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Sample records for clinical heart disease

  1. Clinical pattern of heart diseases in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ejaz, M.S.; Billoo, A.G.

    2000-01-01

    This study was done to determine various causes and clinical presentation of heart disease in children. It was a prospective hospital study conducted in Department of Pediatrics Civil Hospital, Karachi from August 1995 to February 1996. In this study, 70 patients of heart disease upto 12 years of age were inducted. There were 33 (47.14%) cases of congenital heart diseases and 37 (52.85%) cases of acquired heart diseases. The age distribution showed that heart disease was more frequent between 0-11 months of age (41.42%). Congenital heart diseases were also frequent between 0-11 months (28.57%). On the other hand acquired heart diseases were more common between 6-12 years (22.85%). In this study the males were predominantly involved, the male to female ratio was 1.05:1. In congenital heart disease it was 1.3:1 and in acquired heart diseases it was 0.85:1. Ventricular septal defect was the commonest congenital lesion reported (20%). Rheumatic fever and viral myocarditis were two frequently occurring acquired heart-diseases 17.14% each. The common presentation of heart diseases were respiratory distress (94.28%), fever (90%), feeding difficulty (57.14%) and failure to thrive (34.28%). In case of rheumatic fever, chorea was present in 8.57%, arthritis in 11.42% and S/C nodules (2.85%) cases respectively. The early management of the problem may help in decreasing morbidity and mortality due to these disease in children. Prenatal detection of congenital cardiac lesions by fetal echocardiography in high risk pregnancies, early intervention in neonatal period and counseling of the parents may help in prevention of congenital heart diseases in children. Primary prevention of rheumatic fever can be achieved by early diagnosis and treatment of streptococcal throat infection. (author)

  2. 2013 update on congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, heart failure, and heart transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subirana, M Teresa; Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; Oliver, José M; Ripoll, Tomás; Lambert, Jose Luis; Zunzunegui, José L; Bover, Ramon; García-Pinilla, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    This article presents the most relevant developments in 2013 in 3 key areas of cardiology: congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, and heart failure and transplant. Within the area of congenital heart disease, we reviewed contributions related to sudden death in adult congenital heart disease, the importance of specific echocardiographic parameters in assessing the systemic right ventricle, problems in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot and indication for pulmonary valve replacement, and confirmation of the role of specific factors in the selection of candidates for Fontan surgery. The most recent publications in clinical cardiology include a study by a European working group on correct diagnostic work-up in cardiomyopathies, studies on the cost-effectiveness of percutaneous aortic valve implantation, a consensus document on the management of type B aortic dissection, and guidelines on aortic valve and ascending aortic disease. The most noteworthy developments in heart failure and transplantation include new American guidelines on heart failure, therapeutic advances in acute heart failure (serelaxin), the management of comorbidities such as iron deficiency, risk assessment using new biomarkers, and advances in ventricular assist devices. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Heart Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... re like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. ... disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease is ...

  4. Silent disease progression in clinically stable heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbah, Hani N

    2017-04-01

    Heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) is a progressive disorder whereby cardiac structure and function continue to deteriorate, often despite the absence of clinically apparent signs and symptoms of a worsening disease state. This silent yet progressive nature of HFrEF can contribute to the increased risk of death-even in patients who are 'clinically stable', or who are asymptomatic or only mildly symptomatic-because it often goes undetected and/or undertreated. Current therapies are aimed at improving clinical symptoms, and several agents more directly target the underlying causes of disease; however, new therapies are needed that can more fully address factors responsible for underlying progressive cardiac dysfunction. In this review, mechanisms that drive HFrEF, including ongoing cardiomyocyte loss, mitochondrial abnormalities, impaired calcium cycling, elevated LV wall stress, reactive interstitial fibrosis, and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, are discussed. Additionally, limitations of current HF therapies are reviewed, with a focus on how these therapies are designed to counteract the deleterious effects of compensatory neurohumoral activation but do not fully prevent disease progression. Finally, new investigational therapies that may improve the underlying molecular, cellular, and structural abnormalities associated with HF progression are reviewed. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Society of Cardiology.

  5. Ivabradine in stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Kim; Ford, Ian; Steg, Philippe Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An elevated heart rate is an established marker of cardiovascular risk. Previous analyses have suggested that ivabradine, a heart-rate-reducing agent, may improve outcomes in patients with stable coronary artery disease, left ventricular dysfunction, and a heart rate of 70 beats per m...

  6. The clinical use of stress echocardiography in ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicari, Rosa; Cortigiani, Lauro

    2017-03-21

    Stress echocardiography is an established technique for the assessment of extent and severity of coronary artery disease. The combination of echocardiography with a physical, pharmacological or electrical stress allows to detect myocardial ischemia with an excellent accuracy. A transient worsening of regional function during stress is the hallmark of inducible ischemia. Stress echocardiography provides similar diagnostic and prognostic accuracy as radionuclide stress perfusion imaging or magnetic resonance, but at a substantially lower cost, without environmental impact, and with no biohazards for the patient and the physician.The evidence on its clinical impact has been collected over 35 years, based on solid experimental, pathophysiological, technological and clinical foundations. There is the need to implement the combination of wall motion and coronary flow reserve, assessed in the left anterior descending artery, into a single test. The improvement of technology and in imaging quality will make this approach more and more feasible. The future issues in stress echo will be the possibility of obtaining quantitative information translating the current qualitative assessment of regional wall motion into a number. The next challenge for stress echocardiography is to overcome its main weaknesses: dependance on operator expertise, the lack of outcome data (a widesperad problem in clinical imaging) to document the improvement of patient outcomes. This paper summarizes the main indications for the clinical applications of stress echocardiography to ischemic heart disease.

  7. Carcinoid heart disease: two clinical cases and a review | Weinreich ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and quality of life for patients with carcinoid heart disease. Therapy includes somatostatin analogues and treatment for heart failure, removal of primary or metastatic tumour deposits, valve replacement in the presence of valvular involvement, and radioisotopes therapy. Keywords: carcinoid, cardiac involvement, treatment ...

  8. Genetic testing in congenital heart disease: A clinical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaix, Marie A; Andelfinger, Gregor; Khairy, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common type of birth defect. Traditionally, a polygenic model defined by the interaction of multiple genes and environmental factors was hypothesized to account for different forms of CHD. It is now understood that the contribution of genetics to CHD extends beyond a single unified paradigm. For example, monogenic models and chromosomal abnormalities have been associated with various syndromic and non-syndromic forms of CHD. In such instances, genetic investigation and testing may potentially play an important role in clinical care. A family tree with a detailed phenotypic description serves as the initial screening tool to identify potentially inherited defects and to guide further genetic investigation. The selection of a genetic test is contingent upon the particular diagnostic hypothesis generated by clinical examination. Genetic investigation in CHD may carry the potential to improve prognosis by yielding valuable information with regards to personalized medical care, confidence in the clinical diagnosis, and/or targeted patient follow-up. Moreover, genetic assessment may serve as a tool to predict recurrence risk, define the pattern of inheritance within a family, and evaluate the need for further family screening. In some circumstances, prenatal or preimplantation genetic screening could identify fetuses or embryos at high risk for CHD. Although genetics may appear to constitute a highly specialized sector of cardiology, basic knowledge regarding inheritance patterns, recurrence risks, and available screening and diagnostic tools, including their strengths and limitations, could assist the treating physician in providing sound counsel. PMID:26981213

  9. Common clinical practice versus new PRIM score in predicting coronary heart disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Schnohr, Peter

    2010-01-01

    To compare the new Patient Rule Induction Method (PRIM) Score and common clinical practice with the Framingham Point Score for classification of individuals with respect to coronary heart disease (CHD) risk.......To compare the new Patient Rule Induction Method (PRIM) Score and common clinical practice with the Framingham Point Score for classification of individuals with respect to coronary heart disease (CHD) risk....

  10. Cardiac autonomic testing and treating heart disease. 'A clinical perspective'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas L. DePace

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Coronary heart disease (CHD is a major health concern, affecting nearly half the middle-age population and responsible for nearly one-third of all deaths. Clinicians have several major responsibilities beyond diagnosing CHD, such as risk stratification of patients for major adverse cardiac events (MACE and treating risks, as well as the patient. This second of a two-part review series discusses treating risk factors, including autonomic dysfunction, and expected outcomes. Methods Therapies for treating cardiac mortality risks including cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN, are discussed. Results While risk factors effectively target high-risk patients, a large number of individuals who will develop complications from heart disease are not identified by current scoring systems. Many patients with heart conditions, who appear to be well-managed by traditional therapies, experience MACE. Parasympathetic and Sympathetic (P&S function testing provides more information and has the potential to further aid doctors in individualizing and titrating therapy to minimize risk. Advanced autonomic dysfunction (AAD and its more severe form cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy have been strongly associated with an elevated risk of cardiac mortality and are diagnosable through autonomic testing. This additional information includes patient-specific physiologic measures, such as sympathovagal balance (SB. Studies have shown that establishing and maintaining proper SB minimizes morbidity and mortality risk. Conclusions P&S testing promotes primary prevention, treating subclinical disease states, as well as secondary prevention, thereby improving patient outcomes through (1 maintaining wellness, (2 preventing symptoms and disorder and (3 treating subclinical manifestations (autonomic dysfunction, as well as (4 disease and symptoms (autonomic neuropathy.

  11. Late radiation-induced heart disease after radiotherapy. Clinical importance, radiobiological mechanisms and strategies of prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andratschke, Nicolaus; Maurer, Jean; Molls, Michael; Trott, Klaus-Ruediger

    2011-01-01

    The clinical importance of radiation-induced heart disease, in particular in post-operative radiotherapy of breast cancer patients, has been recognised only recently. There is general agreement, that a co-ordinated research effort would be needed to explore all the potential strategies of how to reduce the late risk of radiation-induced heart disease in radiotherapy. This approach would be based, on one hand, on a comprehensive understanding of the radiobiological mechanisms of radiation-induced heart disease after radiotherapy which would require large-scale long-term animal experiments with high precision local heart irradiation. On the other hand - in close co-operation with mechanistic in vivo research studies - clinical studies in patients need to determine the influence of dose distribution in the heart on the risk of radiation-induced heart disease. The aim of these clinical studies would be to identify the critical structures within the organ which need to be spared and their radiation sensitivity as well as a potential volume and dose effect. The results of the mechanistic studies might also provide concepts of how to modify the gradual progression of radiation damage in the heart by drugs or biological molecules. The results of the studies in patients would need to also incorporate detailed dosimetric and imaging studies in order to develop early indicators of impending radiation-induced heart disease which would be a pre-condition to develop sound criteria for treatment plan optimisation.

  12. Late radiation-induced heart disease after radiotherapy. Clinical importance, radiobiological mechanisms and strategies of prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andratschke, Nicolaus; Maurer, Jean; Molls, Michael; Trott, Klaus-Rüdiger

    2011-08-01

    The clinical importance of radiation-induced heart disease, in particular in post-operative radiotherapy of breast cancer patients, has been recognised only recently. There is general agreement, that a co-ordinated research effort would be needed to explore all the potential strategies of how to reduce the late risk of radiation-induced heart disease in radiotherapy. This approach would be based, on one hand, on a comprehensive understanding of the radiobiological mechanisms of radiation-induced heart disease after radiotherapy which would require large-scale long-term animal experiments with high precision local heart irradiation. On the other hand - in close co-operation with mechanistic in vivo research studies - clinical studies in patients need to determine the influence of dose distribution in the heart on the risk of radiation-induced heart disease. The aim of these clinical studies would be to identify the critical structures within the organ which need to be spared and their radiation sensitivity as well as a potential volume and dose effect. The results of the mechanistic studies might also provide concepts of how to modify the gradual progression of radiation damage in the heart by drugs or biological molecules. The results of the studies in patients would need to also incorporate detailed dosimetric and imaging studies in order to develop early indicators of impending radiation-induced heart disease which would be a pre-condition to develop sound criteria for treatment plan optimisation. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  13. Coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... more calcium, the higher your chance for CHD. Exercise stress test . Heart CT scan . Nuclear stress test .

  14. Clinical Observation of Concomitant Congenital Heart Disease and Anomaly of the Urinary System in Adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Limarenko

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the clinical observation of multiple malformations in a child: combination of congenital heart disease with an anomaly of the urinary system on the background of undifferentiated connective tissue dysplasia syndrome of maximum severity. This case report is of interest to pediatricians. Children with defects of the heart and urinary system often have other malformations, so in these patients it is important to conduct a full multisystem examination.

  15. The Genetics of Ischemic Heart Disease: From Current Knowledge to Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elosua, Roberto; Sayols-Baixeras, Sergi

    2017-09-01

    Ischemic heart disease continues to cause high morbidity and mortality. Its prevalence is expected to increase due to population aging, and its prevention is a major goal of health policies. The risk of developing ischemic heart disease is related to a complex interplay between genetic, environmental, and lifestyle factors. In the last decade, considerable progress has been made in knowledge of the genetic architecture of this disease. This narrative review provides an overview of current knowledge of the genetics of ischemic heart disease and of its translation to clinical practice: identification of new therapeutic targets, assessment of the causal relationship between biomarkers and disease, improved risk prediction, and identification of responders and nonresponders to specific drugs (pharmacogenomics). Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. [The course of coronary heart disease concurrent with peptic ulcer disease: clinical and pathogenetic aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonova, Zh G; Martusevich, A K; Tarlovaskaia, E I

    2014-01-01

    To make a comprehensive evaluation of the efficiency of eradication therapy in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) concurrent with peptic ulcer disease (PUD). The results of treatment were studied in 112 patients with CHD concurrent with PUD who were randomized into 3 groups: 1) adequate eradication therapy during treatment for CHD; 2) antisecretory therapy; 3) treatment for CHD only. The trend in the clinical symptoms of the diseases and the results of an exercise test were assessed. After eradication therapy, Group 1 patients displayed a reduction in the frequency of angina attacks by 62.6% and weekly nitroglycerin needs by 70.4% and an increase in exercise tolerance by 45.3%. In Group 2 patients on antisecretory therapy, the similar indicators changed by 30.7, 21.2, and 26.5%, respectively. Group 3 patients showed no significant change in the study indicators. The findings suggest that eradication therapy has a positive impact on the course of CHD, which manifests itself as an antianginal effect and hence a change in the clinical picture.

  17. Visible aging signs as risk markers for ischemic heart disease: Epidemiology, pathogenesis and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, Mette; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Association of common aging signs (i.e., male pattern baldness, hair graying, and facial wrinkles) as well as other age-related appearance factors (i.e., arcus corneae, xanthelasmata, and earlobe crease) with increased risk of ischemic heart disease was initially described in anecdotal reports from clinicians observing trends in the physical appearance of patients with ischemic heart disease. Following these early observations numerous epidemiological studies have reported these associations. Since the prevalences of both visible aging signs and ischemic heart disease have a strong correlation with increasing age, it has been extensively debated whether the observed associations could be entirely explained by a common association with age. Furthermore, the etiologies of the visible aging signs are rarely fully understood, and pathophysiological explanations for these associations remain controversial, and are mostly speculative. As a consequence of inconsistent findings and lack of mechanistic explanations for the observed associations with ischemic heart disease, consensus on the clinical importance of these visible aging signs has been lacking. The aim of this review is for each of the visible aging signs to (i) review the etiology, (ii) to discuss the current epidemiological evidence for an association with risk of ischemic heart disease, and (iii) to present possible pathophysiological explanations for these associations. Finally this review discusses the potential clinical implications of these findings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Pediatric cardiology. Clinical and practical experiences with heart diseases of children, juveniles and young adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, Nikolaus A.

    2011-01-01

    The book on pediatric cardiology covers the following chapters: (I) Fundamentals and diagnostics: pediatric cardiologic anamnesis, electrocardiograms, thorax X-radiography, MRT and CT of the heart, nuclear medical diagnostics, exercise tests, heart catheter examination, electrophysiological tests. (II) Leading symptoms: Cyanosis, cardiac murmur, thorax pain, palpitation, syncopes. (III) Disease pictures: congenital heart defects, acquired heart defects, cardiomyopathies, heart rhythm disturbances, heart insufficiency, arterial hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, other heart involving syndromes. (IV) Therapy: Catheter interventional therapy, post-surgical pediatric cardiac therapy, surgery involving the life-support machine, mechanical cardiovascular support systems, initial treatment of newborns with critical heart defects, heart transplantation, vaccination of children with heart diseases, medicinal therapy.

  19. Clinical evaluation of stress thallium spect in ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui, Osamu; Kimura, Nazuna; Soeki; Takeshi; Takeichi, Naoki; Shinohara, Hisanori; Tamura, Yoshiyuki; Fukuda, Nobuo

    1997-01-01

    Thallium SPECT was performed in patients with significant coronary artery stenosis, 67 cases were after maximal exercise and 74 cases were during coronary vasodilation induced by ATP (adenosine triphosphate) infusion. In patients suspected of angina pectoris, the sensitivity, specificity and predictive accuracy for detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) were 88%, 78% and 82% for exercise SPECT, and 100%, 72% and 84% for ATP SPECT studies, respectively. In patients with old myocardial infarction, these were 73%, 100% and 88% for exercise SPECT and 71%, 100% and 81% for ATP SPECT. These were 75%, 49% and 60% for treadmill exercise test in the patient group including both angina and myocardial infarction. For detection of diseased vessels, the diagnostic accuracy for left anterior descending artery and right coronary artery lesions was almost equal for ATP and exercise SPECT study, but ATP SPECT study was more sensitive than exercise SPECT study in detection of left circumflex artery lesions. ATP as well as exercise SPECT studies occasionally gave false positive results in patients with single-vessel disease. ATP as well as exercise SPECT studies underestimated the severity of multi-vessel disease. In general, the results of ATP SPECT imaging were highly concordant with the results of exercise SPECT imaging. ATP stress thallium SPECT imaging provided a safe and highly accurate diagnostic tool for detection of CAD. (author)

  20. Clinical and epidemiological profile of patients with valvular heart disease admitted to the emergency department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Ricardo Casalino Sanches de [Instituto do Coração, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Katz, Marcelo [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Tarasoutchi, Flávio [Instituto do Coração, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the clinical and epidemiological profile of patients with valvular heart disease who arrived decompensated at the emergency department of a university hospital in Brazil. A descriptive analysis of clinical and echocardiographic data of 174 patients with severe valvular disease, who were clinically decompensated and went to the emergency department of a tertiary cardiology hospital, in the State of São Paulo, in 2009. The mean age of participants was 56±17 years and 54% were female. The main cause of valve disease was rheumatic in 60%, followed by 15% of degenerative aortic disease and mitral valve prolapse in 13%. Mitral regurgitation (27.5%) was the most common isolated valve disease, followed by aortic stenosis (23%), aortic regurgitation (13%) and mitral stenosis (11%). In echocardiographic data, the mean left atrial diameter was 48±12mm, 38±12mm for the left ventricular systolic diameter, and 54±12mm for the diastolic diameter; the mean ejection fraction was 56±13%, and the mean pulmonary artery pressure was 53±16mmHg. Approximately half of patients (44%) presented atrial fibrillation, and over one third of them (37%) had already undergone another cardiac surgery. Despite increased comorbidities and age-dependent risk factors commonly described in patients with valvular heart disease, the clinical profile of patients arriving at the emergency department represented a cohort of rheumatic patients in more advanced stages of disease. These patients require priority care in high complexity specialized hospitals.

  1. Complexity of program and clinical outcomes of heart failure disease management incorporating specialist nurse-led heart failure clinics. A meta-regression analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phillips, CO; Singa, RM; Rubin, HR; Jaarsma, T

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether a hierarchy of effectiveness exists with respect to complexity of published protocols of heart failure (HF) disease management (DM) incorporating specialist nurse-led HF clinics. Data sources and study selection: We searched MEDLINE (1966-November 2004), the Cochrane

  2. Congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001114.htm Congenital heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a problem with the heart's structure ...

  3. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About CDC.gov . Home About Heart Disease Coronary Artery Disease Heart Attack Heart Attack Signs and Symptoms ... Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329-4027 USA 800-CDC-INFO ( ...

  4. Rheumatic heart disease: 15 years of clinical and immunological follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roney O Sampaio

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Roney O Sampaio, Kellen C Fae, Lea MF Demarchi, Pablo MA Pomerantzeff, Vera D Aiello, Guilherme S Spina, Ana C Tanaka, Sandra E Oshiro, Max Grinberg, Jorge Kalil, Luiza GuilhermeHeart Institute (InCor, University of São Paulo, BrazilAbstract: Rheumatic fever (RF is a sequel of group A streptococcal throat infection and occurs in untreated susceptible children. Rheumatic heart disease (RHD, the major sequel of RF, occurs in 30%–45% of RF patients. RF is still considered endemic in some regions of Brazil and is responsible for approximately 90% of early childhood valvular surgery in the country. In this study, we present a 15-year clinical follow-up of 25 children who underwent surgical valvular repair. Histopathological and immunological features of heart tissue lesions of RHD patients were also evaluated. The patients presented severe forms of RHD with congestive symptoms at a very young age. Many of them had surgery at the acute phase of RF. Histological analysis showed the presence of dense valvular inflammatory infiltrates and Aschoff nodules in the myocardium of 21% of acute RHD patients. Infiltrating T-cells were mainly CD4+ in heart tissue biopsies of patients with rheumatic activity. In addition, CD4+ and CD8+ infiltrating T-cell clones recognized streptococcal M peptides and cardiac tissue proteins. These findings may open the possibilities of new ways of immunotherapy. In addition, we demonstrated that the surgical procedure during acute phase of the disease improved the quality of life of young RHD patients.Keywords: rheumatic heart disease, Streptococcus pyogenes, heart failure, inflammatory infiltrate, T lymphocytes, molecular mimicry

  5. Radiology of congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amplatz, K.

    1986-01-01

    This is a text on the radiologic diagnosis of congenital heart disease and its clinical manifestations. The main thrust of the book is the logical approach which allows an understanding of the complex theory of congenital heart disease. The atlas gives a concise overview of the entire field of congenital heart disease. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the pathophysiology and its clinical and radiological consequences. Surgical treatment is included since it provides a different viewpoint of the anatomy

  6. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Carpal tunnel syndrome Depression Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine Thyroid disease Urinary tract infections All A-Z health topics ... Carpal tunnel syndrome Depression Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine Thyroid disease Urinary tract infections All A-Z health topics ...

  7. ESC Working Group on Valvular Heart Disease position paper--heart valve clinics: organization, structure, and experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancellotti, Patrizio; Rosenhek, Raphael; Pibarot, Philippe; Iung, Bernard; Otto, Catherine M; Tornos, Pilar; Donal, Erwan; Prendergast, Bernard; Magne, Julien; La Canna, Giovanni; Piérard, Luc A; Maurer, Gerald

    2013-06-01

    With an increasing prevalence of patients with valvular heart disease (VHD), a dedicated management approach is needed. The challenges encountered are manifold and include appropriate diagnosis and quantification of valve lesion, organization of adequate follow-up, and making the right management decisions, in particular with regard to the timing and choice of interventions. Data from the Euro Heart Survey have shown a substantial discrepancy between guidelines and clinical practice in the field of VHD and many patients are denied surgery despite having clear indications. The concept of heart valve clinics (HVCs) is increasingly recognized as the way to proceed. At the same time, very few centres have developed such expertise, indicating that specific recommendations for the initial development and subsequent operating requirements of an HVC are needed. The aim of this position paper is to provide insights into the rationale, organization, structure, and expertise needed to establish and operate an HVC. Although the main goal is to improve the clinical management of patients with VHD, the impact of HVCs on education is of particular importance: larger patient volumes foster the required expertise among more senior physicians but are also fundamental for training new cardiologists, medical students, and nurses. Additional benefits arise from research opportunities resulting from such an organized structure and the delivery of standardized care protocols. The growing volume of patients with VHD, their changing characteristics, and the growing technological opportunities of refined diagnosis and treatment in addition to the potential dismal prognosis if overlooked mandate specialized evaluation and care by dedicated physicians working in a specialized environment that is called the HVC.

  8. Menopause and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Menopause and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 23,2017 Heart ... can become more evident after the onset of menopause. Menopause does not cause cardiovascular diseases . However, certain ...

  9. Cyanotic heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the aorta Ebstein anomaly Hypoplastic left heart syndrome Tetralogy of Fallot Total anomalous pulmonary venous return Transposition of the ... through the middle Cardiac catheterization Heart, front view Tetralogy of Fallot Clubbing Cyanotic heart disease References Bernstein D. Cyanotic ...

  10. Heart disease and depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000790.htm Heart disease and depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... a heart attack or heart surgery Signs of Depression It is pretty common to feel down or ...

  11. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the risk of cardiovascular disease. Poor diet. A diet that's high in fat, salt, sugar and cholesterol can contribute to the development ... other health conditions, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and ... low in salt and saturated fat Maintain a healthy weight Reduce ...

  12. Annotating risk factors for heart disease in clinical narratives for diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Amber; Uzuner, Özlem

    2015-12-01

    The 2014 i2b2/UTHealth natural language processing shared task featured a track focused on identifying risk factors for heart disease (specifically, Cardiac Artery Disease) in clinical narratives. For this track, we used a "light" annotation paradigm to annotate a set of 1304 longitudinal medical records describing 296 patients for risk factors and the times they were present. We designed the annotation task for this track with the goal of balancing annotation load and time with quality, so as to generate a gold standard corpus that can benefit a clinically-relevant task. We applied light annotation procedures and determined the gold standard using majority voting. On average, the agreement of annotators with the gold standard was above 0.95, indicating high reliability. The resulting document-level annotations generated for each record in each longitudinal EMR in this corpus provide information that can support studies of progression of heart disease risk factors in the included patients over time. These annotations were used in the Risk Factor track of the 2014 i2b2/UTHealth shared task. Participating systems achieved a mean micro-averaged F1 measure of 0.815 and a maximum F1 measure of 0.928 for identifying these risk factors in patient records. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Markers of kidney disease and risk of subclinical and clinical heart failure in African Americans: the Jackson Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Nisha; Katz, Ronit; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Afkarian, Maryam; Kestenbaum, Bryan; de Boer, Ian H; Young, Bessie

    2016-12-01

    African Americans and patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at high risk for clinical heart failure (HF). In this study, we aimed to determine the association of markers of kidney disease with subclinical HF (by echocardiogram) and risk of clinical HF among a large, well-characterized community-based cohort of African American patients. We also examined whether the association of markers of kidney disease with HF was attenuated with adjustment for echocardiographic measures. We studied participants in the Jackson Heart Study, a large community-based cohort of African Americans. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and urine albumin:creatinine ratio (ACR) were measured at baseline. We tested the association of eGFR and urine ACR with left ventricular mass (LVM), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and physician-adjudicated incident HF. Among the 3332 participants in the study, 166 (5%) had eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 and 405 (12%) had urine ACR ≥30 mg/g. In models adjusted for demographics, comorbidity and the alternative measure of kidney disease, lower eGFR and higher urine ACR were associated with higher LVM {β-coefficient 1.54 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78-2.31] per 10 mL/min/1.73 m 2 decrease in eGFR and 2.87 (95% CI 1.85-3.88) per doubling of urine ACR}. There was no association of eGFR and urine ACR with LVEF [β-coefficient -0.12 (95% CI -0.28-0.04) and -0.11 (95% CI -0.35-0.12), respectively]. There was no association of eGFR with the risk of incident HF [HR 1.02 (95% CI 0.91-1.14) per 10 mL/min/1.73 m 2 decrease], while there was a significant association of urine ACR [HR 2.22 (95% CI 1.29-3.84) per doubling of urine ACR]. This association was only modestly attenuated with adjustment for LVM [HR 1.95 (95% CI 1.09-3.49)]. Among a community-based cohort of African Americans, lower eGFR and higher ACR were associated with higher LVM. Furthermore, higher urine ACR was associated with incident HF, which was not entirely explained by

  14. Heart rate modulation in stable coronary artery disease without clinical heart failure: What we have already learned from SIGNIFY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Piero Perna

    2016-12-01

    In conclusion, heart rate is a marker of risk but is not a risk factor and/or a target of therapy in patients with stable coronary artery disease and preserved ventricular systolic function. Standard doses of ivabradine are indicated for treatment of angina as an alternative or in addition to beta-blockers, but should not be administered in association with CYP3A4 inhibitors or heart rate-lowering calcium-channel blockers.

  15. Heart Disease in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing or ... the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease, and it happens slowly over time. It's the ...

  16. Current Role of Blood and Urine Biomarkers in the Clinical Care of Adults with Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpal, Saurabh; Alshawabkeh, Laith; Opotowsky, Alexander R

    2017-06-01

    There is an increasing number of adult patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). While several biomarkers have been validated and integrated into general cardiology clinical practice, these tests are often applied to adults with CHD in the absence of disease-specific validation. Although these patients are often grouped into a single population, there is heterogeneous pathophysiology, variable disease chronicity, extensive multisystem involvement, and a low event rate relative to acquired heart disease. These stand as challenges to systematic investigation and clinical application of biomarkers for adults with CHD. This paper reviews recent studies investigating the use of biomarkers in this population, with emphasis on biomarkers applied in clinical adult CHD care. A handful of biomarkers have been integrated into adult CHD practice, such as iron studies in cyanotic heart disease and stool alpha-1 antitrypsin for diagnosis of protein losing enteropathy in the Fontan circulation. Use of kidney and liver tests has been studied in prognostication of adult CHD patients. A few other biomarkers like natriuretic peptides and troponins seem likely to provide useful information in other ACHD situations based on limited disease-specific data and extrapolation from acquired heart disease. More research is needed to support the robust validity of most existing clinical biomarkers in adult congenital cardiology practice. Until data from larger, prospectively enrolled cohorts are available, clinical use of biomarkers in these patients will require careful interpretation with attention to underlying pathophysiology, as well as detailed understanding of potential pitfalls of specific assays and clinical contexts.

  17. Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke About 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes ... the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Cholesterol Salt Video: Know Your ...

  18. The value of the clinical geneticist caring for adults with congenital heart disease: diagnostic yield and patients' perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Engelen, Klaartje; Baars, Marieke J. H.; Felix, Joyce P.; Postma, Alex V.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Smets, Ellen M. A.

    2013-01-01

    For adult patients with congenital heart disease (CHD), knowledge about the origin and inheritance of their CHD is important. Clinical geneticists may play a significant role in their care. We explored the diagnostic yield of clinical genetic consultation of adult CHD patients, patients' motivations

  19. Acute Valvular Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Varun; Barr, Brian; Srivastava, Mukta

    2018-02-01

    Valvular heart disease (VHD) is a common clinical entity. Recognition of decompensated VHD is crucial to instituting appropriate workup and management. Initial evaluation focuses on hemodynamics, peripheral perfusion, volume overload, and active myocardial ischemia. Initial therapy is targeted at improving hemodynamics, fluid status, and decreasing myocardial ischemia before intervention. Echocardiography can rapidly identify VHD etiology and severity along with physical examination findings. Owing to improved survival with cardiac surgery over the past several decades, prosthetic valve dysfunction should be recognized and initial treatment understood. Mechanical circulatory support is increasingly part of clinical practice in stabilizing patients with decompensated VHD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The stem-cell application in ischemic heart disease: Basic principles, specifics and practical experience from clinical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banović Marko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Longer life duration, different clinical presentations of coronary disease, as well as high incidence of comorbidity in patients with ischemic heart disease have led to an increase in the incidence of ischemic heart failure. Despite numerous and new treatment methods that act on different pathophysiological mechanisms that cause heart failure, and whose aim is to slowdown or stop the progression of this devastating disease, morbidity and mortality in these patients remain high. These facts have firstly led to the introduction of the experimental, and then clinical studies with the application of stem cells in patients with ischemic heart disease. Previous studies have shown that the application of stem cells is a feasible and safe method in patients with acute coronary syndrome, as well as in patients with chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy, but the efficacy of these methods in both of the abovementioned clinical syndromes has yet to be established. This review paper outlines the basic principles of treatment of ischemic heart disease with stem cells, as well as the experience and knowledge gained in previous clinical studies.

  1. [A comparison of the clinical efficacy of enalapril maleate analogs in patients with heart failure and ischemic heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunaev, V V; Berezin, A E

    1998-01-01

    The authors examined 68 patients aged from 42 to 68 years with ischemic heart disease without a history of myocardial infarction and with angina pectoris of exertion functional class 2-3 and circulatory insufficiency class 2 (according to NYHA criteria). The criteria serving as the reason for relating patients to the follow-up group were left-ventricular end-diastolic volume > 160 ml, ejection fraction 0.55, threshold power of endured loads within a range of 71.5 +/- 2.30 watt. After stabilization of the clinical status by means of basic therapy (nitrates, blockers of slow calcium channels, diuretics, antiaggregants), all patients were divided into two follow-up groups. The first group consisted of 36 patients who received renitec (10 mg/24 h), patients of group 2 were given enap in the same dose. The course of treatment lasted 12 weeks. The effectiveness of treatment was controlled by echocardiography according to the standard methods in M- and B-regimens. Analysis of the obtained data showed that within 12-day follow-up renitec demonstrated higher effectiveness and lesser incidence of side-effects than did enap given in the same dose.

  2. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and heart failure: research and clinical practice in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Chiumeo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and comorbidities, increasing with age, is the challenge that nowadays health care systems are facing to better care treat these patients. For this reason a clinical trial was conducted in the province of Trento by a group of 30 volunteer general practitioners members of SNAMID (Scientific Society for Continuing Medical Education of General Practitioners. The objectives were to identify: i prevalence of COPD in patients (65-98 years in the province of Trento; ii presence and incidence of heart failure (HF in COPD patients; iii early detection of other chronic diseases; and iv improving electronic medical records (EMR as an innovation way of professional care management. From May 2011 to October 2013, 17 doctors completed the two-year work using the EMR. The studied patients were men and women (65-98 years, suffering from COPD; the considered data included: anthropometric information, smoking status, International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9 diagnosis of COPD, HF and chronic diseases, specific blood and instrumental tests. The extracted results were then linked with data of sentinel therapies, collected by the EMR. The database obtained identified patients with COPD or HF not previously recognized with ICD-9 diagnosis. The study identified the sentinel drugs chosen for COPD and HF, excluding other drugs not selective for the study or confusing for a proper statistical evaluation.

  3. Adenovirus disease in six small bowel, kidney and heart transplant recipients; pathology and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Vikas; Chou, Pauline C; Picken, Maria M

    2015-11-01

    Adenoviruses are emerging as important viral pathogens in hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplant recipients, impacting morbidity, graft survival, and even mortality. The risk seems to be highest in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients as well as heart, lung, and small bowel transplant recipients. Most of the adenovirus diseases develop in the first 6 months after transplantation, particularly in pediatric patients. Among abdominal organ recipients, small bowel grafts are most frequently affected, presumably due to the presence of a virus reservoir in the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Management of these infections may be difficult and includes the reduction of immunosuppression, whenever possible, combined with antiviral therapy, if necessary. Therefore, an awareness of the pathology associated with such infections is important in order to allow early detection and specific treatment. We reviewed six transplant recipients (small bowel, kidney, and heart) with adenovirus graft involvement from two institutions. We sought to compare the diagnostic morphology and the clinical and laboratory findings. The histopathologic features of an adenovirus infection of the renal graft and one native kidney in a heart transplant recipient included a vaguely granulomatous mixed inflammatory infiltrate associated with rare cells showing a cytopathic effect (smudgy nuclei). A lymphocytic infiltrate, simulating T cell rejection, with admixture of eosinophils was also seen. In the small bowel grafts, there was a focal mixed inflammatory infiltrate with associated necrosis in addition to cytopathic effects. In the heart, allograft adenovirus infection was silent with no evidence of inflammatory changes. Immunohistochemical stain for adenovirus was positive in all grafts and in one native kidney. All patients were subsequently cleared of adenovirus infection, as evidenced by follow-up biopsies, with no loss of the grafts. Adenovirus infection can

  4. MAGNESIUM METABOLISM AND CLINICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Yezhov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study relationship of the clinical state and cardiac functional parameters with magnesium metabolism indices in patients with chronic ischemic heart disease (IHD.Material and methods. Patients with stable angina pectoris, II-III class (n=480 were involved into the study. Evaluation of the following items was performed: disease course, anxiodepressive syndrome intensity, exercise tolerance, blood and urine electrolyte profile, systolic and diastolic left ventricle function, endothelium-dependent and endotheliumnondependent vasodilatation, i/v magnesium load test, Holter electrocardiogram monitoring.Results. High prevalence of systemic magnesium deficiency (17.9 and 37.5% according to serum and erythrocyte levels, respectively was found in IHD patients. Severity of magnesium deficiency in IHD patients depended on duration of disease, experience of myocardial infarction, myocardial ischemia seriousness, disorders of endothelium vasodilating function and left ventricle diastolic function, severity of concomitant anxiety. Exercise tests were changed in IHD patients with magnesium deficiency.Conclusion. The study data let to consider that magnesium deficiency involves into the IHD pathogenesis.

