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Sample records for clinical imaging optimized

  1. Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the breast: protocol optimization, interpretation, and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Savannah C; McDonald, Elizabeth S

    2013-08-01

    Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (DWI) has shown promise for improving the positive predictive value of breast MR imaging for detection of breast cancer, evaluating tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and as a noncontrast alternative to MR imaging in screening for breast cancer. However, data quality varies widely. Before implementing DWI into clinical practice, one must understand the pertinent technical considerations and current evidence regarding clinical applications of breast DWI. This article provides an overview of basic principles of DWI, optimization of breast DWI protocols, imaging features of benign and malignant breast lesions, promising clinical applications, and potential future directions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Review of SPECT collimator selection, optimization, and fabrication for clinical and preclinical imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Audenhaege, Karen, E-mail: karen.vanaudenhaege@ugent.be; Van Holen, Roel; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Vanhove, Christian [Department of Electronics and Information Systems, MEDISIP-IBiTech, Ghent University–iMinds Medical IT, De Pintelaan 185 block B/5, Ghent B-9000 (Belgium); Metzler, Scott D. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Moore, Stephen C. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 75 Francis Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    In single photon emission computed tomography, the choice of the collimator has a major impact on the sensitivity and resolution of the system. Traditional parallel-hole and fan-beam collimators used in clinical practice, for example, have a relatively poor sensitivity and subcentimeter spatial resolution, while in small-animal imaging, pinhole collimators are used to obtain submillimeter resolution and multiple pinholes are often combined to increase sensitivity. This paper reviews methods for production, sensitivity maximization, and task-based optimization of collimation for both clinical and preclinical imaging applications. New opportunities for improved collimation are now arising primarily because of (i) new collimator-production techniques and (ii) detectors with improved intrinsic spatial resolution that have recently become available. These new technologies are expected to impact the design of collimators in the future. The authors also discuss concepts like septal penetration, high-resolution applications, multiplexing, sampling completeness, and adaptive systems, and the authors conclude with an example of an optimization study for a parallel-hole, fan-beam, cone-beam, and multiple-pinhole collimator for different applications.

  3. Dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Lodge, Martin A; Tahari, Abdel K; Zhou, Y; Wahl, Richard L; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-10-21

    Static whole-body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single-bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ~15-20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole-body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole-body PET acquisition protocol of ~45 min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6 min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (six passes × seven bed positions, each scanned for 45 s). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of ten different clinically

  4. Dynamic whole body PET parametric imaging: I. Concept, acquisition protocol optimization and clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Lodge, Martin A.; Tahari, Abdel K.; Zhou, Y.; Wahl, Richard L.; Rahmim, Arman

    2013-01-01

    Static whole body PET/CT, employing the standardized uptake value (SUV), is considered the standard clinical approach to diagnosis and treatment response monitoring for a wide range of oncologic malignancies. Alternative PET protocols involving dynamic acquisition of temporal images have been implemented in the research setting, allowing quantification of tracer dynamics, an important capability for tumor characterization and treatment response monitoring. Nonetheless, dynamic protocols have been confined to single bed-coverage limiting the axial field-of-view to ~15–20 cm, and have not been translated to the routine clinical context of whole-body PET imaging for the inspection of disseminated disease. Here, we pursue a transition to dynamic whole body PET parametric imaging, by presenting, within a unified framework, clinically feasible multi-bed dynamic PET acquisition protocols and parametric imaging methods. We investigate solutions to address the challenges of: (i) long acquisitions, (ii) small number of dynamic frames per bed, and (iii) non-invasive quantification of kinetics in the plasma. In the present study, a novel dynamic (4D) whole body PET acquisition protocol of ~45min total length is presented, composed of (i) an initial 6-min dynamic PET scan (24 frames) over the heart, followed by (ii) a sequence of multi-pass multi-bed PET scans (6 passes x 7 bed positions, each scanned for 45sec). Standard Patlak linear graphical analysis modeling was employed, coupled with image-derived plasma input function measurements. Ordinary least squares (OLS) Patlak estimation was used as the baseline regression method to quantify the physiological parameters of tracer uptake rate Ki and total blood distribution volume V on an individual voxel basis. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation studies, using a wide set of published kinetic FDG parameters and GATE and XCAT platforms, were conducted to optimize the acquisition protocol from a range of 10 different clinically

  5. [Imaging center - optimization of the imaging process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, H-P

    2013-04-01

    Hospitals around the world are under increasing pressure to optimize the economic efficiency of treatment processes. Imaging is responsible for a great part of the success but also of the costs of treatment. In routine work an excessive supply of imaging methods leads to an "as well as" strategy up to the limit of the capacity without critical reflection. Exams that have no predictable influence on the clinical outcome are an unjustified burden for the patient. They are useless and threaten the financial situation and existence of the hospital. In recent years the focus of process optimization was exclusively on the quality and efficiency of performed single examinations. In the future critical discussion of the effectiveness of single exams in relation to the clinical outcome will be more important. Unnecessary exams can be avoided, only if in addition to the optimization of single exams (efficiency) there is an optimization strategy for the total imaging process (efficiency and effectiveness). This requires a new definition of processes (Imaging Pathway), new structures for organization (Imaging Center) and a new kind of thinking on the part of the medical staff. Motivation has to be changed from gratification of performed exams to gratification of process quality (medical quality, service quality, economics), including the avoidance of additional (unnecessary) exams. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Availability of color calibration for consistent color display in medical images and optimization of reference brightness for clinical use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Daiki; Suganami, Haruka; Hosoba, Minoru; Ohno, Kazuko; Emoto, Yutaka; Tabata, Yoshito; Matsui, Norihisa

    2013-03-01

    Color image consistency has not been accomplished yet except the Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) Supplement 100 for implementing a color reproduction pipeline and device independent color spaces. Thus, most healthcare enterprises could not check monitor degradation routinely. To ensure color consistency in medical color imaging, monitor color calibration should be introduced. Using simple color calibration device . chromaticity of colors including typical color (Red, Green, Blue, Green and White) are measured as device independent profile connection space value called u'v' before and after calibration. In addition, clinical color images are displayed and visual differences are observed. In color calibration, monitor brightness level has to be set to quite lower value 80 cd/m2 according to sRGB standard. As Maximum brightness of most color monitors available currently for medical use have much higher brightness than 80 cd/m2, it is not seemed to be appropriate to use 80 cd/m2 level for calibration. Therefore, we propose that new brightness standard should be introduced while maintaining the color representation in clinical use. To evaluate effects of brightness to chromaticity experimentally, brightness level is changed in two monitors from 80 to 270cd/m2 and chromaticity value are compared with each brightness levels. As a result, there are no significant differences in chromaticity diagram when brightness levels are changed. In conclusion, chromaticity is close to theoretical value after color calibration. Moreover, chromaticity isn't moved when brightness is changed. The results indicate optimized reference brightness level for clinical use could be set at high brightness in current monitors .

  7. clinical: imaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI), with asso- ciation between HAD and both diffuse atrophy with ventricular dilatation9 and deep white matter lesions. Furthermore, a correlation between declining cognitive function and the loss of volume in certain brain struc- tures, including the basal ganglia and caudate nucleus,.

  8. Optimization of OSEM parameters in myocardial perfusion imaging reconstruction as a function of body mass index: a clinical approach*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, Pietro Paolo; Metello, Luis F.; Camozzato, Tatiane Sabriela Cagol; Vieira, Domingos Manuel da Silva

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study is aimed at contributing to identify the most appropriate OSEM parameters to generate myocardial perfusion imaging reconstructions with the best diagnostic quality, correlating them with patients’ body mass index. Materials and Methods The present study included 28 adult patients submitted to myocardial perfusion imaging in a public hospital. The OSEM method was utilized in the images reconstruction with six different combinations of iterations and subsets numbers. The images were analyzed by nuclear cardiology specialists taking their diagnostic value into consideration and indicating the most appropriate images in terms of diagnostic quality. Results An overall scoring analysis demonstrated that the combination of four iterations and four subsets has generated the most appropriate images in terms of diagnostic quality for all the classes of body mass index; however, the role played by the combination of six iterations and four subsets is highlighted in relation to the higher body mass index classes. Conclusion The use of optimized parameters seems to play a relevant role in the generation of images with better diagnostic quality, ensuring the diagnosis and consequential appropriate and effective treatment for the patient. PMID:26543282

  9. Radiation dose and image quality in diagnostic radiology. Optimization of the dose-image quality relationship with clinical experience from scoliosis radiography, coronary intervention and a flat-panel digital detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geijer, Håkan

    2002-03-01

    X-rays are known to cause malignancies, skin damage and other side effects and they are thus potentially dangerous. Therefore, it is essential and in fact mandatory to reduce the radiation dose in diagnostic radiology as far as possible. This is also known as the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle. However, the dose is linked to image quality and the image quality may not be lowered so far that it jeopardizes the diagnostic outcome of a radiographic procedure. The process of reaching this balance between dose and image quality is called optimization. The aim of this thesis was to propose and evaluate methods for optimizing the radiation dose-image quality relationship in diagnostic radiography with a focus on clinical usefulness. The work was performed in three main parts. OPTIMIZATION OF SCOLIOSIS RADIOGRAPHY: In the first part, two recently developed methods for digital scoliosis radiography (digital exposure and pulse fluoroscopy) were evaluated and compared to the standard screen-film method. Radiation dose was measured as kerma area-product (KAP), entrance surface dose (ESD) and effective dose; image quality was assessed with a contrast-detail phantom and through visual grading analysis. Accuracy in angle measurements was also evaluated. The radiation dose for digital exposure was nearly twice as high as the screen-film method at a comparable image quality while the dose for pulsed fluoroscopy was very low but with a considerably lower image quality. The variability in angle measurements was sufficiently low for all methods. Then, the digital exposure protocol was optimized to a considerably lower dose with a slightly lower image quality compared to the baseline. FLAT-PANEL DETECTOR: In the second part, an amorphous-silicon direct digital flat-panel detector was evaluated using a contrast-detail phantom, measuring dose as entrance dose. The flat-panel detector yielded a superior image quality at a lower dose than both storage phosphor plates and

  10. Optimizing Ballistic Imaging Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Can; Beggs-Cassin, Mardy; Wein, Lawrence M

    2017-09-01

    Ballistic imaging systems can help solve crimes by comparing images of cartridge cases, which are recovered from a crime scene or test-fired from a gun, to a database of images obtained from past crime scenes. Many U.S. municipalities lack the resources to process all of their cartridge cases. Using data from Stockton, CA, we analyze two problems: how to allocate limited capacity to maximize the number of cartridge cases that generate at least one hit, and how to prioritize the cartridge cases that are processed to maximize the usefulness (i.e., obtained before the corresponding criminal case is closed) of hits. The number of hits can be significantly increased by prioritizing crime scene evidence over test-fires, and by ranking calibers by their hit probability and processing only the higher ranking calibers. We also estimate that last-come first-served increases the proportion of hits that are useful by only 0.05 relative to first-come first-served. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  11. Multi-Criteria Optimization for Image Guidance

    CERN Document Server

    Winey, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a multi-criteria optimization framework for image guided radiotherapy. Methods: An algorithm is proposed for a multi-criteria framework for the purpose of patient setup verification decision processes. Optimal patient setup shifts and rotations are not always straightforward, particularly for deformable or moving targets of the spine, abdomen, thorax, breast, head and neck and limbs. The algorithm relies upon dosimetric constraints and objectives to aid in the patient setup such that the patient is setup to maximize tumor dose coverage and minimize dose to organs at risk while allowing for daily clinical changes. A simple 1D model and a lung lesion are presented. Results: The algorithm delivers a multi-criteria optimization framework allowing for clinical decisions to accommodate patient target variation make setup decisions less straightforward. With dosimetric considerations, optimal patient positions can be derived. Conclusions: A multi-criteria framework is demonstrated to aid in the p...

  12. Frame average optimization of cine-mode EPID images used for routine clinical in vivo patient dose verification of VMAT deliveries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCowan, P. M., E-mail: pmccowan@cancercare.mb.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2, Canada and Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); McCurdy, B. M. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, 820 Sherbrook Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3A 1R9 (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The in vivo 3D dose delivered to a patient during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery can be calculated using electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images. These images must be acquired in cine-mode (i.e., “movie” mode) in order to capture the time-dependent delivery information. The angle subtended by each cine-mode EPID image during an arc can be changed via the frame averaging number selected within the image acquisition software. A large frame average number will decrease the EPID’s angular resolution and will result in a decrease in the accuracy of the dose information contained within each image. Alternatively, less EPID images acquired per delivery will decrease the overall 3D patient dose calculation time, which is appealing for large-scale clinical implementation. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the optimal frame average value per EPID image, defined as the highest frame averaging that can be used without an appreciable loss in 3D dose reconstruction accuracy for VMAT treatments. Methods: Six different VMAT plans and six different SBRT-VMAT plans were delivered to an anthropomorphic phantom. Delivery was carried out on a Varian 2300ix model linear accelerator (Linac) equipped with an aS1000 EPID running at a frame acquisition rate of 7.5 Hz. An additional PC was set up at the Linac console area, equipped with specialized frame-grabber hardware and software packages allowing continuous acquisition of all EPID frames during delivery. Frames were averaged into “frame-averaged” EPID images using MATLAB. Each frame-averaged data set was used to calculate the in vivo dose to the patient and then compared to the single EPID frame in vivo dose calculation (the single frame calculation represents the highest possible angular resolution per EPID image). A mean percentage dose difference of low dose (<20% prescription dose) and high dose regions (>80% prescription dose) was calculated for each frame averaged

  13. Optimizing Synthetic Aperture Compound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Munk; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2012-01-01

    Spatial compound images are constructed from synthetic aperture data acquired using a linear phased-array transducer. Compound images of wires, tissue, and cysts are created using a method, which allows both transmit and receive compounding without any loss in temporal resolution. Similarly...... to conventional imaging, the speckle reduction achieved by spatial compounding comes at the cost of a reduced detail resolution and a compromise must be made. Using a performance indicator, which can be measured from an image of a phantom without cysts, it is demonstrated how a compromise can be made, which...... is optimal for lesion detection. Synthetic aperture data are acquired from unfocused emissions and 154 compound images are constructed by synthesizing different aperture configurations with more or less compounding, all maintaining a constant resolution across depth corresponding to an f-number of 2...

  14. Identification of Threshold Prostate Specific Antigen Levels to Optimize the Detection of Clinically Significant Prostate Cancer by Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Ultrasound Fusion Guided Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakir, Nabeel A.; George, Arvin K.; Siddiqui, M. Minhaj; Rothwax, Jason T.; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Stamatakis, Lambros; Su, Daniel; Okoro, Chinonyerem; Raskolnikov, Dima; Walton-Diaz, Annerleim; Simon, Richard; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter L.; Merino, Maria J.; Wood, Bradford J.; Pinto, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Prostate specific antigen sensitivity increases with lower threshold values but with a corresponding decrease in specificity. Magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsy detects prostate cancer more efficiently and of higher grade than standard 12-core transrectal ultrasound biopsy but the optimal population for its use is not well defined. We evaluated the performance of magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsy vs 12-core biopsy across a prostate specific antigen continuum. Materials and Methods We reviewed the records of all patients enrolled in a prospective trial who underwent 12-core transrectal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsies from August 2007 through February 2014. Patients were stratified by each of 4 prostate specific antigen cutoffs. The greatest Gleason score using either biopsy method was compared in and across groups as well as across the population prostate specific antigen range. Clinically significant prostate cancer was defined as Gleason 7 (4 + 3) or greater. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Results A total of 1,003 targeted and 12-core transrectal ultrasound biopsies were performed, of which 564 diagnosed prostate cancer for a 56.2% detection rate. Targeted biopsy led to significantly more upgrading to clinically significant disease compared to 12-core biopsy. This trend increased more with increasing prostate specific antigen, specifically in patients with prostate specific antigen 4 to 10 and greater than 10 ng/ml. Prostate specific antigen 5.2 ng/ml or greater captured 90% of upgrading by targeted biopsy, corresponding to 64% of patients who underwent multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and subsequent fusion biopsy. Conversely a greater proportion of clinically insignificant disease was detected by 12-core vs targeted biopsy overall. These differences persisted when controlling for potential confounders on multivariate analysis. Conclusions Prostate

  15. Optimizing Outcomes with Clinical Data Registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Lisa

    2016-12-01

    Clinical data registries are platforms to extract, store, analyze, and disseminate large amounts of clinical data. The type of data contained in clinical data registries varies by the registry, and may include patient demographics, clinical examination findings, imaging and laboratory results, procedures performed, and patient-reported outcomes. When large numbers of participants submit data to a clinical data registry the data can then be analyzed in aggregate to answer new clinical questions. Analyses on the data may be performed to show outcomes over time, compare procedures, evaluate care patterns, among others. With the launch of an otolaryngology-specific clinical data registry, Regent, facial plastic and reconstructive surgeons have the opportunity to participate in a clinical data registry for the first time. Through broad participation in the registry, the specialty has a chance to optimize patient outcomes in a manner never before possible. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. Upgrade to iterative image reconstruction (IR) in abdominal MDCT imaging. A clinical study for detailed parameter optimization beyond vendor recommendations using the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction environment (ASIR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueck, F.G.; Koerner, M.; Scherr, M.K.; Geyer, L.L.; Deak, Z.; Linsenmaier, U.; Reiser, M.; Wirth, S. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2012-03-15

    To compare the image quality of dose-reduced 64-row abdominal CT reconstructed at different levels of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) to full-dose baseline examinations reconstructed with filtered back-projection (FBP) in a clinical setting and upgrade situation. Abdominal baseline examinations (noise index NI = 29; LightSpeed VCT XT, GE) were intra-individually compared to follow-up studies on a CT with an ASIR option (NI = 43; Discovery HD750, GE), n = 42. Standard-kernel images were calculated with ASIR blendings of 0 - 100 % in slice and volume mode, respectively. Three experienced radiologists compared the image quality of these 567 sets to their corresponding full-dose baseline examination (-2: diagnostically inferior, -1: inferior, 0: equal, +1: superior, +2: diagnostically superior). Furthermore, a phantom was scanned. Statistical analysis used the Wilcoxon - the Mann-Whitney U-test and the intra-class correlation (ICC). The mean CTDIvol decreased from 19.7 {+-} 5.5 to 12.2 {+-} 4.7 mGy (p < 0.001). The ICC was 0.861. The total image quality of the dose-reduced ASIR studies was comparable to the baseline at ASIR 50 % in slice (p = 0.18) and ASIR 50 - 100 % in volume mode (p > 0.10). Volume mode performed 73 % slower than slice mode (p < 0.01). After the system upgrade, the vendor recommendation of ASIR 50 % in slice mode allowed for a dose reduction of 38 % in abdominal CT with comparable image quality and time expenditure. However, there is still further dose reduction potential for more complex reconstruction settings. (orig.)

  17. Upgrade to iterative image reconstruction (IR) in abdominal MDCT imaging: a clinical study for detailed parameter optimization beyond vendor recommendations using the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction environment (ASIR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueck, F G; Körner, M; Scherr, M K; Geyer, L L; Deak, Z; Linsenmaier, U; Reiser, M; Wirth, S

    2012-03-01

    To compare the image quality of dose-reduced 64-row abdominal CT reconstructed at different levels of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) to full-dose baseline examinations reconstructed with filtered back-projection (FBP) in a clinical setting and upgrade situation. Abdominal baseline examinations (noise index NI = 29; LightSpeed VCT XT, GE) were intra-individually compared to follow-up studies on a CT with an ASIR option (NI = 43; Discovery HD750, GE), n = 42. Standard-kernel images were calculated with ASIR blendings of 0 - 100 % in slice and volume mode, respectively. Three experienced radiologists compared the image quality of these 567 sets to their corresponding full-dose baseline examination (- 2: diagnostically inferior, - 1: inferior, 0: equal, + 1: superior, + 2: diagnostically superior). Furthermore, a phantom was scanned. Statistical analysis used the Wilcoxon - the Mann-Whitney U-test and the intra-class correlation (ICC). The mean CTDIvol decreased from 19.7 ± 5.5 to 12.2 ± 4.7 mGy (p ASIR studies was comparable to the baseline at ASIR 50 % in slice (p = 0.18) and ASIR 50 - 100 % in volume mode (p > 0.10). Volume mode performed 73 % slower than slice mode (p ASIR 50 % in slice mode allowed for a dose reduction of 38 % in abdominal CT with comparable image quality and time expenditure. However, there is still further dose reduction potential for more complex reconstruction settings. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Image registration via optimization over disjoint image regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitts, Todd; Hathaway, Simon; Karelitz, David B.; Sandusky, John; Laine, Mark Richard

    2018-02-06

    Technologies pertaining to registering a target image with a base image are described. In a general embodiment, the base image is selected from a set of images, and the target image is an image in the set of images that is to be registered to the base image. A set of disjoint regions of the target image is selected, and a transform to be applied to the target image is computed based on the optimization of a metric over the selected set of disjoint regions. The transform is applied to the target image so as to register the target image with the base image.

  19. A Review on Medical Image Registration as an Optimization Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Guoli; Han, Jianda; Zhao, Yiwen; Wang, Zheng; Du, Huibin

    2017-08-01

    In the course of clinical treatment, several medical media are required by a phy-sician in order to provide accurate and complete information about a patient. Medical image registra-tion techniques can provide a richer diagnosis and treatment information to doctors and to provide a comprehensive reference source for the researchers involved in image registration as an optimization problem. The essence of image registration is associating two or more different images spatial asso-ciation, and getting the translation of their spatial relationship. For medical image registration, its pro-cess is not absolute. Its core purpose is finding the conversion relationship between different images. The major step of image registration includes the change of geometrical dimensions, and change of the image of the combination, image similarity measure, iterative optimization and interpo-lation process. The contribution of this review is sort of related image registration research methods, can provide a brief reference for researchers about image registration.

  20. Image-driven mesh optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstrom, P; Turk, G

    2001-01-05

    We describe a method of improving the appearance of a low vertex count mesh in a manner that is guided by rendered images of the original, detailed mesh. This approach is motivated by the fact that greedy simplification methods often yield meshes that are poorer than what can be represented with a given number of vertices. Our approach relies on edge swaps and vertex teleports to alter the mesh connectivity, and uses the downhill simplex method to simultaneously improve vertex positions and surface attributes. Note that this is not a simplification method--the vertex count remains the same throughout the optimization. At all stages of the optimization the changes are guided by a metric that measures the differences between rendered versions of the original model and the low vertex count mesh. This method creates meshes that are geometrically faithful to the original model. Moreover, the method takes into account more subtle aspects of a model such as surface shading or whether cracks are visible between two interpenetrating parts of the model.

  1. Optimization of Synthetic Aperture Image Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moshavegh, Ramin; Jensen, Jonas; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando

    2016-01-01

    resolution (CTR). The results of the study showed that SA imaging with only 32 emissions and maximum sweep angle of 22 degrees yields a very good image quality compared with using 256 emissions and the full aperture size. Therefore the number of emissions and the maximum sweep angle in the SA can......Synthetic Aperture (SA) imaging produces high-quality images and velocity estimates of both slow and fast flow at high frame rates. However, grating lobe artifacts can appear both in transmission and reception. These affect the image quality and the frame rate. Therefore optimization of parameters...... effecting the image quality of SA is of great importance, and this paper proposes an advanced procedure for optimizing the parameters essential for acquiring an optimal image quality, while generating high resolution SA images. Optimization of the image quality is mainly performed based on measures...

  2. Optimizing clinical drug product performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dickinson, Paul A.; Kesisoglou, Filippos; Flanagan, Talia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of Biopharmaceutics Risk Assessment Roadmap (BioRAM) and the BioRAM Scoring Grid is to facilitate optimization of clinical performance of drug products. BioRAM strategy relies on therapy-driven drug delivery and follows an integrated systems approach for formulating and addressing critical...... questions and decision-making (J Pharm Sci. 2014,103(11): 3777-97). In BioRAM, risk is defined as not achieving the intended in vivo drug product performance, and success is assessed by time to decision-making and action. Emphasis on time to decision-making and time to action highlights the value of well....... Application of the BioRAM Scoring Grid is illustrated using published literature. Organizational considerations for implementing BioRAM strategy, including the interactions, function, and skillsets of the BioRAM group members, are also reviewed. As a creative and innovative systems approach, we believe...

  3. Clinical application of 'Justification' and 'Optimization' principle of ALARA in pediatric CT imaging: "How many children can be protected from unnecessary radiation?".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodhi, Kushaljit S; Krishna, Satheesh; Saxena, Akshay K; Sinha, Anindita; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Lee, Edward Y

    2015-09-01

    Practice of ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle in the developed world is currently well established. However, there is striking lack of published data regarding such experience in the developing countries. Therefore, the goal of this study is to prospectively evaluate CT request forms to assess how many children could be protected from harmful radiation exposure if 'Justification' and 'Optimization' principles of ALARA are applied before obtaining CT imaging in a developing country. This can save children from potential radiation risks including development of brain cancer and leukemia. Consecutive CT request forms over a six month study period (May 16, 2013 to November 15, 2013) in a tertiary pediatric children's hospital in India were prospectively reviewed by two pediatric radiologists before obtaining CT imaging. First, 'Justification' of CT was evaluated and then 'Optimization' was applied for evaluation of appropriateness of the requested CT studies. The number (and percentage) of CT studies avoided by applying 'Justification' and 'Optimization' principle of ALARA were calculated. The difference in number of declined and optimized CT requests between CT requests from inpatient and outpatient departments was compared using Chi-Square test. A total of 1302 consecutive CT request forms were received during the study period. Some of the request forms (n=86; 6.61%) had requests for more than one (multiple) anatomical regions, hence, a total of 1392 different anatomical CT requests were received. Based on evaluation of the CT request forms for 'Justification' and 'Optimization' principle of ALARA by pediatric radiology reviewers, 111 individual anatomic part CT requests from 105 pediatric patients were avoided. Therefore, 8.06% (105 out of 1302 pediatric patients) were protected from unnecessary or additional radiation exposure.The rates of declined or optimized CT requests from inpatient department was significantly higher than that from outpatient

  4. Iterative Image Reconstruction for Limited-Angle CT Using Optimized Initial Image

    OpenAIRE

    Jingyu Guo; Hongliang Qi; Yuan Xu; Zijia Chen; Shulong Li; Linghong Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Limited-angle computed tomography (CT) has great impact in some clinical applications. Existing iterative reconstruction algorithms could not reconstruct high-quality images, leading to severe artifacts nearby edges. Optimal selection of initial image would influence the iterative reconstruction performance but has not been studied deeply yet. In this work, we proposed to generate optimized initial image followed by total variation (TV) based iterative reconstruction considering the feature o...

  5. Synthetic Imaging Maneuver Optimization (SIMO) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aurora Flight Sciences (AFS), in collaboration with the MIT Space Systems Laboratory (MIT-SSL), proposed the Synthetic Imaging Maneuver Optimization (SIMO) program...

  6. Clinical photoacoustic imaging of cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valluru, Keerthi S.; Willmann, Juergen K. [Dept. of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Photoacoustic imaging is a hybrid technique that shines laser light on tissue and measures optically induced ultrasound signal. There is growing interest in the clinical community over this new technique and its possible clinical applications. One of the most prominent features of photoacoustic imaging is its ability to characterize tissue, leveraging differences in the optical absorption of underlying tissue components such as hemoglobin, lipids, melanin, collagen and water among many others. In this review, the state-of-the-art photoacoustic imaging techniques and some of the key outcomes pertaining to different cancer applications in the clinic are presented.

  7. Iterative Image Reconstruction for Limited-Angle CT Using Optimized Initial Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyu Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Limited-angle computed tomography (CT has great impact in some clinical applications. Existing iterative reconstruction algorithms could not reconstruct high-quality images, leading to severe artifacts nearby edges. Optimal selection of initial image would influence the iterative reconstruction performance but has not been studied deeply yet. In this work, we proposed to generate optimized initial image followed by total variation (TV based iterative reconstruction considering the feature of image symmetry. The simulated data and real data reconstruction results indicate that the proposed method effectively removes the artifacts nearby edges.

  8. Spaceborne SAR Imaging Algorithm for Coherence Optimized.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei Qiu

    Full Text Available This paper proposes SAR imaging algorithm with largest coherence based on the existing SAR imaging algorithm. The basic idea of SAR imaging algorithm in imaging processing is that output signal can have maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR by using the optimal imaging parameters. Traditional imaging algorithm can acquire the best focusing effect, but would bring the decoherence phenomenon in subsequent interference process. Algorithm proposed in this paper is that SAR echo adopts consistent imaging parameters in focusing processing. Although the SNR of the output signal is reduced slightly, their coherence is ensured greatly, and finally the interferogram with high quality is obtained. In this paper, two scenes of Envisat ASAR data in Zhangbei are employed to conduct experiment for this algorithm. Compared with the interferogram from the traditional algorithm, the results show that this algorithm is more suitable for SAR interferometry (InSAR research and application.

  9. Swarm Optimization Methods in Microwave Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Randazzo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Swarm intelligence denotes a class of new stochastic algorithms inspired by the collective social behavior of natural entities (e.g., birds, ants, etc.. Such approaches have been proven to be quite effective in several applicative fields, ranging from intelligent routing to image processing. In the last years, they have also been successfully applied in electromagnetics, especially for antenna synthesis, component design, and microwave imaging. In this paper, the application of swarm optimization methods to microwave imaging is discussed, and some recent imaging approaches based on such methods are critically reviewed.

  10. Optimization of Neutral Atom Imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shappirio, M.; Coplan, M.; Balsamo, E.; Chornay, D.; Collier, M.; Hughes, P.; Keller, J.; Ogilvie, K.; Williams, E.

    2008-01-01

    The interactions between plasma structures and neutral atom populations in interplanetary space can be effectively studied with energetic neutral atom imagers. For neutral atoms with energies less than 1 keV, the most efficient detection method that preserves direction and energy information is conversion to negative ions on surfaces. We have examined a variety of surface materials and conversion geometries in order to identify the factors that determine conversion efficiency. For chemically and physically stable surfaces smoothness is of primary importance while properties such as work function have no obvious correlation to conversion efficiency. For the noble metals, tungsten, silicon, and graphite with comparable smoothness, conversion efficiency varies by a factor of two to three. We have also examined the way in which surface conversion efficiency varies with the angle of incidence of the neutral atom and have found that the highest efficiencies are obtained at angles of incidence greater then 80deg. The conversion efficiency of silicon, tungsten and graphite were examined most closely and the energy dependent variation of conversion efficiency measured over a range of incident angles. We have also developed methods for micromachining silicon in order to reduce the volume to surface area over that of a single flat surface and have been able to reduce volume to surface area ratios by up to a factor of 60. With smooth micro-machined surfaces of the optimum geometry, conversion efficiencies can be increased by an order of magnitude over instruments like LENA on the IMAGE spacecraft without increase the instruments mass or volume.

  11. Circular SAR Optimization Imaging Method of Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Jian-feng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Circular Synthetic Aperture Radar (CSAR can obtain the entire scattering properties of targets because of its great ability of 360° observation. In this study, an optimal orientation of the CSAR imaging algorithm of buildings is proposed by applying a combination of coherent and incoherent processing techniques. FEKO software is used to construct the electromagnetic scattering modes and simulate the radar echo. The FEKO imaging results are compared with the isotropic scattering results. On comparison, the optimal azimuth coherent accumulation angle of CSAR imaging of buildings is obtained. Practically, the scattering directions of buildings are unknown; therefore, we divide the 360° echo of CSAR into many overlapped and few angle echoes corresponding to the sub-aperture and then perform an imaging procedure on each sub-aperture. Sub-aperture imaging results are applied to obtain the all-around image using incoherent fusion techniques. The polarimetry decomposition method is used to decompose the all-around image and further retrieve the edge information of buildings successfully. The proposed method is validated with P-band airborne CSAR data from Sichuan, China.

  12. QR images: optimized image embedding in QR codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garateguy, Gonzalo J; Arce, Gonzalo R; Lau, Daniel L; Villarreal, Ofelia P

    2014-07-01

    This paper introduces the concept of QR images, an automatic method to embed QR codes into color images with bounded probability of detection error. These embeddings are compatible with standard decoding applications and can be applied to any color image with full area coverage. The QR information bits are encoded into the luminance values of the image, taking advantage of the immunity of QR readers against local luminance disturbances. To mitigate the visual distortion of the QR image, the algorithm utilizes halftoning masks for the selection of modified pixels and nonlinear programming techniques to locally optimize luminance levels. A tractable model for the probability of error is developed and models of the human visual system are considered in the quality metric used to optimize the luminance levels of the QR image. To minimize the processing time, the optimization techniques proposed to consider the mechanics of a common binarization method and are designed to be amenable for parallel implementations. Experimental results show the graceful degradation of the decoding rate and the perceptual quality as a function the embedding parameters. A visual comparison between the proposed and existing methods is presented.

  13. Indirect MR arthrography: optimization and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahlensieck, M; Peterfy, C G; Wischer, T; Sommer, T; Lang, P; Schlippert, U; Genant, H K; Schild, H H

    1996-07-01

    To evaluate and optimize a method for producing magnetic resonance (MR) images similar to MR arthrograms of multiple synovial joints with intravenous gadopentetate dimeglumine injection. The authors examined the effects of joint motion, dose of gadopentetate dimeglumine (0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mmol/kg), and fat saturation on the enhancement rate of the joint cavity and the degree of image contrast generated among articular structures on MR images in 14 healthy volunteers. Shoulder, elbow, wrist, hip, knee, and ankle joints of 10 volunteers were imaged with optimized parameters. Indirect MR arthrographic findings in 17 patients with joint disorders (eg, rotator-cuff tears, meniscal tears, and osteoarthritis) were compared with arthroscopic findings. Fat-saturated images obtained after 10 minutes of exercise and administration of 0.1 mmol/kg gadopentetate dimeglumine were similar to those obtained after intraarticular injection of contrast medium. Exercising the joint yielded the strongest joint-cavity enhancement. Increasing the dose of contrast medium in the unexercised joint did not statistically significantly improve the contrast-to-noise ratio. Rotator cuff tears, meniscal tears, and cartilage defects were better delineated with this method than with unenhanced MR imaging and showed good correlation with arthroscopic results. Indirect MR arthrography of an exercised joint provides homogeneous enhancement and improved delineation of soft-tissue structures.

  14. Cloud Optimized Image Format and Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, P.; Plesea, L.; Maurer, T.

    2015-04-01

    Cloud based image storage and processing requires revaluation of formats and processing methods. For the true value of the massive volumes of earth observation data to be realized, the image data needs to be accessible from the cloud. Traditional file formats such as TIF and NITF were developed in the hay day of the desktop and assumed fast low latency file access. Other formats such as JPEG2000 provide for streaming protocols for pixel data, but still require a server to have file access. These concepts no longer truly hold in cloud based elastic storage and computation environments. This paper will provide details of a newly evolving image storage format (MRF) and compression that is optimized for cloud environments. Although the cost of storage continues to fall for large data volumes, there is still significant value in compression. For imagery data to be used in analysis and exploit the extended dynamic range of the new sensors, lossless or controlled lossy compression is of high value. Compression decreases the data volumes stored and reduces the data transferred, but the reduced data size must be balanced with the CPU required to decompress. The paper also outlines a new compression algorithm (LERC) for imagery and elevation data that optimizes this balance. Advantages of the compression include its simple to implement algorithm that enables it to be efficiently accessed using JavaScript. Combing this new cloud based image storage format and compression will help resolve some of the challenges of big image data on the internet.

  15. Clinical applications of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcu, C.B.; Beek, A.M.; Van Rossum, A.C. [Hospital of Saint Raphael, Cardiac Diagnostic Unit, New Haven, CT (United States)], E-mail: bogmarcu@pol.net

    2006-10-15

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved from an effective research tool into a clinically proven, safe and comprehensive imaging modality. It provides anatomic and functional information in acquired and congenital heart disease and is the most precise technique for quantification of ventricular volumes, function and mass. Owing to its excellent interstudy reproducibility, cardiovascular MRI is the optimal method for assessment of changes in ventricular parameters after therapeutic intervention. Delayed contrast enhancement is an accurate and robust method used in the diagnosis of ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathies and less common diseases, such as cardiac sarcoidosis and myocarditis. First-pass magnetic contrast myocardial perfusion is becoming an alternative to radionuclide techniques for the detection of coronary atherosclerotic disease. In this review we outline the techniques used in cardiovascular MRI and discuss the most common clinical applications. (author)

  16. Adaptive photoacoustic imaging quality optimization with EMD and reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chengwen; Ding, Yao; Yuan, Jie; Xu, Guan; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L.

    2016-10-01

    Biomedical photoacoustic (PA) signal is characterized with extremely low signal to noise ratio which will yield significant artifacts in photoacoustic tomography (PAT) images. Since PA signals acquired by ultrasound transducers are non-linear and non-stationary, traditional data analysis methods such as Fourier and wavelet method cannot give useful information for further research. In this paper, we introduce an adaptive method to improve the quality of PA imaging based on empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and reconstruction. Data acquired by ultrasound transducers are adaptively decomposed into several intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) after a sifting pre-process. Since noise is randomly distributed in different IMFs, depressing IMFs with more noise while enhancing IMFs with less noise can effectively enhance the quality of reconstructed PAT images. However, searching optimal parameters by means of brute force searching algorithms will cost too much time, which prevent this method from practical use. To find parameters within reasonable time, heuristic algorithms, which are designed for finding good solutions more efficiently when traditional methods are too slow, are adopted in our method. Two of the heuristic algorithms, Simulated Annealing Algorithm, a probabilistic method to approximate the global optimal solution, and Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm, an optimization method inspired by the foraging behavior of bee swarm, are selected to search optimal parameters of IMFs in this paper. The effectiveness of our proposed method is proved both on simulated data and PA signals from real biomedical tissue, which might bear the potential for future clinical PA imaging de-noising.

  17. High resolution multimodal clinical ophthalmic imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujat, Mircea; Ferguson, R Daniel; Patel, Ankit H; Iftimia, Nicusor; Lue, Niyom; Hammer, Daniel X

    2010-05-24

    We developed a multimodal adaptive optics (AO) retinal imager which is the first to combine high performance AO-corrected scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) and swept source Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) imaging modes in a single compact clinical prototype platform. Such systems are becoming ever more essential to vision research and are expected to prove their clinical value for diagnosis of retinal diseases, including glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR), age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and retinitis pigmentosa. The SSOCT channel operates at a wavelength of 1 microm for increased penetration and visualization of the choriocapillaris and choroid, sites of major disease activity for DR and wet AMD. This AO system is designed for use in clinical populations; a dual deformable mirror (DM) configuration allows simultaneous low- and high-order aberration correction over a large range of refractions and ocular media quality. The system also includes a wide field (33 deg.) line scanning ophthalmoscope (LSO) for initial screening, target identification, and global orientation, an integrated retinal tracker (RT) to stabilize the SLO, OCT, and LSO imaging fields in the presence of lateral eye motion, and a high-resolution LCD-based fixation target for presentation of visual cues. The system was tested in human subjects without retinal disease for performance optimization and validation. We were able to resolve and quantify cone photoreceptors across the macula to within approximately 0.5 deg (approximately 100-150 microm) of the fovea, image and delineate ten retinal layers, and penetrate to resolve features deep into the choroid. The prototype presented here is the first of a new class of powerful flexible imaging platforms that will provide clinicians and researchers with high-resolution, high performance adaptive optics imaging to help guide therapies, develop new drugs, and improve patient outcomes.

  18. Wavelength optimization for quantitative spectral imaging of breast tumor margins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Y Lo

    Full Text Available A wavelength selection method that combines an inverse Monte Carlo model of reflectance and a genetic algorithm for global optimization was developed for the application of spectral imaging of breast tumor margins. The selection of wavelengths impacts system design in cost, size, and accuracy of tissue quantitation. The minimum number of wavelengths required for the accurate quantitation of tissue optical properties is 8, with diminishing gains for additional wavelengths. The resulting wavelength choices for the specific probe geometry used for the breast tumor margin spectral imaging application were tested in an independent pathology-confirmed ex vivo breast tissue data set and in tissue-mimicking phantoms. In breast tissue, the optical endpoints (hemoglobin, β-carotene, and scattering that provide the contrast between normal and malignant tissue specimens are extracted with the optimized 8-wavelength set with <9% error compared to the full spectrum (450-600 nm. A multi-absorber liquid phantom study was also performed to show the improved extraction accuracy with optimization and without optimization. This technique for selecting wavelengths can be used for designing spectral imaging systems for other clinical applications.

  19. Optimization of Image Quality and Dose in Digital Mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fausto, Agnes M F; Lopes, M C; de Sousa, M C; Furquim, Tânia A C; Mol, Anderson W; Velasco, Fermin G

    2017-04-01

    Nowadays, the optimization in digital mammography is one of the most important challenges in diagnostic radiology. The new digital technology has introduced additional elements to be considered in this scenario. A major goal of mammography is related to the detection of structures on the order of micrometers (μm) and the need to distinguish the different types of tissues, with very close density values. The diagnosis in mammography faces the difficulty that the breast tissues and pathological findings have very close linear attenuation coefficients within the energy range used in mammography. The aim of this study was to develop a methodology for optimizing exposure parameters of digital mammography based on a new Figure of Merit: FOM ≡ (IQF inv ) 2 /AGD, considering the image quality and dose. The study was conducted using the digital mammography Senographe DS/GE, and CDMAM and TORMAM phantoms. The characterization of clinical practice, carried out in the mammography system under study, was performed considering different breast thicknesses, the technical parameters of exposure, and processing options of images used by the equipment's automatic exposure system. The results showed a difference between the values of the optimized parameters and those ones chosen by the automatic system of the mammography unit, specifically for small breast. The optimized exposure parameters showed better results than those obtained by the automatic system of the mammography, for the image quality parameters and its impact on detection of breast structures when analyzed by radiologists.

  20. Acoustic-noise-optimized diffusion-weighted imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Martin; Blaimer, Martin; Grodzki, David M; Breuer, Felix A; Roesch, Julie; Dörfler, Arnd; Heismann, Björn; Jakob, Peter M

    2015-12-01

    This work was aimed at reducing acoustic noise in diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) that might reach acoustic noise levels of over 100 dB(A) in clinical practice. A diffusion-weighted readout-segmented echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence was optimized for acoustic noise by utilizing small readout segment widths to obtain low gradient slew rates and amplitudes instead of faster k-space coverage. In addition, all other gradients were optimized for low slew rates. Volunteer and patient imaging experiments were conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of the method. Acoustic noise measurements were performed and analyzed for four different DWI measurement protocols at 1.5T and 3T. An acoustic noise reduction of up to 20 dB(A) was achieved, which corresponds to a fourfold reduction in acoustic perception. The image quality was preserved at the level of a standard single-shot (ss)-EPI sequence, with a 27-54% increase in scan time. The diffusion-weighted imaging technique proposed in this study allowed a substantial reduction in the level of acoustic noise compared to standard single-shot diffusion-weighted EPI. This is expected to afford considerably more patient comfort, but a larger study would be necessary to fully characterize the subjective changes in patient experience.

  1. Stochastic optimization with randomized smoothing for image registration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Wei; Poot, D.H.J.; Smal, Ihor; Yang, Xuan; Niessen, W.J.; Klein, S.

    2017-01-01

    Image registration is typically formulated as an optimization process, which aims to find the optimal transformation parameters of a given transformation model by minimizing a cost function. Local minima may exist in the optimization landscape, which could hamper the optimization process. To

  2. Determination of optimal rhodamine fluorophore for in vivo optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmire, Michelle R; Ogawa, Mikako; Hama, Yukihiro; Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Regino, Celeste A S; Choyke, Peter L; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2008-08-01

    Optical imaging has the potential to improve the efficacy of surgical and endoscopic approaches to cancer treatment; however, the optimal type of fluorescent probe has not yet been established. It is well-known that rhodamine-core-derived fluorophores offer a combination of desirable properties such as good photostability, high extinction coefficient, and high fluorescence quantum yield. However, despite the ubiquitous use of rhodamine fluorophores for in vivo optical imaging, it remains to be determined if unique chemical properties among individual rhodamine core family members affect fluorophore parameters critical to in vivo optical imaging applications. These parameters include preserved fluorescence intensity in low pH environments, similar to that of the endolysosome; efficient fluorescence signal despite conformational changes to targeting proteins as may occur in harsh subcellular environments; persistence of fluorescence after cellular internalization; and sufficient signal-to-background ratios to permit the identification of fluorophore-targeted tumors. In the present study, we conjugated 4 common rhodamine-core based fluorescent dyes to a clinically feasible and quickly internalizing D-galactose receptor targeting reagent, galactosamine serum albumin (GmSA), and conducted a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments using a metastatic ovarian cancer mouse model to determine if differences in optical imaging properties exist among rhodamine fluorophores and if so, which rhodamine core possesses optimal characteristics for in vivo imaging applications. Herein, we demonstrate that the rhodamine-fluorophore, TAMRA, is the most robust of the 4 common rhodamine fluorophores for in vivo optical imaging of ovarian cancer metastases to the peritoneum.

  3. Optimal Scale Edge Detection Utilizing Noise within Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Khashman

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Edge detection techniques have common problems that include poor edge detection in low contrast images, speed of recognition and high computational cost. An efficient solution to the edge detection of objects in low to high contrast images is scale space analysis. However, this approach is time consuming and computationally expensive. These expenses can be marginally reduced if an optimal scale is found in scale space edge detection. This paper presents a new approach to detecting objects within images using noise within the images. The novel idea is based on selecting one optimal scale for the entire image at which scale space edge detection can be applied. The selection of an ideal scale is based on the hypothesis that "the optimal edge detection scale (ideal scale depends on the noise within an image". This paper aims at providing the experimental evidence on the relationship between the optimal scale and the noise within images.

  4. Real-time SPARSE-SENSE cardiac cine MR imaging: optimization of image reconstruction and sequence validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Juliane; Nensa, Felix; Bomas, Bettina; Schemuth, Haemi P; Maderwald, Stefan; Gratz, Marcel; Quick, Harald H; Schlosser, Thomas; Nassenstein, Kai

    2016-12-01

    Improved real-time cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) sequences have currently been introduced, but so far only limited practical experience exists. This study aimed at image reconstruction optimization and clinical validation of a new highly accelerated real-time cine SPARSE-SENSE sequence. Left ventricular (LV) short-axis stacks of a real-time free-breathing SPARSE-SENSE sequence with high spatiotemporal resolution and of a standard segmented cine SSFP sequence were acquired at 1.5 T in 11 volunteers and 15 patients. To determine the optimal iterations, all volunteers' SPARSE-SENSE images were reconstructed using 10-200 iterations, and contrast ratios, image entropies, and reconstruction times were assessed. Subsequently, the patients' SPARSE-SENSE images were reconstructed with the clinically optimal iterations. LV volumetric values were evaluated and compared between both sequences. Sufficient image quality and acceptable reconstruction times were achieved when using 80 iterations. Bland-Altman plots and Passing-Bablok regression showed good agreement for all volumetric parameters. 80 iterations are recommended for iterative SPARSE-SENSE image reconstruction in clinical routine. Real-time cine SPARSE-SENSE yielded comparable volumetric results as the current standard SSFP sequence. Due to its intrinsic low image acquisition times, real-time cine SPARSE-SENSE imaging with iterative image reconstruction seems to be an attractive alternative for LV function analysis. • A highly accelerated real-time CMR sequence using SPARSE-SENSE was evaluated. • SPARSE-SENSE allows free breathing in real-time cardiac cine imaging. • For clinically optimal SPARSE-SENSE image reconstruction, 80 iterations are recommended. • Real-time SPARSE-SENSE imaging yielded comparable volumetric results as the reference SSFP sequence. • The fast SPARSE-SENSE sequence is an attractive alternative to standard SSFP sequences.

  5. Ultrasound molecular imaging: Moving toward clinical translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Bachawal, Sunitha V.; Willmann, Jürgen K., E-mail: willmann@stanford.edu

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Ultrasound molecular imaging is a highly sensitive modality. • A clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent has entered first in human clinical trials. • Several new potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging are being explored. - Abstract: Ultrasound is a widely available, cost-effective, real-time, non-invasive and safe imaging modality widely used in the clinic for anatomical and functional imaging. With the introduction of novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents, another dimension of ultrasound has become a reality: diagnosing and monitoring pathological processes at the molecular level. Most commonly used ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents are micron sized, gas-containing microbubbles functionalized to recognize and attach to molecules expressed on inflamed or angiogenic vascular endothelial cells. There are several potential clinical applications currently being explored including earlier detection, molecular profiling, and monitoring of cancer, as well as visualization of ischemic memory in transient myocardial ischemia, monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease, and assessment of arteriosclerosis. Recently, a first clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent (BR55), targeted at a molecule expressed in neoangiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2; VEGFR2) has been introduced and safety and feasibility of VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound imaging is being explored in first inhuman clinical trials in various cancer types. This review describes the design of ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents, imaging techniques, and potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging.

  6. Optimization of Segmentation Quality of Integrated Circuit Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gintautas Mušketas

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents investigation into the application of genetic algorithms for the segmentation of the active regions of integrated circuit images. This article is dedicated to a theoretical examination of the applied methods (morphological dilation, erosion, hit-and-miss, threshold and describes genetic algorithms, image segmentation as optimization problem. The genetic optimization of the predefined filter sequence parameters is carried out. Improvement to segmentation accuracy using a non optimized filter sequence makes 6%.Artcile in Lithuanian

  7. Optimizing signal and image processing applications using Intel libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landré, Jérôme; Truchetet, Frédéric

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents optimized signal and image processing libraries from Intel Corporation. Intel Performance Primitives (IPP) is a low-level signal and image processing library developed by Intel Corporation to optimize code on Intel processors. Open Computer Vision library (OpenCV) is a high-level library dedicated to computer vision tasks. This article describes the use of both libraries to build flexible and efficient signal and image processing applications.

  8. Optimizing Imaging Instruments for Emission Mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Irving N.

    1996-05-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that radiotracer methods can noninvasively detect breast cancers in vivo(L.P. Adler, J.P.Crowe, N.K. Al-Kaisis, et al, Radiology 187,743-750 (1993)) (I. Khalkhali, I. Mena, E. Jouanne, et al, J. Am. Coll. Surg. 178, 491-497 (1994)). Due to spatial resolution and count efficiency considerations, users of conventional nuclear medicine instruments have had difficulty in detecting subcentimeter cancers. This limitation is unfortunate, since cancer therapy is generally most efficacious when tumor diameter at detection is less than a centimeter. A more subtle limitation of conventional nuclear medicine imaging instruments is that they are poorly suited to guiding interventions. With the assistance of C.J. Thompson from McGill University, and the CEBAF Detector Physics Group, we have explored the possibility of configuring detectors for nuclear medicine imaging devices into geometries that resemble conventional x-ray mammography cameras(I.N. Weinberg, U.S.Patent 5,252,830 (1993)). Phantom and pilot clinical studies suggest that applying breast compression within such geometries may offer several advantages(C.J. Thompson, K. Murthy, I.N. Weinberg, et al, Med. Physics 21, 259-538 (1994)): For coincident detection of positron emitters, efficiency and spatial resolution are improved by bringing the detectors very close to the source (the breast tumor). For single-photon detection, attenuation due to overlying tissue is reduced. Since, for a high-efficiency collimator, spatial resolution worsens with increasing source to collimator distance, adoption of compression allows more efficient collimators to be employed. Economics are favorable in that detectors can be deployed in the region of interest, rather than around the entire body, and that such detectors can be mounted in conventional mammographic gantries. The application of conventional mammographic geometry promises to assist physicians in conducting radiotracer-guided biopsies, and in

  9. [The technology innovation and optimization of clinical application for CT and MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen-Lin; Song, Bin

    2012-07-01

    Along with the application of new medical imaging technology, the clinical diagnosis and treatment relies more and more on the support of imaging study, from health examination to curative effect evaluation. It becomes more prominent than ever to protect the safety of patients and to improve the accuracy of diagnostic imaging with the increasing number of examinee. X-ray radiation hazards and adverse events of contrast agent are major hidden safety risks in the imaging process. The new technology of radiation protection, optimization of check sequence, as well as the dosage reduction of X-ray scanning can reduce the X-ray radiation hazards to examinee. Decreasing the amount of contrast agent can reduce the risk of severe adverse events in CT or MRI enhanced scan. Non-contrast MRA imaging make angiography possible for the patients with renal insufficiency or contrast-allergy. The clinical application of new image techniques, such as energy imaging, function imaging and molecular imaging, not only contribute to improve the accuracy of diagnostic imaging, but also facilitate diagnostic imaging from morphological and anatomic level extending to functional and molecular level. It is the only way to meet the growing clinical demands on precise imaging with technical innovation and optimization. In order to guarantee the benefit for every examinee, we need highly concern about how to avoid any possible safety incidents during imaging examination and the waste of medical resources caused by repeat examination.

  10. Synthetic Imaging Maneuver Optimization (SIMO) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space-based interferometry missions have the potential to revolutionize imaging and astrometry, providing observations of unprecedented accuracy. Realizing the full...

  11. An image morphing technique based on optimal mass preserving mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Yang, Yan; Haker, Steven; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2007-06-01

    Image morphing, or image interpolation in the time domain, deals with the metamorphosis of one image into another. In this paper, a new class of image morphing algorithms is proposed based on the theory of optimal mass transport. The L(2) mass moving energy functional is modified by adding an intensity penalizing term, in order to reduce the undesired double exposure effect. It is an intensity-based approach and, thus, is parameter free. The optimal warping function is computed using an iterative gradient descent approach. This proposed morphing method is also extended to doubly connected domains using a harmonic parameterization technique, along with finite-element methods.

  12. A novel multilayer MV imager computational model for component optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myronakis, Marios; Star-Lack, Josh; Baturin, Paul; Rottmann, Joerg; Morf, Daniel; Wang, Adam; Hu, Yue-Houng; Shedlock, Daniel; Berbeco, Ross I

    2017-08-01

    A novel Megavoltage (MV) multilayer imager (MLI) design featuring higher detective quantum efficiency and lower noise than current conventional MV imagers in clinical use has been recently reported. Optimization of the MLI design for multiple applications including tumor tracking, MV-CBCT and portal dosimetry requires a computational model that will provide insight into the physics processes that affect the overall and individual components' performance. The purpose of the current work was to develop and validate a comprehensive computational model that can be used for MLI optimization. The MLI model was built using the Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) application. The model includes x-ray and charged-particle interactions as well as the optical transfer within the phosphor. A first prototype MLI device featuring a stack of four detection layers was used for model validation. Each layer of the prototype contains a copper buildup plate, a phosphor screen and photodiode array. The model was validated against measured data of Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), Noise-Power Spectrum (NPS), and Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE). MTF was computed using a slanted slit with 2.3(°) angle and 0.1 mm width. NPS was obtained using the autocorrelation function technique. DQE was calculated from MTF and NPS data. The comparison metrics between simulated and measured data were the Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) and the normalized root-mean-square error (NRMSE). Good agreement between measured and simulated MTF and NPS values was observed. Pearson's correlation coefficient for the combined signal from all layers of the MLI was equal to 0.9991 for MTF and 0.9992 for NPS; NRMSE was 0.0121 for MTF and 0.0194 for NPS. Similarly, the DQE correlation coefficient for the combined signal was 0.9888 and the NRMSE was 0.0686. A comprehensive model of the novel MLI design was developed using the GATE toolkit and validated against measured MTF, NPS, and DQE data

  13. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging: Moving Towards Clinical Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Bachawal, Sunitha V.; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is a widely available, cost-effective, real-time, non-invasive and safe imaging modality widely used in the clinic for anatomical and functional imaging. With the introduction of novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents, another dimension of ultrasound has become a reality: diagnosing and monitoring pathological processes at the molecular level. Most commonly used ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents are micron sized, gas-containing microbubbles functionalized to recognize and attach to molecules expressed on inflamed or angiogenic vascular endothelial cells. There are several potential clinical applications currently being explored including earlier detection, molecular profiling, and monitoring of cancer, as well as visualization of ischemic memory in transient myocardial ischemia, monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease, and assessment of arteriosclerosis. Recently, a first clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent (BR55), targeted at a molecule expressed in neoangiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2; VEGFR2) has been introduced and safety and feasibility of VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound imaging is being explored in first inhuman clinical trials in various cancer types. This review describes the design of ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents, imaging techniques, and potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging. PMID:25851932

  14. Ultrasound molecular imaging: Moving toward clinical translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Bachawal, Sunitha V; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasound is a widely available, cost-effective, real-time, non-invasive and safe imaging modality widely used in the clinic for anatomical and functional imaging. With the introduction of novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents, another dimension of ultrasound has become a reality: diagnosing and monitoring pathological processes at the molecular level. Most commonly used ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents are micron sized, gas-containing microbubbles functionalized to recognize and attach to molecules expressed on inflamed or angiogenic vascular endothelial cells. There are several potential clinical applications currently being explored including earlier detection, molecular profiling, and monitoring of cancer, as well as visualization of ischemic memory in transient myocardial ischemia, monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease, and assessment of arteriosclerosis. Recently, a first clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent (BR55), targeted at a molecule expressed in neoangiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2; VEGFR2) has been introduced and safety and feasibility of VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound imaging is being explored in first inhuman clinical trials in various cancer types. This review describes the design of ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents, imaging techniques, and potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical PET/MR Imaging in Oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Andreas; Torigian, Drew A.

    2016-01-01

    . The question, therefore, arises regarding what the future clinical applications of PET/MR imaging will be. In this article, the authors discuss ways in which PET/MR imaging may be used in future applications that justify the added cost, predominantly focusing on oncologic applications. The authors suggest...

  16. Generalized PSF modeling for optimized quantitation in PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafinia, Saeed; Mohy-ud-Din, Hassan; Karakatsanis, Nicolas A.; Jha, Abhinav K.; Casey, Michael E.; Kadrmas, Dan J.; Rahmim, Arman

    2017-06-01

    Point-spread function (PSF) modeling offers the ability to account for resolution degrading phenomena within the PET image generation framework. PSF modeling improves resolution and enhances contrast, but at the same time significantly alters image noise properties and induces edge overshoot effect. Thus, studying the effect of PSF modeling on quantitation task performance can be very important. Frameworks explored in the past involved a dichotomy of PSF versus no-PSF modeling. By contrast, the present work focuses on quantitative performance evaluation of standard uptake value (SUV) PET images, while incorporating a wide spectrum of PSF models, including those that under- and over-estimate the true PSF, for the potential of enhanced quantitation of SUVs. The developed framework first analytically models the true PSF, considering a range of resolution degradation phenomena (including photon non-collinearity, inter-crystal penetration and scattering) as present in data acquisitions with modern commercial PET systems. In the context of oncologic liver FDG PET imaging, we generated 200 noisy datasets per image-set (with clinically realistic noise levels) using an XCAT anthropomorphic phantom with liver tumours of varying sizes. These were subsequently reconstructed using the OS-EM algorithm with varying PSF modelled kernels. We focused on quantitation of both SUVmean and SUVmax, including assessment of contrast recovery coefficients, as well as noise-bias characteristics (including both image roughness and coefficient of-variability), for different tumours/iterations/PSF kernels. It was observed that overestimated PSF yielded more accurate contrast recovery for a range of tumours, and typically improved quantitative performance. For a clinically reasonable number of iterations, edge enhancement due to PSF modeling (especially due to over-estimated PSF) was in fact seen to lower SUVmean bias in small tumours. Overall, the results indicate that exactly matched PSF

  17. Generalized PSF modeling for optimized quantitation in PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafinia, Saeed; Mohy-Ud-Din, Hassan; Karakatsanis, Nicolas A; Jha, Abhinav K; Casey, Michael E; Kadrmas, Dan J; Rahmim, Arman

    2017-06-21

    Point-spread function (PSF) modeling offers the ability to account for resolution degrading phenomena within the PET image generation framework. PSF modeling improves resolution and enhances contrast, but at the same time significantly alters image noise properties and induces edge overshoot effect. Thus, studying the effect of PSF modeling on quantitation task performance can be very important. Frameworks explored in the past involved a dichotomy of PSF versus no-PSF modeling. By contrast, the present work focuses on quantitative performance evaluation of standard uptake value (SUV) PET images, while incorporating a wide spectrum of PSF models, including those that under- and over-estimate the true PSF, for the potential of enhanced quantitation of SUVs. The developed framework first analytically models the true PSF, considering a range of resolution degradation phenomena (including photon non-collinearity, inter-crystal penetration and scattering) as present in data acquisitions with modern commercial PET systems. In the context of oncologic liver FDG PET imaging, we generated 200 noisy datasets per image-set (with clinically realistic noise levels) using an XCAT anthropomorphic phantom with liver tumours of varying sizes. These were subsequently reconstructed using the OS-EM algorithm with varying PSF modelled kernels. We focused on quantitation of both SUVmean and SUVmax, including assessment of contrast recovery coefficients, as well as noise-bias characteristics (including both image roughness and coefficient of-variability), for different tumours/iterations/PSF kernels. It was observed that overestimated PSF yielded more accurate contrast recovery for a range of tumours, and typically improved quantitative performance. For a clinically reasonable number of iterations, edge enhancement due to PSF modeling (especially due to over-estimated PSF) was in fact seen to lower SUVmean bias in small tumours. Overall, the results indicate that exactly matched PSF

  18. Clinical Photoacoustic Breast Imaging: The Twente experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijblom, M.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2015-01-01

    Globally, breast cancer is the most frequently occurring malignancy in women and the leading cause of cancer deaths, with up to half a million women dying of the disease in 2008. Early detection and accurate diagnosis of breast cancer is crucial for optimizing survival chances, with imaging

  19. CT radiation dose and image quality optimization using a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarb, Francis; McEntee, Mark F; Rainford, Louise

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate potential radiation dose savings and resultant image quality effects with regard to optimization of commonly performed computed tomography (CT) studies derived from imaging a porcine (pig) model. Imaging protocols for 4 clinical CT suites were developed based on the lowest milliamperage and kilovoltage, the highest pitch that could be set from current imaging protocol parameters, or both. This occurred before significant changes in noise, contrast, and spatial resolution were measured objectively on images produced from a quality assurance CT phantom. The current and derived phantom protocols were then applied to scan a porcine model for head, abdomen, and chest CT studies. Further optimized protocols were developed based on the same methodology as in the phantom study. The optimization achieved with respect to radiation dose and image quality was evaluated following data collection of radiation dose recordings and image quality review. Relative visual grading analysis of image quality criteria adapted from the European guidelines on radiology quality criteria for CT were used for studies completed with both the phantom-based or porcine-derived imaging protocols. In 5 out of 16 experimental combinations, the current clinical protocol was maintained. In 2 instances, the phantom protocol reduced radiation dose by 19% to 38%. In the remaining 9 instances, the optimization based on the porcine model further reduced radiation dose by 17% to 38%. The porcine model closely reflects anatomical structures in humans, allowing the grading of anatomical criteria as part of image quality review without radiation risks to human subjects. This study demonstrates that using a porcine model to evaluate CT optimization resulted in more radiation dose reduction than when imaging protocols were tested solely on quality assurance phantoms.

  20. Optimization of microsatellite DNA Gelred fluorescence imaging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user1

    2012-10-11

    Oct 11, 2012 ... Decontamination of ethidium bromide spills. Trends. Genet. 6:31. Morin PA, Smith DG (1995). Non-radioactive detection of hyper-variable simple sequence repeats in short polyacrylamide gels. Biotechniques. 19:223-227. Pan SL, Long GF, Chen P, Lin WX (2001). Establishment and optimization of DNA ...

