prevented their achievement. We then used these critical incidents to articulate six organizational capacity domains associated with the achievement of project milestones, and a seventh domain consisting of organizational incentives. Finally, we analyzed the relationship of milestone achievement to the presence of these capacities and incentives. This data center case suggests four requirements for sharing data across organizations: 1) a readiness assessment; 2) a perceived mandate; 3) a formal governance structure; and 4) a third party IT component.

  5. [Hospital information system--project of implementation of SAP information system at Sveti Duh General Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pale, Ivica

    2005-01-01

    Nowadays, as medical and hospital institutions have been facing a growing need of a more efficient provision of healthcare services to patients, with simultaneous complete monitoring of the successfulness of business activities, integrated information systems appear as the logical choice for the support to hospital business processes. The integrated business information system implemented at Sveti Duh General Hospital is a comprehensive system that supports all hospital, clinical and administrative processes, while providing the basis for decision making regarding the patients and hospital management. The system also enables transfer of all data with specific medical business segments such as laboratory device management. The project for the implementation of the information system was realized in accordance with the requests from the Ministry of Health, applying the proven methodology for the execution of such complex projects. The project team consisted of a number of consultants from b4b Co. from Zagreb, as well as Hospital employees. The new information system is completely ready for going live; however, the necessary decisions have to be made first. The application of the system gives the medical staff more time for their professional work with patients, and through longterm collection and analysis of data on symptoms, illnesses and medical treatments, the information system becomes an important tool for the improvement of health and quality of healthcare system in general.

  6. [Hospital information system--project of implementation of SAP information system at Sveti Duh General Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pale, Ivica

    2005-01-01

    Nowadays, as medical and hospital institutions have been facing a growing need of a more efficient provision of healthcare services to patients, with simultaneous complete monitoring of the successfulness of business activities, integrated information systems appear as the logical choice for the support to hospital business processes. The integrated business information system implemented at Sveti Duh General Hospital is a comprehensive system that supports all hospital, clinical and administrative processes, while providing the basis for decision making regarding the patients and hospital management. The system also enables transfer of all data with specific medical business segments such as laboratory device management. The project for the implementation of the information system was realized in accordance with the requests from the Ministry of Health, applying the proven methodology for the execution of such complex projects. The project team consisted of a number of consultants from b4b Co. from Zagreb, as well as Hospital employees. The new information system is completely ready for going live; however, the necessary decisions have to be made first. The application of the system gives the medical staff more time for their professional work with patients, and through longterm collection and analysis of data on symptoms, illnesses and medical treatments, the information system becomes an important tool for the improvement of health and quality of healthcare system in general. PMID:16095196

  7. Biological variation in 32 clinical laboratory routine tests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈政君

    2012-01-01

    Objective To set quality goals of conventional biochemical tests through the research of biological variation of the 32 routine items in Chinese population to provide the basis for Chinese clinical and laboratory standards. Methods According to the experimental designs and computing methods

  8. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Clinical Laboratory Science/Biotechnology Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended to serve as a guide for workforce preparation program providers, details the Illinois Occupational Skill Standards for clinical laboratory occupations programs. The document begins with a brief overview of the Illinois perspective on occupational skill standards and credentialing, the process used to develop the…

  9. 78 FR 44954 - Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clinical Laboratory Improvement Advisory Committee (CLIAC) In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control...

  10. Advances in data exchange for the clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolin, R H

    1999-06-01

    The focus of the article is on the nuts and bolts of those standards relevant to the exchange of data between a clinical laboratory and an electronic health record. These include: Health Level 7 (HL7), Logical Observation Identifier Names and Codes (LOINC), Systematized Nomenclature of Human and Veterinary Medicine (SNOMED), and, most recently, the Extensible Markup Language (XML). PMID:10421962

  11. Laboratory for Information Globalization and Harmonization

    OpenAIRE

    Madnick, Stuart; Choucri, Nazli; Siegel, Michael; Haghseta, Farnaz; Moulton, Allen; Zhu, Harry

    2002-01-01

    The convergence of three distinct but interconnected trends - unrelenting globalization, growing worldwide electronic connectivity, and increasing knowledge intensity of economic activity - is creating powerful new opportunities and challenges for global politics. This rapidly changing environment has information demands that surpass existing capabilities for information access, interpretation, and overall use, thus hindering our abilities to address emergent and complex global challenges, su...

  12. Clinicians' perceptions of organizational readiness for change in the context of clinical information system projects: insights from two cross-sectional surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poba-Nzaou Placide

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The adoption and diffusion of clinical information systems has become one of the critical benchmarks for achieving several healthcare organizational reform priorities, including home care, primary care, and integrated care networks. However, these systems are often strongly resisted by the same community that is expected to benefit from their use. Prior research has found that early perceptions and beliefs play a central role in shaping future attitudes and behaviors such as negative rumors, lack of involvement, and resistance to change. In this line of research, this paper builds on the change management and information systems literature and identifies variables associated with clinicians' early perceptions of organizational readiness for change in the specific context of clinical information system projects. Methods Two cross-sectional surveys were conducted to test our research model. First, a questionnaire was pretested and then distributed to the future users of a mobile computing technology in 11 home care organizations. The second study took place in a large teaching hospital that had approved a budget for the acquisition of an electronic medical records system. Data analysis was performed using partial least squares. Results Scale items used in this study showed adequate psychometric properties. In Study 1, four of the hypothesized links in the research model were supported, with change appropriateness, organizational flexibility, vision clarity, and change efficacy explaining 75% of the variance in organizational readiness. In Study 2, four hypotheses were also supported, two of which differed from those supported in Study 1: the presence of an effective project champion and collective self-efficacy. In addition to these variables, vision clarity and change appropriateness also helped explain 75% of the variance in the dependent variable. Explanations for the similarities and differences observed in the two surveys

  13. Information Systems in University Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe SABAU

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors of this article are going to bring into light the significance, the place and the role of information systems in the university education process. At the same time they define the objectives and the target group of the subject named Economic Information Systems and state the competence gained by students by studying this subject. Special attention is given to the curriculum to be taught to students and to a suggestive enumeration of a series of economic applications that can be themes for laboratory practice and for students’ dissertation (graduation thesis.

  14. Information extraction system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmond, Tracy D; Hanley, William G; Guensche, Joseph Wendell; Perry, Nathan C; Nitao, John J; Kidwell, Paul Brandon; Boakye, Kofi Agyeman; Glaser, Ron E; Prenger, Ryan James

    2014-05-13

    An information extraction system and methods of operating the system are provided. In particular, an information extraction system for performing meta-extraction of named entities of people, organizations, and locations as well as relationships and events from text documents are described herein.

  15. Information Systems: Towards a System of Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Saleh, Majd; Abel, Marie-Helene

    2015-01-01

    International audience Information Systems are viewed as a set of services creating a workflow of information directed to specific groups and members. This allows individuals to share ideas and their talents with other members. In such manner , tasks can be carried out both efficiently and effectively. Due to the nature of Information Systems that revolves around creating information useful to users , and in some higher forms of Information Systems creating knowledge , management of inform...

  16. Walking the bridge: Nursing students' learning in clinical skill laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewertsson, Mona; Allvin, Renée; Holmström, Inger K; Blomberg, Karin

    2015-07-01

    Despite an increasing focus on simulation as a learning strategy in nursing education, there is limited evidence on the transfer of simulated skills into clinical practice. Therefore it's important to increase knowledge of how clinical skills laboratories (CSL) can optimize students' learning for development of professional knowledge and skills, necessary for quality nursing practice and for patient safety. Thus, the aim was to describe nursing students' experiences of learning in the CSL as a preparation for their clinical practice. Interviews with 16 students were analysed with content analysis. An overall theme was identified - walking the bridge - in which the CSL formed a bridge between the university and clinical settings, allowing students to integrate theory and practice and develop a reflective stance. The theme was based on categories: conditions for learning, strategies for learning, tension between learning in the skills laboratory and clinical settings, and development of professional and personal competence. The CSL prepared the students for clinical practice, but a negative tension between learning in CSL and clinical settings was experienced. However, this tension may create reflection. This provides a new perspective that can be used as a pedagogical approach to create opportunities for students to develop their critical thinking. PMID:25892366

  17. Clinical application driven physiology in biomedical engineering laboratory course education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Robert

    2005-01-01

    An innovative biomedical engineering (BME) laboratory course was developed to integrate wireless biotechnology with a hands on learning approach. In recent years the need for biomedical engineers in research and industry has increased dramatically. This requires novel strategies for training BME students in both engineering principles and clinical applications. BME students should be prepared with an appropriate skill set for real-world problems. BME education requires hands on learning with cutting edge technology to produce students ready to solve clinical problems in both research and industry. Including a wide range of BME clinical and rehabilitation applications increases student interest. A wide range of BME laboratories was designed to encompass both the basics of physiological signals and how to effectively utilize them in clinical applications. These clinical application interfaces are critical for students to understand how physiological signals may be manipulated to extract meaningful benefits for various medical disorders and rehabilitation needs. The biomedical engineering laboratory course presented in this paper was implemented and evaluated at several universities. Utilizing a virtual environment for practical applications bridges the gap between fundamentals and real world designs. PMID:17282190

  18. Simulation-based medical education in clinical skills laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaike, Masashi; Fukutomi, Miki; Nagamune, Masami; Fujimoto, Akiko; Tsuji, Akiko; Ishida, Kazuko; Iwata, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Clinical skills laboratories have been established in medical institutions as facilities for simulation-based medical education (SBME). SBME is believed to be superior to the traditional style of medical education from the viewpoint of the active and adult learning theories. SBME can provide a learning cycle of debriefing and feedback for learners as well as evaluation of procedures and competency. SBME offers both learners and patients a safe environment for practice and error. In a full-environment simulation, learners can obtain not only technical skills but also non-technical skills, such as leadership, team work, communication, situation awareness, decision-making, and awareness of personal limitations. SBME is also effective for integration of clinical medicine and basic medicine. In addition, technology-enhanced simulation training is associated with beneficial effects for outcomes of knowledge, skills, behaviors, and patient-related outcomes. To perform SBME, effectively, not only simulators including high-fidelity mannequin-type simulators or virtual-reality simulators but also full-time faculties and instructors as professionals of SBME are essential in a clinical skills laboratory for SBME. Clinical skills laboratory is expected to become an integrated medical education center to achieve continuing professional development, integrated learning of basic and clinical medicine, and citizens' participation and cooperation in medical education. PMID:22449990

  19. Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annesley, Thomas M.; Cooks, Robert G.; Herold, David A.; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.

    2016-01-04

    Each year the journal Clinical Chemistry publishes a January special issue on a topic that is relevant to the laboratory medicine community. In January 2016 the topic is mass spectrometry, and the issue is entitled “Clinical Mass Spectrometry: Achieving Prominence in Laboratory Medicine”. One popular feature in our issues is a Q&A on a topic, clearly in this case mass spectrometry. The journal is assembling a panel of 5-6 experts from various areas of mass spectrometry ranging from instrument manufacturing to practicing clinical chemists. Dick Smith is one of the scientist requested to participate in this special issue Q&A on Mass Spectrometry. The Q&A Transcript is attached

  20. 42 CFR 414.508 - Payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory... SERVICES Payment for New Clinical Diagnostic Laboratory Tests § 414.508 Payment for a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test. For a new clinical diagnostic laboratory test that is assigned a new...

  1. A Solar System Perspective on Laboratory Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.

    2002-01-01

    Planetary science deals with a wide variety of natural materials in a wide variety of environments. These materials include metals, minerals, ices, gases, plasmas, and organic chemicals. In addition, the newly defined discipline of astrobiology introduces biological materials to planetary science. The environments range from the interiors of planets with megapascal pressures to planetary magnetospheres, encompassing planetary mantles, surfaces, atmospheres, and ionospheres. The interplanetary environment includes magnetic and electrical fields, plasma, and dust. In order to understand planetary processes over these vast ranges, the properties of materials must be known, and most of the necessary information comes from the laboratory. Observations of the bodies and materials in the Solar System are accomplished over the full range of the electromagnetic spectrum by remote sensing from Earth or spacecraft. Comets exemplify this; molecular and atomic identifications are made from the hard ultraviolet to radio wavelengths, while X-rays are emitted as comets interact with the solar wind. Gamma rays from the surfaces of the Moon and asteroids are diagnostic of the mineral and ice content of those bodies; eventually, gamma rays will also be observed by probes to comets. A number of planetary materials are available in the laboratory for extensive Study: rocks from the Moon, Mars, several asteroids, as well as dust from comets (and perhaps the Kuiper Belt) are closely studied at every level, including atomic (isotopic). Even pre-solar interstellar grains isolated from meteorites are scrutinized for composition and crystalline structure. Beyond the materials themselves, various agents and processes have altered them over the 4.6-Gy age of the Solar System. Solar radiation, solar wind particles, trapped magnetospheric particles, cosmic rays, and micrometeoroid impacts have produced chemical, physical, and morphological changes in the atmospheres and on the surfaces of all

  2. Management information system

    CERN Document Server

    Halale, Mahesh

    2010-01-01

    Today Information System became one of the strategic recourses of an enterprise. Every business as well as business function is influenced by the information system. Information system has tremendously changed the rules of the game. The advent of computing as well as communication technology has overpowered the way business activities are carried out today. The information systems have offered number of advantages in data collection, processing, presentation, communication, storage, retrieval and search etc. On one had it is catering to the smaller needs of smaller business such as an account

  3. Questions and information systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lauer, Thomas W; Graesser, Arthur C

    2013-01-01

    The design and functioning of an information system improve to the extent that the system can handle the questions people ask. Surprisingly, however, researchers in the cognitive, computer, and information sciences have not thoroughly examined the multitude of relationships between information systems and questions -- both question asking and answering. The purpose of this book is to explicitly examine these relationships. Chapter contributors believe that questions play a central role in the analysis, design, and use of different kinds of natural or artificial information systems such as huma

  4. Bioterrorism and the Role of the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagar, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Regular review of the management of bioterrorism is essential for maintaining readiness for these sporadically occurring events. This review provides an overview of the history of biological disasters and bioterrorism. I also discuss the recent recategorization of tier 1 agents by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Laboratory Response Network (LRN), and specific training and readiness processes and programs, such as the College of American Pathologists (CAP) Laboratory Preparedness Exercise (LPX). LPX examined the management of cultivable bacterial vaccine and attenuated strains of tier 1 agents or close mimics. In the LPX program, participating laboratories showed improvement in the level of diagnosis required and referral of isolates to an appropriate reference laboratory. Agents which proved difficult to manage in sentinel laboratories included the more fastidious Gram-negative organisms, especially Francisella tularensis and Burkholderia spp. The recent Ebola hemorrhagic fever epidemic provided a check on LRN safety processes. Specific guidelines and recommendations for laboratory safety and risk assessment in the clinical microbiology are explored so that sentinel laboratories can better prepare for the next biological disaster.

  5. Increasing access to clinical information on hospital wards.

    OpenAIRE

    Eames, C. H.; Klein, M S

    1994-01-01

    Medical library information resources can make a positive contribution to the clinical information needs of health care professionals. To increase availability of knowledge-based information and transfer information to its point of use, a CD-ROM resource library was networked and interfaced with the existing hospital information system at Children's Hospital of Michigan in Detroit, Michigan. Clinicians in 21 patient care areas now have access to the patient record, full-text pediatric journal...

  6. [The issues and basic principles of training of physicians of clinical laboratory diagnostics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, V T; Naumova, E V

    2012-07-01

    The article considers the main positions concerning the clinical laboratory diagnostics as an independent clinical specialty and the principles of professional training and improvement of specialists. The basic issues complicating the training and improvement of personnel to be kept in line with actual needs of laboratory service of public health system are discussed. Among them are the availability of laboratory academic sub disciplines demanding a profound special theoretical education and technical skills; the need to account in the process of professional training the variety of forms, sizes and types of laboratory structures in different medical institutions; the need of special training programs for numerous specialists with non-medical basic education. The combination of the present system of postgraduate training of specialists on chairs of state educational organizations with initiative involvement of specialists in various public forms of permanent professional improvement (professional scientific societies meetings, research conferences, internet seminars, etc.) is supported Along with a positive appraisal of the existing system of training in the state educational institutions and corresponding regulation documents, a critique is expressed regarding certain actual documents which improperly limit the administrative functions of physicians of clinical laboratory diagnostics and complicate training of bacteriologists for clinical laboratories.

  7. Information systems and human error in the lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissell, Michael G

    2004-01-01

    Health system costs in clinical laboratories are incurred daily due to human error. Indeed, a major impetus for automating clinical laboratories has always been the opportunity it presents to simultaneously reduce cost and improve quality of operations by decreasing human error. But merely automating these processes is not enough. To the extent that introduction of these systems results in operators having less practice in dealing with unexpected events or becoming deskilled in problemsolving, however new kinds of error will likely appear. Clinical laboratories could potentially benefit by integrating findings on human error from modern behavioral science into their operations. Fully understanding human error requires a deep understanding of human information processing and cognition. Predicting and preventing negative consequences requires application of this understanding to laboratory operations. Although the occurrence of a particular error at a particular instant cannot be absolutely prevented, human error rates can be reduced. The following principles are key: an understanding of the process of learning in relation to error; understanding the origin of errors since this knowledge can be used to reduce their occurrence; optimal systems should be forgiving to the operator by absorbing errors, at least for a time; although much is known by industrial psychologists about how to write operating procedures and instructions in ways that reduce the probability of error, this expertise is hardly ever put to use in the laboratory; and a feedback mechanism must be designed into the system that enables the operator to recognize in real time that an error has occurred.

  8. Information retrieval system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, R. F.; Holcomb, J. E.; Kelroy, E. A.; Levine, D. A.; Mee, C., III

    1970-01-01

    Generalized information storage and retrieval system capable of generating and maintaining a file, gathering statistics, sorting output, and generating final reports for output is reviewed. File generation and file maintenance programs written for the system are general purpose routines.