  5. CLINICAL PROFILE OF PATTERN OF DYSLIPIDAEMIA AND ISCHAEMIC HEART DISEASE IN TYPE II DIABETES MELLITUS PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Vijayrao Rajkondawar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The present research was undertaken to study the pattern of dyslipidaemia and varied clinical manifestations of ischaemic heart disease, its risk factors in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. Diabetes Mellitus (DM has become major public health problem in India. It is not only increasing in morbidity and mortality, but also decreases the quality of life. Also, disease and its complications are causing heavy economic burden for patients suffering from it.1,2 Diabetes is endemic globally with increasing prevalence in both developing and developed countries. Diabetes is a major cause of mortality, but several studies indicate that it is likely underreported as a cause of death. A recent estimate suggested that diabetes was the fifth leading cause of death worldwide and was responsible for almost 3 million deaths annually (1.7-5.2% of all deaths. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 100 patients attending the outpatient department or admitted to medical wards, ICU of tertiary care centre and fulfilling the inclusion criteria were evaluated clinically. A baseline Electrocardiogram (ECG was taken in all cases irrespective of clinical evidence of cardiac involvement. Patients with normal ECG pattern were further evaluated by Treadmill Testing (TMT or stress test for subclinical cardiac involvement. Risk factor evaluation was done in all cases. RESULTS Prevalence of IHD was found to be 41% with a male predominance (1.067:1. Evaluation of risk factors has shown its strong association with IHD. Incidence of IHD was high when low HDL (P 25 had negatively significant association with IHD in type 2 diabetics (P=0.072. Smoking was not statistically associated (P=0.577 and in male alcoholics, IHD had positive association with alcohol (P=0.193. CONCLUSION The current study points out that there exists an increased incidence of ischaemic heart disease in diabetics with few, but not all risk factors contributing to it. Early detection, optimal glycaemic

  6. THE STUDY OF PREVALENCE AND CLINICAL PROFILE OF VALVULAR HEART DISEASES IN GOVERNMENT GENERAL HOSPITAL, KAKINADA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Vijay Kumar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Among the cardiovascular diseases acquired, valvular heart disease is one of the common causes of mortality and morbidity in India. An average of 40% of causes is rheumatic valvular heart diseases of all patients admitted with heart diseases. Male preponderance has been noted by most of the physicians in rheumatic heart disease in India. Acquired valvular heart diseases are mitral valve prolapse syndrome, papillary muscle dysfunction, the rupture of chordae tendineae, calcified mitral annulus, calcified aortic stenosis, aortic regurgitation due to syphilis, connective tissue disorders (Marfan’s syndrome, osteogenesis imperfect and systemic lupus erythematosus, atherosclerosis, hypertension and infective endocarditis. Other less common causes are recurrent pulmonary embolism, tuberculosis, cardiac tumours, carcinoid tumours, cardiac surgery for congenital cardiac anomalies and trauma. MATERIALS AND METHODS It is a prospective study on adult patients with valvular abnormalities attending to the Medicine and Cardiology Units of Government General Hospital, Kakinada, between November 2014-May 2017. Total 100 in-patients were included in this study as per inclusion and exclusion criteria. Inclusion Criteria- All patients aged 13 years and above are considered ‘adult’ and are managed by adult medicine. There is no upper age limit. Exclusion Criteria- Patients with congenital valvular heart diseases and cor pulmonale are excluded in the study. RESULTS The incidence of acquired valvular heart disease is higher in the age group of 31-40 years (32% followed by 21-30 years age group (28%. Our study also revealed relatively higher incidence of acquired valvular heart disease among the age groups of 51-60 years and above 60 years, which is due to a relatively higher incidence of mitral regurgitation due to ischaemic heart disease in this same age group. CONCLUSION Out of 100 cases studied mitral valve involvement was noted in 56 cases

  7. Heart transplantation in adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchill, Luke J

    2016-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) is vastly different to that observed in acquired heart disease. Unlike acquired HF in which pharmacological strategies are the cornerstone for protecting and improving ventricular function, ACHD-related HF relies heavily upon structural and other interventions to achieve these aims. patients with ACHD constitute a small percentage of the total adult heart transplant population (∼3%), although the number of ACHD heart transplant recipients is growing rapidly with a 40% increase over the last two decades. The worldwide experience to date has confirmed heart transplantation as an effective life-extending treatment option in carefully selected patients with ACHD with end-stage cardiac disease. Opportunities for improving outcomes in patients with ACHD-related HF include (i) earlier recognition and referral to centres with combined expertise in ACHD and HF, (ii) increased awareness of arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death risk in this population, (iii) greater collaboration between HF and ACHD specialists at the time of heart transplant assessment, (iv) expert surgical planning to reduce ischaemic time and bleeding risk at the time of transplant, (v) tailored immunosuppression in the post-transplant period and (vi) development and validation of ACHD-specific risk scores to predict mortality and guide patient selection. The purpose of this article is to review current approaches to diagnosing and treating advanced HF in patients with ACHD including indications, contraindications and clinical outcomes after heart transplantation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlberg Hansen, Louise; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Correct prehospital diagnosis of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) may accelerate and improve the treatment. We sought to evaluate the accuracy of prehospital diagnoses of ischemic heart diseases assigned by physicians. Methods. The Mobile Emergency Care Unit (MECU) in Odense, Denmark...

  9. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 13,2017 Understand the risks of inflammation. Although it is not proven that inflammation causes ...

  10. [Clinical and cost effectiveness of rehabilitation programs including physical exercises for patients with ischemic heart disease under conditions of resort and outpatient clinics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikhova, E V; Guliaeva, S F; Tsarev, Iu K; Chervotkina, L A

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate clinical and cost effectiveness of rehabilitation programs including long-term physical training of moderate intensity intended for the management of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) who had undergone acute coronary events; the programs were adapted to the treatment under conditions of spa resorts, dispensaries, and outpatient clinics. It was shown that rehabilitation of patients presenting with CDH with the use of moderately intensive physical exercises during a long period enhances the effectiveness of application of the available funds due to improved clinical course of coronary heart disease, tolerance of physical load, and quality of life.

  11. Clinical utility of ductus venosus flow in fetuses with right-sided congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Bhawna; Krishnan, Anita; Donofrio, Mary T

    2014-09-01

    Abnormal ductus venosus flow is associated with fetal compromise and can be present in right-sided congenital heart disease. We hypothesized that the ductus venosus flow pattern in fetuses with obstructive right-sided congenital heart disease will have abnormal flow at baseline. Those with nonobstructive disease will have normal flow at baseline. We further hypothesized that abnormal ductus venosus flow will predict fetal compromise. We conducted a retrospective review of fetuses with right-sided congenital heart disease. Ductus venosus measurements included the presence of atrial reversal, velocity time integral, and peak velocity index. Fetuses were separated into those with obstructive (group 1) and nonobstructive (group 2) lesions. Compromise was defined as fetal distress (pericardial effusion, hydrops, or left ventricular dilatation/dysfunction) or death (fetal/neonatal mortality). Sixty fetuses with right-sided congenital heart disease were identified (mean gestational age ± SD, 24.2 ± 5.4 weeks; group 1, n = 45; group 2, n = 15). Ductus venosus reversal was more often present (49% versus 13%; P = .017), and the peak velocity index was significantly higher (1.39 ± 0.67 versus 0.98 ± 0.33; P= .026) in group 1. In group 1, ductus venosus reversal was more often present (93% versus 32%; P congenital heart disease have ductus venosus reversal at baseline; an abnormal peak velocity index can be used to predict compromise. Fetuses with nonobstructive disease rarely have ductus venosus reversal; the peak velocity index cannot be used to predict outcomes in this group. © 2014 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  12. Contemporary prevalence of pulmonary arterial hypertension in adult congenital heart disease following the updated clinical classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Riel, Annelieke C. M. J.; Schuuring, Mark J.; van Hessen, Irene D.; Zwinderman, Aielko H.; Cozijnsen, Luc; Reichert, Constant L. A.; Hoorntje, Jan C. A.; Wagenaar, Lodewijk J.; Post, Marco C.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Hoendermis, Elke S.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Bouma, Berto J.

    2014-01-01

    The aging congenital heart disease (CHD) population is prone to develop a variety of sequelae, including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Previous prevalence estimates are limited in applicability due to the use of tertiary centers, or database encoding only. We aimed to investigate the

  13. Clinical classification in pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, Willemijn M. H.; Douwes, Johannes M.; Ploegstra, Mark-Jan; Krishnan, Usha; Roofthooft, Marcus T. R.; Hillege, Hans L.; Ivy, D. Dunbar; Rosenzweig, Erika B.; Berger, Rolf M. F.

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a frequent cause of pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), with diverse etiology and outcome. We aimed to describe phenotypic heterogeneity in pediatric PAH associated with CHD (PAH-CHD), assess the applicability of the Nice CHD classification, and explore

  14. Clinical Updates in Women's Health Care Summary: Ischemic Heart Disease: Primary and Preventive Care Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Brittany S; Carlyle, Lynn; Voeltz, Michele D

    2017-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among women in the United States. Obstetrician-gynecologists often are the sole health care providers for otherwise healthy women. Therefore, they must be aware of risk factors, signs, and symptoms of cardiovascular disease and be prepared to recognize and treat this condition in patients as well as provide referrals when specialized care is indicated. Women with cardiac problems typically present with chest discomfort; however, they also are more likely than healthy women to present with other common symptoms, such as shortness of breath, back pain, jaw pain, or nausea and vomiting. This monograph, with a primary focus on ischemic heart disease (IHD), discusses the basic anatomy of the heart and coronary arteries; vascular biology; pathogenesis of atherosclerosis; and the screening, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of IHD as well as the multiple risk factors associated with the development of IHD that contribute to both increased morbidity and mortality.

  15. CLINICAL AND ECONOMICAL ASSESSMENTS OF METOPROLOL TARTRATE/SUCCINATE USAGE IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Soura

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and clinicoeconomical studies review is presented as well as results of author’s comparative cost analysis on metoprolol tartrate (Betaloc and metoprolol succinate (Betaloc ZOK usage in patients with ischemic heart disease. Efficacy of metoprolol therapy is proven in randomized clinical studies in patients with angina and myocardial infarction (MI. In angina patients metoprolol prevents cardiac attacks, MI, reduces nitroglycerine consumption, increases exercise tolerability, prolongs the exercise time before ST segment depression (succinate better than tartrate, decrease of angina intensity. In MI patients metoprolol therapy reduces mortality, sudden death, recurring MI and the rate of early post MI angina attacks. Nowadays metoprolol is the only β-blocker having indication on secondary MI prevention. Besides for the present metoprolol succinate is the only β-blocker with proven direct antisclerosis effect. According to Swedish clinicoeconomical study in patients after MI secondary prevention with metoprolol therapy saves the costs in comparison with placebo. American clinicoeconomical model of metoprolol and atenolol usage in all patients with MI could result in significant reduction in mortality and recurring MI rate, prolong the life and improve its quality, save financial resources. The cost of monthly treatment of angina patient with metoprolol tartrate (Betaloc and metoprolol succinate (Betaloc ZOK is 135 and 354 rubles, respectively. The price range of comparative β-blockers in ascending order is the following: atenolol (Atenolol Nicomed → metoprolol tartrate (Betaloc → metoprolol succinate (Betaloc ZOK → bisoprolol (Concor → nebivolol (Nebilet. In conclusion, metoprolol therapy is the one of mostly economically reasonable approach.

  16. Clinical evaluation of 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine myocardial scintigram in patients with vascular heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terada, Kouji; Sugihara, Hiroki; Shiga, Koji

    1995-01-01

    Myocardial sympathetic nerve function can be evaluated by 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy. Congestive heart failure is closely related to myocardial sympathetic nerve function. This study evaluated the severity of congestive heart failure in 30 patients with valvular heart disease [aortic regurgitation (AR): n=20, mean age=70±13 years; mitral regurgitation (MR): n=10, mean age=61±18 years], who had chronic heart failure by MIBG myocardial scintigraphy. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and anterior planar myocardial images were obtained 15 minutes (initial images) and 4 hours (delayed images) after injection of MIBG (111 MBq). Defect score was determined by the delayed SPECT images visually as a semi-quantitative index. Myocardial MIBG uptake was quantified by the heart to upper mediastinum uptake ratio on the delayed anterior planar images (H/M) and mean cardiac MIBG washout rate during 4 hours was calculated from the bull's eye display data (clearance). These indices were compared with the NYHA class and echocardiographic findings of the patients. MIBG regional defect in the delayed image was most frequently seen in the inferoposterior wall, and defect score and clearance were significantly higher and the H/M ratio was significantly lower in NYHA class III patients than in class II patients. In patients with AR, clearance significantly correlated with left ventricular end-systolic dimension. In patients with MR, both the H/M ratio and clearance significantly correlated with left atrial dimension. Defect score, H/M, and clearance were closely related to the severity of AR and MR. These results indicate that MIBG scan can be used to assess the severity of valvular heart disease. (author)

  17. Running nurse-led secondary prevention clinics for coronary heart disease in primary care: qualitative study of health professionals' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchie, Peter; Campbell, Neil C; Ritchie, Lewis D; Thain, Joan

    2005-07-01

    A randomised trial of nurse-led secondary prevention clinics for coronary heart disease resulted in improved secondary prevention and significantly lowered all-cause mortality at 4-year follow-up. This qualitative trial was conducted to explore the experience of health professionals that had been involved in running the clinics. To identify the barriers and facilitators to establishing secondary prevention clinics for coronary heart disease within primary care. Semi-structured audiotaped telephone interviews with GPs and nurses involved in running clinics. A stratified, random sample of 19 urban, suburban, and rural general practices in north-east Scotland. Semi-structured telephone interviews with 19 GPs and 17 practice-based nurses involved in running nurse-led clinics for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. Eight practices had run clinics continuously and 11 had stopped, with eight subsequently restarting. Participants accounted for these patterns by referring to advantages and disadvantages of the clinics in four areas: patient care, development of nursing skills, team working, and infrastructure. Most practitioners perceived benefits for patients from attending secondary prevention clinics, but some, from small rural practices, thought they were unnecessary. The extended role for nurses was welcomed, but was dependent on motivated staff, appropriate training and support. Clinics relied on, and could enhance, team working, however, some doctors were wary of delegating. With regard to infrastructure, staff shortages (especially nurses) and accommodation were as problematic as lack of funds. Nurse-led secondary prevention clinics were viewed positively by most healthcare professionals that had been involved in running them, but barriers to their implementation had led most to stop running them at some point. Lack of space and staff shortages are likely to remain ongoing problems, but improvements in funding training and communication within

  18. Clinical implications of eicosapentaenoic acid/arachidonic acid ratio (EPA/AA) in adult patients with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanoh, Miki; Inai, Kei; Shinohara, Tokuko; Tomimatsu, Hirofumi; Nakanishi, Toshio

    2017-12-01

    Recent studies showed that a low ratio between the levels of eicosapentaenoic acid and those of arachidonic acid (EPA/AA) is associated with higher incidence of coronary artery disease and poor prognosis of heart failure, arrhythmia, and cardiac sudden death. However, the clinical implications of EPA/AA in adult patients with congenital heart disease remain unclear. We aimed to assess the prognostic value of EPA/AA regarding cardiac events in adult patients with congenital heart disease. We measured the serum levels of eicosapentaenoic acid and arachidonic acid in 130 adult patients (median age, 31 years) stratified into two groups according to their EPA/AA (low, ≤0.22; high, >0.22). We prospectively analyzed the association between EPA/AA and incidence of cardiac events during a mean observation period of 15 months, expressed in terms of hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI). In the subgroup of patients with biventricular circulation (2VC) (n = 76), we analyzed the same clinical endpoints. In our study population, EPA/AA was not associated with the incidence of arrhythmic events (HR, 1.52; 95% CI, 0.82-2.85; p = 0.19), but low EPA/AA was a predictor of heart failure hospitalization (HR, 2.83; 95% CI, 1.35-6.30; p heart failure hospitalization (HR, 5.20; 95% CI, 1.78-18.1; p congenital heart disease.

  19. Diabetic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medicine to treat high blood pressure). A high fasting blood sugar level (or you're on medicine ... find out whether routine testing for DHD will benefit people who have diabetes but no heart disease ...

  20. Heart Disease (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body ... Get Well" card and paying a visit. Can Kids Get Heart Disease? Kids usually don't have ...

  1. Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease and Heart Failure in Type 2 Diabetes – Mechanisms, Management, and Clinical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low Wang, Cecilia C.; Hess, Connie N.; Hiatt, William R.; Goldfine, Allison B.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the principal cause of death and disability among patients with diabetes mellitus. Diabetes exacerbates mechanisms underlying atherosclerosis and heart failure. Unfortunately, these mechanisms are not adequately modulated by therapeutic strategies focusing solely on optimal glycemic control with currently available drugs or approaches. In the setting of multi-factorial risk reduction with statins and other lipid lowering agents, anti-hypertensive therapies, and anti-hyperglycemic treatment strategies, cardiovascular complication rates are falling, yet remain higher for patients with diabetes than for those without. This review considers the mechanisms, history, controversies, new pharmacologic agents, and recent evidence for current guidelines for cardiovascular management in the patient with diabetes mellitus to support evidence-based care in the patient with diabetes and heart disease outside of the acute care setting. PMID:27297342

  2. Clinical outcomes of tricuspid valve repair accompanying left-sided heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Azarnoush, Kasra; Nadeemy, Ahmad S; Pereira, Bruno; Leesar, Massoud A; Lambert, Céline; Azhari, Alaa; Eljezi, Vedat; Dauphin, Nicolas; Geoffroy, Etienne; Camilleri, Lionel

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine whether the need for additional tricuspid valve repair is an independent risk factor when surgery is required for a left-sided heart disease. METHODS One hundred and eighty patients (68 ± 12 years, 79 males) underwent tricuspid annuoplasty. Cox proportional-hazards regression model for multivariate analysis was performed for variables found significant in univariate analyses. RESULTS Tricuspid regurgitation etiology was functional in 154 cases (86%), organic in 16 cases (9%),...

  3. Renin-angiotensin system antagonists and clinical outcomes in stable coronary artery disease without heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbets, Emmanuel; Labreuche, Julien; Simon, Tabassome; Delorme, Laurent; Danchin, Nicolas; Amarenco, Pierre; Goto, Shinya; Meune, Christophe; Eagle, Kim A; Bhatt, Deepak L; Steg, Philippe Gabriel

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) or angiotensin-II receptor blocker (ARB) use is associated with lower rates of cardiovascular events in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) but without heart failure (HF) receiving contemporary medical management. Using data from the Reduction of Atherothrombosis for Continued Health (REACH) registry, we examined, using propensity score approaches, relationships between cardiovascular outcomes and ACEI/ARB use (64.1% users) in 20 909 outpatients with stable CAD and free of HF at baseline. As internal control, we assessed the relation between statin use and outcomes. At 4-year follow-up, the risk of cardiovascular death, MI, or stroke (primary outcome) was similar in ACEI/ARB users compared with non-users (hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.91-1.16; P = 0.66). Similarly, the risk of the primary outcome and cardiovascular hospitalization for atherothrombotic events (secondary outcome) was not reduced in ACEI/ARB users (hazard ratio, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.01-1.16; P = 0.04), nor were the rates of any of its components. Analyses using propensity score matching yielded similar results, as did sensitivity analyses accounting for missing covariates, changes in medications over time, or analysing separately ACEI and ARB use. In contrast, in the same cohort, statin use was associated with lower rates for all outcomes. Use of ACEI/ARB was not associated with better outcomes in stable CAD outpatients without HF. The benefit of ACEI/ARB seen in randomized clinical trials was not replicated in this large contemporary cohort, which questions their value in this specific subset. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. CLINICAL EFFICACY OF GLYCOSAMINOGLYCANS IN PATIENTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS AND ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Kozlova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study sulodexide clinical efficacy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM and ischemic heart disease (IHD in prevention of contrast induced nephropathy (CIN. Material and мethods. Patients with type 2 DM and IHD who undergone X-Ray contrast intervention. The patients were randomized into 2 groups: 56 patients of the main group were i/v administered sulodexide (Vessel Due F , “Alfa Wassermann”, Italy according to standard procedure; 56 patients of the control group were treated with unfractionated heparin. Results. The incidence of CIN in the main and control groups was, respectively , 16% and 42% (p<0.01. Reduction of microalbuminuria (MAU was found in 89.3% of the sulodexide group patients. MAU dynamics in patients of control group was not observed. There were no deteriorations in echocardiography characteristics in patients of both groups. The reduction in  low density cholesterol and triglyceride plasma levels was observed in the main group. Sulodexide induced a lengthening of the activated partial thromboplastin time (from 30±0.6 to 34±0.5 s, without altering fibrinogen level. There were no thrombotic and hemorrhagic complications of endovascular intervention in sulodexide group. No one case of thrombocytopenia was observed. Higher risk of CIN in patients without sulodexide treatment compared with this in sulodexide treated patients was associated with multiple lesions of coronary arteries, diuretic intake in periprocedural period, contrast agent dose, duration of hospitalization, seriousness of intervention. Conclusion. Sulodexide therapy in patients with 2 type DM and IHD undergone X-Ray contrast intervention prevents renal dysfunction, providing antiproteinuric effect and correcting lipid metabolism and coagulation system disturbances.

  5. Interpretation of Clinical Data Based on C4.5 Algorithm for the Diagnosis of Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiharto, Wiharto; Kusnanto, Hari; Herianto, Herianto

    2016-07-01

    The interpretation of clinical data for the diagnosis of coronary heart disease can be done using algorithms in data mining. Most clinical data interpretation systems for diagnosis developed using data mining algorithms with a black-box approach cannot recognize examination attribute relationships with the incidence of coronary heart disease. This study proposes a system to interpretation clinical examination results for the diagnosis of coronary heart disease based the decision tree algorithm. This system comprises several stages. First, oversampling is carried out by a combination of the synthetic minority oversampling technique (SMOTE), feature selection, and the C4.5 classification algorithm. System testing is done using k-fold cross-validation. The performance parameters are sensitivity, specificity, positive prediction value (PPV), negative prediction value (NPV) and the area under the curve (AUC). The results showed that the performance of the system has a sensitivity of 74.7%, a specificity of 93.7%, a PPV of 74.2%, an NPV of 93.7%, and an AUC of 84.2%. This study demonstrated that, by using C4.5 algorithms, data can be interpreted in the form of a decision tree, to aid the understanding of the clinician. In addition, the proposed system can provide better performance by category.

  6. Routine clinical cardiovascular magnetic resonance in paediatric and adult congenital heart disease: patients, protocols, questions asked and contributions made

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinoff Stefan

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (CMR of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD has become routine clinical practice. However, existing CMR protocols focus predominantly on patients with ischemic heart disease, and information is limited on the types of patient with CHD who benefit from CMR investigation, and in what ways. Therefore the aim of this study was to answer the questions: What type of patients were studied by CMR in a centre specializing in paediatric and adult CHD management? What questions were asked, which protocols were used and were the questions successfully answered? To answer these questions, we conducted a cohort study of all 362 patients that received routine clinical CMR during 2007 at the Department of Paediatric Cardiology and Congenital Heart Disease at the Deutsches Herzzentrum München. Results Underlying diagnosis was in 33% Fallot's tetralogy, 17% aortic coarctation, 8% Ebstein's disease, 6% Marfan's disease, 4% single ventricle with Fontan-like circulation, and 32% others. Median age was 26 years (7 days – 75 years. Ventricular volumes were assessed in 67% of the patients; flow in 74%; unknown anatomy only in 9%; specific individual morphology of known anatomy in 83%; myocardial fibrosis in 8%; stress-induced myocardial perfusion defects in 1%. Only in 3% of the cases the question could not be fully answered. Conclusion Contrary to common belief, routine CMR of patients with CHD was not requested to address global anatomical questions so much as to clarify specific questions of morphology and function of known anatomy. The CMR protocols used differed markedly from those widely used in patients with ischemic heart disease.

  7. [Analysis of some clinical aspects of degenerative valvular heart diseases in medical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, Simona Daniela; Sandru, V; Artenie, R; Rezuş, C; Manea, Paloma; Burdujan, Alina; Hrustovici, A; Cosovanu, A

    2003-01-01

    In a period of 5 years there were 18,391 admissions; out of them 1129 cases were diagnosed with valvular lesions: 223 (19.7%) were degenerative valvular heart disease, 608 (53.8%) had rheumatismal valvular lesions, 7 (0.6%) had congenital valvular lesions and 291 cases (25.7%) had valvular lesions of other etiologies. Out of the 223 cases with degenerative valvular lesions, 99 cases (44.4%) were men with an average age of 70.1 years old and 129 were women (55%) with an average age of 74.9 years old. The calcific aortic valve stenosis was encountered in 139 patients (62.3%), the aortic insufficiency was diagnosed in 19 patients (8.5%), the mitral insufficiency 49 patients (21.9%) and the mitral stenosis in 10 patients (4.4%) the other patients having either aortic or mitral valvular disease. The combination of an aortic stenosis with a mitral insufficiency was diagnosed in 46 cases (20.6%) from the 223. Only 14 patients were asymptomatic, most of them having heart failure (namely, 178 patients i.e. 78%) with or without angine pectoris or effort vertigo, or they had only effort angina, vertigo or effort sincope. Rhythm disorders happened in 59 patients (26.4%) while disorders in the transmission of the stimuli were diagnosed in 14 patients (5.2%). Two patients died due to cardiac causes. Rheumatismal valve disease are nearly 2.5 times more frequent than degenerative valve disease and they became a practical reality, which is claimed by its continuously increasing frequency, by a variety of lesional aspects and by implications on the heart, and by it, presence in an age group were arteriosclerosis cumulates its risk factors.

  8. Clinical outcomes of tricuspid valve repair accompanying left-sided heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarnoush, Kasra; Nadeemy, Ahmad S; Pereira, Bruno; Leesar, Massoud A; Lambert, Céline; Azhari, Alaa; Eljezi, Vedat; Dauphin, Nicolas; Geoffroy, Etienne; Camilleri, Lionel

    2017-10-26

    To determine whether the need for additional tricuspid valve repair is an independent risk factor when surgery is required for a left-sided heart disease. One hundred and eighty patients (68 ± 12 years, 79 males) underwent tricuspid annuoplasty. Cox proportional-hazards regression model for multivariate analysis was performed for variables found significant in univariate analyses. Tricuspid regurgitation etiology was functional in 154 cases (86%), organic in 16 cases (9%), and mixed in 10 cases (6%), respectively. Postoperative mortality at 30 days was 11.7%. Mean follow-up was 51.7 mo with survival at 5 years of 73.5%. Risk factors for mortality were acute endocarditis [hazard ratio (HR) = 9.22 (95%CI: 2.87-29.62), P disease requiring myocardial revascularization [HR = 2.79 (1.26-6.20), P = 0.012], and aortic valve stenosis [HR = 2.6 (1.15-5.85), P = 0.021]. Significant predictive factors from univariate analyses were double-valve replacement combined with tricuspid annuloplasty [HR = 2.21 (1.11-4.39), P = 0.003] and preoperatively impaired ejection fraction [HR = 1.98 (1.04-3.92), P = 0.044]. However, successful mitral valve repair showed a protective effect [HR = 0.32 (0.10-0.98), P = 0.046]. Additionally, in instances where tricuspid regurgitation required the need for concomitant tricuspid valve repair, mortality predictor scores such as Euroscore 2 could be shortened to a simple Euroscore-tricuspid comprised of only 7 inputs. The explanation may lie in the fact that significant tricuspid regurgitation following left-sided heart disease represents an independent risk factor encompassing several other factors such as pulmonary arterial hypertension and dyspnea. Tricuspid annuloplasty should be used more often as a concomitant procedure in the presence of relevant tricuspid regurgitation, although it usually reveals an overly delayed correction of a left-sided heart disease.

  9. Clinical, demographic characteristics and results of the long term follow-up in adolescents and adults with congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.G. Lebid

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim – to analyze clinical and demographic indicators in adolescents and adults with congenital heart disease (CHD to provide strategy of cardiac care for these patients, to assess risk of cardiological and cardiac surgery interventions in patients with congenital heart malformations. Materials and methods. 2569 consecutive patients, aged 16–88 years, mean age 24.14 ± 0.20 years, were selected in electronic database from April 01, 2011 to December 31, 2015. The majority (92.57 % of the included patients (n = 2378 were younger than 40 years. Results. Among all CHD patients, a significant majority had septal defects (39 % and left heart lesions (24 %, followed by congenital lesions of thoracic arteries and veins (16 % and right heart lesions (10 %. The annual number of the examined patients with CHD progressively increased (from 210 in 2011 to 656 in 2015. The number of patients aged 18 years or older mostly increased. The number of patients older than 40 years increased from nine patients in 2011 to 75 adults in 2015. Patients after cardiac surgery and percutaneous transcatheter interventions dominated (n=1553, 60.45 %, compared to the patients without any interventions for CHD (n = 1016, 39.55 %. Only one intervention for CHD was performed in the majority of these patients (n = 1255, 80.81 %, 12.94 % needed two interventions, 3.99 % – three, 2.26 % – three or more interventions. Conclusions. Among patients with congenital heart disease, patients younger than 40 years old were prevalent (92.57 %, with no significant gender differences. Septal defects (ASD, VSD, left heart lesions (congenital aortic valve stenosis and insufficiency, congenital lesions of thoracic arteries and veins (patent ductus arteriosus and aorta coarctation were registered most often in adolescents and adults.

  10. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Having diabetes means that ... help to stop. What is the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke? Over time, high blood ...

  11. Clinically relevant lessons from Family HealthLink: a cancer and coronary heart disease familial risk assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Kevin; Sturm, Amy C; Rettig, Amy; McElroy, Joseph; Agnese, Doreen

    2015-06-01

    A descriptive retrospective study was performed using two separate user cohorts to determine the effectiveness of Family HealthLink as a clinical triage tool. Cohort 1 consisted of 2,502 users who accessed the public website. Cohort 2 consisted of 194 new patients in a Comprehensive Breast Center setting. For patient users, we assessed documentation of family history and genetics referral. For all users seen in a genetics clinic, the Family HealthLink assessment was compared with that performed by genetic counselors and genetic testing outcomes. For general public users, the percentage meeting high-risk criteria were: for cancer only, 22.2%; for coronary heart disease only, 24.3%; and for both diseases, 10.4%. These risk stratification percentages were similar for the patient users. For the patient users, there often was documentation of family history of certain cancer types by oncology professionals, but age of onset and coronary heart disease family history were less complete. Of 142 with high-risk assignments seen in a genetics clinic, 130 (91.5%) of these assignments were corroborated. Forty-two underwent genetic testing and 17 (40.5%) had new molecular diagnoses established. A significant percentage of individuals are at high familial risk and may require more intensive screening and referral. Interactive family history triage tools can aid this process.Genet Med 17 6, 493-500.

  12. Clinical and morphologic features of acute, subacute and chronic cor pulmonale (pulmonary heart disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, William Clifford; Shafii, Alexis E; Grayburn, Paul A; Ko, Jong Mi; Weissenborn, Matthew R; Rosenblatt, Randall L; Guileyardo, Joseph M

    2015-03-01

    Described are certain clinical and morphologic features of one patient with acute, another with subacute, and one with chronic cor pulmonale. All 3 had evidence of severe pulmonary hypertension. The patient with acute cor pulmonale 4 days after coronary bypass for unstable angina pectoris suddenly developed severe breathlessness with cyanosis and had fatal cardiac arrest and necropsy disclosed massive pulmonary embolism. The patient with subacute cor pulmonale had severe right-sided heart failure for 5 weeks and necropsy disclosed microscopic-sized neoplastic pulmonary emboli from a gastric carcinoma without parenchymal pulmonary metastases. The patient with chronic cor pulmonale had evidence of right-sided heart failure for years, the result of primary or idiopathic pulmonary hypertension almost certainly present from birth because the pattern of elastic fibers in the pulmonary trunk was that seen in newborns where the pressure in the pulmonary trunk and ascending aorta are similar. The patient with chronic cor pulmonale had plexiform pulmonary lesions indicative of irreversible pulmonary hypertension. Neither the acute nor the subacute patient had chronic pulmonary vascular changes. All 3 patients had dilated right ventricular cavities and non-dilated left ventricular cavities and only the patient with chronic cor pulmonale had right ventricular hypertrophy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Hypertensive Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wachtell, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Hypertensive heart disease is prevalent and during the last decade it has been determined that patients with left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy have increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, many have doubted the effectiveness of LV mass assessment because it is difficult...

  14. Rheumatic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilherme, Luiza; Cury, Patricia; Demarchi, Lea M.F.; Coelho, Verônica; Abel, Lúcia; Lopez, Ana P.; Oshiro, Sandra Emiko; Aliotti, Selma; Cunha-Neto, Edécio; Pomerantzeff, Pablo M.A.; Tanaka, Ana C.; Kalil, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    Heart lesions of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) patients contain T-cell clones that recognize heart proteins and streptococcal M peptides. To functionally characterize heart-infiltrating T lymphocytes, we evaluated their cytokine profile, both directly in situ and in T-cell lines derived from the heart (HIL). Interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-4, and IL-10 expressions were characterized in 20 heart tissue infiltrates from 14 RHD patients by immunohistochemistry. IFN-γ-, TNF-α-, and IL-10-positive cells were consistently predominant, whereas IL-4 was scarce in the valves. In agreement with these data, the in vitro experiments, in which 13 HILs derived from heart samples of eight patients were stimulated with M5 protein and the immunodominant M5 (81-96) peptide, IL-4 was detected in HIL derived from the atrium (three of six) but not from the valve (zero of seven). IFN-γ and IL-10 production were detected in culture supernatants in 11 of 13 and 6 of 12 HILs, respectively. The predominant IFN-γ and TNF-α expression in the heart suggests that Th1-type cytokines could mediate RHD. Unlike in reversible myocardium inflammation, the significantly lower IL-4 expression in the valvular tissue (P = 0.02) may contribute to the progression of the RHD leading to permanent valvular damage (relative risk, 4.3; odds ratio, 15.8). The lack of IL-4 in vitro production by valve-derived HIL also emphasizes the more severe tissue destruction in valves observed in RHD. PMID:15509528

  15. Mediastinal lymph node enlargement in patients with valvular heart disease: CT evaluation and clinical correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hye Ju; Jung, Jung Im; Ahn, Myeong Im; Han, Dae Hee; Park, Seog Hee

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the presence, size and location of enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes (LNs) in patients with valvular heart disease (VHD) using computed tomography scans in correlation with ejection fraction (EF). We retrospectively evaluated 30 patients with VHD, without pre-existing diseases that could cause lymphadenopathy (LAP). The presence, size, and location of LNs greater than 1 cm in short axis diameter were evaluated. The location of mediastinal LNs was recorded according to the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Furthermore, we evaluated the presence of pulmonary edema, pleural effusion, and other thoracic abnormalities and evaluated EF of the heart on transthoracic echocardiography. Sixteen patients (53%) had at least 1 enlarged mediastinal LN. The most frequent locations were lower paratracheal (4R, n = 8/4L, n = 6), subcarinal (7, n = 5) and right upper paratracheal (2R, n = 4) regions. The frequency of mediastinal LAP was higher in patients with aortic regurgitation (2 of 2, 100%) followed by mitral regurgitation (8 of 11, 73%); it was also high in patients with pulmonary edema (80%), pleural effusion (81%), or both (77%), as compared to patients without pulmonary edema or pleural effusion (17%) (p = 0.001). Ten of 30 patients showed an abnormal EF of < 55%; among them, 8 had mediastinal LAP. However, the relationship between EF and LAP was not statistically significant (p = 0.058). Mediastinal LN enlargement is common in patients with VHD, especially in cases of pulmonary edema and pleural effusion. Enlarged mediastinal LNs were frequently observed with abnormal EF, however, the relationship between EF and mediastinal LAP was not statistically significant.