  1. Muon tomography imaging improvement using optimized limited angle data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Chuanyong; Simon, Sean; Kindem, Joel; Luo, Weidong; Sossong, Michael J.; Steiger, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    Image resolution of muon tomography is limited by the range of zenith angles of cosmic ray muons and the flux rate at sea level. Low flux rate limits the use of advanced data rebinning and processing techniques to improve image quality. By optimizing the limited angle data, however, image resolution can be improved. To demonstrate the idea, physical data of tungsten blocks were acquired on a muon tomography system. The angular distribution and energy spectrum of muons measured on the system was also used to generate simulation data of tungsten blocks of different arrangement (geometry). The data were grouped into subsets using the zenith angle and volume images were reconstructed from the data subsets using two algorithms. One was a distributed PoCA (point of closest approach) algorithm and the other was an accelerated iterative maximal likelihood/expectation maximization (MLEM) algorithm. Image resolution was compared for different subsets. Results showed that image resolution was better in the vertical direction for subsets with greater zenith angles and better in the horizontal plane for subsets with smaller zenith angles. The overall image resolution appeared to be the compromise of that of different subsets. This work suggests that the acquired data can be grouped into different limited angle data subsets for optimized image resolution in desired directions. Use of multiple images with resolution optimized in different directions can improve overall imaging fidelity and the intended applications.

  2. An improved technique for the prediction of optimal image resolution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2010-10-04

    Oct 4, 2010 ... two simultaneous equations of values of image noise index (INI) and degradation level Index (LDI), a robust technique for predicting optimal image resolution for the mapping of savannah ecosystems was developed. ..... of aerial photography, Landsat TM and SPOT satellite imagery. Int. J. Remote Sens.

  3. Optimal design in pediatric pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jessica K; Stockmann, Chris; Balch, Alfred; Yu, Tian; Ward, Robert M; Spigarelli, Michael G; Sherwin, Catherine M T

    2015-03-01

    It is not trivial to conduct clinical trials with pediatric participants. Ethical, logistical, and financial considerations add to the complexity of pediatric studies. Optimal design theory allows investigators the opportunity to apply mathematical optimization algorithms to define how to structure their data collection to answer focused research questions. These techniques can be used to determine an optimal sample size, optimal sample times, and the number of samples required for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies. The aim of this review is to demonstrate how to determine optimal sample size, optimal sample times, and the number of samples required from each patient by presenting specific examples using optimal design tools. Additionally, this review aims to discuss the relative usefulness of sparse vs rich data. This review is intended to educate the clinician, as well as the basic research scientist, whom plan on conducting a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic clinical trial in pediatric patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Edge detection in digital images using Ant Colony Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Kuchaki Rafsanjani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ant Colony Optimization (ACO is an optimization algorithm inspired by the behavior of real ant colonies to approximate the solutions of difficult optimization problems. In this paper, ACO is introduced to tackle the image edge detection problem. The proposed approach is based on the distribution of ants on an image; ants try to find possible edges by using a state transition function. Experimental results show that the proposed method compared to standard edge detectors is less sensitive to Gaussian noise and gives finer details and thinner edges when compared to earlier ant-based approaches.

  5. Robust diffusion imaging framework for clinical studies

    CERN Document Server

    Maximov, Ivan I; Neuner, Irene; Shah, N Jon

    2015-01-01

    Clinical diffusion imaging requires short acquisition times and good image quality to permit its use in various medical applications. In turn, these demands require the development of a robust and efficient post-processing framework in order to guarantee useful and reliable results. However, multiple artefacts abound in in vivo measurements; from either subject such as cardiac pulsation, bulk head motion, respiratory motion and involuntary tics and tremor, or imaging hardware related problems, such as table vibrations, etc. These artefacts can severely degrade the resulting images and render diffusion analysis difficult or impossible. In order to overcome these problems, we developed a robust and efficient framework enabling the use of initially corrupted images from a clinical study. At the heart of this framework is an improved least trimmed squares diffusion tensor estimation algorithm that works well with severely degraded datasets with low signal-to-noise ratio. This approach has been compared with other...

  6. Upgrade to iterative image reconstruction (IR) in MDCT imaging: a clinical study for detailed parameter optimization beyond vendor recommendations using the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction environment (ASIR) Part2: The chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueck, F G; Michael, L; Deak, Z; Scherr, M K; Maxien, D; Geyer, L L; Reiser, M; Wirth, S

    2013-07-01

    To compare the image quality in dose-reduced 64-row CT of the chest at different levels of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) to full-dose baseline examinations reconstructed solely with filtered back projection (FBP) in a realistic upgrade scenario. A waiver of consent was granted by the institutional review board (IRB). The noise index (NI) relates to the standard deviation of Hounsfield units in a water phantom. Baseline exams of the chest (NI = 29; LightSpeed VCT XT, GE Healthcare) were intra-individually compared to follow-up studies on a CT with ASIR after system upgrade (NI = 45; Discovery HD750, GE Healthcare), n = 46. Images were calculated in slice and volume mode with ASIR levels of 0 - 100 % in the standard and lung kernel. Three radiologists independently compared the image quality to the corresponding full-dose baseline examinations (-2: diagnostically inferior, -1: inferior, 0: equal, + 1: superior, + 2: diagnostically superior). Statistical analysis used Wilcoxon's test, Mann-Whitney U test and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The mean CTDIvol decreased by 53 % from the FBP baseline to 8.0 ± 2.3 mGy for ASIR follow-ups; p ASIR 70 % in volume mode (-0.07 ± 0.29, p = 0.29). Concerning the lung kernel, every ASIR level outperformed the baseline image quality (p ASIR 30 % rated best (slice: 0.70 ± 0.6, volume: 0.74 ± 0.61). Vendors' recommendation of 50 % ASIR is fair. In detail, the ASIR 70 % in volume mode for the standard kernel and ASIR 30 % for the lung kernel performed best, allowing for a dose reduction of approximately 50 %. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Clinical evaluation of the Cleon imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, B.R.J.; Teates, C.D.; Howard, B.Y.; Barczak, R.J.; Mosby, R.

    1977-11-01

    We have compared bone images from a number of patients using three instruments. In 38 patients, Cleon body images were compared with whole-body rectilinear scans. Cleon images were also compared with scintillation camera images of the trunk or extremities of 31 patients and of the skull of 70 patients. The Cleon was superior to the rectilinear scanner in resolution, lesion detectability, and speed of scanning. The Cleon and gamma camera were comparable in lesion detection, but the Cleon was considerably faster. Clinical studies and comparative evaluation are presented.

  8. Optimization-based image reconstruction with artifact reduction in C-arm CBCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Dan; Langan, David A.; Solomon, Stephen B.; Zhang, Zheng; Chen, Buxin; Lai, Hao; Sidky, Emil Y.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2016-10-01

    We investigate an optimization-based reconstruction, with an emphasis on image-artifact reduction, from data collected in C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) employed in image-guided interventional procedures. In the study, an image to be reconstructed is formulated as a solution to a convex optimization program in which a weighted data divergence is minimized subject to a constraint on the image total variation (TV); a data-derivative fidelity is introduced in the program specifically for effectively suppressing dominant, low-frequency data artifact caused by, e.g. data truncation; and the Chambolle-Pock (CP) algorithm is tailored to reconstruct an image through solving the program. Like any other reconstructions, the optimization-based reconstruction considered depends upon numerous parameters. We elucidate the parameters, illustrate their determination, and demonstrate their impact on the reconstruction. The optimization-based reconstruction, when applied to data collected from swine and patient subjects, yields images with visibly reduced artifacts in contrast to the reference reconstruction, and it also appears to exhibit a high degree of robustness against distinctively different anatomies of imaged subjects and scanning conditions of clinical significance. Knowledge and insights gained in the study may be exploited for aiding in the design of practical reconstructions of truly clinical-application utility.

  9. Spatial-resolution analysis and optimal design of integral imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, ChunHong; Wang, QianQian; Wang, HongXia; Lan, JinHui

    2013-11-01

    Integral imaging is a promising technology for 3D imaging and display. This paper reports the 3D spatial-resolution research based on reconstructed 3D space. Through geometric analysis of the reconstructed optical distribution from all the element images that attend recording, the relationship among microlens parameters, planar-recording resolution, and 3D spatial resolution was obtained. The effect of microlens parameter accuracy on the reconstructed position error also was discussed. The research was carried on the depth priority integral imaging system (DPII). The results can be used in the optimal design of integral imaging.

  10. Modified Discrete Grey Wolf Optimizer Algorithm for Multilevel Image Thresholding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lijuan; Guo, Jian; Xu, Bin; Li, Shujing

    2017-01-01

    The computation of image segmentation has become more complicated with the increasing number of thresholds, and the option and application of the thresholds in image thresholding fields have become an NP problem at the same time. The paper puts forward the modified discrete grey wolf optimizer algorithm (MDGWO), which improves on the optimal solution updating mechanism of the search agent by the weights. Taking Kapur's entropy as the optimized function and based on the discreteness of threshold in image segmentation, the paper firstly discretizes the grey wolf optimizer (GWO) and then proposes a new attack strategy by using the weight coefficient to replace the search formula for optimal solution used in the original algorithm. The experimental results show that MDGWO can search out the optimal thresholds efficiently and precisely, which are very close to the result examined by exhaustive searches. In comparison with the electromagnetism optimization (EMO), the differential evolution (DE), the Artifical Bee Colony (ABC), and the classical GWO, it is concluded that MDGWO has advantages over the latter four in terms of image segmentation quality and objective function values and their stability. PMID:28127305

  11. Modified Discrete Grey Wolf Optimizer Algorithm for Multilevel Image Thresholding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linguo; Sun, Lijuan; Guo, Jian; Qi, Jin; Xu, Bin; Li, Shujing

    2017-01-01

    The computation of image segmentation has become more complicated with the increasing number of thresholds, and the option and application of the thresholds in image thresholding fields have become an NP problem at the same time. The paper puts forward the modified discrete grey wolf optimizer algorithm (MDGWO), which improves on the optimal solution updating mechanism of the search agent by the weights. Taking Kapur's entropy as the optimized function and based on the discreteness of threshold in image segmentation, the paper firstly discretizes the grey wolf optimizer (GWO) and then proposes a new attack strategy by using the weight coefficient to replace the search formula for optimal solution used in the original algorithm. The experimental results show that MDGWO can search out the optimal thresholds efficiently and precisely, which are very close to the result examined by exhaustive searches. In comparison with the electromagnetism optimization (EMO), the differential evolution (DE), the Artifical Bee Colony (ABC), and the classical GWO, it is concluded that MDGWO has advantages over the latter four in terms of image segmentation quality and objective function values and their stability.

  12. Modified Discrete Grey Wolf Optimizer Algorithm for Multilevel Image Thresholding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linguo Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The computation of image segmentation has become more complicated with the increasing number of thresholds, and the option and application of the thresholds in image thresholding fields have become an NP problem at the same time. The paper puts forward the modified discrete grey wolf optimizer algorithm (MDGWO, which improves on the optimal solution updating mechanism of the search agent by the weights. Taking Kapur’s entropy as the optimized function and based on the discreteness of threshold in image segmentation, the paper firstly discretizes the grey wolf optimizer (GWO and then proposes a new attack strategy by using the weight coefficient to replace the search formula for optimal solution used in the original algorithm. The experimental results show that MDGWO can search out the optimal thresholds efficiently and precisely, which are very close to the result examined by exhaustive searches. In comparison with the electromagnetism optimization (EMO, the differential evolution (DE, the Artifical Bee Colony (ABC, and the classical GWO, it is concluded that MDGWO has advantages over the latter four in terms of image segmentation quality and objective function values and their stability.

  13. Intracoronary optical coherence tomography: Clinical and research applications and intravascular imaging software overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tenekecioglu, Erhan; Albuquerque, Felipe N.; Sotomi, Yohei; Zeng, Yaping; Suwannasom, Pannipa; Tateishi, Hiroki; Cavalcante, Rafael; Ishibashi, Yuki; Nakatani, Shimpei; Abdelghani, Mohammad; Dijkstra, Jouke; Bourantas, Christos; Collet, Carlos; Karanasos, Antonios; Radu, Maria; Wang, Ancong; Muramatsu, Takashi; Landmesser, Ulf; Okamura, Takayuki; Regar, Evelyn; Räber, Lorenz; Guagliumi, Giulio; Pyo, Robert T.; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Serruys, Patrick W.

    2017-01-01

    By providing valuable information about the coronary artery wall and lumen, intravascular imaging may aid in optimizing interventional procedure results and thereby could improve clinical outcomes following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Intravascular optical coherence tomography (OCT) is

  14. Compressive Sensing Image Fusion Based on Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Lv, J.; Jiang, S.; Zhou, H.

    2017-09-01

    In order to solve the problem that the spatial matching is difficult and the spectral distortion is large in traditional pixel-level image fusion algorithm. We propose a new method of image fusion that utilizes HIS transformation and the recently developed theory of compressive sensing that is called HIS-CS image fusion. In this algorithm, the particle swarm optimization algorithm is used to select the fusion coefficient ω. In the iterative process, the image fusion coefficient ω is taken as particle, and the optimal value is obtained by combining the optimal objective function. Then we use the compression-aware weighted fusion algorithm for remote sensing image fusion, taking the coefficient ω as the weight value. The algorithm ensures the optimal selection of fusion effect with a certain degree of self-adaptability. To evaluate the fused images, this paper uses five kinds of index parameters such as Entropy, Standard Deviation, Average Gradient, Degree of Distortion and Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio. The experimental results show that the image fusion effect of the algorithm in this paper is better than that of traditional methods.

  15. Illustrated Imaging Essay on Congenital Heart Diseases: Multimodality Approach Part I: Clinical Perspective, Anatomy and Imaging Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Belaval, Vinay; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Raj, Vimal; Shah, Sejal

    2016-05-01

    Rapid evolution in technology in the recent years has lead to availability of multiple options for cardiac imaging. Availability of multiple options of varying capability, poses a challenge for optimal imaging choice. While new imaging choices are added, some of the established methods find their role re-defined. State of the art imaging practices are limited to few specialist cardiac centres, depriving many radiologists and radiologist in-training of optimal exposure to the field. This presentation is aimed at providing a broad idea about complexity of clinical problem, imaging options and a large library of images of congenital heart disease. Some emphasis is made as to the need of proper balance between performing examination with technical excellence in an ideal situation against the need of the majority of patients who are investigated with less optimal resources. Cases of congenital cardiac disease are presented in an illustrative way, showing imaging appearances in multiple modalities, highlighting specific observations in given instance.

  16. Imaging: Guiding the Clinical Translation of Cardiac Stem Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Patricia K.; Lan, Feng; Wang, Yongming; Wu, Joseph C.

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells have been touted as the holy grail of medical therapy with promises to regenerate cardiac tissue, but it appears the jury is still out on this novel therapy. Using advanced imaging technology, scientists have discovered that these cells do not survive nor engraft long-term. In addition, only marginal benefit has been observed in large animal studies and human trials. However, all is not lost. Further application of advanced imaging technology will help scientists unravel the mysteries of stem cell therapy and address the clinical hurdles facing its routine implementation. In this review, we will discuss how advanced imaging technology will help investigators better define the optimal delivery method, improve survival and engraftment, and evaluate efficacy and safety. Insights gained from this review may direct the development of future preclinical investigations and clinical trials. PMID:21960727

  17. Image processing to optimize wave energy converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kyle Marc-Anthony

    The world is turning to renewable energies as a means of ensuring the planet's future and well-being. There have been a few attempts in the past to utilize wave power as a means of generating electricity through the use of Wave Energy Converters (WEC), but only recently are they becoming a focal point in the renewable energy field. Over the past few years there has been a global drive to advance the efficiency of WEC. Placing a mechanical device either onshore or offshore that captures the energy within ocean surface waves to drive a mechanical device is how wave power is produced. This paper seeks to provide a novel and innovative way to estimate ocean wave frequency through the use of image processing. This will be achieved by applying a complex modulated lapped orthogonal transform filter bank to satellite images of ocean waves. The complex modulated lapped orthogonal transform filterbank provides an equal subband decomposition of the Nyquist bounded discrete time Fourier Transform spectrum. The maximum energy of the 2D complex modulated lapped transform subband is used to determine the horizontal and vertical frequency, which subsequently can be used to determine the wave frequency in the direction of the WEC by a simple trigonometric scaling. The robustness of the proposed method is provided by the applications to simulated and real satellite images where the frequency is known.

  18. Optimizing biologically targeted clinical trials for neurofibromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmann, David H; Blakeley, Jaishri O; Korf, Bruce R; Packer, Roger J

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The neurofibromatoses (neurofibromatosis type 1, NF1 and neurofibromatosis type 2, NF2) comprise the most common inherited conditions in which affected children and adults develop tumors of the central and peripheral nervous system. In this review, the authors discuss how the establishment of the Neurofibromatosis Clinical Trials Consortium (NFCTC) has positively impacted on the design and execution of treatment studies for individuals with NF1 and NF2. Areas covered Using an extensive PUBMED search in collaboration with select NFCTC members expert in distinct NF topics, the authors discuss the clinical features of NF1 and NF2, the molecular biology of the NF1 and NF2 genes, the development and application of clinically relevant Nf1 and Nf2 genetically engineered mouse models and the formation of the NFCTC to enable efficient clinical trial design and execution. Expert opinion The NFCTC has resulted in a more seamless integration of mouse preclinical and human clinical trials efforts. Leveraging emerging enabling resources, current research is focused on identifying subtypes of tumors in NF1 and NF2 to deliver the most active compounds to the patients most likely to respond to the targeted therapy. PMID:23425047

  19. Image Compression Algorithms Optimized for MATLAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hanus

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes implementation of the Discrete Cosine Transform(DCT algorithm to MATLAB. This approach is used in JPEG or MPEGstandards for instance. The substance of these specifications is toremove the considerable correlation between adjacent picture elements.The objective of this paper is not to improve the DCT algorithm itself, but to re-write it to the preferable version for MATLAB thusallows the enumeration with insignificant delay. The method proposed inthis paper allows image compression calculation almost two hundredtimes faster compared with the DCT definition.

  20. Knowledge Translation and Barriers to Imaging Optimization in the Emergency Department: A Research Agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Marc A; Dayan, Peter S; Raja, Ali S; Slovis, Benjamin H; Yadav, Kabir; Lam, Samuel H; Shapiro, Jason S; Farris, Coreen; Babcock, Charlene I; Griffey, Richard T; Robey, Thomas E; Fortin, Emily M; Johnson, Jamlik O; Chong, Suzanne T; Davenport, Moira; Grigat, Daniel W; Lang, Eddy L

    2015-12-01

    Researchers have attempted to optimize imaging utilization by describing which clinical variables are more predictive of acute disease and, conversely, what combination of variables can obviate the need for imaging. These results are then used to develop evidence-based clinical pathways, clinical decision instruments, and clinical practice guidelines. Despite the validation of these results in subsequent studies, with some demonstrating improved outcomes, their actual use is often limited. This article outlines a research agenda to promote the dissemination and implementation (also known as knowledge translation) of evidence-based interventions for emergency department (ED) imaging, i.e., clinical pathways, clinical decision instruments, and clinical practice guidelines. We convened a multidisciplinary group of stakeholders and held online and telephone discussions over a 6-month period culminating in an in-person meeting at the 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference. We identified the following four overarching research questions: 1) what determinants (barriers and facilitators) influence emergency physicians' use of evidence-based interventions when ordering imaging in the ED; 2) what implementation strategies at the institutional level can improve the use of evidence-based interventions for ED imaging; 3) what interventions at the health care policy level can facilitate the adoption of evidence-based interventions for ED imaging; and 4) how can health information technology, including electronic health records, clinical decision support, and health information exchanges, be used to increase awareness, use, and adherence to evidence-based interventions for ED imaging? Advancing research that addresses these questions will provide valuable information as to how we can use evidence-based interventions to optimize imaging utilization and ultimately improve patient care. © 2015 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  1. Barrett's esophagus: clinical features, obesity, and imaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2011-09-01

    The following includes commentaries on clinical features and imaging of Barrett\\'s esophagus (BE); the clinical factors that influence the development of BE; the influence of body fat distribution and central obesity; the role of adipocytokines and proinflammatory markers in carcinogenesis; the role of body mass index (BMI) in healing of Barrett\\'s epithelium; the role of surgery in prevention of carcinogenesis in BE; the importance of double-contrast esophagography and cross-sectional images of the esophagus; and the value of positron emission tomography\\/computed tomography.

  2. OPTIMIZATION OF DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING IN BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Velichko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of breast imaging for 47200 women. Breast cancer was detected in 862 (1.9% patients, fibroadenoma in 1267 (2.7% patients and isolated breast cysts in 1162 (2.4% patients. Different types of fibrocystic breast disease (adenosis, diffuse fibrocystic changes, local fibrosis and others were observed in 60.1% of women. Problems of breast cancer visualization during mammography, characterized by the appearance of fibrocystic mastopathy (sclerosing adenosis, fibrous bands along the ducts have been analyzed. Data on the development of diagnostic algorithms including the modern techniques for ultrasound and interventional radiology aimed at detecting early breast cancer have been presented.  

  3. Applying BAT Evolutionary Optimization to Image-Based Visual Servoing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Perez-Cisneros

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a predictive control strategy for an image-based visual servoing scheme that employs evolutionary optimization. The visual control task is approached as a nonlinear optimization problem that naturally handles relevant visual servoing constraints such as workspace limitations and visibility restrictions. As the predictive scheme requires a reliable model, this paper uses a local model that is based on the visual interaction matrix and a global model that employs 3D trajectory data extracted from a quaternion-based interpolator. The work assumes a free-flying camera with 6-DOF simulation whose results support the discussion on the constraint handling and the image prediction scheme.

  4. Multiexposure imaging and parameter optimization for intensified star trackers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenbo; Jiang, Jie; Zhang, Guangjun

    2016-12-20

    Due to the introduction of the intensified image detector, the dynamic performance of the intensified star tracker is effectively improved. However, its attitude update rate is still seriously restricted by the transmission and processing of pixel data. In order to break through the above limitation, a multiexposure imaging approach for intensified star trackers is proposed in this paper. One star image formed by this approach actually records N different groups of star positions, and then N corresponding groups of attitude information can be acquired. Compared with the existing exposure imaging approach, the proposed approach improves the attitude update rate by N times. Furthermore, for a dim star, the proposed approach can also accumulate the energy of its N positions and then effectively improve its signal-to-noise ratio. Subsequently, in order to obtain the optimal performance of the proposed approach, parameter optimization is carried out. First, the motion model of the star spot in the image plane is established, and then based on it, all the key parameters are optimized. Simulations and experiments demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed approach and parameter optimization.

  5. Image indexing using color histogram and k-means clustering for optimization CBIR in image database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejito, Juli; Setiawan Abdullahi, Atje; Akmal; Setiana, Deni; Nurani Ruchjana, Budi

    2017-10-01

    Retrieving visually similar images from image database needs high speed and accuracy. Various text and content based image retrieval techniques are being investigated by the researchers in order to exactly match the image features. In this paper, a content-based image retrieval system (CBIR), which computes color similarity among images, is presented. CBIR is a set of techniques for retrieving semantically relevant images from an image database based on automatically derived image features. Color is one important visual features of an image. This document gives a brief description of a system developed for retrieving images similar to a query image from a large set of distinct images with histogram color feature based on image index. Result from the histogram color feature extraction, then using K-Means clustering to produce the image index. Image index used to compare to the histogram color feature of query image and thus, the image database is sorted in decreasing order of similarity. The results obtained by the proposed system obviously confirm that partitioning of image objects helps in optimization retrieving of similar images from the database. The proposed CBIR method is compared with our previously existed methodologies and found better in the retrieval accuracy. The retrieval accuracy are comparatively good than previous works proposed in CBIR system.

  6. Preclinical and clinical validation of a novel oxygenation imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioux, Sylvain; Mazhar, Amaan; Lee, Bernard T.; Cuccia, David J.; Stockdale, Alan; Oketokoun, Rafiou; Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Durr, Nicholas; Durkin, Anthony J.; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Frangioni, John V.

    2011-02-01

    Introduction: Two major disadvantages of currently available oxygenation probes are the need for contact with the skin and long measurement stabilization times. A novel oxygenation imaging device based on spatial frequency domain and spectral principles has been designed, validated preclinically on pigs, and validated clinically on humans. Importantly, this imaging system has been designed to operate under the rigorous conditions of an operating room. Materials and Methods: Optical properties reconstruction and wavelength selection have been optimized to allow fast and reliable oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin imaging under realistic conditions. In vivo preclinical validation against commercially available contact oxygenation probes was performed on pigs undergoing arterial and venous occlusions. Finally, the device was used clinically to image skin flap oxygenation during a pilot study on women undergoing breast reconstruction after mastectomy. Results: A novel illumination head containing a spatial light modulator (SLM) and a novel fiber-coupled high power light source were constructed. Preclinical experiments showed similar values between local probes and the oxygenation imaging system, with measurement times of the new system being 300 cm2). Conclusion: A novel optical-based oxygenation imaging system has the potential to replace contact probes during human surgery and to provide quantitative, wide-field measurements in near real-time.

  7. Imaging of cystic fibrosis lung disease and clinical interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielpuetz, M.O.; Eichinger, M.; Kauczor, H.U. [Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC) (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology with Nuclear Medicine; Biederer, J. [Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC) (Germany); Gross-Gerau Community Hospital (Germany). Radiologie Darmstadt; Wege, S. [Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Pulmonology and Respiratory Medicine; Stahl, M.; Sommerburg, O. [Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC) (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Div. of Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergy and Cystic Fibrosis Center; Mall, M.A. [Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC) (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Div. of Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergy and Cystic Fibrosis Center; Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Translational Pulmonology; Puderbach, M. [Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC) (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology with Nuclear Medicine; Hufeland Hospital, Bad Langensalza (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2016-09-15

    Progressive lung disease in cystic fibrosis (CF) is the life-limiting factor of this autosomal recessive genetic disorder. Increasing implementation of CF newborn screening allows for a diagnosis even in pre-symptomatic stages. Improvements in therapy have led to a significant improvement in survival, the majority now being of adult age. Imaging provides detailed information on the regional distribution of CF lung disease, hence longitudinal imaging is recommended for disease monitoring in the clinical routine. Chest X-ray (CXR), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are now available as routine modalities, each with individual strengths and drawbacks, which need to be considered when choosing the optimal modality adapted to the clinical situation of the patient. CT stands out with the highest morphological detail and has often been a substitute for CXR for regular severity monitoring at specialized centers. Multidetector CT data can be post-processed with dedicated software for a detailed measurement of airway dimensions and bronchiectasis and potentially a more objective and precise grading of disease severity. However, changing to CT was inseparably accompanied by an increase in radiation exposure of CF patients, a young population with high sensitivity to ionizing radiation and lifetime accumulation of dose. MRI as a cross-sectional imaging modality free of ionizing radiation can depict morphological hallmarks of CF lung disease at lower spatial resolution but excels with comprehensive functional lung imaging, with time-resolved perfusion imaging currently being most valuable.

  8. Lissencephaly: Expanded imaging and clinical classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Donato, Nataliya; Chiari, Sara; Mirzaa, Ghayda M; Aldinger, Kimberly; Parrini, Elena; Olds, Carissa; Barkovich, A James; Guerrini, Renzo; Dobyns, William B

    2017-06-01

    Lissencephaly ("smooth brain," LIS) is a malformation of cortical development associated with deficient neuronal migration and abnormal formation of cerebral convolutions or gyri. The LIS spectrum includes agyria, pachygyria, and subcortical band heterotopia. Our first classification of LIS and subcortical band heterotopia (SBH) was developed to distinguish between the first two genetic causes of LIS-LIS1 (PAFAH1B1) and DCX. However, progress in molecular genetics has led to identification of 19 LIS-associated genes, leaving the existing classification system insufficient to distinguish the increasingly diverse patterns of LIS. To address this challenge, we reviewed clinical, imaging and molecular data on 188 patients with LIS-SBH ascertained during the last 5 years, and reviewed selected archival data on another ∼1,400 patients. Using these data plus published reports, we constructed a new imaging based classification system with 21 recognizable patterns that reliably predict the most likely causative genes. These patterns do not correlate consistently with the clinical outcome, leading us to also develop a new scale useful for predicting clinical severity and outcome. Taken together, our work provides new tools that should prove useful for clinical management and genetic counselling of patients with LIS-SBH (imaging and severity based classifications), and guidance for prioritizing and interpreting genetic testing results (imaging based- classification). © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Optimization of a Biometric System Based on Acoustic Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Izquierdo Fuente

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of an acoustic biometric system that captures 16 acoustic images of a person for 4 frequencies and 4 positions, a study was carried out to improve the performance of the system. On a first stage, an analysis to determine which images provide more information to the system was carried out showing that a set of 12 images allows the system to obtain results that are equivalent to using all of the 16 images. Finally, optimization techniques were used to obtain the set of weights associated with each acoustic image that maximizes the performance of the biometric system. These results improve significantly the performance of the preliminary system, while reducing the time of acquisition and computational burden, since the number of acoustic images was reduced.

  10. Optimization of a Biometric System Based on Acoustic Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo Fuente, Alberto; Del Val Puente, Lara; Villacorta Calvo, Juan J.; Raboso Mateos, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of an acoustic biometric system that captures 16 acoustic images of a person for 4 frequencies and 4 positions, a study was carried out to improve the performance of the system. On a first stage, an analysis to determine which images provide more information to the system was carried out showing that a set of 12 images allows the system to obtain results that are equivalent to using all of the 16 images. Finally, optimization techniques were used to obtain the set of weights associated with each acoustic image that maximizes the performance of the biometric system. These results improve significantly the performance of the preliminary system, while reducing the time of acquisition and computational burden, since the number of acoustic images was reduced. PMID:24616643

  11. New Colors for Histology: Optimized Bivariate Color Maps Increase Perceptual Contrast in Histological Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kather, Jakob Nikolas; Weis, Cleo-Aron; Marx, Alexander; Schuster, Alexander K.; Schad, Lothar R.; Zöllner, Frank Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    Background Accurate evaluation of immunostained histological images is required for reproducible research in many different areas and forms the basis of many clinical decisions. The quality and efficiency of histopathological evaluation is limited by the information content of a histological image, which is primarily encoded as perceivable contrast differences between objects in the image. However, the colors of chromogen and counterstain used for histological samples are not always optimally distinguishable, even under optimal conditions. Methods and Results In this study, we present a method to extract the bivariate color map inherent in a given histological image and to retrospectively optimize this color map. We use a novel, unsupervised approach based on color deconvolution and principal component analysis to show that the commonly used blue and brown color hues in Hematoxylin—3,3’-Diaminobenzidine (DAB) images are poorly suited for human observers. We then demonstrate that it is possible to construct improved color maps according to objective criteria and that these color maps can be used to digitally re-stain histological images. Validation To validate whether this procedure improves distinguishability of objects and background in histological images, we re-stain phantom images and N = 596 large histological images of immunostained samples of human solid tumors. We show that perceptual contrast is improved by a factor of 2.56 in phantom images and up to a factor of 2.17 in sets of histological tumor images. Context Thus, we provide an objective and reliable approach to measure object distinguishability in a given histological image and to maximize visual information available to a human observer. This method could easily be incorporated in digital pathology image viewing systems to improve accuracy and efficiency in research and diagnostics. PMID:26717571

  12. New Colors for Histology: Optimized Bivariate Color Maps Increase Perceptual Contrast in Histological Images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Nikolas Kather

    Full Text Available Accurate evaluation of immunostained histological images is required for reproducible research in many different areas and forms the basis of many clinical decisions. The quality and efficiency of histopathological evaluation is limited by the information content of a histological image, which is primarily encoded as perceivable contrast differences between objects in the image. However, the colors of chromogen and counterstain used for histological samples are not always optimally distinguishable, even under optimal conditions.In this study, we present a method to extract the bivariate color map inherent in a given histological image and to retrospectively optimize this color map. We use a novel, unsupervised approach based on color deconvolution and principal component analysis to show that the commonly used blue and brown color hues in Hematoxylin-3,3'-Diaminobenzidine (DAB images are poorly suited for human observers. We then demonstrate that it is possible to construct improved color maps according to objective criteria and that these color maps can be used to digitally re-stain histological images.To validate whether this procedure improves distinguishability of objects and background in histological images, we re-stain phantom images and N = 596 large histological images of immunostained samples of human solid tumors. We show that perceptual contrast is improved by a factor of 2.56 in phantom images and up to a factor of 2.17 in sets of histological tumor images.Thus, we provide an objective and reliable approach to measure object distinguishability in a given histological image and to maximize visual information available to a human observer. This method could easily be incorporated in digital pathology image viewing systems to improve accuracy and efficiency in research and diagnostics.

  13. Optimal laser wavelength for photoacoustic imaging of breast microcalcifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jeeun; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Young Kwak, Jin; Yoo, Yangmo; Song, Tai-Kyong; Ho Chang, Jin

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents photoacoustic imaging (PAI) for real-time detection of micro-scale calcifications (e.g., breast, which are an indicator of the cancer occurrence. Optimal wavelength of incident laser for the microcalcification imaging was ascertained through ex vivo experiments with seven breast specimens of volunteers. In the ex vivo experiments, the maximum amplitude of photoacoustic signals from the microcalcifications occurred when the laser wavelength ranged from 690 to 700 nm. This result demonstrated that PAI can serve as a real-time imaging and guidance tool for diagnosis and biopsy of the breast microcalcifications.

  14. Optimal context quantization in lossless compression of image data sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren; Wu, X.; Andersen, Jakob Dahl

    2004-01-01

    In image compression context-based entropy coding is commonly used. A critical issue to the performance of context-based image coding is how to resolve the conflict of a desire for large templates to model high-order statistic dependency of the pixels and the problem of context dilution due...... to insufficient sample statistics of a given input image. We consider the problem of finding the optimal quantizer Q that quantizes the K-dimensional causal context C/sub t/=(X/sub t-t1/,X/sub t-t2/,...,X/sub t-tK/) of a source symbol X/sub t/ into one of a set of conditioning states. The optimality of context...... a random variable can be decomposed into a sequence of binary decisions, each of which is coded using optimal context quantization designed for the corresponding binary random variable. This optimized coding scheme is applied to digital maps and /spl alpha-/plane sequences. The proposed optimal context...

  15. Automatic x-ray image contrast enhancement based on parameter auto-optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jianfeng; Harold Li, H; Zhang, Tiezhi; Ma, Fangfang; Yang, Deshan

    2017-11-01

    Insufficient image contrast associated with radiation therapy daily setup x-ray images could negatively affect accurate patient treatment setup. We developed a method to perform automatic and user-independent contrast enhancement on 2D kilo voltage (kV) and megavoltage (MV) x-ray images. The goal was to provide tissue contrast optimized for each treatment site in order to support accurate patient daily treatment setup and the subsequent offline review. The proposed method processes the 2D x-ray images with an optimized image processing filter chain, which consists of a noise reduction filter and a high-pass filter followed by a contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE) filter. The most important innovation is to optimize the image processing parameters automatically to determine the required image contrast settings per disease site and imaging modality. Three major parameters controlling the image processing chain, i.e., the Gaussian smoothing weighting factor for the high-pass filter, the block size, and the clip limiting parameter for the CLAHE filter, were determined automatically using an interior-point constrained optimization algorithm. Fifty-two kV and MV x-ray images were included in this study. The results were manually evaluated and ranked with scores from 1 (worst, unacceptable) to 5 (significantly better than adequate and visually praise worthy) by physicians and physicists. The average scores for the images processed by the proposed method, the CLAHE, and the best window-level adjustment were 3.92, 2.83, and 2.27, respectively. The percentage of the processed images received a score of 5 were 48, 29, and 18%, respectively. The proposed method is able to outperform the standard image contrast adjustment procedures that are currently used in the commercial clinical systems. When the proposed method is implemented in the clinical systems as an automatic image processing filter, it could be useful for allowing quicker and potentially more

  16. An improved technique for the prediction of optimal image resolution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Past studies to predict optimal image resolution required for generating spatial information for savannah ecosystems have yielded different outcomes, hence providing a knowledge gap that was investigated in the present study. The postulation, for the present study, was that by graphically solving two simultaneous ...

  17. Optimized multiple linear mappings for single image super-resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaibing; Li, Jie; Xiong, Zenggang; Liu, Xiuping; Gao, Xinbo

    2017-12-01

    Learning piecewise linear regression has been recognized as an effective way for example learning-based single image super-resolution (SR) in literature. In this paper, we employ an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm to further improve the SR performance of our previous multiple linear mappings (MLM) based SR method. In the training stage, the proposed method starts with a set of linear regressors obtained by the MLM-based method, and then jointly optimizes the clustering results and the low- and high-resolution subdictionary pairs for regression functions by using the metric of the reconstruction errors. In the test stage, we select the optimal regressor for SR reconstruction by accumulating the reconstruction errors of m-nearest neighbors in the training set. Thorough experimental results carried on six publicly available datasets demonstrate that the proposed SR method can yield high-quality images with finer details and sharper edges in terms of both quantitative and perceptual image quality assessments.

  18. Image acquisition optimization of a limited-angle intrafraction verification (LIVE) system for lung radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yawei; Deng, Xinchen; Yin, Fang-Fang; Ren, Lei

    2017-11-01

    Limited-angle intrafraction verification (LIVE) has been previously developed for four-dimensional (4D) intrafraction target verification either during arc delivery or between three-dimensional (3D)/IMRT beams. Preliminary studies showed that LIVE can accurately estimate the target volume using kV/MV projections acquired over orthogonal view 30° scan angles. Currently, the LIVE imaging acquisition requires slow gantry rotation and is not clinically optimized. The goal of this study is to optimize the image acquisition parameters of LIVE for different patient respiratory periods and gantry rotation speeds for the effective clinical implementation of the system. Limited-angle intrafraction verification imaging acquisition was optimized using a digital anthropomorphic phantom (XCAT) with simulated respiratory periods varying from 3 s to 6 s and gantry rotation speeds varying from 1°/s to 6°/s. LIVE scanning time was optimized by minimizing the number of respiratory cycles needed for the four-dimensional scan, and imaging dose was optimized by minimizing the number of kV and MV projections needed for four-dimensional estimation. The estimation accuracy was evaluated by calculating both the center-of-mass-shift (COMS) and three-dimensional volume-percentage-difference (VPD) between the tumor in estimated images and the ground truth images. The robustness of LIVE was evaluated with varied respiratory patterns, tumor sizes, and tumor locations in XCAT simulation. A dynamic thoracic phantom (CIRS) was used to further validate the optimized imaging schemes from XCAT study with changes of respiratory patterns, tumor sizes, and imaging scanning directions. Respiratory periods, gantry rotation speeds, number of respiratory cycles scanned and number of kV/MV projections acquired were all positively correlated with the estimation accuracy of LIVE. Faster gantry rotation speed or longer respiratory period allowed less respiratory cycles to be scanned and less kV/MV projections

  19. Clinically Relevant Imaging in Tuberous Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupa Radhakrishnan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberous sclerosis (TS, also known as Bourneville disease or Bourneville-Pringle disease, is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder classically characterized by the presence of hamartomatous growths in multiple organs. TS and tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC are different terms for the same genetic condition. Both terms describe clinical changes due to mutations involving either of the two genes named TSC1 and TSC2, which regulate cell growth. The diagnosis of TSC is established using diagnostic criteria based on clinical and imaging findings. Routine screening and surveillance of patients with TSC is needed to determine the presence and extent of organ involvement, especially the brain, kidneys, and lungs, and identify the development of associated complications. As the treatment is organ specific, imaging plays a crucial role in the management of patients with TSC.

  20. Intracranial Infections: Clinical and Imaging Characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerster, B.R.; Thurnher, M.M.; Malani, P.N.; Petrou, M.; Carets-Zumelzu, F.; Sundgren, P.C. [Dept. of Radiology, and Divisions of Infectious Diseases and G eriatric Medicine, Dept. of Internal Medicine, Univ. of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2007-10-15

    The radiologist plays a crucial role in identifying and narrowing the differential diagnosis of intracranial infections. A thorough understanding of the intracranial compartment anatomy and characteristic imaging findings of specific pathogens, as well incorporation of the clinical information, is essential to establish correct diagnosis. Specific types of infections have certain propensities for different anatomical regions within the brain. In addition, the imaging findings must be placed in the context of the clinical setting, particularly in immunocompromised and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients. This paper describes and depicts infections within the different compartments of the brain. Pathology-proven infectious cases are presented in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients, with a discussion of the characteristic findings of each pathogen. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) characteristics for several infections are also discussed.

  1. Metanephric Adenoma: clinical, imaging, and histological findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torricelli, Fabio Cesar Miranda; Marchini, Giovanni Scala, E-mail: fabio_torri@yahoo.com.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Urologica; Campos, Rodrigo Sousa Madeira [Hospital do Servidor Publico Estadual, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Urologia; Gil, Antonio Otero [Instituto Dante Pazanezzi, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Metanephric adenoma (MA), also designated nephrogenic nephroma or renal epithelial tumor resembling immature nephron, has just been recently recognized as a special type of benign renal epithelial tumor. Only few reports are found in the literature regarding this rare renal tumor. The purpose of this paper is to describe our clinical, imaging and histological / immunohistochemical observations of MA diagnosed in two patients and compare these data to previous information reported in medical databases (author)

  2. Optimization of image reconstruction conditions with phantoms for brain FDG and amyloid PET imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Akamatsu, Go; Ikari, Yasuhiko; Nishio, Tomoyuki; Nishida, Hiroyuki; Ohnishi, Akihito; Aita, Kazuki; Sasaki, Masahiro; Sasaki, Masayuki; Senda, Michio

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to optimize image reconstruction conditions for brain 18F-FDG, 11C-PiB, 18F-florbetapir and 18F-flutemetamol PET imaging with Discovery-690 PET/CT for diagnosis and research on Alzheimer’s disease (AD...

  3. In silico imaging clinical trials for regulatory evaluation: initial considerations for VICTRE, a demonstration study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badano, Aldo; Badal, Andreu; Glick, Stephen; Graff, Christian G.; Samuelson, Frank; Sharma, Diksha; Zeng, Rongping

    2017-03-01

    Expensive and lengthy clinical trials can delay regulatory evaluation and add significant burden that stifles innovation affecting patient access to novel, high-quality imaging technologies. In silico imaging holds promise for evaluating the safety and effectiveness of imaging technologies with much less burden than clinical trials. We define in silico imaging as a computer simulation of an entire imaging system (including source, object, task, and observer components) used for research, development, optimization, technology assessment, and regulatory evaluation of new technology. In this work we describe VICTRE (our study of virtual imaging clinical trials for regulatory evaluation) and the considerations for building an entire imaging pipeline in silico including device (physics), patient (anatomy, disease), and image interpretation models for regulatory evaluation using open-source tools.

  4. Optimization of an Image-Based Talking Head System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Liu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an image-based talking head system, which includes two parts: analysis and synthesis. The audiovisual analysis part creates a face model of a recorded human subject, which is composed of a personalized 3D mask as well as a large database of mouth images and their related information. The synthesis part generates natural looking facial animations from phonetic transcripts of text. A critical issue of the synthesis is the unit selection which selects and concatenates these appropriate mouth images from the database such that they match the spoken words of the talking head. Selection is based on lip synchronization and the similarity of consecutive images. The unit selection is refined in this paper, and Pareto optimization is used to train the unit selection. Experimental results of subjective tests show that most people cannot distinguish our facial animations from real videos.

  5. Optimization of the alpha image reconstruction - an iterative CT-image reconstruction with well-defined image quality metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, Sergej; Sawall, Stefan; Knaup, Michael; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2017-09-01

    Optimization of the AIR-algorithm for improved convergence and performance. The AIR method is an iterative algorithm for CT image reconstruction. As a result of its linearity with respect to the basis images, the AIR algorithm possesses well defined, regular image quality metrics, e.g. point spread function (PSF) or modulation transfer function (MTF), unlike other iterative reconstruction algorithms. The AIR algorithm computes weighting images α to blend between a set of basis images that preferably have mutually exclusive properties, e.g. high spatial resolution or low noise. The optimized algorithm uses an approach that alternates between the optimization of rawdata fidelity using an OSSART like update and regularization using gradient descent, as opposed to the initially proposed AIR using a straightforward gradient descent implementation. A regularization strength for a given task is chosen by formulating a requirement for the noise reduction and checking whether it is fulfilled for different regularization strengths, while monitoring the spatial resolution using the voxel-wise defined modulation transfer function for the AIR image. The optimized algorithm computes similar images in a shorter time compared to the initial gradient descent implementation of AIR. The result can be influenced by multiple parameters that can be narrowed down to a relatively simple framework to compute high quality images. The AIR images, for instance, can have at least a 50% lower noise level compared to the sharpest basis image, while the spatial resolution is mostly maintained. The optimization improves performance by a factor of 6, while maintaining image quality. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the spatial resolution for AIR can be determined using regular image quality metrics, given smooth weighting images. This is not possible for other iterative reconstructions as a result of their non linearity. A simple set of parameters for the algorithm is discussed that provides

  6. Optimization of the alpha image reconstruction. An iterative CT-image reconstruction with well-defined image quality metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedev, Sergej; Sawall, Stefan; Knaup, Michael; Kachelriess, Marc [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany).

    2017-10-01

    Optimization of the AIR-algorithm for improved convergence and performance. TThe AIR method is an iterative algorithm for CT image reconstruction. As a result of its linearity with respect to the basis images, the AIR algorithm possesses well defined, regular image quality metrics, e.g. point spread function (PSF) or modulation transfer function (MTF), unlike other iterative reconstruction algorithms. The AIR algorithm computes weighting images α to blend between a set of basis images that preferably have mutually exclusive properties, e.g. high spatial resolution or low noise. The optimized algorithm uses an approach that alternates between the optimization of rawdata fidelity using an OSSART like update and regularization using gradient descent, as opposed to the initially proposed AIR using a straightforward gradient descent implementation. A regularization strength for a given task is chosen by formulating a requirement for the noise reduction and checking whether it is fulfilled for different regularization strengths, while monitoring the spatial resolution using the voxel-wise defined modulation transfer function for the AIR image. The optimized algorithm computes similar images in a shorter time compared to the initial gradient descent implementation of AIR. The result can be influenced by multiple parameters that can be narrowed down to a relatively simple framework to compute high quality images. The AIR images, for instance, can have at least a 50% lower noise level compared to the sharpest basis image, while the spatial resolution is mostly maintained. The optimization improves performance by a factor of 6, while maintaining image quality. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the spatial resolution for AIR can be determined using regular image quality metrics, given smooth weighting images. This is not possible for other iterative reconstructions as a result of their non linearity. A simple set of parameters for the algorithm is discussed that provides

  7. Spectral imaging using clinical megavoltage beams and a novel multi-layer imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myronakis, Marios; Fueglistaller, Rony; Rottmann, Joerg; Hu, Yue-Houng; Wang, Adam; Baturin, Paul; Huber, Pascal; Morf, Daniel; Star-Lack, Josh; Berbeco, Ross

    2017-12-01

    We assess the feasibility of clinical megavoltage (MV) spectral imaging for material and bone separation with a novel multi-layer imager (MLI) prototype. The MLI provides higher detective quantum efficiency and lower noise than conventional electronic portal imagers. Simulated experiments were performed using a validated Monte Carlo model of the MLI to estimate energy absorption and energy separation between the MLI components. Material separation was evaluated experimentally using solid water and aluminum (Al), copper (Cu) and gold (Au) for 2.5 MV, 6 MV and 6 MV flattening filter free (FFF) clinical photon beams. An anthropomorphic phantom with implanted gold fiducials was utilized to further demonstrate bone/gold separation. Weighted subtraction imaging was employed for material and bone separation. The weighting factor (w) was iteratively estimated, with the optimal w value determined by minimization of the relative signal difference (Δ {{S}R} ) and signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SDNR) between material (or bone) and the background. Energy separation between layers of the MLI was mainly the result of beam hardening between components with an average energy separation between 34 and 47 keV depending on the x-ray beam energy. The minimum average energy of the detected spectrum in the phosphor layer was 123 keV in the top layer of the MLI with the 2.5 MV beam. The w values that minimized Δ {{S}R} and SDNR for Al, Cu and Au were 0.89, 0.76 and 0.64 for 2.5 MV; for 6 MV FFF, w was 0.98, 0.93 and 0.77 respectively. Bone suppression in the anthropomorphic phantom resulted in improved visibility of the gold fiducials with the 2.5 MV beam. Optimization of the MLI design is required to achieve optimal separation at clinical MV beam energies.

  8. Spectrally optimal illuminations for diabetic retinopathy detection in retinal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartczak, Piotr; Fält, Pauli; Penttinen, Niko; Ylitepsa, Pasi; Laaksonen, Lauri; Lensu, Lasse; Hauta-Kasari, Markku; Uusitalo, Hannu

    2017-04-01

    Retinal photography is a standard method for recording retinal diseases for subsequent analysis and diagnosis. However, the currently used white light or red-free retinal imaging does not necessarily provide the best possible visibility of different types of retinal lesions, important when developing diagnostic tools for handheld devices, such as smartphones. Using specifically designed illumination, the visibility and contrast of retinal lesions could be improved. In this study, spectrally optimal illuminations for diabetic retinopathy lesion visualization are implemented using a spectrally tunable light source based on digital micromirror device. The applicability of this method was tested in vivo by taking retinal monochrome images from the eyes of five diabetic volunteers and two non-diabetic control subjects. For comparison to existing methods, we evaluated the contrast of retinal images taken with our method and red-free illumination. The preliminary results show that the use of optimal illuminations improved the contrast of diabetic lesions in retinal images by 30-70%, compared to the traditional red-free illumination imaging.

  9. Optimizing images of acute deep-vein thrombosis using technetium-99m-apcitide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretta, R F; Streek, P V; Weiland, F L

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the nuclear medicine technologist to a new radiopharmaceutical, 99mTc-apcitide, for imaging acute venous thrombosis. After reading this paper, the technologist should be able to: (a) describe patient preparation for imaging with 99mTc-apcitide; (b) state the amount of 99mTc-apcitide that is administered to patients for imaging acute venous thrombosis; (c) explain patient positioning for optimal image acquisition; and (d) discuss gamma camera acquisition parameters and their importance in obtaining high-quality images. Clinical cases illustrate both the whole-body distribution and diagnostic value of 99mTc-apcitide in detecting acute deep-vein thrombosis.

  10. Task-Based Optimization of Computed Tomography Imaging Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez, Adrian A

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to provide a framework for the use of task-based metrics of image quality to aid in the design, implementation, and evaluation of CT image reconstruction algorithms and CT systems in general. We support the view that task-based metrics of image quality can be useful in guiding the algorithm design and implementation process in order to yield images of objectively superior quality and higher utility for a given task. Further, we believe that metrics such as the Hotelling observer (HO) SNR can be used as summary scalar metrics of image quality for the evaluation of images produced by novel reconstruction algorithms. In this work, we aim to construct a concise and versatile formalism for image reconstruction algorithm design, implementation, and assessment. The bulk of the work focuses on linear analytical algorithms, specifically the ubiquitous filtered back-projection (FBP) algorithm. However, due to the demonstrated importance of optimization-based algorithms in a wide variety of CT...

  11. Optimized Plane Wave Imaging for Fast and High-Quality Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method for optimizing parameters affecting the image quality in plane wave imaging. More specifically, the number of emissions and steering angles is optimized to attain the best images with the highest frame rate possible. The method is applied to a specific problem, where...... image quality for a λ-pitch transducer is compared with a λ/2-pitch transducer. Grating lobe artifacts for λ-pitch transducers degrade the contrast in plane wave images, and the impact on frame rate is studied. Field II simulations of plane wave images are made for all combinations of the parameters...... at 9 mm (24λ). Using a λ/2-pitch transducer and only 21 emissions within the same angle range, the image quality is improved in terms of contrast, which is −37 dB. For imaging in regions deeper than 25 mm (66λ), only 21 emissions are optimal for both the transducers, resulting in a −36 dB contrast...

  12. Gestational Trophoblastic Disease: Clinical and Imaging Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaaban, Akram M; Rezvani, Maryam; Haroun, Reham R; Kennedy, Anne M; Elsayes, Khaled M; Olpin, Jeffrey D; Salama, Mohamed E; Foster, Bryan R; Menias, Christine O

    2017-01-01

    Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) is a spectrum of both benign and malignant gestational tumors, including hydatidiform mole (complete and partial), invasive mole, choriocarcinoma, placental site trophoblastic tumor, and epithelioid trophoblastic tumor. The latter four entities are referred to as gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN). These conditions are aggressive with a propensity to widely metastasize. GTN can result in significant morbidity and mortality if left untreated. Early diagnosis of GTD is essential for prompt and successful management while preserving fertility. Initial diagnosis of GTD is based on a multifactorial approach consisting of clinical features, serial quantitative human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) titers, and imaging findings. Ultrasonography (US) is the modality of choice for initial diagnosis of complete hydatidiform mole and can provide an invaluable means of local surveillance after treatment. The performance of US in diagnosing all molar pregnancies is surprisingly poor, predominantly due to the difficulty in differentiating partial hydatidiform mole from nonmolar abortion and retained products of conception. While GTN after a molar pregnancy is usually diagnosed with serial β-hCG titers, imaging plays an important role in evaluation of local extent of disease and systemic surveillance. Imaging also plays a crucial role in detection and management of complications, such as uterine and pulmonary arteriovenous fistulas. Familiarity with the pathogenesis, classification, imaging features, and treatment of these tumors can aid in radiologic diagnosis and guide appropriate management. (©)RSNA, 2017.

  13. Improving best-phase image quality in cardiac CT by motion correction with MAM optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohkohl, Christopher; Bruder, Herbert; Stierstorfer, Karl; Flohr, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Research in image reconstruction for cardiac CT aims at using motion correction algorithms to improve the image quality of the coronary arteries. The key to those algorithms is motion estimation, which is currently based on 3-D/3-D registration to align the structures of interest in images acquired in multiple heart phases. The need for an extended scan data range covering several heart phases is critical in terms of radiation dose to the patient and limits the clinical potential of the method. Furthermore, literature reports only slight quality improvements of the motion corrected images when compared to the most quiet phase (best-phase) that was actually used for motion estimation. In this paper a motion estimation algorithm is proposed which does not require an extended scan range but works with a short scan data interval, and which markedly improves the best-phase image quality. Motion estimation is based on the definition of motion artifact metrics (MAM) to quantify motion artifacts in a 3-D reconstructed image volume. The authors use two different MAMs, entropy, and positivity. By adjusting the motion field parameters, the MAM of the resulting motion-compensated reconstruction is optimized using a gradient descent procedure. In this way motion artifacts are minimized. For a fast and practical implementation, only analytical methods are used for motion estimation and compensation. Both the MAM-optimization and a 3-D/3-D registration-based motion estimation algorithm were investigated by means of a computer-simulated vessel with a cardiac motion profile. Image quality was evaluated using normalized cross-correlation (NCC) with the ground truth template and root-mean-square deviation (RMSD). Four coronary CT angiography patient cases were reconstructed to evaluate the clinical performance of the proposed method. For the MAM-approach, the best-phase image quality could be improved for all investigated heart phases, with a maximum improvement of the NCC value by

  14. Optimization of dual-wavelength intravascular photoacoustic imaging of atherosclerotic plaques using Monte Carlo optical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dana, Nicholas; Sowers, Timothy; Karpiouk, Andrei; Vanderlaan, Donald; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2017-10-01

    Coronary heart disease (the presence of coronary atherosclerotic plaques) is a significant health problem in the industrialized world. A clinical method to accurately visualize and characterize atherosclerotic plaques is needed. Intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) imaging is being developed to fill this role, but questions remain regarding optimal imaging wavelengths. We utilized a Monte Carlo optical model to simulate IVPA excitation in coronary tissues, identifying optimal wavelengths for plaque characterization. Near-infrared wavelengths (≤1800 nm) were simulated, and single- and dual-wavelength data were analyzed for accuracy of plaque characterization. Results indicate light penetration is best in the range of 1050 to 1370 nm, where 5% residual fluence can be achieved at clinically relevant depths of ≥2 mm in arteries. Across the arterial wall, fluence may vary by over 10-fold, confounding plaque characterization. For single-wavelength results, plaque segmentation accuracy peaked at 1210 and 1720 nm, though correlation was poor (primary wavelength (≈1.0). Results suggest that, without flushing the luminal blood, a primary and secondary wavelength near 1210 and 1350 nm, respectively, may offer the best implementation of dual-wavelength IVPA imaging. These findings could guide the development of a cost-effective clinical system by highlighting optimal wavelengths and improving plaque characterization.

  15. Optimizing in vivo small animal Cerenkov luminescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Antonello E; Boschi, Federico

    2012-04-01

    In vivo Cerenkov luminescence imaging is a rapidly growing molecular imaging research field based on the detection of Cerenkov radiation induced by beta particles when traveling though biological tissues. We investigated theoretically the possibility of enhancing the number of the detected Cerenkov photons in the near infrared (NIR) region of the spectrum. The analysis is based on applying a photon propagation diffusion model to Cerenkov photons in the tissue. Results show that despite the smaller number of Cerenkov photons in the NIR region, the fraction exiting the tissues is greater than in the visible range, and thus, a charge-coupled device detector optimized for the NIR range will allow to obtain a higher signal. The comparison was performed considering Cerenkov point sources located at different depths inside the animal. We concluded that the improvement can be up to 35% and is more significant when the Cerenkov source to be imaged is located deeper inside the animal.

  16. Optimizing value utilizing Toyota Kata methodology in a multidisciplinary clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merguerian, Paul A; Grady, Richard; Waldhausen, John; Libby, Arlene; Murphy, Whitney; Melzer, Lilah; Avansino, Jeffrey

    2015-08-01

    Value in healthcare is measured in terms of patient outcomes achieved per dollar expended. Outcomes and cost must be measured at the patient level to optimize value. Multidisciplinary clinics have been shown to be effective in providing coordinated and comprehensive care with improved outcomes, yet tend to have higher cost than typical clinics. We sought to lower individual patient cost and optimize value in a pediatric multidisciplinary reconstructive pelvic medicine (RPM) clinic. The RPM clinic is a multidisciplinary clinic that takes care of patients with anomalies of the pelvic organs. The specialties involved include Urology, General Surgery, Gynecology, and Gastroenterology/Motility. From May 2012 to November 2014 we performed time-driven activity-based costing (TDABC) analysis by measuring provider time for each step in the patient flow. Using observed time and the estimated hourly cost of each of the providers we calculated the final cost at the individual patient level, targeting clinic preparation. We utilized Toyota Kata methodology to enhance operational efficiency in an effort to optimize value. Variables measured included cost, time to perform a task, number of patients seen in clinic, percent value-added time (VAT) to patients (face to face time) and family experience scores (FES). At the beginning of the study period, clinic costs were $619 per patient. We reduced conference time from 6 min/patient to 1 min per patient, physician preparation time from 8 min to 6 min and increased Medical Assistant (MA) preparation time from 9.5 min to 20 min, achieving a cost reduction of 41% to $366 per patient. Continued improvements further reduced the MA preparation time to 14 min and the MD preparation time to 5 min with a further cost reduction to $194 (69%) (Figure). During this study period, we increased the number of appointments per clinic. We demonstrated sustained improvement in FES with regards to the families overall experience with their providers

  17. Optimization of microfluidic PET tracer synthesis with Cerenkov imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooraghi, Alex A; Keng, Pei Y; Chen, Supin; Javed, Muhammad R; Kim, Chang-Jin C J; Chatziioannou, Arion F; van Dam, R Michael

    2013-10-07

    Microfluidic technologies provide an attractive platform for the synthesis of radiolabeled compounds. Visualization of radioisotopes on chip is critical for synthesis optimization and technological development. With Cerenkov imaging, beta particle emitting isotopes can be localized with a sensitive CCD camera. In order for Cerenkov imaging to also serve as a quantitative tool, it is necessary to understand how material properties relevant to Cerenkov emission, namely, index of refraction and beta particle stopping power, affect Cerenkov light output. In this report, we investigate the fundamental physical characteristics of Cerenkov photon yield at different stages of [(18)F]FDG synthesis on the electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) microfluidic platform. We also demonstrate how Cerenkov imaging has enabled synthesis optimization. Geant4, a Monte Carlo program applied extensively in high energy physics, is used to simulate Cerenkov photon yield from (18)F beta particles traversing materials of interest during [(18)F]FDG synthesis on chip. Our simulations show that the majority (approximately two-thirds) of the (18)F beta particle energy available to produce Cerenkov photons is deposited on the glass plates of the EWOD chip. This result suggests the possibility of using a single calibration factor to convert Cerenkov signal to radioactivity, independent of droplet composition. We validate our simulations with a controlled measurement examining varying ratios of [(18)O]H2O, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and acetonitrile (MeCN), and find a consistent calibration independent of solvent composition. However, the calibration factor may underestimate the radioactivity in actual synthesis due to discoloration of the droplet during certain steps of probe synthesis. In addition to the attractive quantitative potential of Cerenkov imaging, this imaging strategy provides indispensable qualitative data to guide synthesis optimization. We are able to use this imaging technique to

  18. Color standardization and optimization in Whole Slide Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yagi Yukako

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Standardization and validation of the color displayed by digital slides is an important aspect of digital pathology implementation. While the most common reason for color variation is the variance in the protocols and practices in the histology lab, the color displayed can also be affected by variation in capture parameters (for example, illumination and filters, image processing and display factors in the digital systems themselves. Method We have been developing techniques for color validation and optimization along two paths. The first was based on two standard slides that are scanned and displayed by the imaging system in question. In this approach, one slide is embedded with nine filters with colors selected especially for H&E stained slides (looking like tiny Macbeth color chart; the specific color of the nine filters were determined in our previous study and modified for whole slide imaging (WSI. The other slide is an H&E stained mouse embryo. Both of these slides were scanned and the displayed images were compared to a standard. The second approach was based on our previous multispectral imaging research. Discussion As a first step, the two slide method (above was used to identify inaccurate display of color and its cause, and to understand the importance of accurate color in digital pathology. We have also improved the multispectral-based algorithm for more consistent results in stain standardization. In near future, the results of the two slide and multispectral techniques can be combined and will be widely available. We have been conducting a series of researches and developing projects to improve image quality to establish Image Quality Standardization. This paper discusses one of most important aspects of image quality – color.

  19. Optimized Parallelization for Nonlocal Means Based Low Dose CT Image Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Libo; Yang, Benqiang; Zhuang, Zhikun; Hu, Yining; Chen, Yang; Luo, Limin; Shu, Huazhong

    2015-01-01

    Low dose CT (LDCT) images are often significantly degraded by severely increased mottled noise/artifacts, which can lead to lowered diagnostic accuracy in clinic. The nonlocal means (NLM) filtering can effectively remove mottled noise/artifacts by utilizing large-scale patch similarity information in LDCT images. But the NLM filtering application in LDCT imaging also requires high computation cost because intensive patch similarity calculation within a large searching window is often required to be used to include enough structure-similarity information for noise/artifact suppression. To improve its clinical feasibility, in this study we further optimize the parallelization of NLM filtering by avoiding the repeated computation with the row-wise intensity calculation and the symmetry weight calculation. The shared memory with fast I/O speed is also used in row-wise intensity calculation for the proposed method. Quantitative experiment demonstrates that significant acceleration can be achieved with respect to the traditional straight pixel-wise parallelization.