  9. Design of Web Content Management System for Dental Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reham Alabduljabbar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Web Content Management system is a management tool for creating a dynamic website. It ensures logical structure of data organization and ease of content accessing and presenting. Dental laboratories need Web Content Management system (WCMS to control their business. Maintaining a long-term relationship between dental laboratories and their customers (dental clinics and dentists urges an active communication process between the two sides. The main contribution of this paper is to design a simple Web Content Management System for Dental Laboratories. The system adopts three layers of technical architecture. The paper will also discuss why there is a need to develop a standalone WCMS for Dental Laboratories whilst other open source WCMSs can be utilized such as Joomla, Drupal and WordPress.

  10. Executive information system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitullo, M.; Winter, C.; Johnson, D.R.

    1984-07-01

    The Executive Information System (EIS) is a computer-based information handling system. The system has been designed and implemented for Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies to allow program managers easy access and tracking of certain types of reporting at various levels of management interaction, to simplify the handling of program-related data, and to streamline the preparation of reporting documents and responses to requests for information from the program. The EIS is especially useful in assisting DOE program managers in the routine dissemination of reports and information. The characteristics of each component of the EIS are discussed. A user's guide to the EIS is included in this report.

  11. Medical Information Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alterescu, S.; Hipkins, K. R.; Friedman, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    On-line interactive information processing system easily and rapidly handles all aspects of data management related to patient care. General purpose system is flexible enough to be applied to other data management situations found in areas such as occupational safety data, judicial information, or personnel records.

  12. Environmental geographic information system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peek, Dennis W; Helfrich, Donald Alan; Gorman, Susan

    2010-08-01

    This document describes how the Environmental Geographic Information System (EGIS) was used, along with externally received data, to create maps for the Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement (SWEIS) Source Document project. Data quality among the various classes of geographic information system (GIS) data is addressed. A complete listing of map layers used is provided.

  13. Complement analysis 2016: Clinical indications, laboratory diagnostics and quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prohászka, Zoltán; Nilsson, Bo; Frazer-Abel, Ashley; Kirschfink, Michael

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, complement analysis of body fluids and biopsies, going far beyond C3 and C4, has significantly enhanced our understanding of the disease process. Such expanded complement analysis allows for a more precise differential diagnosis and for critical monitoring of complement-targeted therapy. These changes are a result of the growing understanding of the involvement of complement in a diverse set of disorders. To appreciate the importance of proper complement analysis, it is important to understand the role it plays in disease. Historically, it was the absence of complement as manifested in severe infection that was noted. Since then complement has been connected to a variety of inflammatory disorders, such as autoimmune diseases and hereditary angioedema. While the role of complement in the rejection of renal grafts has been known longer, the significant impact of complement. In certain nephropathies has now led to the reclassification of some rare kidney diseases and an increased role for complement analysis in diagnosis. Even more unexpected is that complement has also been implicated in neural, ophtalmological and dermatological disorders. With this level of involvement in some varied and impactful health issues proper complement testing is clearly important; however, analysis of the complement system varies widely among laboratories. Except for a few proteins, such as C3 and C4, there are neither well-characterized standard preparations nor calibrated assays available. This is especially true for the inter-laboratory variation of tests which assess classical, alternative, or lectin pathway function. In addition, there is a need for the standardization of the measurement of complement activation products that are so critical in determining whether clinically relevant complement activation has occurred in vivo. Finally, autoantibodies to complement proteins (e.g. anti-C1q), C3 and C4 convertases (C3 and C4 nephritic factor) or to regulatory proteins

  14. Complement analysis 2016: Clinical indications, laboratory diagnostics and quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prohászka, Zoltán; Nilsson, Bo; Frazer-Abel, Ashley; Kirschfink, Michael

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, complement analysis of body fluids and biopsies, going far beyond C3 and C4, has significantly enhanced our understanding of the disease process. Such expanded complement analysis allows for a more precise differential diagnosis and for critical monitoring of complement-targeted therapy. These changes are a result of the growing understanding of the involvement of complement in a diverse set of disorders. To appreciate the importance of proper complement analysis, it is important to understand the role it plays in disease. Historically, it was the absence of complement as manifested in severe infection that was noted. Since then complement has been connected to a variety of inflammatory disorders, such as autoimmune diseases and hereditary angioedema. While the role of complement in the rejection of renal grafts has been known longer, the significant impact of complement. In certain nephropathies has now led to the reclassification of some rare kidney diseases and an increased role for complement analysis in diagnosis. Even more unexpected is that complement has also been implicated in neural, ophtalmological and dermatological disorders. With this level of involvement in some varied and impactful health issues proper complement testing is clearly important; however, analysis of the complement system varies widely among laboratories. Except for a few proteins, such as C3 and C4, there are neither well-characterized standard preparations nor calibrated assays available. This is especially true for the inter-laboratory variation of tests which assess classical, alternative, or lectin pathway function. In addition, there is a need for the standardization of the measurement of complement activation products that are so critical in determining whether clinically relevant complement activation has occurred in vivo. Finally, autoantibodies to complement proteins (e.g. anti-C1q), C3 and C4 convertases (C3 and C4 nephritic factor) or to regulatory proteins

  15. Establishing a stem cell culture laboratory for clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elíseo Joji Sekiya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult stem/progenitor cells are found in different human tissues. An in vitro cell culture is needed for their isolation or for their expansion when they are not available in a sufficient quantity to regenerate damaged organs and tissues. The level of complexity of these new technologies requires adequate facilities, qualified personnel with experience in cell culture techniques, assessment of quality and clear protocols for cell production. The rules for the implementation of cell therapy centers involve national and international standards of good manufacturing practices. However, such standards are not uniform, reflecting the diversity of technical and scientific development. Here standards from the United States, the European Union and Brazil are analyzed. Moreover, practical solutions encountered for the implementation of a cell therapy center appropriate for the preparation and supply of cultured cells for clinical studies are described. Development stages involved the planning and preparation of the project, the construction of the facility, standardization of laboratory procedures and development of systems to prevent cross contamination. Combining the theoretical knowledge of research centers involved in the study of cells with the practical experience of blood therapy services that manage structures for cell transplantation is presented as the best potential for synergy to meet the demands to implement cell therapy centers.

  16. [Obstructive sleep apneas. A clinical and laboratory study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, T; Vasconcelos, P; Leitão, A N; Andrea, M

    1993-10-01

    Our study included 42 patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSAS) confirmed by polysomnography. In these patients we investigated the clinical manifestations, the results of the laboratory examinations, including polysomnography, ORL observations and tests of pulmonary function, as well as the therapeutic results. Our patients presented a serious set of symptoms which included excessive daytime sleepiness, snoring, obesity, cranio-facial abnormalities, systemic hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, incapacity to work with precocious retirement, marital conflicts and high incidence of accidents, namely traffic accidents. An adequate treatment, mostly with nasal CPAP (continuous positive airway pressure), induced marked relief of the symptoms; some patients had an advantage in surgical treatment and weight reduction. OSAS is a frequent entity, affecting mostly male adults after the 5th decade. The lack of knowledge about this entity and the common social acceptance of some of its cardinal symptoms induces considerable delays in its diagnosis. The severity of the symptoms, the personal and social risks of excessive daytime sleepiness, the cardio-circulatory effects and the risk of sudden death during sleep justify an early diagnosis in order to prevent the severe evolution of the disease. Its complex physiopathology and multiple etiological factors justify a multidisciplinary approach. PMID:8285115

  17. 16S rRNA gene sequencing versus the API 20 NE system and the VITEK 2 ID-GNB card for identification of nonfermenting Gram-negative bacteria in the clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosshard, P P; Zbinden, R; Abels, S; Böddinghaus, B; Altwegg, M; Böttger, E C

    2006-04-01

    Over a period of 26 months, we have evaluated in a prospective fashion the use of 16S rRNA gene sequencing as a means of identifying clinically relevant isolates of nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli (non-Pseudomonas aeruginosa) in the microbiology laboratory. The study was designed to compare phenotypic with molecular identification. Results of molecular analyses were compared with two commercially available identification systems (API 20 NE, VITEK 2 fluorescent card; bioMérieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France). By 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses, 92% of the isolates were assigned to species level and 8% to genus level. Using API 20 NE, 54% of the isolates were assigned to species and 7% to genus level, and 39% of the isolates could not be discriminated at any taxonomic level. The respective numbers for VITEK 2 were 53%, 1%, and 46%, respectively. Fifteen percent and 43% of the isolates corresponded to species not included in the API 20 NE and VITEK 2 databases, respectively. We conclude that 16S rRNA gene sequencing is an effective means for the identification of clinically relevant nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli. Based on our experience, we propose an algorithm for proper identification of nonfermenting gram-negative bacilli in the diagnostic laboratory.

  18. From Laboratory Manipulations To Earth System Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgwell, A.; Schmidt, D.

    2008-12-01

    The apparent incongruence between coccolithophore calcification responses observed across different experimental manipulations, particularly those involving Emiliania huxleyi, raises new challenges particularly for modellers. This is because the global models used for predicting future fossil fuel CO2 uptake by the ocean base their parameterizations for plankton calcification and carbonate export from the ocean surface closely on laboratory results. Predictions of such models will be unreliable if rooted in unrepresentative and/or poorly understood laboratory experiments. The difficulty in making sense of the differing responses reported and thus correctly informing models is compounded by fundamental differences between laboratory culture studies, particularly in the strain (ecotype or likely even genotype) of E. huxleyi cultured. However, two pertinent observations offer the promise of resolving these difficulties: (1) experiments using other coccolithophore species have delineated the existence of a calcification 'optimum' in environmental conditions (pH), and (2) there is an unambiguous direction to the calcification-CO2 response in mesocosm and shipboard incubations. We propose that an equivalence can be drawn between species or even ecosystem integrated phytoplankton calcification rate as a function of pH (or saturation), and widely used descriptions of plankton growth rate vs. temperature (the Eppley curve). An 'Eppley' like calcification formulation provides not only a conceptual framework for reconciling the results of available experimental manipulations of coccolithophores, but also a means of constructing a simple quasi-empirical relationship for describing ocean acidification impacts on planktonic carbonate production in carbon cycle models. The implications of this for future fossil fuel CO2 uptake by the ocean are assessed in an Earth system model.

  19. Agricultural Expert Systems as an Information Resource

    OpenAIRE

    Amany Ramadan Taha

    2007-01-01

    The research discusses the use and usefulness of Agricultural Expert Systems as information source, Those Expert Systems as very important supporting tools for helping people in the decision making process, also this research discusses the role of Central laboratory of Agricultural Expert Systems (CLAES) to support and development the Agricultural Expert System as the main supportive unit to Agricultural Expert Systems in Egypt

  20. Sequencing Information Management System (SIMS). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, C.

    1996-02-15

    A feasibility study to develop a requirements analysis and functional specification for a data management system for large-scale DNA sequencing laboratories resulted in a functional specification for a Sequencing Information Management System (SIMS). This document reports the results of this feasibility study, and includes a functional specification for a SIMS relational schema. The SIMS is an integrated information management system that supports data acquisition, management, analysis, and distribution for DNA sequencing laboratories. The SIMS provides ad hoc query access to information on the sequencing process and its results, and partially automates the transfer of data between laboratory instruments, analysis programs, technical personnel, and managers. The SIMS user interfaces are designed for use by laboratory technicians, laboratory managers, and scientists. The SIMS is designed to run in a heterogeneous, multiplatform environment in a client/server mode. The SIMS communicates with external computational and data resources via the internet.

  1. Quality of Control of Clinical-Biochemical Laboratories – Serbian Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinko Peric

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last 20 years in medical laboratories, numerous activities regarding quality and accreditation system were taken. Approach to this problem in European countries is different, so the task of the Accreditation Work Group of the Confederation of European societies for clinical chemistry (EC 4 to help the efforts to harmonize this issue. External quality control in clinical-chemical laboratories imposed the need for the implementation of quality management system. »Good laboratory practice« and its principles were adopted by nominated bodies, both international and national. In the beginning, the standard ISO 9001 was applied for certification and for accreditation EN 45001 and ISO Guide 25, which are prepared for testing and calibration laboratories. Standard ISO 17025 is the successor of the previous documents and for now it is a reference for mentioned laboratories. Accreditation Work Group of the Confederation of European societies for clinical chemistry (EC 4 made an amendment of the requirements for medical laboratories, which this standard describes. Standard draft ISO 15189 was adopted on February 2003 as a final version with requirements for medical laboratories.

  2. On mixed reality environments for minimally invasive therapy guidance: systems architecture, successes and challenges in their implementation from laboratory to clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linte, Cristian A; Davenport, Katherine P; Cleary, Kevin; Peters, Craig; Vosburgh, Kirby G; Navab, Nassir; Edwards, Philip Eddie; Jannin, Pierre; Peters, Terry M; Holmes, David R; Robb, Richard A

    2013-03-01

    Mixed reality environments for medical applications have been explored and developed over the past three decades in an effort to enhance the clinician's view of anatomy and facilitate the performance of minimally invasive procedures. These environments must faithfully represent the real surgical field and require seamless integration of pre- and intra-operative imaging, surgical instrument tracking, and display technology into a common framework centered around and registered to the patient. However, in spite of their reported benefits, few mixed reality environments have been successfully translated into clinical use. Several challenges that contribute to the difficulty in integrating such environments into clinical practice are presented here and discussed in terms of both technical and clinical limitations. This article should raise awareness among both developers and end-users toward facilitating a greater application of such environments in the surgical practice of the future.

  3. Risk Management in Clinical Laboratory: from Theory to Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Eliza David Remona; Minodora Dobreanu

    2015-01-01

    Clinical laboratory tests ensure approximately 70% of the medical decisions, so that the time until the release of the results and its accuracy are critical for the diagnosis and the efficiency of the treatment [1]. Risk management involves both the anticipation of what could happen erroneous and the assessment of errors’ frequency as well as the consequences or the severity of the effects caused by it, and finally to decide what can be done in order to reduce the risk to an acceptable clinic...

  4. Educating a new generation of clinical laboratory scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinder, Oren

    2002-05-21

    In many countries the new generation of laboratory scientists comes from the graduates of the biological sciences. Their training in the sciences is usually of high quality, but is almost totally lacking in the clinical application of their scientific knowledge. They obtain this clinical knowledge most often by on-the-job training and experience. This paper describes a new undergraduate academic program in Laboratory Medicine developed at the Faculty of Medicine of the Technion, the Israel Institute of Technology. The program is carried out with the collaboration of the Faculty of Biology and the Faculty of Medicine, and upon completion of the classroom studies there is a period of internship for practical experience. The first students of the program are now in their internship period and will graduate this year. PMID:11955492

  5. Clinical laboratories, the select agent program, and biological surety (biosurety).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastel, Ross H; Demmin, Gretchen; Severson, Grant; Torres-Cruz, Rafael; Trevino, Jorge; Kelly, John; Arrison, Jay; Christman, Joy

    2006-06-01

    The threat of bioterrorism has led to increased concerns over the availability of biological select agents and toxins (BSAT). Congress has implemented several public laws that have led to the development of federal regulations by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the US Department of Agriculture. The CDC regulation 42 CFR 73 has a direct impact on all clinical laboratories that may at some time identify BSAT in a clinical specimen. The Department of Defense has imposed a more stringent layer of regulation called biological surety (biosurety) on top of the requirements of 42 CFR 73 for military laboratories that possess BSAT. However,42 CFR 73 falls into the framework of biosurety. Both sets of regulations have four pillars (safety, physical security, agent account-ability, and personnel reliability) that are built on a foundation of training and covered by a roof of management (operations and plans).

  6. Evaluation of four gentamicin and tobramycin assay procedures for clinical laboratories.

    OpenAIRE

    Witebsky, F G; Sliva, C A; Selepak, S T; Ruddel, M E; MacLowry, J D; Johnson, E E; Elin, R J

    1983-01-01

    Accuracy, precision, and clinical laboratory utility of the TDX (Abbott Laboratories), Auto-ICS (Beckman Instruments, Inc.), COBAS-Bio (Roche Analytical Instruments, Inc.) with reagent kits (Syva), and EMIT (Syva) for gentamicin and tobramycin serum assay were assessed. TDX, COBAS-Bio, and EMIT analytical systems showed a proportional bias of less than 10% for recovery studies and a coefficient of variation less than 5% for within-run precision. The results of the recovery studies with the Au...

  7. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome: Clinical and Laboratory Manifestations

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Christopher W.K.; Chan, Michael H M; Wong, Chun K.

    2004-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a recently emerged infectious disease with significant morbidity and mortality. An epidemic in 2003 affected 8,098 patients in 29 countries with 774 deaths. The aetiological agent is a new coronavirus spread by droplet transmission. Clinical and general laboratory manifestations included fever, chills, rigor, myalgia, malaise, diarrhoea, cough, dyspnoea, pneumonia, lymphopenia, neutrophilia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase...

  8. Simulation-based medical education in clinical skills laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Akaike, Masashi; Fukutomi, Miki; Nagamune, Masami; Fujimoto, Akiko; Tsuji, Akiko; Ishida, Kazuko; Iwata, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Clinical skills laboratories have been established in medical institutions as facilities for simulation-based medical education (SBME). SBME is believed to be superior to the traditional style of medical education from the viewpoint of the active and adult learning theories. SBME can provide a learning cycle of debriefing and feedback for learners as well as evaluation of procedures and competency. SBME offers both learners and patients a safe environment for practice and error. In a full-env...

  9. Clinical and laboratory profile of dengue in the elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Unnikrishnan, Rahul; Faizal, Baiju P.; Vijayakumar, Priya; Paul, George; Sharma, R. N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dengue is the most rapidly spreading mosquito-borne viral disease in the world with a 30-fold increase in incidence in the last 50 years. Approximately, 50 million dengue infections occur annually. Aim: To study the various clinical and laboratory manifestations of dengue in the elderly and observe for any variations in IgM titer elevation with progression of age. Design: Retrospective observational study. Subjects and Methods: Medical charts of all patients admitted to the Divisi...