  16. Mediastinal lymph node enlargement in patients with valvular heart disease: CT evaluation and clinical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hye Ju; Jung, Jung Im; Ahn, Myeong Im; Han, Dae Hee; Park, Seog Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    To evaluate the presence, size and location of enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes (LNs) in patients with valvular heart disease (VHD) using computed tomography scans in correlation with ejection fraction (EF). We retrospectively evaluated 30 patients with VHD, without pre-existing diseases that could cause lymphadenopathy (LAP). The presence, size, and location of LNs greater than 1 cm in short axis diameter were evaluated. The location of mediastinal LNs was recorded according to the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Furthermore, we evaluated the presence of pulmonary edema, pleural effusion, and other thoracic abnormalities and evaluated EF of the heart on transthoracic echocardiography. Sixteen patients (53%) had at least 1 enlarged mediastinal LN. The most frequent locations were lower paratracheal (4R, n = 8/4L, n = 6), subcarinal (7, n = 5) and right upper paratracheal (2R, n = 4) regions. The frequency of mediastinal LAP was higher in patients with aortic regurgitation (2 of 2, 100%) followed by mitral regurgitation (8 of 11, 73%); it was also high in patients with pulmonary edema (80%), pleural effusion (81%), or both (77%), as compared to patients without pulmonary edema or pleural effusion (17%) (p = 0.001). Ten of 30 patients showed an abnormal EF of < 55%; among them, 8 had mediastinal LAP. However, the relationship between EF and LAP was not statistically significant (p = 0.058). Mediastinal LN enlargement is common in patients with VHD, especially in cases of pulmonary edema and pleural effusion. Enlarged mediastinal LNs were frequently observed with abnormal EF, however, the relationship between EF and mediastinal LAP was not statistically significant.

  17. Prevalence and clinical characteristics of mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia in patients with coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Samad, Zainab; Boyle, Stephen; Becker, Richard C; Williams, Redford; Kuhn, Cynthia; Ortel, Thomas L; Rogers, Joseph; Kuchibhatla, Maragatha; O'Connor, Christopher; Velazquez, Eric J

    2013-02-19

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and clinical characteristics of mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia. Mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia is prevalent and a risk factor for poor prognosis in patients with coronary heart disease, but past studies mainly studied patients with exercise-induced myocardial ischemia. Eligible patients with clinically stable coronary heart disease, regardless of exercise stress testing status, underwent a battery of 3 mental stress tests followed by a treadmill test. Stress-induced ischemia, assessed by echocardiography and electrocardiography, was defined as: 1) development or worsening of regional wall motion abnormality; 2) left ventricular ejection fraction reduction ≥ 8%; and/or 3) horizontal or downsloping ST-segment depression ≥ 1 mm in 2 or more leads lasting for ≥ 3 consecutive beats during at least 1 mental test or during the exercise test. Mental stress-induced ischemia occurred in 43.45%, whereas exercise-induced ischemia occurred in 33.79% (p = 0.002) of the study population (N = 310). Women (odds ratio [OR]: 1.88), patients who were not married (OR: 1.99), and patients who lived alone (OR: 2.24) were more likely to have mental stress-induced ischemia (all p stress-induced ischemia (all p stress-induced ischemia is more common than exercise-induced ischemia in patients with clinically stable coronary heart disease. Women, unmarried men, and individuals living alone are at higher risk for mental stress-induced ischemia. (Responses of Myocardial Ischemia to Escitalopram Treatment [REMIT]; NCT00574847). Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical role of electrocardiography and of 201Tl scintigraphy exercise tests in diagnosis of ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelok, I.; Hatala, R.; Mistrik, A.; Borovicova, F.

    1988-01-01

    The diagnostic potential of ECG and scintigraphy exercise tests is assessed in the light of the experience gained by the authors in the detection of ischemic heart disease, and the complementary character of the two methods is emphasized. The rational and differentiated use of the two noninvasive examination methods requires an optimal clinical assessment of the patient's condition with regard to the probable incidence of the disease. Optimal diagnostic benefit (as compared with the ECG exercise test up to 32%) is shown of scintigraphy, especially in persons with multiple risk factors and atypical chest pain. With regard to the unavailability of perfusion scintigraphy of the myocardium in the authors' clinical practice, they recommend that this examination should mainly be indicated for patients who have a negative or uniterpretable ECG exercise test. (author). 1 tab., 13 refs

  19. Clinical application of radionuclide cardiac study to the right heart diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Tatsuro; Ozaki, Masaharu; Ikezono, Tohru (Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1984-12-01

    We experienced the four cases of rare right heart diseases: those are two-chambered right ventricle, ball thrombus in right ventricle, right ventricular hypertrophy and tricuspid valve regurgitation due to multiple pulmonary infarction, and right ventricular and right atrial infarction. The preoperative or ante mortem diagnosis of these diseases is difficult, especially by use of a noninvasive technique. This report shows the usefulness of radionuclide cardiac study for diagnosis of these cases. In the two-chambered right ventricle, abnormal muscle bundle was visualized by /sup 201/TlCl and was observed as the filling defect by sup(99m)Tc-HSA radionuclide angiography. The ball thrombus showed the filling defect of sup(99m)Tc-HSA in the right ventricle but was not extracted by /sup 201/TlCl in the site of the defect area. In the multiple pulmonary infarction, the right ventricular free wall was visualized by /sup 201/TlCl, and during right ventricular systole, regurgitation from right atrium to inferior vena cava was noticed by means of sup(99m)Tc-HSA radionuclide angiography. These findings suggested right ventricular hypertrophy and tricuspid valve regurgitation. In the right ventricular and right atrial infarction, right ventricular ejection fraction and right atrial fractional emptying were lower than those of normal controls.

  20. Clinical evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging in coronary heart disease: The CE-MARC study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sculpher Mark

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several investigations are currently available to establish the diagnosis of coronary heart disease (CHD. Of these, cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR offers the greatest information from a single test, allowing the assessment of myocardial function, perfusion, viability and coronary artery anatomy. However, data from large scale studies that prospectively evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of multi-parametric CMR for the detection of CHD in unselected populations are lacking, and there are few data on the performance of CMR compared with current diagnostic tests, its prognostic value and cost-effectiveness. Methods/design This is a prospective diagnostic accuracy cohort study of 750 patients referred to a cardiologist with suspected CHD. Exercise tolerance testing (ETT will be preformed if patients are physically able. Recruited patients will then undergo CMR and single photon emission tomography (SPECT followed in all patients by invasive X-ray coronary angiography. The order of the CMR and SPECT tests will be randomised. The CMR study will comprise rest and adenosine stress perfusion, cine imaging, late gadolinium enhancement and whole-heart MR coronary angiography. SPECT will use a gated stress/rest protocol. The primary objective of the study is to determine the diagnostic accuracy of CMR in detecting significant coronary stenosis, as defined by X-ray coronary angiography. Secondary objectives include an assessment of the prognostic value of CMR imaging, a comparison of its diagnostic accuracy against SPECT and ETT, and an assessment of cost-effectiveness. Discussion The CE-MARC study is a prospective, diagnostic accuracy cohort study of 750 patients assessing the performance of a multi-parametric CMR study in detecting CHD using invasive X-ray coronary angiography as the reference standard and comparing it with ETT and SPECT. Trial Registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN77246133

  1. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid (Fish Oil) Supplementation and the Prevention of Clinical Cardiovascular Disease: A Science Advisory From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siscovick, David S; Barringer, Thomas A; Fretts, Amanda M; Wu, Jason H Y; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Costello, Rebecca B; Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Jacobson, Terry A; Engler, Mary B; Alger, Heather M; Appel, Lawrence J; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2017-04-11

    Multiple randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have assessed the effects of supplementation with eicosapentaenoic acid plus docosahexaenoic acid (omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, commonly called fish oils) on the occurrence of clinical cardiovascular diseases. Although the effects of supplementation for the primary prevention of clinical cardiovascular events in the general population have not been examined, RCTs have assessed the role of supplementation in secondary prevention among patients with diabetes mellitus and prediabetes, patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease, and those with prevalent coronary heart disease. In this scientific advisory, we take a clinical approach and focus on common indications for omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplements related to the prevention of clinical cardiovascular events. We limited the scope of our review to large RCTs of supplementation with major clinical cardiovascular disease end points; meta-analyses were considered secondarily. We discuss the features of available RCTs and provide the rationale for our recommendations. We then use existing American Heart Association criteria to assess the strength of the recommendation and the level of evidence. On the basis of our review of the cumulative evidence from RCTs designed to assess the effect of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation on clinical cardiovascular events, we update prior recommendations for patients with prevalent coronary heart disease, and we offer recommendations, when data are available, for patients with other clinical indications, including patients with diabetes mellitus and prediabetes and those with high risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, heart failure, and atrial fibrillation. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Anxiety and coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Anja Kokalj; Brigita Novak Šarotar

    2018-01-01

    In patients with coronary heart disease anxiety is often overlooked. Symptoms of anxiety are often similar to coronary heart disease symptoms. The prevalence of anxiety in general population and coronary heart disease patients is very high. While the underlying pathophysiology of the connection remains unclear, anxiety lowers the quality of life and is a factor for a higher risk of morbidity and mortality due to coronary heart disease.

  3. Clinical effectiveness of exogenous L-arginine in patients with coronary heart disease after community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. O. Kulynych

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease and community acquired pneumonia associated with a higher risk for morbidity and mortality. The optimization of treatment of comorbid pathology by medicines which modify endothelium functional state is important. Aim: to study effect of exogenous L-arginine on clinical course of disease, markers of systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. Materials and methods. 60 patients with CHD and CAP (the median 72.50 years, range 66.00; 75.00 were included into the study. Patients were randomized in 2 groups: first – 30 patients with basic therapy combined with L-arginine; and second – 30 patients with basic therapy. hs-CRP, neopterin, РАРР-А, NT-proBNP were measured by ELISA-TEST before treatment and 1 month after. Clinical course was assessed during 1 year of follow-up. Results. In the first group the hospitalization rate due to CHD and heart failure decompensation was significantly rare. Biomarkers changes in the 1st group were significant: hs-CRP was significantly decreased by 57.14 % (in the 2nd group – by 28.57 %; neopterin – by 36.57 % (in the 2nd group – by 20.91 %; РАРР-А – by 35.71 % (in the 2nd group – by 4.76 %. There was revealed a significant decreasing of NT-proBNP levels in patients receiving L-arginine by comparing with basic therapy: with the I stage of heart failure (HF – by 50.97 % vs 21.82 %, with the II-A stage of HF – by 43.82 % vs 5.61 % (p < 0.05. After 1 month of therapy patients from the 1st group had significantly lower rates of neopterin – by 16.46 %, and NT-proBNP – by 40.92 % in the subgroup of patients with II-A stage of HF (p < 0.05 compared with patients who received only the basic therapy. Conclusions. Combination of exogenous L-arginine and basic therapy in patients with CHD and CAP was associated with benign clinical course and positive changes of endothelium functional

  4. A new clinical tool for the quantification of myocardial CT perfusion imaging in patients with suspected Ischemic Heart Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Muñoz, A.; Dux-Santoy Hurtado, L.; Rodriguez Palomares, J.L.; Piella Fenoy, G.

    2016-07-01

    In the clinical practice, the evaluation of myocardial perfusion by using Computed Tomography (CT) Imaging is usually performed visually or semi-quantitatively. The scarcity of quantitative perfusion data not always allows a proper diagnose of patients which are suspected of suffering from some diseases, such as Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD). In this work, a clinical tool for the automatic quantification of myocardial perfusion in patients with suspected IHD is proposed. Myocardial perfusion is assessed based on a combined diagnosis protocol (CT/CTP protocol) which involves the acquisition of two contrastenhanced CT images, one obtained at rest and another acquired under pharmacological stress. The clinical tool allows the automatic quantification of perfusion in different myocardial segments defined according to the 16-AHA-segmentation model of the left ventricle, by providing the mean of Hounsfield Units in those regions. Based on this analysis, the clinicians can compare the values at baseline and at hyperemia, and they can better determine hypoperfusion defects in patients with IHD. The validation of the clinical tool was performed by comparing automatic and manual perfusion measurements of 10 patients with suspected IHD who were previously assessed with Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) for perfusion analysis. A strong linear correlation was found between the automatic and manual results. Afterwards, perfusion defects obtained from CT/CTP protocol were compared to perfusion defects from SPECT, to assess the applicability of this clinical tool for the diagnosis of IHD. (Author)

  5. Employment after heart transplantation among adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumin, Dmitry; Chou, Helen; Hayes, Don; Tobias, Joseph D; Galantowicz, Mark; McConnell, Patrick I

    2017-12-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease may require heart transplantation for end-stage heart failure. Whereas heart transplantation potentially allows adults with congenital heart disease to resume their usual activities, employment outcomes in this population are unknown. Therefore, we investigated the prevalence and predictors of work participation after heart transplantation for congenital heart disease. Retrospective review of a prospective registry. United Network for Organ Sharing registry of transplant recipients in the United States. Adult recipients of first-time heart transplantation with a primary diagnosis of congenital heart disease, performed between 2004 and 2015. None. Employment status reported by transplant centers at required follow-up intervals up to 5 y posttransplant. Among 470 patients included in the analysis (mean follow-up: 5 ± 3 y), 127 (27%) worked after transplant, 69 (15%) died before beginning or returning to work, and 274 (58%) survived until censoring, but did not participate in paid work. Multivariable competing-risks regression analysis examined characteristics associated with posttransplant employment, accounting for mortality as a competing outcome. In descriptive and multivariable analysis, pretransplant work participation was associated with a greater likelihood of posttransplant employment, while the use of Medicaid insurance at the time of transplant was associated with a significantly lower likelihood of working after transplant (subhazard ratio compared to private insurance: 0.55; 95% confidence interval: 0.32, 0.95; P = .032). Employment was rare after heart transplantation for congenital heart disease, and was significantly less common than in the broader population of adults with congenital heart disease. Differences in return to work were primarily related to pretransplant employment and the use of public insurance, rather than clinical characteristics. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Fast nonclinical ventricular tachycardia inducible after ablation in patients with structural heart disease: Definition and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masaya; de Riva, Marta; Piers, Sebastiaan R D; Dekkers, Olaf M; Ebert, Micaela; Venlet, Jeroen; Trines, Serge A; Schalij, Martin J; Pijnappels, Daniël A; Zeppenfeld, Katja

    2018-01-08

    Noninducibility of ventricular tachycardia (VT) with an equal or longer cycle length (CL) than that of the clinical VT is considered the minimum ablation endpoint in patients with structural heart disease. Because their clinical relevance remains unclear, fast nonclinical VTs are often not targeted. However, an accepted definition for fast VT is lacking. The shortest possible CL of a monomorphic reentrant VT is determined by the ventricular refractory period (VRP). The purpose of this study was to propose a patient-specific definition for fast VT based on the individual VRP (fVT VRP ) and assess the prognostic significance of persistent inducibility after ablation of fVT VRP for VT recurrence. Of 191 patients with previous myocardial infarction or with nonischemic cardiomyopathy undergoing VT ablation, 70 (age 63 ± 13 years; 64% ischemic) remained inducible for a nonclinical VT and composed the study population. FVT VRP was defined as any VT with CL ≤VRP 400 + 30 ms. Patients were followed for VT recurrence. After ablation, 30 patients (43%) remained inducible exclusively for fVT VRP and 40 (57%) for any slower VT. Patients with only fVT VRP had 3-year VT-free survival of 64% (95% confidence interval [CI] 46%-82%) compared to 27% (95% CI 14%-48%) for patients with any slower remaining VT (P = .013). Inducibility of only fVT VRP was independently associated with lower VT recurrence (hazard ratio 0.38; 95% CI 0.19-0.86; P = .019). Among 36 patients inducible for any fVT VRP , only 1 had recurrence with fVT VRP . In patients with structural heart disease, inducibility of exclusively fVT VRP after ablation is associated with low VT recurrence. Copyright © 2018 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical studies on the thallium-201 myocardial scintiphotography in patient with ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owada, Kenji

    1980-01-01

    Thallium-201 myocardial scintiphotography was performed in 41 patients with myocardial infarction, 13 with angina pectoris and 12 without coronary artery disease. 1) In patients with congestive heart failure, blood clearance of 201 Tl was delayed and radioactivity on the lung area increased compared with normal cases. 2) The scintillation camera image on a globular model containing 0.5 mCi of 201 Tl was recorded in a magnetic disk as 64 * 64 matrix. Myocardial area was estimated as an area where the count showed more than 55% of maximum counts of myocardium. On the myocardial area, cold area due to infarction was defined as an area where the count showed less than 70% of the maximum. 3) The infarct size (%) was calculated as an ratio of the number of matrix in cold area against to myocardial area on the images of ANT, LAO, and LAT view. The mean infarct size (%) was larger in the patient with cardiomegaly (CTR >= 55%) than those without it, and it was larger in the patients with high values of serum CPK or LDH than in those with low values of them. 4) The correlation coefficient between the mean infarct size (%) and direction of QRS vector at the maximum, 20 msec and 40 msec were r = 0.780, 0.672 and 0.766, respectively. 5) Mean values of MBF/CO (%) ratio were showing significant low in myocardial infarction and in angina pectoris. 6) The mean value of Myocardial blood flow (MBF) was showing significant low in myocardial infarction and in angina pectoris. MBF (ml/min/m 2 ) value expressed the states of coronary blood flow better than MBF/CO (%). (J.P.N.)

  8. Tachyarrhythmias in structural heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiès, Philippine

    2006-01-01

    Ventricular tachyarrhythmias, the major cause of sudden unexpected cardiac arrest, occur specifically in patients with structural heart disease. In general, all types of structural heart disease may lead to chronic heart failure, a severe condition with an additional high risk of atrial- and

  9. Bradyarrhythmias in Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Steven K; Patel, Akash R; Chang, Philip M

    2017-06-01

    Bradyarrhythmias in adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) comprise a complex group of arrhythmia disorders with congenital and acquired origins, highly variable long-term sequelae, and complicated treatment options. They can develop across the spectrum of CHD defects and can be encountered at all ages. Although permanent pacing is effective in treating bradyarrhythmias, it is associated with many complications and morbidity, where it is often used early in life. This section discusses the incidence and prevalence of bradyarrhythmias in the CHD population, their timing of occurrence with respect to specific disease entities and interventions, and their short- and long-term clinical sequelae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Heart Attack Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Heart Attack Coronary Artery Disease, Angina Basic Facts & Information What ... and oxygen supply; this is what causes a heart attack. If the damaged area is small, however, your ...

  11. Heart valve disease associated with treatment with ergot-derived dopamine agonists: a clinical and echocardiographic study of patients with Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Vibeke Guldbrand; Poulsen, Steen Hvitfeldt; Dupont, E

    2007-01-01

    . Interventions. Patients were screened for valvular heart disease by clinical means and by examiner-blinded echocardiography. Main outcome measure was valvular regurgitation revealed by echocardiography. RESULTS: Severe aortic regurgitation (n = 4) or moderate aortic (n = 12), mitral (n = 3) or tricuspidal valve...... regurgitation (n = 5) was found in 22 EDDA patients (25.9%). Two patients had coexistent moderate mitral and tricuspid valvular regurgitation. Two non-EDDA patients had moderate valve insufficiency (3.8%, P valve insufficiency in the EDDA patients was 7...... with a clinically important and statistically significant risk of at least moderate valve regurgitation. Clinical screening for valve disease was inadequate and it seems advisable to offer EDDA patients control with echocardiography. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Jan...

  12. Aspirin and heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fluids and diuretics Heart failure - home monitoring Heart failure - what to ask your ... of Cardiology, Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington Medical School, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed ...

  13. Clinical characteristics of the respiratory and cardiovascular systems in patients with combination of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Vyshnyvetskyy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our work was to assess the respiratory and cardiovascular systems of patients with a combination of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and congestive heart failure (CHF. Materials and methods. The study included 177 patients who had been diagnosed COPD by criteria GOLD. CHF was diagnosed in 77 (43.5 % cases – 29 (16.4 % with reduced systolic function and 48 (27.1 % with preserved systolic function. We analyzed some important parameters characterizing respiratory and cardiovascular systems. We tried to identify statistically significant difference of parameters between patients with COPD and those with COPD and CHF. Moreover, patients with CHF were evaluated as a whole, and separately with reduced and with preserved systolic function. Results. Thus, we observed significant deterioration in general clinical, laboratory, spirometric and echocardiographic parameters depending on the presence and severity of CHF in patients with COPD. In particular, the presence of CHF, especially with impaired systolic function significantly impair indicators such as incidence of cardiac arrhythmias and signs of ischemia on the ECG, NT-proBNP levels, prevalence of concentric, eccentric hypertrophy and concentric LV remodeling and diastolic dysfunction type "relaxation disorder", and incidence of a-wave absence during assessment of motion of the rear pulmonary artery valve wall. Listed changes as well as some of the tendencies that have not reached a certain level of significance, indicate that patients with COPD and concomitant CHF, especially with impaired systolic function, worsens general clinical parameters (breath rate, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, frequency arrhythmias and myocardial ischemia on ECG; laboratory levels of hemoglobin, hematocrit, cholesterol, glomerular filtration rate; spirometric indicators of bronchial obstruction (FEV1, FVC, instant volume expiratory flow rates; echocardiographic indicators suggest the

  14. Effect of Peripheral Arterial Disease on Functional and Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Heart Failure From HF-ACTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W. Schuyler; Clare, Robert; Ellis, Stephen J.; Mills, James S.; Fischman, David L.; Kraus, William E.; Whellan, David J.; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Patel, Manesh R.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) have lower functional capacity and worse clinical outcomes than age and gender matched patients. Few data exist on the relationship of PAD with functional and clinical outcomes in heart failure (HF) patients. We sought to compare HF patients with and without PAD for baseline functional capacity, response to exercise training, and clinical outcomes. HF-ACTION was a randomized controlled trial comparing usual care to structured exercise training plus usual care in HF patients with an ejection fraction ≤ 35% and NYHA class II – IV heart failure symptoms. Cardiopulmonary exercise (CPX) testing occurred at enrollment, 3 months, and 1 year. Clinical follow-up occurred up to 4 years. Of the 2331 HF-ACTION patients, 157 (6.8%) had PAD. At baseline, HF patients with PAD had a lower exercise duration (8.0 vs. 9.8 minutes, p<0.001), lower peak oxygen consumption (VO2) (12.5 vs. 14.6 mL/kg/min, p<0.001), and shorter six minute walking distance (306 vs. 371 meters, p<0.001) compared to HF patients without PAD. At three months, HF patients with PAD had less improvement on CPX testing [exercise duration (0.5 vs. 1.1 minutes; p=0.002) and peak VO2 (mean change; 0.1 vs. 0.6 mL/kg/min; p=0.04)] compared to HF patients without PAD. PAD was an independent predictor of all-cause death or hospitalization [hazard ratio (95% CI); 1.31 (1.06 – 1.62), p=0.011]. PAD patients with HF have depressed baseline exercise capacity and decreased response to exercise training. In conclusion, PAD is an independent predictor of all-cause death or hospitalization in HF patients. PMID:21565325

  15. Clinical evaluation of exercise thallium-201 whole body scintigraphy in ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Kenzo; Watanabe, Yoshihiko; Kondo, Takeshi

    1985-01-01

    To evaluate whole body distribution and kinetics of Thallium-201 at exercise and redistribution, whole body scintigraphy (WB-S) was performed on 12 normal subjects (N), 19 patients with angina pectoris (AP) and 18 patients with old myocardial infarction (MI). WB-S was obtained using a gamma camera OMEGA 500 and analized by ADAC System IV. We estimated the following parameters from WB-S; 1) %Distribution (%D): the ratio of whole body counts to organ counts 2) washout rate (WR) in each organ. %D of the heart in N, AP and MI was similar at rest and exercise. At exercise, %D of the lung and the liver decreased and %D of thighs increased remarkably than at rest. At supine exercise, the lung indicated high %D and thinghs indicated low %D compared with at upright exercise. WR of the heart in AP and MI was significantly lower than in N (p<0.005, p<0.01) and further decreased proportionally to the number of stenotic coronary arteries and related to the ischemic ST depression of exercise ECG. WR of the heart was not correlation with pressure rate product and this finding suggested that WR of the heart was not prescribed by the tolerance of exercise but related to coronary flow at exercise a certain degree. WR of the lung in MI was significantly higher (p<0.025) and WR of thighs in AP and MI was significantly lower (p<0.025, p<0.05) compared with N. (author)

  16. Imaging of Heart Disease in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tailor, Tina D; Kicska, Gregory A; Jacobs, Jill E; Pampaloni, Miguel H; Litmanovich, Diana E; Reddy, Gautham P

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease is the number one cause of death of women in the United States, accounting for over a quarter of a million annual female deaths. Evidence within the last several decades supports sex-specific differences in the prevalence, symptoms, and prognosis of ischemic heart disease between men and women. Despite women having a lower burden of obstructive coronary artery disease compared with men, the prevalence of angina and mortality from ischemic heart disease is higher for women than men. In addition to ischemic heart disease, certain nonischemic conditions may also have sex-specific differences in clinical presentation and occurrence. With the rising utilization of noninvasive modalities for the diagnosis and management of ischemic heart disease, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with the unique considerations for imaging women with heart disease. The purpose of this review is to discuss challenges for detection of heart disease in women, examine performance of noninvasive modalities in the detection of ischemic heart disease, and discuss nonischemic cardiomyopathies unique to or prevalent in women. Considerations for cardiac imaging in pregnancy are also discussed. © RSNA, 2017.

  17. The renin–angiotensin–aldosterone-system and right heart failure in congenital heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Stine Andersen, Stine Andersen; Andersen, Asger; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik

    2017-01-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease represent a rapidly growing patient group. Dysfunction of the right ventricle is often present, and right heart failure constitutes the main cause of death. Heart failure therapies used in acquired left heart failure are often initiated in adults with right heart failure due to congenital heart disease, but the right ventricle differs substantially from the left ventricle, and the clinical evidence for this treatment strategy is lacking. In this review,...

  18. Implementing electronic clinical reminders for lipid management in patients with ischemic heart disease in the veterans health administration: QUERI Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plomondon Mary E

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ischemic heart disease (IHD affects at least 150,000 veterans annually in the United States. Lowering serum cholesterol has been shown to reduce coronary events, cardiac death, and total mortality among high risk patients. Electronic clinical reminders available at the point of care delivery have been developed to improve lipid measurement and management in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA. Our objective was to report on a hospital-level intervention to implement and encourage use of the electronic clinical reminders. Methods The implementation used a quasi-experimental design with a comparison group of hospitals. In the intervention hospitals (N = 3, we used a multi-faceted intervention to encourage use of the electronic clinical reminders. We evaluated the degree of reminder use and how patient-level outcomes varied at the intervention and comparison sites (N = 3, with and without adjusting for self-reported reminder use. Results The national electronic clinical reminders were implemented in all of the intervention sites during the intervention period. A total of 5,438 patients with prior diagnosis of ischemic heart disease received care in the six hospitals (3 intervention and 3 comparison throughout the 12-month intervention. The process evaluation showed variation in use of reminders at each site. Without controlling for provider self-report of use of the reminders, there appeared to be a significant improvement in lipid measurement in the intervention sites (OR 1.96, 95% CI 1.34, 2.88. Controlling for use of reminders, the amount of improvement in lipid measurement in the intervention sites was even greater (OR 2.35, CI 1.96, 2.81. Adjusting for reminder use demonstrated that only one of the intervention hospitals had a significant effect of the intervention. There was no significant change in management of hyperlipidemia associated with the intervention. Conclusion There may be some benefit to focused effort to

  19. The heart: Congenital disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, C.B.

    1987-01-01

    The most important diagnostic requirement in congenital heart disease (CHD) is definition of cardiovascular pathoanatomy. The considerable success in operative correction of even the most complex anomalies in recent years compels ever increasing precision in preoperative demonstration of these anomalies. Early experience with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at several institutions indicated that this modality is an effective noninvasive technique for evaluation of CHD. Indeed, MRI seems to have some advantage over other techniques, including angiography, for definitive diagnosis of congenital anomalies of the heart and great arteries and veins. The absence of ionizing radiation and contrast medium in MRI is an additional advantage; the former is particularly important for children, who, up to this time, have frequently been subjected to enormous radiation burdens from multiple cineangiograms during initial diagnosis and follow-up. This chapter describes the MRI appearance of cardiovascular anatomy im the segmental fashion proposed for analysis of complex CHD. Likewise, MRI demonstration of congenital cardiovascular lesions is organized into abnormalities situated at the four segmental cardiovascular levels: great vessels, atria, ventricles, and visceroatrial relationship. The role of MRI in evaluation of complex ventricular anomalies such as single ventricle and thoracic aortic abnormalities is specifically described

  20. Clinical value of 201Tl lung/heart ratio during exercise in hypertensive patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang Wei; He Guorong; Liu Jinhua; Huang Yuying

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the relationship between 201 Tl lung/heart ratio during exercise and left ventricular diastolic function and its diagnostic value on severity of coronary artery disease. Methods: One hundred and two patients with documented coronary artery disease were divided into three groups, including no hypertension, hypertension without or with left ventricular hypertrophy groups. Exercise/delay 201 Tl myocardial perfusion tomography was performed on all patients included. Lung/heart ratio was defined on the anterior planar image obtained during exercise tomography. Results: The lung/heart ratios during exercise in no hypertension (0.43 +- 0.09, P 0.05). The lung/heart ratios of multi-vessel disease subgroup in no hypertension (0.46 +- 0.10 vs 0.40 +- 0.09, P 0.05). When lung/heart ratio was≥0.45, the sensitivities for predicting the presence of multi-vessel disease were 82%, 90%, 40% and specificities were 75%, 75%, 45%, respectively, in no hypertension, hypertension without and with hypertrophy groups. In no hypertension (r=0.402, P 0.05). In no hypertension (r=-0.413, P<0.01), hypertension without (r=-0.662, P<0.01) and with hypertrophy groups (r=-0.408, P<0.05), lung/heart ratios all showed a significant reverse correlation with correspondent E/A ratios. Conclusions: The exercise lung/heart ratios has a better diagnostic value for multi-vessel disease and left ventricular diastolic function abnormalities of coronary artery disease with or without hypertension, but not for multi-vessel disease in hypertension patients complicated with myocardial hypertrophy

  1. The clinical profile of women with stable ischaemic heart disease in Spain. More effort is needed in secondary prevention. SIRENA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gámez, J M; Ripoll, T; Barrios, V; Anguita, M; Pedreira, M; Madariaga, I

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death for women, especially ischaemic heart disease, which is still considered a man's disease. In Spain, there are various registries on ischaemic heart disease, although none are exclusively for women. The objectives of the SIRENA study were to describe the clinical profile of women with ischaemic heart disease treated in cardiology consultations, to estimate its prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and understand its clinical management. A multicentre observational study was conducted with a sample of 631 women with stable ischaemic heart disease, consecutively included during cardiology consultations. Forty-one researchers from all over Spain participated in the study. The mean age was 68.5 years. The clinical presentation was in the form of acute coronary syndrome in up to 67.2% of the patients. The prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors was high (77.7% of the patients had hypertension, 40.7% had diabetes and 68% had dyslipidaemia), with 30.7% having uncontrolled hypertension, 78.4% having LDL-cholesterol levels higher than 70mg/dL and 49.2% having HbA1c levels greater than 7%. The considerable majority of the patients underwent optimal medical treatment with antiplatelet agents, beta-blockers, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockers and hypolipidaemic agents. Coronary angiography was performed for 88.3% of the patients, and 63.4% underwent percutaneous coronary intervention. Women with stable ischaemic heart disease in Spain initially present some form of acute coronary syndrome and a high prevalence of inadequately controlled cardiovascular risk factors, despite undergoing optimal medical therapy. A high percentage of these women undergo coronary revascularisation. Increased efforts are required for secondary prevention in women with stable ischaemic heart disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  2. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazacu, A.; Ciubotaru, A.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of congenital heart disease can be attributed to major improvements in diagnosis and treatment. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging plays an important role in the clinical management strategy of patients with congenital heart disease. The development of new cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) techniques allows comprehensive assessment of complex cardiac anatomy and function and provides information about the long-term residual post-operative lesions and complications of surgery. It overcomes many of the limitations of echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. This review evaluates the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging modality in the management of subject with congenital heart disease (CHD). (authors)

  3. [Risk factor control in the hypertensive patients with chronic ischemic heart disease attended in cardiologic outpatient clinics. The CINHTIA study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, V; Escobar, C; Bertomeu, V; Murga, N; de Pablo, C; Calderón, A

    2008-09-01

    The CINHTIA study is a cross-sectional and multicentre survey designed to assess the clinical management of the hypertensive outpatients with chronic ischemic heart disease attended by cardiologists. Patients > or = 18 years, with a diagnosis of hypertension and chronic ischemic heart disease, were included in the study. Patients with an acute coronary syndrome within the three months prior to the inclusion were excluded. Good blood pressure (BP) control was considered < 140/90 mmHg, < 130/80 mmHg for diabetics (ESH-ESC 2003). LDL cholesterol (LDL-c) < 100 mg/dl (NCEP-ATP III) and fasting glucose between 90 and 130 mg/dl (ADA 2005) were considered as good control rates. A total of 2,024 patients (66.8+/-10.1 years; 31.7% women) were included in the study. Systolic BP was 142.7 +/- 17.9 mmHg and diastolic BP 81.8 +/- 11.3 mmHg. 78.4% of the patients had dyslipidemia and 32.3% diabetes. Almost all the patients (99.7%) were taking at least one antihypertensive drug, beta blockers being the most frequent (67.1%). A total of 74.9% of the patients were taking lipid lowering drugs and 27.9% antidiabetics. BP was controlled in 40.5% of the patients, LDL-c in 30.6% of the dyslipidemic subgroup and fasting glucose in 26.6% of the diabetics. In this high-risk population, the control rates of risk factors continues to remain low even though the majority of patients were taking several drugs.

  4. Heart Valve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your heart has four valves. Normally, these valves open to let blood flow through or out of your heart, and then shut to keep it from flowing ... close tightly. It's one of the most common heart valve conditions. Sometimes it causes regurgitation. Stenosis - when ...