  20. Imaging of Cystic Fibrosis Lung Disease and Clinical Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielpütz, M O; Eichinger, M; Biederer, J; Wege, S; Stahl, M; Sommerburg, O; Mall, M A; Kauczor, H U; Puderbach, M

    2016-09-01

    Progressive lung disease in cystic fibrosis (CF) is the life-limiting factor of this autosomal recessive genetic disorder. Increasing implementation of CF newborn screening allows for a diagnosis even in pre-symptomatic stages. Improvements in therapy have led to a significant improvement in survival, the majority now being of adult age. Imaging provides detailed information on the regional distribution of CF lung disease, hence longitudinal imaging is recommended for disease monitoring in the clinical routine. Chest X-ray (CXR), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are now available as routine modalities, each with individual strengths and drawbacks, which need to be considered when choosing the optimal modality adapted to the clinical situation of the patient. CT stands out with the highest morphological detail and has often been a substitute for CXR for regular severity monitoring at specialized centers. Multidetector CT data can be post-processed with dedicated software for a detailed measurement of airway dimensions and bronchiectasis and potentially a more objective and precise grading of disease severity. However, changing to CT was inseparably accompanied by an increase in radiation exposure of CF patients, a young population with high sensitivity to ionizing radiation and lifetime accumulation of dose. MRI as a cross-sectional imaging modality free of ionizing radiation can depict morphological hallmarks of CF lung disease at lower spatial resolution but excels with comprehensive functional lung imaging, with time-resolved perfusion imaging currently being most valuable. • Hallmarks are bronchiectasis, mucus plugging, air trapping, perfusion abnormalities, and emphysema.• Imaging is more sensitive to disease progression than lung function testing.• CT provides the highest morphological detail but is associated with radiation exposure.• MRI shows comparable sensitivity for morphology but excels with additional

  1. Task-based optimization of image reconstruction in breast CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Adrian A.; Sidky, Emil Y.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate a task-based assessment of image quality in dedicated breast CT in order to optimize the number of projection views acquired. The methodology we employ is based on the Hotelling Observer (HO) and its associated metrics. We consider two tasks: the Rayleigh task of discerning between two resolvable objects and a single larger object, and the signal detection task of classifying an image as belonging to either a signalpresent or signal-absent hypothesis. HO SNR values are computed for 50, 100, 200, 500, and 1000 projection view images, with the total imaging radiation dose held constant. We use the conventional fan-beam FBP algorithm and investigate the effect of varying the width of a Hanning window used in the reconstruction, since this affects both the noise properties of the image and the under-sampling artifacts which can arise in the case of sparse-view acquisitions. Our results demonstrate that fewer projection views should be used in order to increase HO performance, which in this case constitutes an upper-bound on human observer performance. However, the impact on HO SNR of using fewer projection views, each with a higher dose, is not as significant as the impact of employing regularization in the FBP reconstruction through a Hanning filter.

  2. Optimal Magnetic Sensor Vests for Cardiac Source Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Lau

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetocardiography (MCG non-invasively provides functional information about the heart. New room-temperature magnetic field sensors, specifically magnetoresistive and optically pumped magnetometers, have reached sensitivities in the ultra-low range of cardiac fields while allowing for free placement around the human torso. Our aim is to optimize positions and orientations of such magnetic sensors in a vest-like arrangement for robust reconstruction of the electric current distributions in the heart. We optimized a set of 32 sensors on the surface of a torso model with respect to a 13-dipole cardiac source model under noise-free conditions. The reconstruction robustness was estimated by the condition of the lead field matrix. Optimization improved the condition of the lead field matrix by approximately two orders of magnitude compared to a regular array at the front of the torso. Optimized setups exhibited distributions of sensors over the whole torso with denser sampling above the heart at the front and back of the torso. Sensors close to the heart were arranged predominantly tangential to the body surface. The optimized sensor setup could facilitate the definition of a standard for sensor placement in MCG and the development of a wearable MCG vest for clinical diagnostics.

  3. Optimization-Based Approaches To Feature Extraction from Aerial Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fua, Pascal; Gruen, Armin; Li, Haihong

    Extracting cartographic objects from images is a difficult task because aerial images are inherently noisy, complex, and ambiguous. Using models of the objects of interest to guide the search has proved to be an effective approach that yields good results. In such an approach, the problem becomes one of fitting the models to the image data, which we phrase as an optimization problem. The appropriate optimization technique to use depends on the exact nature of the model. In this paper, we review and contrast some of the approaches we have developed for extracting cartographic objects and present the key aspects of their implementation. Using these techniques, rough initial sketches of 2-D and 3-D objects can automatically be refined, resulting in accurate models that can be guaranteed to be consistent with one another. We believe that such capabilities will prove indispensable to automating the generation of complex object databases from imagery, such as the ones required for high-resolution mapping, realistic simulations or intelligence analysis.LNES 95, p. 190 ff.

  4. Image Restoration using Prioritized Exemplar Inpainting with Automatic Patch Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borole, Rajesh Pandurang; Bonde, Sanjiv Vedu

    2017-06-01

    Image analysis and restoration has been carried out by texture synthesis for large regions and inpainting algorithms for small cracks in images. A new approach that allow simultaneous fill-in of different structures and textures is being proposed in present study. A combination of structure inpainting and patch-based texture synthesis with patch size optimization is carried out (termed as `optimized patch based inpainting') for filling and updating the target region that shows additional advantages over earlier approaches. The algorithm here uses the patch based inpainting having isophote driven patch-based texture synthesis at core. In present algorithm, ones the user selects the target regions, the algorithm automatically search and fills-in these regions with best matching information surrounding it. Patch-based filling is found to improve execution speed and robustness significantly over pixel-based fill. The fill-in is done in such a way that structure information arriving at the region boundaries is propagated inside. A number of examples on real and complex images are considered to demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm.

  5. Optimizing Somatostatin Receptor Imaging in Patients With Neuroendocrine Tumors: The Impact of 99mTc-HYNICTOC SPECT/SPECT/CT Versus 68Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT Upon Clinical Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunikowska, Jolanta; Lewington, Valerie; Krolicki, Leszek

    2017-12-01

    The presence of somatostatin receptors in neuroendocrine tumors allows visualization with radiolabeled somatostatin analogs in vivo. The aim of this prospective study was to compare somatostatin receptor imaging using Tc-HYNICTOC with Ga-DOTATATE (DOTA-DPhe1,Tyr3-octreotate) with respect to sensitivity, specificity, and impact upon clinical decision making. Sixty-eight patients (30 men, 38 women; aged 56.4 ± 13.5 years) with disseminated, histologically proven neuroendocrine tumor were enrolled. All patients with previous Tc-HYNICTOC (Tektrotyd; POLATOM, Otwock, Poland) underwent Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT. Both examinations were compared on a per-patient and per-lesion basis. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of Ga-DOTATATE and Tc-HYNICTOC were 100% versus 82%, 85% versus 69%, 97% versus 92%, 100% versus 47%, and 97% versus 79%, respectively.Concordant results were observed in 58 patients (49/68 positive on both Ga-DOTATATE and Tc-HYNICTOC and 9/68 negative in both examinations). Ten of 68 patients had Ga-DOTATATE-positive, Tc-HYNICTOC-negative studies. Two hundred eighteen lesions were detected using Tc-HYNICTOC, compared with 546 lesions using Ga-DOTATATE (P < 0.0001). Ga-DOTATATE detected a higher number of lesions in bone and lymph nodes, liver, intestine, and pancreas and had a higher sensitivity for subcentimeter abnormalities than Tc-HYNICTOC. Ga-DOTATATE led to management change in 23 (34%) of 68 patients. Ga-DOTATATE has a higher sensitivity than Tc-HYNICTOC for the detection of neuroendocrine tumors. Ga-DOTATATE proved superior to Tc-HYNICTOC in detecting subcentimeter skeletal, lymph node, and liver metastases. Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT changed clinical decision making in one third of patients.

  6. Optimal Correlation Filters for Images with Signal-Dependent Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downie, John D.; Walkup, John F.

    1994-01-01

    We address the design of optimal correlation filters for pattern detection and recognition in the presence of signal-dependent image noise sources. The particular examples considered are film-grain noise and speckle. Two basic approaches are investigated: (1) deriving the optimal matched filters for the signal-dependent noise models and comparing their performances with those derived for traditional signal-independent noise models and (2) first nonlinearly transforming the signal-dependent noise to signal-independent noise followed by the use of a classical filter matched to the transformed signal. We present both theoretical and computer simulation results that demonstrate the generally superior performance of the second approach in terms of the correlation peak signal-to-noise ratio.

  7. Optimizing brain tumor resection. Midfield interventional MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, E

    2001-11-01

    The development of the intraoperative MR imager represents an important example of creative vision and interdisciplinary teamwork. The result is a remarkable tool for neurosurgical applications. MRT allows surgical manipulation under direct visualization of the intracranial contents through the eye of the surgeon and through the volumetric images of the MR imaging system. This technology can be applied to cranial and spinal cases, and forseeably can encompass application to the entire gamut of neurosurgical efforts. The author's experience has been that this device is easy and comfortable for the surgeon to use. Image acquisition, giving views in the plane of choice, lasts no more than 2 to 60 seconds (depending on the imaging method), and does not increase the duration of a given procedure substantially. The author believes that the information received through intraoperative MR imaging scanning ultimately will contribute to decreasing the duration of surgery. Future possibilities include combining the intraoperative MR imager with other technologies, such as the endoscope, focused ultrasound, robotics, and the evaluation of brain function intraoperatively. The development of the intraoperative MR imager marks a significant advance in neurosurgery, an advance that will revolutionize intraoperative visualization as fully as the operating microscope. The combination of intraoperative visualization and precise surgical navigation is unparalleled, and its enhancement of surgical applications will be widespread. Considering the remarkable potential of the intraoperative MR imager for neurosurgical applications, optimal magnet design, image quality, and navigational methods are necessary to capitalize on the advantages of this revolutionary tool. The intraoperative MR imaging system that the author's team has developed and used has combined these features, and allows the performance of open surgical procedures without the need of patient or magnet repositioning. By

  8. Optical Imaging of the Breast: Basic Principles and Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Leo, Giovanni; Trimboli, Rubina Manuela; Sella, Tamar; Sardanelli, Francesco

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this article is to summarize the physical principles, technology features, and first clinical applications of optical imaging techniques to the breast. Light-breast tissue interaction is expressed as absorption and scattering coefficients, allowing image reconstruction based on endogenous or exogenous contrast. Diffuse optical spectroscopy and imaging, fluorescence molecular tomography, photoacoustic imaging, and multiparametric infrared imaging show potential for clinical application, especially for lesion characterization, estimation of cancer probability, and monitoring the effect of neoadjuvant therapy.

  9. Twenty images over 20 years: clinical imaging and healthcare photography in the Wellcome Image Awards (WIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draycott, Catherine; Dakin, Carly

    2017-04-01

    The Wellcome Image Awards are celebrating their 20th year of bringing us the world's most incredible science and health images this year. The 2017 winners can be seen at exhibitions to be held simultaneously across the UK, in science centres from Aberdeen to the Eden Project, as well as in Russia and South Africa. Over the last 20 years many images have featured amongst the winners and this gallery showcases the images from the contemporary clinical collection that were successful during that time.

  10. Optimal embedding for shape indexing in medical image databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xiaoning; Tagare, Hemant D; Fulbright, Robert K; Long, Rodney; Antani, Sameer

    2010-06-01

    This paper addresses the problem of indexing shapes in medical image databases. Shapes of organs are often indicative of disease, making shape similarity queries important in medical image databases. Mathematically, shapes with landmarks belong to shape spaces which are curved manifolds with a well defined metric. The challenge in shape indexing is to index data in such curved spaces. One natural indexing scheme is to use metric trees, but metric trees are prone to inefficiency. This paper proposes a more efficient alternative. We show that it is possible to optimally embed finite sets of shapes in shape space into a Euclidean space. After embedding, classical coordinate-based trees can be used for efficient shape retrieval. The embedding proposed in the paper is optimal in the sense that it least distorts the partial Procrustes shape distance. The proposed indexing technique is used to retrieve images by vertebral shape from the NHANES II database of cervical and lumbar spine X-ray images maintained at the National Library of Medicine. Vertebral shape strongly correlates with the presence of osteophytes, and shape similarity retrieval is proposed as a tool for retrieval by osteophyte presence and severity. Experimental results included in the paper evaluate (1) the usefulness of shape similarity as a proxy for osteophytes, (2) the computational and disk access efficiency of the new indexing scheme, (3) the relative performance of indexing with embedding to the performance of indexing without embedding, and (4) the computational cost of indexing using the proposed embedding versus the cost of an alternate embedding. The experimental results clearly show the relevance of shape indexing and the advantage of using the proposed embedding. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Optimization of image processing algorithms on mobile platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Pramod; Shirvaikar, Mukul

    2011-03-01

    This work presents a technique to optimize popular image processing algorithms on mobile platforms such as cell phones, net-books and personal digital assistants (PDAs). The increasing demand for video applications like context-aware computing on mobile embedded systems requires the use of computationally intensive image processing algorithms. The system engineer has a mandate to optimize them so as to meet real-time deadlines. A methodology to take advantage of the asymmetric dual-core processor, which includes an ARM and a DSP core supported by shared memory, is presented with implementation details. The target platform chosen is the popular OMAP 3530 processor for embedded media systems. It has an asymmetric dual-core architecture with an ARM Cortex-A8 and a TMS320C64x Digital Signal Processor (DSP). The development platform was the BeagleBoard with 256 MB of NAND RAM and 256 MB SDRAM memory. The basic image correlation algorithm is chosen for benchmarking as it finds widespread application for various template matching tasks such as face-recognition. The basic algorithm prototypes conform to OpenCV, a popular computer vision library. OpenCV algorithms can be easily ported to the ARM core which runs a popular operating system such as Linux or Windows CE. However, the DSP is architecturally more efficient at handling DFT algorithms. The algorithms are tested on a variety of images and performance results are presented measuring the speedup obtained due to dual-core implementation. A major advantage of this approach is that it allows the ARM processor to perform important real-time tasks, while the DSP addresses performance-hungry algorithms.

  12. Optimal Viewing Angle Determination for Multiple Vessel Segments in Coronary Angiographic Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuehu; Yang, Jian; Chen, Yang; Ai, Danni; Hu, Yining; Wang, Yongtian

    2014-06-01

    Angiographic image is the perspective projection of the whole body from a 3D space to a 2D imaging plane, in which X-ray is used. As such, topological vasculature information has been lost. In 2D angiograms, foreshortening and overlapping are commonly observed in tubular-like structures. Hence, an optimum viewing angle should be determined to observe an interesting vessel segment (IVS) or an interesting vessel bifurcation (IVB) with minimized foreshortening and overlapping from a limited number of angiographic images. In this study, a novel integrated optimization method is proposed to calculate the optimum viewing angle. In the proposed method, the irregular shape and inter-branch distance of vasculatures are considered. Furthermore, three optimized conditions, including projection foreshortening rate, projection stenosis rate, and projection overlapping rate, are designed and integrated to determine the optimum viewing angle in a single vessel segment. The three conditions, including projection foreshortening, projection stenosis, and projection adjacent spacing rates, are also designed to optimize the viewing angle of bifurcations. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, we simulated an angiographic image based on X-ray propagating principle by integrating 3D coronary artery tree models and the respective CT volume data. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is very effective and robust; hence, this method can be used to determine the optimum viewing angle of IVS or IVB with irregular stenosis. The proposed method can also help physicians observe the branching structure or stenosis clearly in clinical practice.

  13. Multigrid optimal mass transport for image registration and morphing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Tauseef ur; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2007-02-01

    In this paper we present a computationally efficient Optimal Mass Transport algorithm. This method is based on the Monge-Kantorovich theory and is used for computing elastic registration and warping maps in image registration and morphing applications. This is a parameter free method which utilizes all of the grayscale data in an image pair in a symmetric fashion. No landmarks need to be specified for correspondence. In our work, we demonstrate significant improvement in computation time when our algorithm is applied as compared to the originally proposed method by Haker et al [1]. The original algorithm was based on a gradient descent method for removing the curl from an initial mass preserving map regarded as 2D vector field. This involves inverting the Laplacian in each iteration which is now computed using full multigrid technique resulting in an improvement in computational time by a factor of two. Greater improvement is achieved by decimating the curl in a multi-resolutional framework. The algorithm was applied to 2D short axis cardiac MRI images and brain MRI images for testing and comparison.

  14. Improved Detection of Kidney Stones Using an Optimized Doppler Imaging Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunitz, Bryan; Dunmire, Barbrina; Paun, Marla; Sapozhnikov, Oleg; Kucewicz, John; Hsi, Ryan; Lee, Franklin; Sorensen, Matthew; Harper, Jonathan; Bailey, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Kidney stones have been shown to exhibit a “twinkling artifact” (TA) under Color-Doppler ultrasound. Although this technique has better specificity than conventional Bmode imaging, it has lower sensitivity. To improve the overall performance of using TA as a diagnostic tool, Doppler output parameters were optimized in-vitro. The collected data supports a previous hypothesis that TA is caused by random oscillations of micron sized bubbles trapped in the cracks and crevices of kidney stones. A set of optimized parameters were implemented such that that the MI & TI remained within the FDA approved limits. Several clinical kidney scans were performed with the optimized settings and were able to detect stones with improved SNR relative to the default settings. PMID:26203346

  15. Advances in Clinical and Biomedical Applications of Photoacoustic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jimmy L; Wang, Bo; Wilson, Katheryne E; Bayer, Carolyn L; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Kim, Seungsoo; Homan, Kimberly A; Emelianov, Stanislav Y

    2010-11-01

    IMPORTANCE OF THE FIELD: Photoacoustic imaging is an imaging modality that derives image contrast from the optical absorption coefficient of the tissue being imaged. The imaging technique is able to differentiate between healthy and diseased tissue with either deeper penetration or higher resolution than other functional imaging modalities currently available. From a clinical standpoint, photoacoustic imaging has demonstrated safety and effectiveness in diagnosing diseased tissue regions using either endogenous tissue contrast or exogenous contrast agents. Furthermore, the potential of photoacoustic imaging has been demonstrated in various therapeutic interventions ranging from drug delivery and release to image-guided therapy and monitoring. AREAS COVERED IN THIS REVIEW: This article reviews the current state of photoacoustic imaging in biomedicine from a technological perspective, highlights various biomedical and clinical applications of photoacoustic imaging, and gives insights on future directions. WHAT THE READER WILL GAIN: Readers will learn about the various applications of photoacoustic imaging, as well as the various contrast agents that can be used to assist photoacoustic imaging. This review will highlight both pre-clinical and clinical uses for photoacoustic imaging, as well as discuss some of the challenges that must be addressed to move photoacoustic imaging into the clinical realm. TAKE HOME MESSAGE: Photoacoustic imaging offers unique advantages over existing imaging modalities. The imaging field is broad with many exciting applications for detecting and diagnosing diseased tissue or processes. Photoacoustics is also used in therapeutic applications to identify and characterize the pathology and then to monitor the treatment. Although the technology is still in its infancy, much work has been done in the pre-clinical arena, and photoacoustic imaging is fast approaching the clinical setting.

  16. Identification of optimal mask size parameter for noise filtering in 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate bone scintigraphy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Anil K; Bisht, Chandan S; Sharma, Param D; ArunRaj, Sreedharan Thankarajan; Taywade, Sameer; Patel, Chetan; Bal, Chandrashekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2017-11-01

    Tc-methylene diphosphonate (Tc-MDP) bone scintigraphy images have limited number of counts per pixel. A noise filtering method based on local statistics of the image produces better results than a linear filter. However, the mask size has a significant effect on image quality. In this study, we have identified the optimal mask size that yields a good smooth bone scan image. Forty four bone scan images were processed using mask sizes 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, and 15 pixels. The input and processed images were reviewed in two steps. In the first step, the images were inspected and the mask sizes that produced images with significant loss of clinical details in comparison with the input image were excluded. In the second step, the image quality of the 40 sets of images (each set had input image, and its corresponding three processed images with 3, 5, and 7-pixel masks) was assessed by two nuclear medicine physicians. They selected one good smooth image from each set of images. The image quality was also assessed quantitatively with a line profile. Fisher's exact test was used to find statistically significant differences in image quality processed with 5 and 7-pixel mask at a 5% cut-off. A statistically significant difference was found between the image quality processed with 5 and 7-pixel mask at P=0.00528. The identified optimal mask size to produce a good smooth image was found to be 7 pixels. The best mask size for the John-Sen Lee filter was found to be 7×7 pixels, which yielded Tc-methylene diphosphonate bone scan images with the highest acceptable smoothness.

  17. SU-E-J-16: Automatic Image Contrast Enhancement Based On Automatic Parameter Optimization for Radiation Therapy Setup Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, J [Taishan Medical University, Taian, Shandong (China); Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, MO (United States); Li, H. Harlod; Zhang, T; Yang, D [Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, MO (United States); Ma, F [Taishan Medical University, Taian, Shandong (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In RT patient setup 2D images, tissues often cannot be seen well due to the lack of image contrast. Contrast enhancement features provided by image reviewing software, e.g. Mosaiq and ARIA, require manual selection of the image processing filters and parameters thus inefficient and cannot be automated. In this work, we developed a novel method to automatically enhance the 2D RT image contrast to allow automatic verification of patient daily setups as a prerequisite step of automatic patient safety assurance. Methods: The new method is based on contrast limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE) and high-pass filtering algorithms. The most important innovation is to automatically select the optimal parameters by optimizing the image contrast. The image processing procedure includes the following steps: 1) background and noise removal, 2) hi-pass filtering by subtracting the Gaussian smoothed Result, and 3) histogram equalization using CLAHE algorithm. Three parameters were determined through an iterative optimization which was based on the interior-point constrained optimization algorithm: the Gaussian smoothing weighting factor, the CLAHE algorithm block size and clip limiting parameters. The goal of the optimization is to maximize the entropy of the processed Result. Results: A total 42 RT images were processed. The results were visually evaluated by RT physicians and physicists. About 48% of the images processed by the new method were ranked as excellent. In comparison, only 29% and 18% of the images processed by the basic CLAHE algorithm and by the basic window level adjustment process, were ranked as excellent. Conclusion: This new image contrast enhancement method is robust and automatic, and is able to significantly outperform the basic CLAHE algorithm and the manual window-level adjustment process that are currently used in clinical 2D image review software tools.

  18. Diagnostic Performance of Three Phase Bone Scan for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type 1 with Optimally Modified Image Criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hyun Woo; Paeng, Jin Chul; Nahm, Francins Sahngun; Kim, Seog Gyun; Zehra, Tanzeel; Oh, So Won; Lee, Hyo Sang; Kang, Keon Wook; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Lee, Dong Soo [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Although the three phase bone scan (TBPS) is one of the widely used imaging studies for diagnosing complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS 1), there is some controversy regarding the TPBS image criteria for CRPS 1. In this study, we modified the image criteria using image pattern and quantitative analysis in the patients diagnosed using the most recent consensus clinical diagnostic criteria. The study included 140 patients with suspected CRPS 1 (CRPS 1, n=79; non CRPS, n=61; mean age 39{+-}15 years) who underwent TPBS. The clinical diagnostic criteria for CRPS 1 revised by the Budapest consensus group were used for confirmative diagnosis. Patients were classified according to flow/pool and delayed uptake (DU) image patterns, and the time interval between the initiating event and TPBS (TI{sup eventscan)}. Quantitative analysis for lesion to contralateral ratio (LCR) was performed. Modified TPBS image criteria were created and evaluated for optimal diagnostic performance. Both increased and decreased periarticular DU were significant image findings for CRPS 1 (CRPS 1 positive rate=73% in the increased DU group, 75% in the decreased DU group). The TI{sup eventscand}id not differ significantly between the different image pattern groups. Quantitative analysis revealed an LCR of 1.43 was the optimal cutoff value for CRPS 1 and diagnostic performance was significantly improved in the increased DU group (area under the curve=0.732). Given the modified image criteria, the sensitivity and specificity of TPBS for diagnosing CRPS 1 were 80% and 72%, respectively. Optimally modified TPBS image criteria for CRPS 1 were suggested using image pattern and quantitative analysis. With the criteria, TPBS is an effective imaging study for CRPS 1 even with the most recent consensus clinical diagnostic criteria.

  19. Optimal imaging techniques in the scanning transmission electron microscope: applications to biological macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, M; Crewe, A V

    1980-01-01

    We show applications of the optimal imaging method to stained biological macromolecules. This optimal imaging method involves the following basic procedures: (i) for any given resolution, which is represented by the electron probe size in the scanning transmission electron microscope, a preferred magnification is used; (ii) the micrographs taken at the condition described above are then spatially filtered by using a low-pass filter (nu < 1/2d, in which d is the space between scan lines) to optically reconstruct the final optimal image. It is found that the micrographs obtained by using the optimal imaging method clearly show an improvement in contrast. Images PMID:6933454

  20. Clinical PET/MR Imaging in Dementia and Neuro-Oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Otto M.; Marner, Lisbeth; Law, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of hybrid PET/MRI systems allows simultaneous multimodality image acquisition of high technical quality. This technique is well suited for the brain, and particularly in dementia and neuro-oncology. In routine use combinations of well-established MRI sequences and PET tracers...... provide the most optimal and clinically valuable protocols. For dementia the [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) has merit with a simultaneous four sequence MRI protocol of 20 min supported by supplementary statistical reading tools and quantitative measurements of the hippocampal volume. Clinical PET......-oncology under general anesthesia. The clinical value of adding advanced MRI sequences in multiparametric imaging setting, however, is still undocumented....

  1. Velocity-based cardiac contractility personalization from images using derivative-free optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ken C L; Sermesant, Maxime; Rhode, Kawal; Ginks, Matthew; Rinaldi, C Aldo; Razavi, Reza; Delingette, Hervé; Ayache, Nicholas

    2015-03-01

    Model personalization is a key aspect for biophysical models to impact clinical practice, and cardiac contractility personalization from medical images is a major step in this direction. Existing gradient-based optimization approaches show promising results of identifying the maximum contractility from images, but the contraction and relaxation rates are not accounted for. A main reason is the limited choices of objective functions when their gradients are required. For complicated cardiac models, analytical evaluations of gradients are very difficult if not impossible, and finite difference approximations are computationally expensive and may introduce numerical difficulties. By removing such limitations with derivative-free optimization, we found that a velocity-based objective function can properly identify regional maximum contraction stresses, contraction rates, and relaxation rates simultaneously with intact model complexity. Experiments on synthetic data show that the parameters are better identified using the velocity-based objective function than its position-based counterpart, and the proposed framework is insensitive to initial parameters with the adopted derivative-free optimization algorithm. Experiments on clinical data show that the framework can provide personalized contractility parameters which are consistent with the underlying physiologies of the patients and healthy volunteers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. An MR Brain Images Classifier System via Particle Swarm Optimization and Kernel Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudong Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Automated abnormal brain detection is extremely of importance for clinical diagnosis. Over last decades numerous methods had been presented. In this paper, we proposed a novel hybrid system to classify a given MR brain image as either normal or abnormal. The proposed method first employed digital wavelet transform to extract features then used principal component analysis (PCA to reduce the feature space. Afterwards, we constructed a kernel support vector machine (KSVM with RBF kernel, using particle swarm optimization (PSO to optimize the parameters C and σ. Fivefold cross-validation was utilized to avoid overfitting. In the experimental procedure, we created a 90 images dataset brain downloaded from Harvard Medical School website. The abnormal brain MR images consist of the following diseases: glioma, metastatic adenocarcinoma, metastatic bronchogenic carcinoma, meningioma, sarcoma, Alzheimer, Huntington, motor neuron disease, cerebral calcinosis, Pick’s disease, Alzheimer plus visual agnosia, multiple sclerosis, AIDS dementia, Lyme encephalopathy, herpes encephalitis, Creutzfeld-Jakob disease, and cerebral toxoplasmosis. The 5-folded cross-validation classification results showed that our method achieved 97.78% classification accuracy, higher than 86.22% by BP-NN and 91.33% by RBF-NN. For the parameter selection, we compared PSO with those of random selection method. The results showed that the PSO is more effective to build optimal KSVM.

  3. An MR brain images classifier system via particle swarm optimization and kernel support vector machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yudong; Wang, Shuihua; Ji, Genlin; Dong, Zhengchao

    2013-01-01

    Automated abnormal brain detection is extremely of importance for clinical diagnosis. Over last decades numerous methods had been presented. In this paper, we proposed a novel hybrid system to classify a given MR brain image as either normal or abnormal. The proposed method first employed digital wavelet transform to extract features then used principal component analysis (PCA) to reduce the feature space. Afterwards, we constructed a kernel support vector machine (KSVM) with RBF kernel, using particle swarm optimization (PSO) to optimize the parameters C and σ . Fivefold cross-validation was utilized to avoid overfitting. In the experimental procedure, we created a 90 images dataset brain downloaded from Harvard Medical School website. The abnormal brain MR images consist of the following diseases: glioma, metastatic adenocarcinoma, metastatic bronchogenic carcinoma, meningioma, sarcoma, Alzheimer, Huntington, motor neuron disease, cerebral calcinosis, Pick's disease, Alzheimer plus visual agnosia, multiple sclerosis, AIDS dementia, Lyme encephalopathy, herpes encephalitis, Creutzfeld-Jakob disease, and cerebral toxoplasmosis. The 5-folded cross-validation classification results showed that our method achieved 97.78% classification accuracy, higher than 86.22% by BP-NN and 91.33% by RBF-NN. For the parameter selection, we compared PSO with those of random selection method. The results showed that the PSO is more effective to build optimal KSVM.

  4. Optimized workflow and imaging protocols for whole-body oncologic PET/MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Shirou; Hara, Takamitsu; Nanbu, Takeyuki; Suenaga, Hiroki; Sugawara, Shigeyasu; Kuroiwa, Daichi; Sekino, Hirofumi; Miyajima, Masayuki; Kubo, Hitoshi; Oriuchi, Noboru; Ito, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    Although PET/MRI has the advantages of a simultaneous acquisition of PET and MRI, high soft-tissue contrast of the MRI images, and reduction of radiation exposure, its low profitability and long acquisition time are significant problems in clinical settings. Thus, MRI protocols that meet oncological purposes need to be used in order to reduce examination time while securing detectability. Currently, half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin echo and 3D-T1 volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination may be the most commonly used sequences for whole-body imaging due to their shorter acquisition time and higher diagnostic accuracy. Although there have been several reports that adding diffusion weighted image (DWI) to PET/MRI protocol has had no effect on tumor detection to date, in cases of liver, kidney, bladder, and prostate cancer, the use of DWI may be beneficial in detecting lesions. Another possible option is to scan each region with different MRI sequences instead of scanning the whole body using one sequence continuously. We herein report a workflow and imaging protocols for whole-body oncologic PET/MRI using an integrated system in the clinical routine, designed for the detection, for example by cancer screening, of metastatic lesions, in order to help future users optimize their workflow and imaging protocols.

  5. Dose optimization for different medical imaging tasks from exposure index, exposure control factor, and MAS in digital radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Menglong; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Yaying; Chen, Weixia; Hou, Lixia

    2012-09-01

    In radiographic examination, not all medical imaging tasks require the same level of image quality or diagnostic information. Criteria should be established for different imaging tasks to avoid excessive doses where there is no clear net benefit in the diagnosis or the image quality. An exposure index provided by manufacturers would be a useful tool for this purpose. This study aims to establish an optimum exposure index to be used as a guideline for clinical imaging tasks to minimize radiation exposure for chest digital radiography. A three-level classification of image quality (high, medium, and low) for chest imaging tasks was carried out. An anthropomorphic phantom was employed to establish minimum exposure index and exposure (mAs) for clinical imaging task type I (corresponding to high image quality). The exposures of medium and low quality images derived from it. Thirty patients were exposed consecutively with these optimized exposure factors, and clinical tasks were considered, while another 30 patients were exposed with the exposure factors routinely used in practice. Image quality was assessed objectively by a consensus panel. The optimized exposure provided a significant reduction of the mean exposure index from 1,556 to 1,207 (p < 0.0001) and mean patient's entrance surface dose from 0.168 mGy to 0.092 mGy (p < 0.0001). The results show that a clinical-task-determined radiographic procedure is more conducive to radiation protection of patients. In this study, the posteroanterior chest imaging examination was chosen as an example. This procedure can also apply to other body parts and views.

  6. Comparison of 3 T and 7 T MRI clinical sequences for ankle imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juras, Vladimir, E-mail: vladimir.juras@meduniwien.ac.at [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna General Hospital, Waeringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Slovak Academy of Sciences, Institute of Measurement Science, Dubravska cesta 9, 84104 Bratislava (Slovakia); Welsch, Goetz, E-mail: welsch@bwh.harvard.edu [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna General Hospital, Waeringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Baer, Peter, E-mail: baerpeter@siemens.com [Siemens Healthcare, Richard-Strauss-Strasse 76, D81679 Munich (Germany); Kronnerwetter, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.kronnerwetter@meduniwien.ac.at [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna General Hospital, Waeringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Fujita, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hiroyuki.fujita@qualedyn.com [Quality Electrodynamics, LCC, 777 Beta Dr, Cleveland, OH 44143-2336 (United States); Trattnig, Siegfried, E-mail: siegfried.trattnig@meduniwien.ac.at [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna General Hospital, Waeringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare 3 T and 7 T signal-to-noise and contrast-to noise ratios of clinical sequences for imaging of the ankles with optimized sequences and dedicated coils. Ten healthy volunteers were examined consecutively on both systems with three clinical sequences: (1) 3D gradient-echo, T{sub 1}-weighted; (2) 2D fast spin-echo, PD-weighted; and (3) 2D spin-echo, T{sub 1}-weighted. SNR was calculated for six regions: cartilage; bone; muscle; synovial fluid; Achilles tendon; and Kager's fat-pad. CNR was obtained for cartilage/bone, cartilage/fluid, cartilage/muscle, and muscle/fat-pad, and compared by a one-way ANOVA test for repeated measures. Mean SNR significantly increased at 7 T compared to 3 T for 3D GRE, and 2D TSE was 60.9% and 86.7%, respectively. In contrast, an average SNR decrease of almost 25% was observed in the 2D SE sequence. A CNR increase was observed in 2D TSE images, and in most 3D GRE images. There was a substantial benefit from ultra high-field MR imaging of ankles with routine clinical sequences at 7 T compared to 3 T. Higher SNR and CNR at ultra-high field MR scanners may be useful in clinical practice for ankle imaging. However, carefully optimized protocols and dedicated extremity coils are necessary to obtain optimal results.

  7. Practical Considerations for Clinical PET/MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgano, Samuel; Viets, Zachary; Fowler, Kathryn; Gore, Lael; Thomas, John V; McNamara, Michelle; McConathy, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    Clinical PET/MR imaging is currently performed at a number of centers around the world as part of routine standard of care. This article focuses on issues and considerations for a clinical PET/MR imaging program, focusing on routine standard-of-care studies. Although local factors influence how clinical PET/MR imaging is implemented, the approaches and considerations described here intend to apply to most clinical programs. PET/MR imaging provides many more options than PET/computed tomography with diagnostic advantages for certain clinical applications but with added complexity. A recurring theme is matching the PET/MR imaging protocol to the clinical application to balance diagnostic accuracy with efficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Computational Modeling of Medical Images of Brain Tumor Patients for Optimized Radiation Therapy Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agn, Mikael

    In brain tumor radiation therapy, the aim is to maximize the delivered radiation dose to the targeted tumor and at the same time minimize the dose to sensitive healthy structures – so-called organs-at-risk (OARs). When planning a radiation therapy session, the tumor and the OARs therefore need...... to be delineated on medical images of the patient’s head, to be able to optimize a radiation dose plan. In clinical practice, the delineation is performed manually with limited assistance from automatic procedures, which is both time-consuming and typically suffers from poor reproducibility. There is, therefore...

  9. Combining clinical variables to optimize prediction of antidepressant treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iniesta, Raquel; Malki, Karim; Maier, Wolfgang; Rietschel, Marcella; Mors, Ole; Hauser, Joanna; Henigsberg, Neven; Dernovsek, Mojca Zvezdana; Souery, Daniel; Stahl, Daniel; Dobson, Richard; Aitchison, Katherine J; Farmer, Anne; Lewis, Cathryn M; McGuffin, Peter; Uher, Rudolf

    2016-07-01

    The outcome of treatment with antidepressants varies markedly across people with the same diagnosis. A clinically significant prediction of outcomes could spare the frustration of trial and error approach and improve the outcomes of major depressive disorder through individualized treatment selection. It is likely that a combination of multiple predictors is needed to achieve such prediction. We used elastic net regularized regression to optimize prediction of symptom improvement and remission during treatment with escitalopram or nortriptyline and to identify contributing predictors from a range of demographic and clinical variables in 793 adults with major depressive disorder. A combination of demographic and clinical variables, with strong contributions from symptoms of depressed mood, reduced interest, decreased activity, indecisiveness, pessimism and anxiety significantly predicted treatment outcomes, explaining 5-10% of variance in symptom improvement with escitalopram. Similar combinations of variables predicted remission with area under the curve 0.72, explaining approximately 15% of variance (pseudo R(2)) in who achieves remission, with strong contributions from body mass index, appetite, interest-activity symptom dimension and anxious-somatizing depression subtype. Escitalopram-specific outcome prediction was more accurate than generic outcome prediction, and reached effect sizes that were near or above a previously established benchmark for clinical significance. Outcome prediction on the nortriptyline arm did not significantly differ from chance. These results suggest that easily obtained demographic and clinical variables can predict therapeutic response to escitalopram with clinically meaningful accuracy, suggesting a potential for individualized prescription of this antidepressant drug. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Optimization of coronary optical coherence tomography imaging using the attenuation-compensated technique: a validation study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teo, Jing Chun; Foin, Nicolas; Otsuka, Fumiyuki; Bulluck, Heerajnarain; Fam, Jiang Ming; Wong, Philip; Low, Fatt Hoe; Leo, Hwa Liang; Mari, Jean-Martial; Joner, Michael; Girard, Michael J A; Virmani, Renu; Bezerra, HG.; Costa, MA.; Guagliumi, G.; Rollins, AM.; Simon, D.; Gutiérrez-Chico, JL.; Alegría-Barrero, E.; Teijeiro-Mestre, R.; Chan, PH.; Tsujioka, H.; de Silva, R.; Otsuka, F.; Joner, M.; Prati, F.; Virmani, R.; Narula, J.; Members, WC.; Levine, GN.; Bates, ER.; Blankenship, JC.; Bailey, SR.; Bittl, JA.; Prati, F.; Guagliumi, G.; Mintz, G.S.; Costa, Marco; Regar, E.; Akasaka, T.; Roleder, T.; Jąkała, J.; Kałuża, GL.; Partyka, Ł.; Proniewska, K.; Pociask, E.; Girard, MJA.; Strouthidis, NG.; Ethier, CR.; Mari, JM.; Mari, JM.; Strouthidis, NG.; Park, SC.; Girard, MJA.; van der Lee, R.; Foin, N.; Otsuka, F.; Wong, P.K.; Mari, J-M.; Joner, M.; Nakano, M.; Vorpahl, M.; Otsuka, F.; Taniwaki, M.; Yazdani, SK.; Finn, AV.; Nakano, M.; Yahagi, K.; Yamamoto, H.; Taniwaki, M.; Otsuka, F.; Ladich, ER.; Girard, MJ.; Ang, M.; Chung, CW.; Farook, M.; Strouthidis, N.; Mehta, JS.; Foin, N.; Mari, JM.; Nijjer, S.; Sen, S.; Petraco, R.; Ghione, M.; Liu, X.; Kang, JU.; Virmani, R.; Kolodgie, F.D.; Burke, AP.; Farb, A.; Schwartz, S.M.; Yahagi, K.; Kolodgie, F.D.; Otsuka, F.; Finn, AV.; Davis, HR.; Joner, M.; Kume, T.; Akasaka, T.; Kawamoto, T.; Watanabe, N.; Toyota, E.; Neishi, Y.; Rieber, J.; Meissner, O.; Babaryka, G.; Reim, S.; Oswald, M.E.; Koenig, A.S.; Tearney, G. J.; Regar, E.; Akasaka, T.; Adriaenssens, T.; Barlis, P.; Bezerra, HG.; Yabushita, H.; Bouma, BE.; Houser, S. L.; Aretz, HT.; Jang, I-K.; Schlendorf, KH.; Guo, J.; Sun, L.; Chen, Y.D.; Tian, F.; Liu, HB.; Chen, L.; Kawasaki, M.; Bouma, BE.; Bressner, J. E.; Houser, S. L.; Nadkarni, S. K.; MacNeill, BD.; Jansen, CHP.; Onthank, DC.; Cuello, F.; Botnar, RM.; Wiethoff, AJ.; Warley, A.; von Birgelen, C.; Hartmann, A. M.; Kubo, T.; Akasaka, T.; Shite, J.; Suzuki, T.; Uemura, S.; Yu, B.; Habara, M.; Nasu, K.; Terashima, M.; Kaneda, H.; Yokota, D.; Ko, E.; Virmani, R.; Burke, AP.; Kolodgie, F.D.; Farb, A.; Takarada, S.; Imanishi, T.; Kubo, T.; Tanimoto, T.; Kitabata, H.; Nakamura, N.; Hattori, K.; Ozaki, Y.; Ismail, TF.; Okumura, M.; Naruse, H.; Kan, S.; Nishio, R.; Shinke, T.; Otake, H.; Nakagawa, M.; Nagoshi, R.; Inoue, T.; Sinclair, H.D.; Bourantas, C.; Bagnall, A.; Mintz, G.S.; Kunadian, V.; Tearney, G. J.; Yabushita, H.; Houser, S. L.; Aretz, HT.; Jang, I-K.; Schlendorf, KH.; van Soest, G.; Goderie, T.; Regar, E.; Koljenović, S.; Leenders, GL. van; Gonzalo, N.; Xu, C.; Schmitt, JM.; Carlier, SG.; Virmani, R.; van der Meer, FJ; Faber, D.J.; Sassoon, DMB.; Aalders, M.C.; Pasterkamp, G.; Leeuwen, TG. van; Schmitt, JM.; Knuttel, A.; Yadlowsky, M.; Eckhaus, MA.; Karamata, B.; Laubscher, M.; Leutenegger, M.; Bourquin, S.; Lasser, T.; Lambelet, P.; Vermeer, K.A.; Mo, J.; Weda, J.J.A.; Lemij, H.G.; Boer, JF. de

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To optimize conventional coronary optical coherence tomography (OCT) images using the attenuation-compensated technique to improve identification of plaques and the external elastic lamina (EEL) contour. METHOD The attenuation-compensated technique was optimized via manipulating contrast

  11. Molecular Imaging of Stem Cell Transplantation for Liver Diseases: Monitoring, Clinical Translation, and Theranostics

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ping; Petrella, Francesco; Nicosia, Luca; Bellomi, Massimo; Rizzo, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation has been investigated to rescue experimental liver failure and is promising to offer an alternative therapy to liver transplantation for liver diseases treatment. Several clinical studies in this field have been carried out, but the therapeutic benefit of this treatment is still controversial. A major obstacle to developing stem cell therapies in clinic is being able to visualize the cells in vivo. Imaging modalities allow optimization of delivery, detecting cell sur...

  12. Clinical feasibility of {sup 90}Y digital PET/CT for imaging microsphere biodistribution following radioembolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Chadwick L.; Binzel, Katherine; Zhang, Jun; Knopp, Michael V. [The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Wright Center of Innovation in Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Columbus, OH (United States); Wuthrick, Evan J. [The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2017-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical feasibility of next generation solid-state digital photon counting PET/CT (dPET/CT) technology and imaging findings in patients following {sup 90}Y microsphere radioembolization in comparison with standard of care (SOC) bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT (bSPECT/CT). Five patients underwent SOC {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung imaging immediately following routine radioembolization with 3.5 ± 1.7 GBq of {sup 90}Y-labeled glass microspheres. All patients also underwent dPET/CT imaging at 29 ± 11 h following radioembolization. Matched pairs comparison was used to compare image quality, image contrast and {sup 90}Y biodistribution between dPET/CT and bSPECT/CT images. Volumetric assessments of {sup 90}Y activity using different isocontour thresholds on dPET/CT and bSPECT/CT images were also compared. Digital PET/CT consistently provided better visual image quality and {sup 90}Y-to-background image contrast while depicting {sup 90}Y biodistribution than bSPECT/CT. Isocontour volumetric assessment using a 1% threshold precisely outlined {sup 90}Y activity and the treatment volume on dPET/CT images, whereas a more restrictive 20% threshold on bSPECT/CT images was needed to obtain comparable treatment volumes. The use of a less restrictive 10% threshold isocontour on bSPECT/CT images grossly overestimated the treatment volume when compared with the 1% threshold on dPET/CT images. Digital PET/CT is clinically feasible for the assessment of {sup 90}Y microsphere biodistribution following radioembolization, and provides better visual image quality and image contrast than routine bSPECT/CT with comparable acquisition times. With further optimization and clinical validation, dPET technology may allow faster and more accurate imaging-based assessment of {sup 90}Y microsphere biodistribution. (orig.)

  13. Clinical applications of choroidal imaging technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Chhablani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Choroid supplies the major blood supply to the eye, especially the outer retinal structures. Its understanding has significantly improved with the advent of advanced imaging modalities such as enhanced depth imaging technique and the newer swept source optical coherence tomography. Recent literature reports the findings of choroidal changes, quantitative as well as qualitative, in various chorioretinal disorders. This review article describes applications of choroidal imaging in the management of common diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, high myopia, central serous chorioretinopathy, chorioretinal inflammatory diseases, and tumors. This article briefly discusses future directions in choroidal imaging including angiography.

  14. Computationally-optimized bone mechanical modeling from high-resolution structural images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy F Magland

    Full Text Available Image-based mechanical modeling of the complex micro-structure of human bone has shown promise as a non-invasive method for characterizing bone strength and fracture risk in vivo. In particular, elastic moduli obtained from image-derived micro-finite element (μFE simulations have been shown to correlate well with results obtained by mechanical testing of cadaveric bone. However, most existing large-scale finite-element simulation programs require significant computing resources, which hamper their use in common laboratory and clinical environments. In this work, we theoretically derive and computationally evaluate the resources needed to perform such simulations (in terms of computer memory and computation time, which are dependent on the number of finite elements in the image-derived bone model. A detailed description of our approach is provided, which is specifically optimized for μFE modeling of the complex three-dimensional architecture of trabecular bone. Our implementation includes domain decomposition for parallel computing, a novel stopping criterion, and a system for speeding up convergence by pre-iterating on coarser grids. The performance of the system is demonstrated on a dual quad-core Xeon 3.16 GHz CPUs equipped with 40 GB of RAM. Models of distal tibia derived from 3D in-vivo MR images in a patient comprising 200,000 elements required less than 30 seconds to converge (and 40 MB RAM. To illustrate the system's potential for large-scale μFE simulations, axial stiffness was estimated from high-resolution micro-CT images of a voxel array of 90 million elements comprising the human proximal femur in seven hours CPU time. In conclusion, the system described should enable image-based finite-element bone simulations in practical computation times on high-end desktop computers with applications to laboratory studies and clinical imaging.

  15. Optimizing Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) System for Image Guided Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chun Joo

    Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) system is the most widely used imaging device in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT), where set of 3D volumetric image of patient can be reconstructed to identify and correct position setup errors prior to the radiation treatment. This CBCT system can significantly improve precision of on-line setup errors of patient position and tumor target localization prior to the treatment. However, there are still a number of issues that needs to be investigated with CBCT system such as 1) progressively increasing defective pixels in imaging detectors by its frequent usage, 2) hazardous radiation exposure to patients during the CBCT imaging, 3) degradation of image quality due to patients' respiratory motion when CBCT is acquired and 4) unknown knowledge of certain anatomical features such as liver, due to lack of soft-tissue contrast which makes tumor motion verification challenging. In this dissertation, we explore on optimizing the use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system under such circumstances. We begin by introducing general concept of IGRT. We then present the development of automated defective pixel detection algorithm for X-ray imagers that is used for CBCT imaging using wavelet analysis. We next investigate on developing fast and efficient low-dose volumetric reconstruction techniques which includes 1) fast digital tomosynthesis reconstruction using general-purpose graphics processing unit (GPGPU) programming and 2) fast low-dose CBCT image reconstruction based on the Gradient-Projection-Barzilai-Borwein formulation (GP-BB). We further developed two efficient approaches that could reduce the degradation of CBCT images from respiratory motion. First, we propose reconstructing four dimensional (4D) CBCT and DTS using respiratory signal extracted from fiducial markers implanted in liver. Second, novel motion-map constrained image reconstruction (MCIR) is proposed that allows reconstruction of high quality and high phase

  16. Optimal markers' placement on the thorax for clinical gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armand, Stéphane; Sangeux, Morgan; Baker, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Although, several thorax models have been proposed for clinical gait analysis, none has received widespread acceptance nor been subject to any extensive validation work, especially for the marker set to use. The aim of this study was thus to determine the optimal and minimal makers' placement on the thorax for clinical gait analysis. Ten healthy subjects have performed a series of movements (arm, head, trunk) with large amplitude during walking. Reflective markers were taped on the thorax (C7, T2, T4, T6, T8, T10, T12, sternum, clavicles and ribs) and their 3D positions were captured with an opto-electronic system. Each combination of 3 markers has been tested. The global error of each model was computed with the estimated position of the markers considering the thorax segment as a solid segment. Two families of marker sets were identified with the lowest error. The first family was composed by two anterior and one posterior marker on the thorax (incisura jugularis (IJ), xiphoid process, and T8). The second family was composed by two posterior and one anterior maker (IJ, T2 and T8 or T10). Even, if these two families of marker sets presented a similar error for marker position, the angles obtained from these marker sets showed large differences especially for the axial rotation movement of the trunk (up to 40.1°). The optimal and minimal maker set identified with a variety of large movements of the trunk, head and arms was IJ, T2 and T8 or T10. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Optimal experimental design to position transducers in ultrasound breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korta Martiartu, Naiara; Boehm, Christian; Vinard, Nicolas; Jovanović Balic, Ivana; Fichtner, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    We present methods to optimize the setup of a 3D ultrasound tomography scanner for breast cancer detection. This approach provides a systematic and quantitative tool to evaluate different designs and to optimize the con- figuration with respect to predefined design parameters. We consider both, time-of-flight inversion using straight rays and time-domain waveform inversion governed by the acoustic wave equation for imaging the sound speed. In order to compare different designs, we measure their quality by extracting properties from the Hessian operator of the time-of-flight or waveform differences defined in the inverse problem, i.e., the second derivatives with respect to the sound speed. Spatial uncertainties and resolution can be related to the eigenvalues of the Hessian, which provide a good indication of the information contained in the data that is acquired with a given design. However, the complete spectrum is often prohibitively expensive to compute, thus suitable approximations have to be developed and analyzed. We use the trace of the Hessian operator as design criterion, which is equivalent to the sum of all eigenvalues and requires less computational effort. In addition, we suggest to take advantage of the spatial symmetry to extrapolate the 3D experimental design from a set of 2D configurations. In order to maximize the quality criterion, we use a genetic algorithm to explore the space of possible design configurations. Numerical results show that the proposed strategies are capable of improving an initial configuration with uniformly distributed transducers, clustering them around regions with poor illumination and improving the ray coverage of the domain of interest.

  18. Dual optimization based prostate zonal segmentation in 3D MR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wu; Yuan, Jing; Ukwatta, Eranga; Sun, Yue; Rajchl, Martin; Fenster, Aaron

    2014-05-01

    Efficient and accurate segmentation of the prostate and two of its clinically meaningful sub-regions: the central gland (CG) and peripheral zone (PZ), from 3D MR images, is of great interest in image-guided prostate interventions and diagnosis of prostate cancer. In this work, a novel multi-region segmentation approach is proposed to simultaneously segment the prostate and its two major sub-regions from only a single 3D T2-weighted (T2w) MR image, which makes use of the prior spatial region consistency and incorporates a customized prostate appearance model into the segmentation task. The formulated challenging combinatorial optimization problem is solved by means of convex relaxation, for which a novel spatially continuous max-flow model is introduced as the dual optimization formulation to the studied convex relaxed optimization problem with region consistency constraints. The proposed continuous max-flow model derives an efficient duality-based algorithm that enjoys numerical advantages and can be easily implemented on GPUs. The proposed approach was validated using 18 3D prostate T2w MR images with a body-coil and 25 images with an endo-rectal coil. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is capable of efficiently and accurately extracting both the prostate zones: CG and PZ, and the whole prostate gland from the input 3D prostate MR images, with a mean Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 89.3±3.2% for the whole gland (WG), 82.2±3.0% for the CG, and 69.1±6.9% for the PZ in 3D body-coil MR images; 89.2±3.3% for the WG, 83.0±2.4% for the CG, and 70.0±6.5% for the PZ in 3D endo-rectal coil MR images. In addition, the experiments of intra- and inter-observer variability introduced by user initialization indicate a good reproducibility of the proposed approach in terms of volume difference (VD) and coefficient-of-variation (CV) of DSC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. MO-PIS-Exhibit Hall-01: Imaging: CT Dose Optimization Technologies I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denison, K; Smith, S [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Partners in Solutions is an exciting new program in which AAPM partners with our vendors to present practical “hands-on” information about the equipment and software systems that we use in our clinics. The imaging topic this year is CT scanner dose optimization capabilities. Note that the sessions are being held in a special purpose room built on the Exhibit Hall Floor, to encourage further interaction with the vendors. Dose Optimization Capabilities of GE Computed Tomography Scanners Presentation Time: 11:15 – 11:45 AM GE Healthcare is dedicated to the delivery of high quality clinical images through the development of technologies, which optimize the application of ionizing radiation. In computed tomography, dose management solutions fall into four categories: employs projection data and statistical modeling to decrease noise in the reconstructed image - creating an opportunity for mA reduction in the acquisition of diagnostic images. Veo represents true Model Based Iterative Reconstruction (MBiR). Using high-level algorithms in tandem with advanced computing power, Veo enables lower pixel noise standard deviation and improved spatial resolution within a single image. Advanced Adaptive Image Filters allow for maintenance of spatial resolution while reducing image noise. Examples of adaptive image space filters include Neuro 3-D filters and Cardiac Noise Reduction Filters. AutomA adjusts mA along the z-axis and is the CT equivalent of auto exposure control in conventional x-ray systems. Dynamic Z-axis Tracking offers an additional opportunity for dose reduction in helical acquisitions while SmartTrack Z-axis Tracking serves to ensure beam, collimator and detector alignment during tube rotation. SmartmA provides angular mA modulation. ECG Helical Modulation reduces mA during the systolic phase of the heart cycle. SmartBeam optimization uses bowtie beam-shaping hardware and software to filter off-axis x-rays - minimizing dose and reducing x-ray scatter. The

  20. Optimization of contrast-enhanced breast imaging: Analysis using a cascaded linear system model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue-Houng; Scaduto, David A; Zhao, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced (CE) breast imaging involves the injection contrast agents (i.e., iodine) to increase conspicuity of malignant lesions. CE imaging may be used in conjunction with digital mammography (DM) or digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and has shown promise in improving diagnostic specificity. Both CE-DM and CE-DBT techniques require optimization as clinical diagnostic tools. Physical factors including x-ray spectra, subtraction technique, and the signal from iodine contrast, must be considered to provide the greatest object detectability and image quality. We developed a cascaded linear system model (CLSM) for the optimization of CE-DM and CE-DBT employing dual energy (DE) subtraction or temporal (TE) subtraction. We have previously developed a CLSM for DBT implemented with an a-Se flat panel imager (FPI) and filtered backprojection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm. The model is used to track image quality metrics - modulation transfer function (MTF) and noise power spectrum (NPS) - at each stage of the imaging chain. In this study, the CLSM is extended for CE breast imaging. The effect of x-ray spectrum (varied by changing tube potential and the filter) and DE and TE subtraction techniques on breast structural noise was measured was studied and included as a deterministic source of noise in the CLSM. From the two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) MTF and NPS, the ideal observer signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), also known as the detectability index (d'), may be calculated. Using d' as a FOM, we discuss the optimization of CE imaging for the task of iodinated contrast object detection within structured backgrounds. Increasing x-ray energy was determined to decrease the magnitude of structural noise and not its correlation. By performing DE subtraction, the magnitude of the structural noise was further reduced at the expense of increased stochastic (quantum and electronic) noise. TE subtraction exhibited essentially no residual structural noise at the

  1. Optimal use of MRI in clinical trials, clinical care and clinical registries of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Møller-Bisgaard, Signe

    2014-01-01

    the benefits of including MRI in treat-to-target strategies. The benefits of incorporating MRI into clinical registries are not yet known, but may include improved knowledge about the real-life advantages of MRI, as well as opportunities to develop better clinical and laboratory composite measures to monitor......Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) clearly is more sensitive than clinical examination and conventional radiography (x-ray) for detection of inflammation (synovitis, bone marrow oedema (osteitis) and tenosynovitis) and damage (bone erosion and cartilage loss/joint space narrowing) in patients...... with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The question is when and how MRI should be used. The present article reviews our knowledge about, and provides suggestions for, the use of MRI in clinical trials, clinical care and clinical registries. In clinical trials, the OMERACT RA MRI scoring system (RAMRIS) is a thoroughly...

  2. Clinical trial optimization: Monte Carlo simulation Markov model for planning clinical trials recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Ismail; Rovira, Joan; Casanovas, Josep

    2007-05-01

    The patient recruitment process of clinical trials is an essential element which needs to be designed properly. In this paper we describe different simulation models under continuous and discrete time assumptions for the design of recruitment in clinical trials. The results of hypothetical examples of clinical trial recruitments are presented. The recruitment time is calculated and the number of recruited patients is quantified for a given time and probability of recruitment. The expected delay and the effective recruitment durations are estimated using both continuous and discrete time modeling. The proposed type of Monte Carlo simulation Markov models will enable optimization of the recruitment process and the estimation and the calibration of its parameters to aid the proposed clinical trials. A continuous time simulation may minimize the duration of the recruitment and, consequently, the total duration of the trial.

  3. Suprasellar cysts: clinical presentation, surgical indications, and optimal surgical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Song-Bai; Wang, Xin-Sheng; Zong, Xu-Yi; Zhang, Ya-Zhuo; Li, Chu-Zhong

    2011-05-18

    To describe the clinical presentation of suprasellar cysts (SSCs) and surgical indications, and compare the treatment methods of endoscopic ventriculocystostomy (VC) and ventriculocystocisternotomy (VCC). We retrospectively reviewed the records of 73 consecutive patients with SSC who were treated between June 2002 and September 2009. Twenty-two patients were treated with VC and 51 with VCC. Outcome was assessed by clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging. The patients were divided into five groups based on age at presentation: age less than 1 year (n = 6), 1-5 years (n = 36), 6-10 years (n = 15), 11-20 years (n = 11), and 21-53 years (n = 5). The main clinical presentations were macrocrania (100%), motor deficits (50%), and gaze disturbance (33.3%) in the age less than 1 year group; macrocrania (75%), motor deficits (63.9%), and gaze disturbance (27.8%) in the 1-5 years group; macrocrania (46.7%), symptoms of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) (40.0%), endocrine dysfunction (40%), and seizures (33.3%) in the 6-10 years group; symptoms of raised ICP (54.5%), endocrine dysfunction (54.5%), and reduced visual field or acuity (36.4%) in the 11-20 years group; and symptoms of raised ICP (80.0%) and reduced visual field or acuity (40.0%) in the 21-53 years group. The overall success rate of endoscopic fenestration was 90.4%. A Kaplan-Meier curve for long-term efficacy of the two treatment modalities showed better results for VCC than for VC (p = 0.008). Different age groups with SSCs have different main clinical presentations. VCC appears to be more efficacious than VC.

  4. Suprasellar cysts: clinical presentation, surgical indications, and optimal surgical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Ya-Zhuo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To describe the clinical presentation of suprasellar cysts (SSCs and surgical indications, and compare the treatment methods of endoscopic ventriculocystostomy (VC and ventriculocystocisternotomy (VCC. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of 73 consecutive patients with SSC who were treated between June 2002 and September 2009. Twenty-two patients were treated with VC and 51 with VCC. Outcome was assessed by clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging. Results The patients were divided into five groups based on age at presentation: age less than 1 year (n = 6, 1-5 years (n = 36, 6-10 years (n = 15, 11-20 years (n = 11, and 21-53 years (n = 5. The main clinical presentations were macrocrania (100%, motor deficits (50%, and gaze disturbance (33.3% in the age less than 1 year group; macrocrania (75%, motor deficits (63.9%, and gaze disturbance (27.8% in the 1-5 years group; macrocrania (46.7%, symptoms of raised intracranial pressure (ICP (40.0%, endocrine dysfunction (40%, and seizures (33.3% in the 6-10 years group; symptoms of raised ICP (54.5%, endocrine dysfunction (54.5%, and reduced visual field or acuity (36.4% in the 11-20 years group; and symptoms of raised ICP (80.0% and reduced visual field or acuity (40.0% in the 21-53 years group. The overall success rate of endoscopic fenestration was 90.4%. A Kaplan-Meier curve for long-term efficacy of the two treatment modalities showed better results for VCC than for VC (p = 0.008. Conclusions Different age groups with SSCs have different main clinical presentations. VCC appears to be more efficacious than VC.

  5. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging of endometrial cancer. Optimizing the imaging delay for tumour-myometrium contrast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung Bin [Chung-Ang University Hospital, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Min Hoan; Sung, Chang Kyu [Seoul National University College of Medicine, 41, Department of Radiology, SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Sohee [Seoul National University College of Medicine, 41, Department of Biostatistics, SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Ho [Kwandong University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Cheil General Hospital and Women' s Healthcare Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    To investigate the optimal imaging delay time of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in women with endometrial cancer. This prospective single-institution study was approved by the institutional review board, and informed consent was obtained from the participants. Thirty-five women (mean age, 54 years; age range, 29-66 years) underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging with a temporal resolution of 25-40 seconds. The signal intensity difference ratios between the myometrium and endometrial cancer were analyzed to investigate the optimal imaging delay time using single change-point analysis. The optimal imaging delay time for appropriate tumour-myometrium contrast ranged from 31.7 to 268.1 seconds. The median optimal imaging delay time was 91.3 seconds, with an interquartile range of 46.2 to 119.5 seconds. The median signal intensity difference ratios between the myometrium and endometrial cancer were 0.03, with an interquartile range of -0.01 to 0.06, on the pre-contrast MR imaging and 0.20, with an interquartile range of 0.15 to 0.25, on the post-contrast MR imaging. An imaging delay of approximately 90 seconds after initiating contrast material injection may be optimal for obtaining appropriate tumour-myometrium contrast in women with endometrial cancer. (orig.)

  6. Formulation of image fusion as a constrained least squares optimization problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwork, Nicholas; Lasry, Eric M; Pauly, John M; Balbás, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Fusing a lower resolution color image with a higher resolution monochrome image is a common practice in medical imaging. By incorporating spatial context and/or improving the signal-to-noise ratio, it provides clinicians with a single frame of the most complete information for diagnosis. In this paper, image fusion is formulated as a convex optimization problem that avoids image decomposition and permits operations at the pixel level. This results in a highly efficient and embarrassingly parallelizable algorithm based on widely available robust and simple numerical methods that realizes the fused image as the global minimizer of the convex optimization problem.

  7. Time Reversal Reconstruction Algorithm Based on PSO Optimized SVM Interpolation for Photoacoustic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjian Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Photoacoustic imaging is an innovative imaging technique to image biomedical tissues. The time reversal reconstruction algorithm in which a numerical model of the acoustic forward problem is run backwards in time is widely used. In the paper, a time reversal reconstruction algorithm based on particle swarm optimization (PSO optimized support vector machine (SVM interpolation method is proposed for photoacoustics imaging. Numerical results show that the reconstructed images of the proposed algorithm are more accurate than those of the nearest neighbor interpolation, linear interpolation, and cubic convolution interpolation based time reversal algorithm, which can provide higher imaging quality by using significantly fewer measurement positions or scanning times.

  8. Convex optimization problem prototyping for image reconstruction in computed tomography with the Chambolle-Pock algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidky, Emil Y; Jørgensen, Jakob H; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2012-05-21

    The primal-dual optimization algorithm developed in Chambolle and Pock (CP) (2011 J. Math. Imag. Vis. 40 1-26) is applied to various convex optimization problems of interest in computed tomography (CT) image reconstruction. This algorithm allows for rapid prototyping of optimization problems for the purpose of designing iterative image reconstruction algorithms for CT. The primal-dual algorithm is briefly summarized in this paper, and its potential for prototyping is demonstrated by explicitly deriving CP algorithm instances for many optimization problems relevant to CT. An example application modeling breast CT with low-intensity x-ray illumination is presented.

  9. Convex optimization problem prototyping for image reconstruction in computed tomography with the Chambolle–Pock algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sidky, Emil Y.; Jørgensen, Jakob Heide; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2012-01-01

    The primal–dual optimization algorithm developed in Chambolle and Pock (CP) (2011 J. Math. Imag. Vis. 40 1–26) is applied to various convex optimization problems of interest in computed tomography (CT) image reconstruction. This algorithm allows for rapid prototyping of optimization problems...... for the purpose of designing iterative image reconstruction algorithms for CT. The primal–dual algorithm is briefly summarized in this paper, and its potential for prototyping is demonstrated by explicitly deriving CP algorithm instances for many optimization problems relevant to CT. An example application...