  10. Clinical versus laboratory for estimating of dehydration severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Malaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Acute gastroenteritis is a common cause of dehydration and precise estimation of dehydration is a vital matter for clinical decisions. We try to find how much clinically diagnosed scales are compatible with laboratory tests measures. Materials and Methods : During 2 years 95 infants and children aged between 2 and 108 months entered to emergency room with acute gastroenteritis. They were categorized as mild, moderate and severe dehydration, their recorded laboratory tests include blood urea nitrogen (BUN, creatinine, venous blood gases values were expressed by means ±95% of confidence interval and compared by mann-whitney test in each groups with SPSS 16, sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratio measured for defined cut off values in severe dehydration group, P value less than 0.05 was significant. Result : Severe dehydration includes 3% of all hospitalization due to dehydration. Laboratory tests cannot differentiate mild to moderate dehydration definietly but this difference is significant between severe to mild and severe to moderate dehydration. Conclusion : R outine laboratory test are not generally helpful for dehydration severity estimation but they can be discriminate severe from mild or moderate dehydration exclusively. Creatinine higher than 0.9 mg/dl and Base deficit beyond-16 are specific (90% for severe dehydration estimation in infant and children.

  11. Car monitoring information systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alica KALAŠOVÁ

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this contribution is to characterize alternatives of information systems used for managing, processing and evaluation of information related to company vehicles. Especially we focus on logging, transferring and processing of on-road vehicle movement information in inland and international transportation. This segment of company information system has to monitor the car movement – actively or passively – according to demand of the company and after the processing it has to evaluate and give the complex monitoring of a situation of all the company vehicles to the controller.

  12. The Information Quality Triangle: a methodology to assess clinical information quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choquet, Rémy; Qouiyd, Samiha; Ouagne, David; Pasche, Emilie; Daniel, Christel; Boussaïd, Omar; Jaulent, Marie-Christine

    2010-01-01

    Building qualitative clinical decision support or monitoring based on information stored in clinical information (or EHR) systems cannot be done without assessing and controlling information quality. Numerous works have introduced methods and measures to qualify and enhance data, information models and terminologies quality. This paper introduces an approach based on an Information Quality Triangle that aims at providing a generic framework to help in characterizing quality measures and methods in the context of the integration of EHR data in a clinical datawarehouse. We have successfully experimented the proposed approach at the HEGP hospital in France, as part of the DebugIT EU FP7 project.

  13. Evolution of information systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Jan

    2000-01-01

    that an evolutionary transformation of informational systems are preferable for small network organisations because of their need to adapt rapidly and easily to new business conditions. The IS will only be flexible if both human and technology are prepared and willing/proper configured. Changes are due to altered......This article offers a dynamic view of continuously changes in a specific informational system illustrated through a case study in a small network company. Central aspects of the evolutionary process will be identified and framed in relation to the informational system change. It will be argued...

  14. Air System Information Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filman, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    I flew to Washington last week, a trip rich in distributed information management. Buying tickets, at the gate, in flight, landing and at the baggage claim, myriad messages about my reservation, the weather, our flight plans, gates, bags and so forth flew among a variety of travel agency, airline and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) computers and personnel. By and large, each kind of information ran on a particular application, often specialized to own data formats and communications network. I went to Washington to attend an FAA meeting on System-Wide Information Management (SWIM) for the National Airspace System (NAS) (http://www.nasarchitecture.faa.gov/Tutorials/NAS101.cfm). NAS (and its information infrastructure, SWIM) is an attempt to bring greater regularity, efficiency and uniformity to the collection of stovepipe applications now used to manage air traffic. Current systems hold information about flight plans, flight trajectories, weather, air turbulence, current and forecast weather, radar summaries, hazardous condition warnings, airport and airspace capacity constraints, temporary flight restrictions, and so forth. Information moving among these stovepipe systems is usually mediated by people (for example, air traffic controllers) or single-purpose applications. People, whose intelligence is critical for difficult tasks and unusual circumstances, are not as efficient as computers for tasks that can be automated. Better information sharing can lead to higher system capacity, more efficient utilization and safer operations. Better information sharing through greater automation is possible though not necessarily easy.

  15. A Concept Annotation System for Clinical Records

    CERN Document Server

    Kang, Ning; Afzal, Zubair; Singh, Bharat; Schuemie, Martijn J; van Mulligen, Erik M; Kors, Jan A

    2010-01-01

    Unstructured information comprises a valuable source of data in clinical records. For text mining in clinical records, concept extraction is the first step in finding assertions and relationships. This study presents a system developed for the annotation of medical concepts, including medical problems, tests, and treatments, mentioned in clinical records. The system combines six publicly available named entity recognition system into one framework, and uses a simple voting scheme that allows to tune precision and recall of the system to specific needs. The system provides both a web service interface and a UIMA interface which can be easily used by other systems. The system was tested in the fourth i2b2 challenge and achieved an F-score of 82.1% for the concept exact match task, a score which is among the top-ranking systems. To our knowledge, this is the first publicly available clinical record concept annotation system.

  16. A survey of geographical information systems applications for the Earth Science and Applications Division, Space Sciences Laboratory, Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, D.; Butler, K. A.; Laymon, C. A.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to introduce Geographical Information System (GIS) terminology and summarize interviews conducted with scientists in the Earth Science and Applications Division (ESAD). There is a growing need in ESAD for GIS technology. With many different data sources available to the scientists comes the need to be able to process and view these data in an efficient manner. Since most of these data are stored in vastly different formats, specialized software and hardware are needed. Several ESAD scientists have been using a GIS, specifically the Man-computer Interactive Data Access System (MCIDAS). MCIDAS can solve many of the research problems that arise, but there are areas of research that need more powerful tools; one such example is the multispectral image analysis which is described in this document. Given the strong need for GIS in ESAD, we recommend that a requirements analysis and implementation plan be developed using this document as a basis for further investigation.

  17. Understanding critical barriers to implementing a clinical information system in a nursing home through the lens of a socio-technical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Or, Calvin; Dohan, Michael; Tan, Joseph

    2014-09-01

    This paper addresses key barriers to implementing a clinical information system (CIS) in a Hong Kong nursing home setting, from a healthcare specific socio-technical perspective. Data was collected through field observations (n = 12) and semi-structured individual interviews (n = 18) of CIS stakeholders in a Hong Kong nursing home, and analyzed using the immersion/crystallization approach. Complex interactions relevant to our case were contextualized and interpreted within the perspective of the Sittig-Singh Healthcare Socio-Technical Framework (HSTF). Three broad clusters of implementation barriers from the eight HSTF dimensions were identified: (a) Infrastructure-based barriers, which relate to conflict between government regulations and system functional needs of users; lack of financial support; inconsistency between workflow, work policy, and procedures; and inadequacy of hardware-software infrastructural and technical support; (b) Process-based barriers, which relate to mismatch between the technology, existing work practice and workflow, and communication; low system speed, accessibility, and stability; deficient computer literacy; more experience in health care profession; clinical content inadequacy and unavailability; as well as poor system usefulness and user interface design; and (c) Outcome-based barriers, which relate to the lack of measurement and monitoring of system effectiveness. Two additional dimensions underlining the importance of the ability of a CIS to change are proposed to extend the Sittig-Singh HSTF. First, advocacy would promote the articulation and influence of changes in the system and subsequent outcomes by CIS stakeholders, and second, adaptability would ensure the ability of the system to adjust to emerging needs. The broad set of discovered implementation shortcomings expands prior research on why CIS can fail in nursing home settings. Moreover, our investigation offers a knowledge base and recommendations that can serve

  18. Enforcement Information System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — EIS is an automated management information system that tracks the FAA’s enforcement actions on a nationwide basis. EIS is the FAA’s primary database for tracking...

  19. Audit Information Management System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — USAID/OIG has initiated its new Audit Information Management System (AIMS) to track OIG's audit recommendations and USAID's management decisions. OIG's in-house...

  20. Control and Information Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Zahradnik

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with main tends of scientific research activities of Department of Control and Information Systems at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering of University of Zilina and its perspectives in this area.

  1. Correlation between the limit values of laboratory and clinical mycotoxicosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanov Igor M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of feed for the presence of fungi and mycotoxins is a request necessary to meet in order to ensure a healthy and economical production in livestock. These tests are related to legal regulation which prescribes the maximum legislated content (MLC, both for the presence of mycotoxins and the total number of fungi in certain feeds. Health problems that can occur during the production of animals are sometimes caused by the presence of mycotoxins in the feed. Laboratory testing is a good practice to confirm a suspicion, and allows timely treatment of contaminated feed. Potential problems arise under circumstances when there is a clinical outcome of mycotoxicosis and animal and laboratory findings suggest that the obtained values are below the level that is within the MLC. For these reasons, the subject of our research was to investigate the occurrence of mycotoxins and mold in feed, as well as the clinical presentation for animals that were fed with the feed with allowed values of these agents according to the recommended levels. The aim of this paper was to highlight the problems associated with clinical correlation of sick animals and laboratory findings, and suggest their overcoming. In the period of one year, a total of 176 samples of feed (complete mixture for broilers, corn and soy products were examined for the presence of fungi, 106 samples were examined for the presence of mycotoxins and 26 flocks of broilers and turkeys were clinically observed. Standard methods were used for isolation of molds and the ELISA test was used for the detection of mycotoxins. Clinical and pathomorphological observation of the flocks was done to determine the natural indicators of production. Studies indicated a problem because clinical and pathomorphological findings in some cases were not correlated with laboratory findings of molds and mycotoxins in the feed, and in some cases it did not necessarily mean that the animals were healthy. Synergism and

  2. The Information System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonoaie C.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A scientific research was carried out using a form, which was filled out by 335 businesses from Brasov County, through which we wanted to determine the awareness degree in regard to some information system notions. To analyse the data the SPSS software was used. The research reached the conclusion that the employees of businesses from Brasov County know very little about information systems.

  3. Information systems definition architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calapristi, A.J.

    1996-06-20

    The Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Information Systems Definition architecture evaluated information Management (IM) processes in several key organizations. The intent of the study is to identify improvements in TWRS IM processes that will enable better support to the TWRS mission, and accommodate changes in TWRS business environment. The ultimate goals of the study are to reduce IM costs, Manage the configuration of TWRS IM elements, and improve IM-related process performance.

  4. DISEASE MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Bens Pardamean; Anindito; Anjela Djoeang; Nana Tobing

    2013-01-01

    The study designed an information system model for Disease Management (DisMan) that met the specifications and needs of a consumer electronics manufacturer. The diseases monitored by this study were diabetes, hypertension and tuberculosis. Data were collected through interviews with the companyâs human resources department and occupational health provider. As for the model, literature and online research were conducted to collect health standards and information system standards on existing D...

  5. Evolution of toxicology information systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wassom, J.S.; Lu, P.Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1990-12-31

    Society today is faced with new health risk situations that have been brought about by recent scientific and technical advances. Federal and state governments are required to assess the many potential health risks to exposed populations from the products (chemicals) and by-products (pollutants) of these advances. Because a sound analysis of any potential health risk should be based on the use of relevant information, it behooves those individuals responsible for making the risk assessments to know where to obtain needed information. This paper reviews the origins of toxicology information systems and explores the specialized information center concept that was proposed in 1963 as a means of providing ready access to scientific and technical information. As a means of illustrating this concept, the operation of one specialized information center (the Environmental Mutagen Information Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory) will be discussed. Insights into how toxicological information resources came into being, their design and makeup, will be of value to those seeking to acquire information for risk assessment purposes. 7 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  6. Clinical and Epidemiological Characterization of Laboratory-Confirmed Autochthonous Cases of Zika Virus Disease in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez Corona, Maria Eugenia; De la Garza Barroso, Ana Lucía; Rodriguez Martínez, Jose Cruz; Luna Guzmán, Norma Irene; Ruiz Matus, Cuitláhuac; Díaz Quiñonez, José Alberto; Lopez Martinez, Irma; Kuri Morales, Pablo A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Since 2014, autochthonous circulation of Zika virus (ZIKV) in the Americas was detected (Easter Island, Chile). In May 2015, Brazil confirmed autochthonous ­­transmission and in October of that year Colombia reported their first  cases. Now more than 52 countries have reported cases, including Mexico. To deal with this contingency in Mexico, several surveillance systems, in addition to systems for vector-borne diseases were strengthened with the participation of all health institutions. Also, the Ministry of Health defined an Action Plan against ZIKV for the whole country. Methods: We analyzed 93 autochthonous cases of ZIKV disease identified by Epidemiological Surveillance System for Zika Virus in Mexico. All autochthonous cases confirmed by laboratory since November 25, 2015 to February 19, 2016 were included. A description of clinical and epidemiological characteristics of 93 cases of ZIKV disease are presenting and, we describe the Action Plan against this public health emergency.  Results: The distribution of cases by sex was 61 men and 32 women; mean age was 35 years old (S.D. 15, range 6-90). The main clinical features in the 93 cases were fever (96.6%), rash (93.3%), non-purulent conjunctivitis (88.8%), headache (85.4%), and myalgia (84.3%). No deaths were reported. Conclusion: The ZIKV epidemic poses new challenges to public health systems. The information provided for basic, clinical, and epidemiological research, in addition to the data derived from epidemiological surveillance is essential. However, there are still many unanswered questions regarding mechanisms of transmission, complications, and impact of this virus. PMID:27158557

  7. Acute tramadol poisoning and its clinical and laboratory findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Hamid Reza; Soltaninejad, Kambiz; Shadnia, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tramadol is a centrally acting analgesic with opioid and nonopioid properties, which extensively used in the relief of mild to moderate pain. Tramadol poisoning is a common cause of acute pharmaceutical poisoning in Iran. There are a few studies about clinical and laboratory findings related to acute tramadol poisoning. Therefore, the aim of this study was to demonstrate the clinical and laboratory findings in tramadol acute poisoning cases. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective descriptive study of patients with acute tramadol poisoning who referred to Loghman Hakim Hospital Poison Center during January to April 2012. Data such as patient's age, sex, time of ingestion, ingested dose, cause of poisoning, mean duration of hospitalization, patient's clinical presentations, laboratory findings, therapeutic measures, and patient's outcome have collected in a predesigned checklist. Results: A total of 144 patients including 111 men (77%) and 33 women (23%) with acute tramadol poisoning was included in this study. The mean ingested dose was 1971.2 mg (100-20000 mg). Seizure (47.91%) was the most frequent clinical symptom. Blood gas on admission showed pH (7.3 ± 0.1), PCO2 (49.7 ± 8.6 mmHg) and HCO3− (24.1 ± 3.8 mEq/L), indicating pure acute respiratory acidosis may be occurred in tramadol-intoxicated patients. There were significant differences between tramadol-intoxicated cases with and without a seizure with regard to the time interval between ingestion and admission on hospital, ingested dose and PCO2. Conclusion: Seizure and rise of PCO2 were the most findings in this study. PMID:25535500

  8. Logistics Management Information System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The logistics information is the logistics manageme nt 's inevitable request. The paper introduces several kinds of logistics informat ion system and their functions in the logistics management, such as the warehous e management system (WMS) in the delivery center, the control system for transpo rtation and delivery, the supply chain management (SCM), the optimization of th e logistics system, etc. In the author's opinion, the development of logistics could been divided into four phases. And the logistic...

  9. Implementation of External Quality Assessment Scheme in Clinical Chemistry for District Laboratories in Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamtsho, Rixin; Nuchpramool, Wilairat

    2012-07-01

    External Quality Assessment Scheme (EQAS) involves evaluation of a number of laboratories by an outside agency on the performance of a number of laboratories based on their analytical performance of tests on samples supplied by the external agency. In developing countries, establishment of national EQAS by preparing homemade quality control material is a useful scheme in terms of resources and time to monitor the laboratory performance. The objective of this study is to implement an EQAS to monitor the analytical performance of the district laboratories in Bhutan. Baseline information was collected through questionnaires. Lyophilized human serum including normal and abnormal levels were prepared and distributed to 19 participating laboratories. Nine routine analytes were included for the study. Their results were evaluated using Variance index scores (VIS) and Coefficient of variations (CV) was compared with Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act (CLIA) Proficiency Testing Criteria (PT) for each analyte. There was significant decrease in CV at the end of the study. The percentages of results in acceptable VIS as 'A' were 63, 60, 66, 69, 73 and 74, 75, 76 and 79 % in November 2009-July 2010 respectively. From our results, we concluded that, establishment of EQAS through distribution of home-made quality control material could be the useful scheme to monitor the laboratory performance in clinical chemistry in Bhutan.

  10. Industrialized Information Systems Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havn, Erling; Bansler, Jørgen P.

    1996-01-01

    The production of application software is rapidly being industrialized. Computer manufacturers and software houses produce a rapidly growing number of generic software applications and systems, and more and more user companies choose to build their computer-based information systems with such gen......The production of application software is rapidly being industrialized. Computer manufacturers and software houses produce a rapidly growing number of generic software applications and systems, and more and more user companies choose to build their computer-based information systems...... with such generic products, instead of custom made software. We discuss how the move away from traditional in-house development and the increasing use of generic software is likely to transform IS development in the near future. We conclude that these developments will make new demands on the information systems...

  11. Protecting clinical data in PACS, teleradiology systems, and research environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Marion C.; Collmann, Jeff R.; Tohme, Walid G.; Mun, Seong K.

    1997-05-01

    As clinical data is more widely stored in electronic patient record management systems and transmitted over the Internet and telephone lines, it becomes more accessible and therefore more useful, but also more vulnerable. Computer systems such as PACS, telemedicine applications, and medical research networks must protect against accidental or deliberate modification, disclosure, and violation of patient confidentiality in order to be viable. Conventional wisdom in the medical field and among lawmakers legislating the use of electronic medical records suggests that, although it may improve access to information, an electronic medical record cannot be as secure as a traditional paper record. This is not the case. Information security is a well-developed field in the computer and communications industry. If medical information systems, such as PACS, telemedicine applications, and research networks, properly apply information security techniques, they can ensure the accuracy and confidentiality of their patient information and even improve the security of their data over a traditional paper record. This paper will elaborate on some of these techniques and discuss how they can be applied to medical information systems. The following systems will be used as examples for the analysis: a research laboratory at Georgetown University Medical Center, the Deployable Radiology system installed to support the US Army's peace- keeping operation in Bosnia, a kidney dialysis telemedicine system in Washington, D.C., and various experiences with implementing and integrating PACS.