  5. Intramyocardial Bone Marrow Cell Injection : Clinical and Functional Effects in Ischemic Heart Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramshorst, Jan van

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in the western world. Despite successive revascularization procedures, a large number of patients ends up with end-stage coronary artery disease, not amenable for conventional revascularization. These patients often have

  6. Using multidetector-row CT in neonates with complex congenital heart disease to replace diagnostic cardiac catheterization for anatomical investigation: initial experiences in technical and clinical feasibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tain; Tsai, I.C.; Chen, Min-Chi [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 407 Department of Radiology, Taichung (Taiwan); Medical College of Chung Shan Medical University, Faculty of Medicine, Taichung (Taiwan); National Yang Ming University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Taipei (Taiwan); Fu, Yun-Ching; Jan, Sheng-Lin [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Taichung (Taiwan); National Yang-Ming University, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (Taiwan); Wang, Chung-Chi; Chang, Yen [Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Section of Cardiovascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, Taichung (Taiwan)

    2006-12-15

    Echocardiography is the first-line modality for the investigation of neonatal congenital heart disease. Diagnostic cardiac catheterization, which has a small but recognized risk, is usually performed if echocardiography fails to provide a confident evaluation of the lesions. To verify the technical and clinical feasibilities of replacing diagnostic cardiac catheterization with multidetector-row CT (MDCT) in neonatal complex congenital heart disease. Over a 1-year period we prospectively enrolled all neonates with complex congenital heart disease referred for diagnostic cardiac catheterization after initial assessment by echocardiography. MDCT was performed using a 40-detector-row CT scanner with dual syringe injection. A multidisciplinary congenital heart disease team evaluated the MDCT images and decided if further diagnostic cardiac catheterization was necessary. The accuracy of MDCT in detecting separate cardiovascular anomalies and bolus geometry of contrast enhancement were calculated. A total of 14 neonates were included in the study. No further diagnostic cardiac catheterization was needed in any neonate. The accuracy of MDCT in diagnosing separate cardiovascular anomalies was 98% (53/54) with only one atrial septal defect missed in a patient with coarctation syndrome. The average cardiovascular enhancement in evaluated chambers was 471 HU. No obvious beam-hardening artefact was observed. The technical and clinical feasibility of MDCT in complex congenital heart disease in neonates is confirmed. After initial assessment with echocardiography, MDCT could probably replace diagnostic cardiac catheterization for further anatomical clarification in neonates. (orig.)

  7. Clinical holistic medicine: the Dean Ornish program ("opening the heart") in cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Merrick, Efrat; Merrick, Joav

    2006-02-02

    Dean Ornish of the Preventive Medicine Research Institute in Sausalito, California has created an intensive holistic treatment for coronary heart patients with improved diet (low fat, whole foods, plant based), exercise, stress management, and social support that has proven to be efficient. In this paper, we analyze the rationale behind his cure in relation to contemporary holistic medical theory. In spite of a complex treatment program, the principles seem to be simple and in accordance with holistic medical theories, like the Antonovsky concept of rehabilitating the sense of coherence and the life mission theory for holistic medicine. We believe there is a need for the allocation of resources for further research into the aspects of holistic health and its methods, where positive and significant results have been proven and reproduced at several sites.

  8. [Prevalence of congenital heart diseases in Koranic schools (daara) in Dakar: a cross-sectional study based on clinical and echocardiographic screening in 2019 school children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodian, M; Ngaïdé, A A; Mbaye, A; Sarr, S A; Jobe, M; Ndiaye, M B; Kane, A D; Aw, F; Gaye, N D; Ba, F G; Bah, M B; Tabane, A; Dioum, M; Diagne, D; Diao, M; Diack, B; Sarr, M; Kane, A; Bâ, S A

    2015-02-01

    Congenital heart diseases are one of the major cardiovascular diseases in developing countries. Most prevalence studies were based on clinical examination of children with echocardiographic confirmation of suspected cases and underestimate its prevalence. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of congenital heart disease in "daara" (Koranic schools) in the city of Dakar and its suburbs on the basis of clinical examination and Doppler echocardiography in school children. This cross-sectional survey was carried out from 9(th) August to 24(th) December 2011, and included a population of 2019 school children aged 5 to 18 years in 16 selected "daaras" under the Academic Inspectorate of Dakar and its suburbs. Anamnestic, clinical and echocardiographic data were recorded in a validated questionnaire. A p school children were included out of which 60.1% were male (sex-ratio: 0.66). The average age was 9.7 years (± 3.3 years). 18 cases of congenital heart diseases were detected being a prevalence of 8.9 per 1 000 (95 % CI: 1.8 to 7.9). This included 6 cases of inter-atrial septal aneurysm, 5 cases of peri-membranous ventricular septal defects, 4 cases of patent ductusarteriosus and 3 cases of tetralogy of Fallot. Factors correlated with the presence of congenital heart disease were ageless than 8 (p <0.001) and residence in the suburbs of Dakar (p <0.001). We also detected 10 cases of rheumatic valvular disease, a prevalence of 4.9 per 1 000 (95% CI: 2.4 to 9.1). Our study shows a high prevalence of congenital heart diseases, which is almost identical to the WHO estimates and that ultrasound screening is more sensitive than clinical screening. Reducing the prevalence of these diseases requires implementation of appropriate policies, focusing on awareness and early detection.

  9. Valvular heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carabello, B.; Crawford, F.

    1998-01-01

    The predicts of the patients with valvular heart disease it has improved substantially in the last 15 years.A better understanding of the appropriate programming of the surgery it is one of the key reasons .In general the surgery for the illness valvular stenosis it can take a long time until the appearance of the symptoms. Probably that in the future it progresses toward a conservation of the native valves in the patient.It will be beneficial because the valves modern prosthetic even have inherent risks .The aortic stenosis acquired it will follow requiring a valve prosthetic substitution .But the valvular disease it will be treated every time but by means of procedures that keep the native valves.They include the lung autograft for the aortic stenosis ,The balloonla commissurectomy with ball for the mitral stenosis ,the aortic valvular repair for aortic inadequacy .This procedures will make that the surgery is but attractive eliminating the risks associated with the prosthetics.The continuous advances in the valuation non invasive of the aortic and mitral valves, the of the appropriate selection moment for the derivation for surgical treatment, the improves of the surgical techniques for the valvular substitution and reconstruction and the very recent advances in less aggressive surgical focuses they should combine to improve the patients' perspectives with cardiopatia valvular [es

  10. Chagas Heart Disease: Report on Recent Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Fabiana S.; Jelicks, Linda A.; Kirchhoff, Louis V.; Shirani, Jamshid; Nagajyothi, Fnu; Mukherjee, Shankar; Nelson, Randin; Coyle, Christina M.; Spray, David C.; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio C.; Guan, Fangxia; Prado, Cibele M.; Lisanti, Michael P.; Weiss, Louis M.; Montgomery, Susan P.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2011-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is an important cause of cardiac disease in endemic areas of Latin America. It is now being diagnosed in non-endemic areas due to immigration. Typical cardiac manifestations of Chagas disease include dilated cardiomyopathy, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, cardioembolism and stroke. Clinical and laboratory-based research to define the pathology resulting from T. cruzi infection has shed light on many of the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to these manifestations. Antiparasitic treatment may not be appropriate for patients with advanced cardiac disease. Clinical management of Chagas heart disease is similar to that used for cardiomyopathies due to other processes. Cardiac transplantation has been successfully performed in a small number of patients with Chagas heart disease. PMID:22293860

  11. Recipient gene polymorphisms in the Th-1 cytokines IL-2 and IFN-gamma in relation to acute rejection and graft vascular disease after clinical heart transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holweg, C T J; Peeters, A M A; Balk, A H M M; Uitterlinden, A G; Niesters, H G M; Maat, A P W M; Weimar, W; Baan, C C

    2003-01-01

    IL-2 and IFN-gamma are associated with acute rejection (AR) and graft vascular disease (GVD) after clinical heart transplantation. Polymorphisms in the genes of IL-2 (T-330G in the promoter) and IFN-gamma (CA repeat in the first intron) influence the production levels of these cytokines. Therefore,

  12. Intragraft platelet-derived growth factor-alpha and transforming growth factor-beta1 during the development of accelerated graft vascular disease after clinical heart transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot-Kruseman, H A; Baan, C C; Mol, W M; Niesters, H G; Maat, A P; Balk, A H; Weimar, W

    1999-01-01

    This study was to determine whether the growth factors platelet-derived growth factor-alpha (PDGF-alpha) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) contribute to the development of graft vascular disease (GVD) after clinical heart transplantation. We analysed intragraft PDGF-alpha and

  13. Pediatric cardiology. Clinical and practical experiences with heart diseases of children, juveniles and young adults; Kinderkardiologie. Klinik und Praxis der Herzerkrankungen bei Kindern, Jugendlichen und jungen Erwachsenen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, Nikolaus A. [Herz- und Diabeteszentrum NRW, Bad Oeynhausen (Germany). Klinik fuer angeborene Herzfehler; Kleideiter, Ulrich [Klinik fuer Kinder- und Jugendmedizin, Coesfeld (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The book on pediatric cardiology covers the following chapters: (I) Fundamentals and diagnostics: pediatric cardiologic anamnesis, electrocardiograms, thorax X-radiography, MRT and CT of the heart, nuclear medical diagnostics, exercise tests, heart catheter examination, electrophysiological tests. (II) Leading symptoms: Cyanosis, cardiac murmur, thorax pain, palpitation, syncopes. (III) Disease pictures: congenital heart defects, acquired heart defects, cardiomyopathies, heart rhythm disturbances, heart insufficiency, arterial hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, other heart involving syndromes. (IV) Therapy: Catheter interventional therapy, post-surgical pediatric cardiac therapy, surgery involving the life-support machine, mechanical cardiovascular support systems, initial treatment of newborns with critical heart defects, heart transplantation, vaccination of children with heart diseases, medicinal therapy.

  14. Clinical Outcomes in 3343 Children and Adults With Rheumatic Heart Disease From 14 Low- and Middle-Income Countries: Two-Year Follow-Up of the Global Rheumatic Heart Disease Registry (the REMEDY Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zühlke, Liesl; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Engel, Mark E; Rangarajan, Sumathy; Mackie, Pam; Cupido-Katya Mauff, Blanche; Islam, Shofiqul; Daniels, Rezeen; Francis, Veronica; Ogendo, Stephen; Gitura, Bernard; Mondo, Charles; Okello, Emmy; Lwabi, Peter; Al-Kebsi, Mohammed M; Hugo-Hamman, Christopher; Sheta, Sahar S; Haileamlak, Abraham; Daniel, Wandimu; Goshu, Dejuma Yadeta; Abdissa, Senbeta G; Desta, Araya G; Shasho, Bekele A; Begna, Dufera M; ElSayed, Ahmed; Ibrahim, Ahmed S; Musuku, John; Bode-Thomas, Fidelia; Yilgwan, Christopher C; Amusa, Ganiyu A; Ige, Olukemi; Okeahialam, Basil; Sutton, Christopher; Misra, Rajeev; Abul Fadl, Azza; Kennedy, Neil; Damasceno, Albertino; Sani, Mahmoud U; Ogah, Okechukwu S; Elhassan, Taiwo OlunugaHuda H M; Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Adeoye, Abiodun M; Mntla, Phindile; Ojji, Dike; Mucumbitsi, Joseph; Teo, Koon; Yusuf, Salim; Mayosi, Bongani M

    2016-11-08

    -adjusted mortality than patients from upper-middle-income countries. Valve surgery was significantly more common in upper-middle-income than in lower-middle- or low-income countries. Patients with clinical rheumatic heart disease have high mortality and morbidity despite being young; those from low- and lower-middle-income countries had a poorer prognosis associated with advanced disease and low education. Programs focused on early detection and the treatment of clinical rheumatic heart disease are required to improve outcomes. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. The evaluation of clinical therapy effects of oral western medicine combined with magnetic pulse acupoint stimulation in treating elderly patients with coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xin; Guo, Li; Jiang, Zheng-Ming; Xu, Ai-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Treat the patients suffered from coronary heart disease with oral western medicine, combining with magnetic pulse acupoint stimulation, and observe the therapeutic effects of such combination therapy method. 56 old people with coronary heart disease are randomly divided into a treatment group and a control group. Both groups of patients are treated by the routine drugs, in addition, the patients of the treatment group are treated by magnetic pulse therapy additionally. Compare clinical symptoms, blood lipid and blood rheological indexes of the patients in the two groups when they are selected and after 30 days' treatment. after 30 days' treatment, it is found that clinical symptoms, blood lipid and blood rheological indexes of the patients in the treatment group are significantly improved compared with those when they are selected and those of the control group (Pmagnetic therapy and the conventional drug intervention, had relieved synptom, improve blood lipid and heart blood supply function.

  16. Clinical therapeutic efficacy of intra-aortic balloon pump as an adjuvant treatment after percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with coronary heart disease associated with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi-lan JING

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the clinical efficacy of intra-aortic balloon pump (IABP as an auxiliary treatment of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD associated with chronic kidney disease. Methods One hundred and twenty CHD patients with concomitant chronic kidney disease and receiving PCI in our hospital from Jan. 2000 to Jul. 2014, and 123 simple CHD patients without renal dysfunction, who had undergone PCI with concomitant IABP for the cardiac pump failure, cardiogenic shock, acute left heart failure, unstable angina pectoris (UP which was not allayed by medical treatment, or acute myocardial infarction (AMI, were selected for observation of preoperative condition, in-hospital mortality and prognosis of patients in two groups. Results There was no statistically significant difference in general clinical data including gender, age, and concomitant hypertension and diabetes, and preoperative blood lipid, AST, D-dimer, APTT, and international normalized ratio (INR showed also no statistically significant difference before surgery between two groups of patients (P>0.05. The difference in proportion of AMI, the left main trunk and (or three-branches involvement was of no statistical significance (P>0.05, but there was significant difference in the incidence of previous myocardial infarction, TnT, CK-MB, Cr, BUN, stent number, IABP application time (P0.05 between the two groups. Logistic regression analysis revealed that diabetes and the number of stents were independent risk factors for in-hospital and long-term mortalities. Conclusions By means of the effective cardiac assistance of IABP, CHD patients with renal insufficiency have the same short and long term clinical prognosis as simple CHD patients without renal dysfunction who has undergone PCI. Diabetes and the number of stents are independent risk factors for in-hospital and 1-year mortality. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.04.03

  17. Clinical profile and management of hypertensive patients with chronic ischemic heart disease and renal dysfunction attended by cardiologists in daily clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Vivencio; Escobar, Carlos; Murga, Nekane; de Pablo, Carmen; Bertomeu, Vicente; Calderón, Alberto; Echarri, Rocio

    2008-11-01

    The present study was designed to assess the influence of renal function on the clinical profile and management of the hypertensive outpatients with chronic ischemic heart disease. A total of 112 investigators, all cardiologists, were asked to consecutively enrol outpatients of at least 18 years of age, both sexes, with an established diagnosis of hypertension and chronic ischemic heart disease. Renal function was assessed by serum creatinine levels and estimated glomerular filtration rate using the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula. Renal impairment was considered a serum creatinine of at least 1.2/1.3 mg/dl (women/men) or an estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 60 ml/min/1.73 m2. Blood pressure was considered controlled when it was less than 140/90 mmHg and less than 130/80 mmHg in diabetic patients or patients with chronic kidney disease. A total of 2024 patients (66.8+/-10.1 years; 31.7% women) were included. A total of 666 (32.9%) and 498 (24.6%) patients exhibited renal function impairment assessed by estimated glomerular filtration rate and serum creatinine, respectively. The subgroup of patients with renal dysfunction was older, with a higher proportion of women with atrial fibrillation, diabetes, organ damage, associated clinical conditions and a worse blood pressure control. No differences were found in clinical profile when the two subgroups of patients with impaired renal function [serum creatinine >or=1.2/>or=1.3 mg/dl (women/men) vs. estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 ml/min per 1.73 m2] were compared. Renal function impairment is frequent in the hypertensive population with coronary artery disease. Patients with renal dysfunction represent a subgroup of very high-risk population with more risk factors and comorbidities and worse blood pressure control. The clinical profiles of hypertensive patients with renal function impairment are similar whether renal dysfunction is detected by high serum creatinine or by low estimated

  18. MicroRNAs in Coronary Heart Disease: Ready to Enter the Clinical Arena?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Cavarretta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD and its complication remain the leading cause of mortality in industrialized countries despite great advances in terms of diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment options. MicroRNAs (miRNAs, small noncoding RNAs, act as posttranscriptional gene expression modulators and have been implicated as key regulators in several physiological and pathological processes linked to CAD. Circulating miRNAs have been evaluated as promising novel biomarkers of CAD, acute coronary syndromes, and acute myocardial infarction, with prognostic implications. Several challenges related to technical aspects, miRNAs normalization, drugs interaction, and quality reporting of statistical multivariable analysis of the miRNAs observational studies remain unresolved. MicroRNA-based therapies in cardiovascular diseases are not ready yet for human trials but definitely appealing. Through this review we will provide clinicians with a concise overview of the pros and cons of microRNAs.

  19. Treatment of anxiety in patients with coronary heart disease: Rationale and design of the UNderstanding the benefits of exercise and escitalopram in anxious patients WIth coroNary heart Disease (UNWIND) randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, James A; Feger, Bryan J; Smith, Patrick J; Watkins, Lana L; Jiang, Wei; Davidson, Jonathan; Hoffman, Benson M; Ashworth, Megan; Mabe, Stephanie K; Babyak, Michael A; Kraus, William E; Hinderliter, Alan; Sherwood, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Anxiety is highly prevalent among patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), and there is growing evidence that high levels of anxiety are associated with worse prognosis. However, few studies have evaluated the efficacy of treating anxiety in CHD patients for reducing symptoms and improving clinical outcomes. Exercise and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors have been shown to be effective in treating patients with depression, but have not been studied in cardiac patients with high anxiety. The UNWIND trial is a randomized clinical trial of patients with CHD who are at increased risk for adverse events because of comorbid anxiety. One hundred fifty participants with CHD and elevated anxiety symptoms and/or with a diagnosed anxiety disorder will be randomly assigned to 12 weeks of aerobic exercise (3×/wk, 35 min, 70%-85% VO2peak), escitalopram (5-20 mg qd), or placebo. Before and after 12 weeks of treatment, participants will undergo assessments of anxiety symptoms and CHD biomarkers of risk, including measures of inflammation, lipids, hemoglobin A1c, heart rate variability, and vascular endothelial function. Primary outcomes include post-intervention effects on symptoms of anxiety and CHD biomarkers. Secondary outcomes include clinical outcomes (cardiovascular hospitalizations and all-cause death) and measures of quality of life. The UNWIND trial (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02516332) will evaluate the efficacy of aerobic exercise and escitalopram for improving anxiety symptoms and reducing risk for adverse clinical events in anxious CHD patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Heart failure: preventing disease and death worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D; AlHabib, Khalid F; Cowie, Martin R; Force, Thomas L; Hu, Shengshou; Jaarsma, Tiny; Krum, Henry; Rastogi, Vishal; Rohde, Luis E; Samal, Umesh C; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Budi Siswanto, Bambang; Sliwa, Karen; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2014-09-01

    Heart failure is a life-threatening disease and addressing it should be considered a global health priority. At present, approximately 26 million people worldwide are living with heart failure. The outlook for such patients is poor, with survival rates worse than those for bowel, breast or prostate cancer. Furthermore, heart failure places great stresses on patients, caregivers and healthcare systems. Demands on healthcare services, in particular, are predicted to increase dramatically over the next decade as patient numbers rise owing to ageing populations, detrimental lifestyle changes and improved survival of those who go on to develop heart failure as the final stage of another disease. It is time to ease the strain on healthcare systems through clear policy initiatives that prioritize heart failure prevention and champion equity of care for all. Despite the burdens that heart failure imposes on society, awareness of the disease is poor. As a result, many premature deaths occur. This is in spite of the fact that most types of heart failure are preventable and that a healthy lifestyle can reduce risk. Even after heart failure has developed, premature deaths could be prevented if people were taught to recognize the symptoms and seek immediate medical attention. Public awareness campaigns focusing on these messages have great potential to improve outcomes for patients with heart failure and ultimately to save lives. Compliance with clinical practice guidelines is also associated with improved outcomes for patients with heart failure. However, in many countries, there is considerable variation in how closely physicians follow guideline recommendations. To promote equity of care, improvements should be encouraged through the use of hospital performance measures and incentives appropriate to the locality. To this end, policies should promote the research required to establish an evidence base for performance measures that reflect improved outcomes for patients

  1. General Concepts in Adult Congenital Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ferit Onur Mutluer; Alpay Çeliker

    2018-01-01

    Congenital heart disease in adults (adult congenital heart disease) is a growing burden for healthcare systems. While infant mortality due to congenital heart disease in the last four decades decreased by almost 3-fold, adult congenital heart disease prevalence increased by more than 2-fold in United States. Adult congenital heart disease prevalence is expected to increase steadily until 2050 in projections. Adult congenital heart disease is a multifaceted problem with many dimensions. This m...

  2. Genetics of congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jonathan J; Gelb, Bruce D

    2016-05-01

    The goal of this review is to highlight recent discoveries in the field of genetics as it relates to congenital heart disease (CHD). Recent advancements in next generation sequencing technology and tools to interpret this growing body of data have allowed us to refine our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that result in CHD. From multiple different study designs, the genetic lesions that cause CHD are increasingly being elucidated. Of the more novel findings, a forward genetic screen in mice has implicated recessive inheritance and the ciliome broadly in CHD pathogenesis. The developmental delays frequently observed in patients with CHD appear to result from mutations affecting genes that overlap heart and brain developmental regulation. A meta-analysis has provided clarity, discriminating pathologic from incidental copy number variations and defining a critical region or gene. Recent technological advances have rapidly expanded our understanding of CHD genetics, and support the applicability to the clinical domain in both sporadic and inherited disease. Though significant gaps remain, genetic lesions remain the primary explanation for CHD pathogenesis, although the precise mechanism is likely multifactorial.

  3. Imaging of ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipton, Martin J.; Reba, Richard C.; Bogaert, Jan; Boxt, Larry M.

    2002-01-01

    Despite advances in the understanding and treatment of ischemic cardiomyopathy, characterized by extensive coronary artery disease and left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, the prognosis remains poor with only a 50-60% 5-year survival rate. The composition of atherosclerotic lesions is currently regarded as being more important than the degree of stenosis in determining acute events. If imaging techniques could distinguish vulnerable from stable plaques, then high-risk patient subgroups could be identified. Another important concept is that LV dysfunction may be the result of either scarring due to necrosis or to the presence of myocardial hibernation, in which there is sufficient blood flow to sustain viable myocytes, but insufficient to maintain systolic contraction. This concept of myocardial viability is critical for making optimal clinical management decisions. This review describes how noninvasive imaging methods can be used to distinguish regions of irreversibly injured myocardium from viable but hibernating segments. Technical advances in CT and MR have made imaging of the beating heart possible. Considerable clinical progress has already been made and further cardiac applications are expected. Radiologists therefore have new opportunities for involvement in cardiac imaging but must recognize the political implications as well as the diagnostic potential of these modalities not only for the heart, but also for the whole vascular system. This review focuses on imaging myocardial injury. It compares state-of-the-art CT and MR with more established yet contemporary echocardiography and nuclear scintigraphy. (orig.)

  4. Cyanotic congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeon, Kyung Mo; Yoo, Shi Joon; Han, Man Chung; Hong, Chang Yee; Lee, Yung Kyoon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-12-15

    Authors analyzed 265 cases of cyanotic congenital heart disease in which cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography were done at the Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital between April 1973 and August 1979. The results are as follows; 1. Among 265 cases, 178 patients were male and 87 patients were female. 240 patients were below the age of 20 and none was over 35 year. 2. The incidence of individual lesions are as follows: tetralogy of Fallot-176; double outlet right ventricle-20; pentalogy-12; trilogy-11; corrected transposition of great arteries-10; complete transposition of great arteries-8; pulmonary atresia-7; single ventricle-6; Ebstein's anomaly-5; total anomalous pulmonary venous return-4; tricuspid atresia-3; double outlet left ventricle-1; truncus arteriosus-1; hypoplastic left ventricle-1. 3. Fallot's teralogy, pentalogy and trilogy were characteristic in their simple chest and angiocardiographic manifestations, but in a few cases of tetralogy and pentalogy it was difficult to differentiate them from double outlet right ventricle or pulmonary atresia. 4. In double outlet right ventricle and transposition of great arteries which are the pathologic spectrum resulting from abnormal conal growth, differential points were ventricular and great arterial loop patterns and their connections but it was very difficult to differentiate them from each other by single injection into one ventricle alone. 5. Ebstein's anomaly and total anomalous pulmonary venous return were so characteristic in angiocardiography was done ventriculography alone. 6. In 7 cases with double outlet right ventricle and transposition of great arteries, selective biventriculography was done and more accurate diagnosis could be made, which was quite difficult with one ventriculography alone. In 31 cases, cineangiocardiography was done and it gave more accurate information about the type and degree of pulmonary stenosis and overriding of aorta, the origin

  5. Cyanotic congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Kyung Mo; Yoo, Shi Joon; Han, Man Chung; Hong, Chang Yee; Lee, Yung Kyoon

    1979-01-01

    Authors analyzed 265 cases of cyanotic congenital heart disease in which cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography were done at the Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital between April 1973 and August 1979. The results are as follows; 1. Among 265 cases, 178 patients were male and 87 patients were female. 240 patients were below the age of 20 and none was over 35 year. 2. The incidence of individual lesions are as follows: tetralogy of Fallot-176; double outlet right ventricle-20; pentalogy-12; trilogy-11; corrected transposition of great arteries-10; complete transposition of great arteries-8; pulmonary atresia-7; single ventricle-6; Ebstein's anomaly-5; total anomalous pulmonary venous return-4; tricuspid atresia-3; double outlet left ventricle-1; truncus arteriosus-1; hypoplastic left ventricle-1. 3. Fallot's teralogy, pentalogy and trilogy were characteristic in their simple chest and angiocardiographic manifestations, but in a few cases of tetralogy and pentalogy it was difficult to differentiate them from double outlet right ventricle or pulmonary atresia. 4. In double outlet right ventricle and transposition of great arteries which are the pathologic spectrum resulting from abnormal conal growth, differential points were ventricular and great arterial loop patterns and their connections but it was very difficult to differentiate them from each other by single injection into one ventricle alone. 5. Ebstein's anomaly and total anomalous pulmonary venous return were so characteristic in angiocardiography was done ventriculography alone. 6. In 7 cases with double outlet right ventricle and transposition of great arteries, selective biventriculography was done and more accurate diagnosis could be made, which was quite difficult with one ventriculography alone. In 31 cases, cineangiocardiography was done and it gave more accurate information about the type and degree of pulmonary stenosis and overriding of aorta, the origin of great

  6. Trends in Risk Factors and Treatments in Patients With Stable Ischemic Heart Disease Seen at Cardiology Clinics Between 2006 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Alberto; Galve, Enrique; Bertomeu-Martínez, Vicente; Bueno, Héctor; Fácila, Lorenzo; Alegría, Eduardo; Cequier, Ángel; Ruiz, Emilio; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2016-04-01

    Chronic ischemic heart disease is the most prevalent of all cardiovascular diseases. Patients are at high risk of complications. In recent decades, changes may have occurred in the clinical characteristics of the disease, its treatment and control of risk factors. A direct comparison of 2 national registries of patients with chronic ischemic heart disease carried out in 2006 (n=1583) and 2014 (n=1110). We observed statistically significant differences between the 2 registries, with a higher percentage of men and smokers in the 2014 registry, but a lower prevalence of diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Heart failure and stroke were more prevalent in the 2006 registry. Patients in the 2014 registry had better results for lipid profile, blood glucose, creatinine, and glomerular filtration rate. We observed higher use of recommended drugs for secondary prevention and an increased percentage of patients receiving optimal medical therapy, from 32.5% to 49.5% (P<.01). Use of high-intensity statin doses also increased from 10.5% to 42.8% (P<.01). We found better control of some risk factors (improved dyslipidemia, heart rate, and blood glucose in patients with diabetes) but worse blood pressure control. The clinical profile of patients with chronic ischemic heart disease is similar in the 2 registries. There has been an improvement in patients' medical therapy and dyslipidemia control, blood glucose, and heart rate, but there is still much room for improvement in the control of other cardiovascular risk factors. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Heart disease and intimacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the ESC Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions (CCNAP). Eur Heart J . ... A. Chen, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Harborview Medical Center, ...

  8. Travel and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... transporting smaller loads and making more trips. The engine — or in this case, your heart — has to ... to go to Johannesburg and go to a game park for the day,” Gandy said. Plane Precautions ...

  9. Natriuretic peptides in common valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steadman, Christopher D; Ray, Simon; Ng, Leong L; McCann, Gerry P

    2010-05-11

    Valvular heart disease, particularly aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation, accounts for a large proportion of cardiology practice, and their prevalence is predicted to increase. Management of the asymptomatic patient remains controversial. Biomarkers have been shown to have utility in the management of cardiovascular disease such as heart failure and acute coronary syndromes. In this state-of-the-art review, we examine the current evidence relating to natriuretic peptides as potential biomarkers in aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation. The natriuretic peptides correlate with measures of disease severity and symptomatic status and also can be used to predict outcome. This review shows that natriuretic peptides have much promise as biomarkers in common valvular heart disease, but the impact of their measurement on clinical practice and outcomes needs to be further assessed in prospective studies before routine clinical use becomes a reality. Copyright 2010 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The value of stress perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging for patients referred from the adult congenital heart disease clinic: 5-year experience at the Toronto General Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deva, Djeven P; Torres, Felipe S; Wald, Rachel M; Roche, S Lucy; Jimenez-Juan, Laura; Oechslin, Erwin N; Crean, Andrew M

    2014-10-01

    Vasodilator stress perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is a clinically useful tool for detection of clinically significant myocardial ischaemia in adults. We report our 5-year retrospective experience with perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance in a large, quarternary adult congenital heart disease centre. We reviewed all cases of perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance in patients referred from the adult congenital heart disease service. Dipyridamole stress perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance was undertaken on commercially available 1.5 and 3 T cardiovascular magnetic resonance scanners. Late gadolinium enhancement imaging was performed 8-10 minutes after completion of the rest perfusion sequence. Navigator whole-heart coronary magnetic resonance angiography was also performed where feasible. RESULTS of stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance were correlated with complementary imaging studies, surgery, and clinical outcomes. Over 5 years, we performed 34 stress perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance examinations (11 positive). In all, 84% of patients had further investigations for ischaemia in addition to cardiovascular magnetic resonance. Within a subgroup of 19 patients who had definitive alternative assessment of their coronary arteries, stress perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance demonstrated a sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 100%. Of the 34 studies, two were false negatives, in which the aetiology of ischaemia was extrinsic arterial compression rather than intrinsic coronary luminal narrowing. Coronary abnormalities were identified in 71% of cases who had coronary magnetic resonance angiography. Stress perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance is a useful and accurate tool for investigation of myocardial ischaemia in an adult congenital heart disease population with suspected non-atherosclerotic coronary abnormalities.

  11. Anticoagulation in ischaemic heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    De Cristofaro, R

    2006-01-01

    Although treatments with oral anti‐vitamin K agents have become more refined and safer over the years, physicians are reluctant to prescribe these agents for fear they will cause bleeding, particular in patients with ischaemic heart disease

  12. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mortality statistics found in the Heart Disease & Stroke Statistics Update . Because mortality is considered "hard" data, it's possible to do time-trend analysis and compute percent changes over time. What are ...

  13. Coronary heart disease clinical manifestation and risk factors in Japanese immigrants and their descendents in the city of São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amato Reynaldo Vicente

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess whether a difference exists in coronary heart disease clinical manifestations and the prevalence of risk factors between Japanese immigrants and their descendents in the city of São Paulo. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of coronary artery disease clinical manifestations and the prevalence of risk factors, comparing 128 Japanese immigrants (Japanese group with 304 Japanese descendents (Nisei group. RESULTS: The initial manifestation of the disease was earlier in the Nisei group (mean = 53 years, a difference of 12 years when compared with that in the Japanese group (mean = 65 years (P<0.001. Myocardial infarction was the first manifestation in both groups (P = 0.83. The following parameters were independently associated with early coronary events: smoking (OR = 2.25; 95% CI = 1.35-3.77; P<0.002; Nisei group (OR = 10.22; 95% CI = 5.64-18.5; P<0.001; and female sex (OR = 5.04; 95% CI = 2.66-9.52; P<0.001. CONCLUSION: The clinical presentation of coronary heart disease in the Japanese and their descendents in the city of São Paulo was similar, but coronary heart disease onset occurred approximately 12 years earlier in the Nisei group than in the Japanese group.

  14. Cost effectiveness of nurse led secondary prevention clinics for coronary heart disease in primary care: follow up of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, James P; Yao, Guiqing L; Murchie, Peter; Campbell, Neil C; Ritchie, Lewis D

    2005-03-26

    To establish the cost effectiveness of nurse led secondary prevention clinics for coronary heart disease based on four years' follow up of a randomised controlled trial. Cost effectiveness analysis. 19 general practices in north east Scotland. 1343 patients (673 in intervention group and 670 in control group, as originally randomised) aged under 80 years with a diagnosis of coronary heart disease but without terminal illness or dementia and not housebound. Nurse led clinics to promote medical and lifestyle components of secondary prevention. Costs of clinics; overall costs to health service; and cost per life year and per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained, expressed as incremental gain in intervention group compared with control group. The cost of the intervention (clinics and drugs) was 136 pounds sterling (254 dollars; 195 euros) per patient higher (1998-9 prices) in the intervention group, but the difference in other NHS costs, although lower for the intervention group, was not statistically significant. Overall, 28 fewer deaths occurred in the intervention group leading to a gain in mean life years per patient of 0.110 and of 0.124 QALYs. The incremental cost per life year saved was 1236 pounds sterling and that per QALY was 1097 pounds sterling. Nurse led clinics for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease in primary care seem to be cost effective compared with most interventions in health care, with the main gains in life years saved.

  15. A randomized clinical trial of hospital-based, comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care for patients with congestive heart failure, ischemic heart disease, or high risk of ischemic heart disease (the DANREHAB trial) - design, intervention, and population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, A.D.O.; Schou, O.; Soja, A.M.B.

    2005-01-01

    Background Current guidelines broadly recommend comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR), although evidence for this is still limited. It is not known whether evidence from before 1995 is still valid. Study Design The DANish Cardiac REHABilitation (DANREHAB) trial was designed as a centrally......, or readmissions due to heart disease based on linkage to public registries. The CR was an individually tailored, multidisciplinary program (6 weeks of intensive CR and 12 months of follow-up) including patient education, exercise training, dietary counseling, smoking cessation, psychosocial support, risk factor...

  16. A randomized clinical trial of hospital-based, comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation versus usual care for patients with congestive heart failure, ischemic heart disease, or high risk of ischemic heart disease (the DANREHAB trial)--design, intervention, and population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe Olsen; Soja, Anne Merete Boas; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current guidelines broadly recommend comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR), although evidence for this is still limited. It is not known whether evidence from before 1995 is still valid. STUDY DESIGN: The DANish Cardiac ReHABilitation (DANREHAB) trial was designed as a centrally......, or readmissions due to heart disease based on linkage to public registries. The CR was an individually tailored, multidisciplinary program (6 weeks of intensive CR and 12 months of follow-up) including patient education, exercise training, dietary counseling, smoking cessation, psychosocial support, risk factor...

  17. Use of an evidence-based protocol to screen for sleep-disordered breathing in a heart failure disease management clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Shelby L; Traverse, Ramona D

    2014-01-01

    Undiagnosed and untreated sleep-disordered breathing can lead to negative health outcomes and increased utilization of health resources among patients with heart failure. The purpose of this evidence-based practice project was to implement and evaluate a new multifaceted sleep-disordered breathing screening protocol in a heart failure disease management clinic. The combined use of a symptoms questionnaire, the Epworth sleepiness scale, and overnight pulse oximetry was significantly more effective in identifying patients with a positive diagnosis of sleep-disordered breathing than using the Epworth sleepiness scale alone (P < .05).

  18. [CLINICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CONGENITAL HEART DISEASES ASSOCIATED WITH CONNECTIVE TISSUE DISPLASIA AT CHILDREN LIVING IN EAST REGION OF KAZAKHSTAN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madiyeva, M; Rymbayeva, T

    2017-11-01

    The frequency of the combination of congenital heart defects (CHD) and connective tissue dysplasia remains poorly understood. And connective tissue dysplasia enhance severity the clinical of CHD. The aim of the study was to conduct a clinical and laboratory analysis of combinations of congenital heart defects and connective tissue dysplasia in children of Semey and to determine the risk for the development of these pathologies. The object of the study is the children of Semey (East Kazakhstan) aged 1-14 with congenital heart defects (CHD), with connective tissue dysplasia, healthy children and their mothers. Definition complex clinical and laboratory studies in children with CHD and connective tissue dysplasia, and their mothers. In children with CHD, the frequency of external and visceral signs of dysplasia was high. In 88.1% of cases in children with CHD was diagnosed 2-3 degrees of dysplasia. Was found difference in the microelement composition of blood serum and of hemostasis in children with CHD were expressed by hypofibrinogenemia, hypocalcemia, hypomagnesemia. Excess of the frequency of signs of dysplasia in mothers over the control group to consider dysplasia as a factor that influences the clinical of CHD.