  10. Optimized protocols for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with thoracic metallic implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivieri, Laura J.; Ratnayaka, Kanishka [Children' s National Health System, Division of Cardiology, Washington, DC (United States); National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Cross, Russell R.; O' Brien, Kendall E. [Children' s National Health System, Division of Cardiology, Washington, DC (United States); Hansen, Michael S. [National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a valuable tool in congenital heart disease; however patients frequently have metal devices in the chest from the treatment of their disease that complicate imaging. Methods are needed to improve imaging around metal implants near the heart. Basic sequence parameter manipulations have the potential to minimize artifact while limiting effects on image resolution and quality. Our objective was to design cine and static cardiac imaging sequences to minimize metal artifact while maintaining image quality. Using systematic variation of standard imaging parameters on a fluid-filled phantom containing commonly used metal cardiac devices, we developed optimized sequences for steady-state free precession (SSFP), gradient recalled echo (GRE) cine imaging, and turbo spin-echo (TSE) black-blood imaging. We imaged 17 consecutive patients undergoing routine cardiac MR with 25 metal implants of various origins using both standard and optimized imaging protocols for a given slice position. We rated images for quality and metal artifact size by measuring metal artifact in two orthogonal planes within the image. All metal artifacts were reduced with optimized imaging. The average metal artifact reduction for the optimized SSFP cine was 1.5+/-1.8 mm, and for the optimized GRE cine the reduction was 4.6+/-4.5 mm (P < 0.05). Quality ratings favored the optimized GRE cine. Similarly, the average metal artifact reduction for the optimized TSE images was 1.6+/-1.7 mm (P < 0.05), and quality ratings favored the optimized TSE imaging. Imaging sequences tailored to minimize metal artifact are easily created by modifying basic sequence parameters, and images are superior to standard imaging sequences in both quality and artifact size. Specifically, for optimized cine imaging a GRE sequence should be used with settings that favor short echo time, i.e. flow compensation off, weak asymmetrical echo and a relatively high receiver bandwidth. For static

  11. Natural Image Enhancement Using a Biogeography Based Optimization Enhanced with Blended Migration Operator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jasper

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses a novel and efficient algorithm for solving optimization problem in image processing applications. Image enhancement (IE is one of the complex optimization problems in image processing. The main goal of this paper is to enhance color images such that the eminence of the image is more suitable than the original image from the perceptual viewpoint of human. Traditional methods require prior knowledge of the image to be enhanced, whereas the aim of the proposed biogeography based optimization (BBO enhanced with blended migration operator (BMO algorithm is to maximize the objective function in order to enhance the image contrast by maximizing the parameters like edge intensity, edge information, and entropy. Experimental results are compared with the current state-of-the-art approaches and indicate the superiority of the proposed technique in terms of subjective and objective evaluation.

  12. Optimized Parallelization for Nonlocal Means Based Low Dose CT Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libo Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Low dose CT (LDCT images are often significantly degraded by severely increased mottled noise/artifacts, which can lead to lowered diagnostic accuracy in clinic. The nonlocal means (NLM filtering can effectively remove mottled noise/artifacts by utilizing large-scale patch similarity information in LDCT images. But the NLM filtering application in LDCT imaging also requires high computation cost because intensive patch similarity calculation within a large searching window is often required to be used to include enough structure-similarity information for noise/artifact suppression. To improve its clinical feasibility, in this study we further optimize the parallelization of NLM filtering by avoiding the repeated computation with the row-wise intensity calculation and the symmetry weight calculation. The shared memory with fast I/O speed is also used in row-wise intensity calculation for the proposed method. Quantitative experiment demonstrates that significant acceleration can be achieved with respect to the traditional straight pixel-wise parallelization.

  13. Image reconstruction for a Positron Emission Tomograph optimized for breast cancer imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virador, Patrick R.G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-04-01

    The author performs image reconstruction for a novel Positron Emission Tomography camera that is optimized for breast cancer imaging. This work addresses for the first time, the problem of fully-3D, tomographic reconstruction using a septa-less, stationary, (i.e. no rotation or linear motion), and rectangular camera whose Field of View (FOV) encompasses the entire volume enclosed by detector modules capable of measuring Depth of Interaction (DOI) information. The camera is rectangular in shape in order to accommodate breasts of varying sizes while allowing for soft compression of the breast during the scan. This non-standard geometry of the camera exacerbates two problems: (a) radial elongation due to crystal penetration and (b) reconstructing images from irregularly sampled data. Packing considerations also give rise to regions in projection space that are not sampled which lead to missing information. The author presents new Fourier Methods based image reconstruction algorithms that incorporate DOI information and accommodate the irregular sampling of the camera in a consistent manner by defining lines of responses (LORs) between the measured interaction points instead of rebinning the events into predefined crystal face LORs which is the only other method to handle DOI information proposed thus far. The new procedures maximize the use of the increased sampling provided by the DOI while minimizing interpolation in the data. The new algorithms use fixed-width evenly spaced radial bins in order to take advantage of the speed of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), which necessitates the use of irregular angular sampling in order to minimize the number of unnormalizable Zero-Efficiency Bins (ZEBs). In order to address the persisting ZEBs and the issue of missing information originating from packing considerations, the algorithms (a) perform nearest neighbor smoothing in 2D in the radial bins (b) employ a semi-iterative procedure in order to estimate the unsampled data

  14. SU-F-J-214: Dose Reduction by Spatially Optimized Image Quality Via Fluence Modulated Proton CT (FMpCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Angelis, L; Landry, G; Dedes, G; Parodi, K [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (LMU Munich), Garching b. Muenchen (Germany); Hansen, D [Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Jutland (Denmark); Rit, S [University Lyon, Lyon, Auvergne-Rhone-Alpes (France); Belka, C [LMU Munich, Munich (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Proton CT (pCT) is a promising imaging modality for reducing range uncertainty in image-guided proton therapy. Range uncertainties partially originate from X-ray CT number conversion to stopping power ratio (SPR) and are limiting the exploitation of the full potential of proton therapy. In this study we explore the concept of spatially dependent fluence modulated proton CT (FMpCT), for achieving optimal image quality in a clinical region of interest (ROI), while reducing significantly the imaging dose to the patient. Methods: The study was based on simulated ideal pCT using pencil beam (PB) scanning. A set of 250 MeV protons PBs was used to create 360 projections of a cylindrical water phantom and a head and neck cancer patient. The tomographic images were reconstructed using a filtered backprojection (FBP) as well as an iterative algorithm (ITR). Different fluence modulation levels were investigated and their impact on the image was quantified in terms of SPR accuracy as well as noise within and outside selected ROIs, as a function of imaging dose. The unmodulated image served as reference. Results: Both FBP reconstruction and ITR without total variation (TV) yielded image quality in the ROIs similar to the reference images, for modulation down to 0.1 of the full proton fluence. The average dose was reduced by 75% for the water phantom and by 40% for the patient. FMpCT does not improve the noise for ITR with TV and modulation 0.1. Conclusion: This is the first work proposing and investigating FMpCT for producing optimal image quality for treatment planning and image guidance, while simultaneously reducing imaging dose. Future work will address spatial resolution effects and the impact of FMpCT on the quality of proton treatment plans for a prototype pCT scanner capable of list mode data acquisition. Acknowledgement: DFG-MAP DFG - Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics (MAP)

  15. Stochastic Optimized Relevance Feedback Particle Swarm Optimization for Content Based Image Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Imran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major challenges for the CBIR is to bridge the gap between low level features and high level semantics according to the need of the user. To overcome this gap, relevance feedback (RF coupled with support vector machine (SVM has been applied successfully. However, when the feedback sample is small, the performance of the SVM based RF is often poor. To improve the performance of RF, this paper has proposed a new technique, namely, PSO-SVM-RF, which combines SVM based RF with particle swarm optimization (PSO. The aims of this proposed technique are to enhance the performance of SVM based RF and also to minimize the user interaction with the system by minimizing the RF number. The PSO-SVM-RF was tested on the coral photo gallery containing 10908 images. The results obtained from the experiments showed that the proposed PSO-SVM-RF achieved 100% accuracy in 8 feedback iterations for top 10 retrievals and 80% accuracy in 6 iterations for 100 top retrievals. This implies that with PSO-SVM-RF technique high accuracy rate is achieved at a small number of iterations.

  16. Highly accelerated cardiovascular MR imaging using many channel technology: concepts and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niendorf, Thoralf; Sodickson, Daniel K

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CVMRI) is of proven clinical value in the non-invasive imaging of cardiovascular diseases. CVMRI requires rapid image acquisition, but acquisition speed is fundamentally limited in conventional MRI. Parallel imaging provides a means for increasing acquisition speed and efficiency. However, signal-to-noise (SNR) limitations and the limited number of receiver channels available on most MR systems have in the past imposed practical constraints, which dictated the use of moderate accelerations in CVMRI. High levels of acceleration, which were unattainable previously, have become possible with many-receiver MR systems and many-element, cardiac-optimized RF-coil arrays. The resulting imaging speed improvements can be exploited in a number of ways, ranging from enhancement of spatial and temporal resolution to efficient whole heart coverage to streamlining of CVMRI work flow. In this review, examples of these strategies are provided, following an outline of the fundamentals of the highly accelerated imaging approaches employed in CVMRI. Topics discussed include basic principles of parallel imaging; key requirements for MR systems and RF-coil design; practical considerations of SNR management, supported by multi-dimensional accelerations, 3D noise averaging and high field imaging; highly accelerated clinical state-of-the art cardiovascular imaging applications spanning the range from SNR-rich to SNR-limited; and current trends and future directions.

  17. Multimodal imaging of bone metastases: From preclinical to clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Ellmann

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Metastases to the skeletal system are commonly observed in cancer patients, highly affecting the patients' quality of life. Imaging plays a major role in detection, follow-up, and molecular characterisation of metastatic disease. Thus, imaging techniques have been optimised and combined in a multimodal and multiparametric manner for assessment of complementary aspects in osseous metastases. This review summarises both application of the most relevant imaging techniques for bone metastasis in preclinical models and the clinical setting.

  18. Optimized T1- and T2-weighted volumetric brain imaging as a diagnostic tool in very preterm neonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nossin-Manor, Revital [Neurosciences and Mental Health, Research Institute, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Chung, Andrew D.; Morris, Drew; Thomas, Bejoy; Shroff, Manohar M. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Soares-Fernandes, Joao P. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Hospital de S. Marcos, Neuroradiology Department, Braga (Portugal); Cheng, Hai-Ling M. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Physiology Experimental Medicine, Research Institute, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Medical Biophysics Department, Toronto (Canada); Whyte, Hilary E.A. [Neurosciences and Mental Health, Research Institute, Neonatology Department, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Taylor, Margot J. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Neurosciences and Mental Health, Research Institute, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Sled, John G. [University of Toronto, Physiology Experimental Medicine, Research Institute, The Hospital for Sick Children, Medical Biophysics, Toronto (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    T1- and T2-W MR sequences used for obtaining diagnostic information and morphometric measurements in the neonatal brain are frequently acquired using different imaging protocols. Optimizing one protocol for obtaining both kinds of information is valuable. To determine whether high-resolution T1- and T2-W volumetric sequences optimized for preterm brain imaging could provide both diagnostic and morphometric value. Thirty preterm neonates born between 24 and 32 weeks' gestational age were scanned during the first 2 weeks after birth. T1- and T2-W high-resolution sequences were optimized in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio and scan time and compared to conventional spin-echo-based sequences. No differences were found between conventional and high-resolution T1-W sequences for diagnostic confidence, image quality and motion artifacts. A preference for conventional over high-resolution T2-W sequences for image quality was observed. High-resolution T1 images provided better delineation of thalamic myelination and the superior temporal sulcus. No differences were found for detection of myelination and sulcation using conventional and high-resolution T2-W images. High-resolution T1- and T2-W volumetric sequences can be used in clinical MRI in the very preterm brain to provide both diagnostic and morphometric information. (orig.)

  19. [Multicystic encephalomalacia: MR imaging findings and clinical correlation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coşkun, Abdulhakim; Mavili, Ertuğrul; Kumandaş, Sefer; Karahan, Okkeş Ibrahim; Imamoğlu, Hakan; Gümüş, Hakan

    2004-03-01

    To review the MR imaging findings of multicystic encephalomalacia and to investigate the correlation between MR imaging and clinical findings. Twenty-one patients who presented with convulsion, mental-motor retardation and microcephaly and had evidence of multicystic encephalomalacia on MR images were included in this study. MR imaging patterns and clinical findings were reviewed. Consequently, we correlated MR imaging findings and clinical outcome. All patients had cortical thinning, white matter destruction, atrophy and gliosis. Tetraplegia was seen in 17 out of 19 patients with mixed type cerebral palsy in two patients with diffuse or symmetric involvement on MR imaging. Both of the patients with mixed type cerebral palsy had basal ganglia involvement on MR imaging. Hemiplegia was seen in two patients with asymmetric involvement on MR imaging. Microcephaly was seen in 17 patients with diffuse or symmetrical, and in one patient with asymmetrical, involvement. Microcephaly and tetraplegia was seen in all patients with cerebellar and basal ganglion involvement. Microcephaly and spastic tetraplegia were developed mostly in patients with diffuse involvement, whereas hemiplegia was seen in patients with asymmetric involvement. The clinical outcome was worse in patients with cerebellar and brainstem involvement. Therefore, we supposed that the symmetry of lesions and cerebellar or brainstem involvement might be used as a prognostic indicator.

  20. An Image Filter Based on Shearlet Transformation and Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital image is always polluted by noise and made data postprocessing difficult. To remove noise and preserve detail of image as much as possible, this paper proposed image filter algorithm which combined the merits of Shearlet transformation and particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm. Firstly, we use classical Shearlet transform to decompose noised image into many subwavelets under multiscale and multiorientation. Secondly, we gave weighted factor to those subwavelets obtained. Then, using classical Shearlet inverse transform, we obtained a composite image which is composed of those weighted subwavelets. After that, we designed fast and rough evaluation method to evaluate noise level of the new image; by using this method as fitness, we adopted PSO to find the optimal weighted factor we added; after lots of iterations, by the optimal factors and Shearlet inverse transform, we got the best denoised image. Experimental results have shown that proposed algorithm eliminates noise effectively and yields good peak signal noise ratio (PSNR.

  1. Incidental ferumoxytol artifacts in clinical brain MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowser, Bruce A.; Campeau, Norbert G.; Carr, Carrie M.; Diehn, Felix E.; McDonald, Jennifer S.; Miller, Gary M.; Kaufmann, Timothy J. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Ferumoxytol (Feraheme) is a parenteral therapy approved for treatment of iron deficiency anemia. The product insert for ferumoxytol states that it may affect the diagnostic ability of MRI for up to 3 months. However, the expected effects may not be commonly recognized among clinical neuroradiologists. Our purpose is to describe the artifacts we have seen at our institution during routine clinical practice. We reviewed the patients at our institution that had brain MRI performed within 90 days of receiving intravenous ferumoxytol. The imaging was reviewed for specific findings, including diffusion-weighted imaging vascular susceptibility artifact, gradient-echo echo-planar T2*-weighted vascular susceptibility artifact, SWI/SWAN vascular susceptibility artifact, hypointense vascular signal on T2-weighted images, pre-gadolinium contrast vascular enhancement on magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo (MPRAGE) imaging, and effects on post-gadolinium contrast T1 imaging. Multiple artifacts were observed in patients having a brain MRI within 3 days of receiving intravenous ferumoxytol. These included susceptibility artifact on DWI, GRE, and SWAN/SWI imaging, pre-gadolinium contrast increased vascular signal on MPRAGE imaging, and decreased expected enhancement on post-gadolinium contrast T1-weighted imaging. Ferumoxytol can create imaging artifacts which complicate clinical interpretation when brain MRI is performed within 3 days of administration. Recognition of the constellation of artifacts produced by ferumoxytol is important in order to obviate additional unnecessary examinations and mitigate errors in interpretation. (orig.)

  2. Enhancement of multimodality texture-based prediction models via optimization of PET and MR image acquisition protocols: a proof of concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallières, Martin; Laberge, Sébastien; Diamant, André; El Naqa, Issam

    2017-11-01

    Texture-based radiomic models constructed from medical images have the potential to support cancer treatment management via personalized assessment of tumour aggressiveness. While the identification of stable texture features under varying imaging settings is crucial for the translation of radiomics analysis into routine clinical practice, we hypothesize in this work that a complementary optimization of image acquisition parameters prior to texture feature extraction could enhance the predictive performance of texture-based radiomic models. As a proof of concept, we evaluated the possibility of enhancing a model constructed for the early prediction of lung metastases in soft-tissue sarcomas by optimizing PET and MR image acquisition protocols via computerized simulations of image acquisitions with varying parameters. Simulated PET images from 30 STS patients were acquired by varying the extent of axial data combined per slice (‘span’). Simulated T 1-weighted and T 2-weighted MR images were acquired by varying the repetition time and echo time in a spin-echo pulse sequence, respectively. We analyzed the impact of the variations of PET and MR image acquisition parameters on individual textures, and we investigated how these variations could enhance the global response and the predictive properties of a texture-based model. Our results suggest that it is feasible to identify an optimal set of image acquisition parameters to improve prediction performance. The model constructed with textures extracted from simulated images acquired with a standard clinical set of acquisition parameters reached an average AUC of 0.84 +/- 0.01 in bootstrap testing experiments. In comparison, the model performance significantly increased using an optimal set of image acquisition parameters (p = 0.04 ), with an average AUC of 0.89 +/- 0.01 . Ultimately, specific acquisition protocols optimized to generate superior radiomics measurements for a given clinical problem could be developed

  3. Digital radiography: optimization of image quality and dose using multi-frequency software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precht, H; Gerke, O; Rosendahl, K; Tingberg, A; Waaler, D

    2012-09-01

    New developments in processing of digital radiographs (DR), including multi-frequency processing (MFP), allow optimization of image quality and radiation dose. This is particularly promising in children as they are believed to be more sensitive to ionizing radiation than adults. To examine whether the use of MFP software reduces the radiation dose without compromising quality at DR of the femur in 5-year-old-equivalent anthropomorphic and technical phantoms. A total of 110 images of an anthropomorphic phantom were imaged on a DR system (Canon DR with CXDI-50 C detector and MLT[S] software) and analyzed by three pediatric radiologists using Visual Grading Analysis. In addition, 3,500 images taken of a technical contrast-detail phantom (CDRAD 2.0) provide an objective image-quality assessment. Optimal image-quality was maintained at a dose reduction of 61% with MLT(S) optimized images. Even for images of diagnostic quality, MLT(S) provided a dose reduction of 88% as compared to the reference image. Software impact on image quality was found significant for dose (mAs), dynamic range dark region and frequency band. By optimizing image processing parameters, a significant dose reduction is possible without significant loss of image quality.

  4. Optimization and applications of an excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Sam A.; Klomkaew, Phiwat; Leavesley, Silas J.; Rich, Thomas C.

    2017-02-01

    Currently, the majority of microscopic and endoscopic technologies utilize white light illumination. For a number of applications, hyper-spectral imaging can be shown to have significant improvements over standard white-light imaging techniques. This is true for both microscopy and in vivo imaging. However, hyperspectral imaging methods have suffered from slow application times. Often, minutes are required to gather a full imaging stack. Here we will describe the system and evaluate optimizations and applications of a novel excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging system. We have developed and are optimizing a novel approach called excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging that provides an order of magnitude increased signal strength. Optimization of the light path, optical components and illumination sources have allowed us to achieve high speed image acquisition. This high speed allows for potential live video acquisition. This excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging technology has potential to impact a range of applications. The current system allows triggering of up to 16 wavelengths at less than 1 millisecond per image using digital strobing. Analog intensity control is also provided for a fully customizable excitation profile. A significant advantage of excitation scanning hyperspectral imaging is can identify multiple targets simultaneously in real time. We are optimizing the system to compare sensitivity and specificity of excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging with pathology techniques. Finally, we are exploring utilizing this technology to measure cAMP distribution in three dimensions within a cell.

  5. Book review: Clinical endocrinology and diagnostic imaging,

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    laboratory and functional tests, reference values, the indications for and algorithms of diagnostic ... acquainted with the unique use of the English language. Although the book is mainly intended for medical students and registrars, Fellows training for the Certificate in. Endocrinology may be pleasantly surprised at the clinical.

  6. Clinical image: MRI during migraine with aura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeal, A.C. [Brooklyn VA Medical Center, NY (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Migraine refers to severe headaches that are usually unilateral, throbbing, and associated with nausea, vomiting, photophobia, and phonophobia. Migraine with aura (formerly called {open_quotes}classic migraine{close_quotes}) consists of the headache preceded or accompanied by neurological dysfunction. This dysfunction (aura) usually involves visual and sensory symptoms. The patient described herein experienced migraine with aura. MRI during and after the attack showed a reversible abnormality of the right posterior cerebral artery, with no parenchymal lesions. This appears to be the first report of abnormal MR vascular imaging during migraine with aura. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Optimization of contrast of MR images in imaging of knee joint; Optymalizacja kontrastu obrazow MR na przykladzie obrazow stawu kolanowego

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szyblinski, K. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Bacic, G. [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The work describes the method of contrast optimization in magnetic resonance imaging. Computer program presented in the report allows analysis of contrast in selected tissues as a function of experiment parameters. Application to imaging of knee joint is presented. 2 refs, 4 figs.

  8. Application of off-line image processing for optimization in chest computed radiography using a low cost system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhogora, Wilbroad E; Msaki, Peter; Padovani, Renato

    2015-03-08

     The objective of this study was to improve the visibility of anatomical details by applying off-line postimage processing in chest computed radiography (CR). Four spatial domain-based external image processing techniques were developed by using MATLAB software version 7.0.0.19920 (R14) and image processing tools. The developed techniques were implemented to sample images and their visual appearances confirmed by two consultant radiologists to be clinically adequate. The techniques were then applied to 200 chest clinical images and randomized with other 100 images previously processed online. These 300 images were presented to three experienced radiologists for image quality assessment using standard quality criteria. The mean and ranges of the average scores for three radiologists were characterized for each of the developed technique and imaging system. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to test the difference of details visibility between the images processed using each of the developed techniques and the corresponding images processed using default algorithms. The results show that the visibility of anatomical features improved significantly (0.005 ≤ p ≤ 0.02) with combinations of intensity values adjustment and/or spatial linear filtering techniques for images acquired using 60 ≤ kVp ≤ 70. However, there was no improvement for images acquired using 102 ≤ kVp ≤ 107 (0.127 ≤ p ≤ 0.48). In conclusion, the use of external image processing for optimization can be effective in chest CR, but should be implemented in consultations with the radiologists.

  9. Clinical application of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Alwatban, A Z W

    2002-01-01

    The work described in this thesis was carried out at the Magnetic Resonance Centre of the University of Nottingham during the time from May 1998 to April 2001, and is the work of the except where indicated by reference. The main source of signal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRJ) is the fluctuation of paramagnetic deoxyhaemoglobin in the venous blood during different states of functional performance. For the work of this thesis, fMRI studies were carried out using a 3 T MR system with an echo planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence. Hearing research utilising fMRI has been previously reported in normal subjects. Hearing fMRI is normally performed by stimulating the auditory cortex via an acoustic task presentation such as music, tone, etc. However, performing the same research on deaf subjects requires special equipment to be designed to allow direct stimulation of the auditory nerve. In this thesis, a new method of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve is described that uses a ...

  10. Registration of challenging pre-clinical brain images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crum, William R.; Modo, Michel; Vernon, Anthony C.; Barker, Gareth J.; Williams, Steven C.R.

    2013-01-01

    The size and complexity of brain imaging studies in pre-clinical populations are increasing, and automated image analysis pipelines are urgently required. Pre-clinical populations can be subjected to controlled interventions (e.g., targeted lesions), which significantly change the appearance of the brain obtained by imaging. Existing systems for registration (the systematic alignment of scans into a consistent anatomical coordinate system), which assume image similarity to a reference scan, may fail when applied to these images. However, affine registration is a particularly vital pre-processing step for subsequent image analysis which is assumed to be an effective procedure in recent literature describing sophisticated techniques such as manifold learning. Therefore, in this paper, we present an affine registration solution that uses a graphical model of a population to decompose difficult pairwise registrations into a composition of steps using other members of the population. We developed this methodology in the context of a pre-clinical model of stroke in which large, variable hyper-intense lesions significantly impact registration performance. We tested this technique systematically in a simulated human population of brain tumour images before applying it to pre-clinical models of Parkinson's disease and stroke. PMID:23558335

  11. Optimization of standard patient radiographic images for chest, skull and pelvis exams in conventional x-ray equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pina, D R [Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Campus de Ribeirao Preto, SP 14040-901 (Brazil); Duarte, S B [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas FIsicas, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22290-180 (Brazil); Netto, T Ghilardi [Centro de Ciencias da Imagem e FIsica Medica, Hospital das ClInicas da Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirao Preto, SP 14048-900 (Brazil); Trad, C S [Centro de Ciencias da Imagem e FIsica Medica, Hospital das ClInicas da Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirao Preto, SP 14048-900 (Brazil); Brochi, M A C [Centro de Ciencias da Imagem e FIsica Medica, Hospital das ClInicas da Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirao Preto, SP 14048-900 (Brazil); Oliveira, S C de [Lehigh Valley Hospital, Allentown, PA 18103 (United States)

    2004-07-21

    Optimized radiographic techniques for clinical images of chest, skull and pelvis using conventional single-phase, three-phase and high-frequency x-ray units for a standard patient have been developed. Optimization of image contrast and optical density was obtained by using a homogeneous phantom (PEP) and an Anderson Rando anthropomorphic phantom. Image quality was evaluated by nine radiologists in independent analyses, leading to the choice of the optimized technique. A course of action to implement and validate these techniques in other radiographic systems has also been introduced. A realistic-analytic phantom (RAP) was constructed to certify the validation process. The optimized radiographic technique was implemented in the routine of our home hospital radiodiagnostic routine, enabling a reduction in patient doses around 25, 14 and 72%, respectively, for chest, skull and pelvis exams when compared with the previously used techniques. In addition, a corresponding reduction in the x-ray tube load of 68, 14 and 62% for the respective mentioned exams has been observed. In conclusion, implemented optimal techniques can lead to a reduction in the rate of film rejection, thus contributing to a better risk-benefit relationship for the patient and cost-benefit for the radiodiagnostic facility. (note)

  12. Clinical PET/MR Imaging in Oncology: Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjær, Andreas; Torigian, Drew A

    2016-10-01

    In 2011, the first fully integrated commercially available clinical PET/MR imaging systems became available, and the imaging community thought that these scanners would replace PET/CT systems. However, today a disappointing number of less than 100 scanners have been installed worldwide. The question, therefore, arises regarding what the future clinical applications of PET/MR imaging will be. In this article, the authors discuss ways in which PET/MR imaging may be used in future applications that justify the added cost, predominantly focusing on oncologic applications. The authors suggest that such areas include combined molecular and functional imaging, multimodality radiomics, and hyperPET. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Image-Guided Surgery Using Invisible Near-Infrared Light: Fundamentals of Clinical Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Gioux

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The field of biomedical optics has matured rapidly over the last decade and is poised to make a significant impact on patient care. In particular, wide-field (typically > 5 cm, planar, near-infrared (NIR fluorescence imaging has the potential to revolutionize human surgery by providing real-time image guidance to surgeons for tissue that needs to be resected, such as tumors, and tissue that needs to be avoided, such as blood vessels and nerves. However, to become a clinical reality, optimized imaging systems and NIR fluorescent contrast agents will be needed. In this review, we introduce the principles of NIR fluorescence imaging, analyze existing NIR fluorescence imaging systems, and discuss the key parameters that guide contrast agent development. We also introduce the complexities surrounding clinical translation using our experience with the Fluorescence-Assisted Resection and Exploration (FLARE™ imaging system as an example. Finally, we introduce state-of-the-art optical imaging techniques that might someday improve image-guided surgery even further.

  14. Hair enhancement in dermoscopic images using dual-channel quaternion tubularness filters and MRF-based multilabel optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaalian, Hengameh; Lee, Tim K; Hamarneh, Ghassan

    2014-12-01

    Hair occlusion is one of the main challenges facing automatic lesion segmentation and feature extraction for skin cancer applications. We propose a novel method for simultaneously enhancing both light and dark hairs with variable widths, from dermoscopic images, without the prior knowledge of the hair color. We measure hair tubularness using a quaternion color curvature filter. We extract optimal hair features (tubularness, scale, and orientation) using Markov random field theory and multilabel optimization. We also develop a novel dual-channel matched filter to enhance hair pixels in the dermoscopic images while suppressing irrelevant skin pixels. We evaluate the hair enhancement capabilities of our method on hair-occluded images generated via our new hair simulation algorithm. Since hair enhancement is an intermediate step in a computer-aided diagnosis system for analyzing dermoscopic images, we validate our method and compare it to other methods by studying its effect on: 1) hair segmentation accuracy; 2) image inpainting quality; and 3) image classification accuracy. The validation results on 40 real clinical dermoscopic images and 94 synthetic data demonstrate that our approach outperforms competing hair enhancement methods.

  15. Clinical application of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alwatban, Adnan Z.W

    2002-07-01

    The work described in this thesis was carried out at the Magnetic Resonance Centre of the University of Nottingham during the time from May 1998 to April 2001, and is the work of the author except where indicated by reference. The main source of signal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRJ) is the fluctuation of paramagnetic deoxyhaemoglobin in the venous blood during different states of functional performance. For the work of this thesis, fMRI studies were carried out using a 3 T MR system with an echo planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence. Hearing research utilising fMRI has been previously reported in normal subjects. Hearing fMRI is normally performed by stimulating the auditory cortex via an acoustic task presentation such as music, tone, etc. However, performing the same research on deaf subjects requires special equipment to be designed to allow direct stimulation of the auditory nerve. In this thesis, a new method of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve is described that uses a transtympanic electrode implanted onto the surface of the cochlea. This approach would however, result in electromotive forces (EMFs) being induced by the time varying magnetic field, which would lead to current flow and heating, as well as deflection of the metallic electrode within the static magnetic field, and image distortion due to the magnetic susceptibility difference. A gold-plated tungsten electrode with a zero magnetic susceptibility was developed to avoid image distortion. Used with carbon leads and a carbon reference pad, it enabled safe, distortion-free fMRI studies of deaf subjects. The study revealed activation of the primary auditory cortex. This fMRI procedure can be used to demonstrate whether the auditory pathway is fully intact, and may provide a useful method for pre-operative assessment of candidates for cochlear implantation. Glucose is the energy source on which the function of the human brain is entirely dependent. Failure to

  16. An Image Enhancement Method Using the Quantum-Behaved Particle Swarm Optimization with an Adaptive Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Su

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Image enhancement techniques are very important to image processing, which are used to improve image quality or extract the fine details in degraded images. In this paper, two novel objective functions based on the normalized incomplete Beta transform function are proposed to evaluate the effectiveness of grayscale image enhancement and color image enhancement, respectively. Using these objective functions, the parameters of transform functions are estimated by the quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO. We also propose an improved QPSO with an adaptive parameter control strategy. The QPSO and the AQPSO algorithms, along with genetic algorithm (GA and particle swarm optimization (PSO, are tested on several benchmark grayscale and color images. The results show that the QPSO and AQPSO perform better than GA and PSO for the enhancement of these images, and the AQPSO has some advantages over QPSO due to its adaptive parameter control strategy.

  17. Multispectral photoacoustic imaging of nerves with a clinical ultrasound system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mari, Jean Martial; West, Simeon; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate and efficient identification of nerves is of great importance during many ultrasound-guided clinical procedures, including nerve blocks and prostate biopsies. It can be challenging to visualise nerves with conventional ultrasound imaging, however. One of the challenges is that nerves can have very similar appearances to nearby structures such as tendons. Several recent studies have highlighted the potential of near-infrared optical spectroscopy for differentiating nerves and adjacent tissues, as this modality can be sensitive to optical absorption of lipids that are present in intra- and extra-neural adipose tissue and in the myelin sheaths. These studies were limited to point measurements, however. In this pilot study, a custom photoacoustic system with a clinical ultrasound imaging probe was used to acquire multi-spectral photoacoustic images of nerves and tendons from swine ex vivo, across the wavelength range of 1100 to 1300 nm. Photoacoustic images were processed and overlaid in colour onto co-registered conventional ultrasound images that were acquired with the same imaging probe. A pronounced optical absorption peak centred at 1210 nm was observed in the photoacoustic signals obtained from nerves, and it was absent in those obtained from tendons. This absorption peak, which is consistent with the presence of lipids, provides a novel image contrast mechanism to significantly enhance the visualization of nerves. In particular, image contrast for nerves was up to 5.5 times greater with photoacoustic imaging (0.82 +/- 0.15) than with conventional ultrasound imaging (0.148 +/- 0.002), with a maximum contrast of 0.95 +/- 0.02 obtained in photoacoustic mode. This pilot study demonstrates the potential of photoacoustic imaging to improve clinical outcomes in ultrasound-guided interventions in regional anaesthesia and interventional oncology.

  18. Operational Analysis of Time-Optimal Maneuvering for Imaging Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Earth orbit EOS Earth Observing Satellite EPS Electrical Power System AOI Area of Interest ROI Return on Investment AHP Analytic Hierarchy Process...absorption to reduce spacecraft systems’ reliance on internal Electrical Power System (EPS). d. Targeting imaging equipment and sensor systems at AOIs for...image collection. Instead of sweeping the imaging sensors from side to side (whisk- broom or push- broom mode3), the entire spacecraft body is able to

  19. Feature and Intensity Based Medical Image Registration Using Particle Swarm Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Basset, Mohamed; Fakhry, Ahmed E; El-Henawy, Ibrahim; Qiu, Tie; Sangaiah, Arun Kumar

    2017-11-03

    Image registration is an important aspect in medical image analysis, and kinds use in a variety of medical applications. Examples include diagnosis, pre/post surgery guidance, comparing/merging/integrating images from multi-modal like Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and Computed Tomography (CT). Whether registering images across modalities for a single patient or registering across patients for a single modality, registration is an effective way to combine information from different images into a normalized frame for reference. Registered datasets can be used for providing information relating to the structure, function, and pathology of the organ or individual being imaged. In this paper a hybrid approach for medical images registration has been developed. It employs a modified Mutual Information (MI) as a similarity metric and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) method. Computation of mutual information is modified using a weighted linear combination of image intensity and image gradient vector flow (GVF) intensity. In this manner, statistical as well as spatial image information is included into the image registration process. Maximization of the modified mutual information is effected using the versatile Particle Swarm Optimization which is developed easily with adjusted less parameter. The developed approach has been tested and verified successfully on a number of medical image data sets that include images with missing parts, noise contamination, and/or of different modalities (CT, MRI). The registration results indicate the proposed model as accurate and effective, and show the posture contribution in inclusion of both statistical and spatial image data to the developed approach.

  20. Optimization of diagnostic imaging use in patients with acute abdominal pain (OPTIMA): Design and rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laméris, Wytze; van Randen, Adrienne; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G W; Bossuyt, Patrick M M; Stoker, Jaap; Boermeester, Marja A

    2007-08-06

    The acute abdomen is a frequent entity at the Emergency Department (ED), which usually needs rapid and accurate diagnostic work-up. Diagnostic work-up with imaging can consist of plain X-ray, ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT) and even diagnostic laparoscopy. However, no evidence-based guidelines exist in current literature. The actual diagnostic work-up of a patient with acute abdominal pain presenting to the ED varies greatly between hospitals and physicians. The OPTIMA study was designed to provide the evidence base for constructing an optimal diagnostic imaging guideline for patients with acute abdominal pain at the ED. Thousand consecutive patients with abdominal pain > 2 hours and post hoc assignment of the final diagnosis by an expert panel. The focus of the analysis will be on the added value of the imaging modalities over history and clinical examination, relative to the incremental costs. This study aims to provide the evidence base for the development of a diagnostic algorithm that can act as a guideline for ED physicians to evaluate patients with acute abdominal pain.

  1. Cameras and settings for optimal image capture from UAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mike; O'Connor, James; James, Mike R.

    2017-04-01

    Aerial image capture has become very common within the geosciences due to the increasing affordability of low payload (markets. Their application to surveying has led to many studies being undertaken using UAV imagery captured from consumer grade cameras as primary data sources. However, image quality and the principles of image capture are seldom given rigorous discussion which can lead to experiments being difficult to accurately reproduce. In this contribution we revisit the underpinning concepts behind image capture, from which the requirements for acquiring sharp, well exposed and suitable imagery are derived. This then leads to discussion of how to optimise the platform, camera, lens and imaging settings relevant to image quality planning, presenting some worked examples as a guide. Finally, we challenge the community to make their image data open for review in order to ensure confidence in the outputs/error estimates, allow reproducibility of the results and have these comparable with future studies. We recommend providing open access imagery where possible, a range of example images, and detailed metadata to rigorously describe the image capture process.

  2. An adaptive optics imaging system designed for clinical use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Yang, Qiang; Saito, Kenichi; Nozato, Koji; Williams, David R.; Rossi, Ethan A.

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate a new imaging system that addresses several major problems limiting the clinical utility of conventional adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO), including its small field of view (FOV), reliance on patient fixation for targeting imaging, and substantial post-processing time. We previously showed an efficient image based eye tracking method for real-time optical stabilization and image registration in AOSLO. However, in patients with poor fixation, eye motion causes the FOV to drift substantially, causing this approach to fail. We solve that problem here by tracking eye motion at multiple spatial scales simultaneously by optically and electronically integrating a wide FOV SLO (WFSLO) with an AOSLO. This multi-scale approach, implemented with fast tip/tilt mirrors, has a large stabilization range of ± 5.6°. Our method consists of three stages implemented in parallel: 1) coarse optical stabilization driven by a WFSLO image, 2) fine optical stabilization driven by an AOSLO image, and 3) sub-pixel digital registration of the AOSLO image. We evaluated system performance in normal eyes and diseased eyes with poor fixation. Residual image motion with incremental compensation after each stage was: 1) ~2–3 arc minutes, (arcmin) 2) ~0.5–0.8 arcmin and, 3) ~0.05–0.07 arcmin, for normal eyes. Performance in eyes with poor fixation was: 1) ~3–5 arcmin, 2) ~0.7–1.1 arcmin and 3) ~0.07–0.14 arcmin. We demonstrate that this system is capable of reducing image motion by a factor of ~400, on average. This new optical design provides additional benefits for clinical imaging, including a steering subsystem for AOSLO that can be guided by the WFSLO to target specific regions of interest such as retinal pathology and real-time averaging of registered images to eliminate image post-processing. PMID:26114033

  3. An adaptive optics imaging system designed for clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Yang, Qiang; Saito, Kenichi; Nozato, Koji; Williams, David R; Rossi, Ethan A

    2015-06-01

    Here we demonstrate a new imaging system that addresses several major problems limiting the clinical utility of conventional adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO), including its small field of view (FOV), reliance on patient fixation for targeting imaging, and substantial post-processing time. We previously showed an efficient image based eye tracking method for real-time optical stabilization and image registration in AOSLO. However, in patients with poor fixation, eye motion causes the FOV to drift substantially, causing this approach to fail. We solve that problem here by tracking eye motion at multiple spatial scales simultaneously by optically and electronically integrating a wide FOV SLO (WFSLO) with an AOSLO. This multi-scale approach, implemented with fast tip/tilt mirrors, has a large stabilization range of ± 5.6°. Our method consists of three stages implemented in parallel: 1) coarse optical stabilization driven by a WFSLO image, 2) fine optical stabilization driven by an AOSLO image, and 3) sub-pixel digital registration of the AOSLO image. We evaluated system performance in normal eyes and diseased eyes with poor fixation. Residual image motion with incremental compensation after each stage was: 1) ~2-3 arc minutes, (arcmin) 2) ~0.5-0.8 arcmin and, 3) ~0.05-0.07 arcmin, for normal eyes. Performance in eyes with poor fixation was: 1) ~3-5 arcmin, 2) ~0.7-1.1 arcmin and 3) ~0.07-0.14 arcmin. We demonstrate that this system is capable of reducing image motion by a factor of ~400, on average. This new optical design provides additional benefits for clinical imaging, including a steering subsystem for AOSLO that can be guided by the WFSLO to target specific regions of interest such as retinal pathology and real-time averaging of registered images to eliminate image post-processing.

  4. 75 FR 47819 - Workshop on Optimizing Clinical Trial Design for the Development of Pediatric Cardiovascular Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Workshop on Optimizing Clinical Trial Design for the... support from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), the American College of Cardiology (ACC), and the... ``Optimizing Clinical Trial Design for the Development of Pediatric Cardiovascular Devices.'' The topic to be...

  5. Optimization of compressive 4D-spatio-spectral snapshot imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xia; Feng, Weiyi; Lin, Lihua; Su, Wu; Xu, Guoqing

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a modified 3D computational reconstruction method in the compressive 4D-spectro-volumetric snapshot imaging system is proposed for better sensing spectral information of 3D objects. In the design of the imaging system, a microlens array (MLA) is used to obtain a set of multi-view elemental images (EIs) of the 3D scenes. Then, these elemental images with one dimensional spectral information and different perspectives are captured by the coded aperture snapshot spectral imager (CASSI) which can sense the spectral data cube onto a compressive 2D measurement image. Finally, the depth images of 3D objects at arbitrary depths, like a focal stack, are computed by inversely mapping the elemental images according to geometrical optics. With the spectral estimation algorithm, the spectral information of 3D objects is also reconstructed. Using a shifted translation matrix, the contrast of the reconstruction result is further enhanced. Numerical simulation results verify the performance of the proposed method. The system can obtain both 3D spatial information and spectral data on 3D objects using only one single snapshot, which is valuable in the agricultural harvesting robots and other 3D dynamic scenes.

  6. Improved image quality of digital lithography using modified particle swarm optimization algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Shi, ZhaoJun; Li, Qishen

    2017-02-01

    Image distortion problem is key issue in DMD digital lithography system, in this paper, quality optimization algorithm of digital lithography based on improved particle swarm optimization algorithm is proposed. The fidelity is adopted as the fitness function. The pixels in the mask pattern are used as particles, and then optimization is implemented by updating the velocities and positions of these particles. Two different graphs are used to verify the method, image quality optimization of the standard particle swarm optimization algorithm and the steepest descent gradient descent algorithm, the pattern errors are reduced by 95.48%, 91.95% and 92.78%, 87.28%, respectively. The quality of image is improved, and the convergence speed is faster.

  7. Molecular Imaging of Stem Cell Transplantation for Liver Diseases: Monitoring, Clinical Translation, and Theranostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell transplantation has been investigated to rescue experimental liver failure and is promising to offer an alternative therapy to liver transplantation for liver diseases treatment. Several clinical studies in this field have been carried out, but the therapeutic benefit of this treatment is still controversial. A major obstacle to developing stem cell therapies in clinic is being able to visualize the cells in vivo. Imaging modalities allow optimization of delivery, detecting cell survival and functionality by in vivo monitoring these transplanted graft cells. Moreover, theranostic imaging is a brand new field that utilizes nanometer-scale materials to glean diagnostic insight for simultaneous treatment, which is very promising to improve stem cell-based therapy for treatment of liver diseases. The aim of this review was to summarize the various imaging tools that have been explored with advanced molecular imaging probes. We also outline some recent progress of preclinical and clinical studies of liver stem cells transplantation. Finally, we discuss theranostic imaging for stem cells transplantation for liver dysfunction and future opportunities afforded by theranostic imaging.

  8. Choosing the optimal spatial domain measure of enhancement for mammogram images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panetta, Karen; Samani, Arash; Agaian, Sos

    2014-01-01

    Medical imaging systems often require image enhancement, such as improving the image contrast, to provide medical professionals with the best visual image quality. This helps in anomaly detection and diagnosis. Most enhancement algorithms are iterative processes that require many parameters be selected. Poor or nonoptimal parameter selection can have a negative effect on the enhancement process. In this paper, a quantitative metric for measuring the image quality is used to select the optimal operating parameters for the enhancement algorithms. A variety of measures evaluating the quality of an image enhancement will be presented along with each measure's basis for analysis, namely, on image content and image attributes. We also provide guidelines for systematically choosing the proper measure of image quality for medical images.

  9. Choosing the Optimal Spatial Domain Measure of Enhancement for Mammogram Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Panetta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical imaging systems often require image enhancement, such as improving the image contrast, to provide medical professionals with the best visual image quality. This helps in anomaly detection and diagnosis. Most enhancement algorithms are iterative processes that require many parameters be selected. Poor or nonoptimal parameter selection can have a negative effect on the enhancement process. In this paper, a quantitative metric for measuring the image quality is used to select the optimal operating parameters for the enhancement algorithms. A variety of measures evaluating the quality of an image enhancement will be presented along with each measure’s basis for analysis, namely, on image content and image attributes. We also provide guidelines for systematically choosing the proper measure of image quality for medical images.

  10. Companion diagnostics and molecular imaging-enhanced approaches for oncology clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Heertum, Ronald L; Scarimbolo, Robert; Ford, Robert; Berdougo, Eli; O'Neal, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the era of personalized medicine, diagnostic approaches are helping pharmaceutical and biotechnology sponsors streamline the clinical trial process. Molecular assays and diagnostic imaging are routinely being used to stratify patients for treatment, monitor disease, and provide reliable early clinical phase assessments. The importance of diagnostic approaches in drug development is highlighted by the rapidly expanding global cancer diagnostics market and the emergent attention of regulatory agencies worldwide, who are beginning to offer more structured platforms and guidance for this area. In this paper, we highlight the key benefits of using companion diagnostics and diagnostic imaging with a focus on oncology clinical trials. Nuclear imaging using widely available radiopharmaceuticals in conjunction with molecular imaging of oncology targets has opened the door to more accurate disease assessment and the modernization of standard criteria for the evaluation, staging, and treatment responses of cancer patients. Furthermore, the introduction and validation of quantitative molecular imaging continues to drive and optimize the field of oncology diagnostics. Given their pivotal role in disease assessment and treatment, the validation and commercialization of diagnostic tools will continue to advance oncology clinical trials, support new oncology drugs, and promote better patient outcomes.

  11. A patient image-based technique to assess the image quality of clinical chest radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan; Samei, Ehsan; Luo, Hui; Dobbins, James T., III; McAdams, H. Page; Wang, Xiaohui; Sehnert, William J.; Barski, Lori; Foos, David H.

    2011-03-01

    Current clinical image quality assessment techniques mainly analyze image quality for the imaging system in terms of factors such as the capture system DQE and MTF, the exposure technique, and the particular image processing method and processing parameters. However, when assessing a clinical image, radiologists seldom refer to these factors, but rather examine several specific regions of the image to see whether the image is suitable for diagnosis. In this work, we developed a new strategy to learn and simulate radiologists' evaluation process on actual clinical chest images. Based on this strategy, a preliminary study was conducted on 254 digital chest radiographs (38 AP without grids, 35 AP with 6:1 ratio grids and 151 PA with 10:1 ratio grids). First, ten regional based perceptual qualities were summarized through an observer study. Each quality was characterized in terms of a physical quantity measured from the image, and as a first step, the three physical quantities in lung region were then implemented algorithmically. A pilot observer study was performed to verify the correlation between image perceptual qualities and physical quantitative qualities. The results demonstrated that our regional based metrics have promising performance for grading perceptual properties of chest radiographs.

  12. Clinical applications of radionuclide imaging in the evaluation and management of patients with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partington, Sara L; Valente, Anne Marie; Landzberg, Michael; Grant, Frederick; Di Carli, Marcelo F; Dorbala, Sharmila

    2016-02-01

    Non-invasive testing of children with congenital heart disease (CHD) began in the 1950s with the introduction of radionuclide studies to assess shunt fractions, pulmonary blood flow, and ventricular contractile function. Echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging have since replaced radionuclide imaging in many of these roles. Concurrently, percutaneous and surgical repairs of complex CHD evolved, creating new roles for radionuclide imaging. In this paper on applications of radionuclide imaging in CHD, we review the multiple mechanisms for myocardial ischemia in CHD. We critically compare optimal radionuclide imaging techniques to other imaging modalities for assessing ischemia in CHD. We present the current role of nuclear imaging for assessing viability and pulmonary blood flow. We highlight the value added by advances in dedicated cardiac SPECT scanners, novel reconstruction software, and cardiac PET in performing low-dose radionuclide imaging in CHD. Finally, we discuss the emerging clinical indications for radionuclide imaging in CHD including coronary flow reserve assessment and evaluation of cardiovascular prosthesis and device infections.

  13. Population of anatomically variable 4D XCAT adult phantoms for imaging research and optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segars, W P; Bond, Jason; Frush, Jack; Hon, Sylvia; Eckersley, Chris; Williams, Cameron H; Feng, Jianqiao; Tward, Daniel J; Ratnanather, J T; Miller, M I; Frush, D; Samei, E

    2013-04-01

    which to create an unlimited number of 3D and 4D variations for imaging research. A population of phantoms that includes a range of anatomical variations representative of the public at large is needed to more closely mimic a clinical study or trial. The series of anatomically variable phantoms developed in this work provide a valuable resource for investigating 3D and 4D imaging devices and the effects of anatomy and motion in imaging. Combined with Monte Carlo simulation programs, the phantoms also provide a valuable tool to investigate patient-specific dose and image quality, and optimization for adults undergoing imaging procedures.

  14. Cardiac tumors: optimal cardiac MR sequences and spectrum of imaging appearances.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, David H

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article reviews the optimal cardiac MRI sequences for and the spectrum of imaging appearances of cardiac tumors. CONCLUSION: Recent technologic advances in cardiac MRI have resulted in the rapid acquisition of images of the heart with high spatial and temporal resolution and excellent myocardial tissue characterization. Cardiac MRI provides optimal assessment of the location, functional characteristics, and soft-tissue features of cardiac tumors, allowing accurate differentiation of benign and malignant lesions.

  15. High throughput tools to access images from clinical archives for research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Shawn N; Herrick, Christopher; Wang, Yanbing; Wang, Taowei David; Sack, Darren; Andriole, Katherine P; Wei, Jesse; Reynolds, Nathaniel; Plesniak, Wendy; Rosen, Bruce R; Pieper, Steven; Gollub, Randy L

    2015-04-01

    Historically, medical images collected in the course of clinical care have been difficult to access for secondary research studies. While there is a tremendous potential value in the large volume of studies contained in clinical image archives, Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) are designed to optimize clinical operations and workflow. Search capabilities in PACS are basic, limiting their use for population studies, and duplication of archives for research is costly. To address this need, we augment the Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) open source software, providing investigators with the tools necessary to query and integrate medical record and clinical research data. Over 100 healthcare institutions have installed this suite of software tools that allows investigators to search medical record metadata including images for specific types of patients. In this report, we describe a new Medical Imaging Informatics Bench to Bedside (mi2b2) module ( www.mi2b2.org ), available now as an open source addition to the i2b2 software platform that allows medical imaging examinations collected during routine clinical care to be made available to translational investigators directly from their institution's clinical PACS for research and educational use in compliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Omnibus Rule. Access governance within the mi2b2 module is customizable per institution and PACS minimizing impact on clinical systems. Currently in active use at our institutions, this new technology has already been used to facilitate access to thousands of clinical MRI brain studies representing specific patient phenotypes for use in research.

  16. Optimal ''image-based'' weighting for energy-resolved CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Taly Gilat [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    This paper investigates a method of reconstructing images from energy-resolved CT data with negligible beam-hardening artifacts and improved contrast-to-nosie ratio (CNR) compared to conventional energy-weighting methods. Conceptually, the investigated method first reconstructs separate images from each energy bin. The final image is a linear combination of the energy-bin images, with the weights chosen to maximize the CNR in the final image. The optimal weight of a particular energy-bin image is derived to be proportional to the contrast-to-noise-variance ratio in that image. The investigated weighting method is referred to as ''image-based'' weighting, although, as will be described, the weights can be calculated and the energy-bin data combined prior to reconstruction. The performance of optimal image-based energy weighting with respect to CNR and beam-hardening artifacts was investigated through simulations and compared to that of energy integrating, photon counting, and previously studied optimal ''projection-based'' energy weighting. Two acquisitions were simulated: dedicated breast CT and a conventional thorax scan. The energy-resolving detector was simulated with five energy bins. Four methods of estimating the optimal weights were investigated, including task-specific and task-independent methods and methods that require a single reconstruction versus multiple reconstructions. Results demonstrated that optimal image-based weighting improved the CNR compared to energy-integrating weighting by factors of 1.15-1.6 depending on the task. Compared to photon-counting weighting, the CNR improvement ranged from 1.0 to 1.3. The CNR improvement factors were comparable to those of projection-based optimal energy weighting. The beam-hardening cupping artifact increased from 5.2% for energy-integrating weighting to 12.8% for optimal projection-based weighting, while optimal image-based weighting reduced the cupping to 0

  17. Magnetic Resonance Super-resolution Imaging Measurement with Dictionary-optimized Sparse Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun-Bao; Liu, Jing; Pan, Jeng-Shyang; Yao, Hongxun

    2017-06-01

    Magnetic Resonance Super-resolution Imaging Measurement (MRIM) is an effective way of measuring materials. MRIM has wide applications in physics, chemistry, biology, geology, medical and material science, especially in medical diagnosis. It is feasible to improve the resolution of MR imaging through increasing radiation intensity, but the high radiation intensity and the longtime of magnetic field harm the human body. Thus, in the practical applications the resolution of hardware imaging reaches the limitation of resolution. Software-based super-resolution technology is effective to improve the resolution of image. This work proposes a framework of dictionary-optimized sparse learning based MR super-resolution method. The framework is to solve the problem of sample selection for dictionary learning of sparse reconstruction. The textural complexity-based image quality representation is proposed to choose the optimal samples for dictionary learning. Comprehensive experiments show that the dictionary-optimized sparse learning improves the performance of sparse representation.

  18. Adaptive polarimetric image representation for contrast optimization of a polarized beacon through fog

    CERN Document Server

    Panigrahi, Swapnesh; Alouini, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    We present a contrast-maximizing optimal linear representation of polarimetric images obtained from a snapshot polarimetric camera for enhanced vision of a polarized light source in obscured weather conditions (fog, haze, cloud) over long distances (above 1 km). We quantitatively compare the gain in contrast obtained by different linear representations of the experimental polarimetric images taken during rapidly varying foggy conditions. It is shown that the adaptive image representation that depends on the correlation in background noise fluctuations in the two polarimetric images provides an optimal contrast enhancement over all weather conditions as opposed to a simple difference image which underperforms during low visibility conditions. Finally, we derive the analytic expression of the gain in contrast obtained with this optimal representation and show that the experimental results are in agreement with the assumed correlated Gaussian noise model.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Super-resolution Imaging Measurement with Dictionary-optimized Sparse Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jun-Bao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance Super-resolution Imaging Measurement (MRIM is an effective way of measuring materials. MRIM has wide applications in physics, chemistry, biology, geology, medical and material science, especially in medical diagnosis. It is feasible to improve the resolution of MR imaging through increasing radiation intensity, but the high radiation intensity and the longtime of magnetic field harm the human body. Thus, in the practical applications the resolution of hardware imaging reaches the limitation of resolution. Software-based super-resolution technology is effective to improve the resolution of image. This work proposes a framework of dictionary-optimized sparse learning based MR super-resolution method. The framework is to solve the problem of sample selection for dictionary learning of sparse reconstruction. The textural complexity-based image quality representation is proposed to choose the optimal samples for dictionary learning. Comprehensive experiments show that the dictionary-optimized sparse learning improves the performance of sparse representation.

  20. Application of Genetic Algorithm and Particle Swarm Optimization techniques for improved image steganography systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jude Hemanth Duraisamy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Image steganography is one of the ever growing computational approaches which has found its application in many fields. The frequency domain techniques are highly preferred for image steganography applications. However, there are significant drawbacks associated with these techniques. In transform based approaches, the secret data is embedded in random manner in the transform coefficients of the cover image. These transform coefficients may not be optimal in terms of the stego image quality and embedding capacity. In this work, the application of Genetic Algorithm (GA and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO have been explored in the context of determining the optimal coefficients in these transforms. Frequency domain transforms such as Bandelet Transform (BT and Finite Ridgelet Transform (FRIT are used in combination with GA and PSO to improve the efficiency of the image steganography system.

  1. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not? by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  2. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-02-02

    This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

  3. WE-AB-BRA-09: Sensitivity of Plan Re-Optimization to Errors in Deformable Image Registration in Online Adaptive Image-Guided Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClain, B; Olsen, J; Green, O; Yang, D; Santanam, L; Olsen, L; Zhao, T; Rodriguez, V; Wooten, H; Mutic, S; Kashani, R [Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Victoria, J; Dempsey, J [ViewRay Incorporated, Oakwood Village, OH (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Online adaptive therapy (ART) relies on auto-contouring using deformable image registration (DIR). DIR’s inherent uncertainties require user intervention and manual edits while the patient is on the table. We investigated the dosimetric impact of DIR errors on the quality of re-optimized plans, and used the findings to establish regions for focusing manual edits to where DIR errors can Result in clinically relevant dose differences. Methods: Our clinical implementation of online adaptive MR-IGRT involves using DIR to transfer contours from CT to daily MR, followed by a physicians’ edits. The plan is then re-optimized to meet the organs at risk (OARs) constraints. Re-optimized abdomen and pelvis plans generated based on physician edited OARs were selected as the baseline for evaluation. Plans were then re-optimized on auto-deformed contours with manual edits limited to pre-defined uniform rings (0 to 5cm) around the PTV. A 0cm ring indicates that the auto-deformed OARs were used without editing. The magnitude of the variations caused by the non-deterministic optimizer was quantified by repeat re-optimizations on the same geometry to determine the mean and standard deviation (STD). For each re-optimized plan, various volumetric parameters for the PTV, the OARs were extracted along with DVH and isodose evaluation. A plan was deemed acceptable if the variation from the baseline plan was within one STD. Results: Initial results show that for abdomen and pancreas cases, a minimum of 5cm margin around the PTV is required for contour corrections, while for pelvic and liver cases a 2–3 cm margin is sufficient. Conclusion: Focusing manual contour edits to regions of dosimetric relevance can reduce contouring time in the online ART process while maintaining a clinically comparable plan. Future work will further refine the contouring region by evaluating the path along the beams, dose gradients near the target and OAR dose metrics.

  4. Image reconstruction and scan configurations enabled by optimization-based algorithms in multispectral CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Buxin; Zhang, Zheng; Sidky, Emil Y.; Xia, Dan; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2017-11-01

    Optimization-based algorithms for image reconstruction in multispectral (or photon-counting) computed tomography (MCT) remains a topic of active research. The challenge of optimization-based image reconstruction in MCT stems from the inherently non-linear data model that can lead to a non-convex optimization program for which no mathematically exact solver seems to exist for achieving globally optimal solutions. In this work, based upon a non-linear data model, we design a non-convex optimization program, derive its first-order-optimality conditions, and propose an algorithm to solve the program for image reconstruction in MCT. In addition to consideration of image reconstruction for the standard scan configuration, the emphasis is on investigating the algorithm’s potential for enabling non-standard scan configurations with no or minimum hardware modification to existing CT systems, which has potential practical implications for lowered hardware cost, enhanced scanning flexibility, and reduced imaging dose/time in MCT. Numerical studies are carried out for verification of the algorithm and its implementation, and for a preliminary demonstration and characterization of the algorithm in reconstructing images and in enabling non-standard configurations with varying scanning angular range and/or x-ray illumination coverage in MCT.

  5. Optimization of Prostate Biopsy: the Role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Targeted Biopsy in Detection, Localization and Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjurlin, Marc A.; Meng, Xiaosong; Le Nobin, Julien; Wysock, James S.; Lepor, Herbert; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Taneja, Samir S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Optimization of prostate biopsy requires addressing the shortcomings of standard systematic transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy, including false-negative rates, incorrect risk stratification, detection of clinically insignificant disease and the need for repeat biopsy. Magnetic resonance imaging is an evolving noninvasive imaging modality that increases the accurate localization of prostate cancer at the time of biopsy, and thereby enhances clinical risk assessment and improves the ability to appropriately counsel patients regarding therapy. In this review we 1) summarize the various sequences that comprise a prostate multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging examination along with its performance characteristics in cancer detection, localization and reporting standards; 2) evaluate potential applications of magnetic resonance imaging targeting in prostate biopsy among men with no previous biopsy, a negative previous biopsy and those with low stage cancer; and 3) describe the techniques of magnetic resonance imaging targeted biopsy and comparative study outcomes. Materials and Methods A bibliographic search covering the period up to October 2013 was conducted using MEDLINE®/PubMed®. Articles were reviewed and categorized based on which of the 3 objectives of this review was addressed. Data were extracted, analyzed and summarized. Results Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging consists of anatomical T2-weighted imaging coupled with at least 2 functional imaging techniques. It has demonstrated improved prostate cancer detection sensitivity up to 80% in the peripheral zone and 81% in the transition zone. A prostate cancer magnetic resonance imaging suspicion score has been developed, and is depicted using the Likert or PI-RADS (Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System) scale for better standardization of magnetic resonance imaging interpretation and reporting. Among men with no previous biopsy, magnetic resonance imaging increases the frequency of

  6. Optimizing object-based image analysis for semi-automated geomorphological mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anders, N.; Smith, M.; Seijmonsbergen, H.; Bouten, W.; Hengl, T.; Evans, I.S.; Wilson, J.P.; Gould, M.

    2011-01-01

    Object-Based Image Analysis (OBIA) is considered a useful tool for analyzing high-resolution digital terrain data. In the past, both segmentation and classification parameters were optimized manually by trial and error. We propose a method to automatically optimize classification parameters for

  7. Computer-aided diagnosis and artificial intelligence in clinical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Junji; Li, Qiang; Appelbaum, Daniel; Doi, Kunio

    2011-11-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) is rapidly entering the radiology mainstream. It has already become a part of the routine clinical work for the detection of breast cancer with mammograms. The computer output is used as a "second opinion" in assisting radiologists' image interpretations. The computer algorithm generally consists of several steps that may include image processing, image feature analysis, and data classification via the use of tools such as artificial neural networks (ANN). In this article, we will explore these and other current processes that have come to be referred to as "artificial intelligence." One element of CAD, temporal subtraction, has been applied for enhancing interval changes and for suppressing unchanged structures (eg, normal structures) between 2 successive radiologic images. To reduce misregistration artifacts on the temporal subtraction images, a nonlinear image warping technique for matching the previous image to the current one has been developed. Development of the temporal subtraction method originated with chest radiographs, with the method subsequently being applied to chest computed tomography (CT) and nuclear medicine bone scans. The usefulness of the temporal subtraction method for bone scans was demonstrated by an observer study in which reading times and diagnostic accuracy improved significantly. An additional prospective clinical study verified that the temporal subtraction image could be used as a "second opinion" by radiologists with negligible detrimental effects. ANN was first used in 1990 for computerized differential diagnosis of interstitial lung diseases in CAD. Since then, ANN has been widely used in CAD schemes for the detection and diagnosis of various diseases in different imaging modalities, including the differential diagnosis of lung nodules and interstitial lung diseases in chest radiography, CT, and position emission tomography/CT. It is likely that CAD will be integrated into picture archiving and

  8. Physical performance and image optimization of megavoltage cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morin, Olivier; Aubry, Jean-Francois; Aubin, Michele; Chen, Josephine; Descovich, Martina; Hashemi, Ali-Bani; Pouliot, Jean [Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen Diller Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 and UCSF/UC Berkeley Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, San Francisco, California 94158 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen Diller Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Siemens Oncology Care Systems, Concord, California 94520 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen Diller Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 and UCSF/UC Berkeley Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, San Francisco, California 94158 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Megavoltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT) is the most recent addition to the in-room CT systems developed for image-guided radiation therapy. The first generation MVCBCT system consists of a 6 MV treatment x-ray beam produced by a conventional linear accelerator equipped with a flat panel amorphous silicon detector. The objective of this study was to evaluate the physical performance of MVCBCT in order to optimize the system acquisition and reconstruction parameters for image quality. MVCBCT acquisitions were performed with the clinical system but images were reconstructed and analyzed with a separate research workstation. The geometrical stability and the positioning accuracy of the system were evaluated by comparing geometrical calibrations routinely performed over a period of 12 months. The beam output and detector intensity stability during MVCBCT acquisition were also evaluated by analyzing in-air acquisitions acquired at different exposure levels. Several system parameters were varied to quantify their impact on image quality including the exposure (2.7, 4.5, 9.0, 18.0, and 54.0 MU), the craniocaudal imaging length (2, 5, 15, and 27.4 cm), the voxel size (0.5, 1, and 2 mm), the slice thickness (1, 3, and 5 mm), and the phantom size. For the reconstruction algorithm, the study investigated the effect of binning, averaging and diffusion filtering of raw projections as well as three different projection filters. A head-sized water cylinder was used to measure and improve the uniformity of MVCBCT images. Inserts of different electron densities were placed in a water cylinder to measure the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). The spatial resolution was obtained by measuring the point-spread function of the system using an iterative edge blurring technique. Our results showed that the geometric stability and accuracy of MVCBCT were better than 1 mm over a period of 12 months. Beam intensity variations per projection of up to 35.4% were observed for a 2.7 MU MVCBCT acquisition

  9. Ultrasound image quality assessment: a framework for evaluation of clinical image quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Petersen, Mads Møller; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Nielsen, Michael Backmann; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2010-03-01

    Improvement of ultrasound images should be guided by their diagnostic value. Evaluation of clinical image quality is generally performed subjectively, because objective criteria have not yet been fully developed and accepted for the evaluation of clinical image quality. Based on recommendation 500 from the International Telecommunication Union - Radiocommunication (ITU-R) for such subjective quality assessment, this work presents equipment and a methodology for clinical image quality evaluation for guiding the development of new and improved imaging. The system is based on a BK-Medical 2202 ProFocus scanner equipped with a UA2227 research interface, connected to a PC through X64-CL Express camera link. Data acquisition features subject data recording, loading/saving of exact scanner settings (for later experiment reproducibility), free access to all system parameters for beamformation and is applicable for clinical use. The free access to all system parameters enables the ability to capture standardized images as found in the clinic and experimental data from new processing or beamformation methods. The length of the data sequences is only restricted by the memory of the external PC. Data may be captured interleaved, switching between multiple setups, to maintain identical transducer, scanner, region of interest and recording time on both the experimental- and standardized images. Data storage is approximately 15.1 seconds pr. 3 sec sequence including complete scanner settings and patient information, which is fast enough to get sufficient number of scans under realistic operating conditions, so that statistical evaluation is valid and reliable.