  12. A Wireless Communications Systems Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzelgoz, Sabih; Arslan, Huseyin

    2010-01-01

    A novel wireless communications systems laboratory course is introduced. The course teaches students how to design, test, and simulate wireless systems using modern instrumentation and computer-aided design (CAD) software. One of the objectives of the course is to help students understand the theoretical concepts behind wireless communication…

  13. Microprocessor-Based Laboratory Data Acquisition Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, F. E.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Focuses on attributes of microcomputer systems which affect their usefulness in a laboratory environment. In addition to presenting general concepts, comments are made regarding the implementation of these concepts using a microprocessor-based data acquisition system developed at the University of North Carolina. (CO)

  14. Determination of Spatial Distribution of Children Treated in Children Oncology Clinic with the Aid of Geographic Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topan, Aysel; Bayram, Dilek; Özendi, Mustafa; Cam, Ali; Öztürk, Özlem; Ayyıldız, Tülay Kuzlu; Kulakçı, Hülya; Veren, Funda

    2016-10-01

    The main objective of this research is to examine child cancer cases in Zonguldak/Turkey descriptively in epidemiological aspect with the help of GIS. Universe of the study is composed of 60 children between 1 and 19 years old who were treated in Children Oncology Clinic with a diagnosis of cancer. Whole universe was reached without selecting a sample in the study. Data were collected by using a form prepared by obtaining expert advice and they were applied to children and their parents at study dates. Results were expressed as percentages. Chi-Square test was used in intergroup comparisons, results were assessed within 95 % confidence interval and p types are ALL with 33.3 % (n = 20), Medullablastoma with 13.3 % (n = 8) and Hodgkin-nonHodgkin Lymphoma with 11.7 % (n = 7). Kdz. Eregli with 31.7 % (n = 19), Center with 31.7 % (n = 19), and Caycuma with 18.3 % (n = 11) are the first-three counties where the cases were mostly observed. Statistically significant difference was found (p = 0.016) comparing disease diagnosis with living place, and distribution maps of the number of cancer cases were produced. PMID:27624492

  15. Recommendations for responsible monitoring and regulation of clinical software systems. American Medical Informatics Association, Computer-based Patient Record Institute, Medical Library Association, Association of Academic Health Science Libraries, American Health Information Management Association, American Nurses Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R A; Gardner, R M

    1997-01-01

    In mid-1996, the FDA called for discussions on regulation of clinical software programs as medical devices. In response, a consortium of organizations dedicated to improving health care through information technology has developed recommendations for the responsible regulation and monitoring of clinical software systems by users, vendors, and regulatory agencies. Organizations assisting in development of recommendations, or endorsing the consortium position include the American Medical Informatics Association, the Computer-based Patient Record Institute, the Medical Library Association, the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries, the American Health Information Management Association, the American Nurses Association, the Center for Healthcare Information Management, and the American College of Physicians. The consortium proposes four categories of clinical system risks and four classes of measured monitoring and regulatory actions that can be applied strategically based on the level of risk in a given setting. The consortium recommends local oversight of clinical software systems, and adoption by healthcare information system developers of a code of good business practices. Budgetary and other constraints limit the type and number of systems that the FDA can regulate effectively. FDA regulation should exempt most clinical software systems and focus on those systems posing highest clinical risk, with limited opportunities for competent human intervention. PMID:9391932

  16. Recommendations for responsible monitoring and regulation of clinical software systems. American Medical Informatics Association, Computer-based Patient Record Institute, Medical Library Association, Association of Academic Health Science Libraries, American Health Information Management Association, American Nurses Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R A; Gardner, R M

    1997-01-01

    In mid-1996, the FDA called for discussions on regulation of clinical software programs as medical devices. In response, a consortium of organizations dedicated to improving health care through information technology has developed recommendations for the responsible regulation and monitoring of clinical software systems by users, vendors, and regulatory agencies. Organizations assisting in development of recommendations, or endorsing the consortium position include the American Medical Informatics Association, the Computer-based Patient Record Institute, the Medical Library Association, the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries, the American Health Information Management Association, the American Nurses Association, the Center for Healthcare Information Management, and the American College of Physicians. The consortium proposes four categories of clinical system risks and four classes of measured monitoring and regulatory actions that can be applied strategically based on the level of risk in a given setting. The consortium recommends local oversight of clinical software systems, and adoption by healthcare information system developers of a code of good business practices. Budgetary and other constraints limit the type and number of systems that the FDA can regulate effectively. FDA regulation should exempt most clinical software systems and focus on those systems posing highest clinical risk, with limited opportunities for competent human intervention.

  17. 海洋监测设备动力环境实验室信息管理系统的构建%Study on the Information Management System for the Marine Environment Dynamics and Monitoring Laboratory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王花梅; 路宽; 田强

    2015-01-01

    实验室信息管理系统(LIMS)为实验室提供了便捷、准确、及时、规范的技术服务,已经被越来越多的实验室认可与应用。针对海洋监测设备动力环境实验室的实验业务与信息管理,分别从业务流程、用户需求和功能需求进行了分析,并对系统功能进行了详细设计。系统由基础设施层、数据层、支撑功能层、业务系统、标准规范支撑体系与信息安全支撑体系六部分组成,分为对外和对内两个应用部分,根据不同用户的不同权限,对实验室信息、实验数据、设备数据以及新闻等信息分别有不同的权限。该系统能够满足实验人员、管理人员与一般用户的不同需求,实现了对海洋监测设备动力环境实验室信息、实验数据与实验资源的有效管理,提高了仪器设备预约效率,实现了测试仪器装置的最大程度共享,节省了人力、物力和财力,同时,便于仪器设备的维修与维护与用户快速获得实验室各类信息。%The Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) is the accepted system to provide convenient, accurate,timely and standardized technical services in increasing laboratories.In this paper, the business processes, user needs and functional requirements are analyzed aimed at the experiments business and information management of the Marine Environment Dynamics and Monitoring Laboratory. The LIMS is designed in a detailed manner, consisting of the infrastructure layer, data layer, supporting function layer, business layer, standard supporting layer and information security layer. It includes the management for the laboratory and the application for the public. Different users have different power limits to operate the laboratory information, experimental data, device data, news and other information. The system is capable of meeting the different needs of researchers, administrators and general users. It can effectively

  18. Determination of Spatial Distribution of Children Treated in Children Oncology Clinic with the Aid of Geographic Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topan, Aysel; Bayram, Dilek; Özendi, Mustafa; Cam, Ali; Öztürk, Özlem; Ayyıldız, Tülay Kuzlu; Kulakçı, Hülya; Veren, Funda

    2016-10-01

    The main objective of this research is to examine child cancer cases in Zonguldak/Turkey descriptively in epidemiological aspect with the help of GIS. Universe of the study is composed of 60 children between 1 and 19 years old who were treated in Children Oncology Clinic with a diagnosis of cancer. Whole universe was reached without selecting a sample in the study. Data were collected by using a form prepared by obtaining expert advice and they were applied to children and their parents at study dates. Results were expressed as percentages. Chi-Square test was used in intergroup comparisons, results were assessed within 95 % confidence interval and p < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Variables that were used in the study were assessed, recorded in prepared data collection form and distribution maps were produced. When disease diagnosis of the children participated in the study were evaluated, the most observed three types are ALL with 33.3 % (n = 20), Medullablastoma with 13.3 % (n = 8) and Hodgkin-nonHodgkin Lymphoma with 11.7 % (n = 7). Kdz. Eregli with 31.7 % (n = 19), Center with 31.7 % (n = 19), and Caycuma with 18.3 % (n = 11) are the first-three counties where the cases were mostly observed. Statistically significant difference was found (p = 0.016) comparing disease diagnosis with living place, and distribution maps of the number of cancer cases were produced.

  19. Epidemiological, clinical and sleep laboratory evaluations of insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixler, E. O.; Kales, A.; Kales, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have contributed to the understanding of the total scope of the insomnia problem, both in terms of the incidence of sleep difficulties, and the extent and frequency of hypnotic drug use. Clinical studies - at the Sleep Research and Treatment Center - have been used to evaluate the medical, psychological, pharmacological and situational factors contributing to insomnia, and to evaluate the psychotherapy and chemotherapy best suited to treatment of insomnia. The sleep laboratory studies were of two types: (1) the study of sleep induction, sleep maintenance, and sleep stages, and (2) the use of hypnotic drugs, emphasizing their effectiveness in inducing and maintaining sleep, and the duration of this effectiveness.

  20. The International Consortium for Harmonization of Clinical Laboratory Results (ICHCLR) – A Pathway for Harmonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, W. Greg

    2016-01-01

    Results from clinical laboratory measurement procedures must be equivalent to enable effective use of clinical guidelines for disease diagnosis and patient management. Analytical results that are harmonized and independent of the measurement system, time, and location of testing is essential for providing adequate patient care. The key to generating harmonized results is establishing traceability to an accepted reference standard where available. Awareness of the benefits of having traceable measurement results that are harmonized has increased along with efforts to develop approaches to enable and facilitate the implementation of harmonization. Although several organizations are addressing harmonization of test procedures, centralized and cooperative global oversight is needed to ensure that the most important tests are being addressed and resources are optimally used. Working with its domestic and international partners, the American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) has created an International Consortium for Harmonization of Clinical Laboratory Results. Advances in this area will improve the quality of patient care.

  1. [The challenges of standardization in clinical diagnostic laboratories of medical organizations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men'shikov, V V

    2013-04-01

    The generalized data concerning the conditions of application of regulations of national standards in clinical diagnostic laboratories of medical organizations is presented. The primary information was provided by 14 regions of 6 federal administrative okrugs of Russia. The causes of challenges of application of requirements of standards are presented. They are mostly related with insufficient financial support, lacking of manpower, difficulties with reagents supply, inadequate technical maintenance of devices and absence of support of administration of medical organizations. The recommendations are formulated concerning the necessity of publishing the document of Minzdrav of Russia to determine the need in application of standards in laboratory practice.

  2. Management Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    New Automated Management Information Center (AMIC) employs innovative microcomputer techniques to create color charts, viewgraphs, or other data displays in a fraction of the time formerly required. Developed under Kennedy Space Center's contract by Boeing Services International Inc., Seattle, WA, AMIC can produce an entirely new informational chart in 30 minutes, or an updated chart in only five minutes. AMIC also has considerable potential as a management system for business firms.

  3. Employee information managment system

    OpenAIRE

    Ekaande Mbole, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    This work involves the development of an Employees’ Information Management Application for Cameroon Development Corporation (CDC). CDC is an agro-industrial corporation with vast plantations and factories in the south west of Cameroon. With its huge labor force its human resources department formerly had a flat file system for handling employee information. This wasn’t quite good as it couldn’t meet up with the ever changing needs of the corporation. The aim of this project is to build a ...

  4. Insect Barcode Information System

    OpenAIRE

    Pratheepa, Maria; Jalali, Sushil Kumar; Arokiaraj, Robinson Silvester; Venkatesan, Thiruvengadam; Nagesh, Mandadi; Panda, Madhusmita; Pattar, Sharath

    2014-01-01

    Insect Barcode Information System called as Insect Barcode Informática (IBIn) is an online database resource developed by the National Bureau of Agriculturally Important Insects, Bangalore. This database provides acquisition, storage, analysis and publication of DNA barcode records of agriculturally important insects, for researchers specifically in India and other countries. It bridges a gap in bioinformatics by integrating molecular, morphological and distribution details of agriculturally ...

  5. 42 CFR 493.1453 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; clinical consultant. The laboratory must have a... testing; clinical consultant. 493.1453 Section 493.1453 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION...

  6. Integrated Information Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Moscati

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Currently in the field of management, enhancement, territory and cultural heritage analysis, two types of information systems offer significant tools: GIS (Geographic Information System and AIS (Architectural Information System. The first one manages urban and territorial scale data, the second one administers architectural scale data. For a complete management and analysis of heritage both scales (territorial-urban and architectural are essential. But despite numerous attempts made in recent years, currently no system is really able to manage them simultaneously. This study aims to create a hybrid system, which is a new interface that allows to simultaneously view an AIS, a GIS and a window for management of spatial queries. Considering the profound differences between the two systems, the ultimate goal is to integrate them by proposing a new Hybrid System (HS to solve the problem of scale change (from analysis to synthesis using a new data structure and a new interface. To achieve the ultimate goal it has been studied mainly: a the possibilities of implementation of the two systems; b spatial analysis and 3D topology.

  7. 关于医院检验科实验室信息系统的伦理学思考%Ethical Thinking on Hospital Laboratory Information System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈丹; 孙莉; 刘海菊; 范久波; 李智山

    2015-01-01

    从六个方面阐述了实验室信息系统( LIS )存在的问题,包括LIS安全和功能扩展、患者的隐私保护、突发事件的应急机制、数据真实性和准确性以及自动核准风险。从伦理学角度分析了其整改的必要性,并提出了以下应对策略:加强系统和数据的安全管理;保障特殊检查项目的机密性,保护患者隐私;建立突发事件应急机制;根据医院实际工作量和财力确定LIS的功能模块;定期核对检验数据,避免职业性伤害;持续改进自动核准规则的严谨性。%This paper discussed the existing problems of Information System ( LIS) from six aspects, inclu-ding:the security and the expansion of the function, protection of patients′privacy, the establishment of emergency response mechanisms, authenticity and accuracy of data and the risks for auto-approval rules, etc.The authors also analysed the necessity of its rectification from the perspective of ethics, proposed improvement programme and suggestions: strengthening the safety management systems and data, ensuring special check the confidentiality of the project, protect the patient′s privacy;setting up emergency mechanism;hospital based on the actual workload and resources to determine the LIS function module; regularly checking the test data, to avoid occupational inju-ries;continuously improving the rigour of automatic approval rules.

  8. Usefulness of EC4 essential criteria for quality systems of medical laboratories as guideline to the ISO 15189 and ISO 17025 documents. European Community Confederation of Clinical Chemistry (EC4) Working Group on Harmonisation of Quality Systems and Accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, R T; Kenny, D; Blaton, V; Burnett, D; Huisman, W; Plebani, M; Queraltó, J M; Zérah, S; van Lieshout, J

    2000-10-01

    Many medical laboratories have made a start with the introduction of quality management systems. However, it is still not clear against which standards such systems should be measured. The existing ISO and CEN standards do not cover essential aspects of medical laboratories. The publication of the EC4 Essential Criteria has stimulated the development of the ISO/Draft International Standard 15189. This standard seems adequate for our type of laboratories. However, it is not easy to read. The EC4 Essential Criteria could well serve as a guide, covering additional aspects, e.g. on total quality management and budget management as required in the EFQM model, that are not (yet) included in the ISO standard. In the present article the EC4 Essential Criteria are cross-referenced with two new international ISO standards, ISO/FDIS 15189 and ISO/FDIS 17025, the latter being the successor of ISO guide 25 and EN 45000. Both new ISO documents are in compliance with the new ISO 9000:2000 standard. PMID:11140624

  9. COMMUNICATIONS AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dănuţ ŢIGĂNUŞ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay assesses the communications and information systems (CIS in support of the civilian and military structures deployed in the European Union led crises management operations and missions. The article emphasizes the specific structure and function of CIS taking in consideration the particularities of EU led missions. The integration of the EU institutional networks and systems with the national systems provided by the EU member states is considered a key element. The analysis-part of this paper starts with the specific EU command and control system for crises management missions based on two autonomous solutions and one relying on NATO capabilities. Further, it continues with the challenges of the classifi ed information exchange at the operational theatre level. The most important contribution of this article is based on the long term vision implementation measures for the CIS structure, roles, functions and services provided and the information management infrastructure. CIS deployment mechanisms are described with references to the practical situation of the CIS deployed in support of crises management operations and missions. Two important defi nitions are provided regarding the CIS for crisis management and their roles in the specific EU operational environment. The system view of the operational CIS is depicted and analysed also, with a focus on the integration aspects of the infrastructure as the information transport layer for the information exchange flow. The last part of the article focuses on the CIS functions for the deployed systems which are detailed alongside with the C2 and Information Exchange Requirements in the EU operational environment. The variety of the theoretical approaches to determine the CIS infrastructure for EU-led civilian and military missions triggers the conclusion that the planning and implementation process is extremely complex especially in the context of the new security environment and requires

  10. Designing healthcare information technology to catalyse change in clinical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Lester

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The gap between best practice and actual patient care continues to be a pervasive problem in our healthcare system. Efforts to improve on this knowledge_performance gap have included computerised disease management programs designed to improve guideline adherence. However, current computerised reminder and decision support interventions directed at changing physician behaviour have had only a limited and variable effect on clinical outcomes. Further, immediate pay-for-performance financial pressures on institutions have created an environmentwhere disease management systems are often created under duress, appended to existing clinical systems and poorly integrated into the existing workflow, potentially limiting their realworld effectiveness. The authors present a review of disease management as well as a conceptual framework to guide the development of more effective health information technology (HIT tools for translating clinical information into clinical action.

  11. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities around the country have, over the years, become contaminated with radionuclides and a range of organic and inorganic wastes. Many of the DOE sites encompass large land areas and were originally sited in relatively unpopulated regions of the country to minimize risk to surrounding populations. In addition, wastes were sometimes stored underground at the sites in 55-gallon drums, wood boxes or other containers until final disposal methods could be determined. Over the years, these containers have deteriorated, releasing contaminants into the surrounding environment. This contamination has spread, in some cases polluting extensive areas. Remediation of these sites requires extensive sampling to determine the extent of the contamination, to monitor clean-up and remediation progress, and for post-closure monitoring of facilities. The DOE would benefit greatly if it had reliable, road transportable, fully independent laboratory systems that could perform on-site the full range of analyses required. Such systems would accelerate and thereby reduce the cost of clean-up and remediation efforts by (1) providing critical analytical data more rapidly, and (2) eliminating the handling, shipping and manpower associated with sample shipments. The goal of the Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) Project is the development and demonstration of a system to meet the unique needs of the DOE for rapid, accurate analysis of a wide variety of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface waters. This laboratory system has been designed to provide the field and laboratory analytical equipment necessary to detect and quantify radionuclides, organics, heavy metals and other inorganic compounds. The laboratory system consists of a set of individual laboratory modules deployable independently or as an interconnected group to meet each DOE site's specific needs

  12. CMDS System Integration and IAMD End-to-End Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Cruise Missile Defense Systems (CMDS) Project Office is establishing a secure System Integration Laboratory at the AMRDEC. This lab will contain tactical Signal...