  19. Valvular aspects of rheumatic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remenyi, Boglarka; ElGuindy, Ahmed; Smith, Sidney C; Yacoub, Magdi; Holmes, David R

    2016-03-26

    Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease remain major global health problems. Although strategies for primary and secondary prevention are well established, their worldwide implementation is suboptimum. In patients with advanced valvular heart disease, mechanical approaches (both percutaneous and surgical) are well described and can, for selected patients, greatly improve outcomes; however, access to centres with experienced staff is very restricted in regions that have the highest prevalence of disease. Development of diagnostic strategies that can be locally and regionally provided and improve access to expert centres for more advanced disease are urgent and, as yet, unmet clinical needs. We outline current management strategies for valvular rheumatic heart disease on the basis of either strong evidence or expert consensus, and highlight areas needing future research and development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Metabolomics and ischaemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmiena, Aliki A; Ng, Theodore W; Meikle, Peter J

    2013-03-01

    Ischaemic heart disease accounts for nearly half of the global cardiovascular disease burden. Aetiologies relating to heart disease are complex, but dyslipidaemia, oxidative stress and inflammation are cardinal features. Despite preventative measures and advancements in treatment regimens with lipid-lowering agents, the high prevalence of heart disease and the residual risk of recurrent events continue to be a significant burden to the health sector and to the affected individuals and their families. The development of improved risk models for the early detection and prevention of cardiovascular events in addition to new therapeutic strategies to address this residual risk are required if we are to continue to make inroads into this most prevalent of diseases. Metabolomics and lipidomics are modern disciplines that characterize the metabolite and lipid complement respectively, of a given system. Their application to ischaemic heart disease has demonstrated utilities in population profiling, identification of multivariate biomarkers and in monitoring of therapeutic response, as well as in basic mechanistic studies. Although advances in magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry technologies have given rise to the fields of metabolomics and lipidomics, the plethora of data generated presents challenges requiring specific statistical and bioinformatics applications, together with appropriate study designs. Nonetheless, the predictive and re-classification capacity of individuals with various degrees of risk by the plasma lipidome has recently been demonstrated. In the present review, we summarize evidence derived exclusively by metabolomic and lipidomic studies in the context of ischaemic heart disease. We consider the potential role of plasma lipid profiling in assessing heart disease risk and therapeutic responses, and explore the potential mechanisms. Finally, we highlight where metabolomic studies together with complementary -omic disciplines may make further

  1. [Genetics of congenital heart diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Damien

    2017-06-01

    Developmental genetics of congenital heart diseases has evolved from analysis of serial slices in embryos towards molecular genetics of cardiac morphogenesis with a dynamic view of cardiac development. Genetics of congenital heart diseases has also changed from formal genetic analysis of familial recurrences or population-based analysis to screening for mutations in candidates genes identified in animal models. Close cooperation between molecular embryologists, pathologists involved in heart development and pediatric cardiologists is crucial for further increase of knowledge in the field of cardiac morphogenesis and genetics of cardiac defects. The genetic model for congenital heart disease has to be revised to favor a polygenic origin rather than a monogenic one. The main mechanism is altered genic dosage that can account for heart diseases in chromosomal anomalies as well as in point mutations in syndromic and isolated congenital heart diseases. The use of big data grouping information from cardiac development, interactions between genes and proteins, epigenetic factors such as chromatin remodeling or DNA methylation is the current source for improving our knowledge in the field and to give clues for future therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Expanding the value of qualitative theories of illness experience in clinical practice: a grounded theory of secondary heart disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ononeze, V; Murphy, A W; MacFarlane, A; Byrne, M; Bradley, C

    2009-06-01

    Qualitative theories of illness experience are about the individual interpretations of the psychosocial and cultural aspects of living with illness. Thus, they contribute to a better understanding of health and health care provision. In this paper, we examine how a grounded theory (GT) of heart disease experience can inform secondary prevention. In-depth interviews of individual experience of heart disease were conducted with 26 patients, using GT iterative data collection and analysis framework. A GT was compiled from data and examined within a sociocultural framework to ascertain how experience influenced health behaviour. Despite individual contextual variations, the theory of 'keeping it going' describes the study sample's common attitude to living with heart disease. The theory was adequate in explaining secondary cardiac behaviour, because it identified the aspects of patients' beliefs and attitudes which are key to effective secondary prevention. The assessment of the impact of illness experience on health behaviour within a sociocultural framework helped to articulate the strong influence of social and contextual factors. The study offers an appropriate explanatory framework for encouraging health behaviour change. It emphasizes the importance of interventions being relevant to individual perceptions and interpretations. It provides a framework for designing and evaluating cardiac interventions and the theoretical principles which underpin them.

  3. General Concepts in Adult Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutluer, Ferit Onur; Çeliker, Alpay

    2018-01-20

    Congenital heart disease in adults (adult congenital heart disease) is a growing burden for healthcare systems. While infant mortality due to congenital heart disease in the last four decades decreased by almost 3-fold, adult congenital heart disease prevalence increased by more than 2-fold in United States. Adult congenital heart disease prevalence is expected to increase steadily until 2050 in projections. Adult congenital heart disease is a multifaceted problem with many dimensions. This manuscript aims to provide an overview of the common adult congenital heart diseases and summarize important points in management of these diseases with possible problems and complications that the patients and the physicians face.

  4. General Concepts in Adult Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferit Onur Mutluer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease in adults (adult congenital heart disease is a growing burden for healthcare systems. While infant mortality due to congenital heart disease in the last four decades decreased by almost 3-fold, adult congenital heart disease prevalence increased by more than 2-fold in United States. Adult congenital heart disease prevalence is expected to increase steadily until 2050 in projections. Adult congenital heart disease is a multifaceted problem with many dimensions. This manuscript aims to provide an overview of the common adult congenital heart diseases and summarize important points in management of these diseases with possible problems and complications that the patients and the physicians face

  5. Does intravenous sildenafil clinically ameliorate pulmonary hypertension during perioperative management of congenital heart diseases in children? - A prospective randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipul Krishen Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulmonary hypertension (PHT, if present, can be a significant cause of increased morbidity and mortality in children undergoing surgery for congenital heart diseases (CHD. Various techniques and drugs have been used perioperatively to alleviate the effects of PHT. Intravenous (IV sildenafil is one of them and not many studies validate its clinical use. Aims and Objectives: To compare perioperative PaO 2 - FiO 2 ratio peak filling rate (PFR, systolic pulmonary artery pressure (PAP - systolic aortic pressure (AoP ratio, extubation time, and Intensive Care Unit (ICU stay between two groups of children when one of them is administered IV sildenafil perioperatively during surgery for CHDs. Materials and Methods: Patients with ventricular septal defects and proven PHT, <14 years of age, all American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status III, undergoing cardiac surgery, were enrolled into two groups - Group S (IV sildenafil and Group C (control - over a period of 14 months, starting from October 2013. Independent t-test and Mann-Whitney U-test were used to compare the various parameters between two groups. Results: PFR was higher throughout, perioperatively, in Group S. PAP/AoP was 0.3 and 0.4 in Group S and Group C, respectively. In Group S, mean group extubation time was 7 ± 7.34 h, whereas in Group C it was 22.1 ± 10.6. Postoperative ICU stay in Group S and Group C were 42.3 ± 8.8 h and 64.4 ± 15.9 h, respectively. Conclusion: IV sildenafil, when used perioperatively, in children with CHD having PHT undergoing corrective surgery, improves not only PaO 2 - FiO 2 ratio and PAP - AoP ratio but also reduces extubation time and postoperative ICU stay.

  6. The Feasibility and Clinical Utility of Microsphere Contrast-enhanced Transthoracic Echocardiography in Adult Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platts, David G; Kelly, Natalie F A; Wijesekera, Vishva A; Sengupta, Abhishek; Burns, Kylie; Burstow, Darryl J; Butler, Thomas; Radford, Dorothy J; Nicolae, Mugur

    2015-01-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) plays a key role in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD). However, a significant number of studies are nondiagnostic due to poor image quality. Enhancement of the blood pool-tissue interface with contrast-enhanced TTE (CE-TTE) can improve image quality in suboptimal studies. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate feasibility and clinical utility of CE-TTE in the assessment of patients with ACHD. A retrospective analysis of all CE-TTE performed in ACHD patients at our institution from August 2007 to May 2014 was performed. Endocardial definition scores (EDS) for each segment in the right and left ventricles were graded pre- and postcontrast imaging, as 1 = good, 2 = suboptimal, 3 = not seen. The endocardial border definition score index (EBDSI) was also calculated pre- and postcontrast imaging. Twenty patients with ACHD had 24 CE. Summation data for all ventricular EDS for unenhanced TTE vs. CE-TTE imaging was: EDS 1 = 136 vs. 314, EDS 2 = 119 vs. 72, EDS 3 = 162 vs. 31, respectively. Wilcoxon matched-pairs rank-signed test showed a significant ranking difference (improvement) pre- and postcontrast for the combined ventricular data (P TTE was significantly lower than for noncontrast imaging (1.23 ± 0.49 vs. 2.06 ± 0.62, P TTE resulted in significantly improved right and left ventricular endocardial definition and improved EDBSI. CE-TTE should be viewed as an additional imaging technique that is available to help assess patients with ACHD, especially those with nondiagnostic images. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. African-Americans and Heart Disease, Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More African-Americans and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Aug 22,2017 Heart disease is the ... a marathon.” Learn more: Family History and Heart Disease, Stroke Make the Effort to Prevent Heart Disease with ...

  8. Clinical utility and prognostic value of appropriateness criteria in stress echocardiography for the evaluation of valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sanjeev; Kamperidis, Vasilis; Shah, Benoy Nalin; Roussin, Isabelle; Chahal, Navtej; Li, Wei; Khattar, Rajdeep; Senior, Roxy

    2013-09-01

    We examined the prognostic value of stress echocardiography appropriateness criteria for evaluation of valvular heart disease in 100 consecutive patients. Of the studies, 49%, 36%, and 15% were classified as appropriate, uncertain, and inappropriate, respectively. Over a median of 12.6 months, 24 events (12 deaths and 12 heart failure admissions) occurred. The 12-month event-free survival was significantly reduced in patients with appropriate or uncertain studies compared with patients with inappropriate studies (p = 0.04 and p = 0.005, respectively). There was no survival difference between patients with an appropriate or uncertain indication (p = 0.1). The only independent predictors of events were a positive stress echocardiogram (hazard ratio: 15.5, p heart disease provide the ability to differentiate between patients at high- (appropriate group) and low- (inappropriate group) risk of cardiac events. Reclassification of the uncertain group may improve the differential value of these criteria. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Diabetes and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Natasha; Ballegaard, Søren; Holmager, Pernille

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test i) whether patients having diabetes and ischemic heart disease (IHD), i.e., patients suffering from two chronic diseases, demonstrate a higher degree of chronic stress when compared with patients suffering from IHD alone, and ii) whether suffering from the two...

  10. Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Carpal tunnel syndrome Depression Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine Thyroid disease Urinary tract infections All A-Z health topics ... Carpal tunnel syndrome Depression Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine Thyroid disease Urinary tract infections All A-Z health topics ...

  11. Heart disease - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk factors ... do smoke, quit. Controlling your cholesterol through diet, exercise, and medicines . Controlling high blood pressure through diet, ...

  12. Effects of eHealth physical activity encouragement in adolescents with complex congenital heart disease: The PReVaiL randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausen, Susanne Hwiid; Andersen, Lars L; Søndergaard, Lars; Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Dideriksen, Kasper; Kruse, Anne; Mikkelsen, Ulla Ramer; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2016-10-15

    To assess benefit and harms of adding an eHealth intervention to health education and individual counseling in adolescents with congenital heart disease. Randomized clinical trial. Denmark. A total of 158 adolescents aged 13-16years with no physical activity restrictions after repaired complex congenital heart disease. PReVaiL consisted of individually tailored eHealth encouragement physical activity for 52weeks. All patients received 45min of group-based health education and 15min of individual counseling involving patients' parents. The primary outcome was maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) at 52weeks after randomization. The secondary outcome was physical activity. Exploratory outcomes were generic and disease-specific questionnaires. In the intervention group, 58 patients (72%) completed the final test, but of those, only 46 (57%) fulfilled the compliance criteria of using the eHealth application for at least 2 consecutive weeks. In the control group, 61 patients (79%) completed both exercise tests. Adjusted for baseline values, the difference between the intervention group and the control group in mean VO2 peak at 1year was -0.65ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) (95% CI -2.66 to 1.36). Between-group differences at 1year in physical activity, generic health-related quality of life, and disease-specific quality of life were not statistically significant. Adding a tailored eHealth intervention to health education and individual counseling did not affect outcomes among adolescents with congenital heart disease. Our results do not support the use of this eHealth intervention in adolescents with complex congenital heart disease. Clinical trials.gov identifier: NCT01189981. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Anxiety and Heart Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    De

    2003-01-01

    ...es) characteristics on development of cardiac events and on recovery has been well- studied.(Breithardt et al., 1995) These demographic and clinical characteristics are used commonly in clinical practice to determine patient risk for future events...

  14. Homocysteine and coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clarke, Robert; Bennett, Derrick A; Parish, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Moderately elevated blood levels of homocysteine are weakly correlated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but causality remains uncertain. When folate levels are low, the TT genotype of the common C677T polymorphism (rs1801133) of the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) appreci......Moderately elevated blood levels of homocysteine are weakly correlated with coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but causality remains uncertain. When folate levels are low, the TT genotype of the common C677T polymorphism (rs1801133) of the methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR...

  15. [Congenital Heart Diseases and Sports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wippermann, Friederike; Oberhoffer, Renate; Hager, Alfred

    2017-01-01

    Daily activity is essential for children's development. Especially children with congenital heart disease do not burden adequate, even physical activity is beneficial for them. They should get used to activity and individual athletic performance. Once risks are defined or excluded in a cardiological examination, a detailed sports medical examination is recommended to give advice on individual intensity for leisure and school sports activities. By participation in sporting activities with their peers, they will benefit both physically as well as psychologically. Furthermore, children with congenital heart disease are able to experience their performance limitations. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Renovascular heart failure: heart failure in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawarada, Osami; Yasuda, Satoshi; Noguchi, Teruo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Ogawa, Hisao

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery disease presents with a broad spectrum of clinical features, including heart failure as well as hypertension, and renal failure. Although recent randomized controlled trials failed to demonstrate renal artery stenting can reduce blood pressure or the number of cardiovascular or renal events more so than medical therapy, increasing attention has been paid to flash pulmonary edema and congestive heart failure associated with atherosclerotic renal artery disease. This clinical entity "renovascular heart failure" is diagnosed retrospectively. Given the increasing global burden of heart failure, this review highlights the background and catheter-based therapeutic aspects for renovascular heart failure.

  17. Clinicians' perspectives on patient satisfaction in adult congenital heart disease clinics--a dimension of health care quality whose time has come.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenblum, Ronen; Gianola, Ann; Ionescu-Ittu, Raluca; Verstappen, Amy; Landzberg, Michael; Gurvitz, Michelle; Jenkins, Kathy; Bates, David W; Marelli, Ariane J

    2015-01-01

    Patient-centered care and patient satisfaction represent key dimensions of health care quality. This is relevant for the growing number of patients with life-long conditions. In the present study, our goal was to examine clinicians' attitudes and behavior with respect to patient satisfaction in adult congenital heart disease outpatient clinics. A 34-question survey was developed to assess adult congenital heart disease clinicians' awareness, attitudes, and behavior relative to patient satisfaction and administered in-person or online to clinicians from the largely U.S.-based Adult Congenital Heart Association's database of adult congenital heart disease health care providers. Overall, 267 questionnaires were filled out: 108 were collected in person (79% response rate) and 159 online (17.5% response rate). Responses were received from physicians (161); nurses (73); physician assistants (20); and others (13). Although 85% of clinicians believed it was important to inquire about patient satisfaction, only 28% reported routinely inquiring about this dimension of care. Only 34% claimed they had adequate training to cope with varying levels of patient satisfaction, 44% stated that their department utilized patient satisfaction surveys, and 37% received feedback from the hospital management in the preceding 12 months. In multivariate analyses, clinicians that received feedback from the hospital management and had adequate training were more likely to inquire about patient satisfaction. Although patient satisfaction is perceived as an important dimension of quality care by adult congenital heart disease clinicians, most of them reported insufficient institutional support to achieve this. Our findings suggest that clinicians would benefit from health care organizations engaging them in the delivery of this dimension of health care quality. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Million Hearts: Key to Collaboration to Reduce Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Extension has taught successful classes to address heart disease, yet heart disease remains the number one killer in the United States. The U.S. government's Million Hearts initiative seeks collaboration among colleges, local and state health departments, Extension and other organizations, and medical providers in imparting a consistent message…

  19. Clinical relevance of determination the changes of serum cTnI, NPY and PGMP contents after treatment in patients with coronary heart diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Hengsong; Ma Chao; Wu Kaixia

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical significance of changes of serum cTnI, NPY and PGMP levels in patients with coronary heart diseases after treatment. Methods: Serum NPY, PGMP (with RIA), serum cTnI (with Biochemistry) levels were measured in 41 patients with coronary heart diseases both before and after treatment as well as in 35 normal controls. Results: Before treatment, serum cTnI, NPY and PGMP levels were significantly higher than those in controls (P 0.05), but serum PGMP level remained prominently higher (P<0.05). Conclusion: Pathogenesis and progress of CHD, might be closely related to serum cTnI, NPY and PGMP levels. (authors)

  20. Changing Landscape of Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, Berto J; Mulder, Barbara J M

    2017-03-17

    Congenital heart disease is the most frequently occurring congenital disorder affecting ≈0.8% of live births. Thanks to great efforts and technical improvements, including the development of cardiopulmonary bypass in the 1950s, large-scale repair in these patients became possible, with subsequent dramatic reduction in morbidity and mortality. The ongoing search for progress and the growing understanding of the cardiovascular system and its pathophysiology refined all aspects of care for these patients. As a consequence, survival further increased over the past decades, and a new group of patients, those who survived congenital heart disease into adulthood, emerged. However, a large range of complications raised at the horizon as arrhythmias, endocarditis, pulmonary hypertension, and heart failure, and the need for additional treatment became clear. Technical solutions were sought in perfection and creation of new surgical techniques by developing catheter-based interventions, with elimination of open heart surgery and new electronic devices enabling, for example, multisite pacing and implantation of internal cardiac defibrillators to prevent sudden death. Over time, many pharmaceutical studies were conducted, changing clinical treatment slowly toward evidence-based care, although results were often limited by low numbers and clinical heterogeneity. More attention has been given to secondary issues like sports participation, pregnancy, work, and social-related difficulties. The relevance of these issues was already recognized in the 1970s when the need for specialized centers with multidisciplinary teams was proclaimed. Finally, research has become incorporated in care. Results of intervention studies and registries increased the knowledge on epidemiology of adults with congenital heart disease and their complications during life, and at the end, several guidelines became easily accessible, guiding physicians to deliver care appropriately. Over the past decades

  1. Heart Diseases and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MOC) Scientific Sessions Certified Education Courses & Online Learning Co-Sponsored & Endorsed Events Educational Resources Career Resources Job Board Fellowships & Program Directors IBHRE Exam Jobs at HRS Policy & Payment QPP Resource Center Clinical Guidelines & Documents Safety Alert ...

  2. Predicting coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Henrik; Fuster, Valentin

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death and disabling disease. Whereas risk factors are well known and constitute therapeutic targets, they are not useful for prediction of risk of future myocardial infarction, stroke, or death. Therefore, methods to identify atherosclerosis itself have bee...

  3. Heart disease and women

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAD - women; Coronary artery disease - women ... NOT smoke or use tobacco. Get plenty of exercise. Women who need to lose or keep off ... least 60 to 90 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise on most days. To maintain your health, get ...

  4. Coronary Heart Disease and Exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga SAKA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease is a chronic process, of which the progression can rapidly change the functional capacity of patients. In CAD patients, the quality of life can be improved with an appropriate exercise prescription. This article explains how a safe exercise program for CAD patients can be prescribed.

  5. Chelation for Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... conventional medicine , such as treating lead poisoning or iron overload. When used as a complementary treatment for heart disease, a health care provider typically administers a solution of disodium EDTA, a man-made amino acid, in a series of infusions ...

  6. Monocytes in ischemic heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    The link between the immune system and ischemic heart disease has been recognized for years and great improvements have been made in understanding the role of immune cells in the context of infarct healing, atherosclerosis and arteriogenesis, using experimental and in vitro models. However, the role

  7. Heart Disease in Hispanic Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... does have a bit of a penchant for racial bias where Hispanic and Latina women are concerned. And the statistics above are proof. Why? “Hispanic women think [heart disease] is something that is ‘my’ problem and they don’t want to share it ...

  8. Congenital Heart Disease and ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Risk factors for inattention, hyperactivity and impaired school performance were examined in 109 children, 5 to 10 years of age, who had undergone newborn cardiac surgery for complex congenital heart disease (CHD at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, PA.

  9. Clinical utility and diagnostic accuracy of palm-held, mini-sized ultrasonocardiographic scanner in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Mao-Hung; Huang, Chien-Fu; Lin, I-Chun; Lin, Ying-Jui; Kuo, Hsuan-Chang; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng

    2018-02-01

    To investigate whether a palm-held ultrasonocardiographic scanner would be useful for screening and follow-up in congenital heart disease (CHD). We retrospectively reviewed the echocardiographic images from June 1, 2014 to November 1, 2014. All patients underwent two ultrasonographic examinations including palm-held scanner examination and standard echocardiography. To compare the quality of the two instruments, we developed a diagnostic scoring system ranging from 1 point to 10 points, with 10 points indicating the best quality. Two experienced echocardiographers retrospectively reviewed all recorded images blindedly and gave each examination a score. Comparisons of diagnostic score between two equipments were performed. A total of 262 patients' images were reviewed. All cardiac lesions could be detected with both instruments. The mean diagnostic score of palm-held scanner and standard echocardiography were 8.20±0.53 versus 9.64±0.37 (ppalm-held scanner in detecting CHD was very good. Despite both instruments having a high diagnostic score in detecting CHD, standard echocardiography had better quality. Traditional echocardiography is still the standard tool for CHD evaluation. However, the palm-held scanner can support physical examination for initial screening and follow-up, and offer cardiologists an opportunity to visualize and listen to the heart at any time. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Stem Cell Therapy in Heart Diseases: A Review of Selected New Perspectives, Practical Considerations and Clinical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwahid, Eltyeb; Siminiak, Tomasz; Guarita-Souza, Luiz César; de Carvalho, Katherine Athayde Teixeira; Gallo, Pasquale; Shim, Winston; Condorelli, Gianluigi

    2011-01-01

    Degeneration of cardiac tissues is considered a major cause of mortality in the western world and is expected to be a greater problem in the forthcoming decades. Cardiac damage is associated with dysfunction and irreversible loss of cardiomyocytes. Stem cell therapy for ischemic heart failure is very promising approach in cardiovascular medicine. Initial trials have indicated the ability of cardiomyocytes to regenerate after myocardial injury. These preliminary trials aim to translate cardiac regeneration strategies into clinical practice. In spite of advances, current therapeutic strategies to ischemic heart failure remain very limited. Moreover, major obstacles still need to be solved before stem cell therapy can be fully applied. This review addresses the current state of research and experimental data regarding embryonic stem cells (ESCs), myoblast transplantation, histological and functional analysis of transplantation of co-cultured myoblasts and mesenchymal stem cells, as well as comparison between mononuclear and mesenchymal stem cells in a model of myocardium infarction. We also discuss how research with stem cell transplantation could translate to improvement of cardiac function. PMID:22758618

  11. Aortic valve calcification and mild tricuspid regurgitation but no clinical heart disease after 8 years of dopamine agonist therapy for prolactinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kars, Marleen; Delgado, Victoria; Holman, Eduard R.; Feelders, Richard A.; Smit, Johannes W. A.; Romijn, Johannes A.; Bax, Jeroen J.; Pereira, Alberto M.

    2008-01-01

    Treatment with ergot-derived dopamine agonists, pergolide, and cabergoline has been associated with an increased frequency of valvular heart disease in Parkinson's disease. The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence of valvular heart disease in patients treated with dopamine agonists

  12. Aortic valve calcification and mild tricuspid regurgitation but no clinical heart disease after 8 years of dopamine agonist therapy for prolactinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Kars; V. Delgado (Victoria); E.R. Holman (Eduard); R.A. Feelders (Richard); J.W.A. Smit (Jan); J.A. Romijn (Johannes); J.J. Bax (Jeroen); A.M. Pereira (Alberto)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Treatment with ergot-derived dopamine agonists, pergolide, and cabergoline has been associated with an increased frequency of valvular heart disease in Parkinson's disease. The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence of valvular heart disease in patients treated

  13. Carcinoid heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A. Geller

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The images are of the tricuspid valve and the pulmonic valve from the autopsy of a patient with mid-gut neuroendocrine carcinoma, carcinoid pattern, extensively metastatic to the liver. The patient had typical “carcinoid syndrome,” including clinical evidence of tricuspid and pulmonic stenosis and insufficiency. The tricuspid valve (left shows slight retraction and distortion by the overlying endothelial deposition of plaque composed of acid mucopolysaccharide-rich matrix with varying amounts of smooth muscle cells and collagen fibers. The plaque material causes partial coalescence of chordae tendinae with effacement of the usual delicate strands. The pulmonic valve (right shows more marked distortion with shrinkage and obliteration of cusps and coalescence at the commissures. Beneath the plaque the valves are intact.

  14. Coronary Artery Disease - Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risk and stress in a person's life, their health behaviors and socioeconomic status. These factors may affect established ... Syndrome • Pericarditis • Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) • Stroke • Vascular Health • Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) • Consumer Healthcare • Tools For Your Heart Health • Watch, Learn & ...

  15. Heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houyel, Lucile; To-Dumortier, Ngoc-Tram; Lepers, Yannick; Petit, Jérôme; Roussin, Régine; Ly, Mohamed; Lebret, Emmanuel; Fadel, Elie; Hörer, Jürgen; Hascoët, Sébastien

    2017-05-01

    With the advances in congenital cardiac surgery and postoperative care, an increasing number of children with complex congenital heart disease now reach adulthood. There are already more adults than children living with a congenital heart defect, including patients with complex congenital heart defects. Among these adults with congenital heart disease, a significant number will develop ventricular dysfunction over time. Heart failure accounts for 26-42% of deaths in adults with congenital heart defects. Heart transplantation, or heart-lung transplantation in Eisenmenger syndrome, then becomes the ultimate therapeutic possibility for these patients. This population is deemed to be at high risk of mortality after heart transplantation, although their long-term survival is similar to that of patients transplanted for other reasons. Indeed, heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease is often challenging, because of several potential problems: complex cardiac and vascular anatomy, multiple previous palliative and corrective surgeries, and effects on other organs (kidney, liver, lungs) of long-standing cardiac dysfunction or cyanosis, with frequent elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance. In this review, we focus on the specific problems relating to heart and heart-lung transplantation in this population, revisit the indications/contraindications, and update the long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. Concise Review: Review and Perspective of Cell Dosage and Routes of Administration From Preclinical and Clinical Studies of Stem Cell Therapy for Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golpanian, Samuel; Schulman, Ivonne H; Ebert, Ray F; Heldman, Alan W; DiFede, Darcy L; Yang, Phillip C; Wu, Joseph C; Bolli, Roberto; Perin, Emerson C; Moyé, Lem; Simari, Robert D; Wolf, Ariel; Hare, Joshua M

    2016-02-01

    An important stage in the development of any new therapeutic agent is establishment of the optimal dosage and route of administration. This can be particularly challenging when the treatment is a biologic agent that might exert its therapeutic effects via complex or poorly understood mechanisms. Multiple preclinical and clinical studies have shown paradoxical results, with inconsistent findings regarding the relationship between the cell dose and clinical benefit. Such phenomena can, at least in part, be attributed to variations in cell dosing or concentration and the route of administration (ROA). Although clinical trials of cell-based therapy for cardiovascular disease began more than a decade ago, specification of the optimal dosage and ROA has not been established. The present review summarizes what has been learned regarding the optimal cell dosage and ROA from preclinical and clinical studies of stem cell therapy for heart disease and offers a perspective on future directions. Significance: Preclinical and clinical studies on cell-based therapy for cardiovascular disease have shown inconsistent results, in part because of variations in study-specific dosages and/or routes of administration (ROA). Future preclinical studies and smaller clinical trials implementing cell-dose and ROA comparisons are warranted before proceeding to pivotal trials. ©AlphaMed Press.

  17. Guidelines for the secondary prevention of rheumatic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrazaq Al-Jazairi

    2017-03-01

    Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease can be prevented with appropriate antibiotics administration to prevent the progression of valve damage. The current use of primary and secondary prevention antibiotics in Saudi Arabia is not known. Therefore, this clinical practice guideline is developed, based on the best available evidence, to promote appropriate antibiotics secondary prophylaxis use for prevention of rheumatic heart disease.

  18. Heart disease among children with HIV/AIDS attending the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There are very few published studies of heart disease in HIV infected children living in sub-Saharan Africa, a region with more than 50% of the world's population of HIV infected patients. Objectives: To determine the prevalence, and describe the type and clinical presentation of heart disease among children ...

  19. Effects of secondary prevention clinics on health status in patients with coronary heart disease: 4 year follow-up of a randomized trial in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchie, Peter; Campbell, Neil C; Ritchie, Lewis D; Deans, H George; Thain, Joan

    2004-10-01

    The long-term effects of disease management programmes for coronary heart disease on health status are unknown. In a randomized trial of nurse-led secondary prevention clinics, we found significantly improved health status at 1 year. Participants were followed-up again at 4 years to determine if improvements had been sustained. Our aim was to evaluate the effects on health of nurse-led clinics for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease in primary care. A total of 1343 patients with coronary heart disease were randomized to nurse-led secondary prevention clinics or usual care, with follow-up at 1 and 4 years by review of medical case notes and national data sets, and postal questionnaires. The study involved a stratified, random sample of 19 general practices in north-east Scotland. Health status was measured by the SF-36 questionnaire, chest pain by the angina TyPE specification and anxiety and depression by the hospital anxiety and depression scale. At 1 year, there were significant improvements in five of eight SF-36 domains (all functioning scales, pain and general health) in patients randomized to clinics. Role limitations attributed to physical problems improved the most [adjusted difference 8.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.16-12.9]. At 4 years, the intervention group scored higher than control in all domains, but differences were no longer significant. At 1 year, fewer patients in the intervention group reported worsening chest pain (odds ratio 0.59, 95% C1 0.37-0.94). At 4 years, there were no significant differences between the proportion of intervention or control group patients who reported chest pain in the last week or who reported worsening chest pain. No significant effects were observed on anxiety or depression at 1 or 4 years. We have demonstrated previously a significantly greater survival in attendees at nurse-led secondary prevention clinics. Despite this, improvements in health status achieved in the first year of the study were

  20. Serotonergic Drugs and Valvular Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Richard B.; Baumann, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    Background The serotonin (5-HT) releasers (±)-fenfluramine and (+)-fenfluramine were withdrawn from clinical use due to increased risk of valvular heart disease. One prevailing hypothesis (i.e., the “5-HT hypothesis”) suggests that fenfluramine-induced increases in plasma 5-HT underlie the disease. Objective Here we critically evaluate the possible mechanisms responsible for fenfluramine-associated valve disease. Methods Findings from in vitro and in vivo experiments performed in our laboratory are reviewed. The data are integrated with existing literature to address the validity of the 5-HT hypothesis and suggest alternative explanations. Conclusions The overwhelming majority of evidence refutes the 5-HT hypothesis. A more likely cause of fenfluramine-induced valvulopathy is activation of 5-HT2B receptors on heart valves by the metabolite norfenfluramine. Future serotonergic medications should be designed to lack 5-HT2B agonist activity. PMID:19505264

  1. What Is Heart Valve Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is called a valve-in-valve procedure. Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes to Treat Other Related Heart Conditions To ... your doctor may advise you to make heart-healthy lifestyle changes, such as: Heart-healthy eating Aiming for ...

  2. Clinical characteristics and usage of statins in patients with stable ischemic heart disease referred for angiography or coronary artery bypass grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Shklianka

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim – to compare the clinical characteristics and frequency of statins usage in real clinical practice in patients referred to a specialized clinic for angiography or coronary artery bypass grafting. Materials and methods. In a retrospective slice single-center study data from a primary examination of 155 patients with stable ischemic heart disease, consecutively selected for coronary artery bypass grafting surgery, were analyzed. Depending on the inclusion of statins in the list of medicinal prescriptions, patients were retrospectively divided into two groups: those who had been prescribed statins while they were initially referred to a specialized cardiac surgery center for angiography or revascularization (n = 84 and those who were not prescribed statins (n ​​= 71. Results. The studied patients’ cohort was characterized by earlier coronary events, signs of the peripheral artery atherosclerosis and other absolute indications for treatment with statins in vast majority of cases. At the same time, groups of patients who had been and had not been prescribed statins, did not differ by vast majority of demographic, clinical and instrumental characteristics, concomitant diseases and risk factors. No statin therapy was associated with higher levels of total cholesterol and interleukin-6 compared with the group of patients taking statins (total cholesterol, respectively, 4.8 versus 4.2 mmol/l (p = 0.016 and interleukin-6, respectively, 4.4 versus. 3.1 p/ml (p = 0.022. In general, statins were prescribed in 54,2 % of patients, among them high doses – in 17 patients (20.2 %, moderate – 46 patients (54.8 %, low – 21 patients (25 %. Conclusions. The obtained data show the insufficient level of ambulatory statins usage in patients with ischemic heart disease referred for myocardial revascularization and significant discrepancy between clinical characteristics and real statins usage. Therefore, there is a great need to determine the

  3. Identification of altered plasma proteins by proteomic study in valvular heart diseases and the potential clinical significance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known about genetic basis and proteomics in valvular heart disease (VHD including rheumatic (RVD and degenerative (DVD valvular disease. The present proteomic study examined the hypothesis that certain proteins may be associated with the pathological changes in the plasma of VHD patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: Differential protein analysis in the plasma identified 18 differentially expressed protein spots and 14 corresponding proteins or polypeptides by two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry in 120 subjects. Two up-regulated (complement C4A and carbonic anhydrase 1 and three down-regulated proteins (serotransferrin, alpha-1-antichymotrypsin, and vitronectin were validated by ELISA in enlarging samples. The plasma levels (n = 40 for each of complement C4A in RVD (715.8±35.6 vs. 594.7±28.2 ng/ml, P = 0.009 and carbonic anhydrase 1 (237.70±15.7 vs. 184.7±10.8 U/L, P = 0.007 in DVD patients were significantly higher and that of serotransferrin (2.36±0.20 vs. 2.93±0.16 mg/ml, P = 0.025 and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (370.0±13.7 vs. 413.0±11.6 µg/ml, P = 0.019 in RVD patients were significantly lower than those in controls. The plasma vitronectin level in both RVD (281.3±11.0 vs. 323.2±10.0 µg/ml, P = 0.006 and DVD (283.6±11.4 vs. 323.2±10.0 µg/ml, P = 0.011 was significantly lower than those in normal controls. CONCLUSIONS: We have for the first time identified alterations of 14 differential proteins or polypeptides in the plasma of patients with various VHD. The elevation of plasma complement C4A in RVD and carbonic anhydrase 1 in DVD and the decrease of serotransferrin and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin in RVD patients may be useful biomarkers for these valvular diseases. The decreased plasma level of vitronectin - a protein related to the formation of valvular structure - in both RVD and DVD patients might indicate the possible genetic deficiency in these patients.