  10. Adaptive sensing and optimal power allocation for wireless video sensors with sigma-delta imager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marijan, Malisa; Demirkol, Ilker; Maricić I, Danijel; Sharma, Gaurav; Ignjatovi, Zeljko

    2010-10-01

    We consider optimal power allocation for wireless video sensors (WVSs), including the image sensor subsystem in the system analysis. By assigning a power-rate-distortion (P-R-D) characteristic for the image sensor, we build a comprehensive P-R-D optimization framework for WVSs. For a WVS node operating under a power budget, we propose power allocation among the image sensor, compression, and transmission modules, in order to minimize the distortion of the video reconstructed at the receiver. To demonstrate the proposed optimization method, we establish a P-R-D model for an image sensor based upon a pixel level sigma-delta (Σ∆) image sensor design that allows investigation of the tradeoff between the bit depth of the captured images and spatio-temporal characteristics of the video sequence under the power constraint. The optimization results obtained in this setting confirm that including the image sensor in the system optimization procedure can improve the overall video quality under power constraint and prolong the lifetime of the WVSs. In particular, when the available power budget for a WVS node falls below a threshold, adaptive sensing becomes necessary to ensure that the node communicates useful information about the video content while meeting its power budget.

  11. Recommendations for imaging tumor response in neurofibromatosis clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombi, Eva; Ardern-Holmes, Simone L; Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica; Barker, Fred G; Connor, Steve; Evans, D Gareth; Fisher, Michael J; Goutagny, Stephane; Harris, Gordon J; Jaramillo, Diego; Karajannis, Matthias A; Korf, Bruce R; Mautner, Victor; Plotkin, Scott R; Poussaint, Tina Y; Robertson, Kent; Shih, Chie-Schin; Widemann, Brigitte C

    2013-11-19

    Neurofibromatosis (NF)-related benign tumors such as plexiform neurofibromas (PN) and vestibular schwannomas (VS) can cause substantial morbidity. Clinical trials directed at these tumors have become available. Due to differences in disease manifestations and the natural history of NF-related tumors, response criteria used for solid cancers (1-dimensional/RECIST [Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors] and bidimensional/World Health Organization) have limited applicability. No standardized response criteria for benign NF tumors exist. The goal of the Tumor Measurement Working Group of the REiNS (Response Evaluation in Neurofibromatosis and Schwannomatosis) committee is to propose consensus guidelines for the evaluation of imaging response in clinical trials for NF tumors. Currently used imaging endpoints, designs of NF clinical trials, and knowledge of the natural history of NF-related tumors, in particular PN and VS, were reviewed. Consensus recommendations for response evaluation for future studies were developed based on this review and the expertise of group members. MRI with volumetric analysis is recommended to sensitively and reproducibly evaluate changes in tumor size in clinical trials. Volumetric analysis requires adherence to specific imaging recommendations. A 20% volume change was chosen to indicate a decrease or increase in tumor size. Use of these criteria in future trials will enable meaningful comparison of results across studies. The proposed imaging response evaluation guidelines, along with validated clinical outcome measures, will maximize the ability to identify potentially active agents for patients with NF and benign tumors.

  12. Validation of an optimized SPM procedure for FDG-PET in dementia diagnosis in a clinical setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Perani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostic accuracy in FDG-PET imaging highly depends on the operating procedures. In this clinical study on dementia, we compared the diagnostic accuracy at a single-subject level of a Clinical Scenarios, b Standard FDG Images and c Statistical Parametrical (SPM Maps generated via a new optimized SPM procedure. We evaluated the added value of FDG-PET, either Standard FDG Images or SPM Maps, to Clinical Scenarios. In 88 patients with neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer's Disease—AD, Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration—FTLD, Dementia with Lewy bodies—DLB and Mild Cognitive Impairment—MCI, 9 neuroimaging experts made a forced diagnostic decision on the basis of the evaluation of the three types of information. There was also the possibility of a decision of normality on the FDG-PET images. The clinical diagnosis confirmed at a long-term follow-up was used as the gold standard. SPM Maps showed higher sensitivity and specificity (96% and 84%, and better diagnostic positive (6.8 and negative (0.05 likelihood ratios compared to Clinical Scenarios and Standard FDG Images. SPM Maps increased diagnostic accuracy for differential diagnosis (AD vs. FTD; beta 1.414, p = 0.019. The AUC of the ROC curve was 0.67 for SPM Maps, 0.57 for Clinical Scenarios and 0.50 for Standard FDG Images. In the MCI group, SPM Maps showed the highest predictive prognostic value (mean LOC = 2.46, by identifying either normal brain metabolism (exclusionary role or hypometabolic patterns typical of different neurodegenerative conditions.

  13. Energy function behavior in optimization based image sequence stabilization in presence of moving objects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karimi Nejadasl, F.; Gorte, B.G.H.; Snellen, M.M.; Hoogendoorn, S.P.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we address the registration of two images as an optimization problem within indicated bounds. Our contribution is to identify such situations where the optimum value represents the real transformation parameters between the two images. Consider for example Mean Square Error (MSE) as

  14. Intensity inhomogeneity compensation and tissue segmentation for magnetic resonance imaging with noise-suppressed multiplicative intrinsic component optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Huaipeng; Zhang, Qi; Shi, Jun

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images suffer from intensity inhomogeneity. Segmentation-based approaches can simultaneously achieve both intensity inhomogeneity compensation (IIC) and tissue segmentation for MR images with little noise, but they often fail for images polluted by severe noise. Here, we propose a noise-robust algorithm named noise-suppressed multiplicative intrinsic component optimization (NSMICO) for simultaneous IIC and tissue segmentation. Considering the spatial characteristics in an image, an adaptive nonlocal means filtering term is incorporated into the objective function of NSMICO to decrease image deterioration due to noise. Then, a fuzzy local factor term utilizing the spatial and gray-level relationship among local pixels is embedded into the objective function to reach a balance between noise suppression and detail preservation. Experimental results on synthetic natural and MR images with various levels of intensity inhomogeneity and noise, as well as in vivo clinical MR images, have demonstrated the effectiveness of the NSMICO and its superiority to three competing approaches. The NSMICO could be potentially valuable for MR image IIC and tissue segmentation.

  15. Evaluation of clinical image processing algorithms used in digital mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanca, Federica; Jacobs, Jurgen; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Claus, Filip; Celis, Valerie; Geniets, Catherine; Provost, Veerle; Pauwels, Herman; Marchal, Guy; Bosmans, Hilde

    2009-03-01

    modalities were significantly different, but the JAFROC confidence intervals were about 32% smaller than ROC confidence intervals. This study shows that image processing has a significant impact on the detection of microcalcifications in digital mammograms. Objective measurements, such as described here, should be used by the manufacturers to select the optimal image processing algorithm.

  16. Analysis of clinical and imaging characteristics of tabes dorsalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-feng WANG

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the characteristics of clinical symptoms and imaging features of tabes dorsalis.  Methods We retrospectively analyzed clinical signs and symptoms, laboratory examinations, imaging features, electrophysiological manifestations, treatment and prognosis of 3 patients with tabes dorsalis diagnosed in our hospital and 7 patients reported in literatures.  Results The initial symptoms of 10 patients with tabes dorsalis included unsteady gait, pricking or lightning pain in abdomen and numbness of limbs (especially in both legs and feet. In addition to the above symptoms, the most common clinical features also included urination disorders, weakened or disappeared reflexes at knee and ankle, disorders of deep and shallow sensation, Romberg sign positive and heel-knee-tibia test instability. Treponema pallidum particle agglutination assay (TPPA in serum of all patients was positive, and the titer of rapid plasma reagin (RPR in serum was 1∶ 8-256. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF test showed increased white blood cell and protein. TPPA in CSF was also positive, and the titer of RPR in CSF was 1∶1-8. No obvious specificity of imaging changes was found except spinal disc degeneration. Some patients showed abnormal somatosensory-evoked potential (SEP with prolonged latency and decreased amplitude of bilateral P100 waves, and the nerve conduction velocity (NCV of most patients was normal. Six patients were improved after penicillin treatment.  Conclusions Due to its complicated clinical manifestations and non-specific imaging changes, tabes dorsalis is prone to be misdiagnosed. A clear diagnosis depends on clinical signs and symptoms, laboratory examinations, imaging and electrophysiological manifestations. Only a minority of patients show imaging changes which are proved significant for the diagnosis of tabes dorsalis. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.07.006

  17. [An adaptive ultrasound sound speed optimization based on image contrast analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoying; Liu, Dongquan

    2011-12-01

    In order to get real time ultrasound images with clear structure and improved contrast, an adaptive ultrasound sound speed optimization method based on image contrast analysis was investigated. It firstly introduced the dynamic beamforming of ultrasound system, as well as the definition of assumed system's sound speed and the true sound speed propagated in tissues the degrade image quality due to their mismatch was also discussed. After given the pixel gray level value based ultrasound image contrast ratio, the basic idea to precisely estimate the true sound speed for real time system sound speed was proposed. Algorithms have been verified both in tissue-mimicking phantoms with known sound speeds and in vivo ultrasound images, compared with other existing method. The testing results showed that this new method not only produced accurate sound speed for ultrasound image optimization, but also finely met the critical computation requirement for real time applications.

  18. Numerical simulation and optimal design of Segmented Planar Imaging Detector for Electro-Optical Reconnaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Qiuhui; Shen, Yijie; Yuan, Meng; Gong, Mali

    2017-12-01

    Segmented Planar Imaging Detector for Electro-Optical Reconnaissance (SPIDER) is a cutting-edge electro-optical imaging technology to realize miniaturization and complanation of imaging systems. In this paper, the principle of SPIDER has been numerically demonstrated based on the partially coherent light theory, and a novel concept of adjustable baseline pairing SPIDER system has further been proposed. Based on the results of simulation, it is verified that the imaging quality could be effectively improved by adjusting the Nyquist sampling density, optimizing the baseline pairing method and increasing the spectral channel of demultiplexer. Therefore, an adjustable baseline pairing algorithm is established for further enhancing the image quality, and the optimal design procedure in SPIDER for arbitrary targets is also summarized. The SPIDER system with adjustable baseline pairing method can broaden its application and reduce cost under the same imaging quality.

  19. Joubert syndrome: Clinical manifestations and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Cheol; Kim, In One; Yoon, Yong Kyu; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Kim, Woo Sun; Song, Jong Gi; Hwang, Yong Seung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-05-15

    Joubert syndrome presents neonatal respiratory abnormalities and other clinical manifestations. Pathologically the patients show hypoplasia or agenesis of cerebellar vermis and other intracranial anomalies. Our purpose is to evaluate the clinical manifestations and MR findings of Joubert syndrome. Among the patient presenting with clinical stigmata of Joubert syndrome and agenesis of vermis on MR imaging, eight patients who did not satisfied the criteria of Dandy-Walker malformation, tectocerebellar dysraphia and rhombencephalosynapsis were selected. MR findings and clinical manifestation were analyzed. On MR imaging, agenesis of the cerebellar vermis (all cases), hypoplasia of the cerebellar peduncle (6 cases), fourth ventricular contour deformity (6 cases), tentorial elevation (4 caes), deformity of the lateral ventricles (4 cases), dysgenesis of the straight sinus (3 cases) were demonstrated. Other findings were abnormalities of corpus callosum (3 cases), falx anomalies (3 case), occipital encephalomeningocele (2 cases) and fluid collection in posterior cranial fossa (2 cases). Clinical manifestations were developmental delay (5 cases), abnormal eyeball movement (3 cases), hypotonia (2 cases), neonatal respiratory abnormality (2 cases), etc. Joubert syndrome showed various clinical manifestations and intracranial anomalies. MR imaging is an useful modality in detection of the cerebellar vermian agenesis and other anomalies of the patients.

  20. Image denoising: Learning the noise model via nonsmooth PDE-constrained optimization

    KAUST Repository

    Reyes, Juan Carlos De los

    2013-11-01

    We propose a nonsmooth PDE-constrained optimization approach for the determination of the correct noise model in total variation (TV) image denoising. An optimization problem for the determination of the weights corresponding to different types of noise distributions is stated and existence of an optimal solution is proved. A tailored regularization approach for the approximation of the optimal parameter values is proposed thereafter and its consistency studied. Additionally, the differentiability of the solution operator is proved and an optimality system characterizing the optimal solutions of each regularized problem is derived. The optimal parameter values are numerically computed by using a quasi-Newton method, together with semismooth Newton type algorithms for the solution of the TV-subproblems. © 2013 American Institute of Mathematical Sciences.

  1. ACCURACY Detection of Digital Image Forgery by Using Ant Colony Optimization Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Sarvjit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Image forgery is one of the well known fields in which researches continuously exploring new areas. In digital image forgery one can change image in many ways using several software’s, researchers exploring new algorithms to detect image forgery areas and change it to original pixel values if possible. In this paper we employed ACO (Ant Colony Optimization to find areas which are manipulated with some software. The experimental results prove that ACO is better than existing methods of detecting tampered regions in digital photo images.

  2. An optimized framework for quantitative magnetization transfer imaging of the cervical spinal cord in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiston, Marco; Grussu, Francesco; Ianus, Andrada; Schneider, Torben; Prados, Ferran; Fairney, James; Ourselin, Sebastien; Alexander, Daniel C; Cercignani, Mara; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Samson, Rebecca S

    2018-05-01

    To develop a framework to fully characterize quantitative magnetization transfer indices in the human cervical cord in vivo within a clinically feasible time. A dedicated spinal cord imaging protocol for quantitative magnetization transfer was developed using a reduced field-of-view approach with echo planar imaging (EPI) readout. Sequence parameters were optimized based in the Cramer-Rao-lower bound. Quantitative model parameters (i.e., bound pool fraction, free and bound pool transverse relaxation times [ T2F, T2B], and forward exchange rate [k FB ]) were estimated implementing a numerical model capable of dealing with the novelties of the sequence adopted. The framework was tested on five healthy subjects. Cramer-Rao-lower bound minimization produces optimal sampling schemes without requiring the establishment of a steady-state MT effect. The proposed framework allows quantitative voxel-wise estimation of model parameters at the resolution typically used for spinal cord imaging (i.e. 0.75 × 0.75 × 5 mm 3 ), with a protocol duration of ∼35 min. Quantitative magnetization transfer parametric maps agree with literature values. Whole-cord mean values are: bound pool fraction = 0.11(±0.01), T2F = 46.5(±1.6) ms, T2B = 11.0(±0.2) µs, and k FB  = 1.95(±0.06) Hz. Protocol optimization has a beneficial effect on reproducibility, especially for T2B and k FB . The framework developed enables robust characterization of spinal cord microstructure in vivo using qMT. Magn Reson Med 79:2576-2588, 2018. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  3. Optimal imaging for treaty verification FY2014 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilton, Nathan R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Johnson, William C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Brubaker, Erik M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Kupinski, Matthew Alan [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); MacGahan, Christopher Jonathan [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2014-10-01

    FY2014 technical report of our project funded by DNN R&D that leverages advanced inference methods developed for medical and adaptive imaging to address arms control applications. We seek a method to acquire and analyze imaging data of declared treaty-accountable items without creating an image of those objects or otherwise storing or revealing any classified information. Such a method would avoid the use of classified-information barriers. We present our progress on FY2014 tasks defined in our life-cycle plan. We also describe some future work that is part of the continuation of this project in FY2015 and beyond as part of a venture that joins ours with a related PNNL project.

  4. Clinical utility of imaging for evaluation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murakami T

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Takamichi Murakami,1 Masakatsu Tsurusaki,1 Tomoko Hyodo,1 Yasuharu Imai2 1Department of Radiology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 2Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Ikeda Municipal Hospital, Osaka, Japan Abstract: The hemodynamics of a hepatocellular nodule is the most important imaging parameter used to characterize various hepatocellular nodules in liver cirrhosis, because sequential changes occur in the feeding vessels and hemodynamic status during hepatocarcinogenesis. Therefore, the imaging criteria for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC are also usually based on vascular findings, eg, early arterial uptake followed by washout in the portal venous and equilibrium phases. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, dynamic multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT, and dynamic magnetic resonance (MR imaging with gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA are useful for detecting hypervascular HCC on the basis of vascular criteria but are not as useful for hypovascular HCC. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging with gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA, a hepatocyte-specific MR contrast agent, is superior to dynamic MDCT and dynamic MR imaging with Gd-DTPA in detecting both hypervascular and hypovascular HCC. Moreover, Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging can display each histologically differentiated HCC as hypointense relative to the liver parenchyma. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography imaging might not be suitable for the screening and detection of HCC, given its lower diagnostic performance. However, this technique plays an important role in determining whether HCC has spread beyond the liver. Keywords: hepatocellular carcinoma, evaluation, imaging, clinical utility

  5. WAVELET BASED SEGMENTATION USING OPTIMAL STATISTICAL FEATURES ON BREAST IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sindhuja

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Elastography is the emerging imaging modality that analyzes the stiffness of the tissue for detecting and classifying breast tumors. Computer-aided detection speeds up the diagnostic process of breast cancer improving the survival rate. A multiresolution approach using Discrete wavelet transform is employed on real time images, using the low-low (LL, low-high (LH, high-low (HL, and high-high (HH sub-bands of Daubechies family. Features are extracted, selected and then finally segmented by K-means clustering algorithm. The proposed work can be extended to Classification of the tumors.

  6. Optimization of oncological {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging based on a multiparameter analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menezes, Vinicius O., E-mail: vinicius@radtec.com.br [Nuclear Medicine Department, São Rafael Hospital, Salvador 41720-375, Brazil and Nuclear Medicine Department, Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Pernambuco/Ebserh, Recife 50670-901 (Brazil); Machado, Marcos A. D. [Nuclear Medicine Department, São Rafael Hospital, Salvador 41720-375, Brazil and Nuclear Medicine Department, Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Bahia/Ebserh, Salvador 40110-060 (Brazil); Queiroz, Cleiton C. [Nuclear Medicine Department, São Rafael Hospital, Salvador 41720-375, Brazil and Nuclear Medicine Department, Hospital Universitário Professor Alberto Antunes/Ebserh, Maceió 57072-900 (Brazil); Souza, Susana O. [Department of Physics, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, São Cristóvão 49100-000 (Brazil); D’Errico, Francesco [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 and School of Engineering, University of Pisa, Pisa 56126 (Italy); Namías, Mauro [Fundación Centro Diagnóstico Nuclear, Buenos Aires C1417CVE (Argentina); Larocca, Ticiana F. [Centro de Biotecnologia e Terapia Celular, São Rafael Hospital, Salvador 41253-190 (Brazil); Soares, Milena B. P. [Centro de Biotecnologia e Terapia Celular, São Rafael Hospital, Salvador 41253-190, Brazil and Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Centro de Pesq. Gonçalo Moniz, Salvador 40296-710 (Brazil)

    2016-02-15

    Purpose: This paper describes a method to achieve consistent clinical image quality in {sup 18}F-FDG scans accounting for patient habitus, dose regimen, image acquisition, and processing techniques. Methods: Oncological PET/CT scan data for 58 subjects were evaluated retrospectively to derive analytical curves that predict image quality. Patient noise equivalent count rate and coefficient of variation (CV) were used as metrics in their analysis. Optimized acquisition protocols were identified and prospectively applied to 179 subjects. Results: The adoption of different schemes for three body mass ranges (<60 kg, 60–90 kg, >90 kg) allows improved image quality with both point spread function and ordered-subsets expectation maximization-3D reconstruction methods. The application of this methodology showed that CV improved significantly (p < 0.0001) in clinical practice. Conclusions: Consistent oncological PET/CT image quality on a high-performance scanner was achieved from an analysis of the relations existing between dose regimen, patient habitus, acquisition, and processing techniques. The proposed methodology may be used by PET/CT centers to develop protocols to standardize PET/CT imaging procedures and achieve better patient management and cost-effective operations.

  7. Tools for managing image flow in the modality to clinical-image-review chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kenneth W; Melson, David L; Moore, Stephen M; James Blaine, G James; Moulton, Ralph A; Clayton, William K; Peterson, Colin S; Vendt, Bruce A

    2003-09-01

    Web-based clinical-image viewing is commonplace in large medical centers. As demands for product and performance escalate, physicians, sold on the concept of "any image, anytime, anywhere," fret when image studies cannot be viewed in a time frame to which they are accustomed. Image delivery pathways in large medical centers are oftentimes complicated by multiple networks, multiple picture archiving and communication systems (PACS), and multiple groups responsible for image acquisition and delivery to multiple destinations. When studies are delayed, it may be difficult to rapidly pinpoint bottlenecks. Described here are the tools used to monitor likely failure points in our modality to clinical-image-viewing chain and tools for reporting volume and throughput trends. Though perhaps unique to our environment, we believe that tools of this type are essential for understanding and monitoring image-study flow, re-configuring resources to achieve better throughput, and planning for anticipated growth. Without such tools, quality clinical-image delivery may not be what it should.

  8. Imaging-assisted endoscopic surgery: Cleveland Clinic experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukimura, Osamu; Gill, Inderbir S

    2008-04-01

    Our initial experience in using computer-aided image assistance in minimally invasive urology was reported. The system consisted of a computer and a localizer allowing spatial localization of the position of the various surgical instruments, using a magnetic sensor as well as an optical sensor. Available imaging modality included real-time ultrasound as well as preoperative computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We first clinically applied the fusion system of real-time US with preoperative CT or MRI for percutanous radiofrequency/cryoablation for renal tumor. We also clinically applied an augmented reality visualization system that helps the laparoscopic surgeon to understand three-dimensional (3D) anatomies beyond the surgical view. Augmented reality was feasible and useful to facilitate the surgeon's direct interpretation of 3D anatomies of cancer or vital anatomies beyond the surgical view, using preoperative CT data during laparoscopic partial nephrectomy and intraoperative transrectal US during laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. To our knowledge, we report the first clinical use of augmented reality technology in urology. Imaging assistance beyond the endoscopic surgical view could increase the precision for and confidence of the surgeon, providing preoperative oncological data and understanding of the surrounding vital anatomies. Novel computer-based emerging techniques with 3D imaging technologies potentially indicate the ideal dissection plane to achieve better oncological outcomes as well as to maximize functional preservation.

  9. MR imaging and clinical findings of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sam Soo [Seoul City Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Hyun Beom [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    2000-01-01

    To describe the MR imaging and clinical findings of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma. The MR and clinical findings in six patients (M:F=3D4:2;adult:child=3D3:3) with spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma were reviewed. Five patients without any predisposing factor which might cause the condition and one with acute myelogenous leukemia were included. Emergency surgery was performed in two patients, and the other four were managed conservatively. The epidural lesion involved between three and seven vertebrae (mean:4.5), and relative to the spinal cord was located in the posterior-lateral (n=3D4), anterior (n=3D1), or right lateral (n=3D1) area. The hematoma was isointense (n=3D1) or hyperintense (n=3D5) with spinal cord on T1-weighted images, and hypointense (n=3D2) or hyperintense (n=3D4) on T2-weighted images. It was completely absorbed in four of five patients who underwent follow-up MR imaging, but not changed in one. The clinical outcome of these patients was complete recovery (n=3D4), spastic cerebral palsy (n=3D1), or unknown (n=3D1). Because of the lesion's characteristic signal intensity; MR imaging is very useful in the diagnosis and evaluation of spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma. (author)

  10. Clinical development of BLZ-100 for real-time optical imaging of tumors during resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Heather L.; Miller, Dennis M.; Hedges, Teresa; Perry, Jeff; Parrish-Novak, Julia

    2016-03-01

    Complete initial resection can give cancer patients the best opportunity for long-term survival. There is unmet need in surgical oncology for optical imaging that enables simple and precise visualization of tumors and consistent contrast with surrounding normal tissues. Near-infrared (NIR) contrast agents and camera systems that can detect them represent an area of active research and development. The investigational Tumor Paint agent BLZ-100 is a conjugate of a chlorotoxin peptide and the NIR dye indocyanine green (ICG) that has been shown to specifically bind to a broad range of solid tumors. Clinical efficacy studies with BLZ-100 are in progress, a necessary step in bringing the product into clinical practice. To ensure a product that will be useful for and accepted by surgeons, the early clinical development of BLZ- 100 incorporates multiple tumor types and imaging devices so that surgeon feedback covers the range of anticipated clinical uses. Key contrast agent characteristics include safety, specificity, flexibility in timing between dose and surgery, and breadth of tumor types recognized. Imaging devices should use wavelengths that are optimal for the contrast agent, be sensitive enough that contrast agent dosing can be adjusted for optimal contrast, include real-time video display of fluorescence and white light image, and be simple for surgeons to use with minimal disruption of surgical flow. Rapid entry into clinical studies provides the best opportunity for early surgeon feedback, enabling development of agents and devices that will gain broad acceptance and provide information that helps surgeons achieve more complete and precise resections.

  11. Clinical pharmacology in leishmaniasis: treatment optimization of a neglected disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorlo, T.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents various novel applications of clinical pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in the treatment of leishmaniasis, by which diverse clinically relevant issues, mainly related to the efficacy and safety of miltefosine, could be elucidated. Throughout this thesis, the added value of

  12. Parotid lymphomas – clinical and computed tomographic imaging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Radiology, South infirmary victoria hospital, Cork, Republic of ireland. Summary. Objective. To review the clinical presentation and computed tomography (CT) imaging characteristics of all parotid lymphomas diagnosed at the study institution over a 7-year period. Design. Retrospective chart review of parotid ...

  13. An Adaptive Image Enhancement Technique by Combining Cuckoo Search and Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhiwei; Wang, Mingwei; Hu, Zhengbing; Liu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Image enhancement is an important procedure of image processing and analysis. This paper presents a new technique using a modified measure and blending of cuckoo search and particle swarm optimization (CS-PSO) for low contrast images to enhance image adaptively. In this way, contrast enhancement is obtained by global transformation of the input intensities; it employs incomplete Beta function as the transformation function and a novel criterion for measuring image quality considering three factors which are threshold, entropy value, and gray-level probability density of the image. The enhancement process is a nonlinear optimization problem with several constraints. CS-PSO is utilized to maximize the objective fitness criterion in order to enhance the contrast and detail in an image by adapting the parameters of a novel extension to a local enhancement technique. The performance of the proposed method has been compared with other existing techniques such as linear contrast stretching, histogram equalization, and evolutionary computing based image enhancement methods like backtracking search algorithm, differential search algorithm, genetic algorithm, and particle swarm optimization in terms of processing time and image quality. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is robust and adaptive and exhibits the better performance than other methods involved in the paper. PMID:25784928

  14. Optimizing Patient-centered Communication and Multidisciplinary Care Coordination in Emergency Diagnostic Imaging: A Research Agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbatini, Amber K; Merck, Lisa H; Froemming, Adam T; Vaughan, William; Brown, Michael D; Hess, Erik P; Applegate, Kimberly E; Comfere, Nneka I

    2015-12-01

    Patient-centered emergency diagnostic imaging relies on efficient communication and multispecialty care coordination to ensure optimal imaging utilization. The construct of the emergency diagnostic imaging care coordination cycle with three main phases (pretest, test, and posttest) provides a useful framework to evaluate care coordination in patient-centered emergency diagnostic imaging. This article summarizes findings reached during the patient-centered outcomes session of the 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference "Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: A Research Agenda to Optimize Utilization." The primary objective was to develop a research agenda focused on 1) defining component parts of the emergency diagnostic imaging care coordination process, 2) identifying gaps in communication that affect emergency diagnostic imaging, and 3) defining optimal methods of communication and multidisciplinary care coordination that ensure patient-centered emergency diagnostic imaging. Prioritized research questions provided the framework to define a research agenda for multidisciplinary care coordination in emergency diagnostic imaging. © 2015 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  15. An Adaptive Image Enhancement Technique by Combining Cuckoo Search and Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei Ye

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Image enhancement is an important procedure of image processing and analysis. This paper presents a new technique using a modified measure and blending of cuckoo search and particle swarm optimization (CS-PSO for low contrast images to enhance image adaptively. In this way, contrast enhancement is obtained by global transformation of the input intensities; it employs incomplete Beta function as the transformation function and a novel criterion for measuring image quality considering three factors which are threshold, entropy value, and gray-level probability density of the image. The enhancement process is a nonlinear optimization problem with several constraints. CS-PSO is utilized to maximize the objective fitness criterion in order to enhance the contrast and detail in an image by adapting the parameters of a novel extension to a local enhancement technique. The performance of the proposed method has been compared with other existing techniques such as linear contrast stretching, histogram equalization, and evolutionary computing based image enhancement methods like backtracking search algorithm, differential search algorithm, genetic algorithm, and particle swarm optimization in terms of processing time and image quality. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is robust and adaptive and exhibits the better performance than other methods involved in the paper.

  16. An adaptive image enhancement technique by combining cuckoo search and particle swarm optimization algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhiwei; Wang, Mingwei; Hu, Zhengbing; Liu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Image enhancement is an important procedure of image processing and analysis. This paper presents a new technique using a modified measure and blending of cuckoo search and particle swarm optimization (CS-PSO) for low contrast images to enhance image adaptively. In this way, contrast enhancement is obtained by global transformation of the input intensities; it employs incomplete Beta function as the transformation function and a novel criterion for measuring image quality considering three factors which are threshold, entropy value, and gray-level probability density of the image. The enhancement process is a nonlinear optimization problem with several constraints. CS-PSO is utilized to maximize the objective fitness criterion in order to enhance the contrast and detail in an image by adapting the parameters of a novel extension to a local enhancement technique. The performance of the proposed method has been compared with other existing techniques such as linear contrast stretching, histogram equalization, and evolutionary computing based image enhancement methods like backtracking search algorithm, differential search algorithm, genetic algorithm, and particle swarm optimization in terms of processing time and image quality. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is robust and adaptive and exhibits the better performance than other methods involved in the paper.

  17. Normal feline brain: clinical anatomy using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogicato, G; Conchou, F; Layssol-Lamour, C; Raharison, F; Sautet, J

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide a clinical anatomy atlas of the feline brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Brains of twelve normal cats were imaged using a 1.5 T magnetic resonance unit and an inversion/recovery sequence (T1). Fourteen relevant MRI sections were chosen in transverse, dorsal, median and sagittal planes. Anatomic structures were identified and labelled using anatomical texts and Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria, sectioned specimen heads, and previously published articles. The MRI sections were stained according to the major embryological and anatomical subdivisions of the brain. The relevant anatomical structures seen on MRI will assist clinicians to better understand MR images and to relate this neuro-anatomy to clinical signs. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Optimization of Proton CT Detector System and Image Reconstruction Algorithm for On-Line Proton Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chae Young Lee

    Full Text Available The purposes of this study were to optimize a proton computed tomography system (pCT for proton range verification and to confirm the pCT image reconstruction algorithm based on projection images generated with optimized parameters. For this purpose, we developed a new pCT scanner using the Geometry and Tracking (GEANT 4.9.6 simulation toolkit. GEANT4 simulations were performed to optimize the geometric parameters representing the detector thickness and the distance between the detectors for pCT. The system consisted of four silicon strip detectors for particle tracking and a calorimeter to measure the residual energies of the individual protons. The optimized pCT system design was then adjusted to ensure that the solution to a CS-based convex optimization problem would converge to yield the desired pCT images after a reasonable number of iterative corrections. In particular, we used a total variation-based formulation that has been useful in exploiting prior knowledge about the minimal variations of proton attenuation characteristics in the human body. Examinations performed using our CS algorithm showed that high-quality pCT images could be reconstructed using sets of 72 projections within 20 iterations and without any streaks or noise, which can be caused by under-sampling and proton starvation. Moreover, the images yielded by this CS algorithm were found to be of higher quality than those obtained using other reconstruction algorithms. The optimized pCT scanner system demonstrated the potential to perform high-quality pCT during on-line image-guided proton therapy, without increasing the imaging dose, by applying our CS based proton CT reconstruction algorithm. Further, we make our optimized detector system and CS-based proton CT reconstruction algorithm potentially useful in on-line proton therapy.

  19. Approach to analytically minimize the LCD moiré by image-based particle swarm optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yu-Lin; Tien, Chung-Hao

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we proposed a methodology to optimize the parametric window of a liquid crystal display (LCD) system, whose visual performance was deteriorated by the pixel moiré arising in between multiple periodic structures. Conventional analysis and minimization of moiré patterns are limited by few parameters. With the proposed image-based particle swarm optimization (PSO), we enable a multivariable optimization at the same time. A series of experiments was conducted to validate the methodology. Due to its versatility, the proposed technique will certainly have a promising impact on the fast optimization in LCD design with more complex configuration.

  20. CT image segmentation using FEM with optimized boundary condition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Hishida

    Full Text Available The authors propose a CT image segmentation method using structural analysis that is useful for objects with structural dynamic characteristics. Motivation of our research is from the area of genetic activity. In order to reveal the roles of genes, it is necessary to create mutant mice and measure differences among them by scanning their skeletons with an X-ray CT scanner. The CT image needs to be manually segmented into pieces of the bones. It is a very time consuming to manually segment many mutant mouse models in order to reveal the roles of genes. It is desirable to make this segmentation procedure automatic. Although numerous papers in the past have proposed segmentation techniques, no general segmentation method for skeletons of living creatures has been established. Against this background, the authors propose a segmentation method based on the concept of destruction analogy. To realize this concept, structural analysis is performed using the finite element method (FEM, as structurally weak areas can be expected to break under conditions of stress. The contribution of the method is its novelty, as no studies have so far used structural analysis for image segmentation. The method's implementation involves three steps. First, finite elements are created directly from the pixels of a CT image, and then candidates are also selected in areas where segmentation is thought to be appropriate. The second step involves destruction analogy to find a single candidate with high strain chosen as the segmentation target. The boundary conditions for FEM are also set automatically. Then, destruction analogy is implemented by replacing pixels with high strain as background ones, and this process is iterated until object is decomposed into two parts. Here, CT image segmentation is demonstrated using various types of CT imagery.

  1. Cancer imaging phenomics toolkit: quantitative imaging analytics for precision diagnostics and predictive modeling of clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davatzikos, Christos; Rathore, Saima; Bakas, Spyridon; Pati, Sarthak; Bergman, Mark; Kalarot, Ratheesh; Sridharan, Patmaa; Gastounioti, Aimilia; Jahani, Nariman; Cohen, Eric; Akbari, Hamed; Tunc, Birkan; Doshi, Jimit; Parker, Drew; Hsieh, Michael; Sotiras, Aristeidis; Li, Hongming; Ou, Yangming; Doot, Robert K; Bilello, Michel; Fan, Yong; Shinohara, Russell T; Yushkevich, Paul; Verma, Ragini; Kontos, Despina

    2018-01-01

    The growth of multiparametric imaging protocols has paved the way for quantitative imaging phenotypes that predict treatment response and clinical outcome, reflect underlying cancer molecular characteristics and spatiotemporal heterogeneity, and can guide personalized treatment planning. This growth has underlined the need for efficient quantitative analytics to derive high-dimensional imaging signatures of diagnostic and predictive value in this emerging era of integrated precision diagnostics. This paper presents cancer imaging phenomics toolkit (CaPTk), a new and dynamically growing software platform for analysis of radiographic images of cancer, currently focusing on brain, breast, and lung cancer. CaPTk leverages the value of quantitative imaging analytics along with machine learning to derive phenotypic imaging signatures, based on two-level functionality. First, image analysis algorithms are used to extract comprehensive panels of diverse and complementary features, such as multiparametric intensity histogram distributions, texture, shape, kinetics, connectomics, and spatial patterns. At the second level, these quantitative imaging signatures are fed into multivariate machine learning models to produce diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive biomarkers. Results from clinical studies in three areas are shown: (i) computational neuro-oncology of brain gliomas for precision diagnostics, prediction of outcome, and treatment planning; (ii) prediction of treatment response for breast and lung cancer, and (iii) risk assessment for breast cancer.

  2. Single-heartbeat electromechanical wave imaging with optimal strain estimation using temporally unequispaced acquisition sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provost, Jean; Thiébaut, Stéphane; Luo, Jianwen; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2012-02-21

    Electromechanical Wave Imaging (EWI) is a non-invasive, ultrasound-based imaging method capable of mapping the electromechanical wave (EW) in vivo, i.e. the transient deformations occurring in response to the electrical activation of the heart. Optimal imaging frame rates, in terms of the elastographic signal-to-noise ratio, to capture the EW cannot be achieved due to the limitations of conventional imaging sequences, in which the frame rate is low and tied to the imaging parameters. To achieve higher frame rates, EWI is typically performed by combining sectors acquired during separate heartbeats, which are then combined into a single view. However, the frame rates achieved remain potentially sub-optimal and this approach precludes the study of non-periodic arrhythmias. This paper describes a temporally unequispaced acquisition sequence (TUAS) for which a wide range of frame rates are achievable independently of the imaging parameters, while maintaining a full view of the heart at high beam density. TUAS is first used to determine the optimal frame rate for EWI in a paced canine heart in vivo and then to image during ventricular fibrillation. These results indicate how EWI can be optimally performed within a single heartbeat, during free breathing and in real time, for both periodic and non-periodic cardiac events.

  3. [Optimization of digital chest radiography image post-processing in diagnosis of pneumoconiosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Bing-yong; Mao, Ling; Zhou, Shao-wei; Shi, Jin

    2013-11-01

    To establish the optimal image post-processing parameters for digital chest radiography as preliminary research for introducing digital radiography (DR) to pneumoconiosis diagnosis in China. A total of 204 pneumoconiosis patients and 31 dust-exposed workers were enrolled as the subjects in this research. Film-screen radiography (FSR) and DR images were taken for all subjects. DR films were printed after raw images were processed and parameters were altered using DR workstation (GE Healthcare, U.S.A.). Image gradations, lung textures, and the imaging of thoracic vertebra were evaluated by pneumoconiosis experts, and the optimal post-processing parameters were selected. Optical density was measured for both DR films and FSR films. For the DR machine used in this research, the contrast adjustment (CA) and brightness adjustment (BA) were the main parameters that determine the brightness and gray levels of images. The optimal ranges for CA and BA were 115%∼120% and 160%∼165%, respectively. The quality of DR chest films would be optimized when tissue contrast was adjusted to a maximum of 0.15, edge to a minimum of 1, and both noise reduction and tissue equalization to0.The failure rate of chest DR (0.4%) was significantly lower than that of chest FSR (17%) (P image post-processing on DR machine purchased from GE Healthcare, the DR chest films can meet all requirements for the quality of chest X-ray films in the Chinese diagnostic criteria for pneumoconiosis.

  4. Information Extraction of High Resolution Remote Sensing Images Based on the Calculation of Optimal Segmentation Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongchun; Cai, Lijie; Liu, Haiying; Huang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Multi-scale image segmentation and the selection of optimal segmentation parameters are the key processes in the object-oriented information extraction of high-resolution remote sensing images. The accuracy of remote sensing special subject information depends on this extraction. On the basis of WorldView-2 high-resolution data, the optimal segmentation parameters methodof object-oriented image segmentation and high-resolution image information extraction, the following processes were conducted in this study. Firstly, the best combination of the bands and weights was determined for the information extraction of high-resolution remote sensing image. An improved weighted mean-variance method was proposed andused to calculatethe optimal segmentation scale. Thereafter, the best shape factor parameter and compact factor parameters were computed with the use of the control variables and the combination of the heterogeneity and homogeneity indexes. Different types of image segmentation parameters were obtained according to the surface features. The high-resolution remote sensing images were multi-scale segmented with the optimal segmentation parameters. Ahierarchical network structure was established by setting the information extraction rules to achieve object-oriented information extraction. This study presents an effective and practical method that can explain expert input judgment by reproducible quantitative measurements. Furthermore the results of this procedure may be incorporated into a classification scheme.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging for clinical management of rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beets-Tan, Regina G H; Lambregts, Doenja M J; Maas, Monique

    2018-01-01

    Radiology (ESGAR) participated in a consensus meeting, organised according to an adaptation of the RAND-UCLA Appropriateness Method. Two independent (non-voting) Chairs facilitated the meeting. 246 items were scored (comprising 229 items from the previous 2012 consensus and 17 additional items......OBJECTIVES: To update the 2012 ESGAR consensus guidelines on the acquisition, interpretation and reporting of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for clinical staging and restaging of rectal cancer. METHODS: Fourteen abdominal imaging experts from the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal......) and classified as 'appropriate' or 'inappropriate' (defined by ≥ 80 % consensus) or uncertain (defined by consensus). RESULTS: Consensus was reached for 226 (92 %) of items. From these recommendations regarding hardware, patient preparation, imaging sequences and acquisition, criteria for MR imaging...

  6. Clinical decision tool for optimal delivery of liver stereotactic body radiation therapy: Photons versus protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Saumil J; Liang, Xing; Ding, Xuanfeng; Zhu, Timothy C; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Plastaras, John P; Metz, James M; Both, Stefan; Apisarnthanarax, Smith

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for treatment of liver tumors is often limited by liver dose constraints. Protons offer potential for more liver sparing, but clinical situations in which protons may be superior to photons are not well described. We developed and validated a treatment decision model to determine whether liver tumors of certain sizes and locations are more suited for photon versus proton SBRT. Six spherical mock tumors from 1 to 6 cm in diameter were contoured on computed tomography images of 1 patient at 4 locations: dome, caudal, left medial, and central. Photon and proton plans were generated to deliver 50 Gy in 5 fractions to each tumor and optimized to deliver equivalent target coverage and maximal liver sparing. Using these plans, we developed a hypothesis-generating model to predict the optimal modality for maximal liver sparing based on tumor size and location. We then validated this model in 10 patients with liver tumors. Protons spared significantly more liver than photons for dome or central tumors ≥3 cm (dome: 134 ± 21 cm(3), P = .03; central: 108 ± 4 cm(3), P = .01). Our model correctly predicted the optimal SBRT modality for all 10 patients. For patients with dome or central tumors ≥3 cm, protons significantly increased the volume of liver spared (176 ± 21 cm(3), P = .01) and decreased the mean liver dose (8.4 vs 12.2 Gy, P = .01) while offering no significant advantage for tumors protons should be considered as the radiation modality of choice for dome and central tumors >3 cm to allow maximal liver sparing and potentially reduce radiation toxicity. Protons should also be considered for any tumor >5 cm if photon plans fail to achieve adequate coverage or exceed the mean liver threshold. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Image Registration and Optimization in the Virtual Slaughterhouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Christensen, Martin

    This thesis presents the development and application of algorithms for the analysis of pig carcasses. Focus is on the simulation and quality estimation of meat products produced in a Danish slaughterhouse. Computed Tomography scans of pig carcasses provide the data used in the application. Image...... analysis is applied in order to imitate some of the cutting processes found in a slaughterhouse but also to give a quantitative measure of the composition of each carcass. The basis of the algorithms is non-linear image registration. This method finds the anatomical correspondence between a reference......-invasively estimating the quality of the slaughtering products provides a very valuable tool for use in the slaughterhouse in the future....

  8. Improved total variation-based CT image reconstruction applied to clinical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritschl, Ludwig; Bergner, Frank; Fleischmann, Christof; Kachelriess, Marc

    2011-03-21

    In computed tomography there are different situations where reconstruction has to be performed with limited raw data. In the past few years it has been shown that algorithms which are based on compressed sensing theory are able to handle incomplete datasets quite well. As a cost function these algorithms use the ℓ(1)-norm of the image after it has been transformed by a sparsifying transformation. This yields to an inequality-constrained convex optimization problem. Due to the large size of the optimization problem some heuristic optimization algorithms have been proposed in the past few years. The most popular way is optimizing the raw data and sparsity cost functions separately in an alternating manner. In this paper we will follow this strategy and present a new method to adapt these optimization steps. Compared to existing methods which perform similarly, the proposed method needs no a priori knowledge about the raw data consistency. It is ensured that the algorithm converges to the lowest possible value of the raw data cost function, while holding the sparsity constraint at a low value. This is achieved by transferring the step-size determination of both optimization procedures into the raw data domain, where they are adapted to each other. To evaluate the algorithm, we process measured clinical datasets. To cover a wide field of possible applications, we focus on the problems of angular undersampling, data lost due to metal implants, limited view angle tomography and interior tomography. In all cases the presented method reaches convergence within less than 25 iteration steps, while using a constant set of algorithm control parameters. The image artifacts caused by incomplete raw data are mostly removed without introducing new effects like staircasing. All scenarios are compared to an existing implementation of the ASD-POCS algorithm, which realizes the step-size adaption in a different way. Additional prior information as proposed by the PICCS algorithm can

  9. Lossless image data sequence compression using optimal context quantization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren; WU, Xiaolin; Andersen, Jakob Dahl

    2001-01-01

    Context based entropy coding often faces the conflict of a desire for large templates and the problem of context dilution. We consider the problem of finding the quantizer Q that quantizes the K-dimensional causal context Ci=(X(i-t1), X(i-t2), …, X(i-tK)) of a source symbol Xi into one of M...... and context quantization for coding the binary decisions is presented and applied to digital maps and α-plane sequences. The optimal context quantization is also used to evaluate existing heuristic context quantizations....

  10. Optimizing The Imaging Performance Of The Exist High Energy Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Gerald K.; Finger, M. H.; Hong, J.; Jernigan, J. G.; Sturner, S. J.; Allen, B.; Grindlay, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    The baseline concept for the primary instrument of the EXIST mission, the high energy telescope (HET), is a coded mask instrument with a wide field of view and extremely good sensitivity (Hong et al., this meeting). Achieving the performance goals requires an imaging capability close to the statistical photon limit, minimizing systematic errors even when the total integration time is very long. At the same time there is a requirement to be able to reconstruct images on board in near real time in order to detect and localize gamma-ray bursts. This must be done while the spacecraft is scanning the sky with a motion designed to help reduce systematic errors and to provide all-sky coverage. During the 2008 Advanced Mission Concept Study, the Exist Imaging Technical Working Group has investigated and compared numerous alternative designs for the HET. The selected baseline concept meets all of the scientific requirements, while being compatible with spacecraft and launch constraints and with those imposed by the Infra-Red Telescope that forms the other key part of the mission. The approach adopted depends on a unique annular coded mask with two spatial scales, offering good resolution and low background at low energies, with a lower resolution but enhanced sensitivity in the upper part of the energy band. Monte Carlo simulations and analytic analysis techniques have been used to demonstrate the capabilities of the proposed design.

  11. SU-G-BRA-03: PCA Based Imaging Angle Optimization for 2D Cine MRI Based Radiotherapy Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, T; Yue, N; Jabbour, S; Zhang, M [Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an imaging angle optimization methodology for orthogonal 2D cine MRI based radiotherapy guidance using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of target motion retrieved from 4DCT. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 4DCT of 6 patients with lung tumor. A radiation oncologist manually contoured the target volume at the maximal inhalation phase of the respiratory cycle. An object constrained deformable image registration (DIR) method has been developed to track the target motion along the respiration at ten phases. The motion of the center of the target mass has been analyzed using the PCA to find out the principal motion components that were uncorrelated with each other. Two orthogonal image planes for cineMRI have been determined using this method to minimize the through plane motion during MRI based radiotherapy guidance. Results: 3D target respiratory motion for all 6 patients has been efficiently retrieved from 4DCT. In this process, the object constrained DIR demonstrated satisfactory accuracy and efficiency to enable the automatic motion tracking for clinical application. The average motion amplitude in the AP, lateral, and longitudinal directions were 3.6mm (min: 1.6mm, max: 5.6mm), 1.7mm (min: 0.6mm, max: 2.7mm), and 5.6mm (min: 1.8mm, max: 16.1mm), respectively. Based on PCA, the optimal orthogonal imaging planes were determined for cineMRI. The average angular difference between the PCA determined imaging planes and the traditional AP and lateral imaging planes were 47 and 31 degrees, respectively. After optimization, the average amplitude of through plane motion reduced from 3.6mm in AP images to 2.5mm (min:1.3mm, max:3.9mm); and from 1.7mm in lateral images to 0.6mm (min: 0.2mm, max:1.5mm), while the principal in plane motion amplitude increased from 5.6mm to 6.5mm (min: 2.8mm, max: 17mm). Conclusion: DIR and PCA can be used to optimize the orthogonal image planes of cineMRI to minimize the through plane motion during radiotherapy

  12. 2D sparse array transducer optimization for 3D ultrasound imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jae Hoon; Park, Kwan Kyu [Dept. of Mechanical Convergence Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    A 3D ultrasound image is desired in many medical examinations. However, the implementation of a 2D array, which is needed for a 3D image, is challenging with respect to fabrication, interconnection and cabling. A 2D sparse array, which needs fewer elements than a dense array, is a realistic way to achieve 3D images. Because the number of ways the elements can be placed in an array is extremely large, a method for optimizing the array configuration is needed. Previous research placed the target point far from the transducer array, making it impossible to optimize the array in the operating range. In our study, we focused on optimizing a 2D sparse array transducer for 3D imaging by using a simulated annealing method. We compared the far-field optimization method with the near-field optimization method by analyzing a point-spread function (PSF). The resolution of the optimized sparse array is comparable to that of the dense array.

  13. Lymphoma: current status of clinical and preclinical imaging with radiolabeled antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    England, Christopher G. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Rui, Lixin [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Medicine, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States); Cai, Weibo [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Lymphoma is a complex disease that arises from cells of the immune system with an intricate pathology. While lymphoma may be classified as Hodgkin or non-Hodgkin, each type of tumor is genetically and phenotypically different and highly invasive tissue biopsies are the only method to investigate these differences. Noninvasive imaging strategies, such as immunoPET, can provide a vital insight into disease staging, monitoring treatment response in patients, and dose planning in radioimmunotherapy. ImmunoPET imaging with radiolabeled antibody-based tracers may also assist physicians in optimizing treatment strategies and enhancing patient stratification. Currently, there are two common biomarkers for molecular imaging of lymphoma, CD20 and CD30, both of which have been considered for investigation in preclinical imaging studies. In this review, we examine the current status of both preclinical and clinical imaging of lymphoma using radiolabeled antibodies. Additionally, we briefly investigate the role of radiolabeled antibodies in lymphoma therapy. As radiolabeled antibodies play critical roles in both imaging and therapy of lymphoma, the development of novel antibodies and the discovery of new biomarkers may greatly affect lymphoma imaging and therapy in the future. (orig.)

  14. Fast Automatic Step Size Estimation for Gradient Descent Optimization of Image Registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yuchuan; van Lew, Baldur; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F; Staring, Marius

    2016-02-01

    Fast automatic image registration is an important prerequisite for image-guided clinical procedures. However, due to the large number of voxels in an image and the complexity of registration algorithms, this process is often very slow. Stochastic gradient descent is a powerful method to iteratively solve the registration problem, but relies for convergence on a proper selection of the optimization step size. This selection is difficult to perform manually, since it depends on the input data, similarity measure and transformation model. The Adaptive Stochastic Gradient Descent (ASGD) method is an automatic approach, but it comes at a high computational cost. In this paper, we propose a new computationally efficient method (fast ASGD) to automatically determine the step size for gradient descent methods, by considering the observed distribution of the voxel displacements between iterations. A relation between the step size and the expectation and variance of the observed distribution is derived. While ASGD has quadratic complexity with respect to the transformation parameters, fast ASGD only has linear complexity. Extensive validation has been performed on different datasets with different modalities, inter/intra subjects, different similarity measures and transformation models. For all experiments, we obtained similar accuracy as ASGD. Moreover, the estimation time of fast ASGD is reduced to a very small value, from 40 s to less than 1 s when the number of parameters is 105, almost 40 times faster. Depending on the registration settings, the total registration time is reduced by a factor of 2.5-7 × for the experiments in this paper.

  15. Strategies to optimize tacrolimus treatment and improve long-term clinical outcomes in solid organ transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.M. Shuker (Nauras)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractAlthough tacrolimus has been in widespread use since the 1990s, there are still a number of unanswered questions related to its clinical use. For example, the optimal starting dose of tacrolimus and the optimal target concentration in both the early and late phase after

  16. Medical Image Registration by means of a Bio-Inspired Optimization Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hariton Costin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Medical imaging mainly treats and processes missing, ambiguous, complementary, redundant and distorted data. Biomedical image registration is the process of geometric overlaying or alignment of two or more 2D/3D images of the same scene, taken at different time slots, from different angles, and/or by different acquisition systems. In medical practice, it is becoming increasingly important in diagnosis, treatment planning, functional studies, computer-guided therapies, and in biomedical research. Technically, image registration implies a complex optimization of different parameters, performed at local or/and global levels. Local optimization methods frequently fail because functions of the involved metrics with respect to transformation parameters are generally nonconvex and irregular. Therefore, global methods are often required, at least at the beginning of the procedure. In this paper, a new evolutionary and bio-inspired approach -- bacterial foraging optimization -- is adapted for single-slice to 3-D PET and CT multimodal image registration. Preliminary results of optimizing the normalized mutual information similarity metric validated the efficacy of the proposed method by using a freely available medical image database.

  17. Optimized 3D Street Scene Reconstruction from Driving Recorder Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an automatic region detection based method to reconstruct street scenes from driving recorder images. The driving recorder in this paper is a dashboard camera that collects images while the motor vehicle is moving. An enormous number of moving vehicles are included in the collected data because the typical recorders are often mounted in the front of moving vehicles and face the forward direction, which can make matching points on vehicles and guardrails unreliable. Believing that utilizing these image data can reduce street scene reconstruction and updating costs because of their low price, wide use, and extensive shooting coverage, we therefore proposed a new method, which is called the Mask automatic detecting method, to improve the structure results from the motion reconstruction. Note that we define vehicle and guardrail regions as “mask” in this paper since the features on them should be masked out to avoid poor matches. After removing the feature points in our new method, the camera poses and sparse 3D points that are reconstructed with the remaining matches. Our contrast experiments with the typical pipeline of structure from motion (SfM reconstruction methods, such as Photosynth and VisualSFM, demonstrated that the Mask decreased the root-mean-square error (RMSE of the pairwise matching results, which led to more accurate recovering results from the camera-relative poses. Removing features from the Mask also increased the accuracy of point clouds by nearly 30%–40% and corrected the problems of the typical methods on repeatedly reconstructing several buildings when there was only one target building.

  18. Optimal Local Dimming for LC Image Formation With Controllable Backlighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shu, Xiao; Wu, Xiaolin; Forchhammer, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Light emitting diode (LED)-backlit liquid crystal displays (LCDs) hold the promise of improving image quality while reducing the energy consumption with signal-dependent local dimming. However, most existing local dimming algorithms are mostly motivated by simple implementation, and they often lack...... concern for visual quality. To fully realize the potential of LED-backlit LCDs and reduce the artifacts that often occur in current systems, we propose a novel local dimming technique that can achieve the theoretical highest fidelity of intensity reproduction in either $\\ell_{1}$ or $\\ell_{2}$ metrics...

  19. An analytical optimization model for infrared image enhancement via local context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yongjian; Liang, Kun; Xiong, Yiru; Wang, Hui

    2017-12-01

    The requirement for high-quality infrared images is constantly increasing in both military and civilian areas, and it is always associated with little distortion and appropriate contrast, while infrared images commonly have some shortcomings such as low contrast. In this paper, we propose a novel infrared image histogram enhancement algorithm based on local context. By constraining the enhanced image to have high local contrast, a regularized analytical optimization model is proposed to enhance infrared images. The local contrast is determined by evaluating whether two intensities are neighbors and calculating their differences. The comparison on 8-bit images shows that the proposed method can enhance the infrared images with more details and lower noise.

  20. Optimizing MR imaging-guided navigation for focused ultrasound interventions in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, B.; Martin, E.; Bauer, R.; O'Gorman, R.

    2017-03-01

    MR imaging during transcranial MR imaging-guided Focused Ultrasound surgery (tcMRIgFUS) is challenging due to the complex ultrasound transducer setup and the water bolus used for acoustic coupling. Achievable image quality in the tcMRIgFUS setup using the standard body coil is significantly inferior to current neuroradiologic standards. As a consequence, MR image guidance for precise navigation in functional neurosurgical interventions using tcMRIgFUS is basically limited to the acquisition of MR coordinates of salient landmarks such as the anterior and posterior commissure for aligning a stereotactic atlas. Here, we show how improved MR image quality provided by a custom built MR coil and optimized MR imaging sequences can support imaging-guided navigation for functional tcMRIgFUS neurosurgery by visualizing anatomical landmarks that can be integrated into the navigation process to accommodate for patient specific anatomy.

  1. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations for Hip Imaging in Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Garry E.; Cicuttini, Flavia; Crema, Michel D.; Eckstein, Felix; Guermazi, Ali; Kijowski, Richard; Link, Thomas M.; Maheu, Emmanuel; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Miller, Colin G.; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Peterfy, Charles G.; Potter, Hollis G.; Roemer, Frank W.; Hunter, David. J

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of hip in osteoarthritis (OA) has seen considerable progress in the past decade, with the introduction of new techniques that may be more sensitive to structural disease changes. The purpose of this expert opinion, consensus driven recommendation is to provide detail on how to apply hip imaging in disease modifying clinical trials. It includes information on acquisition methods/ techniques (including guidance on positioning for radiography, sequence/protocol recommendations/ hardware for MRI); commonly encountered problems (including positioning, hardware and coil failures, artifacts associated with various MRI sequences); quality assurance/ control procedures; measurement methods; measurement performance (reliability, responsiveness, and validity); recommendations for trials; and research recommendations. PMID:25952344

  2. Single-Heartbeat Electromechanical Wave Imaging with Optimal Strain Estimation Using Temporally-Unequispaced Acquisition Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provost, Jean; Thiébaut, Stéphane; Luo, Jianwen; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2014-01-01

    Electromechanical Wave Imaging (EWI) is a non-invasive, ultrasound-based imaging method capable of mapping the electromechanical wave (EW) in vivo, i.e., the transient deformations occurring in response to the electrical activation of the heart. Achieving the optimal imaging frame rates, in terms of the elastographic signal-to-noise ratio, to capture the EW in a full-view of the heart poses a technical challenge due to the limitations of conventional imaging sequences, in which the frame rate is low and tied to the imaging parameters. To achieve higher frame rates, EWI is typically performed in multiple small regions of interest acquired over separate heartbeats, which are then combined into a single view. However, the reliance on multiple heartbeats has previously precluded the method from its application in non-periodic arrhythmias such as fibrillation. Moreover, the frame rates achieved remain sub-optimal, because they are determined by the imaging parameters rather than being optimized to image the EW. In this paper, we develop a temporally-unequispaced acquisition sequence (TUAS) for which a wide range of frame rates are achievable independently of the imaging parameters, while maintaining a full view of the heart at high beam density. TUAS is first used to determine the optimal frame rate for EWI in a paced canine heart in vivo. The feasibility of performing single-heartbeat EWI during ventricular fibrillation is then demonstrated. These results indicate that EWI can be performed optimally, within a single heartbeat, during free breathing, and implemented in real time for periodic and non-periodic cardiac events. PMID:22297208

  3. Optimism and Recovery After Acute Coronary Syndrome: A Clinical Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ronaldson, Amy; Molloy, Gerard J.; Wikman, Anna; Poole, Lydia; Kaski, Juan-Carlos; Steptoe, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Optimism is associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality, but its impact on recovery after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is poorly understood. We hypothesized that greater optimism would lead to more effective physical and emotional adaptation after ACS and would buffer the impact of persistent depressive symptoms on clinical outcomes. Methods This prospective observational clinical study took place in an urban general hospital and involved 369 patients admitted with a ...

  4. Binary image segmentation based on optimized parallel K-means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiao-bing; Zhou, Yong; Lin, Li

    2015-07-01

    K-means is a classic unsupervised learning clustering algorithm. In theory, it can work well in the field of image segmentation. But compared with other segmentation algorithms, this algorithm needs much more computation, and segmentation speed is slow. This limits its application. With the emergence of general-purpose computing on the GPU and the release of CUDA, some scholars try to implement K-means algorithm in parallel on the GPU, and applied to image segmentation at the same time. They have achieved some results, but the approach they use is not completely parallel, not take full advantage of GPU's super computing power. K-means algorithm has two core steps: label and update, in current parallel realization of K-means, only labeling is parallel, update operation is still serial. In this paper, both of the two steps in K-means will be parallel to improve the degree of parallelism and accelerate this algorithm. Experimental results show that this improvement has reached a much quicker speed than the previous research.

  5. Method for Automatic Tube Current Selection for Obtaining a Consistent Image Quality and Dose Optimization in a Cardiac Multidetector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Weiwei; Du, Xiangke [Peking University People' s Hospital, Beijing (China); Li, Jianying [GE Healthcare China, Beijing (China)

    2009-12-15

    To evaluate a quantitative method for individually adjusting the tube current to obtain images with consistent noise in electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated CT cardiac scans. The image noise from timing bolus and cardiac CT scans of 80 patients (Group A) who underwent a 64-row multidetector (MD) CT cardiac examination with patient-independent scan parameters were analyzed. A formula was established using the noise correlation between the timing bolus and cardiac scans. This formula was used to predict the required tube current to obtain the desired cardiac CT image noise based on the timing bolus noise measurement. Subsequently, 80 additional cardiac patients (Group B) were scanned with individually adjusted tube currents using an established formula to evaluate its ability to obtain accurate and consistent image noise across the patient population. Image quality was evaluated using score scale of 1 to 5 with a score of 3 or higher being clinically acceptable. Using the formula, we obtained an average CT image noise of 28.55 Hounsfield unit (HU), with a standard deviation of only 1.7 HU, as opposed to a target value of 28 HU. Image quality scores were 4.03 and 4.27 for images in Groups A and B, respectively, and there was no statistical difference between the image quality scores between the two groups. However, the average CT dose index (CTDIvol) was 30% lower for Group B. Adjusting the tube current based on timing bolus scans may provide a consistent image quality and dose optimization for cardiac patients of various body mass index values.