  13. Radiation information and informed consent for clinical trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caon, Martin [School of Nursing and Midwifery, Flinders University, Adelaide (Australia)], E-mail: martin.caon@flinders.edu.au

    2008-09-01

    Examples of the statements about the radiation from medical imaging in the information for participants provided to the Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC) for approval are presented and discussed. There is considerable scope for improvement in the information about radiation that is presented to potential participants in clinical trials. Many radiation statements seem only intended to allay fear and anxiety about radiation rather than providing accurate information. This situation cannot be said to be conducive to allowing the participant to give informed consent to their involvement in a clinical trial in which ionising radiation is used. As many clinical trials are international and conducted at many sites (sometimes over 100), we would expect the same statements to have been seen by members of HRECs in many countries. Few HRECs include a member who is an expert in radiation. Hence, to ensure that the information is sound, those sections of the participant information that refer to radiation should be written or reviewed by a specialist in radiation protection such as a medical physicist, a health physicist or a radiation safety officer. (opinion)

  14. Online information retrieval systems and health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lialiou, Pascalina; Mantas, John

    2014-01-01

    The following paper presents a scientific contribution that explores the clinicians' use of online information retrieval systems for their clinical decision making. Particularly, the research focuses on the ability of doctors and nurses in seeking information through MEDLINE and ScienceDirect. The research process took place by an electronic form consisted of five clinical scenarios and an evaluation sheet. The results testify that only a small percent of clinicians use the recommended electronic bibliographic databasesand take the right clinical decision to the scenarios. Health professionals have to be educated in information searching and take advantage from the provided literature taking more useful and reliable answers on their clinical questions.

  15. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of women with uterine leiomiyoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür ÖZKUL

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare clinical and laboratory findings of women with or without uterine leiomyoma.Study group consisted of 82 women with uterine leiomyoma and the control group comprised 42 healthy women. Women’s age, gravity, parity, blood groups, pattern of menstrual cycles, complaints at presentation, fertility, ultrasonographical findings, surgical operations and thyroid function tests were evaluated.There were no significant differences in blood group distribution, gravity, parity and thyroid function test results between the patients and the control subjects (P>0.05. A significant difference was found in the complaints at presentation between two groups (P<0.001. Mentrual cycles irregularity was more frequently found in the patients compared with the controls (57.3% vs. 42.9%, respectively, P=0.009. Although no infertile woman was found in the control group, 8.5% of patients were found to have infertility. The sensitivity of ultrasonography was found to be 97.6%. Except for the existence of higher infertility rate and the menstrual cycles irregularities, no significant difference was found in the clinical and laboratory findings between women with or without uterine leiomyoma. Therefore, physical examination and imaging methods are remained as the most important diagnostic tools for uterine leiomyoma.

  16. [Issues Associated with the Management of Clinical Laboratories and Their Future: What is the Problem in Our Laboratory?--Chairmen's Introductory Remarks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikane, Keita; Kaku, Mitsuo

    2015-03-01

    The management of clinical laboratories in hospitals has to be changed in accordance with the trends in the healthcare-providing system. In this symposium, six presenters talked about various issues associated with their laboratories. The issues raised included conflict between specialty and generality, phlebotomy as a duty of laboratory technologists, management of the phlebotomy section, imbalance of numbers between retirees and newcomers, and cooperation with the division of clinical research. Presenters, chairmen, and the audience were able to understand that we are now facing these issues, and we could identify some of their solutions. PMID:26524864

  17. 42 CFR 405.515 - Reimbursement for clinical laboratory services billed by physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reimbursement for clinical laboratory services... Criteria for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.515 Reimbursement for clinical laboratory services billed... limitation on reimbursement for markups on clinical laboratory services billed by physicians. If a...

  18. An Effective Model for a Comprehensive Performance Measurement of Clinical and Research Laboratory Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazinoory S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bachground and objectives: Improvement of the effectiveness of services isone of the most important strategies in many clinical and research laboratorycenters. The increased client satisfaction (researchers or patients, resourcedevelopment innovation, efficacy, continuity of services and income are alsothe important strategies of these centers. For achieving these strategies, wecombined the qualitative and the quantitative approaches to evaluate theeffective model based on frameworks of the Balance Scorecard (BSC and theLaboratory Quality Management Systems (LQMS.Material and Methods: This paper describes the basic steps required fordesigning and developing of a model for performance measurement inlaboratory centers. For model validation, the relationship between the criteria,the strategies and the strategic objectives was evaluated using both the AHPmethod and the evaluation by the experts.Results: Implementation of the above mentioned model, conducted in one ofthe largest Laboratory centers, has resulted in a remarkable enhancement inthe efficiency (22%, profit (33%, level of quality of service (27% and inthe clients’ satisfaction (4%.Conclusion: This research model is a valuable tool for effective evaluationand continuous improvement of the clinical and research laboratory centers.Applying this model leads to increased resource productivity as well as theclients and community satisfaction from the laboratories services.Key words: Laboratory Centers, Performance Management, BalanceScorecard (BSC, Laboratory Quality Management Systems (LQMS

  19. NCIS - a Nuclear Criticality Information System (overview)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS) is being established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in order to serve personnel responsible for safe storage, transport, and handling of fissile materials and those concerned with the evaluation and analysis of nuclear, critical experiments. Public concern for nuclear safety provides the incentive for improved access to nuclear safety information

  20. Insect Barcode Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratheepa, Maria; Jalali, Sushil Kumar; Arokiaraj, Robinson Silvester; Venkatesan, Thiruvengadam; Nagesh, Mandadi; Panda, Madhusmita; Pattar, Sharath

    2014-01-01

    Insect Barcode Information System called as Insect Barcode Informática (IBIn) is an online database resource developed by the National Bureau of Agriculturally Important Insects, Bangalore. This database provides acquisition, storage, analysis and publication of DNA barcode records of agriculturally important insects, for researchers specifically in India and other countries. It bridges a gap in bioinformatics by integrating molecular, morphological and distribution details of agriculturally important insects. IBIn was developed using PHP/My SQL by using relational database management concept. This database is based on the client– server architecture, where many clients can access data simultaneously. IBIn is freely available on-line and is user-friendly. IBIn allows the registered users to input new information, search and view information related to DNA barcode of agriculturally important insects.This paper provides a current status of insect barcode in India and brief introduction about the database IBIn. Availability http://www.nabg-nbaii.res.in/barcode PMID:24616562

  1. Pharmacology Information System Ready

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the development and future of Prophet,'' a specialized information handling system for pharmacology research. It is designed to facilitate the acquisition and dissemination of knowledge about mechanisms of drug action, and it is hoped that it will aid in converting pharmacology research from an empirical to a predictive science. (JR)

  2. Integrated healthcare information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J

    1995-01-01

    When it comes to electronic data processing in healthcare, we offer a guarded, but hopeful, prognosis. To be sure, the age of electronic information processing has hit healthcare. Employers, insurance companies, hospitals, physicians and a host of ancillary service providers are all being ushered into a world of high speed, high tech electronic information. Some are even predicting that the health information business will grow from $20 billion to over $100 billion in a decade. Yet, out industry lags behind other industries in its overall movement to the paperless world. Selecting and installing the most advanced integrated information system isn't a simple task, as we've seen. As in life, compromises can produce less than optimal results. Nevertheless, integrated healthcare systems simply won't achieve their goals without systems designed to support the operation of a continuum of services. That's the reality! It is difficult to read about the wonderful advances in other sectors, while realizing that many trees still fall each year in the name of the health care industry. Yes, there are some outstanding examples of organizations pushing the envelop in a variety of areas. Yet from a very practical standpoint, many (like our physician's office) are still struggling or are on the sidelines wondering what to do. Given the competitive marketplace, organizations without effective systems may not have long to wonder and wait.

  3. Embedded ubiquitous services on hospital information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Suenaga, Takatoshi; Masuda, Yasushi; Yasumuro, Yoshihiro; Hori, Kenta; Ohboshi, Naoki; Takemura, Tadamasa; Chihara, Kunihiro; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki

    2012-11-01

    A Hospital Information Systems (HIS) have turned a hospital into a gigantic computer with huge computational power, huge storage and wired/wireless local area network. On the other hand, a modern medical device, such as echograph, is a computer system with several functional units connected by an internal network named a bus. Therefore, we can embed such a medical device into the HIS by simply replacing the bus with the local area network. This paper designed and developed two embedded systems, a ubiquitous echograph system and a networked digital camera. Evaluations of the developed systems clearly show that the proposed approach, embedding existing clinical systems into HIS, drastically changes productivity in the clinical field. Once a clinical system becomes a pluggable unit for a gigantic computer system, HIS, the combination of multiple embedded systems with application software designed under deep consideration about clinical processes may lead to the emergence of disruptive innovation in the clinical field. PMID:22855229

  4. Glycogen storage disease type I: clinical and laboratory profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berenice L. Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To characterize the clinical, laboratory, and anthropometric profile of a sample of Brazilian patients with glycogen storage disease type I managed at an outpatient referral clinic for inborn errors of metabolism. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional outpatient study based on a convenience sampling strategy. Data on diagnosis, management, anthropometric parameters, and follow-up were assessed. RESULTS: Twenty-one patients were included (median age 10 years, range 1-25 years, all using uncooked cornstarch therapy. Median age at diagnosis was 7 months (range, 1-132 months, and 19 patients underwent liver biopsy for diagnostic confirmation. Overweight, short stature, hepatomegaly, and liver nodules were present in 16 of 21, four of 21, nine of 14, and three of 14 patients, respectively. A correlation was found between height-for-age and BMI-for-age Z-scores (r = 0.561; p = 0.008. CONCLUSIONS: Diagnosis of glycogen storage disease type I is delayed in Brazil. Most patients undergo liver biopsy for diagnostic confirmation, even though the combination of a characteristic clinical presentation and molecular methods can provide a definitive diagnosis in a less invasive manner. Obesity is a side effect of cornstarch therapy, and appears to be associated with growth in these patients.

  5. Autoimmune thyroiditis goitrogenic. Aspects of clinical and laboratorial diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To asses the accuracy achieved by the A.C.A.T. and other clinical and laboratorial criterion in the diagnoses of T.A.I.B. we investigated twenty patients with goiter and antimicrossomal antibodies titres of 1/1.600 or more. Analysing the parameters useful in the diagnosis, we found a significant correlation between the antimicrossomal antibodies titres and the basal TSH concentration, an elevated basal TSH and an exaggerated response to TRH independent of the patient clinical status reflecting in the majority of the cases a state of subclinical hypotyroidism; an irregular appearance of the radioisotope thyroid scan and a positive response to a perchlorate discharge test. We conclude that from the parameters useful in the T.A.I.B. diagnosis, the A.C.A.T. detection mainly the antimicrossomal antibodies, is an excellent tool to detect patients with a clinical suspect of thyroid auto-immune disease and when we found high tires in a patient with goiter and an elevated basal TSH concentration we can suggest T.A.I.B. diagnosis. (author)

  6. Concepts for the third generation of laboratory systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, G E

    1998-12-01

    This paper briefly describes the history of laboratory systems and discusses some of the recent concepts. The third generation of laboratory systems, which appeared around 1990, encompasses most of the pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical procedural steps of the laboratory workflow, thus eliminating much of the so-called "3 D tasks" (dull, dirty, dangerous). These automation systems enable humans to focus on work of higher value such as result validation or development of tests in emerging areas. The new development started in Japan in 1981 and reached the Western hemisphere around 1995. Currently there are between 800 and 900 installations world-wide that meet the above criteria. The majority of them automate hematology, whereas systems that automate more complex areas such as clinical chemistry, immunochemistry, coagulation and urinalysis, represent only about one third. More than 60% of the world-wide system base has been installed in Japan. Future growth in the West and high market saturation in Japan are likely to decrease this percentage during the next few years. The two key concepts of third generation systems are "consolidation" and "integration". The following definitions are suggested: * Consolidation: Combining different analytical technologies or strategies on one instrument or on one group of connected instruments. * Integration: Linking analytical instruments or groups of instruments with pre- and post-analytical devices. Examples for the technical realization of both concepts and practical aspects of how to apply them in an individual laboratory are given. Components, which are specifically new in the context of laboratory automation, are conveyor belts, stationary and floor-running robots, and software for process control. The most attractive options to be considered when automating a laboratory are primary tube sorting and the use of secondary samples to increase speed and to avoid sample carryover. Other applications include automatic

  7. Computing handbook information systems and information technology

    CERN Document Server

    Topi, Heikki

    2014-01-01

    Disciplinary Foundations and Global ImpactEvolving Discipline of Information Systems Heikki TopiDiscipline of Information Technology Barry M. Lunt and Han ReichgeltInformation Systems as a Practical Discipline Juhani IivariInformation Technology Han Reichgelt, Joseph J. Ekstrom, Art Gowan, and Barry M. LuntSociotechnical Approaches to the Study of Information Systems Steve Sawyer and Mohammad Hossein JarrahiIT and Global Development Erkki SutinenUsing ICT for Development, Societal Transformation, and Beyond Sherif KamelTechnical Foundations of Data and Database ManagementData Models Avi Silber

  8. An Evaluation of the Rates of Repeat Notifiable Disease Reporting and Patient Crossover Using a Health Information Exchange-based Automated Electronic Laboratory Reporting System

    OpenAIRE

    Gichoya, Judy; Gamache, Roland E.; Vreeman, Daniel J.; Dixon, Brian E.; Finnell, John T.; Grannis, Shaun

    2012-01-01

    Patients move across healthcare organizations and utilize services with great frequency and variety. This fact impacts both health information technology policy and patient care. To understand the challenges faced when developing strategies for effective health information exchange, it is important to understand patterns of patient movement and utilization for many healthcare contexts, including managing public-health notifiable conditions. We studied over 10 years of public-health notifiable...

  9. Current practices and challenges in the standardization and harmonization of clinical laboratory tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesper, Hubert W; Myers, Gary L; Miller, W Greg

    2016-09-01

    Effective patient care, clinical research, and public health efforts require comparability of laboratory results independent of time, place, and measurement procedure. Comparability is achieved by establishing metrological traceability, which ensures that measurement procedures measure the same quantity and that the calibration of measurement procedures is traceable to a common reference system consisting of reference methods and materials. Whereas standardization ensures traceability to the International System of Units, harmonization ensures traceability to a reference system agreed on by convention. This article provides an overview of standardization and harmonization with an emphasis on commutability as an important variable that affects testing accuracy. Commutability of reference materials is required to ensure that traceability is established appropriately and that laboratory results are comparable. The use of noncommutable reference materials leads to inaccurate results. Whereas procedures and protocols for standardizing measurements are established and have been successfully applied in efforts such as the Hormones Standardization Program of the CDC, harmonization activities require new, more complex procedures and approaches. The American Association for Clinical Chemistry, together with its domestic and international partners, formed the International Consortium for Harmonization of Clinical Laboratory Results to coordinate harmonization efforts. Reference systems, as well as procedures and protocols to establish traceability of clinical laboratory tests, have been established and continue to be developed by national and international groups and organizations. Serum tests of thyroid function, including those for the thyroid hormones thyroxine and triiodothyronine, are among the clinical procedures for which standardization efforts are well under way. Approaches to the harmonization of measurement procedures for serum concentrations of thyroid

  10. Symposium on Geographic Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felleman, John, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Six papers on geographic information systems cover the future of geographic information systems, land information systems modernization in Wisconsin, the Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing (TIGER) System of the U.S. Bureau of the Census, satellite remote sensing, geographic information systems and sustainable development,…

  11. Virtualization Technologies in Information Systems Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunsford, Dale L.

    2009-01-01

    Information systems educators must balance the need to protect the stability, availability, and security of computer laboratories with the learning objectives of various courses. In advanced courses where students need to install, configure, and otherwise manipulate application and operating system settings, this is especially problematic as these…

  12. Evaluation of clinical and laboratory correlates of sickle leg ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madu, Anazoeze Jude; Ubesie, Agozie; Madu, Kenechi Anthony; Okwor, Bismarck; Anigbo, Chukwudi

    2013-01-01

    The exact mechanism for the occurrence of sickle leg ulcers (SLUs) has not been fully explained, although, popular opinion supports a multifactorial etio-pathogenetic process. Leg ulceration in sickle cell is a chronic and debilitating condition which is difficult to treat and may worsen the psychosocial impact of this illness. This study aims to evaluate the laboratory and clinical correlates of SLUs. One hundred sixty-seven patients who had been diagnosed with sickle cell anemia (homozygous S) had their steady-state hemoglobin concentration (Hb), hematocrit, white cell count, platelet count, serum bilirubin, and aspartate transaminase (AST) as well as frequency of crisis per annum evaluated with respect to their relationship to the occurrence of leg ulcers. They were aged 6-53 years (mean age 24.3 years), and prevalence of leg ulcer was found to be 2.75 per 1000 (2.54 per 1000 in females and 2.83 per 1000 in males). The independent sample t-test showed a significant difference in the serum AST levels in those with SLU (p = 0.029), though a positive correlation did not exist. Other predictors of disease severity found to have positive relationship with each other were the AST and total serum bilirubin 0.207 (p = 0.012); Hb and age 0.130 (p = 0.035); Hb and white cell count -0.159 (p = 0.010), white cell count and age -0.113 (p = 0.018). SLUs do not occur in patients with severe disease in sickle cell. The clinical and laboratory indicators of severe sickle cell disease do not correlate positively with the occurrence of SLU. Serum AST may have a relationship with leg ulceration in these patients. Environmental factors most likely play a major part in the etiopathogenesis of leg ulcer and this may require further studies in different sociocultural settings.

  13. Customer Satisfaction Survey With Clinical Laboratory and Phlebotomy Services at a Tertiary Care Unit Level

    OpenAIRE

    Koh, Young Rae; Kim, Shine Young; Kim, In Suk; Chang, Chulhun L.; Lee, Eun Yup; Son, Han Chul; Kim, Hyung Hoi

    2014-01-01

    We performed customer satisfaction surveys for physicians and nurses regarding clinical laboratory services, and for outpatients who used phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level to evaluate our clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. Thus, we wish to share our experiences with the customer satisfaction survey for clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. Board members of our laboratory designed a study procedure and study population, and developed two types of questionnaire....