  4. [Demographic analysis of a congenital heart disease clinic of the Mexican Institute of Social Security, with special interest in the adult].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-González, Horacio; Yáñez-Gutiérrez, Lucelli; Rivera-May, Jimena Lucely; López-Gallegos, Diana; Almeida-Gutiérrez, Eduardo

    2017-11-07

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) has an incidence of 8-10 cases per 1000 live births. In Mexico, there are 18,000-20,000 new cases per year. Most tertiary care centers for CHD attend only pediatric population; the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS) has a clinic that attends pediatric and adult population. To analyze the demographic aspects of the CHD clinic of IMSS. From 2011 to 2016 a cross-sectional study of the CC clinic of a third level hospital of the IMSS, including all patients with confirmed structural heart disease of recent diagnosis was carried out. The sex, age, reference entity, antecedent of pregnancy and treatment were registered. The population was divided into age ranges (17.1 years). Descriptive statistics and χ 2 test were used in qualitative variables. 3,483 patients with CHD (male:female ratio, 0.8:1.2) were included. Increased pulmonary flow acyanogenic cardiopathies were the most frequent CHD group (47.2%), with atrial septal defect being the most frequent diagnosis overall; 25.6% were adults and 35% of women with a history of pregnancy. Chiapas was Federal entity with greater proportion of patients diagnosed in the adult stage (33.82%); 7% were not candidates for any treatment for complications of the disease. CHD is a late diagnosis; it is necessary to create a national register to promote new health policies and a rational distribution of resources for these patients. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  5. Virtual Surgery in Congenital Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thomas Sangild; Mosegaard, Jesper; Kislinskiy, Stefan

    2014-01-01

     Teaching, diagnosing, and planning of therapy in patients with complex structural cardiovascular heart disease require profound understanding of the three-dimensional (3D) nature of cardiovascular structures in these patients. To obtain such understanding, modern imaging modalities provide high...... et al., Cardiol Young 13:451–460, 2003). In combination with the availability of virtual models of congenital heart disease (CHD), techniques for computer- based simulation of cardiac interventions have enabled early clinical exploration of the emerging concept of virtual surgery (Sorensen et al......., Interact Cardiovasc Thorac Surg 5:536–539, 2006; Sorensen et al., Pediatr Radiol 38:1314–1322, 2008). This chapter serves as an introduction to virtual surgery for patient-specific preoperative planning and teaching of cardiovascular anatomy and interventions for clinicians. The chapter is mainly based...

  6. When a Heart Murmur Signals Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understanding Problems and Causes Heart Murmurs and Valve Disease "Innocent" Heart Murmur Problem: Valve Stenosis - Problem: Aortic Valve Stenosis - Problem: Mitral Valve Stenosis - Problem: Tricuspid Valve Stenosis - Problem: Pulmonary Valve Stenosis Problem: Mitral ...

  7. Profiles in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freed, M.D.; Keane, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    Pediatric cardiology has made great strides in the diagnosis, management, and correction of complex congenital malformations in the past two decades. The foundation of these advances is a more precise understanding of the physiology and anatomy of complex lesions that has been obtained from cardiac catheterization and angiography. The techniques for catheterization of infants and children have been discussed in another paper. This chapter focuses on brief profiles of some of the more important congenital abnormalities. The incidence cited in the discussion of each abnormality pertains to a population comprises of children and adults referred to The Children's Hospital Medical Center and Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, respectively, for evaluation of congenital heart disease

  8. Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes of Patients With Coronary Artery Disease and Angina: Analysis of the Irbesartan in Patients With Heart Failure and Preserved Systolic Function Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badar, Athar A; Perez-Moreno, Ana Cristina; Hawkins, Nathaniel M; Jhund, Pardeep S; Brunton, Alan P T; Anand, Inder S; McKelvie, Robert S; Komajda, Michel; Zile, Michael R; Carson, Peter E; Gardner, Roy S; Petrie, Mark C; McMurray, John J V

    2015-07-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between coronary artery disease (CAD), angina, and clinical outcomes in patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction enrolled in the irbesartan in patients with heart failure and preserved systolic function (I-Preserve) trial. The mean follow-up period for the 4128 patients enrolled in I-Preserve was 49.5 months. Patients were divided into 4 mutually exclusive groups according to history of CAD and angina: patients with no history of CAD or angina (n=2008), patients with no history of CAD but a history of angina (n=649), patients with a history of CAD but no angina (n=468), and patients with a history of CAD and angina (n=1003); patients with no known CAD or angina were the reference group. After adjustment for other prognostic variables using Cox proportional-hazard models, patients with CAD but no angina were found to be at higher risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 1.58 [1.22-2.04]; P<0.01) and sudden death (HR, 2.12 [1.33-3.39]; P<0.01), compared with patients with no CAD or angina. Patients with CAD and angina were also at higher risk of all-cause mortality (HR, 1.29 [1.05-1.59]; P=0.02) and sudden death (HR, 1.83 [1.24-2.69]; P<0.01) compared with the same reference group and had the highest risk of unstable angina or myocardial infarction (HR, 5.84 [3.43-9.95]; P<0.01). Patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction and CAD are at higher risk of all-cause mortality and sudden death when compared with those without CAD. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00095238. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. The clinical use of stress echocardiography in non-ischaemic heart disease: recommendations from the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging and the American Society of Echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancellotti, Patrizio; Pellikka, Patricia A; Budts, Werner; Chaudhry, Farooq A; Donal, Erwan; Dulgheru, Raluca; Edvardsen, Thor; Garbi, Madalina; Ha, Jong-Won; Kane, Garvan C; Kreeger, Joe; Mertens, Luc; Pibarot, Philippe; Picano, Eugenio; Ryan, Thomas; Tsutsui, Jeane M; Varga, Albert

    2016-11-01

    A unique and highly versatile technique, stress echocardiography (SE) is increasingly recognized for its utility in the evaluation of non-ischaemic heart disease. SE allows for simultaneous assessment of myocardial function and haemodynamics under physiological or pharmacological conditions. Due to its diagnostic and prognostic value, SE has become widely implemented to assess various conditions other than ischaemic heart disease. It has thus become essential to establish guidance for its applications and performance in the area of non-ischaemic heart disease. This paper summarizes these recommendations. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. The global burden of paediatric heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musa, Ndidiamaka L; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Zheleva, Bistra

    2017-01-01

    An estimated 15 million children die or are crippled annually by treatable or preventable heart disease in low- and middle-income countries. Global efforts to reduce under-5 mortality have focused on reducing death from communicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries with little...... to no attention focusing on paediatric CHD and acquired heart disease. Lack of awareness of CHD and acquired heart disease, access to care, poor healthcare infrastructure, competing health priorities, and a critical shortage of specialists are important reasons why paediatric heart disease has not been addressed...... in low resourced settings. Non-governmental organisations have taken the lead to address these challenges. This review describes the global burden of paediatric heart disease and strategies to improve the quality of care for paediatric heart disease. These strategies would improve outcomes for children...

  11. Mercury Exposure and Heart Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genchi, Giuseppe; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; Carocci, Alessia; Lauria, Graziantonio; Catalano, Alessia

    2017-01-12

    Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. It has been determined that mercury is not only harmful to the health of vulnerable populations such as pregnant women and children, but is also toxic to ordinary adults in various ways. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities. Nowadays, the exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Recent studies suggest that chronic exposure, even to low concentration levels of mercury, can cause cardiovascular, reproductive, and developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and carcinogenicity. Possible biological effects of mercury, including the relationship between mercury toxicity and diseases of the cardiovascular system, such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction, are being studied. As heart rhythm and function are under autonomic nervous system control, it has been hypothesized that the neurotoxic effects of mercury might also impact cardiac autonomic function. Mercury exposure could have a long-lasting effect on cardiac parasympathetic activity and some evidence has shown that mercury exposure might affect heart rate variability, particularly early exposures in children. The mechanism by which mercury produces toxic effects on the cardiovascular system is not fully elucidated, but this mechanism is believed to involve an increase in oxidative stress. The exposure to mercury increases the production of free radicals, potentially because of the role of mercury in the Fenton reaction and a reduction in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase. In this review we report an overview on the toxicity of mercury and focus our attention on the toxic effects on the cardiovascular system.

  12. Mercury Exposure and Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Genchi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental contamination has exposed humans to various metal agents, including mercury. It has been determined that mercury is not only harmful to the health of vulnerable populations such as pregnant women and children, but is also toxic to ordinary adults in various ways. For many years, mercury was used in a wide variety of human activities. Nowadays, the exposure to this metal from both natural and artificial sources is significantly increasing. Recent studies suggest that chronic exposure, even to low concentration levels of mercury, can cause cardiovascular, reproductive, and developmental toxicity, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and carcinogenicity. Possible biological effects of mercury, including the relationship between mercury toxicity and diseases of the cardiovascular system, such as hypertension, coronary heart disease, and myocardial infarction, are being studied. As heart rhythm and function are under autonomic nervous system control, it has been hypothesized that the neurotoxic effects of mercury might also impact cardiac autonomic function. Mercury exposure could have a long-lasting effect on cardiac parasympathetic activity and some evidence has shown that mercury exposure might affect heart rate variability, particularly early exposures in children. The mechanism by which mercury produces toxic effects on the cardiovascular system is not fully elucidated, but this mechanism is believed to involve an increase in oxidative stress. The exposure to mercury increases the production of free radicals, potentially because of the role of mercury in the Fenton reaction and a reduction in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as glutathione peroxidase. In this review we report an overview on the toxicity of mercury and focus our attention on the toxic effects on the cardiovascular system.

  13. American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hearts® WISEWOMAN American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Census Bureau. American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke Facts Heart Disease is the first and stroke ...

  14. Pattern and Diagnosis of Congenital Heart Disease in Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To study the pattern of Congenital Heart Diseases (CHD) in children referred to Ahmed Gasim Cardiac Center) in Khartoum. Methods: This is a prospective cross-sectional, clinic based study conducted over a six months period. The children were referred to the Cardiac Centre because of suspected heart ...

  15. Heart valve disease among patients with hyperprolactinemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Maria Charlotte; Maegbaek, Merete Lund; Laurberg, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Increased risk of heart valve disease during treatment with certain dopamine agonists, such as cabergoline, has been observed in patients with Parkinson's disease. The same compound is used to treat hyperprolactinemia, but it is unknown whether this also associates with heart valve disease....

  16. Comparative assessment of the diets of healthy individuals, subjects with preclinical coronary heart disease and patients with severe heart diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronov, D.M.; Eganyan, R.A.; Kovaleva, O.F.; Zhidko, N.I.; Danielov, G.Eh.; Rozhnov, A.V.; Shcherbakova, I.A.

    1991-01-01

    92 males aged 26 to 55 (28 healthy individuals, 45 persons with preclinical coronary heart disease and 19 patients with functional class 1-2 coronary heart disease) were examined to study the peculiarities and dietary patterns of persons with a high physical working capacity and having no typical clinical signs of the disease. All persons were subjected to a complex examination which included questionnarire, myocardial scintigraphy with 201 Tl at a maximum physical loading, echocardiography, coronaroangiography. Certain dietary peculiarities are established in persons with preclinical coronary heart disease

  17. Being active when you have heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... regular exercise when you have heart disease is important. Exercise can make your heart muscle stronger. It may ... exercise program. You need to make sure the exercise you would like to do is safe for you. This is especially important if: You recently had a heart attack. You ...

  18. Nutrition in neonatal congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan CT

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Conall T Morgan,1 Anne Marie Shine,2 Colin J McMahon1 1Department of Pediatric Cardiology, 2Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Our Lady's Children's Hospital Crumlin, Dublin, Republic of Ireland Abstract: There are 40,000 infants born in the USA with congenital heart disease annually. Achievement of adequate oral nutrition is difficult in this population. Malnutrition is common. Single ventricle physiology, the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis, and cardiopulmonary bypass prevent the establishment of normal oral feeding patterns. Improved nutrition results in improved surgical outcomes, lower mortality, and shorter hospital stay. In this review, we discuss the challenges this population faces. Keywords: necrotizing enterocolitis, malnutrition, growth failure, hypoplastic left heart

  19. Clinical utility and diagnostic accuracy of palm-held, mini-sized ultrasonocardiographic scanner in congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-Hung Lo

    2018-02-01

    Conclusion: The diagnostic sensitivity of palm-held scanner in detecting CHD was very good. Despite both instruments having a high diagnostic score in detecting CHD, standard echocardiography had better quality. Traditional echocardiography is still the standard tool for CHD evaluation. However, the palm-held scanner can support physical examination for initial screening and follow-up, and offer cardiologists an opportunity to visualize and listen to the heart at any time.

  20. Ischemic heart disease in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Kellan E; Geraci, Stephen A

    2013-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women. Although overall mortality from coronary heart disease (CHD) has decreased, there are subsets of patients, particularly young women, in whom the mortality rate has increased. Underlying sex differences in CHD may be an explanation. Women have more frequent symptoms, more ischemia, and higher mortality than men, but less obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD). Despite this, traditional risk factor assessment has been ineffective in risk stratifying women, prompting the emergence of novel markers and prediction scores to identify a population at risk. Sex differences in manifestations and the pathophysiology of CHD also have led to differences in the selection of diagnostic testing and treatment options for women, having profound effects on outcomes. The frequent finding of nonobstructive CAD in women with ischemia suggests microvascular dysfunction as an underlying cause; therefore, coronary reactivity and endothelial function testing may add to diagnostic accuracy in female patients. In spite of evidence that women benefit from the same therapies as men, they continue to receive less-aggressive therapy, which is reflected in higher healthcare resource utilization and adverse outcomes. More sex-specific research is needed in the area of symptomatic nonobstructive CAD to define the optimal therapeutic approach.

  1. High sensitivity troponin and valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Cian P; Donnellan, Eoin; Phelan, Dermot; Griffin, Brian P; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice; McEvoy, John W

    2017-07-01

    Blood-based biomarkers have been extensively studied in a range of cardiovascular diseases and have established utility in routine clinical care, most notably in the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome (e.g., troponin) and the management of heart failure (e.g., brain-natriuretic peptide). The role of biomarkers is less well established in the management of valvular heart disease (VHD), in which the optimal timing of surgical intervention is often challenging. One promising biomarker that has been the subject of a number of recent VHD research studies is high sensitivity troponin (hs-cTn). Novel high-sensitivity assays can detect subclinical myocardial damage in asymptomatic individuals. Thus, hs-cTn may have utility in the assessment of asymptomatic patients with severe VHD who do not have a clear traditional indication for surgical intervention. In this state-of-the-art review, we examine the current evidence for hs-cTn as a potential biomarker in the most commonly encountered VHD conditions, aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation. This review provides a synopsis of early evidence indicating that hs-cTn has promise as a biomarker in VHD. However, the impact of its measurement on clinical practice and VHD outcomes needs to be further assessed in prospective studies before routine clinical use becomes a reality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Radioisotope heart examination during exercise to diagnose ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farsky, S.

    1986-01-01

    The radioisotope exercise test is discussed and its benefits characterized for the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease, namely the use of 99m Tc in scintiscanning heart ventricles and of 201 Tl in scintiscanning myocardial perfusion. The exercise ventricular function and perfusion scintigraphies are compared with the common exercise ECG examination, and their superior sensitivity and specificity emphasized. Considering the constraints of scintigraphic imaging, indications are outlined for patients including those with suspect serious ischemic heart disease in whom the exercise ECG test has been negative or inconclusive, patients with the so-called nondiagnostic ECG, patients with atypical symptoms, and healthy individuals for whom the exercise ECG test indicated with respect to their occupation has been positive. Both radionuclide imaging techniques are complementary and are shown to be valuable not only in improving the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease but also in identifying the high-risk patients in whom cardiac surgery is to be considered. (L.O.)

  3. Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adult Diseases Resources Heart Disease, Stroke, or Other Cardiovascular Disease and Adult Vaccination Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... important step in staying healthy. If you have cardiovascular disease, talk with your doctor about getting your vaccinations ...

  4. What Is Heart Valve Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Valves Sometimes heart valves can’t be repaired and must be replaced. This surgery involves removing the faulty valve and replacing it with a man-made or biological valve. Biological valves are made ...

  5. ECHOCARDIOGRAPHIC DIAGNOSTICS OF CARCINOID HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janez Ravnik

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Carcinoid heart disease is a rare heart disease which affects endocard and heart valves on the right side of heart. It affects only patients with manifested carcinoid syndrome, which is thought to be the consequence of secretory active metastases of carcinoid tumour. The carcinoid endocardial plaques cause structural changes of tricuspid and pulmonic valve and later on their stenosis and/or insufficiency.Patients and methods. In this article we introduce a carcinoid valve heart disease (CVHD scoring system for easier end exact echocardiographic diagnostics. Four echocardiographic parameters are beeing estimated: structural changes of tricuspid valve, tricuspid valve regurgitation, stenosis of pulmonic valve and pulmonic valve regurgitation.Conclusions. The scoring system allows us to make an early diagnosis and evaluation of progression of carcinoid heart disease, which is very important for planning the treatment process. Our experiences confirm the usefulness of this scoring system in echocardiographic follow–up of patients with carcinoid syndrome.

  6. Xenopus: An Emerging Model for Studying Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenbrun, Erin; Tandon, Panna; Amin, Nirav M.; Waldron, Lauren; Showell, Chris; Conlon, Frank L.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart defects affect nearly 1% of all newborns and are a significant cause of infant death. Clinical studies have identified a number of congenital heart syndromes associated with mutations in genes that are involved in the complex process of cardiogenesis. The African clawed frog, Xenopus, has been instrumental in studies of vertebrate heart development and provides a valuable tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying human congenital heart diseases. In this review, we discuss the methodologies that make Xenopus an ideal model system to investigate heart development and disease. We also outline congenital heart conditions linked to cardiac genes that have been well-studied in Xenopus and describe some emerging technologies that will further aid in the study of these complex syndromes. PMID:21538812

  7. Large Mammalian Animal Models of Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Camacho

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to the biological complexity of the cardiovascular system, the animal model is an urgent pre-clinical need to advance our knowledge of cardiovascular disease and to explore new drugs to repair the damaged heart. Ideally, a model system should be inexpensive, easily manipulated, reproducible, a biological representative of human disease, and ethically sound. Although a larger animal model is more expensive and difficult to manipulate, its genetic, structural, functional, and even disease similarities to humans make it an ideal model to first consider. This review presents the commonly-used large animals—dog, sheep, pig, and non-human primates—while the less-used other large animals—cows, horses—are excluded. The review attempts to introduce unique points for each species regarding its biological property, degrees of susceptibility to develop certain types of heart diseases, and methodology of induced conditions. For example, dogs barely develop myocardial infarction, while dilated cardiomyopathy is developed quite often. Based on the similarities of each species to the human, the model selection may first consider non-human primates—pig, sheep, then dog—but it also depends on other factors, for example, purposes, funding, ethics, and policy. We hope this review can serve as a basic outline of large animal models for cardiovascular researchers and clinicians.

  8. Heart rate and heart rate variability in dogs with different degrees of myxomatous mitral valve disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Caroline Elisabeth; Falk, Bo Torkel; Zois, Nora Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    HEART RATE AND HEART RATE VARIABILITY IN DOGS WITH DIFFERENT DEGREES OF MYXOMATOUS MITRAL VALVE DISEASE. CE Rasmussen1, T Falk1, NE Zois1, SG Moesgaard1, HD Pedersen2, J Häggström3 and LH Olsen1. 1. Department of Basic Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University...... of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark. 2. Novo Nordic A/S, Maaloev, Denmark. 3. Department of Clinical Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Uppsala, Sweden. Heart rate variability (HRV) is an indirect measurement of the autonomic modulation of heart rate (HR). Reduced HRV measured from short......-time electrocardiography is seen in dogs with heart failure (HF) secondary to myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD). However, HRV is suggested to increase with disease severity at early stages of MMVD. The aims of this study were 1) to associate HR and HRV with severity of MMVD in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCS...

  9. Smoking, Stress, and Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Leonard H.; Perkins, Kenneth A.

    1988-01-01

    Focuses on the interrelation between stressors and smoking, and on its potential impact on coronary heart disease risk beyond that due to stressors or to smoking alone. Reviews evidence supporting the stress-smoking interrelationship, its relevance to the risk of heart disease, and mechanisms explaining why smokers smoke more during stress and why…

  10. Sleep Apnea and Heart Disease, Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Sleep Apnea and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Mar 16, ... be life-threatening. It’s a condition known as sleep apnea, in which the person may experience pauses ...

  11. Flu and Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease includes but is not limited to coronary artery disease [heart attack or myocardial infarction, acute coronary ... Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329-4027 USA 800-CDC-INFO ( ...

  12. Heart Failure: From Research to Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Shahidul

    2018-03-03

    "Heart failure: from research to clinical practice", a collection of selected reviews, which comes out also as a book, covers essentially all important aspects of heart failure, including the pathogenesis, clinical features, biomarkers, imaging techniques, medical treatment and surgical treatments, use of pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators, and palliative care. The reviews include essential background information, state of the art, critical and in-depth analysis, and directions for future researches for elucidation of the unresolved issues. Everyone interested in heart failure is expected to find this compilation helpful for a deeper understanding of some of the complex issues.

  13. Valvular Disorders in Carcinoid Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    Full Text Available Abstract Carcinoid heart disease is a rare but important cause of intrinsic right heart valve disorders leading to right heart failure. Occasionally, left-sided heart valves may also be involved. The characteristic cardiac pathological findings of carcinoid heart disease are endocardial thickening as a result of fibrous deposits on the endocardium. Echocardiographic examination and right heart catheterization are very useful for the diagnosis of the lesion. If more cardiac valves are affected, multiple valve replacement should be considered. The management of the pulmonary valve lesion depends on the extent of the diseased valve, either by valvulotomy, valvectomy, or valve replacement. Percutaneous valve implantations in the pulmonary and in the inferior vena cava positions have been advocated for high-risk patients.

  14. Congenital and Acquired Valvular Heart Disease in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Sarah A; Ward, Cary C

    2017-08-24

    The number of pregnancies complicated by valvular heart disease is increasing. This review describes the hemodynamic effects of clinically important valvular abnormalities during pregnancy and reviews current guideline-driven management strategies. Valvular heart disease in women of childbearing age is most commonly caused by congenital abnormalities and rheumatic heart disease. Regurgitant lesions are well tolerated, while stenotic lesions are associated with a higher risk of pregnancy-related complications. Management of symptomatic disease during pregnancy is primarily medical, with percutaneous interventions considered for refractory symptoms. Most guidelines addressing the management of valvular heart disease during pregnancy are based on case reports and observational studies. Additional investigation is required to further advance the care of this growing patient population.

  15. Parental overprotection and heart-focused anxiety in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Lephuong; Nolan, Robert P; Irvine, Jane; Kovacs, Adrienne H

    2011-09-01

    The care of adult patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) is challenging from a mental health perspective, as these patients continue to face a variety of biopsychosocial issues that may impact emotional functioning. Despite these issues, there are limited data on the psychosocial functioning of adults with CHD, and there are no data on the impact of parental overprotection on heart-focused anxiety in this patient population. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between patient recollections of parental overprotection and current heart-focused anxiety in adults with CHD. A cross-sectional sample of 190 adult patients with CHD (51% male; mean age = 32.28, SD = 11.86 years) completed validated measures of perceived parental overprotection (Parental Bonding Instrument) and heart-focused anxiety (Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire). The results indicated that perceived parental overprotection (β = 0.19, p = 0.02) and heart defect complexity (β = 0.17, p = 0.03) were significantly related to heart-focused anxiety. Contrary to hypotheses, perceived parental overprotection did not vary as a function of heart defect complexity (F (2, 169) = 0.02, p = 0.98). Perceived parental overprotection and heart defect complexity are associated with heart-focused anxiety in adults with congenital heart disease. These results can inform the development of clinical interventions aimed at improving the psychosocial adjustment of this patient population.

  16. Lung Function Abnormalities in Smokers with Ischemic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franssen, Frits M E; Soriano, Joan B; Roche, Nicolas; Bloomfield, Paul H; Brusselle, Guy; Fabbri, Leonardo M; García-Rio, Francisco; Kearney, Mark T; Kwon, Namhee; Lundbäck, Bo; Rabe, Klaus F; Raillard, Alice; Muellerova, Hana; Cockcroft, John R

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the ALICE (Airflow Limitation in Cardiac Diseases in Europe) study was to investigate the prevalence of airflow limitation in patients with ischemic heart disease and the effects on quality of life, healthcare use, and future health risk. To examine prebronchodilator and post-bronchodilator spirometry in outpatients aged greater than or equal to 40 years with clinically documented ischemic heart disease who were current or former smokers. This multicenter, cross-sectional study was conducted in 15 cardiovascular outpatient clinics in nine European countries. Airflow limitation was defined as post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC less than 0.70. Among the 3,103 patients with ischemic heart disease who were recruited, lung function was defined for 2,730 patients. Airflow limitation was observed in 30.5% of patients with ischemic heart disease: 11.3% had mild airflow limitation, 15.8% moderate airflow limitation, 3.3% severe airflow limitation, and 0.1% very severe airflow limitation. Most patients with airflow limitation (70.6%) had no previous spirometry testing or diagnosed pulmonary disease. Airflow limitation was associated with greater respiratory symptomatology, impaired health status, and more frequent emergency room visits (P < 0.05). Airflow limitation compatible with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease affects almost one-third of patients with ischemic heart disease. Although airflow limitation is associated with additional morbidity and societal burden, it is largely undiagnosed and untreated. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01485159).

  17. Triglycerides and Heart Disease, Still a Hypothesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Ira J.; Eckel, Robert H.; McPherson, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the basic and clinical science relating plasma triglycerides and cardiovascular disease. Although many aspects of the basic physiology of triglyceride production, its plasma transport and tissue uptake have been known for several decades, the relationship of plasma triglyceride levels to vascular disease is uncertain. Are triglyceride rich lipoproteins, their influence on HDL and LDL, or the underlying diseases leading to defects in triglyceride metabolism the culprit? Animal models have failed to confirm that anything other than early fatty lesions can be produced by triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. Metabolic products of triglyceride metabolism can be toxic to arterial cells; however, these studies are primarily in vitro. Correlative studies of fasting and postprandial triglycerides and genetic diseases implicate VLDL and their remnants, and chylomicron remnants in atherosclerosis development; but the concomitant alterations in other lipoproteins and other risk factors obscure any conclusions about direct relationships between disease and triglycerides. Genes that regulate triglyceride levels also correlate with vascular disease. Human intervention trials, however, have lacked an appropriately defined population, and have produced outcomes without definitive conclusions. The time is more than ripe for new and creative approaches to understanding the relationship of triglycerides and heart disease. PMID:21527746

  18. Preattentive processing of heart cues and the perception of heart symptoms in congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsdorp, Petra A.; Kindt, Merel; Everaerd, Walter; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2007-01-01

    The present study was aimed at clarifying whether preattentive processing of heart cues results in biased perception of heart sensations in patients with congenital heart disease (ConHD) who are also highly trait anxious. Twenty-six patients with ConHD and 22 healthy participants categorized

  19. Clinical significance of the changes of serum levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), endothelin (ET) and T cell subsets distribution type after treatment in patients with coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Lin; Zhu Xuejun; Liu Sheguo

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the changes in serum SOD, ET levels and T-lymphocyte subsets distribution type after treatment in patients with coronary heart disease. Methods: The levels of serum SOD, ET were detected with RIA and T-lymphocyte subsets distribution type was detected with monoclonal antibody method in 42 cases of coronary heart disease both before and after a course of treatment and 35 controls. Results: before treatment, the levels of serum ET were significantly higher than those in controls (P 4 /CD 8 ratio were significantly lower than those in controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Detection of serum SOD, ET and CD 4 /CD 8 ratio is valuable for the diagnosis and outcome prediction in patients with coronary heart disease. (authors)

  20. Stress echocardiography in valvular heart disease: a current appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, Peyman; Patel, Krishna; Griffin, Brian P; Desai, Milind Y

    2015-03-01

    Stress echocardiography is increasingly used in the management of patients with valvular heart disease and can aid in evaluation, risk stratification and clinical decision making in these patients. Evaluation of symptoms, exercise capacity and changes in blood pressure can be done during the exercise portion of the test, whereas echocardiographic portion can reveal changes in severity of disease, pulmonary artery pressure and left ventricular function in response to exercise. These parameters, which are not available at rest, can have diagnostic and prognostic importance. In this article, we will review the indications and diagnostic implications, prognostic implications, and clinical impact of stress echocardiography in decision making and management of patients with valvular heart disease.

  1. Genetics and Genomics of Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Samir; Brueckner, Martina

    2017-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common birth defect, and due to major advances in medical and surgical management, there are now more adults living with CHD than children. Until recently, the cause of the majority of CHD was unknown. Advances in genomic technologies have discovered the genetic etiology of a significant fraction of CHD, while at the same time pointing to remarkable complexity in CHD genetics. This review will focus on the evidence for genetic causes underlying CHD and discuss data supporting both monogenic and complex genetic mechanisms underlying CHD. The discoveries from CHD genetic studies draw attention to biological pathways that simultaneously open the door to a better understanding of cardiac development, and impact clinical care of CHD patients. Finally, we address clinical genetic evaluation of patients and families affected by CHD. PMID:28302740

  2. Clinical usefulness of cine MRI for evaluation of left ventricular volume and diagnosis of heart and great vessel diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, Takeshi; Anno, Hirofumi; Uritani, Tomizo (Fujita-Gakuen Health Univ., Toyoake, Aichi (Japan)) (and others)

    1990-01-01

    ECG-gated cine mode magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed in 20 patients with various heart deseases. Left ventricular volume (LVV) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were calculated on MR images obtained in left ventricular vertical and horizontal long axis views. The findings were compared with those obtained from left ventriculography. There was a significant positive correlation between MR imaging and ventriculography for both LVV and LVEF (p<0.001). In Marfan syndrome after surgery for dissecting aneurysm of the aorta, MR imaging was capable of visualizing not only the whole aorta in a single plane but also enlargement of the aortic root. It also depicted asynergy and thinned wall of the infarcted myocardium for myocardial infarction; an enlarged left auricle, the thickened septum, and constricted outflow tract for idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis; shunt flow for ventricular septum defect; and an enlarged aortic root for aortitis syndrome. Using ventriculography as the standard, cine MR imaging was frequently false positive for the detection of mitral regurgitation. There was, however, good concordance between MR imaging and ventriculography in detecting aortic regurgitation. In addition, MR imaging was equivalent to color Doppler technique for detecting valvular regurgitation. (N.K.).

  3. Clinical usefulness of cine MRI for evaluation of left ventricular volume and diagnosis of heart and great vessel diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Takeshi; Anno, Hirofumi; Uritani, Tomizo

    1990-01-01

    ECG-gated cine mode magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed in 20 patients with various heart deseases. Left ventricular volume (LVV) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were calculated on MR images obtained in left ventricular vertical and horizontal long axis views. The findings were compared with those obtained from left ventriculography. There was a significant positive correlation between MR imaging and ventriculography for both LVV and LVEF (p<0.001). In Marfan syndrome after surgery for dissecting aneurysm of the aorta, MR imaging was capable of visualizing not only the whole aorta in a single plane but also enlargement of the aortic root. It also depicted asynergy and thinned wall of the infarcted myocardium for myocardial infarction; an enlarged left auricle, the thickened septum, and constricted outflow tract for idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis; shunt flow for ventricular septum defect; and an enlarged aortic root for aortitis syndrome. Using ventriculography as the standard, cine MR imaging was frequently false positive for the detection of mitral regurgitation. There was, however, good concordance between MR imaging and ventriculography in detecting aortic regurgitation. In addition, MR imaging was equivalent to color Doppler technique for detecting valvular regurgitation. (N.K.)

  4. Behavior patterns and coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, J. C.; Cronin, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    The relationships between two behavioral patterns, cardiac risk factors, and coronary heart disease are investigated. Risk factors used in the analysis were family history of coronary disease, smoking, cholesterol, obesity, systotic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, blood sugar, uric acid, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and white blood unit. It was found that conventional, non-behavioral pattern risk factors alone were not significantly related to coronary heart disease.

  5. Chemotherapy Side Effects: A Cause of Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A cause of heart disease? Can chemotherapy side effects increase the risk of heart disease? Answers from Timothy J. Moynihan, M.D. Chemotherapy side effects may increase the risk of heart disease, including ...

  6. Isolated congenital heart block in undifferentiated connective tissue disease and in primary Sjögren’s syndrome: a clinical study of 81 pregnancies in 41 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Todesco

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the incidence and the features of congenital heart block (CHB in patients with undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD and primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS. Methods: We studied 81 pregnancies of 41 women attending the Outpatients’ Clinic of the Rheumatology Unit of University Hospital of Padova from July 1989 to March 2004. Twenty five of these (61% were affected with UCTD and 16 (39% with pSS. Serologic inclusion criteria was anti-Ro/La positivity, assessed by counterimmunoelectrophoresis and ELISA. Results: CHB was found in 2 out of the 46 (4,3% pregnancies followed by our Staff and in 2 out of the 35 (5,7% included in the retrospective part of the study. In 3 cases CHB was a 3rd degree block, causing pregnancy termination in 2. The only 2nd degree block was identified in one patient at the 22nd week of gestation and treated with dexamethasone and plasma-exchange. All of the women were positive to 52 kd and 60 kd Ro autoantibodies. CHB mothers had higher titer antibodies to 52 kd Ro protein than did the mothers with healthy infants (P = 0,026. Electrocardiographic abnormalities at birth were found in 3 out of 29 asymptomatic infants. One presented sinus bradycardia, the second abnormalities of ventricular repolarization, both regressed spontaneously, while the third ventricular extrasystoles which continue even now at 5 months. Conclusion: These results showed that in UCTD and pSS there is a higher incidence of CHB than that reported in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Electrocardiographic screening in all infants born to mothers with anti-Ro/La antibodies would seem an important measure to identify those with irreversible heart conduction abnormalities.

  7. Creatine Depletion and Altered Fatty Acid Metabolism in Diseased Human Hearts: Clinical Investigation Using 1H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and 123I BMIPP Myocardial Scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakae, I.; Mitsunami, K.; Matsuo, S.; Horie, M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: In the heart, the creatine kinase system plays an important role in energy reserves, and myocardial energy production essentially depends upon fatty acid metabolism. Purpose: To examine myocardial creatine (CR) concentration and altered cardiac fatty acid metabolism in various forms of heart disease. Material and Methods: Myocardial CR concentration of the septum was measured by gated 1 H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), applying a point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) sequence in 34 patients with heart disease. Of these patients, 14 underwent 123 I BMIPP (radioactive fatty acid analogue) myocardial scintigraphy to evaluate myocardial fatty acid metabolism. Cardiac 123 I BMIPP uptake was calculated as the heart-to-mediastinum count ratio. Results: Myocardial CR concentration correlated positively with the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) by echocardiography (R = 0.61, P 123 I BMIPP uptake also correlated positively with LVEF (initial image, R 0.60, P 123 I BMIPP uptake (initial image, R = 0.77, P<0.01; delayed image, R = 0.82, P<0.001; n = 14). Conclusion: Our study suggests an association between CR depletion and impaired fatty acid metabolism in various forms of heart diseases

  8. The tricuspid valve in adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginns, Jonathan; Ammash, Naser; Bernier, Pierre-Luc

    2014-01-01

    The tricuspid valve is frequently affected in adults with congenital heart disease but is also frequently overlooked. Disease of this valve can occur primarily or develop secondary to changes in the right ventricle caused by other disease states. The embryology and anatomy of the tricuspid valve are important to understanding pathogenesis of valve dysfunction in congenital heart disease. Clinical findings can be subtle. Multimodality imaging may be necessary to fully assess the cause and impact of tricuspid valve lesions. More research is needed in pathophysiology, imaging, and treatment in this area. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Heart failure in patients with kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuegel, Courtney; Bansal, Nisha

    2017-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and the population of CKD patients with concurrent HF continues to grow. The accurate diagnosis of HF is challenging in patients with CKD in part due to a lack of validated imaging and biomarkers specifically in this population. The pathophysiology between the heart and the kidneys is complex and bidirectional. Patients with CKD have greater prevalence of traditional HF risk factors as well as unique kidney-specific risk factors including malnutrition, acid-base alterations, uraemic toxins, bone mineral changes, anemia and myocardial stunning. These risk factors also contribute to the decline of kidney function seen in patients with subclinical and clinical HF. More targeted HF therapies may improve outcomes in patients with kidney disease as current HF therapies are underutilised in this population. Further work is also needed to develop novel HF therapies for the CKD population. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. The changing epidemiology of congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Bom, Teun; Zomer, A. Carla; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Meijboom, Folkert J.; Bouma, Berto J.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital disorder in newborns. Advances in cardiovascular medicine and surgery have enabled most patients to reach adulthood. Unfortunately, prolonged survival has been achieved at a cost, as many patients suffer late complications, of which heart

  11. Genetics Home Reference: critical congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MW, Willems PJ. Genetic factors in non-syndromic congenital heart malformations. Clin Genet. 2010 Aug;78(2):103-23. doi: 10.1111/j.1399-0004.2010.01435.x. Epub 2010 May 17. Review. Citation on ... genes in congenital heart disease. Nature. 2013 Jun 13;498(7453): ...