  6. Otimização de imagens mamográficas Optimization of mammographic images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Rodrigues de Pina

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Este trabalho tem como objetivo a otimização de imagens mamográficas, com consideráveis reduções de doses. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Neste estudo o feixe de raios-X foi calibrado para cada tensão (kVp, de modo a determinar a melhor combinação de kVp e mAs que irá proporcionar uma densidade ótica (DO em torno de 1.0 acima da base mais véu do filme utilizado. RESULTADOS: Serão discutidas questões sobre os métodos empregados para a seleção de parâmetros de exposição do feixe de raios-X, seleção da melhor imagem utilizando o método de avaliação gradativa visual, comparações entre as doses e carga do tubo (kVp × mAs proporcionadas pelas técnicas determinadas neste estudo e pelas utilizadas na rotina clínica do Serviço de Diagnóstico por Imagem do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu. Neste estudo foram obtidas imagens radiográficas de mama de excelente qualidade, com redução de dose e carga de tubo, respectivamente, de 36,8% e 46,2%, quando comparadas com a técnica utilizada pela rotina clínica da instituição. CONCLUSÃO: Esta pesquisa vem contribuir com a otimização da relação risco-benefício para o paciente e custo-benefício para a instituição.OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is the optimization of mammographic images with a considerable radiation dose reduction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In the present study the X-ray beam was calibrated for each tension (kVp, aiming at determining the best combination between kVp and mAs, resulting in optical densities of about 1.0 above the base-plus-fog density. RESULTS: This study will bring into question the methods for X-ray beam calibration, the choice of the best image by means of visual grading analysis, comparisons between doses and tube load (kVp × mAs delivered by the techniques described in this study and by those adopted in the clinical routine at Service of Diagnostic Imaging of Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu Clinics

  7. Optimizing bioimpedance measurement configuration for dual-gated nuclear medicine imaging: a sensitivity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivumäki, Tuomas; Vauhkonen, Marko; Kuikka, Jyrki T; Hakulinen, Mikko A

    2011-07-01

    Motion artefacts due to respiration and cardiac contractions may deteriorate the quality of nuclear medicine imaging leading to incorrect diagnosis and inadequate treatment. Motion artefacts can be minimized by simultaneous respiratory and cardiac gating, dual-gating. Currently, only cardiac gating is often performed. In this study, an optimized bioimpedance measurement configuration was determined for simultaneous respiratory and cardiac gating signal acquisition. The optimized configuration was located on anterolateral upper thorax based on sensitivity simulations utilizing a simplified thorax model. The validity of the optimized configuration was studied with six healthy volunteers. In the peak-to-peak and frequency content analyses the optimized configuration showed consistently higher peak-to-peak values and frequency content than other studied measurement configurations. This study indicates that the bioimpedance method has potential for the dual-gating in nuclear medicine imaging. The method would minimize the need of additional equipment, is easy for the technologists to use and comfortable for the patients.

  8. Task-based data-acquisition optimization for sparse image reconstruction systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yujia; Lou, Yang; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2017-03-01

    Conventional wisdom dictates that imaging hardware should be optimized by use of an ideal observer (IO) that exploits full statistical knowledge of the class of objects to be imaged, without consideration of the reconstruction method to be employed. However, accurate and tractable models of the complete object statistics are often difficult to determine in practice. Moreover, in imaging systems that employ compressive sensing concepts, imaging hardware and (sparse) image reconstruction are innately coupled technologies. We have previously proposed a sparsity-driven ideal observer (SDIO) that can be employed to optimize hardware by use of a stochastic object model that describes object sparsity. The SDIO and sparse reconstruction method can therefore be "matched" in the sense that they both utilize the same statistical information regarding the class of objects to be imaged. To efficiently compute SDIO performance, the posterior distribution is estimated by use of computational tools developed recently for variational Bayesian inference. Subsequently, the SDIO test statistic can be computed semi-analytically. The advantages of employing the SDIO instead of a Hotelling observer are systematically demonstrated in case studies in which magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data acquisition schemes are optimized for signal detection tasks.

  9. Ultrasound Image Quality Assessment: A framework for evaluation of clinical image quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Pedersen, Mads Møller; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov

    2010-01-01

    and is applicable for clinical use. The free access to all system parameters enables the ability to capture standardized images as found in the clinic and experimental data from new processing or beamformation methods. The length of the data sequences is only restricted by the memory of the external PC. Data may...... be captured interleaved, switching between multiple setups, to maintain identical transducer, scanner, region of interest and recording time on both the experimental- and standardized images. Data storage is approximately 15.1 seconds pr. 3 sec sequence including complete scanner settings and patient...

  10. Feasibility of interactive magnetic resonance imaging of moving anatomy for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brix, Lau; Sørensen, Thomas S; Berber, Yasmina; Ries, Mario; Stausbøl-Grøn, Brian; Ringgaard, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) imaging with real-time reconstruction has been available for some time. The technique acquires and presents the MRI images to the operator the instant they are acquired. However, besides guiding purposes, like catheter tracking and placement of electrodes during neurosurgery, the diagnostic value of this method is relatively unexplored. To test an interactive slice-positioning system with respect to real-time MRI reconstruction for imaging of moving anatomical structures on two different scanner brands by using inexpensive computer hardware. The MRI data were sampled using two acquisition schemes: a Cartesian sampling scheme and a radial sampling scheme based on the golden ratio. Four anatomical targets, which exhibit non-periodic movement, were identified and imaged: movement of the gastric ventricle emptying, movement of the small bowels, the articulators of a professional singer and of a 20-week old fetus. Informative anatomical images were obtained in different settings of moving targets. The implemented real-time system acquired, reconstructed and displayed MRI images in real time with a high frame rate using inexpensive computer hardware on two standard 1.5 T clinical MRI scanners. Our approach verified that when imaging selected moving anatomical targets, with no a priori knowledge of the movement, interactive slice positioning using real-time reconstruction may be a feasible approach for finding the optimal slice position in cases in which a standard 3D volumetric scan is impeded by movement. Future studies are needed to explore its full potential. © 2013 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Optimized Laplacian image sharpening algorithm based on graphic processing unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Tinghuai; Li, Lu; Ji, Sai; Wang, Xin; Tian, Yuan; Al-Dhelaan, Abdullah; Al-Rodhaan, Mznah

    2014-12-01

    In classical Laplacian image sharpening, all pixels are processed one by one, which leads to large amount of computation. Traditional Laplacian sharpening processed on CPU is considerably time-consuming especially for those large pictures. In this paper, we propose a parallel implementation of Laplacian sharpening based on Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), which is a computing platform of Graphic Processing Units (GPU), and analyze the impact of picture size on performance and the relationship between the processing time of between data transfer time and parallel computing time. Further, according to different features of different memory, an improved scheme of our method is developed, which exploits shared memory in GPU instead of global memory and further increases the efficiency. Experimental results prove that two novel algorithms outperform traditional consequentially method based on OpenCV in the aspect of computing speed.

  12. Optimization of mid-IR photothermal imaging for tissue analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totachawattana, Atcha; Erramilli, Shyamsunder; Sander, Michelle Y.

    2015-08-01

    Photothermal imaging in the mid-infrared enables highly sensitive, label-free microscopy by relying on bond-specific characterization of functional groups within the samples. In a pump-probe configuration, the mid-infrared (mid-IR) pump laser is tuned to characteristic vibrational modes and through localized absorption thermal changes in the refractive index are induced. The shorter wavelength probe scatter can be detected with lock-in technology, utilizing highly sensitive detectors at telecommunication wavelengths. This mitigates the need of complex detector technology as required for traditional infrared spectroscopy/Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. The presented photothermal system integrates a high brightness quantum cascade laser that can be tuned continuously over a spectral range of interest with a fiber probe laser. Fiber laser technology features a compact footprint and offers robust performance metrics and reduced sensitivity to environmental perturbations compared to free-space laser configurations. In systematic spectroscopy studies where the probe laser parameters were modified, we demonstrate that the signal-to-noise ratio can be significantly enhanced by utilizing a mode-locked laser compared to a continuous-wave laser. With a raster-scanning approach, photothermal spectroscopy can be extended to hyperspectral label-free mid-infrared imaging to combine spectral content with localized sample details. By tuning the pump laser to the amide-I absorption band around 1650 cm-1 in biological tissue samples, the spectral characteristics can provide insight into the secondary structure of proteins (e.g. amyloid plaques; alpha-helix, beta-sheet). We present the versatility of our mid-IR photothermal system by analyzing histopathological tissue sections of cancerous tissue in a non-contact, non-destructive approach with good sensitivity.

  13. Studies of dose optimization and image quality in technological transition in mammography; Estudos de otimizacao de dose e qualidade de imagem em processos de transicao tecnologica em mamografia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furquim, Tania C.; Nersissian, Denise Y., E-mail: tfurquim@iee.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IEE/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Eletrotecnica e Energia

    2011-07-01

    The introduction of new technologies in mammography may improve image quality; however, it may unnecessarily increase doses if optimization processes are not studied. In this work, radiation doses of the moment of transition of conventional to digital mammography have been analyzed. The presented data have been acquired from 2005 to 2009, in hospitals and clinics of Sao Paulo city, to 4 conventional and 5 digital equipment. The results show that even after optimization processes, new technologies still impart higher doses. Thus, individualized studies are needed when technological transitions occur, in order to maintain image quality without significant dose increase. (author)

  14. Study of dose optimization and image in technological transition in mammography; Estudos de otimizacao de dose e qualidade de imagem em processos de transicao tecnologica em mamografia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furquim, Tania A.C.; Nersissian, Denise Y. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Eletrotecnica e Energia

    2010-07-01

    The introduction of new technologies in mammography may improve image quality; however, it may unnecessarily increase doses if optimization processes are not studied. In this work, radiation doses of the moment of transition of conventional to digital mammography have been analyzed. The presented data have been acquired from 2005 to 2009, in hospitals and clinics of Sao Paulo city, to 4 conventional and 5 digital equipment. The results show that even after optimization processes, new technologies still impart higher doses. Thus, individualized studies are needed when technological transitions occur, in order to maintain image quality without significant dose increase. (author)

  15. Applications of fluorescence lifetime imaging in clinical medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanwen Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence lifetime is not only associated with the molecular structure of fluorophores, but also strongly depends on the environment around them, which allows fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM to be used as a tool for precise measurement of the cell or tissue microenvironment. This review introduces the basic principle of fluorescence lifetime imaging technology and its application in clinical medicine, including research and diagnosis of diseases in skin, brain, eyes, mouth, bone, blood vessels and cavity organs, and drug evaluation. As a noninvasive, nontoxic and nonionizing radiation technique, FLIM demonstrates excellent performance with high sensitivity and specificity, which allows to determine precise position of the lesion and, thus, has good potential for application in biomedical research and clinical diagnosis.

  16. [3D imaging benefits in clinical pratice of orthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frèrejouand, Emmanuel

    2016-12-01

    3D imaging possibilities raised up in the last few years in the orthodontic field. In 2016, it can be used for diagnosis improvement and treatment planning by using digital set up combined to CBCT. It is relevant for orthodontic mechanic updating by creating visible or invisible customised appliances. It forms the basis of numerous scientific researches. The author explains the progress 3D imaging brings to diagnosis and clinics but also highlights the requirements it creates. The daily use of these processes in orthodontic clinical practices needs to be regulated regarding the benefit/risk ratio and the patient satisfaction. The command of the digital work flow created by these technics requires habits modifications from the orthodontist and his staff. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2016.

  17. Clinical and imaging assessment of cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rocca, Maria A; Amato, Maria P; De Stefano, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    In patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), grey matter damage is widespread and might underlie many of the clinical symptoms, especially cognitive impairment. This relation between grey matter damage and cognitive impairment has been lent support by findings from clinical and MRI studies. However......, many aspects of cognitive impairment in patients with MS still need to be characterised. Standardised neuropsychological tests that are easy to administer and sensitive to disease-related abnormalities are needed to gain a better understanding of the factors affecting cognitive performance in patients...... with MS than exists at present. Imaging measures of the grey matter are necessary, but not sufficient to fully characterise cognitive decline in MS. Imaging measures of both lesioned and normal-appearing white matter lend support to the hypothesis of the existence of an underlying disconnection syndrome...

  18. Nuclear Breast Imaging: Clinical Results and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Wendie A

    2016-02-01

    Interest in nuclear breast imaging is increasing because of technical improvements in dedicated devices that allow the use of relatively low doses of radiotracers with high sensitivity for even small breast cancers. For women with newly diagnosed cancer, primary chemotherapy is often recommended, and improved methods of assessing treatment response are of interest. With widespread breast density notification, functional rather than anatomic methods of screening are of increasing interest as well. For a cancer imaging technology to be adopted, several criteria must be met that will be discussed: evidence of clinical benefit with minimal harm, standardized interpretive criteria, direct biopsy guidance, and acceptable cost-effectiveness. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  19. Optimizing Medication Outcomes in Neurocritical Care: Focus on Clinical Pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoney, Denise H; Morbitzer, Kathryn; Hatton-Kolpek, Jimmi

    2016-12-01

    Drug dosing in neurocritically ill patients presents enormous challenges for clinicians due to the complex pathophysiological alterations. These alterations are dynamic both between and within patients. Unpredictable exposure from standard dosing regimens, which were extrapolated to intensive care unit patients from healthy volunteer studies, may influence medication outcomes. Knowledge of potential alterations in pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics in these patients could be applied to maximize the clinical response and minimize adverse effects. Recognizing potential confounding clinical and treatment factors affecting drug response is an important step, but it is not enough. Overcoming absorption and distribution challenges by using specialized formulations and delivery systems is an area of active research. Improved methods for measuring drug concentrations in clinical settings across different matrices are also needed. Even with these advances, defining endogenous mediators signaling drug-target activation is necessary. Identifying biomarkers in disease and changes when a drug has reached its target will be pivotal. This information will improve our understanding of the pharmacogenomic and pharmacokinetic variables affecting pharmacodynamic endpoints across a spectrum of neurologic diseases. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  20. Update on the clinical utility and optimal use of cefditoren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barberán J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available José Barberán,1 Lorenzo Aguilar,2 María-José Giménez21Infectious Diseases Department, Hospital Central de la Defensa Gomez Ulla, 2Microbiology Department, School of Medicine, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, SpainAbstract: This article reviews and updates published data on cefditoren. The in vitro activity of cefditoren and its potential pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic adequacy to cover emerging resistance phenotypes in the present decade is reviewed. Cefditoren's in vitro activity against most prevalent bacterial respiratory pathogens in the community and its pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile suggests a significant role for cefditoren in the treatment of respiratory tract infections. Clinical trials (in acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, community-acquired pneumonia, pharyngotonsillitis, and sinusitis performed during clinical development outside Japan, mainly in adults, are reviewed, together with new clinical studies in the treatment of pharyngotonsillitis, sinusitis, and otitis media in children, mainly in Japan, for efficacy and safety assessment. The results of these studies support the adequacy of cefditoren for the treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract infections with a safety profile similar to previous oral antibiotics. From the data reviewed, it is concluded that cefditoren is an adequate option for the treatment of mild-to-moderate community-acquired respiratory infections, especially in geographical areas with a reported prevalence of phenotypes exhibiting nonsusceptibility to common oral antibiotics.Keywords: acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, community-acquired pneumonia, pharyngotonsillitis, sinusitis, otitis media

  1. Optimization of SPECT-CT Hybrid Imaging Using Iterative Image Reconstruction for Low-Dose CT: A Phantom Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver S Grosser

    Full Text Available Hybrid imaging combines nuclear medicine imaging such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT or positron emission tomography (PET with computed tomography (CT. Through this hybrid design, scanned patients accumulate radiation exposure from both applications. Imaging modalities have been the subject of long-term optimization efforts, focusing on diagnostic applications. It was the aim of this study to investigate the influence of an iterative CT image reconstruction algorithm (ASIR on the image quality of the low-dose CT images.Examinations were performed with a SPECT-CT scanner with standardized CT and SPECT-phantom geometries and CT protocols with systematically reduced X-ray tube currents. Analyses included image quality with respect to photon flux. Results were compared to the standard FBP reconstructed images. The general impact of the CT-based attenuation maps used during SPECT reconstruction was examined for two SPECT phantoms. Using ASIR for image reconstructions, image noise was reduced compared to FBP reconstructions for the same X-ray tube current. The Hounsfield unit (HU values reconstructed by ASIR were correlated to the FBP HU values(R2 ≥ 0.88 and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR was improved by ASIR. However, for a phantom with increased attenuation, the HU values shifted for low X-ray tube currents I ≤ 60 mA (p ≤ 0.04. In addition, the shift of the HU values was observed within the attenuation corrected SPECT images for very low X-ray tube currents (I ≤ 20 mA, p ≤ 0.001.In general, the decrease in X-ray tube current up to 30 mA in combination with ASIR led to a reduction of CT-related radiation exposure without a significant decrease in image quality.

  2. Optimization of SPECT-CT Hybrid Imaging Using Iterative Image Reconstruction for Low-Dose CT: A Phantom Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosser, Oliver S.; Kupitz, Dennis; Ruf, Juri; Czuczwara, Damian; Steffen, Ingo G.; Furth, Christian; Thormann, Markus; Loewenthal, David; Ricke, Jens; Amthauer, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Background Hybrid imaging combines nuclear medicine imaging such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET) with computed tomography (CT). Through this hybrid design, scanned patients accumulate radiation exposure from both applications. Imaging modalities have been the subject of long-term optimization efforts, focusing on diagnostic applications. It was the aim of this study to investigate the influence of an iterative CT image reconstruction algorithm (ASIR) on the image quality of the low-dose CT images. Methodology/Principal Findings Examinations were performed with a SPECT-CT scanner with standardized CT and SPECT-phantom geometries and CT protocols with systematically reduced X-ray tube currents. Analyses included image quality with respect to photon flux. Results were compared to the standard FBP reconstructed images. The general impact of the CT-based attenuation maps used during SPECT reconstruction was examined for two SPECT phantoms. Using ASIR for image reconstructions, image noise was reduced compared to FBP reconstructions for the same X-ray tube current. The Hounsfield unit (HU) values reconstructed by ASIR were correlated to the FBP HU values(R2 ≥ 0.88) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was improved by ASIR. However, for a phantom with increased attenuation, the HU values shifted for low X-ray tube currents I ≤ 60 mA (p ≤ 0.04). In addition, the shift of the HU values was observed within the attenuation corrected SPECT images for very low X-ray tube currents (I ≤ 20 mA, p ≤ 0.001). Conclusion/Significance In general, the decrease in X-ray tube current up to 30 mA in combination with ASIR led to a reduction of CT-related radiation exposure without a significant decrease in image quality. PMID:26390216

  3. Clinical Outcome Metrics for Optimization of Robust Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, D.; Byrne, V. E.; McGuire, K. M.; Hurst, V. W., IV; Kerstman, E. L.; Cole, R. W.; Sargsyan, A. E.; Garcia, K. M.; Reyes, D.; Young, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The emphasis of this research is on the Human Research Program (HRP) Exploration Medical Capability's (ExMC) "Risk of Unacceptable Health and Mission Outcomes Due to Limitations of In-Flight Medical Capabilities." Specifically, this project aims to contribute to the closure of gap ExMC 2.02: We do not know how the inclusion of a physician crew medical officer quantitatively impacts clinical outcomes during exploration missions. The experiments are specifically designed to address clinical outcome differences between physician and non-physician cohorts in both near-term and longer-term (mission impacting) outcomes. Methods: Medical simulations will systematically compare success of individual diagnostic and therapeutic procedure simulations performed by physician and non-physician crew medical officer (CMO) analogs using clearly defined short-term (individual procedure) outcome metrics. In the subsequent step of the project, the procedure simulation outcomes will be used as input to a modified version of the NASA Integrated Medical Model (IMM) to analyze the effect of the outcome (degree of success) of individual procedures (including successful, imperfectly performed, and failed procedures) on overall long-term clinical outcomes and the consequent mission impacts. The procedures to be simulated are endotracheal intubation, fundoscopic examination, kidney/urinary ultrasound, ultrasound-guided intravenous catheter insertion, and a differential diagnosis exercise. Multiple assessment techniques will be used, centered on medical procedure simulation studies occurring at 3, 6, and 12 months after initial training (as depicted in the following flow diagram of the experiment design). Discussion: Analysis of procedure outcomes in the physician and non-physician groups and their subsets (tested at different elapsed times post training) will allow the team to 1) define differences between physician and non-physician CMOs in terms of both procedure performance

  4. Increasing accuracy and precision of digital image correlation through pattern optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomarito, G. F.; Hochhalter, J. D.; Ruggles, T. J.; Cannon, A. H.

    2017-04-01

    The accuracy and precision of digital image correlation (DIC) is based on three primary components: image acquisition, image analysis, and the subject of the image. Focus on the third component, the image subject, has been relatively limited and primarily concerned with comparing pseudo-random surface patterns. In the current work, a strategy is proposed for the creation of optimal DIC patterns. In this strategy, a pattern quality metric is developed as a combination of quality metrics from the literature rather than optimization based on any single one of them. In this way, optimization produces a pattern which balances the benefits of multiple quality metrics. Specifically, sum of square of subset intensity gradients (SSSIG) was found to be the metric most strongly correlated to DIC accuracy and thus is the main component of the newly proposed pattern quality metric. A term related to the secondary auto-correlation peak height is also part of the proposed quality metric which effectively acts as a constraint upon SSSIG ensuring that a regular (e.g., checkerboard-type) pattern is not achieved. The combined pattern quality metric is used to generate a pattern that was on average 11.6% more accurate than a randomly generated pattern in a suite of numerical experiments. Furthermore, physical experiments were performed which confirm that there is indeed improvement of a similar magnitude in DIC measurements for the optimized pattern compared to a random pattern.

  5. l0TV: A Sparse Optimization Method for Impulse Noise Image Restoration

    KAUST Repository

    Yuan, Ganzhao

    2017-12-18

    Total Variation (TV) is an effective and popular prior model in the field of regularization-based image processing. This paper focuses on total variation for removing impulse noise in image restoration. This type of noise frequently arises in data acquisition and transmission due to many reasons, e.g. a faulty sensor or analog-to-digital converter errors. Removing this noise is an important task in image restoration. State-of-the-art methods such as Adaptive Outlier Pursuit(AOP), which is based on TV with l02-norm data fidelity, only give sub-optimal performance. In this paper, we propose a new sparse optimization method, called l0TV-PADMM, which solves the TV-based restoration problem with l0-norm data fidelity. To effectively deal with the resulting non-convex non-smooth optimization problem, we first reformulate it as an equivalent biconvex Mathematical Program with Equilibrium Constraints (MPEC), and then solve it using a proximal Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers (PADMM). Our l0TV-PADMM method finds a desirable solution to the original l0-norm optimization problem and is proven to be convergent under mild conditions. We apply l0TV-PADMM to the problems of image denoising and deblurring in the presence of impulse noise. Our extensive experiments demonstrate that l0TV-PADMM outperforms state-of-the-art image restoration methods.

  6. A High-precision Motion Compensation Method for SAR Based on Image Intensity Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Ke-bin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Owing to the platform instability and precision limitations of motion sensors, motion errors negatively affect the quality of synthetic aperture radar (SAR images. The autofocus Back Projection (BP algorithm based on the optimization of image sharpness compensates for motion errors through phase error estimation. This method can attain relatively good performance, while assuming the same phase error for all pixels, i.e., it ignores the spatial variance of motion errors. To overcome this drawback, a high-precision motion error compensation method is presented in this study. In the proposed method, the Antenna Phase Centers (APC are estimated via optimization using the criterion of maximum image intensity. Then, the estimated APCs are applied for BP imaging. Because the APC estimation equals the range history estimation for each pixel, high-precision phase compensation for every pixel can be achieved. Point-target simulations and processing of experimental data validate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  7. Fusion of remote sensing images based on pyramid decomposition with Baldwinian Clonal Selection Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Haiyan; Xing, Bei; Wang, Lei; Wang, Yanyan

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we put forward a novel fusion method for remote sensing images based on the contrast pyramid (CP) using the Baldwinian Clonal Selection Algorithm (BCSA), referred to as CPBCSA. Compared with classical methods based on the transform domain, the method proposed in this paper adopts an improved heuristic evolutionary algorithm, wherein the clonal selection algorithm includes Baldwinian learning. In the process of image fusion, BCSA automatically adjusts the fusion coefficients of different sub-bands decomposed by CP according to the value of the fitness function. BCSA also adaptively controls the optimal search direction of the coefficients and accelerates the convergence rate of the algorithm. Finally, the fusion images are obtained via weighted integration of the optimal fusion coefficients and CP reconstruction. Our experiments show that the proposed method outperforms existing methods in terms of both visual effect and objective evaluation criteria, and the fused images are more suitable for human visual or machine perception.

  8. Energy-Constrained Quality Optimization for Secure Image Transmission in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Resource allocation for multimedia selective encryption and energy efficient transmission has not been fully investigated in literature for wireless sensor networks (WSNs. In this article, we propose a new cross-layer approach to optimize selectively encrypted image transmission quality in WSNs with strict energy constraint. A new selective image encryption approach favorable for unequal error protection (UEP is proposed, which reduces encryption overhead considerably by controlling the structure of image bitstreams. Also, a novel cross-layer UEP scheme based on cipher-plain-text diversity is studied. In this UEP scheme, resources are unequally and optimally allocated in the encrypted bitstream structure, including data position information and magnitude value information. Simulation studies demonstrate that the proposed approach can simultaneously achieve improved image quality and assured energy efficiency with secure transmissions over WSNs.

  9. Spinal cord ischemia: aetiology, clinical syndromes and imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidauer, Stefan [Frankfurt Univ., Sankt Katharinen Hospital Teaching Hospital, Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Dept. of Neurology; Hattingen, Elke; Berkefeld, Joachim [Frankfurt Univ., Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Inst. of Neuroradiology; Nichtweiss, Michael

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse MR imaging features and lesion patterns as defined by compromised vascular territories, correlating them to different clinical syndromes and aetiological aspects. In a 19.8-year period, clinical records and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of 55 consecutive patients suffering from spinal cord ischemia were evaluated. Aetiologies of infarcts were arteriosclerosis of the aorta and vertebral arteries (23.6 %), aortic surgery or interventional aneurysm repair (11 %) and aortic and vertebral artery dissection (11 %), and in 23.6 %, aetiology remained unclear. Infarcts occurred in 38.2 % at the cervical and thoracic level, respectively, and 49 % of patients suffered from centromedullar syndrome caused by anterior spinal artery ischemia. MRI disclosed hyperintense pencil-like lesion pattern on T2WI in 98.2 %, cord swelling in 40 %, enhancement on post-contrast T1WI in 42.9 % and always hyperintense signal on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) when acquired. The most common clinical feature in spinal cord ischemia is a centromedullar syndrome, and in contrast to anterior spinal artery ischemia, infarcts in the posterior spinal artery territory are rare. The exclusively cervical location of the spinal sulcal artery syndrome seems to be a likely consequence of anterior spinal artery duplication which is observed preferentially here. (orig.)

  10. Optimizing ventilation-perfusion lung scintigraphy: parting with planar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinartz, P.; Schirp, U.; Zimny, M.; Sabri, O.; Nowak, B.; Schaefer, W.; Cremerius, U.; Buell, U. [University Hospital, Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2001-04-01

    Aim of the study was to introduce and verify a ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) acquisition protocol that incorporates new developments in scinitgraphy in order to allow for a more balanced comparison with other diagnostic procedures. Methods: In 103 patients suspect of having pulmonary embolism, V/Q scans were acquired exclusively with SPECT technique. Ventilation was done with ultrafine aerosol. Planar images in eight directions were reconstructed through addition of three consecutive SPECT projections. Three referees examined the scans in regard to type, localization, and extent of V/Q defects. Results: Using this protocol, significantly more defects, especially of subsegmental size, were detected (p<0.01). Sensitivity, and diagnostic accuracy were also significantly improved (p<0.01) to 0.96, and 0.99, respectively. Furthermore, kappa values were increased up to 0.82 - a relevant enhancement in the ability to precisely localize V/Q defects. Conclusion: In conclusion this protocol provides high-resolution tomographic scans as well as high-quality planar images within a short acquisition time. Due to the significant increase in lesion detection, sensitivity, diagnostic accuracy, and anatomical localization of defects, it is a substantial improvement in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism that will put V/Q scintigraphy on a par with other tomographic methods. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Studie ist die Einfuehrung und Evaluierung eines Ventilations-Perfusions-Akquisitionsprotokolles (V/Q), das neue technische Entwicklungen beruecksichtigt und auf diese Weise einen ausgewogeneren Vergleich mit anderen tomographischen Verfahren erlaubt. Methodik: Bei 103 Patienten mit Verdacht auf Lungenembolie wurden V/Q-Akquisitionen ausschliesslich in SPECT-Technik angefertigt. Die Ventilationsstudien erfolgten dabei unter Verwendung eines ultrafeinen Aerosols. Durch Addition von jeweils drei aufeinander folgenden SPECT-Projektionen wurden planare Bilder in acht Ansichten rekonstruiert

  11. [Evaluating the maturity of IT-supported clinical imaging and diagnosis using the Digital Imaging Adoption Model : Are your clinical imaging processes ready for the digital era?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studzinski, J

    2017-06-01

    The Digital Imaging Adoption Model (DIAM) has been jointly developed by HIMSS Analytics and the European Society of Radiology (ESR). It helps evaluate the maturity of IT-supported processes in medical imaging, particularly in radiology. This eight-stage maturity model drives your organisational, strategic and tactical alignment towards imaging-IT planning. The key audience for the model comprises hospitals with imaging centers, as well as external imaging centers that collaborate with hospitals. The assessment focuses on different dimensions relevant to digital imaging, such as software infrastructure and usage, workflow security, clinical documentation and decision support, data exchange and analytical capabilities. With its standardised approach, it enables regional, national and international benchmarking. All DIAM participants receive a structured report that can be used as a basis for presenting, e.g. budget planning and investment decisions at management level.

  12. Contrast Optimization by Metaheuristic for Inclusion Detection in Nonlinear Ultrasound Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girault, Jean-Marc; Ménigot, Sébastien

    In ultrasound imaging, improvements have been made possible by taking into account the harmonic frequencies. However, the transmitted signal often consists of providing empirically pre-set transmit frequencies, even if the medium to be explored should be taken into account during the optimization process. To resolve this waveform optimization, transmission of stochastic sequences were proposed combined with a genetic algorithm. A medium with an inclusion was compared in term of contrast to a reference medium without defect. Two media were distinguished thanks an Euclidean distance. In simulation, the optimal distance could be multiplied by 4 in comparison with an usual excitation.

  13. Learning optimal spatially-dependent regularization parameters in total variation image denoising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Chung, Cao; De los Reyes, J. C.; Schönlieb, C. B.

    2017-07-01

    We consider a bilevel optimization approach in function space for the choice of spatially dependent regularization parameters in TV image denoising models. First- and second-order optimality conditions for the bilevel problem are studied when the spatially-dependent parameter belongs to the Sobolev space {{H}1}≤ft(Ω \\right) . A combined Schwarz domain decomposition-semismooth Newton method is proposed for the solution of the full optimality system and local superlinear convergence of the semismooth Newton method is verified. Exhaustive numerical computations are finally carried out to show the suitability of the approach.

  14. Optimization of Monochromated TEM for Ultimate Resolution Imaging and Ultrahigh Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Lopatin, Sergei

    2017-09-01

    The performance of a monochromated transmission electron microscope with Wien type monochromator is optimized to achieve an extremely narrow energy spread of electron beam and an ultrahigh energy resolution with spectroscopy. The energy spread in the beam is improved by almost an order of magnitude as compared to specified values. The optimization involves both the monochromator and the electron energy loss detection system. We demonstrate boosted capability of optimized systems with respect to ultra-low loss EELS and sub-angstrom resolution imaging (in a combination with spherical aberration correction).

  15. First-order Convex Optimization Methods for Signal and Image Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis we investigate the use of first-order convex optimization methods applied to problems in signal and image processing. First we make a general introduction to convex optimization, first-order methods and their iteration complexity. Then we look at different techniques, which can...... be used with first-order methods such as smoothing, Lagrange multipliers and proximal gradient methods. We continue by presenting different applications of convex optimization and notable convex formulations with an emphasis on inverse problems and sparse signal processing. We also describe the multiple...

  16. Sparse Contribution Feature Selection and Classifiers Optimized by Concave-Convex Variation for HCC Image Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Wenbo; Jiang, Huiyan; Li, Siqi

    2017-01-01

    Accurate classification of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) image is of great importance in pathology diagnosis and treatment. This paper proposes a concave-convex variation (CCV) method to optimize three classifiers (random forest, support vector machine, and extreme learning machine) for the more accurate HCC image classification results. First, in preprocessing stage, hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) pathological images are enhanced using bilateral filter and each HCC image patch is obtained under the guidance of pathologists. Then, after extracting the complete features of each patch, a new sparse contribution (SC) feature selection model is established to select the beneficial features for each classifier. Finally, a concave-convex variation method is developed to improve the performance of classifiers. Experiments using 1260 HCC image patches demonstrate that our proposed CCV classifiers have improved greatly compared to each original classifier and CCV-random forest (CCV-RF) performs the best for HCC image recognition.

  17. Application of digital image quality criteria to optimize the confocal microscope setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriete, Andres

    1994-04-01

    This paper discusses how digital image quality criteria help to optimize image quality, in particular for applications in laser scanning microscopy. Image quality considerations offer a uniform description of the available transfer characteristics, which are summed up and weighted properly to finally represent the system by a single number. In the spatial domain we can measure sharpness and contrast of the (digital) volumes by analyzing intensities and their local dependencies in a statistical fashion. This includes sum modulus difference, gray level variance, and lateral inhibition. Based on information theory, the criterion volume fidelity takes into account the knowledge of the spatial structure of a test object and compares the intensities with those present in the final digital image. Applications presented here include measurement of image quality improvement when going from non-confocal to confocal imaging, testing of new confocal system designs and the evaluation of digital post-processing methods. Limitations in the presence of noise are discussed.

  18. An object localization optimization technique in medical images using plant growth simulation algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharjee, Deblina; Paul, Anand; Kim, Jeong Hong; Kim, Mucheol

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of leukocyte images has drawn interest from fields of both medicine and computer vision for quite some time where different techniques have been applied to automate the process of manual analysis and classification of such images. Manual analysis of blood samples to identify leukocytes is time-consuming and susceptible to error due to the different morphological features of the cells.?In this article, the nature-inspired plant growth simulation algorithm has been applied to optim...

  19. Clinical value of imaging techniques in childhood osteomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, S.; Jorulf, H. [Karolinska Hospital, Astrid Lindgren Children`s Hospital, Dept. of Pediatric Radiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Hirsch, G. [Karolinska Hospital, Astrid Lindgren Children`s Hospital, Dept. of Pediatric Surgery, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1998-09-01

    Purpose: The traditional approach to investigating suspected osteomyelitis in children includes conventional radiography and bone scintigraphy. The roles of US, CT and MR imaging are controversial. Our objective was to determine whether the additional use of these modalities would yield information likely to lead to treatment modification. Material and Methods: Sixty-five children with clinically suspected osteomyelitis took part in a prospective study. All patients underwent conventional radiography and bone scintigraphy. In addition to this, US, CT and MR imaging were all performed in 33 patients; the remaining 32 patients were examined with various combinations of these three modalities. The value of the additional information obtained was estimated retrospectively by a pediatric orthopedic surgeon in terms of possible modification of treatment. Results: MR imaging was the modality with the highest sensitivity and specificity for detecting osteomyelitis. MR yielded information likely to influence treatment in the greatest proportion of patients (45%) followed by US (30%). Conclusion: The standard investigation protocol with the addition of US (because of its ability to detect subperiosteal abscesses early and simply) is adequate in uncomplicated cases. When additional imaging is required to outline a lesion, or in complicated cases, and when bone scintigraphy is inconclusive, MR imaging should also be performed. CT should be considered when MR investigation is not available or when anesthesia is required but cannot be provided. (orig.)

  20. The image schema and innate archetypes: theoretical and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, John

    2016-02-01

    Based in contemporary neuroscience, Jean Knox's 2004 JAP paper 'From archetypes to reflective function' honed her position on image schemas, thereby introducing a model for archetypes which sees them as 'reliably repeated early developmental achievements' and not as genetically inherited, innate psychic structures. The image schema model is used to illustrate how the analyst worked with a patient who began life as an unwanted pregnancy, was adopted at birth and as an adult experienced profound synchronicities, paranormal/telepathic phenomena and visions. The classical approach to such phenomena would see the intense affectivity arising out of a ruptured symbiotic mother-infant relationship constellating certain archetypes which set up the patient's visions. This view is contrasted with Knox's model which sees the archetype an sich as a developmentally produced image schema underpinning the emergence of later imagery. The patient's visions can then be understood to arise from his psychoid body memory related to his traumatic conception and birth. The contemporary neuroscience which supports this view is outlined and a subsequent image schema explanation is presented. Clinically, the case material suggests that a pre-birth perspective needs to be explored in all analytic work. Other implications of Knox's image schema model are summarized. © 2016, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  1. New technology of functional infrared imaging and its clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongqin; Xie, Shusen; Lu, Zukang; Liu, Zhongqi

    2006-01-01

    With improvements in infrared camera technology, the promise of reduced costs and noninvasive character, infrared thermal imaging resurges in medicine. The paper introduces a new technology of functional infrared imaging, thermal texture maps (TTM), which is not only an apparatus for thermal radiation imaging but also a new method for revealing the relationship between the temperature distribution of the skin surface and the emission field inside body. The skin temperature distribution of a healthy human body exhibits a contralateral symmetry. Any disease in the body is associated with an alteration of the thermal distribution of human body. Infrared thermography is noninvasive, so it is the best choice for studying the physiology of thermoregulation and the thermal dysfunction associated with diseases. Reading and extracting information from the thermograms is a complex and subjective task that can be greatly facilitated by computerized techniques. Through image processing and measurement technology, surface or internal radiation sources can be non-invasively distinguished through extrapolation. We discuss the principle, the evaluation procedure and the effectiveness of TTM technology in the clinical detection and diagnosis of cancers, especially in their early stages and other diseases by comparing with other imaging technologies, such as ultrasound. Several study cases are given to show the effectiveness of this method. At last, we point out the applications of TTM technology in the research field of traditional medicine.

  2. Optimization of image process parameters through factorial experiments using a flat panel detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrman, Eva; Geijer, Håkan; Persliden, Jan

    2007-09-07

    In the optimization process of lumbar spine examinations, factorial experiments were performed addressing the question of whether the effective dose can be reduced and the image quality maintained by adjusting the image processing parameters. A 2k-factorial design was used which is a systematic and effective method of investigating the influence of many parameters on a result variable. Radiographic images of a Contrast Detail phantom were exposed using the default settings of the process parameters for lumbar spine examinations. The image was processed using different settings of the process parameters. The parameters studied were ROI density, gamma, detail contrast enhancement (DCE), noise compensation, unsharp masking and unsharp masking kernel (UMK). The images were computer analysed and an image quality figure (IQF) was calculated and used as a measurement of the image quality. The parameters with the largest influence on image quality were noise compensation, unsharp masking, unsharp masking kernel and detail contrast enhancement. There was an interaction between unsharp masking and kernel indicating that increasing the unsharp masking improved the image quality when combined with a large kernel size. Combined with a small kernel size however the unsharp masking had a deteriorating effect. Performing a factorial experiment gave an overview of how the image quality was influenced by image processing. By adjusting the level of noise compensation, unsharp masking and kernel, the IQF was improved to a 30% lower effective dose.

  3. Endoneurosonography: technique and equipment, anatomy and imaging, and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resch, Klaus D M; Schroeder, H W S

    2007-09-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of transendoscopic ultrasound in neurosurgery, we studied two new sonoprobes measuring 6 and 8 French in diameter in 20 fresh specimens. The application and indication are discussed in the first clinical series of 75 patients. Sonocatheters (ALOKA, Meerbusch, Germany) 1.9 mm (6 French) and 2.4 mm (8 French) in diameter were introduced into the working channel of an endoscope. The preparations were done in nonfixed skulls in a surgical simulation-setting laboratory. Based on these experiences with imaging possibilities, intraoperative transendoscopic ultrasound was applied in 75 patients and a variety of lesions. It was used for imaging (41 patients), targeting (18 patients), and neuronavigation (16 patients) in neuroendoscopy. The sonoprobe adds a transverse scan at the tip of the probe to the anterior endoscopic view. This axial scan to the longitudinal axis of the endoscope is geometrically comparable with radar scanning. Three probes working with 10, 15, and 20 MHz were used, resulting in a short penetration with a radius of 3 cm. The orthogonal scanning plane had limitations, which were documented. We observed precise imaging of well known anatomic structures and, moreover, achieved an additional dimension in endoscopy. The axial scan presents the anatomic landmarks like a map at the tip of the endoscope where the endoscope is represented as a spot. The real-time imaging and representation of the tip of the endoscope showed a capacity for navigation. This preclinical study rectified clinical application. The real-time imaging of this technique showed the ability of the navigation of endoscopes to detect more overall movements, such as blood flow or change of ventricle size during endoscopy. The primary benefit in this first clinical series was witnessed in difficult endoscopy cases and complex lesions, but benefit was also observed in cases in which vision through the endoscope alone was obscured. The main limitation was the result of

  4. Wavelet sparse transform optimization in image reconstruction based on compressed sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziran, Wei; Huachuang, Wang; Jianlin, Zhang

    2017-06-01

    The high image sparsity is very important to improve the accuracy of compressed sensing reconstruction image, and the wavelet transform can make the image sparse obviously. This paper is the optimization method based on wavelet sparse transform in image reconstruction based on compressed sensing, and we have designed a restraining matrix to optimize the wavelet sparse transform. Firstly, the wavelet coefficients are obtained by wavelet transform of the original signal data, and the wavelet coefficients have a tendency of decreasing gradually. The restraining matrix is used to restrain the small coefficients and is a part of image sparse transform, so as to make the wavelet coefficients more sparse. When the sampling rate is between 0. 15 and 0. 45, the simulation results show that the quality promotion of the reconstructed image is the best, and the peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR) is increased by about 0.5dB to 1dB. At the same time, it is more obvious to improve the reconstruction accuracy of the fingerprint texture image, which to some extent makes up for the shortcomings that reconstruction of texture image by compressed sensing based on the wavelet transform has the low accuracy.

  5. Optimized SIFTFlow for registration of whole-mount histology to reference optical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaii, Rushin; Martel, Anne L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. The registration of two-dimensional histology images to reference images from other modalities is an important preprocessing step in the reconstruction of three-dimensional histology volumes. This is a challenging problem because of the differences in the appearances of histology images and other modalities, and the presence of large nonrigid deformations which occur during slide preparation. This paper shows the feasibility of using densely sampled scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) features and a SIFTFlow deformable registration algorithm for coregistering whole-mount histology images with blockface optical images. We present a method for jointly optimizing the regularization parameters used by the SIFTFlow objective function and use it to determine the most appropriate values for the registration of breast lumpectomy specimens. We demonstrate that tuning the regularization parameters results in significant improvements in accuracy and we also show that SIFTFlow outperforms a previously described edge-based registration method. The accuracy of the histology images to blockface images registration using the optimized SIFTFlow method was assessed using an independent test set of images from five different lumpectomy specimens and the mean registration error was 0.32±0.22  mm. PMID:27774494

  6. An optimized color transformation for the analysis of digital images of hematoxylin & eosin stained slides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarella, Mark D; Breen, David E; Plagov, Andrei; Garcia, Fernando U

    2015-01-01

    Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining is ubiquitous in pathology practice and research. As digital pathology has evolved, the reliance of quantitative methods that make use of H&E images has similarly expanded. For example, cell counting and nuclear morphometry rely on the accurate demarcation of nuclei from other structures and each other. One of the major obstacles to quantitative analysis of H&E images is the high degree of variability observed between different samples and different laboratories. In an effort to characterize this variability, as well as to provide a substrate that can potentially mitigate this factor in quantitative image analysis, we developed a technique to project H&E images into an optimized space more appropriate for many image analysis procedures. We used a decision tree-based support vector machine learning algorithm to classify 44 H&E stained whole slide images of resected breast tumors according to the histological structures that are present. This procedure takes an H&E image as an input and produces a classification map of the image that predicts the likelihood of a pixel belonging to any one of a set of user-defined structures (e.g., cytoplasm, stroma). By reducing these maps into their constituent pixels in color space, an optimal reference vector is obtained for each structure, which identifies the color attributes that maximally distinguish one structure from other elements in the image. We show that tissue structures can be identified using this semi-automated technique. By comparing structure centroids across different images, we obtained a quantitative depiction of H&E variability for each structure. This measurement can potentially be utilized in the laboratory to help calibrate daily staining or identify troublesome slides. Moreover, by aligning reference vectors derived from this technique, images can be transformed in a way that standardizes their color properties and makes them more amenable to image processing.

  7. An optimized color transformation for the analysis of digital images of hematoxylin & eosin stained slides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D Zarella

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E staining is ubiquitous in pathology practice and research. As digital pathology has evolved, the reliance of quantitative methods that make use of H&E images has similarly expanded. For example, cell counting and nuclear morphometry rely on the accurate demarcation of nuclei from other structures and each other. One of the major obstacles to quantitative analysis of H&E images is the high degree of variability observed between different samples and different laboratories. In an effort to characterize this variability, as well as to provide a substrate that can potentially mitigate this factor in quantitative image analysis, we developed a technique to project H&E images into an optimized space more appropriate for many image analysis procedures. We used a decision tree-based support vector machine learning algorithm to classify 44 H&E stained whole slide images of resected breast tumors according to the histological structures that are present. This procedure takes an H&E image as an input and produces a classification map of the image that predicts the likelihood of a pixel belonging to any one of a set of user-defined structures (e.g., cytoplasm, stroma. By reducing these maps into their constituent pixels in color space, an optimal reference vector is obtained for each structure, which identifies the color attributes that maximally distinguish one structure from other elements in the image. We show that tissue structures can be identified using this semi-automated technique. By comparing structure centroids across different images, we obtained a quantitative depiction of H&E variability for each structure. This measurement can potentially be utilized in the laboratory to help calibrate daily staining or identify troublesome slides. Moreover, by aligning reference vectors derived from this technique, images can be transformed in a way that standardizes their color properties and makes them more amenable to image

  8. Infrared and visible image fusion based on visual saliency map and weighted least square optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jinlei; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Wang, Bo; Zong, Hua

    2017-05-01

    The goal of infrared (IR) and visible image fusion is to produce a more informative image for human observation or some other computer vision tasks. In this paper, we propose a novel multi-scale fusion method based on visual saliency map (VSM) and weighted least square (WLS) optimization, aiming to overcome some common deficiencies of conventional methods. Firstly, we introduce a multi-scale decomposition (MSD) using the rolling guidance filter (RGF) and Gaussian filter to decompose input images into base and detail layers. Compared with conventional MSDs, this MSD can achieve the unique property of preserving the information of specific scales and reducing halos near edges. Secondly, we argue that the base layers obtained by most MSDs would contain a certain amount of residual low-frequency information, which is important for controlling the contrast and overall visual appearance of the fused image, and the conventional "averaging" fusion scheme is unable to achieve desired effects. To address this problem, an improved VSM-based technique is proposed to fuse the base layers. Lastly, a novel WLS optimization scheme is proposed to fuse the detail layers. This optimization aims to transfer more visual details and less irrelevant IR details or noise into the fused image. As a result, the fused image details would appear more naturally and be suitable for human visual perception. Experimental results demonstrate that our method can achieve a superior performance compared with other fusion methods in both subjective and objective assessments.

  9. Images of deep neck space infection and the clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Gao, Bu-Lang; Xu, Guo-Ping; Xiang, Cheng

    2014-10-01

    Deep neck infection is not difficult to diagnose clinically, but correct localization of the involved space for timely incision and drainage is not easy without assistance of imaging. To investigate the images of deep neck space infection of phlegmon and abscess and the role of imaging examination in correct localization and treatment. Between June 2004 and June 2010, 28 patients were diagnosed with deep neck infection (14 men, 14 women; age range, 17-72 years; mean age, 46 years). Clinical presentations included neck swelling, pain, dysphagia, fever, and elevated white blood cell count. Of the 28 cases, 20 had computed tomography (CT) scans, 18 had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations, and 10 had both CT and MRI. All 28 patients were confirmed by CT and/or MRI to have deep neck infection, with 11 cases in the retropharyngeal space, five in the parapharyngeal space, four in the masseteric space, and eight in multiple spaces. Thirteen cases had abscesses that were successfully treated with incision and drainage under CT guidance in combination with large doses of antibiotics, and 15 had phlegmon managed with large doses of antibiotics. Followed up for 5-20 months, all patients recovered completely. Two patients were confirmed by imaging examination to have retropharyngeal infection spreading to the superior mediastinum with abscess formation and another two patients had multiple space infection because inappropriate puncture or incision for drainage without imaging guidance in these patients caused the spread of infection. Clinical diagnosis was not accurate with only 12 patients (42.9%) being correctly diagnosed of the exact deep neck space involved before imaging confirmation. CT and/or MRI made the correct diagnosis in all 28 patients. CT and/or MRI also directly changed the treatment plan in seven patients and contributed to the recovery of these patients. CT and MRI play a crucial role in both the diagnosis and correct puncture and incision for

  10. [Diagnostic imaging in dementia: use of imaging modalities in Dutch memory clinics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardeniers, Mayke; Wattjes, Mike P; Meulen, Etienne F J; Barkhof, Frederik; Bakker, Jeannette

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the use of MRI and CT in the diagnostic work-up of dementia in Dutch memory clinics, and to analyse the rationale for choosing each modality. A digital survey was sent by e-mail to all medical specialists (n=235) working at a memory clinic in the Netherlands. The survey was completed by 64% (151). 85% of the respondents were geriatricians, 13% neurologists and 2% other, working at a total of 69 clinics. 40% variably orders CT or MRI, 37% orders MRI, 19% CT, and 4% CT plus MRI. Primary factors influencing this choice are: MRI contraindications, physical limitations, age, vascular or oncological medical history, and waiting time. With CT, 87% indicates information is lacking: vascular disease/white matter lesions, (hippocampal) atrophy, and specific pathologies (metastases, amyloid angiopathy). Furthermore, respondents prefer MRI because they can assess the images more easily themselves. Only 50% of respondents indicate that CT protocol dictates coronal reconstructions. Additionally, these reconstructions are not provided consistently. Rating-scales are used to describe images in 5%. In 75% assessment is not uniform. MRI is preferred over CT in diagnostic imaging of dementia, in accordance with existing guidelines. However, these guidelines are mostly out-dated and modern multislice CT potential is relatively unknown among geriatricians. In memory clinics, multislice CT could offer a well suitable imaging alternative, but only if multiplanar reconstructions are performed consistently. Furthermore, radiology reports need to be improved by using more standardized assessment.

  11. An optimized image analysis algorithm for detecting nuclear signals in digital whole slides for histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulik, Róbert; Micsik, Tamás; Kiszler, Gábor; Kaszál, Péter; Székely, János; Paulik, Norbert; Várhalmi, Eszter; Prémusz, Viktória; Krenács, Tibor; Molnár, Béla

    2017-06-01

    Nuclear estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and Ki-67 protein positive tumor cell fractions are semiquantitatively assessed in breast cancer for prognostic and predictive purposes. These biomarkers are usually revealed using immunoperoxidase methods resulting in diverse signal intensity and frequent inhomogeneity in tumor cell nuclei, which are routinely scored and interpreted by a pathologist during conventional light-microscopic examination. In the last decade digital pathology-based whole slide scanning and image analysis algorithms have shown tremendous development to support pathologists in this diagnostic process, which can directly influence patient selection for targeted- and chemotherapy. We have developed an image analysis algorithm optimized for whole slide quantification of nuclear immunostaining signals of ER, PR, and Ki-67 proteins in breast cancers. In this study, we tested the consistency and reliability of this system both in a series of brightfield and DAPI stained fluorescent samples. Our method allows the separation of overlapping cells and signals, reliable detection of vesicular nuclei and background compensation, especially in FISH stained slides. Detection accuracy and the processing speeds were validated in routinely immunostained breast cancer samples of varying reaction intensities and image qualities. Our technique supported automated nuclear signal detection with excellent efficacy: Precision Rate/Positive Predictive Value was 90.23 ± 4.29%, while Recall Rate/Sensitivity was 88.23 ± 4.84%. These factors and average counting speed of our algorithm were compared with two other open source applications (QuPath and CellProfiler) and resulted in 6-7% higher Recall Rate, while 4- to 30-fold higher processing speed. In conclusion, our image analysis algorithm can reliably detect and count nuclear signals in digital whole slides or any selected large areas i.e. hot spots, thus can support pathologists in assessing

  12. Hypothalamic hamartomas: optimal approach to clinical evaluation and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilfong, Angus A; Curry, Daniel J

    2013-12-01

    Hypothalamic hamartomas (HHs) present a difficult medical problem, manifested by gelastic seizures, which are often medically intractable. Although existing techniques offer modest surgical outcomes with the potential for significant morbidity, the relatively novel technique of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided stereotactic laser ablation (SLA) offers a potentially safer, minimally invasive method with high efficacy for the HH treatment. We report here on 14 patients with medically refractory gelastic epilepsy who underwent stereotactic frame-based placement of an MR-compatible laser catheter (1.6 mm diameter) through a 3.2-mm twist drill hole. A U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-cleared laser surgery system (Visualase, Inc.) was utilized to ablate the HH, using real-time MRI thermometry. Seizure freedom was obtained in 12 (86%) of 14 cases, with mean follow-up of 9 months. There were no permanent surgical complications, neurologic deficits, or neuroendocrine disturbances. One patient had a minor subarachnoid hemorrhage that was asymptomatic. Most patients were discharged home within 1 day. SLA was demonstrated to be a safe and effective minimally invasive tool in the ablation of epileptogenic HH. Because use of SLA for HH is being adopted by other medical centers, further data will be acquired to help treat this difficult disorder. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  13. Imaging vascular function for early stage clinical trials using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, M.O.; Orton, M. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Cancer Research UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Morgan, B. [Univ. of Leicester, College of Medicine, Biological Sciences and Psychology, Leicester (United Kingdom); Tofts, P.S. [Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Univ. of Sussex, Clinical Imaging Sciences Centre, Sussex (United Kingdom); Buckley, D.L. [University of Leeds, Division of Medical Physics, Leeds (United Kingdom); Huang, W. [Oregon Health and Science Univ., Advanced Imaging Research Centre, Portland, OR (United States); Horsfield, M.A. [Medical Physics Section, Leicester Royal Infirmary, Dept. of Cardiovascular Sciences, Leicester (United Kingdom); Chenevert, T.L. [Univ. of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Collins, D.J. [Royal Marsden Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Cancer Research UK and EPSRC Cancer Imaging Centre, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Jackson, A. [Univ. of Manchester, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, Withington, Manchester, M20 3LJ (United Kingdom); Lomas, D. [Univ. of Cambridge, Dept. of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Whitcher, B. [Unit 2 Greenways Business Park, Mango Solutions, Chippenham (United Kingdom); Clarke, L. [Cancer Imaging Program, Imaging Technology Development Branch, Rockville, MD (United States); Plummer, R. [Univ. of Newcastle Upon Tyne, The Medical School, Medical Oncology, Northern Inst. for Cancer Research, Newcastle Upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Judson, I. [Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Jones, R. [Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Alonzi, R. [Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Northwood (United Kingdom); Brunner, T. [Gray Inst. for Radiation, Oncology and Biology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Koh, D.M. [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Diagnostic Radiology, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)] [and others

    2012-07-15

    Many therapeutic approaches to cancer affect the tumour vasculature, either indirectly or as a direct target. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has become an important means of investigating this action, both pre-clinically and in early stage clinical trials. For such trials, it is essential that the measurement process (i.e. image acquisition and analysis) can be performed effectively and with consistency among contributing centres. As the technique continues to develop in order to provide potential improvements in sensitivity and physiological relevance, there is considerable scope for between-centre variation in techniques. A workshop was convened by the Imaging Committee of the Experimental Cancer Medicine Centres (ECMC) to review the current status of DCE-MRI and to provide recommendations on how the technique can best be used for early stage trials. This review and the consequent recommendations are summarised here. (orig.)

  14. Optimization of dose and image quality in adult and pediatric computed tomography scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kwo-Ping; Hsu, Tzu-Kun; Lin, Wei-Ting; Hsu, Wen-Lin

    2017-11-01

    Exploration to maximize CT image and reduce radiation dose was conducted while controlling for multiple factors. The kVp, mAs, and iteration reconstruction (IR), affect the CT image quality and radiation dose absorbed. The optimal protocols (kVp, mAs, IR) are derived by figure of merit (FOM) based on CT image quality (CNR) and CT dose index (CTDIvol). CT image quality metrics such as CT number accuracy, SNR, low contrast materials' CNR and line pair resolution were also analyzed as auxiliary assessments. CT protocols were carried out with an ACR accreditation phantom and a five-year-old pediatric head phantom. The threshold values of the adult CT scan parameters, 100 kVp and 150 mAs, were determined from the CT number test and line pairs in ACR phantom module 1and module 4 respectively. The findings of this study suggest that the optimal scanning parameters for adults be set at 100 kVp and 150-250 mAs. However, for improved low- contrast resolution, 120 kVp and 150-250 mAs are optimal. Optimal settings for pediatric head CT scan were 80 kVp/50 mAs, for maxillary sinus and brain stem, while 80 kVp /300 mAs for temporal bone. SNR is not reliable as the independent image parameter nor the metric for determining optimal CT scan parameters. The iteration reconstruction (IR) approach is strongly recommended for both adult and pediatric CT scanning as it markedly improves image quality without affecting radiation dose.

  15. Clinical epidemiology of premenstrual disorder: informing optimized patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson LLL

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lynne LL Robinson,1 Khaled MK Ismail1,21Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Birmingham Women’s Hospital, Birmingham, UK; 2Birmingham Centre for Women’s and Children’s Health, School of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UKAbstract: Premenstrual disorders encompass a spectrum that ranges from mild cyclical psychological and somatic symptoms to the rarer but much-more-severe premenstrual dysphoric disorder. This condition is serious and the etiology is unclear, but possible causes include genetic factors, hormonal fluctuations, and neurotransmitter dysfunctions. Differentiation from other affective disorders can be difficult but is key to providing appropriate management. This comprehensive review will discuss the most-recent classification of premenstrual disorders, etiology, diagnosis, and potential current management strategies.Keywords: premenstrual dysphoric disorder, progesterone, oestrogen, oophrectomy, GNRH analogues

  16. 'Ready-access' CT imaging for an orthopaedic trauma clinic.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cawley, D

    2011-03-01

    \\'Ready-Access\\' to CT imaging facilities in Orthopaedic Trauma Clinics is not a standard facility. This facility has been available at the regional trauma unit, in Merlin Park Hospital, Galway for the past four years. We reviewed the use of this facility over a 2-year period when 100 patients had CT scans as part of their trauma clinic assessment. The rate of CT scan per clinic was 0.6. The mean waiting time for a CT scan was 30 minutes. 20 (20%) new fractures were confirmed, 33 (33%) fractures were out-ruled, 25 (25%) fractures demonstrated additional information and 8 (8%) had additional fractures. 20 (20%) patients were discharged and 12 (12%) patients were admitted as a result of the CT scan. It adds little time and cost to CT scanning lists.

  17. Automatic multimodal 2D/3D breast image registration using biomechanical FEM models and intensity-based optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, T; Dietzel, M; Baltzer, P A; Kreisel, P; Kaiser, W A; Gemmeke, H; Ruiter, N V

    2013-02-01

    Due to their different physical origin, X-ray mammography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provide complementary diagnostic information. However, the correlation of their images is challenging due to differences in dimensionality, patient positioning and compression state of the breast. Our automated registration takes over part of the correlation task. The registration method is based on a biomechanical finite element model, which is used to simulate mammographic compression. The deformed MRI volume can be compared directly with the corresponding mammogram. The registration accuracy is determined by a number of patient-specific parameters. We optimize these parameters--e.g. breast rotation--using image similarity measures. The method was evaluated on 79 datasets from clinical routine. The mean target registration error was 13.2mm in a fully automated setting. On basis of our results, we conclude that a completely automated registration of volume images with 2D mammograms is feasible. The registration accuracy is within the clinically relevant range and thus beneficial for multimodal diagnosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Proper Image Subtraction—Optimal Transient Detection, Photometry, and Hypothesis Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zackay, Barak; Ofek, Eran O.; Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2016-10-01

    Transient detection and flux measurement via image subtraction stand at the base of time domain astronomy. Due to the varying seeing conditions, the image subtraction process is non-trivial, and existing solutions suffer from a variety of problems. Starting from basic statistical principles, we develop the optimal statistic for transient detection, flux measurement, and any image-difference hypothesis testing. We derive a closed-form statistic that: (1) is mathematically proven to be the optimal transient detection statistic in the limit of background-dominated noise, (2) is numerically stable, (3) for accurately registered, adequately sampled images, does not leave subtraction or deconvolution artifacts, (4) allows automatic transient detection to the theoretical sensitivity limit by providing credible detection significance, (5) has uncorrelated white noise, (6) is a sufficient statistic for any further statistical test on the difference image, and, in particular, allows us to distinguish particle hits and other image artifacts from real transients, (7) is symmetric to the exchange of the new and reference images, (8) is at least an order of magnitude faster to compute than some popular methods, and (9) is straightforward to implement. Furthermore, we present extensions of this method that make it resilient to registration errors, color-refraction errors, and any noise source that can be modeled. In addition, we show that the optimal way to prepare a reference image is the proper image coaddition presented in Zackay & Ofek. We demonstrate this method on simulated data and real observations from the PTF data release 2. We provide an implementation of this algorithm in MATLAB and Python.

  19. A practical cone-beam CT scatter correction method with optimized Monte Carlo simulations for image-guided radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuan; Bai, Ti; Yan, Hao; Ouyang, Luo; Pompos, Arnold; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Linghong; Jiang, Steve B.; Jia, Xun

    2015-05-01

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) has become the standard image guidance tool for patient setup in image-guided radiation therapy. However, due to its large illumination field, scattered photons severely degrade its image quality. While kernel-based scatter correction methods have been used routinely in the clinic, it is still desirable to develop Monte Carlo (MC) simulation-based methods due to their accuracy. However, the high computational burden of the MC method has prevented routine clinical application. This paper reports our recent development of a practical method of MC-based scatter estimation and removal for CBCT. In contrast with conventional MC approaches that estimate scatter signals using a scatter-contaminated CBCT image, our method used a planning CT image for MC simulation, which has the advantages of accurate image intensity and absence of image truncation. In our method, the planning CT was first rigidly registered with the CBCT. Scatter signals were then estimated via MC simulation. After scatter signals were removed from the raw CBCT projections, a corrected CBCT image was reconstructed. The entire workflow was implemented on a GPU platform for high computational efficiency. Strategies such as projection denoising, CT image downsampling, and interpolation along the angular direction were employed to further enhance the calculation speed. We studied the impact of key parameters in the workflow on the resulting accuracy and efficiency, based on which the optimal parameter values were determined. Our method was evaluated in numerical simulation, phantom, and real patient cases. In the simulation cases, our method reduced mean HU errors from 44 to 3 HU and from 78 to 9 HU in the full-fan and the half-fan cases, respectively. In both the phantom and the patient cases, image artifacts caused by scatter, such as ring artifacts around the bowtie area, were reduced. With all the techniques employed, we achieved computation time of less than 30 s including the

  20. MR imaging of the ankle at 3 Tesla and 1.5 Tesla: protocol optimization and application to cartilage, ligament and tendon pathology in cadaver specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, Cameron; Malfair, David; Henning, Tobias D.; Steinbach, Lynne; Link, Thomas M. [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Bauer, Jan S. [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Ma, Benjamin [University of California San Francisco, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2007-06-15

    The objective of this study was to optimize ankle joint MR imaging in volunteers at 1.5 Tesla (T) and 3.0 T, and to compare these optimized sequences concerning image quality and performance in assessing cartilage, ligament and tendon pathology in fresh human cadaver specimens. Initially our clinical ankle protocol consisting of T1-weighted (-w), fat-saturated (fs) T2-w, and short {tau} inversion-recovery fast spinecho (FSE) sequences was optimized at 1.5 T and 3.0 T by two radiologists. For dedicated cartilage imaging, fs-intermediate (IM)-w FSE, fs spoiled gradient echo, and balanced free-precession steady-state sequences were optimized. Using the optimized sequences, thirteen cadaver ankle joints were imaged. Four radiologists independently assessed these images concerning image quality and pathology. All radiologists consistently rated image quality higher at 3.0 T (all sequences p<0.05). For detecting cartilage pathology, diagnostic performance was significantly higher at 3.0 T (ROC-values up to 0.93 vs. 0.77; p<0.05); the fs-IM FSE sequence showed highest values among the different sequences. Average sensitivity for detecting tendon pathology was 63% at 3.0 T vs. 41% at 1.5 T and was significantly higher at 3.0 T for 2 out of 4 radiologists (p<0.05). Compared to 1.5 T, imaging of the ankle joint at 3.0 T significantly improved image quality and diagnostic performance in assessing cartilage pathology. (orig.)