  14. Study on the environmental perception in clinical laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Marques Júnior

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This study objectified to investigate the environmental perception of the technician of clinical analyses laboratories, in the city of the Natal, state of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, focusing the environmental aspects and impacts, the strategical importance of the environment management for the activity, as well as the knowledge of norms and applied ambient resolutions to the sector. A research was carried through type survey, exploratory and descriptive using a questionnaire, applied in 82 laboratories getting a return tax of 53.65%. The results of the descriptive analyses and statistical point with respect to environmental conscience of the interviewed, therefore the majority (75% described the activities of the sector as of great impact on the environment, however with little knowledge on ISO 14001 and practical of ambient protection in the sector of public health. It is concluded that a program of environmental qualification for the sector becomes necessary, in order to improve the knowledge of the professionals of the area and mitigation of risks.

  15. Appropriation of Information Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Annemette Leonhardt; Jensen, Tina Blegind

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores the use of cognitive mapping for eliciting users' sensemaking during information system (IS) appropriation. Despite the potential usefulness of sensemaking, few studies in IS research use it as a theoretical lens to address IS appropriation. A possible reason for this may...... be that sensemaking does not easily lend itself to be used in practice. We introduce cognitive mapping as a way to elicit users' sensemaking and illustrate its value by reporting on findings from an empirical study of the introduction of an Electronic Patient Record (EPR) system. The contribution of the paper...

  16. The frequency of clinical and laboratory findings of hypernatremia and factors affecting its severity in term newborns

    OpenAIRE

    Hajieh Borna; Shiva Rafati; Fathemeh Haj Ebrahim Tehrani

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypernatremic dehydration in neonate is a serious potentially life treating can damage the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical and laboratory signs of hypernatremic dehydration in term infant. Methods: A cross sectional study was performed from April 2010 to March 2012 in 111 neonates with sodium>145 mmol/l who were admitted at the Mostafa Khomeini and Hazrat Zainab Hospitals in Tehran, Iran. The incidence of clinical and laboratory findi...

  17. Applying Digitalization to Total Quality Control of Clinical Laboratory Examination Works:Measures and Performance%检验工作全程质量控制数字化建设与作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁进亚; 黄前川; 曹军皓

    2014-01-01

    With widely application and further development of the laboratory information system , and its connection with hospital information system completely , the clinical laboratory examination work has achieved digi-talization of total quality control , refined management of instrument and reagent , normalized interactive communica-tion between laboratory and clinical , which promoted the continuous improvement of the laboratory examination work.%医院检验科信息系统的广泛应用、深层开发及与医院信息系统的“无缝”联接,逐步使检验工作全过程的质量控制数字化、科室的仪器设备和试剂管理精细化、与临床交流互动常态化,从而推进检验工作的持续改进。

  18. HSI Prototypes for Human Systems Simulation Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes in detail the design and features of three Human System Interface (HSI) prototypes developed by the Institutt for Energiteknikk (IFE) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program under Contract 128420 through Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The prototypes are implemented for the Generic Pressurized Water Reactor simulator and installed in the Human Systems Simulation Laboratory at INL. The three prototypes are: 1) Power Ramp display 2) RCS Heat-up and Cool-down display 3) Estimated time to limit display The power ramp display and the RCS heat-up/cool-down display are designed to provide good visual indications to the operators on how well they are performing their task compared to their target ramp/heat-up/cool-down rate. The estimated time to limit display is designed to help operators restore levels or pressures before automatic or required manual actions are activated.

  19. HSI Prototypes for Human Systems Simulation Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokstad, Håkon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McDonald, Rob [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report describes in detail the design and features of three Human System Interface (HSI) prototypes developed by the Institutt for Energiteknikk (IFE) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program under Contract 128420 through Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The prototypes are implemented for the Generic Pressurized Water Reactor simulator and installed in the Human Systems Simulation Laboratory at INL. The three prototypes are: 1) Power Ramp display 2) RCS Heat-up and Cool-down display 3) Estimated time to limit display The power ramp display and the RCS heat-up/cool-down display are designed to provide good visual indications to the operators on how well they are performing their task compared to their target ramp/heat-up/cool-down rate. The estimated time to limit display is designed to help operators restore levels or pressures before automatic or required manual actions are activated.

  20. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of children with Kawasaki disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Akın

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we aimed to evaluate clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients with Kawasaki disease (KD in Konya region of Turkey. Methods: The hospital records of patients who were hospitalized with the diagnosis of KD in the Pediatrics Clinics of Konya Training and Research Hospital between May 2010 and June 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. Results: Seven cases were found to have the diagnosis of KD, two of whom were incomplete KD. Oropharynx changes were the most common (100% feature in our patients. Five (71% patients had bulbar conjunctivitis. Three (43% patients had erythema at the site of BCG inoculation. Adenopathy was present in all of our patients with the classical form. A desquamation was observed in one case at the seventh day of fever. No cardiac manifestation was seen. Elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate and thrombocytosis were present in all patients. All of the patients were received intravenous immunoglobulin in the first ten days of the fever. Conclusion: KD should be considered as a possible diagnosis in any child presenting with prolonged fever. BCG reaction can be attributed as a diagnostic criterion for incomplete form of the disease especially in countries where BCG vaccination is routinely performed. Early treatment is essential to prevent cardiovascular complications.

  1. Clinical and laboratory diagnosis of dengue fever in travelers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Khokhlova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the analysis of clinical and laboratory symptoms in 35 adult patients with denger fever, Novosibirsk residents, which travelled in endemic countries, mostly Tailand. The classic form of the disease was determined in all cases. The moderate form was in 71,5% patients, the severe form was in the rest ones. The diagnosis of dengue was verified by detection of specific immunoglobulin M and in some cases immunoglobulin G and also virus dengue NS1 antigen by immunochromatography. The dominant clinical symptoms in observed patients were fever for 3–8 days (100%, mostly high one (71,4%, asthenia (97,1%, anorexia (100%, myalgia or/and arthralgia (77,1%, exantema (60%, hepatomegaly (62,8%. The gematologic indicators were represented with thrombocytopenia in 91,4% patients (from 167 to 20×109/l и leucopenia in 85,7% patients (from 3,9 to 1,1×109/l. The cytolitic syndrom was revealed in 80% patients with predominance of aspartate aminotransferase activity in early period of the disease. 

  2. Acute Viral Hepatitis A – Clinical, Laboratory and Epidemiological Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda HORVAT

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Infection with hepatitis A virus is still one of the most common causes of hepatitis worldwide. The clinical manifestation of acute hepatitis A (AHA in adults can vary greatly, ranging from asymptomatic infection to severe and fulminant hepatitis. The aim of this study was to describe the demographic, clinical characteristics, laboratory features and hospital outcome of adult patients with AHA over a consecutive period of 4 years within an area from Eastern European country. Methods: Two hundred and two adult patients diagnosed with AHA were retrospective, observational and analytic analized over a period of 4 years. Based on prothrombin time less than 50, the study group was stratified in medium (79.2% and severe forms (20.8%. We investigated the clinical, laboratory and epidemiological features. Statistical analysis were applied to compare the medium and severe forms of AHA. Results: Most patients (72.7% were younger than 40 years. The main symptoms included: dyspepsia (72.07%, jaundice (86.63%, asteno-adynamia (86.72%, and flu-like symptoms (53.46%. The hemorrhagic cutaneous-mucous manifestations (6.93% associated with the severe forms of AHA (OR =12.19, 95%CI -3.59 - 41.3, p =0.001. We found statistically significant differences for PT (p <0.001, INR (p <0.001, TQ (p <0.001, ALAT (p <0.001, ASAT (p <0.001, ALP (p <0.001 and platelets (p =0.009 between severe and medium AHA forms. We found that TQ, INR, ALAT and ASAT have the highest diagnostic values, statistically significant (p <0.05 for severe AHA forms with AUC (0.99, 0.99, 0.72, 0.70 at values of sensitivity (95%, 90.5%, 89%, 95% and specificity (98%, 99%, 88%,94%. Conclusions Medium severity AHA forms were found in most of the study group patients (79.2%. The severe AHA forms were associated with hemorrhagic cutaneous-mucous manifestations (OR =12.19, p =0.001. The univariate analysis proved a negatively statistically significant correlation between IP and ALAT

  3. An approach to 'dynamic--DDD (defined daily dose) monitoring' to reduce adverse clinical outcomes and increase patient safety: information repositories and event triggers in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eryilmaz, Esat N

    2011-01-01

    The goal of every effort and actions/interventions in almost all healthcare settings throughout the world's health systems -primary care, inpatient, outpatient encounters, diagnostic and therapeutic interventions, peri-operative settings- is and has been to achieve a well defined outcome (a kind of improvement in health status of the patient under consideration, an observable and significant change(s) in selected set(s) of clinical parameters confirmed by laboratory results and pathology findings, improvements in clinical outcomes). Clinical inefficiencies, in this context, should be addressed very systematically and scientifically. This is achieved through a continuously monitoring approach to adverse drug events based on information repositories and evidence-based rule sets. For monitoring drug-related outcomes and clinical outcomes in general, the concept of DDD (Defined Daily Dose) compliance is explained in this article to eliminate and avoid adverse clinical outcomes.

  4. Organizational performance and regulatory compliance as measured by clinical pertinence indicators before and after implementation of Anesthesia Information Management System (AIMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Clark K; Saberito, Darlene; Tyagaraj, Changa; Tyagaraj, Kalpana

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that electronic medical records (EMR) can lead to a greater reduction of medical errors and better adherence to regulatory compliance than paper medical records (PMR). In order to assess the organizational performance and regulatory compliance, we tracked different clinical pertinence indicators (CPI) in our anesthesia information management system (AIMS) for 5 years. These indicators comprised of the protocols from the Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP), elements of performance (EP) from The Joint Commission (TJC), and guidelines from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). A comprehensive AIMS was initiated and the CPI were collected from October 5, 2009 to December 31, 2010 (EMR period) and from January 1, 2006 to October 4, 2009 (PMR period). Fourteen CPI were found to be common between the EMR and PMR periods. Based on the statistical analysis of the 14 common CPI, there was a significant increase (p < 0.001) in overall compliance after the introduction of EMR compared to the PMR period. The increase in overall compliance was significantly progressive (p = 0.013) from year to year over 2006 and 2010. Of the 14 CPI, Documentation of a) medication doses, and b) monitoring of postoperative physiological status, mental status, and pain scores showed significant improvement (p < 0.001) during the EMR period compared to the PMR period. PMID:24424430

  5. Organizational performance and regulatory compliance as measured by clinical pertinence indicators before and after implementation of Anesthesia Information Management System (AIMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Clark K; Saberito, Darlene; Tyagaraj, Changa; Tyagaraj, Kalpana

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that electronic medical records (EMR) can lead to a greater reduction of medical errors and better adherence to regulatory compliance than paper medical records (PMR). In order to assess the organizational performance and regulatory compliance, we tracked different clinical pertinence indicators (CPI) in our anesthesia information management system (AIMS) for 5 years. These indicators comprised of the protocols from the Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP), elements of performance (EP) from The Joint Commission (TJC), and guidelines from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). A comprehensive AIMS was initiated and the CPI were collected from October 5, 2009 to December 31, 2010 (EMR period) and from January 1, 2006 to October 4, 2009 (PMR period). Fourteen CPI were found to be common between the EMR and PMR periods. Based on the statistical analysis of the 14 common CPI, there was a significant increase (p < 0.001) in overall compliance after the introduction of EMR compared to the PMR period. The increase in overall compliance was significantly progressive (p = 0.013) from year to year over 2006 and 2010. Of the 14 CPI, Documentation of a) medication doses, and b) monitoring of postoperative physiological status, mental status, and pain scores showed significant improvement (p < 0.001) during the EMR period compared to the PMR period.

  6. INFORMATION SYSTEM SECURITY THREATS CLASSIFICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Sandro Gerić; Željko Hutinski

    2007-01-01

    Information systems are exposed to different types of security risks. Theconsequences of information systems security (ISS) breaches can vary from e.g. damaging the data base integrity to physical "destruction" of entire information system facilities, and can result with minor disruptions in less important segments of information systems, or with significant interruptions in information systems functionality. The sources of security risks are different, and can origin from inside or outside o...

  7. 42 CFR 493.1415 - Condition: Laboratories performing moderate complexity testing; clinical consultant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... laboratory must have a clinical consultant who meets the qualification requirements of § 493.1417 of this... complexity testing; clinical consultant. 493.1415 Section 493.1415 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS Personnel for Nonwaived Testing Laboratories Performing Moderate Complexity...

  8. Distinguishing Informational Cascades from Herd Behavior in the Laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    Bogaçhan Çelen; Shachar Kariv

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports an experimental test of how individuals learn from the behavior of others. By using techniques only available in the laboratory, we elicit subjects' beliefs. This allows us to distinguish informational cascades from herd behavior. By adding a setup with continuous signal and discrete action, we enrich the ball-andurn observational learning experiments paradigm of Lisa R. Anderson and Charles Holt (1997). We attempt to understand subjects' behavior by estimating a model that...

  9. Planning for information systems

    CERN Document Server

    King, William R

    2015-01-01

    Edited by one of the best-known and most widely respected figures in the field, ""Planning for Information Systems"" is a comprehensive, single source overview of the myriad ideas and processes that are identified with IS planning. While many chapters deal with high level strategic planning, the book gives equal attention to on-the-ground planning issues.Part I, 'Key Concepts of IS Planning', focuses on how IS planning has evolved over the years; business-IS strategic alignment; and the role of dynamic organizational capabilities in leveraging IS competencies. Part II, 'The Organizational IS P

  10. Audit for Information Systems Security

    OpenAIRE

    Ana-Maria SUDUC; Mihai BIZOI; Florin Gheorghe FILIP

    2010-01-01

    The information and communication technologies advances made available enormous and vast amounts of information. This availability generates also significant risks to computer systems, information and to the critical operations and infrastructures they support. In spite of significant advances in the information security area many information systems are still vulnerable to inside or outside attacks. The existence of an internal audit for information system security increases the probability ...

  11. Semantic Integration of Information Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lisa Guido

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the previous years Information System manage only information inside the company, today a companymay search and manage information of the other companies. In this scenario the problem ofcommunication between Information Systems is of the highest importance. Up to the present moment,several types of integration have been used but all were founded on the agreement (about data to shareand the exchange format between the interested Information Systems. Today, thanks to the newtechnologies, it is possible that an Information System uses data of another Information System without aprevious agreement. The problem is that, often, the Information System may refer to the same data butwith different names. In this paper we present a methodology that, using ontology, and thus the intrinsicsemantic of each data of the Information System, allow to create a global ontology useful to enable asemantic communication between Information Systems.

  12. 76 FR 1212 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-07

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Eligibility of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and... areas of biomedical, behavioral and clinical science research. The panel meeting will be open to...

  13. 76 FR 79273 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Eligibility of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and... biomedical, behavioral, and clinical science research. The panel meeting will be open to the public...

  14. Geographic information system-based source estimation of copper pollution in Lake Itezhi-tezhi and metal-accumulation profiles in Oreochromis spp. from both field and laboratory studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Shouta M M; Ikenaka, Yoshinori; Muzandu, Kaampwe; Choongo, Kennedy; Yabe, John; Muroya, Taro; Ijiri, Shigeho; Minagawa, Masao; Umemura, Takashi; Ishizuka, Mayumi

    2013-01-01

    The Copperbelt region, upstream of the Kafue River, including Lake Itezhi-tezhi (ITT), in Zambia has extensive copper (Cu) mines. In our field study, geographic information system analysis in lake sediment indicated that the northern part of the lake, i.e., the Copperbelt region, could be the source of Cu pollution. Concentrations of Cu in stomach contents between fish species were not significantly different. However, Oreochromis spp. liver showed significantly greater Cu concentrations than those in other fish species. Log liver [Cu], standard length, and nitrogen stable isotope ratio were positively correlated only in Oreochromis spp. In the laboratory study, O. niloticus and O. latipes were exposed to Cu for 4 days, and recovery phases ≤ 28 days were examined. O. niloticus showed significantly greater concentrations of Cu compared with O. latipes at all sampling points. Significantly greater concentrations of Hg in Schilbe intermedius liver than for other fish species were observed, whereas O. macrochir showed significantly greater concentrations of cadmium. In conclusion, the northern part of the lake could be the source of Cu pollution in Lake ITT. Diet may not be the reason for high Cu accumulation in Oreochromis spp. Results from both field and laboratory studies imply that Oreochromis spp. contain high concentrations of Cu under normal physiological conditions. PMID:23052357

  15. Clinical and Laboratory evaluation of measleslike rash in children and young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewien Klaus Eberhard

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A clinical and laboratory evaluation of 11 children and young adults with measleslike rash was done during the measles outbreak in the Greater São Paulo Metropolitan area at the end of 1996 and spread over the country during 1997. Measles was laboratory confirmed in 07 patients by specific IgM detection in acute serum specimens using an IgM-capture EIA, by specific IgG seroconversion in serum pairs, and by reverse transcription PCR and virus isolation in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Clinical presentations were not always classic; one of the 07 cases had received measles vaccine and corresponded to modified clinical case of measles. The 4 remaining cases were negative for measles and were diagnosed as exanthem subitum (2 cases, scarlet fever and Kawasaki disease. The present study reinforces the view that clinical features alone are not sufficient for establishing an accurate diagnosis in the post-vaccine era, and a surveillance system based on sensitive laboratory results is needed so that it can confirm IgM-negative measles cases.

  16. Selection and Implementation of New Information Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Keith J; Rao, Luigi K F

    2016-03-01

    The single most important element to consider when evaluating clinical information systems for a practice is workflow. Workflow can be broadly defined as an orchestrated and repeatable pattern of business activity enabled by the systematic organization of resources into processes that transform materials, provide services, or process information. PMID:26851669

  17. Pesticide Product Information System (PPIS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Pesticide Product Information System contains information concerning all pesticide products registered in the United States. It includes registrant name and...

  18. Labor Agreement Information System (LAIRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — The Labor Agreement Information Retrieval System (LAIRS) is a database containing historical information on labor-management relations in the Federal Government. It...