  12. Periodontal status affects C-reactive protein and lipids in patients with stable heart disease from a tertiary care cardiovascular clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Manuela F; Montenegro, Marlon M; Furtado, Mariana V; Polanczyk, Carisi A; Rösing, Cassiano K; Haas, Alex N

    2014-04-01

    There are scarce data on the impact of the periodontal condition in the control of biomarkers in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of this study is to assess whether periodontal inflammation and tissue breakdown are associated with C-reactive protein (CRP) and lipids in patients with stable heart disease. This cross-sectional study included 93 patients with stable coronary artery disease (57 males; mean age: 63.5 ± 9.8 years) who were in outpatient care for at least 6 months. After applying a structured questionnaire, periodontal examinations were performed by two calibrated periodontists in six sites per tooth at all teeth. Blood samples were collected from patients on the day of periodontal examination to determine levels of CRP, lipids, and glycated hemoglobin. Multiple linear regression models were fitted to evaluate the association among different periodontal and blood parameters controlling for sex, body mass index, glycated hemoglobin, use of oral hypoglycemic drugs, and smoking. Overall, the sample presented high levels of periodontal inflammation and tissue breakdown. Unadjusted mean concentrations of triglycerides (TGs), very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and glucose were significantly higher in individuals with severe periodontitis. When multiple linear regression models were applied, number of teeth with clinical attachment loss ≥6 mm and presence of severe periodontitis were significantly associated with higher CRP concentrations. Bleeding on probing was significantly associated with TGs, total cholesterol, and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In this sample of patients with stable CVD, current periodontal inflammation and tissue breakdown are associated with cardiovascular inflammatory markers, such as CRP and lipid profile.

  13. The pediatric heart network: meeting the challenges to multicenter studies in pediatric heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Kristin M; Pemberton, Victoria L; Pearson, Gail D

    2015-10-01

    Because of the relatively small numbers of pediatric patients with congenital heart disease cared for in any individual center, there is a significant need for multicenter clinical studies to validate new medical or surgical therapies. The Pediatric Heart Network (PHN), with 15 years of experience in multicenter clinical research, has tackled numerous challenges when conducting multicenter studies. This review describes the challenges encountered and the strategies employed to conduct high-quality, collaborative research in pediatric cardiovascular disease. Sharing lessons learned from the PHN can provide guidance to investigators interested in conducting pediatric multicenter studies.

  14. Measurement of frontal lobe volume and thalamic volume in fetuses with congenital heart disease at different gestational weeks using three dimensional ultra sonography and its clinical value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Fei, Zhu; Hong-Xiong, Liu; Ying, H E

    2016-11-01

    Our study aimed to investigate the measurement of frontal lobe volume and thalamic volume in fetuses with congenital heart disease (CHD) at different gestational weeks using three dimensional (3-D) ultrasonography and its clinical value. Then, 238 pregnant women who received obstetric ultrasonography in ultrasound department of Internal Medicine of our hospital were enrolled between March 2013 to April 2014. In this study, 85 fetuses were diagnosed to develop CHD by prenatal fetal echocardiography, and the other 153 fetuses were normal. Frontal lobe volume, thalamic volume and cerebral blood flow was determined by color Doppler ultrasonic diagnostic apparatus (type: GE Voluson E8). The level of MCA-PI and CPR in CHD fetus group performed significantly lower than that in normal fetus group (Pfrontal lobe volume between the two groups (Pfrontal lobe volume than that in normal fetus group (Pfrontal lobe volume and thalamic volume; if gestational age frontal lobe volume and thalamic volume in fetuses with CHD performed significantly lower than that in normal fetuses.

  15. The transcription factor GATA-2 does not associate with angiographic coronary artery disease in the Ottawa Heart Genomics and Cleveland Clinic GeneBank Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandona, Sonny; Chen, Li; Fan, Meng; Alam, Md Afaque; Assogba, Olivia; Belanger, Melanie; Williams, Kathryn; Wells, George A.; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Ellis, Stephen G.; Hazen, Stanley L.; McPherson, Ruth; Roberts, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The transcription factor GATA2 was reported to associate with coronary artery disease (CAD) in the family-based Genecard sample (Connelly et al. in PLoS Genet 2:e139, 2006). We asked whether GATA2 associates with sporadic cases of CAD in the Ottawa Heart Genomics Study (OHGS) and Cleveland Clinic (CC) populations. We genotyped the lead single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) from Genecard, rs2713604 which is located in intron 5–6 of GATA2 in 600 CAD cases and 625 controls, as well as a tag SNP rs1573949 (r2 = 0.87 in Caucasians of European ancestry in Utah from HapMap) in 1,136 cases and 1,162 controls in the OHGS1 population. A further 1,838 CAD cases and 913 controls derived from an independent sample combining genotypes from CC and OHGS2 populations were genotyped for rs1573949. Neither of the genotyped SNPs associates with CAD in the OHGS1 or CC/OHGS2 populations. Our data suggest that GATA2 does not contribute to the development of angiographic CAD among sporadic cases. PMID:19885677

  16. Interactive Whole-Heart Segmentation in Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Danielle F; Dalca, Adrian V; Geva, Tal; Powell, Andrew J; Moghari, Mehdi H; Golland, Polina

    2015-10-01

    We present an interactive algorithm to segment the heart chambers and epicardial surfaces, including the great vessel walls, in pediatric cardiac MRI of congenital heart disease. Accurate whole-heart segmentation is necessary to create patient-specific 3D heart models for surgical planning in the presence of complex heart defects. Anatomical variability due to congenital defects precludes fully automatic atlas-based segmentation. Our interactive segmentation method exploits expert segmentations of a small set of short-axis slice regions to automatically delineate the remaining volume using patch-based segmentation. We also investigate the potential of active learning to automatically solicit user input in areas where segmentation error is likely to be high. Validation is performed on four subjects with double outlet right ventricle, a severe congenital heart defect. We show that strategies asking the user to manually segment regions of interest within short-axis slices yield higher accuracy with less user input than those querying entire short-axis slices.

  17. Data and Statistics: Women and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Summary Coverdell Program 2012-2015 State Summaries Data & Statistics Fact Sheets Heart Disease and Stroke Fact Sheets ... Roadmap for State Planning Other Data Resources Other Statistic Resources Grantee Information Cross-Program Information Online Tools ...

  18. Anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A S; Idorn, L; Nørager, B

    2015-01-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease are a growing population. One of the major challenges in the care of these patients is to prevent thromboembolic episodes. Despite relative young age and no typical cardiovascular risk factors, this cohort has a high prevalence of thrombotic events....... Furthermore, there is a lack of scientific evidence regarding how to prevent thromboembolic events with anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature pertaining to anticoagulation in adults with congenital heart disease and hence enable....... It is difficult to use treatment algorithms from the general adult population with acquired heart disease in this heterogeneous population due to special conditions such as myocardial scarring after previous surgery, atypical atrial flutter, prothrombotic conditions and the presence of interatrial shunts...

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of valvular heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Lise; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1999-01-01

    The optimum management of patients with valvular heart diseases requires accurate and reproducible assessment of the valvular lesion and its hemodynamic consequences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, such as volume measurements, signal-void phenomena, and velocity mapping, can be used...... in an integrated approach to gain qualitative and quantitative information on valvular heart disease as well as ventricular dimensions and functions. Thus, MRI may be advantageous to the established diagnostic tools in assessing the severity of valvular heart disease as well as monitoring the lesion and predicting...... the optimal timing for valvular surgery. This paper reviews the validation of these MRI techniques in assessing valvular heart disease and discusses some typical pitfalls of the techniques, including suggestions for solutions.J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:627-638....

  20. Cardiac Arrhythmias In Congenital Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Khairy

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Arrhythmias figure prominently among the complications encountered in the varied and diverse population of patients with congenital heart disease, and are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The incidence generally increases as the patient ages, with multifactorial predisposing features that may include congenitally malformed or displaced conduction systems, altered hemodynamics, mechanical or hypoxic stress, and residual or postoperative sequelae. The safe and effective management of arrhythmias in congenital heart disease requires a thorough appreciation for conduction system variants, arrhythmia mechanisms, underlying anatomy, and associated physiology. We, therefore, begin this review by presenting the scope of the problem, outlining therapeutic options, and summarizing congenital heart disease-related conduction system anomalies associated with disorders of the sinus node and AV conduction system. Arrhythmias encountered in common forms of congenital heart disease are subsequently discussed. In so doing, we touch upon issues related to risk stratification for sudden death, implantable cardiac devices, catheter ablation, and adjuvant surgical therapy.

  1. Job Dissatisfaction and Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, Robert

    1976-01-01

    Based on the psychosocial factor that life dissatisfactions may be associated with physical illnesses, this research examines the relationship between job dissatisfaction and its causal link to premature death from heart disease. (Author/RK)

  2. Clinical heterogeneity in Fabry disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Salogub

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is an X-linked, lysosomal storage disease (OMIM: 301500, caused by α-galactosidase A deficiency, resulting in accumulation of its substrates, glycosphingolipids, primarily – globotriaosylceramide, in the lysosomes of multiple cell types with multi-system clinical manifestations, even within the same family, including abnormalities of the central and peripheral nervous system, kidneys, heart, gastrointestinal tract, lungs, organ of vision. Clinical heterogeneity is often the reason of the delayed diagnosis. Nowadays enzyme replacement therapy has proved its efficiency in the treatment of Fabry disease. Including Fabry disease in the differential diagnosis of a large range of disorders is important because of its wide clinical heterogeneity and the possibility of an earlier intervention with a beneficial treatment.

  3. Clinical Utility of a Coronary Heart Disease Risk Prediction Gene Score in UK Healthy Middle Aged Men and in the Pakistani Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E Beaney

    Full Text Available Numerous risk prediction algorithms based on conventional risk factors for Coronary Heart Disease (CHD are available but provide only modest discrimination. The inclusion of genetic information may improve clinical utility.We tested the use of two gene scores (GS in the prospective second Northwick Park Heart Study (NPHSII of 2775 healthy UK men (284 cases, and Pakistani case-control studies from Islamabad/Rawalpindi (321 cases/228 controls and Lahore (414 cases/219 controls. The 19-SNP GS included SNPs in loci identified by GWAS and candidate gene studies, while the 13-SNP GS only included SNPs in loci identified by the CARDIoGRAMplusC4D consortium.In NPHSII, the mean of both gene scores was higher in those who went on to develop CHD over 13.5 years of follow-up (19-SNP p=0.01, 13-SNP p=7x10-3. In combination with the Framingham algorithm the GSs appeared to show improvement in discrimination (increase in area under the ROC curve, 19-SNP p=0.48, 13-SNP p=0.82 and risk classification (net reclassification improvement (NRI, 19-SNP p=0.28, 13-SNP p=0.42 compared to the Framingham algorithm alone, but these were not statistically significant. When considering only individuals who moved up a risk category with inclusion of the GS, the improvement in risk classification was statistically significant (19-SNP p=0.01, 13-SNP p=0.04. In the Pakistani samples, risk allele frequencies were significantly lower compared to NPHSII for 13/19 SNPs. In the Islamabad study, the mean gene score was higher in cases than controls only for the 13-SNP GS (2.24 v 2.34, p=0.04. There was no association with CHD and either score in the Lahore study.The performance of both GSs showed potential clinical utility in European men but much less utility in subjects from Pakistan, suggesting that a different set of risk loci or SNPs may be required for risk prediction in the South Asian population.

  4. Postnatal Cardiac Autonomic Nervous Control in Pediatric Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ineke Nederend

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital defect. During childhood, survival is generally good but, in adulthood, late complications are not uncommon. Abnormal autonomic control in children with congenital heart disease may contribute considerably to the pathophysiology of these long term sequelae. This narrative review of 34 studies aims to summarize current knowledge on function of the autonomic nervous system in children with a congenital heart defect. Large scale studies that measure both branches of the nervous system for prolonged periods of time in well-defined patient cohorts in various phases of childhood and adolescence are currently lacking. Pending such studies, there is not yet a good grasp on the extent and direction of sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic function in pediatric congenital heart disease. Longitudinal studies in homogenous patient groups linking autonomic nervous system function and clinical outcome are warranted.

  5. [Hypothyroidism in patients with heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiskra, Jan

    Hypothyroidism is frequently found in patients with heart disease. It is a risk factor for atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease and has a direct negative effect on both the left and right ventricular functions (hypothyroidism-induced cardiomyopathy). The confirmed manifest hypothyroidism is always a reason for replacement therapy with levothyroxine; regarding patients with heart disease, we always begin treatment with a small dose and increase it gradually. The treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism in patients with heart disease is disputable and its benefits probably depend on age. At a higher age, the therapy-related risks often outweigh its benefits, so we make do with the target levels of the thyroid stimulating hormone being within the upper band of the normal range, or even slightly above it, rather than overdosing the patient. To summarize in a simplified way, the treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism in patients with heart disease is the most effective in younger individuals, mainly those aged below 65, while at a higher age > 80 years the risk usually outweighs the benefit.Key words: cardiovascular risk - hypothyroidism - ischemic heart disease - left ventricular dysfunction - right ventricular dysfunction - subclinical hypothyroidism - thyroid peroxidase antibodies.

  6. Right ventricular strain in heart failure: Clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadic, Marijana; Pieske-Kraigher, Elisabeth; Cuspidi, Cesare; Morris, Daniel A; Burkhardt, Franziska; Baudisch, Ana; Haßfeld, Sabine; Tschöpe, Carsten; Pieske, Burket

    2017-10-01

    The number of studies demonstrating the importance of right ventricular remodelling in a wide range of cardiovascular diseases has increased in the past two decades. Speckle-tracking imaging provides new variables that give comprehensive information about right ventricular function and mechanics. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of right ventricular mechanics in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and preserved ejection fraction. We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, Ovid and Embase databases for studies published from January 2000 to December 2016 in the English language using the following keywords: "right ventricle"; "strain"; "speckle tracking"; "heart failure with reduced ejection fraction"; and "heart failure with preserved ejection fraction". Investigations showed that right ventricular dysfunction is associated with higher cardiovascular and overall mortality in patients with heart failure, irrespective of ejection fraction. The number of studies investigating right ventricular strain in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction is constantly increasing, whereas data on right ventricular mechanics in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction are limited. Given the high feasibility, accuracy and clinical implications of right ventricular strain in the population with heart failure, it is of great importance to try to include the evaluation of right ventricular strain as a regular part of each echocardiographic examination in patients with heart failure. However, further investigations are necessary to establish right ventricular strain as a standard variable for decision-making. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Clarithromycin for stable coronary heart disease increases all-cause and cardiovascular mortality and cerebrovascular morbidity over 10years in the CLARICOR randomised, blinded clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkel, Per; Hilden, Jørgen; Hansen, Jørgen Fischer

    2015-01-01

    -cause mortality (hazard ratio (HR): 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.00-1.21) and cerebrovascular disease during 10years (HR: 1.19, 95% CI: 1.02-1.38). The increased mortality and morbidity were restricted to patients not on statin at entry (HR: 1.16, 95% CI: 1.04-1.31, and HR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1...... death outside hospital and cerebrovascular morbidity in patients with stable coronary heart disease who were not on statin. The increased cardiovascular mortality was years later compensated, likely through frailty attrition.......BACKGROUND: The CLARICOR trial reported that clarithromycin compared with placebo increased all-cause mortality in patients with stable coronary heart disease. This study investigates the effects of clarithromycin versus placebo during 10years follow up. METHODS: The CLARICOR trial is a randomised...

  8. Gender and the treatment of heart disease in older persons in the United States, France, and England: a comparative, population-based view of a clinical phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisz, Daniel; Gusmano, Michael K; Rodwin, Victor G

    2004-08-01

    Gender disparities in the treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD) have been extensively documented in studies from the United States. However, they have been less well studied in other countries and, to our knowledge, have not been investigated at the more disaggregated spatial level of cities. This study tests the hypothesis that there is a common international pattern of gender disparity in the treatment of CAD in persons aged > or =65 years by analyzing data from the United States, France, and England and from their largest cities-New York City and its outer boroughs, Paris and its First Ring, and Greater London. This was an ecological study based on a retrospective analysis of comparable administrative data from government health databases for the 9 spatial units of analysis: the 3 countries, their 3 largest cities, and the urban cores of these 3 cities. A simple index was used to assess the relationship between treatment rates and a measure of CAD prevalence by gender among age-adjusted cohorts of patients. Differences in rates were examined by univariate analysis using the Student t test for statistical differences in mean values. Despite differences in health system characteristics, including health insurance coverage, availability of medical resources, and medical culture, we found consistent gender differences in rates of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and coronary artery bypass grafting across the 9 spatial units. The rate of interventional treatment in women with CAD was less than half that in men. This difference persisted after adjustment for the prevalence of heart disease. A consistent pattern of gender disparity in the interventional treatment of CAD was seen across 3 national health systems with known differences in patterns of medical practice. This finding is consistent with the results of clinical studies suggesting that gender disparities in the treatment of CAD are due at least in part to the underdiagnosis of CAD in women.

  9. Clinical characteristics and causes of heart failure, adherence to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical characteristics and causes of heart failure, adherence to treatment guidelines, and mortality of patients with acute heart failure: Experience at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa.

  10. Clinical service organisation for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Andrea; Taylor, Stephanie J C; Taylor, Rod S; Khan, Faisal; Krum, Henry; Underwood, Martin

    2012-09-12

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a serious, common condition associated with frequent hospitalisation. Several different disease management interventions (clinical service organisation interventions) for patients with CHF have been proposed. To update the previously published review which assessed the effectiveness of disease management interventions for patients with CHF. A number of databases were searched for the updated review: CENTRAL, (the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) and DARE, on The Cochrane Library, ( Issue 1 2009); MEDLINE (1950-January 2009); EMBASE (1980-January 2009); CINAHL (1982-January 2009); AMED (1985-January 2009). For the original review (but not the update) we had also searched: Science Citation Index Expanded (1981-2001); SIGLE (1980-2003); National Research Register (2003) and NHS Economic Evaluations Database (2001). We also searched reference lists of included studies for both the original and updated reviews. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with at least six months follow up, comparing disease management interventions specifically directed at patients with CHF to usual care. At least two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed study quality. Study authors were contacted for further information where necessary. Data were analysed and presented as odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Twenty five trials (5,942 people) were included. Interventions were classified by: (1) case management interventions (intense monitoring of patients following discharge often involving telephone follow up and home visits); (2) clinic interventions (follow up in a CHF clinic) and (3) multidisciplinary interventions (holistic approach bridging the gap between hospital admission and discharge home delivered by a team). The components, intensity and duration of the interventions varied, as did the 'usual care' comparator provided in different trials.Case management interventions were associated with reduction in all

  11. Evaluation of a Clinical Pharmacist Intervention on Clinical and Drug-Related Problems Among Coronary Heart Disease Inpatients: A pre-experimental prospective study at a general hospital in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vina A. Sagita

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the role of a clinical pharmacist intervention in decreasing subsequent clinical and drug-related problems (DRPs among coronary heart disease (CHD inpatients with at least one previous DRP. Methods: This pre-experimental study with a pre-post design was carried out from January to April 2017 among inpatients with at least one previous DRP at a general hospital in Tangerang District, Banten, Indonesia. Clinical and DRPs were documented prospectively by a clinical pharmacist, with DRPs classified using Version 6.2 of the DRP classification scheme of the Pharmaceutical Care Network Europe Foundation. The intervention consisted of a discussion of identified DRPs with physicians, patients, pharmaceutical logistics clerks, nurses and nutritionists. Following this, any subsequent clinical and DRPs were re-identified and further interventions were conducted as necessary. Results: A total of 75 inpatients were included in the study. Pre-intervention, there were 443 DRPs and 202 clinical problems. The most frequent DRPs were adverse drug reactions (52.6%, followed by drug effects (41.8%. Most DRPs were of moderate severity and would have resulted in moderate consequences had the pharmacist not intervened. The interventions resulted in a significant reduction in the number of DRPs, type of DRPs and number of clinical problems (P <0.05 each. Patients with complications were 26.047 times more likely to have no reduction or an increased number of clinical problems compared to patients without complications (P <0.05. Conclusion: Clinical pharmacist interventions were found to reduce subsequent DRPs and clinical problems among CHD patients with at least one previous DRP.

  12. How to Prevent Heart Disease: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease - At Any Age (American Heart Association) Red Wine and Resveratrol: Good for Your Heart? (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research) Time to Talk: Five Things to Know about Omega-3s for Heart Disease (National Center for ...

  13. Nocturnal breathing in cyanotic congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legault, Sylvie; Lanfranchi, Paola; Montplaisir, Jacques; Nielsen, Tore; Dore, Annie; Khairy, Paul; Marcotte, François; Mercier, Lise-Andrée

    2008-08-18

    Sleep disordered breathing is frequently observed in patients with cardiovascular disease. Even in the absence of heart disease, acute and chronic hypoxia have been shown to promote sleep-related periodic breathing with central apnea characterized by a repetitive reduction or lack of respiratory activity. Cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) is associated with chronic hypoxia, regardless of whether an increase in pulmonary artery pressures coexists. Sleep aggravated hypoxia has been observed in many such patients, but it remains to be determined whether sleep disordered breathing is contributory. We, therefore, sought to assess sleep-related breathing pattern in patients with CCHD. Adults with CCHD, resting arterial oxygen saturation 40% were prospectively enrolled in a cross-sectional study. To assess sleep and respiratory indices, subjects underwent a standardized clinical appraisal that included arterial blood gas analysis and a comprehensive sleep study with an ambulatory device. An apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) >or=5/h was considered to indicate sleep apnea. Ten adults with CCHD, aged 38+/-11 years, completed the study. Seven patients had elevated pulmonary artery pressures, with a mean systolic pressure of 86.3+/-18.1 mm Hg. All patients demonstrated normal sleep parameters. Oxygen saturation further declined in 5 patients during sleep. However, no associated alteration in respiratory parameters was observed and no significant arrhythmia. The mean AHI was 1.1+/-1.0/h. No subject met the pre-defined criterion for sleep apnea. Although further oxygen desaturation may be observed during sleep in patients with CCHD, it occurs in the absence of sleep disordered breathing.

  14. The second rheumatic heart disease forum report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zühlke, Liesl J; Engel, Mark E; Remenyi, Bo; Wyber, Rosemary; Carapetis, Jonathan

    2013-09-01

    The second rheumatic heart disease (RHD) forum was held on February 18, 2013, at the Sixth World Congress of Pediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery in Cape Town, South Africa, to focus attention on key areas in global RHD control, management, and prevention. Building on the foundation of the first RHD forum, over 150 interested participants met to discuss critical issues on the RHD landscape. Unique to this meeting was a mixture of diverse backgrounds and disciplines, all crucially important to the conversation around RHD control and prevention. Some clear priorities have emerged for RHD activities in the next era: the necessity for political intervention and policy change; increasing the health workforce by incorporating teaching, training, and task-shifting; revitalizing the research agenda by merging basic, clinical, and translational research; and obtaining universal access to high-quality penicillin. There was also an urgent request for new resources; for existing resources to be further developed, improved, and shared across platforms; and for resources to be supported in the nonmedical arena. Finally, the necessity of involving the patient community in the ongoing discussion was highlighted. The participants of both the first and second RHD forum represent a new, thriving, and growing community of RHD activists who should usher in a new era of significant improvements in RHD control and prevention. Copyright © 2013 World Heart Federation (Geneva). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Congenital Heart Disease and Impacts on Child Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Alievi Mari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To evaluate the child development and evaluate a possible association with the commitment by biopsychosocial factors of children with and without congenital heart disease. Methods: Observational study of case-control with three groups: Group 1 - children with congenital heart disease without surgical correction; Group 2 - children with congenital heart disease who underwent surgery; and Group 3 - healthy children. Children were assessed by socio-demographic and clinical questionnaire and the Denver II Screening Test. Results: One hundred and twenty eight children were evaluated, 29 in Group 1, 43 in Group 2 and 56 in Group 3. Of the total, 51.56% are girls and ages ranged from two months to six years (median 24.5 months. Regarding the Denver II, the children with heart disease had more "suspicious" and "suspect/abnormal" ratings and in the group of healthy children 53.6% were considered with "normal" development (P≤0.0001. The biopsychosocial variables that were related to a possible developmental delay were gender (P=0.042, child's age (P=0.001 and income per capita (P=0.019. Conclusion: The results suggest that children with congenital heart disease are likely to have a developmental delay with significant difference between children who have undergone surgery and those awaiting surgery under clinical follow-up.

  16. Clinical Value of Left Ventricular Wall Motion Assessment with Pulsed-Wave Tissue Doppler Echocardiography for Rejection Monitoring and Allograft Coronary Artery Disease Surveillance After Heart Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Dandel, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The usefulness of pulsed-wave tissue Doppler imaging (PW-TDI) for detection of ventricular dysfunction linked to acute rejection (AR) and transplant coronary disease (TxCAD) in order to optimize invasive examination timing was assessed over several years in a large number of heart transplant recipients. The results validate wall motion assessment by PW-TDI as being particularly suited for the early detection of LV functional alterations linked to AR and TxCAD and commend this simple echocardi...

  17. Anesthesia in pregnancy with heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Luthra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of pregnant women with heart disease remains challenging due to the advancement of innovations in cardiac surgery and correction of complex cardiac anomalies, and more recently, with the successful performance of heart transplants, cardiac diseases are not only likely to coexist with pregnancy, but will also increase in frequency over the years to come. In developing countries with a higher prevalence of rheumatic fever, cardiac disease may complicate as many as 5.9% of pregnancies with a high incidence of maternal death. Since many of these deaths occur during or immediately following parturition, heart disease is of special importance to the anesthesiologist. This importance arises from the fact that drugs used for preventing or relieving pain during labor and delivery exert a major influence – for better or for worse – on the prognosis of the mother and newborn. Properly administered anesthesia and analgesia can contribute to the reduction of maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity.

  18. Stress echo for evaluation of valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavagal, S T; Deshpande, Niteen; Admane, Parag

    2014-01-01

    Resting echocardiography is the most important tool for diagnosing valvular heart disease. However, treatment planning in valvular heart diseases may require additional information in some patients, particularly asymptomatic patients with severe valve disease or symptomatic patients with moderate disease. Stress echocardiography provides invaluable information in these situations and aids decision making. Stress echocardiography is performed using either physical stress or dobutamine stress and various valve parameters are monitored during the stress. Further, the ventricular performance, which is an important determinant of outcome in valve disease is also closely monitored during stress which helps immensely in planning the intervention. Lastly, possibility of associated coronary artery disease can also be evaluated, especially in the elderly. This article discusses the role of stress evaluation in assessment of valve disease in the commonly encountered clinical situations. Copyright © 2014 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The educational gradient in coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariansen, Inger; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Igland, Jannicke

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Independently of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, cognitive ability may account for some of the excess risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) associated with lower education. We aimed to assess how late adolescence cognitive ability and midlife CVD risk factors are associated...

  20. Heart Disease and Stroke in Women

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-11

    This women's health podcast focuses on the impact of heart disease and stroke in women and includes steps to prevent these conditions.  Created: 5/11/2009 by Office of Women’s Health (OWH) and National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/11/2009.

  1. Impact of esomeprazole on platelet reactivity and clinical outcome according to CYP2C19 genotype in coronary heart disease patients during dual antiplatelet therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokimoto, Seiji; Akasaka, Tomonori; Tabata, Noriaki; Arima, Yuichiro; Tsujita, Kenichi; Sakamoto, Kenji; Kaikita, Koichi; Morita, Kazunori; Kumagae, Naoki; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Oniki, Kentaro; Nakagawa, Kazuko; Ogawa, Hisao

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of CYP2C19 polymorphism and co-therapy with esomeprazole on the antiplatelet efficacy of clopidogrel. The antiplatelet efficacy of clopidogrel depends on CYP2C19 polymorphism or the co-administration of some kind of proton pump inhibitor (PPI). CYP2C19 genotype and the residual platelet reactivity (RPR) were measured in 361 coronary heart disease patients (male, mean age 69yrs), and the risk of cardiovascular events over a 3-month follow-up was assessed to evaluate the impact of co-administration of esomeprazole during dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel. The values of RPR did not differ between esomeprazole and non-esomeprazole groups (4389 ± 1112 versus 4079 ± 1355 AU·min, P=0.103). RPR value was higher in intermediate metabolizers (IM) than in extensive metabolizers (EM) (4089 ± 1252 versus 3697 ± 1215 AU·min P=0.012) and, similarly, higher in poor metabolizers (PM) than in IM (4884 ± 1027 versus 4089 ± 1252 AU·min, Pesomeprazole and non-esomeprazole groups according to CYP2C19 genotype (EM, 3954 ± 1192 versus 3645 ± 1220 AU·min, P=0.361; IM, 4401 ± 1063 versus 4051 ± 1271 AU·min, P=0.293; PM, 4917 ± 669 versus 4876 ± 1099 AU·min, P=0.907, respectively). There was also no difference in clinical outcomes between esomeprazole and non-esomeprazole groups in the three-month follow-up (0% versus 0.92%, P=0.487). These results suggest that concomitant use of esomeprazole with clopidogrel is not associated with reduced antiplatelet efficacy of clopidogrel or increased risk of cardiovascular events, irrespective of CYP2C19 genotype. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Secondary prevention clinics for coronary heart disease: a 10-year follow-up of a randomised controlled trial in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, E K; Murchie, P; Lee, A J; Ritchie, L D; Campbell, N C

    2008-11-01

    To evaluate the effects of nurse-led secondary prevention clinics for coronary heart disease (CHD) in primary care on total mortality and coronary event rates after 10 years. Follow-up of a randomised controlled trial by review of national datasets. Stratified random sample of 19 general practices in northeast Scotland. Original study cohort of 1343 patients, aged coronary events (non-fatal myocardial infarctions (MIs) and coronary deaths). Mean (SD) follow-up was at 10.2 (0.19) years. No significant differences in total mortality or coronary events were found at 10 years. 254 patients in the intervention group and 277 patients in the control group had died: cumulative death rates were 38% and 41%, respectively (p = 0.177). 196 coronary events occurred in the intervention group and 195 in the control group: cumulative event rates were 29.1% and 29.1%, respectively (p = 0.994). When Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, adjusted for age, sex and general practice, was used, proportional hazard ratios were 0.88 (0.74 to 1.04) for total mortality and 0.96 (0.79 to 1.18) for coronary death or non-fatal MI. No significant differences in the distribution of cause of death classifications was found at either 4 or 10 years. After 10 years, differences between groups were no longer significant. Total mortality survival curves for the intervention and control groups had not converged, but the coronary event survival curves had. Possibly, therefore, the earlier that secondary prevention is optimised, the less likely a subsequent coronary event is to prove fatal.

  3. Imaging congenital heart disease in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilner, P J

    2011-12-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography is the first-line modality for cardiovascular imaging in adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD). The windows of access that are possible with transthoracic echocardiography are, however, rarely adequate for all regions of interest. The choice of further imaging depends on the clinical questions that remain to be addressed. The strengths of MRI include comprehensive access and coverage, providing imaging of all parts of the right ventricle, the pulmonary arteries, pulmonary veins and aorta. Cine images and velocity maps are acquired in specifically aligned planes, with stacks of cines or dynamic contrast angiography providing more comprehensive coverage. Tissues can be characterised if necessary, and MRI provides relatively accurate measurements of biventricular function and volume flow. These parameters are important in the assessment and follow-up of adults after repairs for tetralogy of Fallot or transposition of the great arteries and after Fontan operations. The superior spatial resolution and rapid acquisition of CT are invaluable in selected situations, including the visualisation of anomalous coronary or aortopulmonary collateral arteries, the assessment of luminal patency after stenting and imaging in patients with pacemakers. Ionising radiation is, however, a concern in younger patients who may need repeated investigation. Adults with relatively complex conditions should ideally be imaged in a specialist ACHD centre, where dedicated echocardiographic and cardiovascular MRI services are a necessary facility. General radiologists should be aware of the nature and pathophysiology of congenital heart disease, and should be alert for previously undiagnosed cases presenting in adulthood, including cases of atrial septal defect, aortic coarctation, patent ductus arteriosus, double-chambered right ventricle and congenitally corrected transposition.

  4. Management of newborns with duct-dependent congenital heart disease with prostaglandin E1 – Slovenian guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojca Grošelj Grenc

    2012-02-01

    Conclusions: It is critical to start with PGE1 infusion as soon as we clinically suspect ductdependent congenital heart disease. With this approach, morbidity and mortality of newborns with congenital heart disease is significantly reduced.

  5. Effect of infectious diseases on outcome after heart transplant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beek, Diederik; Kremers, Walter K.; del Pozo, Jose L.; Daly, Richard C.; Edwards, Brooks S.; McGregor, Christopher G. A.; Patel, Robin

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine how often cardiac allograft recipients develop infectious diseases and how the infections affect these patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively studied 313 patients who underwent heart transplant at Mayo Clinic's site in Rochester, MN, from January 1, 1988, through

  6. Whole population secondary prevention of coronary heart disease in Scotland: the HEARTS database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Frank M; Donnan, Peter T; Love, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Implementing the evidence base for the management of chronic disease is as challenging as discovering which interventions are effective. The HEARTS collaboration (Heart disease Evidence-based Audit and Research in Tayside Scotland) is achieving that goal for the secondary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD by linking national databases to manually validated hospital and family practice electronic patient records. Specific data from the system is fed back to practices in a facilitated educational process and through the NHS intranet. This paper describes some of the key features of this strategic decision support system. All residents of the Tayside region of Scotland (n=484,013 mid year estimate 2002) are covered by the system. 9,828 patients who have suffered a myocardial infarction(MI) or who have undergone angioplasty or bypass surgery are registered on the system. Improvements in clinical status and prescribing of effective therapies are 5-10% greater than elsewhere in Scotland.