  1. ACCF/AHA/HRS/SCAI clinical competence statement on physician knowledge to optimize patient safety and image quality in fluoroscopically guided invasive cardiovascular procedures. A report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association/American College of Physicians Task Force on Clinical Competence and Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hirshfeld, Jr, John W; Balter, Stephen; Brinker, Jeffrey A; Kern, Morton J; Klein, Lloyd W; Lindsay, Bruce D; Tommaso, Carl L; Tracy, Cynthia M; Wagner, Louis K; Creager, Mark A; Elnicki, Michael; Lorell, Beverly H; Rodgers, George P; Weitz, Howard H

    2004-01-01

    ...) Task Force on Clinical Competence was formed in 1998 to develop recommendations for attaining and maintaining the cognitive and technical skills necessary for the competent performance of a specific...

  2. Methylphenidate dose optimization for ADHD treatment: review of safety, efficacy, and clinical necessity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, Michael; Duhan, Praveen; Gandhi, Preetam; Chen, Chien-Wei; Spannhuth, Carsten; Kumar, Vinod

    2017-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a chronic psychiatric disorder characterized by hyperactivity and/or inattention and is often associated with a substantial impact on psychosocial functioning. Methylphenidate (MPH), a central nervous system stimulant, is commonly used for pharmacological treatment of adults and children with ADHD. Current practice guidelines recommend optimizing MPH dosage to individual patient needs; however, the clinical benefits of individual dose optimization compared with fixed-dose regimens remain unclear. Here we review the available literature on MPH dose optimization from clinical trials and real-world experience on ADHD management. In addition, we report safety and efficacy data from the largest MPH modified-release long-acting Phase III clinical trial conducted to examine benefits of dose optimization in adults with ADHD. Overall, MPH is an effective ADHD treatment with a good safety profile; data suggest that dose optimization may enhance the safety and efficacy of treatment. Further research is required to establish the extent to which short-term clinical benefits of MPH dose optimization translate into improved long-term outcomes for patients with ADHD.

  3. Dose reduction and image quality optimizations in CT of pediatric and adult patients: phantom studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, P.-H.; Lee, C.-L.; Kim, D.-H.; Lee, Y.-J.; Jeon, S.-S.; Kim, H.-J.

    2014-03-01

    Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) can be used to easily and rapidly perform numerous acquisitions, possibly leading to a marked increase in the radiation dose to individual patients. Technical options dedicated to automatically adjusting the acquisition parameters according to the patient's size are of specific interest in pediatric radiology. A constant tube potential reduction can be achieved for adults and children, while maintaining a constant detector energy fluence. To evaluate radiation dose, the weighted CT dose index (CTDIw) was calculated based on the CT dose index (CTDI) measured using an ion chamber, and image noise and image contrast were measured from a scanned image to evaluate image quality. The dose-weighted contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRD) was calculated from the radiation dose, image noise, and image contrast measured from a scanned image. The noise derivative (ND) is a quality index for dose efficiency. X-ray spectra with tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kVp were used to compute the average photon energy. Image contrast and the corresponding contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were determined for lesions of soft tissue, muscle, bone, and iodine relative to a uniform water background, as the iodine contrast increases at lower energy (i.e., k-edge of iodine is 33 keV closer to the beam energy) using mixed water-iodine contrast normalization (water 0, iodine 25, 100, 200, and 1000 HU, respectively). The proposed values correspond to high quality images and can be reduced if only high-contrast organs are assessed. The potential benefit of lowering the tube voltage is an improved CNRD, resulting in a lower radiation dose and optimization of image quality. Adjusting the tube potential in abdominal CT would be useful in current pediatric radiography, where the choice of X-ray techniques generally takes into account the size of the patient as well as the need to balance the conflicting requirements of diagnostic image quality and radiation dose

  4. X-ray image calibration and its application to clinical orthopedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Steffen; Thelen, Benedikt; Ballestra, Steven; Nolte, Lutz-P; Büchler, Philippe; Zheng, Guoyan

    2014-07-01

    X-ray imaging is one of the most commonly used medical imaging modality. Albeit X-ray radiographs provide important clinical information for diagnosis, planning and post-operative follow-up, the challenging interpretation due to its 2D projection characteristics and the unknown magnification factor constrain the full benefit of X-ray imaging. In order to overcome these drawbacks, we proposed here an easy-to-use X-ray calibration object and developed an optimization method to robustly find correspondences between the 3D fiducials of the calibration object and their 2D projections. In this work we present all the details of this outlined concept. Moreover, we demonstrate the potential of using such a method to precisely extract information from calibrated X-ray radiographs for two different orthopedic applications: post-operative acetabular cup implant orientation measurement and 3D vertebral body displacement measurement during preoperative traction tests. In the first application, we have achieved a clinically acceptable accuracy of below 1° for both anteversion and inclination angles, where in the second application an average displacement of 8.06±3.71 mm was measured. The results of both applications indicate the importance of using X-ray calibration in the clinical routine. Copyright © 2014 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Optimism and positive body image in women : The mediating role of the feared fat self

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalley, Simon E.; Vidal, Jose

    We predicted that an expectancy judgment about acquiring a feared fat self and an expectancy judgment about acquiring a hoped-for thin self would mediate dispositional optimism on positive body image. We also predicted that the mediation pathway through the feared self would be significantly

  6. CT-imaging in Acute Ischemic Stroke: Thrombus Characterization and Technique Optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niesten, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis two main subjects were discussed. First, histopathologic and CT characteristics of cerebral thrombi were examined. Second, techniques to increase the accuracy and to optimize CT-perfusion (CTP)- and CT-angiography (CTA)-imaging were explored. In part 1 we investigated the relation

  7. Optimization of Tomosynthesis Imaging for Improved Mass and Microcalcification Detection in the Breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    for Improved Mass and Microcalcification Detection in the Breast PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dan Xia CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Optimization of Tomosynthesis Imaging for Improved Mass and Microcalcification Detection in the Breast 5b...detec- tion of breast cancer [2,3,4]. Although considerable progress has been made, improvements to several areas of breast tomosynthesis technology are

  8. Optimal Class Separation in Hyperspectral Image Data: Iterated Canonical Discriminant Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Müller, Andreas

    This paper describes canonical discriminant analysis and sketches an iterative version which is then applied to obtain optimal separation between a region, here examplified by either “water” or “wood/trees” and the rest of a HyMap image. We show that the iterative version greatly enhances...

  9. Optimization of contrast resolution by genetic algorithm in ultrasound tissue harmonic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménigot, Sébastien; Girault, Jean-Marc

    2016-09-01

    The development of ultrasound imaging techniques such as pulse inversion has improved tissue harmonic imaging. Nevertheless, no recommendation has been made to date for the design of the waveform transmitted through the medium being explored. Our aim was therefore to find automatically the optimal "imaging" wave which maximized the contrast resolution without a priori information. To overcome assumption regarding the waveform, a genetic algorithm investigated the medium thanks to the transmission of stochastic "explorer" waves. Moreover, these stochastic signals could be constrained by the type of generator available (bipolar or arbitrary). To implement it, we changed the current pulse inversion imaging system by including feedback. Thus the method optimized the contrast resolution by adaptively selecting the samples of the excitation. In simulation, we benchmarked the contrast effectiveness of the best found transmitted stochastic commands and the usual fixed-frequency command. The optimization method converged quickly after around 300 iterations in the same optimal area. These results were confirmed experimentally. In the experimental case, the contrast resolution measured on a radiofrequency line could be improved by 6% with a bipolar generator and it could still increase by 15% with an arbitrary waveform generator. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Methods for optimizing the display conditions of brain magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Toshimasa; Inoue, Yusuke; Ukisu, Ryutaro; Hata, Hirofumi

    2017-10-01

    To investigate a method for optimizing the display conditions of brain magnetic resonance (MR) images. We retrospectively analyzed brain MR images of 120 adults classified into screening, acute cerebral infarction, and brain tumor groups (n = 40 each). Two observers independently displayed the images on a monitor and optimized the display conditions using the W/L and U/L methods. In the W/L method, the observers manipulated the width and level of the display window, while in the U/L method they manipulated the upper and lower levels of the window. The times required were compared between the two methods. Additionally, the appropriateness of the determined window setting was evaluated visually by the respective observer to exclude the possibility that rough, suboptimal adjustment shortened the adjustment time. For both observers and all groups, the time required for optimization was significantly shorter for the U/L method than for the W/L method. The appropriateness of the window setting for the U/L method was equal to or better than that for the W/L method. Manipulating the upper and lower levels of the display window appears to improve the efficiency of interpreting brain MR images through rapid optimization of the display condition.

  11. Optimal query-based relevance feedback in medical image retrieval using score fusion-based classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnam, Mohammad; Pourghassem, Hossein

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a new content-based medical image retrieval (CBMIR) framework using an effective classification method and a novel relevance feedback (RF) approach are proposed. For a large-scale database with diverse collection of different modalities, query image classification is inevitable due to firstly, reducing the computational complexity and secondly, increasing influence of data fusion by removing unimportant data and focus on the more valuable information. Hence, we find probability distribution of classes in the database using Gaussian mixture model (GMM) for each feature descriptor and then using the fusion of obtained scores from the dependency probabilities, the most relevant clusters are identified for a given query. Afterwards, visual similarity of query image and images in relevant clusters are calculated. This method is performed separately on all feature descriptors, and then the results are fused together using feature similarity ranking level fusion algorithm. In the RF level, we propose a new approach to find the optimal queries based on relevant images. The main idea is based on density function estimation of positive images and strategy of moving toward the aggregation of estimated density function. The proposed framework has been evaluated on ImageCLEF 2005 database consisting of 10,000 medical X-ray images of 57 semantic classes. The experimental results show that compared with the existing CBMIR systems, our framework obtains the acceptable performance both in the image classification and in the image retrieval by RF.

  12. Automatic alignment of multi-temporal images of planetary nebulae using local optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Hajian, Arsen R.

    2010-08-01

    Automatic alignment of time-separated astronomical images have historically proven to be difficult. The main reason for this difficulty is the amount of sporadic and unpredictable noise associated with astronomical images. A few examples of these effects are: image distortion due to optics, cosmic ray hits, transient background sources (super novae) and various artifact sources associated with the CCD imager itself. In this paper a new automated image registration method is introduced for aligning two time-separated images while minimizing the inherent errors and unpredictabilities. Using local optimization, the two images are aligned when the root mean square of the difference between the two images is minimized. The dataset consists of images of galactic planetary nebulae acquired by the Hubble Space Telescope. The aligned centroids inferred by the suggested method agree with the results from previously aligned images by inspection with high confidence. It is also demonstrated that this method is robust, sufficient, does not require extensive user input and it is highly sensitive to minor adjustments.

  13. Integration Of An MR Image Network Into A Clinical PACS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratib, Osman M.; Mankovich, Nicholas J.; Taira, Ricky K.; Cho, Paul S.; Huang, H. K.

    1988-06-01

    A direct link between a clinical pediatric PACS module and a FONAR MRI image network was implemented. The original MR network combines together the MR scanner, a remote viewing station and a central archiving station. The pediatric PACS directly connects to the archiving unit through an Ethernet TCP-IP network adhering to FONAR's protocol. The PACS communication software developed supports the transfer of patient studies and the patient information directly from the MR archive database to the pediatric PACS. In the first phase of our project we developed a package to transfer data between a VAX-111750 and the IBM PC I AT-based MR archive database through the Ethernet network. This system served as a model for PACS-to-modality network communication. Once testing was complete on this research network, the software and network hardware was moved to the clinical pediatric VAX for full PACS integration. In parallel to the direct transmission of digital images to the Pediatric PACS, a broadband communication system in video format was developed for real-time broadcasting of images originating from the MR console to 8 remote viewing stations distributed in the radiology department. These analog viewing stations allow the radiologists to directly monitor patient positioning and to select the scan levels during a patient examination from remote locations in the radiology department. This paper reports (1) the technical details of this implementation, (2) the merits of this network development scheme, and (3) the performance statistics of the network-to-PACS interface.

  14. The optimal monochromatic spectral computed tomographic imaging plus adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction algorithm can improve the superior mesenteric vessel image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiao-Ping; Zuo, Zi-Wei; Xu, Ying-Jin; Wang, Jia-Ning; Liu, Huai-Jun; Liang, Guang-Lu; Gao, Bu-Lang

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the effect of the optimal monochromatic spectral computed tomography (CT) plus adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction on the improvement of the image quality of the superior mesenteric artery and vein. The gemstone spectral CT angiographic data of 25 patients were reconstructed in the following three groups: 70KeV, the optimal monochromatic imaging, and the optimal monochromatic plus 40%iterative reconstruction mode. The CT value, image noises (IN), background CT value and noises, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and image scores of the vessels and surrounding tissues were analyzed. In the 70KeV, the optimal monochromatic and the optimal monochromatic images plus 40% iterative reconstruction group, the mean scores of image quality were 3.86, 4.24 and 4.25 for the superior mesenteric artery and 3.46, 3.78 and 3.81 for the superior mesenteric vein, respectively. The image quality scores for the optimal monochromatic and the optimal monochromatic plus 40% iterative reconstruction groups were significantly greater than for the 70KeV group (Piterative reconstruction group than in the 70KeV group. The optimal monochromatic plus 40% iterative reconstruction group had significantly (Piterative reconstruction using low-contrast agent dosage and low injection rate can significantly improve the image quality of the superior mesenteric artery and vein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Image resolution enhancement for healthy weight-bearing bones based on topology optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Jin; Jang, In Gwun

    2016-09-06

    Although high-resolution skeletal images are essential for accurate bone strength assessment, the current high-resolution imaging modalities have critical problems that remain to be solved such as high radiation doses, low signal-to-noise ratios, and long scan times. Resolution enhancement techniques, which have recently received much attention, have also been difficult to obtain acceptable image resolutions. Inspired by the self-optimizing capabilities of bone (i.e. reorienting the trabecula for maximum mechanical efficiency with minimum bone mass), this paper proposes a novel resolution enhancement method that can reconstruct a high-resolution skeletal image from a low-resolution image. In order to achieve this, the proposed method conducts mesh refinement for resolution upscaling and then performs topology optimization with a constraint for the bone mineral density deviation in order to preserve the subject-specific bone distribution data. The numerical results show that the proposed method successfully reconstructs the enhanced images of trabecular architecture in terms of structure similarity and apparent elastic modulus, thereby demonstrating the feasibility of the proposed method for skeletal image resolution enhancement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Imaging Integrin Expression: Tracers in Clinical Studies and Recent Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Haubner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive determination of integrin expression has become an interesting approach in nuclear medicine. Since the discovery of the first 18F-labeled cyclic RGD peptide as radiotracer for imaging integrin αvβ3 expression in vivo, there have been carried out enormous efforts to develop RGD peptides for PET imaging. Moreover, in recent years, additional integrins, including α5β1 and αvβ6, came into the focus of pharmaceutical radiochemistry. This review will discuss the tracers already evaluated in clinical trials and summarize the preliminary outcome. It will also give an overview on recent developments to further optimize the first-generation compounds such as [18F]Galacto-RGD. This includes recently developed 18F-labeling strategies and also new approaches in 68Ga-complex chemistry. Furthermore, the approaches to develop radiopharmaceuticals targeting integrin α5β1 and αvβ6 will be summarized and discussed.

  17. Optimizing Cloud Based Image Storage, Dissemination and Processing Through Use of Mrf and Lerc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Peter; Plesea, Lucian; Maurer, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The volume and numbers of geospatial images being collected continue to increase exponentially with the ever increasing number of airborne and satellite imaging platforms, and the increasing rate of data collection. As a result, the cost of fast storage required to provide access to the imagery is a major cost factor in enterprise image management solutions to handle, process and disseminate the imagery and information extracted from the imagery. Cloud based object storage offers to provide significantly lower cost and elastic storage for this imagery, but also adds some disadvantages in terms of greater latency for data access and lack of traditional file access. Although traditional file formats geoTIF, JPEG2000 and NITF can be downloaded from such object storage, their structure and available compression are not optimum and access performance is curtailed. This paper provides details on a solution by utilizing a new open image formats for storage and access to geospatial imagery optimized for cloud storage and processing. MRF (Meta Raster Format) is optimized for large collections of scenes such as those acquired from optical sensors. The format enables optimized data access from cloud storage, along with the use of new compression options which cannot easily be added to existing formats. The paper also provides an overview of LERC a new image compression that can be used with MRF that provides very good lossless and controlled lossy compression.

  18. A Novel Optimization-Based Approach for Content-Based Image Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manyu Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Content-based image retrieval is nowadays one of the possible and promising solutions to manage image databases effectively. However, with the large number of images, there still exists a great discrepancy between the users’ expectations (accuracy and efficiency and the real performance in image retrieval. In this work, new optimization strategies are proposed on vocabulary tree building, retrieval, and matching methods. More precisely, a new clustering strategy combining classification and conventional K-Means method is firstly redefined. Then a new matching technique is built to eliminate the error caused by large-scaled scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT. Additionally, a new unit mechanism is proposed to reduce the cost of indexing time. Finally, the numerical results show that excellent performances are obtained in both accuracy and efficiency based on the proposed improvements for image retrieval.

  19. Adapted erase method using ultraviolet light and the influence of ghosting image on a clinical CR image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Takahide; Ohuchi, Hiroko; Maejima, Hideyuki; Minami, Toshihiro; Mogi, Eiji; Ichiji, Hiroshi; Furui, Shigeru

    2010-04-01

    In Storage Phosphor (SP) used for Computed Radiography (CR), the quite stable latent image remains due to impurities and the lattice imperfections by the existence of trapped electron and hole. The quite stable latent image appears again (Ghosting image) by the passage of time etc, is recognized as image, and becomes an artifact in a clinical CR image. This study verified the influence of Ghosting image on a clinical image by a physical characteristic and the subjective evaluation, and examined the method to delete this artifact by the exposure of ultraviolet light as a method of improving image. As a result, Ghosting image can be confirmed by the dose used by the clinical diagnosis study, and it is taken as deterioration of the granularity on a physical characteristic. The decrease of the granularity of about 15% (by winner spectrum) was admitted by the frequency band of 2cycle/mm in SP that had been used for a long term. As the method of improving these, Ghosting image was erased with the ultraviolet light lamp with the peak wavelength at 310nm, and has band from 290 nm to 320 nm, and is useful for the improvement of the image quality. In this study, we examine the influence of Ghosting image on a clinical image, and report on the method to delete them by the exposure to ultraviolet light radiation for the image quality improvement plan that uses the x-ray used for usual clinical diagnosis study.

  20. Functional imaging in oncology. Clinical applications. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, Antonio [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiology; MRI Health Time Group, Jaen (Spain); Vilanova, Joan C. [Girona Univ. (Spain). Clinica Girona - Hospital Sta. Caterina; Hygino da Cruz, L. Celso Jr. (ed.) [CDPI and IRM, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Dept. of Radiology; Rossi, Santiago E. [Centro de Diagnostico, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-06-01

    Easy-to-read manual on new functional imaging techniques in oncology. Explains current clinical applications and outlines future avenues. Includes numerous high-quality illustrations to highlight the major teaching points. In the new era of functional and molecular imaging, both currently available imaging biomarkers and biomarkers under development are expected to lead to major changes in the management of oncological patients. This two-volume book is a practical manual on the various imaging techniques capable of delivering functional information on cancer, including diffusion MRI, perfusion CT and MRI, dual-energy CT, spectroscopy, dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, PET, and hybrid modalities. This second volume considers the applications and benefits of these techniques in a wide range of tumor types, including their role in diagnosis, prediction of treatment outcome, and early evaluation of treatment response. Each chapter addresses a specific malignancy and is written by one or more acclaimed experts. The lucid text is complemented by numerous high-quality illustrations that highlight key features and major teaching points.

  1. Development of a 3D clinical facial imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Stephen J.; Rixon, R. C.; Whiteford, Don N.; Cumming, J. T.; Wells, Peter J.; Powell, S. J.

    1993-09-01

    A collaborative project between NEL and St George's Hospital to investigate the measurement of the human face has resulted in the development of a 3-D clinical facial imager. The system utilizes the projection moire fringe contouring method developed at NEL to acquire accurate 3-D coordinates from the surface of a patient's face. In order that data can be obtained from the full facial area, two moire measuring units are employed, positioned symmetrically to each side of the face. The phase-stepping technique is used to improve the accuracy of interpolation between fringe centers and to distinguish automatically between surface concavity and convexity. Digitization and analysis of the resulting fringe patterns is performed using CCD cameras linked to a PC-hosted transputer image processing board which also controls the operation of the measuring units. Output is in the form of a dense mesh of 3-D coordinates which are transferred to a graphics workstation for image display, manipulation, and interrogation using specially developed software. A detailed description of the facial imager is given, with particular emphasis on the design features and two-stage calibration method which ensure that the inherent accuracy of the data acquisition technique is realized and facilitate the reliable measurement of unrestrained patients.

  2. Review of Post Ischemic Stroke Imaging and Its Clinical Relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Leonard L L; Tan, Benjamin Y Q; Andersson, Tommy

    2017-02-14

    In this day and age, multiple imaging modalities are available to the stroke physician in the post-treatment phase.The practical challenge for physicians who treat stroke is to evaluate the pros and cons of each technique and select the best choice for the situation. The choice of imaging modality remains contentious at best and varies among different institutions and centres. This is no simple task an there are many factors to consider, including the differential diagnosis which need to be evaluated, the availability and reliability of the imaging technique and time and expertise required to perform and interpret the scanning. Other ancillary competing interest also come into play such as the financial cost of the modality, the requirement for patient monitoring during the imaging procedure and patient comfort. In an effort to clear some of the ambiguity surrounding this topic we present some of the current techniques in use and others, which are still in the realm of research and have not yet transitioned into clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Dual-energy compared to single-energy CT in pediatric imaging: a phantom study for DECT clinical guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaowei; Servaes, Sabah; Darge, Kassa [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Pennsylvania, The Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); McCullough, William P. [University of Virginia Health System, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Mecca, Patricia [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Dual-energy CT technology is available on scanners from several vendors and offers significant advantages over classic single-energy CT technology in multiple clinical applications. Many studies have detailed dual-energy CT applications in adults and several have evaluated the relative radiation dose performance of dual-energy CT in adult imaging. However, little has been published on dual-energy CT imaging in the pediatric population, and the relative dose performance of dual-energy CT imaging in the pediatric population is not well described. When evaluating dual-energy CT technology for implementation into a routine clinical pediatric imaging practice, the radiation dose implications must be considered, and when comparing relative CT dose performance, image quality must also be evaluated. Therefore the purpose of this study is to develop dual-energy CT scan protocols based on our optimized single-energy scan protocols and compare the dose. We scanned the head, chest and abdomen regions of pediatric-size anthropomorphic phantoms with contrast inserts, using our optimized single-energy clinical imaging protocols on a Siemens Flash {sup registered} CT scanner. We then scanned the phantoms in dual-energy mode using matching image-quality reference settings. The effective CT dose index volume (CTDI{sub vol}) of the scans was used as a surrogate for relative dose in comparing the single- and dual-energy scans. Additionally, we evaluated image quality using visual assessment and contrast-to-noise ratio. Dual-energy CT scans of the head and abdomen were dose-neutral for all three phantoms. Dual-energy CT scans of the chest showed a relative dose increase over the single-energy scan for 1- and 5-year-old child-based age-equivalent phantoms, ranging 11-20%. Quantitative analysis of image quality showed no statistically significant difference in image quality between the single-energy and dual-energy scans. There was no clinically significant difference in image quality by

  4. Comparison of clinical and physics scoring of PET images when image reconstruction parameters are varied.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, C; Johnston, C; Sheehy, N; O' Reilly, G

    2013-02-01

    In this study the quantitative and qualitative image quality (IQ) measurements with clinical judgement of IQ in positron emission tomography (PET) were compared. The limitations of IQ metrics and the proposed criteria of acceptability for PET scanners are discussed. Phantom and patient images were reconstructed using seven different iterative reconstruction protocols. For each reconstructed set of images, IQ was scored based both on the visual analysis and on the quantitative metrics. The quantitative physics metrics did not rank the reconstruction protocols in the same order as the clinicians' scoring of perceived IQ (R(s)=-0.54). Better agreement was achieved when comparing the clinical perception of IQ to the physicist's visual assessment of IQ in the phantom images (R(s)=+0.59). The closest agreement was seen between the quantitative physics metrics and the measurement of the standard uptake values (SUVs) in small tumours (R(s)=+0.92). Given the disparity between the clinical perception of IQ and the physics metrics a cautious approach to use of IQ measurements for determining suspension levels is warranted.

  5. [Coupling AFM fluid imaging with micro-flocculation filtration process for the technological optimization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bei; Ge, Xiao-peng; Yu, Zhi-yong; Yuan, Sheng-guang; Zhang, Wen-jing; Sun, Jing-fang

    2012-08-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) fluid imaging was applied to the study of micro-flocculation filtration process and the optimization of micro-flocculation time and the agitation intensity of G values. It can be concluded that AFM fluid imaging proves to be a promising tool in the observation and characterization of floc morphology and the dynamic coagulation processes under aqueous environmental conditions. Through the use of AFM fluid imaging technique, optimized conditions for micro-flocculation time of 2 min and the agitation intensity (G value) of 100 s(-1) were obtained in the treatment of dye-printing industrial tailing wastewater by the micro-flocculation filtration process with a good performance.

  6. Landmark Optimization Using Local Curvature for Point-Based Nonlinear Rodent Brain Image Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutong Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To develop a technique to automate landmark selection for point-based interpolating transformations for nonlinear medical image registration. Materials and Methods. Interpolating transformations were calculated from homologous point landmarks on the source (image to be transformed and target (reference image. Point landmarks are placed at regular intervals on contours of anatomical features, and their positions are optimized along the contour surface by a function composed of curvature similarity and displacements of the homologous landmarks. The method was evaluated in two cases (=5 each. In one, MRI was registered to histological sections; in the second, geometric distortions in EPI MRI were corrected. Normalized mutual information and target registration error were calculated to compare the registration accuracy of the automatically and manually generated landmarks. Results. Statistical analyses demonstrated significant improvement (<0.05 in registration accuracy by landmark optimization in most data sets and trends towards improvement (<0.1 in others as compared to manual landmark selection.

  7. New software developments for quality mesh generation and optimization from biomedical imaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zeyun; Wang, Jun; Gao, Zhanheng; Xu, Ming; Hoshijima, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a new software toolkit for generating and optimizing surface and volumetric meshes from three-dimensional (3D) biomedical imaging data, targeted at image-based finite element analysis of some biomedical activities in a single material domain. Our toolkit includes a series of geometric processing algorithms including surface re-meshing and quality-guaranteed tetrahedral mesh generation and optimization. All methods described have been encapsulated into a user-friendly graphical interface for easy manipulation and informative visualization of biomedical images and mesh models. Numerous examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the described methods and toolkit. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Optimism and recovery after acute coronary syndrome: a clinical cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronaldson, Amy; Molloy, Gerard J; Wikman, Anna; Poole, Lydia; Kaski, Juan-Carlos; Steptoe, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Optimism is associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality, but its impact on recovery after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is poorly understood. We hypothesized that greater optimism would lead to more effective physical and emotional adaptation after ACS and would buffer the impact of persistent depressive symptoms on clinical outcomes. This prospective observational clinical study took place in an urban general hospital and involved 369 patients admitted with a documented ACS. Optimism was assessed with a standardized questionnaire. The main outcomes were physical health status, depressive symptoms, smoking, physical activity, and fruit and vegetable consumption measured 12 months after ACS, and composite major adverse cardiac events (cardiovascular death, readmission with reinfarction or unstable angina, and coronary artery bypass graft surgery) assessed over an average of 45.7 months. We found that optimism predicted better physical health status 12 months after ACS independently of baseline physical health, age, sex, ethnicity, social deprivation, and clinical risk factors (B = 0.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.10-1.20). Greater optimism also predicted reduced risk of depressive symptoms (odds ratio = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.74-0.90), more smoking cessation, and more fruit and vegetable consumption at 12 months. Persistent depressive symptoms 12 months after ACS predicted major adverse cardiac events over subsequent years (odds ratio = 2.56, 95% CI = 1.16-5.67), but only among individuals low in optimism (optimism × depression interaction; p = .014). Optimism predicts better physical and emotional health after ACS. Measuring optimism may help identify individuals at risk. Pessimistic outlooks can be modified, potentially leading to improved recovery after major cardiac events.

  9. Image Watermarking Algorithm Based on Multiobjective Ant Colony Optimization and Singular Value Decomposition in Wavelet Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Loukhaoukha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new optimal watermarking scheme based on discrete wavelet transform (DWT and singular value decomposition (SVD using multiobjective ant colony optimization (MOACO. A binary watermark is decomposed using a singular value decomposition. Then, the singular values are embedded in a detailed subband of host image. The trade-off between watermark transparency and robustness is controlled by multiple scaling factors (MSFs instead of a single scaling factor (SSF. Determining the optimal values of the multiple scaling factors (MSFs is a difficult problem. However, a multiobjective ant colony optimization is used to determine these values. Experimental results show much improved performances of the proposed scheme in terms of transparency and robustness compared to other watermarking schemes. Furthermore, it does not suffer from the problem of high probability of false positive detection of the watermarks.

  10. Optimizing Kernel PCA Using Sparse Representation-Based Classifier for MSTAR SAR Image Target Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuang Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Different kernels cause various class discriminations owing to their different geometrical structures of the data in the feature space. In this paper, a method of kernel optimization by maximizing a measure of class separability in the empirical feature space with sparse representation-based classifier (SRC is proposed to solve the problem of automatically choosing kernel functions and their parameters in kernel learning. The proposed method first adopts a so-called data-dependent kernel to generate an efficient kernel optimization algorithm. Then, a constrained optimization function using general gradient descent method is created to find combination coefficients varied with the input data. After that, optimized kernel PCA (KOPCA is obtained via combination coefficients to extract features. Finally, the sparse representation-based classifier is used to perform pattern classification task. Experimental results on MSTAR SAR images show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  11. Imaging and clinical characteristics of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAN Shun-chang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Five patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD presented rapidly progressive dementia which were subacute onset from 1 to 4 months. Among these cases, periodic synchronous discharge (PSD of electroencephalography (EEG was seen in 2 patients. Besides, 4 patients obtained positive results in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis for 14-3-3 protein. The cranial MRI examination showed symmetrical or asymmetrical colored-ribbon-shaped high signals in cerebral cortex or basal ganglia by diffusion weighted imaging (DWI, suggesting that DWI had high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of sCJD as a preferred method in the clinical examination of sCJD.

  12. Primary hyperoxaluria: spectrum of clinical and imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, Sara B.; Levin, Terry L. [Children' s Hospital of Montefiore Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Bronx, NY (United States); Waltuch, Temima; Kaskel, Frederick [Children' s Hospital at Montefiore Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Nephrology, Bronx, NY (United States); Bivin, William [Allegheny General Hospital, Department of Pathology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Primary hyperoxaluria is a rare autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism with three known subtypes. In primary hyperoxaluria type 1, the most common of the subtypes, a deficiency in the hepatic enzymes responsible for the metabolism of glycoxylate to glycine, leads to excessive levels of glyoxylate, which is converted to oxalate. The resultant elevation in serum and urinary oxalate that characterizes primary hyperoxaluria leads to calcium oxalate crystal deposition in multiple organ systems (oxalosis). We review the genetics, pathogenesis, variable clinical presentation and course of this disease as well as its treatment. Emphasis is placed on the characteristic imaging findings before and after definitive treatment with combined liver and renal transplantation. (orig.)

  13. The economics of functional magnetic resonance imaging: clinical and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousem, David M

    2014-11-01

    It is difficult to justify maintaining a clinical functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) program based solely on revenue generation. The use of fMRI is, therefore, based mostly in patient care considerations, leading to better outcomes. The high costs of the top-of-the-line equipment, hardware, and software needed for state-of-the-art fMRI and the time commitment by multiple professionals are not adequately reimbursed at a representative rate by current payor schemes for the Current Procedure Terminology codes assigned. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A dedicated cone-beam CT system for musculoskeletal extremities imaging: Design, optimization, and initial performance characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zbijewski, W.; De Jean, P.; Prakash, P.; Ding, Y.; Stayman, J. W.; Packard, N.; Senn, R.; Yang, D.; Yorkston, J.; Machado, A.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Carestream Health, Rochester, New York 14615 (United States); The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21287 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    20 cm diameter bore (20 x 20 x 20 cm{sup 3} field of view); total acquisition arc of {approx}240 deg. The system MTF declines to 50% at {approx}1.3 mm{sup -1} and to 10% at {approx}2.7 mm{sup -1}, consistent with sub-millimeter spatial resolution. Analysis of DQE suggested a nominal technique of 90 kVp (+0.3 mm Cu added filtration) to provide high imaging performance from {approx}500 projections at less than {approx}0.5 kW power, implying {approx}6.4 mGy (0.064 mSv) for low-dose protocols and {approx}15 mGy (0.15 mSv) for high-quality protocols. The experimental studies show improved image uniformity and contrast-to-noise ratio (without increase in dose) through incorporation of a custom 10:1 GR antiscatter grid. Cadaver images demonstrate exquisite bone detail, visualization of articular morphology, and soft-tissue visibility comparable to diagnostic CT (10-20 HU contrast resolution). Conclusions: The results indicate that the proposed system will deliver volumetric images of the extremities with soft-tissue contrast resolution comparable to diagnostic CT and improved spatial resolution at potentially reduced dose. Cascaded systems analysis provided a useful basis for system design and optimization without costly repeated experimentation. A combined process of design specification, image quality analysis, clinical feedback, and revision yielded a prototype that is now awaiting clinical pilot studies. Potential advantages of the proposed system include reduced space and cost, imaging of load-bearing extremities, and combined volumetric imaging with real-time fluoroscopy and digital radiography.

  15. Unenhanced MR Imaging in adults with clinically suspected acute appendicitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chabanova, Elizaveta; Balslev, Ingegerd; Achiam, Michael

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of the study was to evaluate unenhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of appendicitis or another surgery-requiring condition in an adult population scheduled for emergency appendectomy based on a clinical diagnosis of suspected acute appendicitis. MATERIALS...... radiologists and one surgeon independent of each other and compared with surgical and pathological records. RESULTS: According to the surgical and histopathological findings 30 of 48 patients (63%) had acute appendicitis. Of the remaining 18 patients, 4 patients had no reasons for the clinical symptoms and 14...... patients had other pathology. For the three reviewers the performance of MRI in the diagnosis of acute appendicitis showed the following sensitivity, specificity and accuracy ranges: 83-93%, 50-83% and 77-83%. Moderate (kappa=0.51) and fair (kappa=0.31) interobserver agreements in the MR diagnosis of acute...

  16. Bimelic Hirayama Disease: Clinical Dilemma Solved by Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalabh Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hirayama disease (juvenile muscular atrophy of distal upper extremity is a cervical myelopathy predominantly affecting adolescent males. It is characterized by progressive muscular weakness and atrophy of unilateral or asymmetrically bilateral distal upper limbs. We report a case of an 18-year-male painter, who presented with gradually progressive, symmetrical bilateral weakness of hands and forearm for the last two years. On the basis of clinical examination, a provisional diagnosis of lower motor neuron type of symmetrical distal weakness due to heavy metal intoxication was kept. However, imaging studies helped in making a definitive diagnosis of Hirayama disease. The patient was advised cervical collar, and there was no progression in symptoms after six months of followup. Due to the rarity of bilateral symmetrical involvement in Hirayama disease, it remains obscured or unsuspected clinically, and MRI plays a pivotal role in diagnosis.

  17. MR imaging assessment of clinical problems in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narvaez, Jose A.; Roca, Yolanda; Aguilera, Carlos [Department of CT and MR Imaging, Hospital Duran i Reynals, Universitaria de Bellvitge, Barcelona (Spain); Narvaez, Javier [Department of Medicine, Delfos Medical Center, Barcelona (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    Although MR imaging has been increasingly recognized as a useful tool in the diagnosis of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in the assessment of disease activity, these applications have not yet been usually included in the routine management of this condition. Our goal is to review the current role of MRI in the everyday clinical management of patients with RA. The usefulness of MRI in the evaluation of articular and para-articular changes in specific locations, mainly the craniocervical region and the temporomandibular joint, are reviewed. Clinical problems derived from local extra-articular involvement, such as tenosynovitis, ''rice-bodies'' bursitis, and Baker's cyst rupture, are also described. Finally, we also review the value of MRI in evaluation of some complications of RA such as tendinous rupture, osteonecrosis, stress fracture, and septic arthritis/osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  18. Optimized density-weighted imaging for dynamic contrast-enhanced 3D-MR mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutberlet, Marcel; Roth, Anne; Hahn, Dietbert; Köstler, Herbert

    2011-02-01

    To increase the spatial coverage and to reduce slice crosstalk combined with an optimal signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in 3D dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance (MR) mammography. Asymmetric sampling schemes and a new reconstruction strategy based on virtual coils are presented for density-weighted (DW) 3D imaging. Additionally, for MR mammography an alternating DW (ADW) sampling along the k(y) direction shifts the undersampling artifacts out of the signal reception region. Virtual coils for effective DW (VIDED) imaging suppresses the aliasing in undersampled DW imaging. VIDED and ADW were compared to the conventional Cartesian imaging in phantom and in vivo MR mammography studies. The slice crosstalk was significantly reduced by VIDED and compared to Cartesian imaging the SNR increased by 16%. Additionally, VIDED and ADW provided a substantially increased field of view (FOV) in the slice direction and allowed the spatial resolution to be improved (up to 60% for ADW and 30% for VIDED) without lengthening the scan time. VIDED and ADW improve the image quality in 3D DCE MR mammography by enhancing the spatial resolution, reducing the slice crosstalk at nearly optimal SNR, and increasing the FOV in the slice direction. For VIDED no lengthening of the scan time or usage of multichannel receiver coils is necessary. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Acquisition of multi-spectral flash image using optimization method via weight map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bong-Seok; Kim, Dae-Chul; Kwon, Oh-Seol; Ha, Yeong-Ho

    2013-02-01

    To acquire images in low-light environments, it is usually necessary to adopt long exposure times or to resort to flashes. Flashes, however, often induce color distortion, cause the red-eye effect and can be disturbing to the subjects. On the other hand, long-exposure shots are susceptible to subject-motion, as well as motion-blur due to camera shake when performed with a hand-held camera. A recently introduced technique to overcome the limitations of the traditional lowlight photography is the use of the multi-spectral flash. Multi-spectral flash images are a combination of UV/IR and visible spectrum information. The general idea is to retrieve the details from the UV/IR spectrum and the color from the visible spectrum. Multi-spectral flash images, however, are themselves subject to color distortion and noise. In this work, a method of computing multi-spectral flash images so as to reduce the noise and to improve the color accuracy is presented. The proposed method is a previously seen optimization method, improved by introducing a weight map used to discriminate the uniform regions from the detail regions. The optimization target function takes into account the output likelihood with respect to the ambient light image, the sparsity of image gradients, and the spectral constraints for the IR-red and UV-blue channels. The performance of the proposed method was objectively evaluated using longexposure shots as references.

  20. Optimization of wavelengths sets for multispectral reflectance imaging of rat olfactory bulb activation in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Rémi; Bendahmane, Mounir; Chery, Romain; Martin, Claire; Gurden, Hirac; Pain, Frederic

    2012-06-01

    Wide field multispectral imaging of light backscattered by brain tissues provides maps of hemodynamics changes (total blood volume and oxygenation) following activation. This technique relies on the fit of the reflectance images obtain at two or more wavelengths using a modified Beer-Lambert law1,2. It has been successfully applied to study the activation of several sensory cortices in the anesthetized rodent using visible light1-5. We have carried out recently the first multispectral imaging in the olfactory bulb6 (OB) of anesthetized rats. However, the optimization of wavelengths choice has not been discussed in terms of cross talk and uniqueness of the estimated parameters (blood volume and saturation maps) although this point was shown to be crucial for similar studies in Diffuse Optical Imaging in humans7-10. We have studied theoretically and experimentally the optimal sets of wavelength for multispectral imaging of rodent brain activation in the visible. Sets of optimal wavelengths have been identified and validated in vivo for multispectral imaging of the OB of rats following odor stimulus. We studied the influence of the wavelengths sets on the magnitude and time courses of the oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin concentration variations as well as on the spatial extent of activated brain areas following stimulation. Beyond the estimation of hemodynamic parameters from multispectral reflectance data, we observed repeatedly and for all wavelengths a decrease of light reflectance. For wavelengths longer than 590 nm, these observations differ from those observed in the somatosensory and barrel cortex and question the basis of the reflectance changes during activation in the OB. To solve this issue, Monte Carlo simulations (MCS) have been carried out to assess the relative contribution of absorption, scattering and anisotropy changes to the intrinsic optical imaging signals in somatosensory cortex (SsC) and OB model.

  1. Optimization, evaluation, and comparison of standard algorithms for image reconstruction with the VIP-PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaylova, E.; Kolstein, M.; De Lorenzo, G.; Chmeissani, M.

    2014-01-01

    A novel positron emission tomography (PET) scanner design based on a room-temperature pixelated CdTe solid-state detector is being developed within the framework of the Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project [1]. The simulation results show a great potential of the VIP to produce high-resolution images even in extremely challenging conditions such as the screening of a human head [2]. With unprecedented high channel density (450 channels/cm3) image reconstruction is a challenge. Therefore optimization is needed to find the best algorithm in order to exploit correctly the promising detector potential. The following reconstruction algorithms are evaluated: 2-D Filtered Backprojection (FBP), Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (OSEM), List-Mode OSEM (LM-OSEM), and the Origin Ensemble (OE) algorithm. The evaluation is based on the comparison of a true image phantom with a set of reconstructed images obtained by each algorithm. This is achieved by calculation of image quality merit parameters such as the bias, the variance and the mean square error (MSE). A systematic optimization of each algorithm is performed by varying the reconstruction parameters, such as the cutoff frequency of the noise filters and the number of iterations. The region of interest (ROI) analysis of the reconstructed phantom is also performed for each algorithm and the results are compared. Additionally, the performance of the image reconstruction methods is compared by calculating the modulation transfer function (MTF). The reconstruction time is also taken into account to choose the optimal algorithm. The analysis is based on GAMOS [3] simulation including the expected CdTe and electronic specifics. PMID:25018777

  2. Optimizing dual energy cone beam CT protocols for preclinical imaging and radiation research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schyns, Lotte E J R; Almeida, Isabel P; van Hoof, Stefan J; Descamps, Benedicte; Vanhove, Christian; Landry, Guillaume; Granton, Patrick V; Verhaegen, Frank

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate whether quantitative dual-energy CT (DECT) imaging is feasible for small animal irradiators with an integrated cone-beam CT (CBCT) system. The optimal imaging protocols were determined by analyzing different energy combinations and dose levels. The influence of beam hardening effects and the performance of a beam hardening correction (BHC) were investigated. In addition, two systems from different manufacturers were compared in terms of errors in the extracted effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and relative electron densities (ρe) for phantom inserts with known elemental compositions and relative electron densities. The optimal energy combination was determined to be 50 and 90 kVp. For this combination, Zeff and ρe can be extracted with a mean error of 0.11 and 0.010, respectively, at a dose level of 60 cGy. Quantitative DECT imaging is feasible for small animal irradiators with an integrated CBCT system. To obtain the best results, optimizing the imaging protocols is required. Well-separated X-ray spectra and a sufficient dose level should be used to minimize the error and noise for Zeff and ρe. When no BHC is applied in the image reconstruction, the size of the calibration phantom should match the size of the imaged object to limit the influence of beam hardening effects. No significant differences in Zeff and ρe errors are observed between the two systems from different manufacturers. Advances in knowledge: This is the first study that investigates quantitative DECT imaging for small animal irradiators with an integrated CBCT system.

  3. An optimized blockwise nonlocal means denoising filter for 3-D magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coupe, P; Yger, P; Prima, S; Hellier, P; Kervrann, C; Barillot, C

    2008-04-01

    A critical issue in image restoration is the problem of noise removal while keeping the integrity of relevant image information. Denoising is a crucial step to increase image quality and to improve the performance of all the tasks needed for quantitative imaging analysis. The method proposed in this paper is based on a 3-D optimized blockwise version of the nonlocal (NL)-means filter (Buades, et al., 2005). The NL-means filter uses the redundancy of information in the image under study to remove the noise. The performance of the NL-means filter has been already demonstrated for 2-D images, but reducing the computational burden is a critical aspect to extend the method to 3-D images. To overcome this problem, we propose improvements to reduce the computational complexity. These different improvements allow to drastically divide the computational time while preserving the performances of the NL-means filter. A fully automated and optimized version of the NL-means filter is then presented. Our contributions to the NL-means filter are: 1) an automatic tuning of the smoothing parameter; 2) a selection of the most relevant voxels; 3) a blockwise implementation; and 4) a parallelized computation. Quantitative validation was carried out on synthetic datasets generated with BrainWeb (Collins, et al., 1998). The results show that our optimized NL-means filter outperforms the classical implementation of the NL-means filter, as well as two other classical denoising methods [anisotropic diffusion (Perona and Malik, 1990)] and total variation minimization process (Rudin, et al., 1992) in terms of accuracy (measured by the peak signal-to-noise ratio) with low computation time. Finally, qualitative results on real data are presented .

  4. An Optimized Clustering Approach for Automated Detection of White Matter Lesions in MRI Brain Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Anitha

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Settings White Matter lesions (WMLs are small areas of dead cells found in parts of the brain. In general, it is difficult for medical experts to accurately quantify the WMLs due to decreased contrast between White Matter (WM and Grey Matter (GM. The aim of this paper is to
    automatically detect the White Matter Lesions which is present in the brains of elderly people. WML detection process includes the following stages: 1. Image preprocessing, 2. Clustering (Fuzzy c-means clustering, Geostatistical Possibilistic clustering and Geostatistical Fuzzy clustering and 3.Optimization using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO. The proposed system is tested on a database of 208 MRI images. GFCM yields high sensitivity of 89%, specificity of 94% and overall accuracy of 93% over FCM and GPC. The clustered brain images are then subjected to Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO. The optimized result obtained from GFCM-PSO provides sensitivity of 90%, specificity of 94% and accuracy of 95%. The detection results reveals that GFCM and GFCMPSO better localizes the large regions of lesions and gives less false positive rate when compared to GPC and GPC-PSO which captures the largest loads of WMLs only in the upper ventral horns of the brain.

  5. Hybrid Artificial Root Foraging Optimizer Based Multilevel Threshold for Image Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new plant-inspired optimization algorithm for multilevel threshold image segmentation, namely, hybrid artificial root foraging optimizer (HARFO, which essentially mimics the iterative root foraging behaviors. In this algorithm the new growth operators of branching, regrowing, and shrinkage are initially designed to optimize continuous space search by combining root-to-root communication and coevolution mechanism. With the auxin-regulated scheme, various root growth operators are guided systematically. With root-to-root communication, individuals exchange information in different efficient topologies, which essentially improve the exploration ability. With coevolution mechanism, the hierarchical spatial population driven by evolutionary pressure of multiple subpopulations is structured, which ensure that the diversity of root population is well maintained. The comparative results on a suit of benchmarks show the superiority of the proposed algorithm. Finally, the proposed HARFO algorithm is applied to handle the complex image segmentation problem based on multilevel threshold. Computational results of this approach on a set of tested images show the outperformance of the proposed algorithm in terms of optimization accuracy computation efficiency.

  6. Task-based strategy for optimized contrast enhanced breast imaging: analysis of six imaging techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikejimba, Lynda C; Kiarashi, Nooshin; Ghate, Sujata V; Samei, Ehsan; Lo, Joseph Y

    2014-06-01

    The use of contrast agents in breast imaging has the capability of enhancing nodule detectability and providing physiological information. Accordingly, there has been a growing trend toward using iodine as a contrast medium in digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Widespread use raises concerns about the best way to use iodine in DM and DBT, and thus a comparison is necessary to evaluate typical iodine-enhanced imaging methods. This study used a task-based observer model to determine the optimal imaging approach by analyzing six imaging paradigms in terms of their ability to resolve iodine at a given dose: unsubtracted mammography and tomosynthesis, temporal subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis, and dual energy subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis. Imaging performance was characterized using a detectability index d', derived from the system task transfer function (TTF), an imaging task, iodine signal difference, and the noise power spectrum (NPS). The task modeled a 10 mm diameter lesion containing iodine concentrations between 2.1 mg/cc and 8.6 mg/cc. TTF was obtained using an edge phantom, and the NPS was measured over several exposure levels, energies, and target-filter combinations. Using a structured CIRS phantom, d' was generated as a function of dose and iodine concentration. For all iodine concentrations and dose, temporal subtraction techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis yielded the highest d', while dual energy techniques for both modalities demonstrated the next best performance. Unsubtracted imaging resulted in the lowest d' values for both modalities, with unsubtracted mammography performing the worst out of all six paradigms. At any dose, temporal subtraction imaging provides the greatest detectability, with temporally subtracted DBT performing the highest. The authors attribute the successful performance to excellent cancellation of inplane structures and improved signal difference in the lesion.

  7. Task-based strategy for optimized contrast enhanced breast imaging: Analysis of six imaging techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikejimba, Lynda C., E-mail: lci@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Kiarashi, Nooshin [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Ghate, Sujata V. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Lo, Joseph Y. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The use of contrast agents in breast imaging has the capability of enhancing nodule detectability and providing physiological information. Accordingly, there has been a growing trend toward using iodine as a contrast medium in digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Widespread use raises concerns about the best way to use iodine in DM and DBT, and thus a comparison is necessary to evaluate typical iodine-enhanced imaging methods. This study used a task-based observer model to determine the optimal imaging approach by analyzing six imaging paradigms in terms of their ability to resolve iodine at a given dose: unsubtracted mammography and tomosynthesis, temporal subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis, and dual energy subtraction mammography and tomosynthesis. Methods: Imaging performance was characterized using a detectability index d{sup ′}, derived from the system task transfer function (TTF), an imaging task, iodine signal difference, and the noise power spectrum (NPS). The task modeled a 10 mm diameter lesion containing iodine concentrations between 2.1 mg/cc and 8.6 mg/cc. TTF was obtained using an edge phantom, and the NPS was measured over several exposure levels, energies, and target-filter combinations. Using a structured CIRS phantom, d{sup ′} was generated as a function of dose and iodine concentration. Results: For all iodine concentrations and dose, temporal subtraction techniques for mammography and tomosynthesis yielded the highest d{sup ′}, while dual energy techniques for both modalities demonstrated the next best performance. Unsubtracted imaging resulted in the lowest d{sup ′} values for both modalities, with unsubtracted mammography performing the worst out of all six paradigms. Conclusions: At any dose, temporal subtraction imaging provides the greatest detectability, with temporally subtracted DBT performing the highest. The authors attribute the successful performance to excellent cancellation of

  8. Arm exercise stress perfusion imaging predicts clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Albert K; Ilias-Khan, Nasreen A; Xian, Hong; Inman, Cindi; Martin, Wade H

    2011-12-01

    Treadmill exercise capacity in resting metabolic equivalents (METs) and stress hemodynamic, electrocardiographic (ECG), and myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) responses are independently predictive of adverse clinical events. However, limited data exist for arm ergometer stress testing (AXT) in patients who cannot perform leg exercise because of lower extremity disabilities. We sought to determine the extent to which AXT METs, hemodynamic, ECG, and MPI responses to arm exercise add independent incremental value to demographic and clinical variables for prediction of all-cause mortality, myocardial infarction (MI), or late coronary revascularization, individually or as a composite. A prospective cohort of 186 patients aged 64 ± 10 (SD) yr, unable to perform lower extremity exercise, underwent AXT MPI for clinical reasons between 1997 and 2002, and were followed for 62 ± 23 mo, to an endpoint of death or 12/31/2006. Average annual rates were 5.4% for mortality, 2.2% for MI, 2.5% for late coronary revascularization, and 8.0% for combined events. After adjustment for age and clinical variables, AXT METs [P ECG (P ECG (P leg exercise because of lower extremity disabilities, AXT METs are as important as MPI for prediction of mortality alone and death and MI combined, and a positive AXT ECG prognosticates MI alone and death and MI combined.

  9. Multi-objective optimization for deformable image registration: proof of concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderliesten, Tanja; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Bosman, Peter A. N.

    2012-02-01

    In this work we develop and study a methodology for deformable image registration that overcomes a drawback of optimization procedures in common deformable image registration approaches: the use of a single combination of different objectives. Because selecting the best combination is well-known to be non-trivial, we use a multi-objective optimization approach that computes and presents multiple outcomes (a so-called Pareto front) at once. The approach is inherently more powerful because not all Pareto-optimal outcomes are necessarily obtainable by running existing approaches multiple times, for different combinations. Furthermore, expert knowledge can be easily incorporated in making the final best-possible decision by simply looking at (a diverse selection of) the outcomes illustrating both the transformed image and the associated deformation vector field. At the basis of the optimization methodology lies an advanced, model-based evolutionary algorithm that aims to exploit features of a problem's structure in a principled manner via probabilistic modeling. Two objectives are defined: 1) maximization of intensity similarity (normalized mutual information) and 2) minimization of energy required to accomplish the transformation (a model based on Hooke's law that incorporates elasticity characteristics associated with different tissue types). A regular grid of points forms the basis of the transformation model. Interpolation extends the correspondence as found for the grid to the rest of the volume. As a proof of concept we performed tests on a 2D axial slice of a CT scan of a breast. Results indicate plausible behavior of the proposed methodology that innovatively combines intensity-based and model-based registration criteria with state-of-the-art adaptive computation techniques for multi-objective optimization in deformable image registration.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvic floor: from clinical to biomechanical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Sofia; Da Roza, Thuane; Parente, Marco; Ramos, Isabel; Mascarenhas, Teresa; Natal Jorge, Renato M

    2013-12-01

    This article reviews the current role of magnetic resonance imaging in the study of the pelvic floor anatomy and pelvic floor dysfunction. The application of static and dynamic magnetic resonance imaging in the clinical context and for biomechanical simulation modeling is assessed, and the main findings are summarized. Additionally, magnetic resonance-based diffusion tensor imaging is presented as a potential tool to evaluate muscle fiber morphology. In this article, focus is set on pelvic floor muscle damage related to urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse, sometimes as a consequence of vaginal delivery. Modeling applications that evaluate anatomical and physiological properties of pelvic floor are presented to further illustrate their particular characteristics. Finally, finite element method is described as a method for modeling and analyzing pelvic floor structures' biomechanical performance, based on material and behavioral properties of the tissues, and considering pressure loads that mimic real-life conditions such as active contraction or Valsalva maneuver.

  11. A widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor for image cytometry of biospecimens: Considerations for image quality optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheson, Joshua A; Majid, Aneeka A; Powless, Amy J; Muldoon, Timothy J

    2015-09-01

    Linear image sensors have been widely used in numerous research and industry applications to provide continuous imaging of moving objects. Here, we present a widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor used to image translating objects for image cytometry. First, a calibration curve was characterized for a custom microfluidic chamber over a span of volumetric pump rates. Image data were also acquired using 15 μm fluorescent polystyrene spheres on a slide with a motorized translation stage in order to match linear translation speed with line exposure periods to preserve the image aspect ratio. Aspect ratios were then calculated after imaging to ensure quality control of image data. Fluorescent beads were imaged in suspension flowing through the microfluidics chamber being pumped by a mechanical syringe pump at 16 μl min(-1) with a line exposure period of 150 μs. The line period was selected to acquire images of fluorescent beads with a 40 dB signal-to-background ratio. A motorized translation stage was then used to transport conventional glass slides of stained cellular biospecimens. Whole blood collected from healthy volunteers was stained with 0.02% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate was imaged to highlight leukocyte morphology with a 1.56 mm × 1.28 mm field of view (1540 ms total acquisition time). Oral squamous cells were also collected from healthy volunteers and stained with 0.01% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate to demonstrate quantifiable subcellular features and an average nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio of 0.03 (n = 75), with a resolution of 0.31 μm pixels(-1).

  12. A widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor for image cytometry of biospecimens: Considerations for image quality optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutcheson, Joshua A.; Majid, Aneeka A.; Powless, Amy J.; Muldoon, Timothy J., E-mail: tmuldoon@uark.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Arkansas, 120 Engineering Hall, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Linear image sensors have been widely used in numerous research and industry applications to provide continuous imaging of moving objects. Here, we present a widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor used to image translating objects for image cytometry. First, a calibration curve was characterized for a custom microfluidic chamber over a span of volumetric pump rates. Image data were also acquired using 15 μm fluorescent polystyrene spheres on a slide with a motorized translation stage in order to match linear translation speed with line exposure periods to preserve the image aspect ratio. Aspect ratios were then calculated after imaging to ensure quality control of image data. Fluorescent beads were imaged in suspension flowing through the microfluidics chamber being pumped by a mechanical syringe pump at 16 μl min{sup −1} with a line exposure period of 150 μs. The line period was selected to acquire images of fluorescent beads with a 40 dB signal-to-background ratio. A motorized translation stage was then used to transport conventional glass slides of stained cellular biospecimens. Whole blood collected from healthy volunteers was stained with 0.02% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate was imaged to highlight leukocyte morphology with a 1.56 mm × 1.28 mm field of view (1540 ms total acquisition time). Oral squamous cells were also collected from healthy volunteers and stained with 0.01% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate to demonstrate quantifiable subcellular features and an average nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio of 0.03 (n = 75), with a resolution of 0.31 μm pixels{sup −1}.

  13. Optimization of a shorter variable-acquisition time for legs to achieve true whole-body PET/CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Takuro; Miwa, Kenta; Murata, Taisuke; Miyaji, Noriaki; Wagatsuma, Kei; Motegi, Kazuki; Terauchi, Takashi; Koizumi, Mitsuru

    2017-12-01

    The present study aimed to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate PET images as a function of acquisition time for various leg sizes, and to optimize a shorter variable-acquisition time protocol for legs to achieve better qualitative and quantitative accuracy of true whole-body PET/CT images. The diameters of legs to be modeled as phantoms were defined based on data derived from 53 patients. This study analyzed PET images of a NEMA phantom and three plastic bottle phantoms (diameter, 5.68, 8.54 and 10.7 cm) that simulated the human body and legs, respectively. The phantoms comprised two spheres (diameters, 10 and 17 mm) containing fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose solution with sphere-to-background ratios of 4 at a background radioactivity level of 2.65 kBq/mL. All PET data were reconstructed with acquisition times ranging from 10 to 180, and 1200 s. We visually evaluated image quality and determined the coefficient of variance (CV) of the background, contrast and the quantitative %error of the hot spheres, and then determined two shorter variable-acquisition protocols for legs. Lesion detectability and quantitative accuracy determined based on maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) in PET images of a patient using the proposed protocols were also evaluated. A larger phantom and a shorter acquisition time resulted in increased background noise on images and decreased the contrast in hot spheres. A visual score of ≥ 1.5 was obtained when the acquisition time was ≥ 30 s for three leg phantoms, and ≥ 120 s for the NEMA phantom. The quantitative %errors of the 10- and 17-mm spheres in the leg phantoms were ± 15 and ± 10%, respectively, in PET images with a high CV (scan PET/CT assessment in the clinical setting.

  14. Mission planning optimization of video satellite for ground multi-object staring imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Kaikai; Xiang, Junhua; Zhang, Yulin

    2018-03-01

    This study investigates the emergency scheduling problem of ground multi-object staring imaging for a single video satellite. In the proposed mission scenario, the ground objects require a specified duration of staring imaging by the video satellite. The planning horizon is not long, i.e., it is usually shorter than one orbit period. A binary decision variable and the imaging order are used as the design variables, and the total observation revenue combined with the influence of the total attitude maneuvering time is regarded as the optimization objective. Based on the constraints of the observation time windows, satellite attitude adjustment time, and satellite maneuverability, a constraint satisfaction mission planning model is established for ground object staring imaging by a single video satellite. Further, a modified ant colony optimization algorithm with tabu lists (Tabu-ACO) is designed to solve this problem. The proposed algorithm can fully exploit the intelligence and local search ability of ACO. Based on full consideration of the mission characteristics, the design of the tabu lists can reduce the search range of ACO and improve the algorithm efficiency significantly. The simulation results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the conventional algorithm in terms of optimization performance, and it can obtain satisfactory scheduling results for the mission planning problem.

  15. Vehicle occupancy detection camera position optimization using design of experiments and standard image references

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Peter; Hoover, Martin; Rabbani, Mojgan

    2013-03-01

    Camera positioning and orientation is important to applications in domains such as transportation since the objects to be imaged vary greatly in shape and size. In a typical transportation application that requires capturing still images, inductive loops buried in the ground or laser trigger sensors are used when a vehicle reaches the image capture zone to trigger the image capture system. The camera in such a system is in a fixed position pointed at the roadway and at a fixed orientation. Thus the problem is to determine the optimal location and orientation of the camera when capturing images from a wide variety of vehicles. Methods from Design for Six Sigma, including identifying important parameters and noise sources and performing systematically designed experiments (DOE) can be used to determine an effective set of parameter settings for the camera position and orientation under these conditions. In the transportation application of high occupancy vehicle lane enforcement, the number of passengers in the vehicle is to be counted. Past work has described front seat vehicle occupant counting using a camera mounted on an overhead gantry looking through the front windshield in order to capture images of vehicle occupants. However, viewing rear seat passengers is more problematic due to obstructions including the vehicle body frame structures and seats. One approach is to view the rear seats through the side window. In this situation the problem of optimally positioning and orienting the camera to adequately capture the rear seats through the side window can be addressed through a designed experiment. In any automated traffic enforcement system it is necessary for humans to be able to review any automatically captured digital imagery in order to verify detected infractions. Thus for defining an output to be optimized for the designed experiment, a human defined standard image reference (SIR) was used to quantify the quality of the line-of-sight to the rear seats of

  16. SU-F-I-45: An Automated Technique to Measure Image Contrast in Clinical CT Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, J; Abadi, E; Meng, B; Samei, E [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate an automated technique for measuring image contrast in chest computed tomography (CT) exams. Methods: An automated computer algorithm was developed to measure the distribution of Hounsfield units (HUs) inside four major organs: the lungs, liver, aorta, and bones. These organs were first segmented or identified using computer vision and image processing techniques. Regions of interest (ROIs) were automatically placed inside the lungs, liver, and aorta and histograms of the HUs inside the ROIs were constructed. The mean and standard deviation of each histogram were computed for each CT dataset. Comparison of the mean and standard deviation of the HUs in the different organs provides different contrast values. The ROI for the bones is simply the segmentation mask of the bones. Since the histogram for bones does not follow a Gaussian distribution, the 25th and 75th percentile were computed instead of the mean. The sensitivity and accuracy of the algorithm was investigated by comparing the automated measurements with manual measurements. Fifteen contrast enhanced and fifteen non-contrast enhanced chest CT clinical datasets were examined in the validation procedure. Results: The algorithm successfully measured the histograms of the four organs in both contrast and non-contrast enhanced chest CT exams. The automated measurements were in agreement with manual measurements. The algorithm has sufficient sensitivity as indicated by the near unity slope of the automated versus manual measurement plots. Furthermore, the algorithm has sufficient accuracy as indicated by the high coefficient of determination, R2, values ranging from 0.879 to 0.998. Conclusion: Patient-specific image contrast can be measured from clinical datasets. The algorithm can be run on both contrast enhanced and non-enhanced clinical datasets. The method can be applied to automatically assess the contrast characteristics of clinical chest CT images and quantify dependencies

  17. Clinical Nonlinear Laser Imaging of Human Skin: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Cicchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear optical microscopy has the potential of being used in vivo as a noninvasive imaging modality for both epidermal and dermal imaging. This paper reviews the capabilities of nonlinear microscopy as a noninvasive high-resolution tool for clinical skin inspection. In particular, we show that two-photon fluorescence microscopy can be used as a diagnostic tool for characterizing epidermal layers by means of a morphological examination. Additional functional information on the metabolic state of cells can be provided by measuring the fluorescence decay of NADH. This approach allows differentiating epidermal layers having different structural and cytological features and has the potential of diagnosing pathologies in a very early stage. Regarding therapy follow-up, we demonstrate that nonlinear microscopy could be successfully used for monitoring the effect of a treatment. In particular, combined two-photon fluorescence and second-harmonic generation microscopy were used in vivo for monitoring collagen remodeling after microablative fractional laser resurfacing and for quantitatively monitoring psoriasis on the basis of the morphology of epidermal cells and dermal papillae. We believe that the described microscopic modalities could find in the near future a stable place in a clinical dermatological setting for quantitative diagnostic purposes and as a monitoring method for various treatments.