  19. 重症监护临床信息系统优化的实践及效果%Effect and practice methods of optimized intensive care clinical information system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐晟; 连素娜

    2012-01-01

    重症临床监护信息系统改变传统ICU手工记录、整理各种危重症信息的现状,使ICU工作标准化、流程化和自动化,实现患者信息的自动采集、处理、共享收到了很好的效果,在应用过程中总结出优化的实践方法.%Intensive care clinical information system changed the status of traditional collating information from ICU critical patients by manual save,which made the work of ICU become a standardization process,flow management and automation.The effect of automatic collecting, handling and sharing the information of patients was realized,and the study summarized the practice methods regarding optimized intensive care clinical information system.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of sacroiliitis in early seronegative spondylarthropathy. Abnormalities correlated to clinical and laboratory findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puhakka, K B; Jurik, A G; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit;

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare a new MRI scoring system of the sacroiliac joints (SIJs) in early spondylarthropathy (SpA) with clinical and laboratory parameters. METHODS: Forty-one patients (24 males, 17 females) with a median age of 26 yr and a median duration of inflammatory low back pain of 19 months...... were included. They all fulfilled the ESSG-criteria for SpA. The patients were examined by MRI of the SIJs using a new scoring system. Clinical examinations, biochemical tests, functional score (BASFI), and pain score (BASDAI) were also performed. RESULTS: 95% of the patients had inflammation and....../or destructive bone changes of the SIJs at MRI. No correlation was found between MRI pathology and clinical findings. MRI demonstrated significantly greater severity of both inflammation and destruction of the SIJs in HLA B27 positive patients than in the HLA B27 negative patients. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with...

  1. Microbial contamination of removable prosthodontic appliances from laboratories and impact of clinical storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D W; Chamary, N; Lewis, M A O; Milward, P J; McAndrew, R

    2011-08-01

    Decontamination of dental instruments has recently been the subject of considerable debate. However, little information is available on the potential bacterial colonisation of dental appliances returning from dental laboratories and their need for decontamination. This study investigated the extent and nature of microbial contamination of removable prosthodontic appliances produced at different dental laboratories and stored in two clinical teaching units (CTU 1 and CTU 2) of a dental hospital and school. Forty consecutive dental prosthodontic appliances that were being stored under varying conditions in the two clinical teaching units were selected for study; the appliances having been produced 'in-house' (hospital laboratory) or 'out-of-house' (external commercial laboratory). Two appliances, that were known to have undergone decontamination before storage, were used as controls. Swabs were taken according to a standard protocol and transferred to the microbiological laboratory with bacterial growth expressed as colony forming units (cfu) per cm(2). Microbial sampling yielded growth from 23 (58%) of the 40 appliances studied (CTU 1, n = 22; CTU 2, n = 18), with 38% of these having a high level of contamination (>42,000 cfu/cm(2)). The predominant bacteria isolated were Bacillus spp. (57%), pseudomonads (22%) and staphylococci (13%). Fungi of the genus Candida were detected in 38% of the samples. There was no significant difference in contamination of the appliances in relation to either their place of production or the CTU (p >0.05). However, the level of contamination was significantly higher (p = 0.035) for those appliances stored in plastic bag with fluid (n = 16) compared to those stored on models (n = 19). No growth was recovered from the two appliances that had undergone decontamination before storage. The research showed that appliances received from laboratories are often contaminated and therefore there is a need for routine disinfection of such items

  2. Clinical, demographic, and laboratory characteristics of children with nephrolithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sas, David J; Becton, Lauren J; Tutman, Jeffrey; Lindsay, Laura A; Wahlquist, Amy H

    2016-06-01

    While the incidence of pediatric kidney stones appears to be increasing, little is known about the demographic, clinical, laboratory, imaging, and management variables in this patient population. We sought to describe various characteristics of our stone-forming pediatric population. To that end, we retrospectively reviewed the charts of pediatric patients with nephrolithiasis confirmed by imaging. Data were collected on multiple variables from each patient and analyzed for trends. For body mass index (BMI) controls, data from the general pediatrics population similar to our nephrolithiasis population were used. Data on 155 pediatric nephrolithiasis patients were analyzed. Of the 54 calculi available for analysis, 98 % were calcium based. Low urine volume, elevated supersaturation of calcium phosphate, elevated supersaturation of calcium oxalate, and hypercalciuria were the most commonly identified abnormalities on analysis of 24-h urine collections. Our stone-forming population did not have a higher BMI than our general pediatrics population, making it unlikely that obesity is a risk factor for nephrolithiasis in children. More girls presented with their first stone during adolescence, suggesting a role for reproductive hormones contributing to stone risk, while boys tended to present more commonly at a younger age, though this did not reach statistical significance. These intriguing findings warrant further investigation. PMID:26467033

  3. Information systems support for OR product standardization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faetanini, C

    1994-02-01

    A critical reason why many healthcare institutions cannot effectively standardize OR products is that they cannot access necessary information. An OR information system that manages, tracks and generates documentation on OR inventory is an important answer to implementing change. At least four key areas any information system should address in order to make standardization a reality are 1) clinical preference, 2) supplying a changing case mix, 3) product usage data and 4) vendor performance. OR information systems operate on various hardware platforms. Users have more software choices than ever before, because connectivity issues have been effectively solved through the development of standard electronic transaction sets. PMID:10131895

  4. INFORMATION STREAMS OF LOGISTICAL SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    E. N. Zhivitskaya

    2015-01-01

    The problem of formalisation and practical realisation of information streams of logistical systems, as the basic component of a separate kind of systems the logistical information systems having the features and properties that allows to investigate them by means of methods, applicable to information systems is considered.

  5. Health record systems that meet clinical needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Negrini

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Increased attention has recently been focused on health record systems as a result of accreditation programs, a growing emphasis on patient safety, and the increase in lawsuits involving allegations of malpractice. Health-care professionals frequently express dissatisfaction with the health record systems and complain that the data included are neither informative nor useful for clinical decision making. This article reviews the main objectives of a hospital health record system, with emphasis on its roles in communication and exchange among clinicians, patient safety, and continuity of care, and asks whether current systems have responded to the recent changes in the Italian health-care system.Discussion If health records are to meet the expectations of all health professionals, the overall information need must be carefully analyzed, a common data set must be created, and essential specialist contributions must be defined. Working with health-care professionals, the hospital management should define how clinical information is to be displayed and organized, identify a functionally optimal layout, define the characteristics of ongoing patient assessment in terms of who will be responsible for these activities and how often they will be performed. Internet technology can facilitate data retrieval and meet the general requirements of a paper-based health record system, but it must also ensure focus on clinical information, business continuity, integrity, security, and privacy.Conclusions The current health records system needs to be thoroughly revised to increase its accessibility, streamline the work of health-care professionals who consult it, and render it more useful for clinical decision making—a challenging task that will require the active involvement of the many professional classes involved.

  6. External quality assessment on detection of hepatitis C virus RNA in clinical laboratories of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lu-nan; ZHANG Rui; SHEN Zi-yu; CHEN Wen-xiang; LI Jin-ming

    2008-01-01

    Background As with many studies carried out in European countries, a quality assurance program has been established by the National Center for Clinical Laboratories in China (NCCL). The results showed that the external quality assessment significantly improves laboratory performance for quantitative evaluation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA.Methods Serum panels were delivered twice annuatly to the clinical laboratories which performed HCV RNA detection in China. Each panel made up of 5 coded samples. All laboratories were requested to carry out the detection within the required time period and report on testing results which contained qualitative and/or quantitative test findings, reagents used and relevant information about apparatus. All the positive samples were calibrated against the first International Standard for HCV RNA in a collaborative study and the range of comparison target value (TG) designated as ±0.5 log.Results The numbers of laboratories reporting on qualitative testing results for the first and second time external quality assessment were 168 and 167 in the year of 2003 and increased to 209 and 233 in 2007; the numbers of laboratories reporting on quantitative testing results were 134 and 147 in 2003 and rose to 340 and 339 in 2007. Deviation between the mean value for quantitative results at home in 2003 and the target value was above 0.5 log, which was comparatively high.By 2007, the target value was close to the national average except for the low concentrated specimens (103 IU/ml). The percentage of results within the range of GM±0.5 log10 varied from 8.2% to 93.5%. Some laboratories had some difficulties in the exact quantification of the lowest (3.00 log IU/ml) as well as of the highest viral levels (6.37 log IU/ml) values, very near to the limits of the dynamic range of the assays.Conclusions The comparison of these results with the previous study confirms that a regular participation in external quality assessment (EQA) assures the

  7. Expert systems in clinical microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstanley, Trevor; Courvalin, Patrice

    2011-07-01

    This review aims to discuss expert systems in general and how they may be used in medicine as a whole and clinical microbiology in particular (with the aid of interpretive reading). It considers rule-based systems, pattern-based systems, and data mining and introduces neural nets. A variety of noncommercial systems is described, and the central role played by the EUCAST is stressed. The need for expert rules in the environment of reset EUCAST breakpoints is also questioned. Commercial automated systems with on-board expert systems are considered, with emphasis being placed on the "big three": Vitek 2, BD Phoenix, and MicroScan. By necessity and in places, the review becomes a general review of automated system performances for the detection of specific resistance mechanisms rather than focusing solely on expert systems. Published performance evaluations of each system are drawn together and commented on critically.

  8. Enterprise Information Systems Outsourcing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pries-Heje, Jan; Svejvig, Per

    2009-01-01

      Outsourcing is now a feasible mean for Enterprise Information Systems (EIS) cost savings, but do however increase the complexity substantially when many organizations are involved. We set out to study EIS outsourcing with many interorganizational partners in a large Scandinavian high......-tech organization SCANDI, trying to answer the question: Why does SCANDI engage in very complex EIS outsourcing arrangements? To answer this question we observed numerous meetings and collected data from interviews in four parts of SCANDI. After transcribing and analyzing our data we found at first just...... the rational cost saving explanation; but then with a more careful analysis focusing on institutional factors, other explanations "behind the curtain" were revealed, such as management consultants with a "best practice" agenda, people promoting outsourcing thereby being promoted themselves, and outside...

  9. Enterprise Information Systems Outsourcing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svejvig, Per; Pries.Heje, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Outsourcing is now a feasible mean for Enterprise Information Systems (EIS) cost savings, but do however increase the complexity substantially when many organizations are involved. We set out to study EIS outsourcing with many interorganizational partners in a large Scandinavian high......-tech organization SCANDI, trying to answer the question: Why does SCANDI engage in very complex EIS outsourcing arrangements? To answer this question we observed numerous meetings and collected data from interviews in four parts of SCANDI. After transcribing and analyzing our data we found at first just...... the rational cost saving explanation; but then with a more careful analysis focusing on institutional factors, other explanations "behind the curtain" were revealed, such as management consultants with a "best practice" agenda, people promoting outsourcing thereby being promoted themselves, and outside...

  10. Audit for Information Systems Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria SUDUC

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The information and communication technologies advances made available enormous and vast amounts of information. This availability generates also significant risks to computer systems, information and to the critical operations and infrastructures they support. In spite of significant advances in the information security area many information systems are still vulnerable to inside or outside attacks. The existence of an internal audit for information system security increases the probability of adopting adequate security measures and preventing these attacks or lowering the negative consequences. The paper presents an exploratory study on informatics audit for information systems security.

  11. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Nonradiological Waste Management Information for 1993 and record to date

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides detailed data and graphics on airborne and liquid effluent releases, fuel oil and coal consumption, water usage, and hazardous and mixed waste generated for calendar year 1993. This report summarizes industrial waste data records compiled since 1971 for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The data presented are from the INEL Nonradiological Waste Management Information System

  12. Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) Data Base Maintenance System (DBAM) user's guide and system description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, P. S.; Card, D.

    1983-01-01

    The Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) Data Base Maintenance System (DBAM) is explained. The various software facilities of the SEL, DBAM operating procedures, and DBAM system information are described. The relationships among DBAM components (baseline diagrams), component descriptions, overlay descriptions, indirect command file listings, file definitions, and sample data collection forms are provided.

  13. Recording information on protein complexes in an information management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitsky, Marc; Diprose, Jonathan M; Morris, Chris; Griffiths, Susanne L; Daniel, Edward; Lin, Bill; Daenke, Susan; Bishop, Benjamin; Siebold, Christian; Wilson, Keith S; Blake, Richard; Stuart, David I; Esnouf, Robert M

    2011-08-01

    The Protein Information Management System (PiMS) is a laboratory information management system (LIMS) designed for use with the production of proteins in a research environment. The software is distributed under the CCP4 licence, and so is available free of charge to academic laboratories. Like most LIMS, the underlying PiMS data model originally had no support for protein-protein complexes. To support the SPINE2-Complexes project the developers have extended PiMS to meet these requirements. The modifications to PiMS, described here, include data model changes, additional protocols, some user interface changes and functionality to detect when an experiment may have formed a complex. Example data are shown for the production of a crystal of a protein complex. Integration with SPINE2-Complexes Target Tracker application is also described. PMID:21605682

  14. Recording information on protein complexes in an information management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitsky, Marc; Diprose, Jonathan M.; Morris, Chris; Griffiths, Susanne L.; Daniel, Edward; Lin, Bill; Daenke, Susan; Bishop, Benjamin; Siebold, Christian; Wilson, Keith S.; Blake, Richard; Stuart, David I.; Esnouf, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    The Protein Information Management System (PiMS) is a laboratory information management system (LIMS) designed for use with the production of proteins in a research environment. The software is distributed under the CCP4 licence, and so is available free of charge to academic laboratories. Like most LIMS, the underlying PiMS data model originally had no support for protein–protein complexes. To support the SPINE2-Complexes project the developers have extended PiMS to meet these requirements. The modifications to PiMS, described here, include data model changes, additional protocols, some user interface changes and functionality to detect when an experiment may have formed a complex. Example data are shown for the production of a crystal of a protein complex. Integration with SPINE2-Complexes Target Tracker application is also described. PMID:21605682

  15. Recording information on protein complexes in an information management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitsky, Marc; Diprose, Jonathan M; Morris, Chris; Griffiths, Susanne L; Daniel, Edward; Lin, Bill; Daenke, Susan; Bishop, Benjamin; Siebold, Christian; Wilson, Keith S; Blake, Richard; Stuart, David I; Esnouf, Robert M

    2011-08-01

    The Protein Information Management System (PiMS) is a laboratory information management system (LIMS) designed for use with the production of proteins in a research environment. The software is distributed under the CCP4 licence, and so is available free of charge to academic laboratories. Like most LIMS, the underlying PiMS data model originally had no support for protein-protein complexes. To support the SPINE2-Complexes project the developers have extended PiMS to meet these requirements. The modifications to PiMS, described here, include data model changes, additional protocols, some user interface changes and functionality to detect when an experiment may have formed a complex. Example data are shown for the production of a crystal of a protein complex. Integration with SPINE2-Complexes Target Tracker application is also described.

  16. Development of a database system and image viewer to assist in the correlation of histopathologic features and digital image analysis with clinical and molecular genetic information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Yukako; Riedlinger, Gregory; Xu, Xun; Nakamura, Akira; Levy, Bruce; Iafrate, A John; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Klepeis, Veronica E

    2016-02-01

    Pathologists are required to integrate data from multiple sources when making a diagnosis. Furthermore, whole slide imaging (WSI) and next generation sequencing will escalate data size and complexity. Development of well-designed databases that can allow efficient navigation between multiple data types is necessary for both clinical and research purposes. We developed and evaluated an interactive, web-based database that integrates clinical, histologic, immunohistochemical and genetic information to aid in pathologic diagnosis and interpretation with nine lung adenocarcinoma cases. To minimize sectioning artifacts, representative blocks were serially sectioned using automated tissue sectioning (Kurabo Industries, Osaka Japan) and selected slides were stained by multiple techniques, (hematoxylin and eosin [H&E], immunohistochemistry [IHC] or fluorescence in situ hybridization [FISH]). Slides were digitized by WSI scanners. An interactive relational database was designed based on a list of proposed fields covering a variety of clinical, pathologic and molecular parameters. By focusing on the three main tasks of 1.) efficient management of textual information, 2.) effective viewing of all varieties of stained whole slide images (WSI), and 3.) assistance in evaluating WSI with computer-aided diagnosis, this database prototype shows great promise for multi-modality research and diagnosis. PMID:26778830

  17. Security Information System Digital Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Tao Kuang; Shanhong Zhu

    2015-01-01

    The study built a simulation model for the study of food security information system relay protection. MATLAB-based simulation technology can support the analysis and design of food security information systems. As an example, the food security information system fault simulation, zero-sequence current protection simulation and transformer differential protection simulation are presented in this study. The case studies show that the simulation of food security information system relay protect...

  18. Application of enterprise information system

    OpenAIRE

    Čamborová, Michaela

    2012-01-01

    APPLICATION OF ENTEPRISE INFORMATION SYSTEM SUMMARY Information systems are used in every profession. From small companies like flower shops to multinational companies like Coca Cola. Information systems are used to help managers make million dollar decisions, to contact clients anywhere around the world, to advertise product and to make accounting and finance operations. The first part of the thesis brings brief introduction of the history and development of information systems. Th...

  19. Reasonable Accommodation Information Tracking System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Reasonable Accommodation Information Tracking System (RAITS) is a case management system that allows the National Reasonable Accommodation Coordinator (NRAC)...

  20. Severe acute respiratory syndrome: clinical and laboratory manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Christopher W K; Chan, Michael H M; Wong, Chun K

    2004-05-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a recently emerged infectious disease with significant morbidity and mortality. An epidemic in 2003 affected 8,098 patients in 29 countries with 774 deaths. The aetiological agent is a new coronavirus spread by droplet transmission. Clinical and general laboratory manifestations included fever, chills, rigor, myalgia, malaise, diarrhoea, cough, dyspnoea, pneumonia, lymphopenia, neutrophilia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase (LD), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and creatine kinase (CK) activities. Treatment has been empirical; initial potent antibiotic cover, followed by simultaneous ribavirin and corticosteroids, with or without pulse high-dose methylprednisolone, have been used. The postulated disease progression comprises (1) active viral infection, (2) hyperactive immune response, and (3) recovery or pulmonary destruction and death. We investigated serum LD isoenzymes and blood lymphocyte subsets of SARS patients, and found LD1 activity as the best biochemical prognostic indicator for death, while CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ and natural killer cell counts were promising predictors for intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Plasma cytokine and chemokine profiles showed markedly elevated Th1 cytokine interferon (IFN)-gamma, inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6 and IL-12, neutrophil chemokine IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and Th1 chemokine IFN-gamma-inducible protein-10 (IP-10) for at least two weeks after disease onset, but there was no significant elevation of inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Corticosteroid reduced IL-8, MCP-1 and IP-10 concentrations from 5-8 days after treatment. Measurement of biochemical markers of bone metabolism demonstrated significant but transient increase in bone resorption from Day 28-44 after onset of fever, when pulse steroid was most frequently given. With tapering down of steroid

  1. Positioning Navigation and Timing System Integration Laboratory (PNT SIL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — ThePositioning Navigation and Timing System Integration Laboratory (PNT SIL)is currently used for a number of PNT system development test and evaluation activities...

  2. Obtaining valid laboratory data in clinical trials conducted in resource diverse settings: lessons learned from a microbicide phase III clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Crucitti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Over the last decade several phase III microbicides trials have been conducted in developing countries. However, laboratories in resource constrained settings do not always have the experience, infrastructure, and the capacity to deliver laboratory data meeting the high standards of clinical trials. This paper describes the design and outcomes of a laboratory quality assurance program which was implemented during a phase III clinical trial evaluating the efficacy of the candidate microbicide Cellulose Sulfate 6% (CS [1]. METHODOLOGY: In order to assess the effectiveness of CS for HIV and STI prevention, a phase III clinical trial was conducted in 5 sites: 3 in Africa and 2 in India. The trial sponsor identified an International Central Reference Laboratory (ICRL, responsible for the design and management of a quality assurance program, which would guarantee the reliability of laboratory data. The ICRL provided advice on the tests, assessed local laboratories, organized trainings, conducted supervision visits, performed re-tests, and prepared control panels. Local laboratories were provided with control panels for HIV rapid tests and Chlamydia trachomatis/Neisseria gonorrhoeae (CT/NG amplification technique. Aliquots from respective control panels were tested by local laboratories and were compared with results obtained at the ICRL. RESULTS: Overall, good results were observed. However, discordances between the ICRL and site laboratories were identified for HIV and CT/NG results. One particular site experienced difficulties with HIV rapid testing shortly after study initiation. At all sites, DNA contamination was identified as a cause of invalid CT/NG results. Both problems were timely detected and solved. Through immediate feedback, guidance and repeated training of laboratory staff, additional inaccuracies were prevented. CONCLUSIONS: Quality control guidelines when applied in field laboratories ensured the reliability and validity

  3. Clinical laboratory indices in the treatment of acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemmons, David R

    2011-02-20

    Measurement of serum growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-) is used to monitor the degree of improvement that occurs following treatment of patients with acromegaly. Improvement in GH assay sensitivity has led to changes in the definition of normal GH however many studies that assess the predictive value of GH were conducted in an era where assays were less sensitive. Other problems that have occurred with GH measurements include utilization of different standards and failure to prove commutability of commonly accepted standard. GH reference ranges vary in their quality and are not stratified for age, sex or body mass index. IGF-I measurements are associated with similar problems. They do not use a common standard that has been proven to be commutable and results can vary widely when the same specimens are assayed in different laboratories. Although age and sex stratified reference ranges exist, these do not always have adequate numbers of subjects and BMI adjusted ranges are not available. These problems have led to significant discordance in a significant number of patients wherein the IGF-I and GH values may yield a discrepant prediction of disease stabilization. In these cases in general the IGF-I values correlate better with the presence of persistent symptoms. Patients who fail to suppress GH to normal but have a normal IGF-I have to be monitored carefully for recurrence but usually do not require further therapy if they are asymptomatic. For the long term assessment of outcome and clinical disease activity measurement of both hormones is recommended. PMID:21075098

  4. Cybersecurity Considerations for Information Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Irvine, Cynthia E.

    2005-01-01

    The significant efficiencies possible through the use of information technology in public systems are alluring, however, as the value of the information stored electronically increases, computer systems become targets for abuse and attack. To ensure continued public confidence in these systems, managers need to understand the impact of security shortcomings in their automated systems. A high level taxonomy of threats to information systems is presented to provide a basis for security requirem...

  5. Onsite Distributed Generation Systems For Laboratories, Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-09-01

    This guide provides general information on implementing onsite distributed generation systems in laboratory environments. Specific technology applications, general performance information, and cost data are provided to educate and encourage laboratory energy managers to consider onsite power generation or combined heat and power (CHP) systems for their facilities. After conducting an initial screening, energy managers are encouraged to conduct a detailed feasibility study with actual cost and performance data for technologies that look promising. Onsite distributed generation systems are small, modular, decentralized, grid-connected, or off-grid energy systems. These systems are located at or near the place where the energy is used. These systems are also known as distributed energy or distributed power systems. DG technologies are generally considered those that produce less than 20 megawatts (MW) of power. A number of technologies can be applied as effective onsite DG systems, including: (1) Diesel, natural gas, and dual-fuel reciprocating engines; (2) Combustion turbines and steam turbines; (3) Fuel cells; (4) Biomass heating; (5) Biomass combined heat and power; (6) Photovoltaics; and (7) Wind turbines. These systems can provide a number of potential benefits to an individual laboratory facility or campus, including: (1) High-quality, reliable, and potentially dispatchable power; (2) Low-cost energy and long-term utility cost assurance, especially where electricity and/or fuel costs are high; (3) Significantly reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Typical CHP plants reduce onsite GHG by 40 to 60 percent; (4) Peak demand shaving where demand costs are high; (5) CHP where thermal energy can be used in addition to electricity; (6) The ability to meet standby power needs, especially where utility-supplied power is interrupted frequently or for long periods and where standby power is required for safety or emergencies; and (7) Use for standalone or off

  6. Information retrieval system for ENDF format libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a data information retrieval system for ENDF (Evaluated Nuclear Data File) format libraries, which can be run on PC computers under the WindowsTM environment. The input is the filename of an ENDF data. The system will process this field and generate two others. One contains a list of materials with corresponding nuclides laboratory, author and date of evaluation; the other provides information about the MF and MT numbers for each material, expressed by the number of records. This interactive and easy-to-handle system is of interest to nuclear and reactor physics researchers. (author)

  7. Information retrieval system for ENDF format libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a data information retrieval system for ENDF (Evaluated Nuclear Data File) format libraries, which can be run on PC computers under the Windows environment. The input is the filename of an ENDF. The system will process this file and generate two others. One contains a list of materials with the corresponding nuclides, laboratory, author and date of evaluation; the other provides information about the MF and MT numbers for each material expressed by the number of records. This interactive and easy-to-handle system is of interest to nuclear and reactor physics researchers. (author)

  8. Incidência e aspectos clínico-laboratoriais do Lúpus eritematoso sistêmico em cidade do Sul do Brasil Incidence and clinical-laboratory aspects of systemic lupus erythematosus in a Southern brazilian city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Kenji Nakashima

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Estudos epidemiológicos brasileiros sobre o lúpus eritematoso sistêmico (LES são bastante escassos e os dados existentes hoje são praticamente todos de literatura internacional. OBJETIVOS: Determinar a incidência e algumas características clínicas e laboratoriais de pacientes com LES em Cascavel, Paraná - Brasil. PACIENTES E MÉTODOS: Os dados foram coletados entre agosto de 2007 e julho de 2008 em todos os serviços de saúde do município que possuíam atendimentos na especialidade de Reumatologia: um hospital universitário, um ambulatório público e três clínicas privadas da cidade. RESULTADOS: Foram identificados 14 pacientes com diagnóstico de LES, resultando em uma incidência estimada de 4,8 casos/100.000 habitantes/ano. Todos os pacientes eram do sexo feminino, com média de idade de 41,5 anos. A faixa etária com maior incidência foi a de 30 - 39 anos e 92,8% apresentaram quatro ou mais dos 11 critérios do American College of Rheumatology (ACR para o diagnóstico de LES. O tratamento farmacológico dos pacientes também foi avaliado e mostrou estar de acordo com o Consenso Brasileiro para o tratamento de LES. CONCLUSÃO: A incidência obtida em Cascavel/PR está próxima das incidências observadas em estudos internacionais.INTRODUCTION: Brazilian epidemiological studies on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE are scarce, and currently available data originate almost entirely from international literature. OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence and some clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients with SLE in the municipality of Cascavel, state of Paraná, Brazil. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data were collected from August 2007 to July 2008 in all health services of Cascavel providing health care in rheumatology: a university-affiliated hospital, a public outpatient clinic, and three private clinics. RESULTS: The study identified 14 patients diagnosed with SLE, which resulted in an estimated incidence of 4

  9. Quality management system in hospital radiopharmacy laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: 1) To determine the necessary conditions for increasing the complexity of the Radiopharmacy Laboratory and reach an operational level defined by the IAEA as 3a (Operational Guidance on Hospital Radiopharmacy). Our aim is that, within a framework of quality, last generation radiopharmaceuticals can be used, by sophisticated techniques such as labeling with bifunctional chelating agents, like HYNIC; 2) Consequently, we decided to implement a Quality Management System (QMS) in the field of Hospital Radiopharmacy in order to guarantee the safe and effective preparation and handling of radiopharmaceuticals for the diagnosis of patients, based on recommendations of the IAEA. Procedure For the implementation of the QMS, the sector of Radiopharmacy was capacitated in the application of ISO 9001. In a first stage it had begun with the formulation of the main documents and their enumeration. According to the recommendations of the IAEA Operational Guide, this year we proceeded to the optimization of the documents produced in the first stage and formulation of new documents essential to the improvement of work in the Radiopharmacy Laboratory. Results: Corrections were made to the performed procedures, and new ones were composed such as: Reception of raw materials, Control dose calibrator (Activity meter), General procedure of dosage, Procedure for decontamination, for Using the bio safety cabinet, for Cleaning the hot laboratory, etc. The Quality Controls were added to each of the Work Instructions of radiopharmaceuticals to be undertaken and how and when to carry out, with their respective references. Records were modified and new ones incorporated, in order to ensure traceability of the results before and after injection. Finally, the require documentation has been completed with the addition of the Staff Training Plan, and other records such as Nonconformance and Corrective and Preventive Actions. Conclusion: With the application of a QMS correctly implemented

  10. System design description for Waste Information and Control System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) Hazardous Material Control Group (HMC) of the 222-S Laboratory has requested the development of a system to help resolve many of the difficulties associated with tracking and data collection of containers and drums of waste. This system has been identified as the Waste Information and Control System (WICS). WICS shall partially automate the procedure for acquisition, tracking and reporting of the container, drum, and waste data that is currently manually processed. The WICS project shall use handheld computer units (HCU) to collect laboratory data, a local database with an user friendly interface to import the laboratory data from the HCUs, and barcode technology with associated software and operational procedures. After the container, drum, and waste data has been collected and verified, WICS shall be manipulated to provide informal reports containing data required to properly document waste disposal. 8 refs, 82 figs, 69 tabs

  11. Clinical decision support systems for improving diagnostic accuracy and achieving precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaneda, Christian; Nalley, Kip; Mannion, Ciaran; Bhattacharyya, Pritish; Blake, Patrick; Pecora, Andrew; Goy, Andre; Suh, K Stephen

    2015-01-01

    As research laboratories and clinics collaborate to achieve precision medicine, both communities are required to understand mandated electronic health/medical record (EHR/EMR) initiatives that will be fully implemented in all clinics in the United States by 2015. Stakeholders will need to evaluate current record keeping practices and optimize and standardize methodologies to capture nearly all information in digital format. Collaborative efforts from academic and industry sectors are crucial to achieving higher efficacy in patient care while minimizing costs. Currently existing digitized data and information are present in multiple formats and are largely unstructured. In the absence of a universally accepted management system, departments and institutions continue to generate silos of information. As a result, invaluable and newly discovered knowledge is difficult to access. To accelerate biomedical research and reduce healthcare costs, clinical and bioinformatics systems must employ common data elements to create structured annotation forms enabling laboratories and clinics to capture sharable data in real time. Conversion of these datasets to knowable information should be a routine institutionalized process. New scientific knowledge and clinical discoveries can be shared via integrated knowledge environments defined by flexible data models and extensive use of standards, ontologies, vocabularies, and thesauri. In the clinical setting, aggregated knowledge must be displayed in user-friendly formats so that physicians, non-technical laboratory personnel, nurses, data/research coordinators, and end-users can enter data, access information, and understand the output. The effort to connect astronomical numbers of data points, including '-omics'-based molecular data, individual genome sequences, experimental data, patient clinical phenotypes, and follow-up data is a monumental task. Roadblocks to this vision of integration and interoperability include ethical, legal

  12. DESIGNING INFORMATION SYSTEM IN ORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna WALASEK

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is an attempt to approach essential issues in designing modern information systems. The key to successful information system is good design. A modern design requires looking from a number of different perspectives. Different people use different information in different contexts. These problems should be analyzed and requirements should be documented before solutions are designed and implemented. Satisfying the business needs is a baseline standard for information system.

  13. IT adoption of clinical information systems in Austrian and German hospitals: results of a comparative survey with a focus on nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaubmayr Christine

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background IT adoption is a process that is influenced by different external and internal factors. This study aimed 1. to identify similarities and differences in the prevalence of medical and nursing IT systems in Austrian and German hospitals, and 2. to match these findings with characteristics of the two countries, in particular their healthcare system, and with features of the hospitals. Methods In 2007, all acute care hospitals in both countries received questionnaires with identical questions. 12.4% in Germany and 34.6% in Austria responded. Results The surveys revealed a consistent higher usage of nearly all clinical IT systems, especially nursing systems, but also PACS and electronic archiving systems, in Austrian than in German hospitals. These findings correspond with a significantly wider use of standardised nursing terminologies and a higher number of PC workstations on the wards (average 2.1 PCs in Germany, 3.2 PCs in Austria. Despite these differences, Austrian and German hospitals both reported a similar IT budget of 2.6% in Austria and 2.0% in Germany (median. Conclusions Despite the many similarities of the Austrian and German healthcare system there are distinct differences which may have led to a wider use of IT systems in Austrian hospitals. In nursing, the specific legal requirement to document nursing diagnoses in Austria may have stimulated the use of standardised terminologies for nursing diagnoses and the implementation of electronic nursing documentation systems. Other factors which correspond with the wider use of clinical IT systems in Austria are: good infrastructure of medical-technical devices, rigorous organisational changes which had led to leaner processes and to a lower length of stay, and finally a more IT friendly climate. As country size is the most pronounced difference between Germany and Austria it could be that smaller countries, such as Austria, are more ready to translate innovation into

  14. 77 FR 26069 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-02

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... following three panels of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science... review by the Board involve a wide range of medical specialties within the general areas of...

  15. 76 FR 24974 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-03

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... following four panels of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science... involve a wide range of medical specialties within the general areas of biomedical, behavioral...

  16. 75 FR 57833 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-22

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... under the Public Law 92-463 (Federal Advisory Committee Act) that the panels of the Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific...

  17. First-Year Residents' Caring, Medical Knowledge, and Clinical Judgment in Relation to Laboratory Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnold, Paul R.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A study of 36 first-year Northwestern University (Illinois) medical residents found that students' medical knowledge was a predictor of increased laboratory test use, that clinical judgment was a predictor of decreased laboratory use, and that level of caring was statistically unrelated to amount of laboratory use. (Author/MSE)

  18. Missing Clinical Information in NHS hospital outpatient clinics: prevalence, causes and effects on patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moorthy Krishna

    2011-05-01

    to their care and 20% had a risk of harm. In over half of cases the doctor relied on the patient for the information, making a clinical decision despite the information being missing in 20% of cases. Hospital mergers, temporary staff and non-integrated IT systems were contributing factors. Conclusions If these findings are replicated across the NHS then almost 10 million outpatients are seen each year without key clinical information, creating over a million unnecessary appointments, and putting nearly 2 million patients at risk of harm. There is a need for a systematic, regular audit of the prevalence of missing clinical information. Only then will we know the impact on clinical decision making and patient care of new technology, service reorganisations and, crucially given the present financial climate, temporary or reduced staffing levels. Further research is needed to assess the relationship between missing clinical information and diagnostic errors; to examine the issue in primary care; and to consider the patients perspective.

  19. Implementation of Good Clinical Laboratory Practice (GCLP) guidelines within the External Quality Assurance Program Oversight Laboratory (EQAPOL)

    OpenAIRE

    Todd, Christopher A.; Sanchez, Ana M.; Garcia, Ambrosia; Thomas N Denny; Sarzotti-Kelsoe, Marcella

    2013-01-01

    The EQAPOL contract was awarded to Duke University to develop and manage global proficiency testing programs for flow cytometry-, ELISpot-, and Luminex bead-based assays (cytokine analytes), as well as create a genetically diverse panel of HIV-1 viral cultures to be made available to National Institutes of Health (NIH) researchers. As a part of this contract, EQAPOL was required to operate under Good Clinical Laboratory Practices (GCLP) that are traditionally used for laboratories conducting ...

  20. Neurobrucellosis: Clinical and laboratory findings in 22 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasoolinejad M

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is a multisystem disease with diverse clinical presentations and involvement of the nervous system is considered to 5 to be 10% in adult patients and 1% in children. The presentations of neurobrucellosis includes meningoencephalitis, subarachnoid haemorrhage, myelitis, radiculoneuritis, intracerebral and epidural abscess, psychosis and vascular syndrome. Twenty-two patients with neurobrucellosis are described. Ten patients had meningoencephalitis, seven patients had meningitis, three patients had polyradiculopathy and one patient presented with spinal epidural abscess and one patient had brain abscess. Results of an agglutination test for Brucella in serum were positive for all patients (>1:160; eight of 15 patients had positive agglutination test in CSF. Five patients had positive blood cultures, 3 patients had positive bone marrow cultures and 2 of 15 patients had positive CSF cultures. All of cultures were Brucella Mellitensis. Antimicrobial treatment included concurrent administration of Doxycycline, Rifampin and Trimethoprim-Sulfametoxazole. Four patients received Dexamethason concurrently. In conclusion, nervous system involvement is a serious manifestation of brucellosis. As brucellosis is an endemic disease in Iran we suggest that brucellosis be investigated with neurological symptoms and signs.