  18. Stress fractures: pathophysiology, clinical presentation, imaging features, and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matcuk, George R; Mahanty, Scott R; Skalski, Matthew R; Patel, Dakshesh B; White, Eric A; Gottsegen, Christopher J

    2016-08-01

    Stress fracture, in its most inclusive description, includes both fatigue and insufficiency fracture. Fatigue fractures, sometimes equated with the term "stress fractures," are most common in runners and other athletes and typically occur in the lower extremities. These fractures are the result of abnormal, cyclical loading on normal bone leading to local cortical resorption and fracture. Insufficiency fractures are common in elderly populations, secondary to osteoporosis, and are typically located in and around the pelvis. They are a result of normal or traumatic loading on abnormal bone. Subchondral insufficiency fractures of the hip or knee may cause acute pain that may present in the emergency setting. Medial tibial stress syndrome is a type of stress injury of the tibia related to activity and is a clinical syndrome encompassing a range of injuries from stress edema to frank-displaced fracture. Atypical subtrochanteric femoral fracture associated with long-term bisphosphonate therapy is also a recently discovered entity that needs early recognition to prevent progression to a complete fracture. Imaging recommendations for evaluation of stress fractures include initial plain radiographs followed, if necessary, by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is preferred over computed tomography (CT) and bone scintigraphy. Radiographs are the first-line modality and may reveal linear sclerosis and periosteal reaction prior to the development of a frank fracture. MRI is highly sensitive with findings ranging from periosteal edema to bone marrow and intracortical signal abnormality. Additionally, a brief description of relevant clinical management of stress fractures is included.

  19. Traceable working standards with SI units of radiance for characterizing the measurement performance of investigational clinical NIRF imaging devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Banghe; Rasmussen, John C.; Litorja, Maritoni; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2017-03-01

    All medical devices for Food and Drug market approval require specifications of performance based upon International System of Units (SI) or units derived from SI for reasons of traceability. Recently, near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging devices of a variety of designs have emerged on the market and in investigational clinical studies. Yet the design of devices used in the clinical studies vary widely, suggesting variable device performance. Device performance depends upon optimal excitation of NIRF imaging agents, rejection of backscattered excitation and ambient light, and selective collection of fluorescence emanating from the fluorophore. There remains no traceable working standards with SI units of radiance to enable prediction that a given molecular imaging agent can be detected in humans by a given NIRF imaging device. Furthermore, as technologies evolve and as NIRF imaging device components change, there remains no standardized means to track device improvements over time and establish clinical performance without involving clinical trials, often costly. In this study, we deployed a methodology to calibrate luminescent radiance of a stable, solid phantom in SI units of mW/cm2/sr for characterizing the measurement performance of ICCD and IsCMOS camera based NIRF imaging devices, such as signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast. The methodology allowed determination of superior SNR of the ICCD over the IsCMOS system; comparable contrast of ICCD and IsCMOS depending upon binning strategies.

  20. In vivo near-infrared autofluorescence imaging of pigmented skin lesions: methods, technical improvements and preliminary clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang; Zhao, Jianhua; Lui, Harvey; He, Qingli; Zeng, Haishan

    2013-02-01

    Fluorescence emission from in vivo cutaneous melanin was recently detected under near-infrared (NIR) excitation by our group. We then built a prototype NIR autofluorescence imaging system to observe and characterize the melanin distribution in human skin. In this article, we reported a new setup of NIR fluorescence imaging system and calibration methods to optimize the system for better clinical feasibility and clearer image. The imaging system was designed to perform both fluorescence and reflectance imaging with a 785-nm fiber-coupled laser source. The illumination light was purified by a 785-nm bandpass filter for fluorescence excitation; while the spontaneous components were selected by a longpass filter for NIR reflectance imaging. A hand-controlled filter wheel was used to switch these two filters for different imaging modes. A dichroic filter was used to guide the illuminating light onto the skin surface for excitation. Reflectance and fluorescence signals were collected sequentially by a NIR optimized CCD camera. The captured images were calibrated by the reflectance images of a standard reflectance disk for non-uniform illuminations and light collection efficiencies. The clinical results demonstrated that NIR fluorescence intensities and distribution patterns vary among lesion types. It was also confirmed that pigmented skin lesions emitted higher NIR fluorescence than the surrounding normal skin due to the presentation of higher concentrations of cutaneous melanin within the lesions. NIR autofluorescence imaging system could be utilized as a powerful tool for visualizing melanin distribution in pigmented skin lesions and as a potential method for aiding melanoma detection. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Characterization and optimization of a thin direct electron detector for fast imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dourki, I.; Westermeier, F.; Schopper, F.; Richter, R. H.; Andricek, L.; Ninkovic, J.; Treis, J.; Koffmane, C.; Wassatsch, A.; Peric, I.; Epp, S. W.; Miller, R. J. D.

    2017-03-01

    Direct electron detectors are increasingly used to explore the dynamics of macromolecules in real space and real time using transmission electron microscopy. The purpose of this work is to optimize the most suitable detector configuration of a thin silicon detector by Monte Carlo Simulations. Several simulations were performed to achieve an advanced detector geometry that reduces significantly the background signal due to backscattered electrons resulting in an enhanced imaging performance of the detector. Utilizing DEPFET (DEpleted P-channel Field Effect Transistor) technology and the novel ideas for the optimized detector geometry, a unique direct hit electron detector is currently being produced.

  2. Extended hidden Markov model for optimized segmentation of breast thermography images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudzadeh, E.; Montazeri, M. A.; Zekri, M.; Sadri, S.

    2015-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed form of cancer in women. Thermography has been shown to provide an efficient screening modality for detecting breast cancer as it is able to detect small tumors and hence can lead to earlier diagnosis. This paper presents a novel extended hidden Markov model (EHMM), for optimized segmentation of breast thermogram for more effective image interpretation and easier analysis of Infrared (IR) thermal patterns. Competitive advantage of EHMM method refers to handling random sampling of the breast IR images with re-estimation of the model parameters. The performance of the algorithm is illustrated by applying EHMM segmentation method on the images of IUT_OPTIC database and compared with previously related methods. Simulation results indicate the remarkable capabilities of the proposed approach. It is worth noting that the presented algorithm is able to map semi hot regions into distinct areas and extract the regions of breast thermal images significantly, while the execution time is reduced.

  3. Imaging in drug discovery and early clinical trials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rudin, M

    2005-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Imaging modalities: principles and information content Tobias Schaeffter ... 15 Magnetic resonance and fluorescence based molecular imaging technologies David...

  4. Impact of miscentering on patient dose and image noise in x-ray CT imaging : Phantom and clinical studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habibzadeh, M. A.; Ay, M. R.; Asl, A. R. Kamali; Ghadiri, H.; Zaidi, H.

    The operation of the bowtie filter in x-ray CT is correct if the object being scanned is properly centered in the scanner's field-of-view. Otherwise, the dose delivered to the patient and image noise will deviate from optimal setting. We investigate the effect of miscentering on image noise and

  5. Evaluation of image registration in PET/CT of the liver and recommendations for optimized imaging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, W.V.; Dalen, J.A. van; Wiering, B.; Huisman, H.J.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Ruers, T.J.M.; Oyen, W.J.G.

    2007-01-01

    Multimodality PET/CT of the liver can be performed with an integrated (hybrid) PET/CT scanner or with software fusion of dedicated PET and CT. Accurate anatomic correlation and good image quality of both modalities are important prerequisites, regardless of the applied method. Registration accuracy

  6. Teaching learning based optimization-functional link artificial neural network filter for mixed noise reduction from magnetic resonance image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M; Mishra, S K

    2017-01-01

    The clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images may get corrupted due to the presence of the mixture of different types of noises such as Rician, Gaussian, impulse, etc. Most of the available filtering algorithms are noise specific, linear, and non-adaptive. There is a need to develop a nonlinear adaptive filter that adapts itself according to the requirement and effectively applied for suppression of mixed noise from different MRI images. In view of this, a novel nonlinear neural network based adaptive filter i.e. functional link artificial neural network (FLANN) whose weights are trained by a recently developed derivative free meta-heuristic technique i.e. teaching learning based optimization (TLBO) is proposed and implemented. The performance of the proposed filter is compared with five other adaptive filters and analyzed by considering quantitative metrics and evaluating the nonparametric statistical test. The convergence curve and computational time are also included for investigating the efficiency of the proposed as well as competitive filters. The simulation outcomes of proposed filter outperform the other adaptive filters. The proposed filter can be hybridized with other evolutionary technique and utilized for removing different noise and artifacts from others medical images more competently.

  7. Optimizing T1-weighted imaging of cortical myelin content at 3.0 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Nicholas A; Hashim, Eyesha; Janik, Rafal; Konyer, Norman B; Weiss, Marcel; Stanisz, Greg J; Turner, Robert; Geyer, Stefan

    2013-01-15

    With increases in the sensitivity and resolution of anatomical MRI for the brain, methods for mapping the organization of the cerebral cortex by imaging its myelin content have emerged. This identifies major sensory and motor regions and could be used in studies of cortical organization, particularly if patterns of myelination can be visualized over the cortical surface robustly in individual subjects. The imaging problem is difficult, however, because of the relative thinness of the cerebral cortex and the low intracortical tissue contrast. In this paper, we optimize the contrast of T(1)-weighted MRI to help better visualize patterns of myelination. We measure a small but statistically significant difference in T(1) of 171 ± 40 ms between cortical regions with low and high myelin contents in the human cortex at 3T, and then perform simulations to choose parameters for an inversion-recovery pulse sequence that utilizes this T(1) difference to increase contrast within the cortex. We show that lengthening the delay between signal acquisition and the next inversion pulse in the sequence increases intracortical contrast more effectively than does image averaging. Using the optimized sequence, we show that major myelinated regions that are relatively thick, such as the primary motor and auditory regions, can be visualized well in individuals at 3T using whole-cortex 3D images made at 1mm isotropic resolution, while thinner regions, such as the primary visual cortex, can be visualized using targeted 3D images made at 0.5mm isotropic resolution. Our findings demonstrate that patterns of myelination can be better visualized in individual subjects when the imaging is optimized to highlight intracortical contrast and can help to pave the way for the creation of matched maps of microanatomy and function in the cortex of living individual humans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Lumbar spinal imaging in radicular pain and related conditions. Understanding diagnostic images in a clinical context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmink, Jan T. [University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands). Dept. Radiology

    2010-07-01

    There is general agreement that lumbosacral nerve root compression is a prime factor in the pathogenesis of sciatica and neurogenic claudication, although humoral and vascular factors certainly play a role as well. This book focuses on imaging of the various ways in which nerve root compression can come about, and assessing which anatomic features are reliably associated with the occurrence of radicular pain, as opposed to morphologic findings which are probably coincidental. After a discussion of the nature of radicular pain and related symptoms, spinal imaging techniques and options are reviewed, with emphasis on the role of MR myelography in assessing the condition of the intradural nerve roots. A chapter on normal topographic, sectional, and functional (dynamic) radiologic anatomy is followed by a presentation on pathologic anatomy, addressing the various mechanisms of nerve root compression. In the chapter on pre- and postoperative imaging, features which may help to predict the evolution of the symptoms are discussed, with an eye to selecting candidates for surgical treatment. This is followed by a discussion of the role and limitations of imaging studies in various adverse postoperative conditions. In illustrations involving patient studies, imaging features are linked where possible to the clinical symptoms and history of the individuals involved. (orig.)

  9. Clinical applications of cobalt-radionuclides in neuro-imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, H.M.L

    1998-04-01

    The aim of the studies embodied in this thesis was to investigate the clinical applicability of Co in euro-imaging using positron emission tomography (PET). To this purpose, a set of closely related pilot studies were performed in patients suffering from several neurological diseases affecting the brain. Chapter 2 discusses the physiological role of Co and both indications and complications of Co-administration in the past. The probable deposition mechanism of Co is described, potential (absence of) evidence of Co mimicking Ca in vivo is discussed, a comparison is made with other tracer-analogues (Ga, TI, Rb) and several hypotheses with respect to the pharmacokinetic behaviour of Co and the role of (inflammatory) proteins and cells are forwarded. The etiologic mechanism(s), clinical symptoms, Ca-related pathophysiology and (most recent) imaging techniques are reviewed of Multiple Sclerosis, cerebrovascular stroke, traumatic brain injury and primary brain tumours. The major goal of these respective reviews is both a rough outline of present insights and near-future developments and an assessment of the (im)possibilities in visualising the actual substrate of disease. Since Co is assumed to reflect (the common pathway of) Ca, an application of Co (based on cell-decay and inflammation) may be hypothesised in all of the diseases mentioned. These considerations served as a theoretical basis for our further studies in clinical practice. Chapter 3 (Original reprints) presents the actual results, whil Chapter 4 (General discussion) reflects on lessons that can be learned from the present work and consequently formulates some suggestions for future (extended) studies. The contours of possible new emerging areas of interest (dementia of the Alzheimer type; vascular dementia; stunned myocardium) are drawn in continuation of the foregoing studies. 47 refs.

  10. Clinical characteristics and MR imaging features of nonalcoholic Wernicke encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, G-Q; Zhong, C; Jin, L; Wang, J; Zhang, Yuhao; Zheng, X; Zhang, Yuwen; Hong, Z

    2008-01-01

    Nonalcoholic Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is prone to be underestimated in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to improve its awareness and early accurate diagnosis. We conducted a retrospective review of the cases of 12 patients with nonalcoholic WE, consisting of clinical characteristics and MR imaging features as well as follow-up after administration of thiamine. Patients with mild coma or lethargy (7/12) exhibited typical MR features of symmetric brain paraventricular damage. Patients without disturbances of consciousness or who only had drowsiness (3/12) exhibited a lesion of the periaqueductal area only. In addition to typical MR manifestations, symmetric cortical involvement was observed in 2 of 12 patients with deep coma. Gadolinium enhancement of the mammillary bodies was observed in 2 of 3 patients. No atrophy of the mammillary bodies and cerebellar vermis was found in any patients. Of 10 patients without deep coma and cortical damage, 2 missed the follow-up and 8, who recovered clinically, also showed accordant resolution of abnormal hyperintense signal intensity on T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images within 2 weeks to 1 year after thiamine supplementation. Two patients with deep coma and cortical damage showed a poor prognosis:1 patient died 15 days after being diagnosed with WE, and the other entered a persistent vegetative state during a follow-up of 2 years. Typical symmetric damage of the mammillary bodies and brain paraventricular regions may permit a specific diagnosis of nonalcoholic WE. In all patients, no atrophy of the mammillary bodies and cerebellar vermis was found. Cortical involvement in patients with nonalcoholic WE may be indicative of irreversible lesions and a poor prognosis.

  11. Genetic Optimization for Associative Semantic Ranking Models of Satellite Images by Land Cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nil Kilicay-Ergin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Associative methods for content-based image ranking by semantics are attractive due to the similarity of generated models to human models of understanding. Although they tend to return results that are better understood by image analysts, the induction of these models is difficult to build due to factors that affect training complexity, such as coexistence of visual patterns in same images, over-fitting or under-fitting and semantic representation differences among image analysts. This article proposes a methodology to reduce the complexity of ranking satellite images for associative methods. Our approach employs genetic operations to provide faster and more accurate models for ranking by semantic using low level features. The added accuracy is provided by a reduction in the likelihood to reach local minima or to overfit. The experiments show that, using genetic optimization, associative methods perform better or at similar levels as state-of-the-art ensemble methods for ranking. The mean average precision (MAP of ranking by semantic was improved by 14% over similar associative methods that use other optimization techniques while maintaining smaller size for each semantic model.

  12. A generalized model for optimal transport of images including dissipation and density modulation

    KAUST Repository

    Maas, Jan

    2015-11-01

    © EDP Sciences, SMAI 2015. In this paper the optimal transport and the metamorphosis perspectives are combined. For a pair of given input images geodesic paths in the space of images are defined as minimizers of a resulting path energy. To this end, the underlying Riemannian metric measures the rate of transport cost and the rate of viscous dissipation. Furthermore, the model is capable to deal with strongly varying image contrast and explicitly allows for sources and sinks in the transport equations which are incorporated in the metric related to the metamorphosis approach by Trouvé and Younes. In the non-viscous case with source term existence of geodesic paths is proven in the space of measures. The proposed model is explored on the range from merely optimal transport to strongly dissipative dynamics. For this model a robust and effective variational time discretization of geodesic paths is proposed. This requires to minimize a discrete path energy consisting of a sum of consecutive image matching functionals. These functionals are defined on corresponding pairs of intensity functions and on associated pairwise matching deformations. Existence of time discrete geodesics is demonstrated. Furthermore, a finite element implementation is proposed and applied to instructive test cases and to real images. In the non-viscous case this is compared to the algorithm proposed by Benamou and Brenier including a discretization of the source term. Finally, the model is generalized to define discrete weighted barycentres with applications to textures and objects.

  13. Learning with distribution of optimized features for recognizing common CT imaging signs of lung diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ling; Liu, Xiabi; Fei, Baowei

    2017-01-01

    Common CT imaging signs of lung diseases (CISLs) are defined as the imaging signs that frequently appear in lung CT images from patients. CISLs play important roles in the diagnosis of lung diseases. This paper proposes a novel learning method, namely learning with distribution of optimized feature (DOF), to effectively recognize the characteristics of CISLs. We improve the classification performance by learning the optimized features under different distributions. Specifically, we adopt the minimum spanning tree algorithm to capture the relationship between features and discriminant ability of features for selecting the most important features. To overcome the problem of various distributions in one CISL, we propose a hierarchical learning method. First, we use an unsupervised learning method to cluster samples into groups based on their distribution. Second, in each group, we use a supervised learning method to train a model based on their categories of CISLs. Finally, we obtain multiple classification decisions from multiple trained models and use majority voting to achieve the final decision. The proposed approach has been implemented on a set of 511 samples captured from human lung CT images and achieves a classification accuracy of 91.96%. The proposed DOF method is effective and can provide a useful tool for computer-aided diagnosis of lung diseases on CT images.

  14. Optimization procedure for a Talbot-Lau x-ray phase-contrast imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, J.; Meyer, P.; Horn, F.; Pelzer, G.; Michel, T.; Mohr, J.; Anton, G.

    2017-04-01

    In Talbot-Lau x-ray imaging, the fringe visibility provided by the interferometer is a crucial quality parameter to preserve high quality images at an acceptable dose level. The noise of the obtained differential phase signal and the dark-field image is directly influenced by the visibility. To optimize the performance of such an interferometer, we use wave-field simulations to investigate the effect of the phase grating G1. Therefore, we varied the grating parameters duty cycle and grating bar height. Each set of these parameters were evaluated for different propagation distances and for multiple x-ray spectra. In this multidimensional space the interferometer configuration with the highest visibility over a wide range of energies was selected to cover a multiple possible x-ray applications. We manufactured the optimized phase grating G1, the corresponding source grating G0 and analyzer grating G2 and compare the experimental results with the expected results obtained from simulations. The presented measurements show outstanding visibilities up to 50% using a broad x-ray spectrum. These measurements are in very good agreement to the simulation results. The achieved visibility is up to two times higher than for a standard-type setup. This enhancement results in high quality images at a reasonable dose level which we exemplarily demonstrate by imaging a foreign object in a pork trotter.

  15. Tree Structure Sparsity Pattern Guided Convex Optimization for Compressive Sensing of Large-Scale Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wei-Jie; Lin, Gang-Xuan; Lu, Chun-Shien

    2016-12-01

    Cost-efficient compressive sensing of large-scale images with quickly reconstructed high-quality results is very challenging. In this paper, we present an algorithm to solve convex optimization via the tree structure sparsity pattern, which can be run in the operator to reduce computation cost and maintain good quality, especially for large-scale images. We also provide convergence analysis and convergence rate analysis for the proposed method. The feasibility of our method is verified through simulations and comparison with state-of-theart algorithms.

  16. Product code optimization for determinate state LDPC decoding in robust image transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomos, Nikolaos; Boulgouris, Nikolaos V; Strintzis, Michael G

    2006-08-01

    We propose a novel scheme for error-resilient image transmission. The proposed scheme employs a product coder consisting of low-density parity check (LDPC) codes and Reed-Solomon codes in order to deal effectively with bit errors. The efficiency of the proposed scheme is based on the exploitation of determinate symbols in Tanner graph decoding of LDPC codes and a novel product code optimization technique based on error estimation. Experimental evaluation demonstrates the superiority of the proposed system in comparison to recent state-of-the-art techniques for image transmission.

  17. Quantitative Clinical Imaging Methods for Monitoring Intratumoral Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo Yeun; Gatenby, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    Solid tumors are multiscale, open, complex, dynamic systems: complex because they have many interacting components, dynamic because both the components and their interactions can change with time, and open because the tumor freely communicates with surrounding and even distant host tissue. Thus, it is not surprising that striking intratumoral variations are commonly observed in clinical imaging such as MRI and CT and that several recent studies found striking regional variations in the molecular properties of cancer cells from the same tumor. Interestingly, this spatial heterogeneity in molecular properties of tumor cells is typically ascribed to branching clonal evolution due to accumulating mutations while macroscopic variations observed in, for example, clinical MRI scans are usually viewed as functions of blood flow. The clinical significance of spatial heterogeneity has not been fully determined but there is a general consensus that the varying intratumoral landscape along with patient factors such as age, morbidity and lifestyle, contributes significantly to the often unpredictable response of individual patients within a disease cohort treated with the same standard-of-care therapy.Here we investigate the potential link between macroscopic tumor heterogeneity observed by clinical imaging and spatial variations in the observed molecular properties of cancer cells. We build on techniques developed in landscape ecology to link regional variations in the distribution of species with local environmental conditions that define their habitat. That is, we view each region of the tumor as a local ecosystem consisting of environmental conditions such as access to nutrients, oxygen, and means of waste clearance related to blood flow and the local population of tumor cells that both adapt to these conditions and, to some extent, change them through, for example, production of angiogenic factors. Furthermore, interactions among neighboring habitats can produce broader

  18. Design and Optimization of Gadolinium Based Contrast Agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, G.A.; Geraldes, C.F.G.C. [University of Coimbra (Portugal). Faculty of Science and Technology; University of Coimbra (Portugal). Center of Neurosciences and Cell Biology. Dept. of Biochemistry; E-mail: geraldes@bioq.uc.pt

    2007-07-01

    The role of Gd{sup 3+} chelates as contrast agents in Magnetic Resonance Imaging is discussed. The theory describing the different contributions to paramagnetic relaxation relevant to the understanding of the molecular parameters determining the relativity of those Gd{sup 3+} chelates, is presented. The experimental techniques used to obtain those parameters are also described. Then, the various approaches taken to optimize those parameters, leading to maximum relativity (efficiency) of the contrast agents, are also illustrated with relevant examples taken from the literature. The various types of Gd{sup 3+}-based agents, besides non-specific and hepatobiliary agents, are also discussed, namely blood pool, targeting, responsive and paramagnetic chemical shift saturation transfer (PARACEST) agents. Finally, a perspective is presented of some of the challenges lying ahead in the optimization of MRI contrast agents to be useful in Molecular Imaging. (author)

  19. GPU implementation of discrete particle swarm optimization algorithm for endmember extraction from hyperspectral image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chaoyin; Yuan, Zhengwu; Wu, Yuanfeng

    2017-10-01

    Hyperspectral image unmixing is an important part of hyperspectral data analysis. The mixed pixel decomposition consists of two steps, endmember (the unique signatures of pure ground components) extraction and abundance (the proportion of each endmember in each pixel) estimation. Recently, a Discrete Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm (DPSO) was proposed for accurately extract endmembers with high optimal performance. However, the DPSO algorithm shows very high computational complexity, which makes the endmember extraction procedure very time consuming for hyperspectral image unmixing. Thus, in this paper, the DPSO endmember extraction algorithm was parallelized, implemented on the CUDA (GPU K20) platform, and evaluated by real hyperspectral remote sensing data. The experimental results show that with increasing the number of particles the parallelized version obtained much higher computing efficiency while maintain the same endmember exaction accuracy.

  20. Improving the performance of surgery-based clinical pathways: a simulation-optimization approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Yasar A; Tànfani, Elena; Testi, Angela

    2017-03-01

    This paper aims to improve the performance of clinical processes using clinical pathways (CPs). The specific goal of this research is to develop a decision support tool, based on a simulation-optimization approach, which identify the proper adjustment and alignment of resources to achieve better performance for both the patients and the health-care facility. When multiple perspectives are present in a decision problem, critical issues arise and often require the balancing of goals. In our approach, meeting patients' clinical needs in a timely manner, and to avoid worsening of clinical conditions, we assess the level of appropriate resources. The simulation-optimization model seeks and evaluates alternative resource configurations aimed at balancing the two main objectives-meeting patient needs and optimal utilization of beds and operating rooms.Using primary data collected at a Department of Surgery of a public hospital located in Genoa, Italy. The simulation-optimization modelling approach in this study has been applied to evaluate the thyroid surgical treatment together with the other surgery-based CPs. The low rate of bed utilization and the long elective waiting lists of the specialty under study indicates that the wards were oversized while the operating room capacity was the bottleneck of the system. The model enables hospital managers determine which objective has to be given priority, as well as the corresponding opportunity costs.

  1. Optimizing clinical performance and geometrical robustness of a new electrode device for intracranial tumor electroporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmood, Faisal; Gehl, Julie

    2011-01-01

    and genes to intracranial tumors in humans, and demonstrate a method to optimize the design (i.e. geometry) of the electrode device prototype to improve both clinical performance and geometrical tolerance (robustness). We have employed a semiempirical objective function based on constraints similar to those...

  2. Multi-armed Bandit Models for the Optimal Design of Clinical Trials: Benefits and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Sofía S; Bowden, Jack; Wason, James

    Multi-armed bandit problems (MABPs) are a special type of optimal control problem well suited to model resource allocation under uncertainty in a wide variety of contexts. Since the first publication of the optimal solution of the classic MABP by a dynamic index rule, the bandit literature quickly diversified and emerged as an active research topic. Across this literature, the use of bandit models to optimally design clinical trials became a typical motivating application, yet little of the resulting theory has ever been used in the actual design and analysis of clinical trials. To this end, we review two MABP decision-theoretic approaches to the optimal allocation of treatments in a clinical trial: the infinite-horizon Bayesian Bernoulli MABP and the finite-horizon variant. These models possess distinct theoretical properties and lead to separate allocation rules in a clinical trial design context. We evaluate their performance compared to other allocation rules, including fixed randomization. Our results indicate that bandit approaches offer significant advantages, in terms of assigning more patients to better treatments, and severe limitations, in terms of their resulting statistical power. We propose a novel bandit-based patient allocation rule that overcomes the issue of low power, thus removing a potential barrier for their use in practice.

  3. Imaging studies and biomarkers to detect clinically meaningful vesicoureteral reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaella Maloney Prasad

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The work-up of a febrile urinary tract infection is generally performed to detect vesicoureteral reflux (VUR and its possible complications. The imaging modalities most commonly used for this purpose are renal-bladder ultrasound, voiding cystourethrogram and dimercapto-succinic acid scan. These studies each contribute valuable information, but carry individual benefits and limitations that may impact their efficacy. Biochemical markers are not commonly used in pediatric urology to diagnose or differentiate high-risk disease, but this is the emerging frontier, which will hopefully change our approach to VUR in the future. As it becomes more apparent that there is tremendous clinical variation within grades of VUR, the need to distinguish clinically significant from insignificant disease grows. The unfortunate truth about VUR is that recommendations for treatment may be inconsistent. Nuances in clinical decision-making will always exist, but opinions for medical versus surgical intervention should be more standardized, based on risk of injury to the kidney.

  4. Hemicrania Continua: Functional Imaging and Clinical Features With Diagnostic Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahler, Kristen

    2013-04-10

    This review focuses on summarizing 2 pivotal articles in the clinical and pathophysiologic understanding of hemicrania continua (HC). The first article, a functional imaging project, identifies both the dorsal rostral pons (a region associated with the generation of migraines) and the posterior hypothalamus (a region associated with the generation of cluster and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache with conjunctival injection and tearing [SUNCT]) as active during HC. The second article is a summary of the clinical features seen in a prospective cohort of HC patients that carry significant diagnostic implications. In particular, they identify a wider range of autonomic signs than what is currently included in the International Headache Society criteria (including an absence of autonomic signs in a small percentage of patients), a high frequency of migrainous features, and the presence of aggravation and/or restlessness during attacks. Wide variations in exacerbation length, frequency, pain description, and pain location (including side-switching pain) are also noted. Thus, a case is made for widening and modifying the clinical diagnostic criteria used to identify patients with HC. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  5. An object localization optimization technique in medical images using plant growth simulation algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Deblina; Paul, Anand; Kim, Jeong Hong; Kim, Mucheol

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of leukocyte images has drawn interest from fields of both medicine and computer vision for quite some time where different techniques have been applied to automate the process of manual analysis and classification of such images. Manual analysis of blood samples to identify leukocytes is time-consuming and susceptible to error due to the different morphological features of the cells. In this article, the nature-inspired plant growth simulation algorithm has been applied to optimize the image processing technique of object localization of medical images of leukocytes. This paper presents a random bionic algorithm for the automated detection of white blood cells embedded in cluttered smear and stained images of blood samples that uses a fitness function that matches the resemblances of the generated candidate solution to an actual leukocyte. The set of candidate solutions evolves via successive iterations as the proposed algorithm proceeds, guaranteeing their fit with the actual leukocytes outlined in the edge map of the image. The higher precision and sensitivity of the proposed scheme from the existing methods is validated with the experimental results of blood cell images. The proposed method reduces the feasible sets of growth points in each iteration, thereby reducing the required run time of load flow, objective function evaluation, thus reaching the goal state in minimum time and within the desired constraints.

  6. Optimization of polarizer azimuth in improving domain image contrast in magneto-optical Kerr microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X. [School of Physics and Technology, University of Ji Nan, Jinan 250022 (China); Lian, J., E-mail: sps_wangx@ujn.edu.cn [Department of Optical Engineering, Scholl of Science and Engineering, Shan Dong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Li, P.; Li, X [School of Physics and Technology, University of Ji Nan, Jinan 250022 (China); Li, M.M.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Y.X. [Department of Optical Engineering, Scholl of Science and Engineering, Shan Dong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2016-02-01

    The magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) is a widely used technique in magnetic domain imaging for its high surface sensitivity and external magnetic compatibility. In this work, we use the generalized magneto-optical ellipsometry technique to study the influence of polarizer and analyzer azimuth on domain image contrast in the Kerr microscope. Results show that the image contrasts around the extinction place are larger than other area. When the polarizer and analyzer are set slightly deviated from the extinction condition (0.35°,89.7°), the maximum image contrast can be obtained. The color map of image contrast on polarizer and analyzer angle is given by measuring the MOKE response of 200 nm permalloy. Results verify the validity of the conclusion. - Highlights: • In this text, we expand the application of generalized magneto-optical ellipsometry (GME) to domain observing area. We study the domain image contrast with different polarizer and analyzer combination with GME. • 1. In this text, we provide a new method to improve the domain image contrast by optimizing the polarizer and analyzer azimuth combinations in magneto-optical Kerr microscopy.

  7. X-ray imaging optimization of 3D tissue engineering scaffolds via combinatorial fabrication methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanyin; Dorsey, Shauna M; Becker, Matthew L; Lin-Gibson, Sheng; Schumacher, Gary E; Flaim, Glenn M; Kohn, Joachim; Simon, Carl G

    2008-04-01

    We have developed a combinatorial method for determining optimum tissue scaffold composition for several X-ray imaging techniques. X-ray radiography and X-ray microcomputed tomography enable non-invasive imaging of implants in vivo and in vitro. However, highly porous polymeric scaffolds do not always possess sufficient X-ray contrast and are therefore difficult to image with X-ray-based techniques. Incorporation of high radiocontrast atoms, such as iodine, into the polymer structure improves X-ray radiopacity but also affects physicochemical properties and material performance. Thus, we have developed a combinatorial library approach to efficiently determine the minimum amount of contrast agent necessary for X-ray-based imaging. The combinatorial approach is demonstrated in a polymer blend scaffold system where X-ray imaging of poly(desaminotyrosyl-tyrosine ethyl ester carbonate) (pDTEc) scaffolds is improved through a controlled composition variation with an iodinated-pDTEc analog (pI(2)DTEc). The results show that pDTEc scaffolds must include at least 9%, 16%, 38% or 46% pI(2)DTEc (by mass) to enable effective imaging by microradiography, dental radiography, dental radiography through 0.75cm of muscle tissue or microcomputed tomography, respectively. Only two scaffold libraries were required to determine these minimum pI(2)DTEc percentages required for X-ray imaging, which demonstrates the efficiency of this new combinatorial approach for optimizing scaffold formulations.

  8. Seismic imaging of glaciomarine sediments of Antarctica: Optimizing the acquisition parameters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pandey, D.; Chaubey, A.K.; Rajan, S.

    of Marine Sciences Vol. 37(4), December 2008, pp. 412-418 Seismic imaging of glaciomarine sediments of Antarctica: Optimizing the acquisition parameters Dhananjai Pandey1*, Anil Chaubey2, S Rajan1 1National Centre for Antarctic and Ocean... discussions on the reflection signature of the glaciomarine sediments of the continental slope and rise off Prydz Bay in east Antarctica in terms of depositional processes. The present study is based on synthetic seismogram modeling using finite...

  9. Hounsfield unit recovery in clinical cone beam CT images of the thorax acquired for image guided radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thing, Rune Slot; Bernchou, Uffe; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive artefact correction method for clinical cone beam CT (CBCT) images acquired for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) on a commercial system is presented. The method is demonstrated to reduce artefacts and recover CT-like Hounsfield units (HU) in reconstructed CBCT images of five...

  10. Optimization of propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography for breast cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, P; Pacile, S; Nesterets, Y I; Mayo, S C; Dullin, C; Dreossi, D; Arfelli, F; Thompson, D; Lockie, D; McCormack, M; Taba, S T; Brun, F; Pinamonti, M; Nickson, C; Hall, C; Dimmock, M; Zanconati, F; Cholewa, M; Quiney, H; Brennan, P C; Tromba, G; Gureyev, T E

    2017-03-21

    The aim of this study was to optimise the experimental protocol and data analysis for in-vivo breast cancer x-ray imaging. Results are presented of the experiment at the SYRMEP beamline of Elettra Synchrotron using the propagation-based phase-contrast mammographic tomography method, which incorporates not only absorption, but also x-ray phase information. In this study the images of breast tissue samples, of a size corresponding to a full human breast, with radiologically acceptable x-ray doses were obtained, and the degree of improvement of the image quality (from the diagnostic point of view) achievable using propagation-based phase-contrast image acquisition protocols with proper incorporation of x-ray phase retrieval into the reconstruction pipeline was investigated. Parameters such as the x-ray energy, sample-to-detector distance and data processing methods were tested, evaluated and optimized with respect to the estimated diagnostic value using a mastectomy sample with a malignant lesion. The results of quantitative evaluation of images were obtained by means of radiological assessment carried out by 13 experienced specialists. A comparative analysis was performed between the x-ray and the histological images of the specimen. The results of the analysis indicate that, within the investigated range of parameters, both the objective image quality characteristics and the subjective radiological scores of propagation-based phase-contrast images of breast tissues monotonically increase with the strength of phase contrast which in turn is directly proportional to the product of the radiation wavelength and the sample-to-detector distance. The outcomes of this study serve to define the practical imaging conditions and the CT reconstruction procedures appropriate for low-dose phase-contrast mammographic imaging of live patients at specially designed synchrotron beamlines.

  11. OPTIMAL IMAGE STITCHING FOR CONCRETE BRIDGE BOTTOM SURFACES AIDED BY 3D STRUCTURE LINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Crack detection for bridge bottom surfaces via remote sensing techniques is undergoing a revolution in the last few years. For such applications, a large amount of images, acquired with high-resolution industrial cameras close to the bottom surfaces with some mobile platform, are required to be stitched into a wide-view single composite image. The conventional idea of stitching a panorama with the affine model or the homographic model always suffers a series of serious problems due to poor texture and out-of-focus blurring introduced by depth of field. In this paper, we present a novel method to seamlessly stitch these images aided by 3D structure lines of bridge bottom surfaces, which are extracted from 3D camera data. First, we propose to initially align each image in geometry based on its rough position and orientation acquired with both a laser range finder (LRF and a high-precision incremental encoder, and these images are divided into several groups with the rough position and orientation data. Secondly, the 3D structure lines of bridge bottom surfaces are extracted from the 3D cloud points acquired with 3D cameras, which impose additional strong constraints on geometrical alignment of structure lines in adjacent images to perform a position and orientation optimization in each group to increase the local consistency. Thirdly, a homographic refinement between groups is applied to increase the global consistency. Finally, we apply a multi-band blending algorithm to generate a large-view single composite image as seamlessly as possible, which greatly eliminates both the luminance differences and the color deviations between images and further conceals image parallax. Experimental results on a set of representative images acquired from real bridge bottom surfaces illustrate the superiority of our proposed approaches.

  12. Determining the optimal age for recording the retinal vascular pattern image of lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Olivares, M A; Caja, G; Carné, S; Salama, A A K; Adell, N; Puig, P

    2012-03-01

    Newborn Ripollesa lambs (n = 143) were used to assess the optimal age at which the vascular pattern of the retina can be used as a reference for identification and traceability. Retinal images from both eyes were recorded from birth to yearling (d 1, 8, 30, 82, 180, and 388 of age) in duplicate (2,534 images) using a digital camera specially designed for livestock (Optibrand, Fort Collins, CO). Intra- and inter-age image comparisons (9,316 pairs of images) were carried out, and matching score (MS) was used as the exclusion criterion of lamb identity (MS ovino mayor," 6 mo of age and ~35 kg of BW, n = 59); and yearling replacement lambs (YR; >12 mo of age and ~50 kg of BW, n = 25). Values of MS were treated with a model based on the 1-inflated bivariate beta distribution, and treated data were compared by using a likelihood ratio test. Intra-age image comparisons showed that average MS and percentage of images with MS ≥70 increased (P 0.05); no differences were detected for 30-d images (97.4 and 98.0%, respectively, for RR and YR lambs; P > 0.05). Total percentage of matching was achieved when images were obtained from older lambs (180 and 388 d). In conclusion, retinal imaging was a useful tool for verifying the identity and auditing the traceability of live lambs from suckling to yearling. Matching scores were satisfactory when the reference retinal images were obtained from 1-mo-old or older lambs.

  13. Optimization of propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography for breast cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, P.; Pacile, S.; Nesterets, Y. I.; Mayo, S. C.; Dullin, C.; Dreossi, D.; Arfelli, F.; Thompson, D.; Lockie, D.; McCormack, M.; Taba, S. T.; Brun, F.; Pinamonti, M.; Nickson, C.; Hall, C.; Dimmock, M.; Zanconati, F.; Cholewa, M.; Quiney, H.; Brennan, P. C.; Tromba, G.; Gureyev, T. E.

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to optimise the experimental protocol and data analysis for in-vivo breast cancer x-ray imaging. Results are presented of the experiment at the SYRMEP beamline of Elettra Synchrotron using the propagation-based phase-contrast mammographic tomography method, which incorporates not only absorption, but also x-ray phase information. In this study the images of breast tissue samples, of a size corresponding to a full human breast, with radiologically acceptable x-ray doses were obtained, and the degree of improvement of the image quality (from the diagnostic point of view) achievable using propagation-based phase-contrast image acquisition protocols with proper incorporation of x-ray phase retrieval into the reconstruction pipeline was investigated. Parameters such as the x-ray energy, sample-to-detector distance and data processing methods were tested, evaluated and optimized with respect to the estimated diagnostic value using a mastectomy sample with a malignant lesion. The results of quantitative evaluation of images were obtained by means of radiological assessment carried out by 13 experienced specialists. A comparative analysis was performed between the x-ray and the histological images of the specimen. The results of the analysis indicate that, within the investigated range of parameters, both the objective image quality characteristics and the subjective radiological scores of propagation-based phase-contrast images of breast tissues monotonically increase with the strength of phase contrast which in turn is directly proportional to the product of the radiation wavelength and the sample-to-detector distance. The outcomes of this study serve to define the practical imaging conditions and the CT reconstruction procedures appropriate for low-dose phase-contrast mammographic imaging of live patients at specially designed synchrotron beamlines.

  14. Design of a tomato packing system by image processing and optimization processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, K.; Kumazaki, T.; Saigusa, M.

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, with the development of environmental control systems in plant factories, tomato production has rapidly increased in Japan. However, with the decline in the availability of agricultural labor, there is a need to automate grading, sorting and packing operations. In this research, we designed an automatic packing program with which tomato weight could be estimated by image processing and that they were able to be packed in an optimized configuration. The weight was estimated by using the pixel area properties after an L*a*b* color model conversion, noise rejection, filling holes and boundary preprocessing. The packing optimization program was designed by a 0-1 knapsack algorithm for dynamic combinatorial optimization.

  15. Convex Array Vector Velocity Imaging Using Transverse Oscillation and Its Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Brandt, Andreas Hjelm; Bachmann Nielsen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A method for obtaining vector flow images using the transverse oscillation (TO) approach on a convex array is presented. The paper presents optimization schemes for TO fields and evaluates their performance using simulations and measurements with an experimental scanner. A 3-MHz 192-element convex...... array probe (pitch 0.33 mm) is used in both simulations and measurements. A parabolic velocity profile is simulated at a beam-to-flow angle of 90°. The optimization routine changes the lateral oscillation period λx as a function of depth to yield the best possible estimates based on the energy ratio...... between positive and negative spatial frequencies in the ultrasound field. The energy ratio is reduced from −17.1 dB to −22.1 dB. Parabolic profiles are estimated on simulated data using 16 emissions. The optimization gives a reduction in standard deviation from 8.81% to 7.4% for 16 emissions...

  16. Progress on Using Image-Optimization to Improve Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Shaela; Davila, Joseph M.; Uritsky, Vadim M.

    2018-01-01

    Reliable measurements of the coronal magnetic field have proven to be very elusive. Over several decades, solar physicists have developed means of extrapolating photospheric magnetic field measurements into the corona and ultimately into the heliosphere. However, these methods can be very sensitive to the photospheric measurements, with a significant range of heliospheric conditions possible within the uncertainty of the photospheric magnetograms. Recently we have presented a method to obtain morphological information about the coronal magnetic field from coronagraph images, and to incorporate this information into a PFSS coronal magnetic field model via optimization. Here we will present details of the method and recent progress in its development, including a significant speed-up of the optimization process that allows the optimization of higher-resolution coronal models.

  17. Homogeneous Canine Chest Phantom Construction: A Tool for Image Quality Optimization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Menegatti Pavan

    Full Text Available Digital radiographic imaging is increasing in veterinary practice. The use of radiation demands responsibility to maintain high image quality. Low doses are necessary because workers are requested to restrain the animal. Optimizing digital systems is necessary to avoid unnecessary exposure, causing the phenomenon known as dose creep. Homogeneous phantoms are widely used to optimize image quality and dose. We developed an automatic computational methodology to classify and quantify tissues (i.e., lung tissue, adipose tissue, muscle tissue, and bone in canine chest computed tomography exams. The thickness of each tissue was converted to simulator materials (i.e., Lucite, aluminum, and air. Dogs were separated into groups of 20 animals each according to weight. Mean weights were 6.5 ± 2.0 kg, 15.0 ± 5.0 kg, 32.0 ± 5.5 kg, and 50.0 ± 12.0 kg, for the small, medium, large, and giant groups, respectively. The one-way analysis of variance revealed significant differences in all simulator material thicknesses (p < 0.05 quantified between groups. As a result, four phantoms were constructed for dorsoventral and lateral views. In conclusion, the present methodology allows the development of phantoms of the canine chest and possibly other body regions and/or animals. The proposed phantom is a practical tool that may be employed in future work to optimize veterinary X-ray procedures.

  18. General solution of undersampling frequency conversion and its optimization for parallel photodisplacement imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Toshihiko; Ninomiya, Takanori

    2006-10-10

    A general solution of undersampling frequency conversion and its optimization for parallel photodisplacement imaging is presented. Phase-modulated heterodyne interference light generated by a linear region of periodic displacement is captured by a charge-coupled device image sensor, in which the interference light is sampled at a sampling rate lower than the Nyquist frequency. The frequencies of the components of the light, such as the sideband and carrier (which include photodisplacement and topography information, respectively), are downconverted and sampled simultaneously based on the integration and sampling effects of the sensor. A general solution of frequency and amplitude in this downconversion is derived by Fourier analysis of the sampling procedure. The optimal frequency condition for the heterodyne beat signal, modulation signal, and sensor gate pulse is derived such that undesirable components are eliminated and each information component is converted into an orthogonal function, allowing each to be discretely reproduced from the Fourier coefficients. The optimal frequency parameters that maximize the sideband-to-carrier amplitude ratio are determined, theoretically demonstrating its high selectivity over 80 dB. Preliminary experiments demonstrate that this technique is capable of simultaneous imaging of reflectivity, topography, and photodisplacement for the detection of subsurface lattice defects at a speed corresponding to an acquisition time of only 0.26 s per 256 x 256 pixel area.

  19. Automatic detection of solitary pulmonary nodules using swarm intelligence optimized neural networks on CT images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezhil E. Nithila

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lung Cancer is one of the most dangerous diseases that cause a large number of deaths. Early detection and analysis will be the only remedy. Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD plays a key role in the early detection and diagnosis of lung cancer. This paper develops a CAD system that focus on new heuristic search algorithm to optimize the Back Propagation Neural Network (BPNN in characterizing nodule from non-nodules. The proposed CAD system consists of four main stages: (i image acquisition (ii lesion detection, (iii texture feature extraction and (iv tumor characterization using a classifier. The optimization mechanism employs Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO with new inertia weight for NN in order to investigate the classification rate of these algorithms in reducing the problems of trapping in local minima and the slow convergence rate of current evolutionary learning algorithms. The experiments were conducted on CT images to classify into nodule and non-nodule from the tumor region of interest. The performance of the CAD system was evaluated for the texture characterized images taken from LIDC-IDRI and SPIE-AAPM databases. Due to improved inertia weight used in Particle Swarm (PS the CAD achieves highest classification accuracy of 98% for solid nodules, 99.5% for part solid nodules and 97.2% for non solid nodules respectively. The experimental results suggest that the developed CAD system has great potential and promise in the automatic diagnosis of tumors of lung.

  20. Poster - Thur Eve - 65: Optimization of an automatic image contouring system for radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, T; Nedialkov, N; Wierzbicki, M

    2012-07-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is an advanced technique used to concentrate the prescribed dose in the tumour while minimizing exposure to healthy tissues. Success in IMRT is greatly dependent upon the localization of the target volume and normal tissue, thus accurate contouring is crucial. In this paper, we describe an automated atlas-based image contouring system and our approach for improving the system by performing a full-scale optimization of registration parameters using high-performance computing. To achieve this, we use manually pre-contoured CT images of ten head and neck patients. For any parameter set, each patient data is registered with the remaining patients. Accuracy of the resulting contours is determined automatically by comparing their overlap with manually defined targets using Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC). This allows us to compare all permutations of the image registration parameter sets and input data to investigate their impact on final contour accuracy. Investigating the parameter space required 27,000 image registrations and 216,000 DSC computations. To perform these registrations we introduced a large cluster of high-performance computers and developed a parallel testing harness. The metrics collected from the tests show a wide range of performance, indicating that parameter selection is crucial in our contouring system. By selecting an optimized parameter set, we increased the mean overlap of the automatically contoured regions of interest by 50% and reduced registration time by 50% compared to the original parameters. Our findings illustrate that full-scale optimization is an effective method for improving the performance of the automated image contouring system. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  1. System for verifiable CT radiation dose optimization based on image quality. part II. process control system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, David B; Malarik, Remo J; Hall, Seth M; Podberesky, Daniel J

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of an automated computed tomography (CT) radiation dose optimization and process control system on the consistency of estimated image noise and size-specific dose estimates (SSDEs) of radiation in CT examinations of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. This quality improvement project was determined not to constitute human subject research. An automated system was developed to analyze each examination immediately after completion, and to report individual axial-image-level and study-level summary data for patient size, image noise, and SSDE. The system acquired data for 4 months beginning October 1, 2011. Protocol changes were made by using parameters recommended by the prediction application, and 3 months of additional data were acquired. Preimplementation and postimplementation mean image noise and SSDE were compared by using unpaired t tests and F tests. Common-cause variation was differentiated from special-cause variation by using a statistical process control individual chart. A total of 817 CT examinations, 490 acquired before and 327 acquired after the initial protocol changes, were included in the study. Mean patient age and water-equivalent diameter were 12.0 years and 23.0 cm, respectively. The difference between actual and target noise increased from -1.4 to 0.3 HU (P process control chart identified several special causes of variation. Implementation of an automated CT radiation dose optimization system led to verifiable simultaneous decrease in image noise variation and SSDE. The automated nature of the system provides the opportunity for consistent CT radiation dose optimization on a broad scale. © RSNA, 2013.

  2. Automated prescription of an optimal imaging plane for measurement of cerebral blood flow by phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Pang-yu; Bagci, Ahmet Murat; Alperin, Noam

    2011-09-01

    This study describes and evaluates a semiautomated method for prescribing an optimal imaging plane that is located as close as possible to the skull base, and is simultaneously nearly perpendicular to the four arteries leading blood to the brain [internal carotid arteries (ICAs) and vertebral arteries (VAs)]. Such a method will streamline and improve reliability of the measurement of total cerebral blood flow and intracranial pressure by velocity encoding phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging. The method first extracts the vessels' centerline from a 2-D time-of-flight magnetic resonance angiogram of the neck by performing distance transformations. An anatomical marker, the V2 segment of the VAs, is then identified to guide the imaging plane to be as close and below the skull base. An imaging plane that is nearly perpendicular to the ICAs and V2 segment of VAs is then identified by minimizing a misalignment value, estimated by a weighted mean of the angles between the plane's normal and the vessel axes at the vessel-plane intersections. The performance of the semiautomated method was evaluated by comparing manually selected planes to those found semiautomatically in nine magnetic resonance angiogram datasets. The semiautomated method consistently outperformed manual prescription with a significantly smaller misalignment value, 8.6° versus 20.7° (P < 0.001), respectively, and significantly improved reproducibility.

  3. Clinical, FDG and amyloid PET imaging in posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tarun D; Josephs, Keith A; Machulda, Mary M; Drubach, Daniel A; Apostolova, Liana G; Lowe, Val J; Whitwell, Jennifer L

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the clinical, [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and amyloid-PET findings in a large cohort of posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) patients, to examine the neural correlates of the classic features of PCA, and to better understand the features associated with early PCA. We prospectively recruited 25 patients who presented to the Mayo Clinic between March 2013 and August 2014 and met diagnostic criteria for PCA. All patients underwent a standardized set of tests and amyloid imaging with [(11)C] Pittsburg compound B (PiB). Seventeen (68 %) underwent FDG-PET scanning. We divided the cohort at the median disease duration of 4 years in order to assess clinical and FDG-PET correlates of early PCA (n = 13). The most common clinical features were simultanagnosia (92 %), dysgraphia (68 %), poly-mini-myoclonus (64 %) and oculomotor apraxia (56.5 %). On FDG-PET, hypometabolism was observed bilaterally in the lateral and medial parietal and occipital lobes. Simultanagnosia was associated with hypometabolism in the right occipital lobe and posterior cingulum, optic ataxia with hypometabolism in left occipital lobe, and oculomotor apraxia with hypometabolism in the left parietal lobe and posterior cingulate gyrus. All 25 PCA patients were amyloid positive. Simultanagnosia was the only feature present in 85 % of early PCA patients. The syndrome of PCA is associated with posterior hemisphere hypometabolism and with amyloid deposition. Many of the classic features of PCA show associated focal, but not widespread, areas of involvement of these posterior hemispheric regions. Simultanagnosia appears to be the most common and hence sensitive feature of early PCA.

  4. SLAP lesions: Anatomy, clinical presentation, MR imaging diagnosis and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Debra [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, 200 W. Arbor Drive, San Diego, CA 92103 (United States); VA Healthcare System San Diego, Department of Radiology, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, La Jolla, CA 92161 (United States); MedRay Imaging and Fraser Health Authority, Vancouver, BC (Canada)], E-mail: cbchung@ucsd.edu; Mohana-Borges, Aurea; Borso, Maya; Chung, Christine B. [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, 200 W. Arbor Drive, San Diego, CA 92103 (United States); VA Healthcare System San Diego, Department of Radiology, 3350 La Jolla Village Drive, La Jolla, CA 92161 (United States)

    2008-10-15

    ABSTRACT: Superior labral anterior posterior (SLAP) tears are an abnormality of the superior labrum usually centered on the attachment of the long head of the biceps tendon. Tears are commonly caused by repetitive overhead motion or fall on an outstretched arm. SLAP lesions can lead to shoulder pain and instability. Clinical diagnosis is difficult thus imaging plays a key diagnostic role. The normal anatomic variability of the capsulolabral complex can make SLAP lesions a diagnostic challenge. Concurrent shoulder injuries are often present including rotator cuff tears, cystic changes or marrow edema in the humeral head, capsular laxity, Hill-Sachs or Bankart lesion. The relevant anatomy, capsulolabral anatomic variants, primary and secondary findings of SLAP tears including MR arthrography findings, types of SLAP lesions and a practical approach to labral lesions are reviewed.

  5. Osseous metastases of chordoma: imaging and clinical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Connie; Torriani, Martin; Bredella, Miriam [Massachusetts General Hospital, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Chebib, Ivan [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-03-15

    To describe the imaging and clinical characteristics of chordoma osseous metastases (COM). Our study was IRB approved and HIPAA compliant. A retrospective search of our pathology database for pathology-proven COM yielded 15 patients who had undergone MRI, CT, bone scan, and/or FDG-PET/CT. The imaging and clinical features of the COMs were recorded. A control group of age and gender matched chordoma patients without osseous metastasis was evaluated. The COM mean maximal dimension was 6.4 ± 4.0 cm. The majority (60%) of patients had one lesion. Extra-osseous soft tissue component was present in 85% and was larger than intra-osseous component in 76%. On MRI the lesions were heterogeneous but predominantly T2 hyperintense with hypointense septae, and with variable enhancement. On CT the lesions were typically destructive or permeative; calcifications were rare. The extent of the soft tissue component was isodense to muscle on CT and therefore better evaluated on MRI. COM was in a body part contiguous to the site of the primary tumor. Compared to the controls, COM patients were more likely to have local recurrence (P = 0.0009) and positive resection margins (P = 0.002). At 1 year, 33% of COM patients were deceased and 13% had progressive metastases. COM are associated with large extra-osseous soft tissue components, which are better visualized by MRI. They are often located in a body part contiguous to the site of the primary tumor, portend poor prognosis, and are associated with positive resection margins and local recurrence. (orig.)

  6. An imaging informatics-based ePR (electronic patient record) system for providing decision support in evaluating dose optimization in stroke rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Brent J.; Winstein, Carolee; Wang, Ximing; Konersman, Matt; Martinez, Clarisa; Schweighofer, Nicolas

    2012-02-01

    Stroke is one of the major causes of death and disability in America. After stroke, about 65% of survivors still suffer from severe paresis, while rehabilitation treatment strategy after stroke plays an essential role in recovery. Currently, there is a clinical trial (NIH award #HD065438) to determine the optimal dose of rehabilitation for persistent recovery of arm and hand paresis. For DOSE (Dose Optimization Stroke Evaluation), laboratory-based measurements, such as the Wolf Motor Function test, behavioral questionnaires (e.g. Motor Activity Log-MAL), and MR, DTI, and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) imaging studies are planned. Current data collection processes are tedious and reside in various standalone systems including hardcopy forms. In order to improve the efficiency of this clinical trial and facilitate decision support, a web-based imaging informatics system has been implemented together with utilizing mobile devices (eg, iPAD, tablet PC's, laptops) for collecting input data and integrating all multi-media data into a single system. The system aims to provide clinical imaging informatics management and a platform to develop tools to predict the treatment effect based on the imaging studies and the treatment dosage with mathematical models. Since there is a large amount of information to be recorded within the DOSE project, the system provides clinical data entry through mobile device applications thus allowing users to collect data at the point of patient interaction without typing into a desktop computer, which is inconvenient. Imaging analysis tools will also be developed for structural MRI, DTI, and TMS imaging studies that will be integrated within the system and correlated with the clinical and behavioral data. This system provides a research platform for future development of mathematical models to evaluate the differences between prediction and reality and thus improve and refine the models rapidly and efficiently.

  7. Optimization of digital image processing to determine quantum dots' height and density from atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, J E; Paciornik, S; Pinto, L D; Ptak, F; Pires, M P; Souza, P L

    2018-01-01

    An optimized method of digital image processing to interpret quantum dots' height measurements obtained by atomic force microscopy is presented. The method was developed by combining well-known digital image processing techniques and particle recognition algorithms. The properties of quantum dot structures strongly depend on dots' height, among other features. Determination of their height is sensitive to small variations in their digital image processing parameters, which can generate misleading results. Comparing the results obtained with two image processing techniques - a conventional method and the new method proposed herein - with the data obtained by determining the height of quantum dots one by one within a fixed area, showed that the optimized method leads to more accurate results. Moreover, the log-normal distribution, which is often used to represent natural processes, shows a better fit to the quantum dots' height histogram obtained with the proposed method. Finally, the quantum dots' height obtained were used to calculate the predicted photoluminescence peak energies which were compared with the experimental data. Again, a better match was observed when using the proposed method to evaluate the quantum dots' height. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effective Alternating Direction Optimization Methods for Sparsity-Constrained Blind Image Deblurring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naixue Xiong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-image blind deblurring for imaging sensors in the Internet of Things (IoT is a challenging ill-conditioned inverse problem, which requires regularization techniques to stabilize the image restoration process. The purpose is to recover the underlying blur kernel and latent sharp image from only one blurred image. Under many degraded imaging conditions, the blur kernel could be considered not only spatially sparse, but also piecewise smooth with the support of a continuous curve. By taking advantage of the hybrid sparse properties of the blur kernel, a hybrid regularization method is proposed in this paper to robustly and accurately estimate the blur kernel. The effectiveness of the proposed blur kernel estimation method is enhanced by incorporating both the L 1 -norm of kernel intensity and the squared L 2 -norm of the intensity derivative. Once the accurate estimation of the blur kernel is obtained, the original blind deblurring can be simplified to the direct deconvolution of blurred images. To guarantee robust non-blind deconvolution, a variational image restoration model is presented based on the L 1 -norm data-fidelity term and the total generalized variation (TGV regularizer of second-order. All non-smooth optimization problems related to blur kernel estimation and non-blind deconvolution are effectively handled by using the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM-based numerical methods. Comprehensive experiments on both synthetic and realistic datasets have been implemented to compare the proposed method with several state-of-the-art methods. The experimental comparisons have illustrated the satisfactory imaging performance of the proposed method in terms of quantitative and qualitative evaluations.

  9. Effective Alternating Direction Optimization Methods for Sparsity-Constrained Blind Image Deblurring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Naixue; Liu, Ryan Wen; Liang, Maohan; Wu, Di; Liu, Zhao; Wu, Huisi

    2017-01-18

    Single-image blind deblurring for imaging sensors in the Internet of Things (IoT) is a challenging ill-conditioned inverse problem, which requires regularization techniques to stabilize the image restoration process. The purpose is to recover the underlying blur kernel and latent sharp image from only one blurred image. Under many degraded imaging conditions, the blur kernel could be considered not only spatially sparse, but also piecewise smooth with the support of a continuous curve. By taking advantage of the hybrid sparse properties of the blur kernel, a hybrid regularization method is proposed in this paper to robustly and accurately estimate the blur kernel. The effectiveness of the proposed blur kernel estimation method is enhanced by incorporating both the L 1 -norm of kernel intensity and the squared L 2 -norm of the intensity derivative. Once the accurate estimation of the blur kernel is obtained, the original blind deblurring can be simplified to the direct deconvolution of blurred images. To guarantee robust non-blind deconvolution, a variational image restoration model is presented based on the L 1 -norm data-fidelity term and the total generalized variation (TGV) regularizer of second-order. All non-smooth optimization problems related to blur kernel estimation and non-blind deconvolution are effectively handled by using the alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM)-based numerical methods. Comprehensive experiments on both synthetic and realistic datasets have been implemented to compare the proposed method with several state-of-the-art methods. The experimental comparisons have illustrated the satisfactory imaging performance of the proposed method in terms of quantitative and qualitative evaluations.

  10. Optimal Configuration for Relaxation Times Estimation in Complex Spin Echo Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Baselice

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many pathologies can be identified by evaluating differences raised in the physical parameters of involved tissues. In a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI framework, spin-lattice T1 and spin-spin T2 relaxation time parameters play a major role in such an identification. In this manuscript, a theoretical study related to the evaluation of the achievable performances in the estimation of relaxation times in MRI is proposed. After a discussion about the considered acquisition model, an analysis on the ideal imaging acquisition parameters in the case of spin echo sequences, i.e., echo and repetition times, is conducted. In particular, the aim of the manuscript consists in providing an empirical rule for optimal imaging parameter identification with respect to the tissues under investigation. Theoretical results are validated on different datasets in order to show the effectiveness of the presented study and of the proposed methodology.

  11. Normal Vector Projection Method used for Convex Optimization of Chan-Vese Model for Image Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, W. B.; Tan, L.; Jia, M. Q.; Pan, Z. K.

    2017-01-01

    The variational level set method is one of the main methods of image segmentation. Due to signed distance functions as level sets have to keep the nature of the functions through numerical remedy or additional technology in an evolutionary process, it is not very efficient. In this paper, a normal vector projection method for image segmentation using Chan-Vese model is proposed. An equivalent formulation of Chan-Vese model is used by taking advantage of property of binary level set functions and combining with the concept of convex relaxation. Threshold method and projection formula are applied in the implementation. It can avoid the above problems and obtain a global optimal solution. Experimental results on both synthetic and real images validate the effects of the proposed normal vector projection method, and show advantages over traditional algorithms in terms of computational efficiency.

  12. Multiple description image coding based on delta-sigma quantization with rate-distortion optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuhua; Wang, Jia; Sun, Jun

    2012-09-01

    Recently, Østergaard and Zamir revealed the connection between multiple description coding and delta-sigma quantization (DSQ). The principle has been applied to image coding, with main focus on the framework where each block is processed separately. In this brief, we propose a two-channel multiple description image coding scheme that performs inter-block processing. The source image is first rearranged into a block sequence. Then, vector DSQ is performed with a bank of noise-shaping filters. Their coefficients as well as the quantization steps are chosen by a rate-distortion optimization algorithm. A post-processing algorithm is proposed for side decoding. Experiment results show the improvement achieved by the proposed scheme in terms of both peak signal-to-noise ratio values and subjective quality.

  13. Optimal Broadband Noise Matching to Inductive Sensors: Application to Magnetic Particle Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States