  7. Towards the standardization of stem cell therapy studies for ischemic heart diseases: Bridging the gap between animal models and the clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Fábio; Leite-Moreira, Adelino; Ferreira-Martins, João; Ferreira, Rita; Falcão-Pires, Inês; Vitorino, Rui

    2017-02-01

    Today there is an increasing demand for heart transplantations for patients diagnosed with heart failure. Though, shortage of donors as well as the large number of ineligible patients hurdle such treatment option. This, in addition to the considerable number of transplant rejections, has driven the clinical research towards the field of regenerative medicine. Nonetheless, to date, several stem cell therapies tested in animal models fall by the wayside and when they meet the criteria to clinical trials, subjects often exhibit modest improvements. A main issue slowing down the admission of such therapies in the domain of human trials is the lack of protocol standardization between research groups, which hampers comparison between different approaches as well as the lack of thought regarding the clinical translation. In this sense, given the large amount of reports on stem cell therapy studies in animal models reported in the last 3years, we sought to evaluate their advantages and limitations towards the clinical setting and provide some suggestions for the forthcoming investigations. We expect, with this review, to start a new paradigm on regenerative medicine, by evoking the debate on how to plan novel stem cell therapy studies with animal models in order to achieve more consistent scientific production and accelerate the admission of stem cell therapies in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical characteristics, response to exercise training, and outcomes in patients with heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: findings from Heart Failure and A Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of Exercise TraiNing (HF-ACTION).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentz, Robert J; Schulte, Phillip J; Fleg, Jerome L; Fiuzat, Mona; Kraus, William E; Piña, Ileana L; Keteyian, Steven J; Kitzman, Dalane W; Whellan, David J; Ellis, Stephen J; O'Connor, Christopher M

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristics, exercise training response, β-blocker selectivity, and outcomes in patients with heart failure (HF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We performed an analysis of HF-ACTION, which randomized 2,331 patients with HF having an ejection fraction of ≤35% to usual care with or without aerobic exercise training. We examined clinical characteristics and outcomes (mortality/hospitalization, mortality, cardiovascular [CV] mortality/CV hospitalization, and CV mortality/HF hospitalization) by physician-reported COPD status using adjusted Cox models and explored an interaction with exercise training. The interaction between β-blocker cardioselectivity and outcomes was investigated. Of patients with COPD status documented (n = 2311), 11% (n = 249) had COPD. Patients with COPD were older, had more comorbidities, and had lower use of β-blockers compared with those without COPD. At baseline, patients with COPD had lower peak oxygen consumption and higher V(E)/V(CO)(2) slope. During a median follow-up of 2.5 years, COPD was associated with increased mortality/hospitalization, mortality, and CV mortality/HF hospitalization. After multivariable adjustment, the risk of CV mortality/HF hospitalization remained increased (hazard ratio [HR] 1.46, 95% CI 1.14-1.87), whereas mortality/hospitalization (HR 1.15, 95% CI 0.96-1.37) and mortality (HR 1.33, 95% CI 0.99-1.76) were not significantly increased. There was no interaction between COPD and exercise training on outcomes or between COPD and β-blocker selectivity on mortality/hospitalization (all P > .1). Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with HF was associated with older age, more comorbidities, reduced exercise capacity, and increased CV mortality/HF hospitalization, but not a differential response to exercise training. β-Blocker selectivity was not associated with differences in outcome for patients with vs without COPD

  9. Heart failure as an endpoint in heart failure and non-heart failure cardiovascular clinical trials: the need for a consensus definition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zannad, F.; Stough, W.G.; Pitt, B.

    2008-01-01

    Specific criteria have been established to define the occurrence of myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke in cardiovascular clinical trials, but there is not a consistent definition for heart failure. Heart failure events appear to occur at a rate that is similar to stroke and MI in trials...... of hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, and coronary heart disease, yet a consistent approach to defining heart failure events has not yet been realized. The wide range of definitions used in clinical trials makes it difficult to interpret new data in the context of existing literature. This inconsistency has...... led to challenges in determining the incidence of heart failure in cardiovascular studies and the effects of interventions on these endpoints. This paper examines issues related to defining heart failure events in cardiovascular clinical trials and presents a definition to formally address this issue...

  10. Heart failure as an endpoint in heart failure and non-heart failure cardiovascular clinical trials: the need for a consensus definition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zannad, F.; Stough, W.G.; Pitt, B.

    2008-01-01

    of hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, diabetes, and coronary heart disease, yet a consistent approach to defining heart failure events has not yet been realized. The wide range of definitions used in clinical trials makes it difficult to interpret new data in the context of existing literature. This inconsistency has......Specific criteria have been established to define the occurrence of myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke in cardiovascular clinical trials, but there is not a consistent definition for heart failure. Heart failure events appear to occur at a rate that is similar to stroke and MI in trials...... led to challenges in determining the incidence of heart failure in cardiovascular studies and the effects of interventions on these endpoints. This paper examines issues related to defining heart failure events in cardiovascular clinical trials and presents a definition to formally address this issue...

  11. Chagas Heart Disease: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Lindsey H; Singh, Gagan D; Amsterdam, Ezra A

    2015-11-01

    Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, results from infection by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, and is a major cause of cardiac disease worldwide. Until recently, Chagas disease was confined to those areas of South and Central America where Trypanosoma cruzi is endemic. With the migration of infected individuals, however, the disease has spread, and it is estimated that 6-7 million people worldwide are infected. In the US alone, more than 7 million people from Trypanosoma cruzi-endemic countries became legal US residents by the turn of the century, resulting in a surge of Chagas disease in this country. According to preliminary estimates, the US now ranks seventh in the Western Hemisphere in number of individuals infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, and the disease has become a major public health concern due to limited awareness in the medical community. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Short Telomere Length and Ischemic Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madrid, Alexander Scheller; Rode, Line; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Short telomeres are associated with aging and have been associated with a high risk of ischemic heart disease in observational studies; however, the latter association could be due to residual confounding and/or reverse causation. We wanted to test the hypothesis that short telomeres...... are associated with high risk of ischemic heart disease using a Mendelian randomization approach free of reverse causation and of most confounding. METHODS: We genotyped 3 genetic variants in OBFC1 (oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding fold containing 1), TERT (telomerase reverse transcriptase), and TERC...... (telomerase RNA component), which code for proteins and RNA involved in telomere maintenance. We studied 105 055 individuals from Copenhagen; 17 235 of these individuals were diagnosed with ischemic heart disease between 1977 and 2013, and 66 618 had telomere length measured. For genetic studies, we further...

  13. Adult congenital heart disease: the patient's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstappen, Amy; Pearson, Disty; Kovacs, Adrienne H

    2006-11-01

    This article presents the adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) patient "voice" by high-lighting issues and challenges commonly identified in peer support forums but rarely addressed in the existing literature. Representative patient quotations are provided, and relevant research on patient education and psychosocial function is referenced. Issues discussed include the provision of overly pessimistic and overly optimistic prognoses, common patient misperceptions and knowledge gaps, frustrations and dangerous encounters in the medical system, and living with invisible disabilities. Patient self-perception of congenital heart disease, the gifts of congenital heart disease, and the role of patient associations are also discussed. For each issue identified, implications for the ACHD health professional are outlined and recommendations for best practices are made.

  14. The association between early menopause and risk of ischaemic heart disease: Influence of Hormone Therapy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, E; Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic; Heitmann, B L

    2006-01-01

    Randomised clinical trials find no protection against development of ischaemic heart disease by use of Hormone Therapy (HT) after the age of 50 years. Observational studies suggest that early menopause is a risk factor for ischaemic heart disease. Yet, a clinical very relevant question is whether...... HT reduces this risk associated with early menopause....

  15. Pulmonary Hypertension secondary to Left Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabbach, Ghazal; Mukherjee, Debabrata

    2017-09-12

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) related to left heart disease (LHD) is the most common form of PH, accounting for more than two third of all PH cases. The hemodynamic abnormalities seen in PH-LHD are complex, and there are currently minimal evidence-based recommendations for the management of PH-LHD. While it is accepted that PH in the context of left heart disease is a marker of worse prognosis, it remains unclear whether its primary treatment is beneficial or harmful. In this article, we discuss the prevalence and significance of PH in patients with heart failure (HF) with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) as well as HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), and those with valvular heart disease and provide insights into the complex pathophysiology of cardiopulmonary interrelationship in individuals with PH due to left heart disease. Furthermore, we provide a framework for diagnostic testing and an approach to optimal management of these complex patients based on current European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Ischemic Heart Disease: Special Considerations in Cardio-Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giza, Dana Elena; Boccalandro, Fernando; Lopez-Mattei, Juan; Iliescu, Gloria; Karimzad, Kaveh; Kim, Peter; Iliescu, Cezar

    2017-05-01

    The interplay and balance between the competing morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases and cancer have a significant impact on both short- and long-term health outcomes of patients who survived cancer or are being treated for cancer. Ischemic heart disease in patients with cancer or caused by cancer therapy is a clinical problem of emerging importance. Prompt recognition and optimum management of ischemic heart disease mean that patients with cancer can successfully receive therapies to treat their malignancy and reduce morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular disease. In this sense, the presence of cancer and cancer-related comorbidities (e.g., thrombocytopenia, propensity to bleed, thrombotic status) substantially complicates the management of cardiovascular diseases in cancer patients. In this review, we will summarize the current state of knowledge on the management strategies for ischemic disease in patients with cancer, focusing on the challenges encountered when addressing these complexities.

  17. Epidemiology of congenital heart disease in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdester Cavalcante Pinto Júnior

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction:Congenital heart disease is an abnormality in the structure or cardiocirculatory function, occurring from birth, even if diagnosed later. It can result in intrauterine death in childhood or in adulthood. Accounted for 6% of infant deaths in Brazil in 2007.Objective:To estimate underreporting in the prevalence of congenital heart disease in Brazil and its subtypes.Methods:The calculations of prevalence were performed by applying coefficients, giving them function rates for calculations of health problems. The study makes an approach between the literature and the governmental registries. It was adopted an estimate of 9: 1000 births and prevalence rates for subtypes applied to births of 2010. Estimates of births with congenital heart disease were compared with the reports to the Ministry of Health and were studied by descriptive methods with the use of rates and coefficients represented in tables.Results:The incidence in Brazil is 25,757 new cases/year, distributed in: North 2,758; Northeast 7,570; Southeast 10,112; South 3,329; and Midwest 1,987. In 2010, were reported to System of Live Birth Information of Ministry of Health 1,377 cases of babies with congenital heart disease, representing 5.3% of the estimated for Brazil. In the same period, the most common subtypes were: ventricular septal defect (7,498; atrial septal defect (4,693; persistent ductus arteriosus (2,490; pulmonary stenosis (1,431; tetralogy of Fallot (973; coarctation of the aorta (973; transposition of the great arteries (887; and aortic stenosis 630. The prevalence of congenital heart disease, for the year of 2009, was 675,495 children and adolescents and 552,092 adults.Conclusion:In Brazil, there is underreporting in the prevalence of congenital heart disease, signaling the need for adjustments in the methodology of registration.

  18. Relationship between stress and coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurd, Bushra Jawaid; Dar, Mudassir Iqbal; Shoaib, Maria; Malik, Laraib; Aijaz, Zobia; Asif, Iqra

    2014-02-01

    Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide and accounts for 13.7% of deaths in countries like Pakistan. Its association with stress has not been well considered in our setup. Patients with coronary artery disease admitted for coronary artery bypass grafting may have a high prevalence of stress that might increase the risk of adverse outcomes. 60 patients with coronary artery disease admitted to the Civil Hospital Karachi for coronary artery bypass graft surgery from January 1 to March 31, 2012, were evaluated using a stress evaluation scale. Stress of varying degrees was found to be a significant independent risk factor in patients with coronary heart disease. Analysis of our collected sample of patients with stress showed 60% with high stress (p = 0.025) and 36.7% moderate stress (p = 0.0025). An appreciable relationship was found between stress and patient age, sex, body mass index, blood group, and the incidence of myocardial infarction. Our study found evidence of an independent causative association between psychological stress and coronary heart disease, of a similar order to the more conventional coronary heart disease risk factors.

  19. [Dizziness in patients with heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuesen, Leif; May, Ole; Brorholt-Petersen, Jens Uffe; Christensen, Per Dahl

    2013-11-04

    In patients with heart disease, dizziness is primarily associated with syncope or pre-syncope and mandates further investigation to obtain a specific diagnosis, estimation of risk of sudden death and treatment options. After a focused history and physical examination, the cause of the problem may be determined in more than half of the patients. The reflex syncope is by far the most common form and may usually be handled by reassurance of the benign nature of the problem. Patients with syncope caused by brachy- or tachy-arrhythmia or structural or ischaemic heart disease should be referred to a cardiological department for specific diagnosis and treatment.

  20. E valuation and clinical significance of serum C-reactive protein and homocysteine level in obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome complicated with coronary heart disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Yingrui; Zha Jinshun; Xu Chaoxiang; Chen Xiaoyang; Wang Yaoguo; Du Xinqing

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between homocysteine (HCY) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) patients and OSAHS patients complicated with coronary heart disease by detecting the scrum level of HCY and CRP on the mechanism of OSAHS complicated with coronary heart disease. Methods: Ninety-one patients were divided into three groups, 30 patients as control group, 36 patients as OSAHS group, and 25 patients as OSAHS complicated with CHD group. Serum HCY level was detected through chemiluminescence. Serum CRP level was detected through radioimmunity. The serum level of HCY and CRP was compared among these groups. OSAHS patients were divided into mild OSAHS subgroup, moderate OSAHS subgroup and severe OSAHS subgroup. The morbidity rate of CHD and the serum level of HCY and CRP were compared among these subgroups. Meanwhile the parameters of polysomnogram such as activity apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and blood oxygen saturation (SaO 2 ) were compared between OSAHS group and OSAHS complicated with coronary heart disease group. Results: (1) There was significant difference among the serum level of HCY and CRP of control group, OSAHS group and OSAHS complicated with CHD group (F HCY =15.80, F CRP =19.21, P all HCY =4.74, t CRP =5.14, P all HCY =7.31, t CRP =8.17, P all 2 =6.96, χ 2 =4.18, P HCY =16.38, F CRP =12.97, P all 2 of OSAHS group and OSAHS complicated with CHD group (t AHI =5.46, percentage of SaO 2 2 : t=4.68, average lowest SaO 2 : t=3.65, longest duration of disordered breathing events: t=4.73, P all<0.01 ). Conclusion: The serum level of HCY and CRP rose because of hypoxia in OSAHS patients,and might play an important role in the mechanism of OSAHS complicated with CHD. (authors)

  1. Vital Exhaustion and Coronary Heart Disease Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frestad, Daria; Prescott, Eva

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The construct of vital exhaustion has been identified as a potential independent psychological risk factor for incident and recurrent coronary heart disease (CHD). Despite several decades of research, no systematic review or meta-analysis has previously attempted to collate the empiri......OBJECTIVES: The construct of vital exhaustion has been identified as a potential independent psychological risk factor for incident and recurrent coronary heart disease (CHD). Despite several decades of research, no systematic review or meta-analysis has previously attempted to collate.......22-1.85) for prospective studies, and 2.61 (95% CI = 1.66-4.10) for case-control studies using hospital controls. Risk of recurrent events in patients with CHD was 2.03 (95% CI = 1.54-2.68). The pooled adjusted risk of chronic heart failure in healthy populations was 1.37 (95% CI = 1.21-1.56), but this was based...

  2. Cyanotic congenital heart disease and atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Julie Bjerre; Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Engstrøm, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Improved treatment options in paediatric cardiology and congenital heart surgery have resulted in an ageing population of patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD). The risk of acquired heart disease such as atherosclerosis increases with age.Previous studies have speculated whether...... patients with CCHD are protected against atherosclerosis. Results have shown that the coronary arteries of patients with CCHD are free from plaques and stenosis. Decreased carotid intima-media thickness and low total plasma cholesterol may indicate a reduced risk of later development of atherosclerosis....... However, the evidence is still sparse and questionable, and a reasonable explanation for the decreased risk of developing atherosclerosis in patients with CCHD is still missing.This review provides an overview of what is known about the prevalence and potential causes of the reduced risk...

  3. [Mucha-Habermann disease and orthotopic heart transplant. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetina-Tun, Hugo; de la Cerda-Belmont, Gustavo Armando; Lezama-Urtecho, Carlos Alberto; Careaga-Reyna, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    Mucha-Habermann disease is a cutaneous clinical manifestation of unknown etiology that frequently appears in young patients. The aim was to present Mucha-Habermann disease that occurred in an old man who had a heart transplant. a 62 year-old male, heart transplant recipient, who four years after that transplantation procedure presented with papular lesions in neck, thoracic members of which extended to all body surfaces and that evolved vesicles and pustular lesions. A skin biopsy was performed and Mucha-Habermann disease was diagnosed. The patient was treated with steroids and antimicrobial therapy with favorable response. After two years there are no skin lesions. Mucha-Habermann disease is a low frequency disease and it requires skin biopsy to confirm diagnose. This is an uncommon case due to the age and kind of patient.

  4. Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Launch Programs and Activities National Wear Red Day ® Road Show Stories from the Road Road Show Photographs Lower Heart Disease Risk What is ... physical activity that's best for you. Eat less salt and sodium, saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol. ...

  5. HEART SIZE IN PRIMARY MYOCARDIAL DISEASE*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-07-10

    Jul 10, 1971 ... Heart volllme and cardia-Thoracic raTio were compared. STaTiSTically wiTh rhe haemodynamic and angiocardio- graphic paramerers measured aT cardiac caThererizaTion in. ]8 paTienis wiTh primary myocardial disease. Three paTients had mild cardiomyopaThy, 17 had classical cardiomyo- parhy, in 6 ...

  6. Employment in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, Mascha; Vogels, Ton; Ottenkamp, Jaap; van der Wall, Ernst E.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S. Pauline; Vliegen, Hubert W.

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate job participation, career-related problems, and actual job problems in adults with complex congenital heart disease (CHD) compared with adults with mild CHD and reference groups. Cross-sectional study. Patients were randomly selected from the archives of the Department of Pediatric

  7. Employment in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, M.; Vogels, T.; Ottenkamp, J.; Wall, E.E. van der; Verloove-Vanhorick, S.P.; Vliegen, H.W.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate job participation, careerrelated problems, and actual job problems in adults with complex congenital heart disease (CHD) compared with adults with mild CHD and reference groups. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Patients were randomly selected from the archives of the

  8. Antioxidant vitamins and coronary heart disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knekt, Paul; Ritz, John; Pereira, Mark A

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies have suggested a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) at higher intakes of fruit, vegetables, and whole grain. Whether this association is due to antioxidant vitamins or some other factors remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: We studied the relation between the intake...

  9. The right side in congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuuring, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Life expectancy of children with congenital heart disease (CHD) has increased dramatically during the past years, due to the successes of cardiac surgery. At present, nearly all of these children with CHD can be operated at young age and more than 90% reach adulthood. At adult age, however, many

  10. cholesterol, coronary heart disease and oestrogens

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-04-03

    Apr 3, 1971 ... Present concepts of the interrelationship between oestro- gens, endogenous and exogenous, and the development of atheromatosis and coronalY heart disease in the human female are reviewed. Aspects of research conducted by me at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, are incorporated.

  11. Celiac disease: clinical observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Emel’yanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Presented clinical cases of patients with a diagnosis of gluten enteropathy in treatment in the department of gastroenterology Regional Clinical Hospital. The case is of interest to doctors of different specialties for the differential diagnosis of anemia and malabsorption syndrome, demonstrate both the classic version, and atypical forms of the disease course. Diagnosis of celiac disease is based on three key positions: clinical findings, histology and serological markers. The clinical picture of celiac disease is characterized by pronounced polymorphism, by going beyond the a gastroenterological pathology. For screening of gluten sensitive celiac typically used an antibody to tissue transglutaminase. Morphological research of the mucous membrane of the small intestine is the determining criterion in the diagnosis of celiac disease. The use of specific gluten-free diet leads to the positive dynamics of the disease and improve the quality of life of patients.

  12. Berlin Heart EXCOR use in patients with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, David L S; Zafar, Farhan; Almond, Christopher S; Canter, Charles; Fynn-Thompson, Francis; Conway, Jennifer; Adachi, Iki; Lorts, Angela

    2017-11-01

    Management of mechanical circulatory support in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) is challenging due to physiologic variations and anatomic limitations to device placement. In this study we examine the use of Berlin Heart EXCOR in CHD patients. CHD patients were identified from the EXCOR Pediatric Study data set (2007 to 2010). Mortality and serious adverse events were compared between CHD and non-CHD cohorts, and predictors of poor outcomes in the CHD cohort were identified. CHD was present in 29% (n = 59, 18 with 1-ventricle physiology) of all EXCOR patients (N = 204). Successful bridge (transplant or wean) was less likely in CHD patients compared with non-CHD patients (48% vs 80%; p 1 year) were successfully bridged. Pre-implant congenital heart surgery (CHS) and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) on the same admission occurred in 60% of children ≤1 year of age (83% of neonates, 50% of infants), with 8% survival. Regardless of age, patients who did not have CHS and ECMO had 61% survival. Smaller pump, pre-implant bilirubin >1.2 mg/dl and renal dysfunction were independently associated with mortality. End-organ function at implant reliably predicts adverse outcomes and should be considered when making implant decisions. EXCOR use in neonates and infants with CHD should be approached cautiously. If patients have undergone pre-implant CHS and ECMO, EXCOR support may not provide any survival benefit. EXCOR support in non-infants with CHD is challenging but can be consistently successful with appropriate patient selection. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. HEART SIZE IN PRIMARY MYOCARDIAL DISEASE*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-07-10

    Jul 10, 1971 ... The clinical diagnosis was. SUMMARY. Heart volllme and cardia-Thoracic raTio were ... present in all and tricuspid incompetence in 4. In each patient the degree of ventricular dysfunction was ..... petence of first the mitral. and later the tricuspid valve so that functional atrio-ventricular valve incompetence ...

  14. Electrocardiography in Chagas' heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio A.C. Garzon

    Full Text Available Conventional ECG still plays an important role in the overall knowledge of Chagas' cardiopathy, because of its importance in longitudinal and epidemiological studies, its diagnostic value, and its utility in prognostic evaluation. The authors discuss these aspects, as well as the use of ECG in the acute phase and the significance of a normal ECG in Chagas' disease. Correlations were made between ECG and hemodynamic/angiographic variables among 1010 patients with positive laboratory tests for Chagas' disease: a in the group with normal ECG there were no significant differences between symptomatic and non-symptomatic patients with regard to ejection fraction and angiographic abnormalities; b slight abnormalities on the ECG corresponded to an intermediate level of severity of the disease, that is, between normal ECG and ECG with significant abnormalities; c fibrosis on the ECG was not predictive of akinesia in the related area on the angiography; d combined ECG abnormalities generally correlated with greater myocardial compromise compared to isolated abnormalities; e under multiple regression analysis the ECG abnormalities that independently correlated with depressed ejection fraction were: premature ventricular beats, ventricular tachycardia, left bundle branch block, atrial fibrillation, complete AV block, and anterior and inferior fibrosis. Male sex, cardiac insufficiency and cardiomegaly on the thorax radiography were also significantly related.

  15. Anemic syndrome in patients with ischemic heart disease and chronic heart failure (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shvarts Y.G.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anemic syndrome of different severity often accompanies ischemic heart disease (IHD and chronic heart failure (CHF. Anemia has association with unfavorable prognosis in patients with all forms of CVD — acute and chronic. In this article the authors summarize a literature review of English articles dedicated to the problem of anemia and ischemic heart disease (IHD and the results of original research on the relationship between anemic syndrome and prognosis in the hospitalized patients with IHD and chronic heart failure (CHF. Anemia is frequently observed in patients with CHF, and evidence suggests that anemia might be associated with an increased mortality in both systolic and diastolic chronic heart failure (CHF, morbidity and rate of hospitalization in CHF patients. Moreover, CHF itself could be involved in the pathogenesis of anemia. Early studies suggested a pathogenic role of inflammation mediators. The normalization of hemoglobin concentration by EPO and iron supply in patients with CHF and chronic renal insufficiency results in improved exercise capacity by increasing oxygen delivery and improving cardiac function. However, there is limited information concerning the association of hemoglobin concentration and new onset of clinically recognized coronary artery disease, and lack of information about the effect of anemia treatment on prognosis of acute forms of IHD

  16. Genomic imbalances in syndromic congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molck, Miriam Coelho; Simioni, Milena; Paiva Vieira, Társis; Sgardioli, Ilária Cristina; Paoli Monteiro, Fabíola; Souza, Josiane; Fett-Conte, Agnes Cristina; Félix, Têmis Maria; Lopes Monlléo, Isabella; Gil-da-Silva-Lopes, Vera Lúcia

    To identify pathogenic genomic imbalances in patients presenting congenital heart disease (CHD) with extra cardiac anomalies and exclusion of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2 DS). 78 patients negative for the 22q11.2 deletion, previously screened by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and/or multiplex ligation probe amplification (MLPA) were tested by chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA). Clinically significant copy number variations (CNVs ≥300kb) were identified in 10% (8/78) of cases. In addition, potentially relevant CNVs were detected in two cases (993kb duplication in 15q21.1 and 706kb duplication in 2p22.3). Genes inside the CNV regions found in this study, such as IRX4, BMPR1A, SORBS2, ID2, ROCK2, E2F6, GATA4, SOX7, SEMAD6D, FBN1, and LTPB1 are known to participate in cardiac development and could be candidate genes for CHD. These data showed that patients presenting CHD with extra cardiac anomalies and exclusion of 22q11.2 DS should be investigated by CMA. The present study emphasizes the possible role of CNVs in CHD. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Genomic imbalances in syndromic congenital heart disease,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Coelho Molck

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To identify pathogenic genomic imbalances in patients presenting congenital heart disease (CHD with extra cardiac anomalies and exclusion of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2 DS. Methods: 78 patients negative for the 22q11.2 deletion, previously screened by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and/or multiplex ligation probe amplification (MLPA were tested by chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA. Results: Clinically significant copy number variations (CNVs ≥300 kb were identified in 10% (8/78 of cases. In addition, potentially relevant CNVs were detected in two cases (993 kb duplication in 15q21.1 and 706 kb duplication in 2p22.3. Genes inside the CNV regions found in this study, such as IRX4, BMPR1A, SORBS2, ID2, ROCK2, E2F6, GATA4, SOX7, SEMAD6D, FBN1, and LTPB1 are known to participate in cardiac development and could be candidate genes for CHD. Conclusion: These data showed that patients presenting CHD with extra cardiac anomalies and exclusion of 22q11.2 DS should be investigated by CMA. The present study emphasizes the possible role of CNVs in CHD.

  18. Congenital Heart Disease: Causes, Diagnosis, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, RongRong; Liu, Min; Lu, Lei; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    The congenital heart disease includes abnormalities in heart structure that occur before birth. Such defects occur in the fetus while it is developing in the uterus during pregnancy. About 500,000 adults have congenital heart disease in USA (WebMD, Congenital heart defects medications, www.WebMD.com/heart-disease/tc/congenital-heart-defects-medications , 2014). 1 in every 100 children has defects in their heart due to genetic or chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome. The excessive alcohol consumption during pregnancy and use of medications, maternal viral infection, such as Rubella virus, measles (German), in the first trimester of pregnancy, all these are risk factors for congenital heart disease in children, and the risk increases if parent or sibling has a congenital heart defect. These are heart valves defects, atrial and ventricular septa defects, stenosis, the heart muscle abnormalities, and a hole inside wall of the heart which causes defect in blood circulation, heart failure, and eventual death. There are no particular symptoms of congenital heart disease, but shortness of breath and limited ability to do exercise, fatigue, abnormal sound of heart as heart murmur, which is diagnosed by a physician while listening to the heart beats. The echocardiogram or transesophageal echocardiogram, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, cardiac catheterization, and MRI methods are used to detect congenital heart disease. Several medications are given depending on the severity of this disease, and catheter method and surgery are required for serious cases to repair heart valves or heart transplantation as in endocarditis. For genetic study, first DNA is extracted from blood followed by DNA sequence analysis and any defect in nucleotide sequence of DNA is determined. For congenital heart disease, genes in chromosome 1 show some defects in nucleotide sequence. In this review the causes, diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments of congenital heart disease are described.

  19. Assessment and management of patients with ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Shamsuddin; Silverman, David G

    2004-04-01

    Review the perioperative management of patients who are scheduled for noncardiac surgery. Review of literature (PubMed, MEDLINE). Patients with ischemic heart disease who undergo noncardiac surgery are at significant risk of perioperative cardiac morbidity and mortality. Recent joint guidelines from the American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association have significantly streamlined the preoperative evaluation processes. Augmented hemodynamic control with intensive perioperative pharmacologic therapy with beta-blockers and possibly alpha-2 agonist has been shown to improve perioperative cardiovascular outcomes. However, translating this information to clinical practice continues to be a challenge and requires a multi- disciplinary approach. A particular intraoperative anesthetic technique is unlikely to influence perioperative cardiac morbidity and mortality. Postoperative management with goals of decreasing hemodynamic stress is important in patients with ischemic heart disease. Diagnosis and management of perioperative myocardial infarction continues to be a challenge. However, use of cardiac specific biomarkers should improve the diagnostic process.

  20. A vital role for complement in heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappegård, Knut T; Garred, Peter; Jonasson, Lena

    2014-01-01

    fibrillation often share risk factors both with coronary heart disease and heart failure, and there is some evidence implicating complement activation in atrial fibrillation. Moreover, Chagas heart disease, a protozoal infection, is an important cause of heart failure in Latin America, and the complement...

  1. Increasing mortality burden among adults with complex congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greutmann, Matthias; Tobler, Daniel; Kovacs, Adrienne H; Greutmann-Yantiri, Mehtap; Haile, Sarah R; Held, Leonhard; Ivanov, Joan; Williams, William G; Oechslin, Erwin N; Silversides, Candice K; Colman, Jack M

    2015-01-01

    Progress in management of congenital heart disease has shifted mortality largely to adulthood. However, adult survivors with complex congenital heart disease are not cured and remain at risk of premature death as young adults. Thus, our aim was to describe the evolution and mortality risk of adult patient cohorts with complex congenital heart disease. Among 12,644 adults with congenital heart disease followed at a single center from 1980 to 2009, 176 had Eisenmenger syndrome, 76 had unrepaired cyanotic defects, 221 had atrial switch operations for transposition of the great arteries, 158 had congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries, 227 had Fontan palliation, and 789 had repaired tetralogy of Fallot. We depict the 30-year evolution of these 6 patient cohorts, analyze survival probabilities in adulthood, and predict future number of deaths through 2029. Since 1980, there has been a steady increase in numbers of patients followed, except in cohorts with Eisenmenger syndrome and unrepaired cyanotic defects. Between 1980 and 2009, 308 patients in the study cohorts (19%) died. At the end of 2009, 85% of survivors were younger than 50 years. Survival estimates for all cohorts were markedly lower than for the general population, with important differences between cohorts. Over the upcoming two decades, we predict a substantial increase in numbers of deaths among young adults with subaortic right ventricles, Fontan palliation, and repaired tetralogy of Fallot. Anticipatory action is needed to prepare clinical services for increasing numbers of young adults at risk of dying from complex congenital heart disease. © 2014 The Authors. Congenital Heart Disease Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Effect of torsemide and furosemide on clinical, laboratory, radiographic and quality of life variables in dogs with heart failure secondary to mitral valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddle, Gordon D; Singletary, Gretchen E; Reynolds, Caryn A; Trafny, Dennis J; Machen, Maggie C; Oyama, Mark A

    2012-03-01

    Diuretic therapy reduces preload and relieves congestion secondary to cardiac dysfunction. Torsemide (torasemide) is a loop diuretic with longer duration of action, decreased susceptibility to diuretic resistance, and adjunctive aldosterone antagonist properties compared with furosemide. We hypothesized that torsemide would be well tolerated and no less effective than furosemide at diuresis, control of clinical signs, and maintenance of quality of life (QOL) in dogs with congestive heart failure (CHF). Seven client-owned dogs with stable CHF receiving twice daily oral furosemide and adjunctive medications. Utilizing a double-blinded, randomized, crossover design, dogs were administered either oral furosemide at their current dose or an equivalent oral dose of torsemide (1/10 of the daily furosemide dose divided into twice daily dosing) on day 0. Crossover occurred at day 7 and the study ended on day 14. Clinical, laboratory, radiographic, and QOL variables were evaluated on days 0, 7 and 14. No dogs developed recurrent CHF during the study. Mean furosemide dose on day 0 was 5.13 mg/kg/day (range 2.8-9.6). Following torsemide treatment, creatinine (P = 0.020), urea nitrogen (P = 0.013), phosphorus (P = 0.032), albumin (P = 0.019), carbon dioxide (P = 0.015) and anion gap (P = 0.005) were significantly increased, and urine specific gravity (P = 0.004) and chloride (P = 0.021) were significantly decreased compared with furosemide dosing. No differences in QOL were found. Results indicate that torsemide is equivalent to furosemide at controlling clinical signs of CHF in dogs and is likely to achieve greater diuresis vs. furosemide. Larger clinical trials evaluating torsemide as a first or second-line loop diuretic for congestive heart failure in dogs are warranted. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Multimodality Imaging of Heart Valve Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajani, Ronak, E-mail: Dr.R.Rajani@gmail.com [Department of Cardiology, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Khattar, Rajdeep [Department of Cardiology, Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Chiribiri, Amedeo [Divisions of Imaging Sciences, The Rayne Institute, St. Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Victor, Kelly; Chambers, John [Department of Cardiology, St. Thomas’ Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    Unidentified heart valve disease is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. It has therefore become important to accurately identify, assess and monitor patients with this condition in order that appropriate and timely intervention can occur. Although echocardiography has emerged as the predominant imaging modality for this purpose, recent advances in cardiac magnetic resonance and cardiac computed tomography indicate that they may have an important contribution to make. The current review describes the assessment of regurgitant and stenotic heart valves by multimodality imaging (echocardiography, cardiac computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance) and discusses their relative strengths and weaknesses.

  4. Heart rate, heart rate variability, and arrhythmias in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Caroline Elisabeth; Falk, Bo Torkel; Zois, Nora Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Autonomic modulation of heart rhythm is thought to influence the pathophysiology of myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD).......Autonomic modulation of heart rhythm is thought to influence the pathophysiology of myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD)....

  5. Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Emmanuelle; Bailly, Minh Tam; Hatimi, Safwane El; Robard, Ingrid; Rezgui, Hatem; Bouchachi, Amir; Montani, David; Sitbon, Olivier; Chemla, Denis; Assayag, Patrick

    Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease, also known as group 2 pulmonary hypertension according to the European Society of Cardiology/European Respiratory Society classification, is the most common cause of pulmonary hypertension. In patients with left heart disease, the development of pulmonary hypertension favours right heart dysfunction, which has a major impact on disease severity and outcome. Over the past few years, this condition has been considered more frequently. However, epidemiological studies of group 2 pulmonary hypertension are less exhaustive than studies of other causes of pulmonary hypertension. In group 2 patients, pulmonary hypertension may be caused by an isolated increase in left-sided filling pressures or by a combination of this condition with increased pulmonary vascular resistance, with an abnormally high pressure gradient between arteries and pulmonary veins. A better understanding of the conditions underlying pulmonary hypertension is of key importance to establish a comprehensive diagnosis, leading to an adapted treatment to reduce heart failure morbidity and mortality. In this review, epidemiology, mechanisms and diagnostic approaches are reviewed; then, treatment options and future approaches are considered. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  6. Heart Rate Variability in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels with Different Degree of Myxomatous Mitral Valve Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Caroline Elisabeth; Falk, Bo Torkel; Zois, Nora Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    variability (HRV). Reduced HRV is seen in dogs with heart failure secondary to myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD). However, HRV is suggested to increase with disease progression in dogs with early stages of MMVD. Comparable results are found in people with primary mitral valve prolapse, a disease......dogs; even prior to the development of overt congestive heart failure....... into 4 groups: 1) no or minimal mitral regurgitation (MR) (MR jet=15% of the left atrial area) and no murmur, 2) mild MR (20%50%) and no clinical signs of heart failure, 4) left atrium to aortic root ratio >1.5, clinical signs of heart failure and furosemide...

  7. Heart Disease Prevention: Does Oral Health Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Forum. 2013;16:e232. Chapple ILC, et al. Diabetes and periodontal diseases: Consensus report of the Joint EFP/AAP Workshop on Periodontitis and Systemic Diseases. Journal of Clinical Periodontology. 2013; ...

  8. [Coronary heart disease: epidemiologic-genetic aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, F H

    1985-01-01

    Coronary heart disease and the risk factors which predispose to it aggregate in families. How much of this clustering of disease is "explained" by the familial resemblance in predisposing factors? The published reports which bear on this question fall into six distinct study designs: prospective studies, persons at high or low risk or persons with and without a positive family history as points of departure, case-control studies, studies of patients who had a coronary angiogram and studies in different ethnic groups. The findings of the 16 investigations reviewed suggest that there are as yet unidentified factors - genetic, environmental or both - which are responsible for familial clustering of coronary heart disease, apart from the three main risk factors (serum lipids, blood pressure, smoking) and diabetes. Future research must put greater emphasis on studies of families rather than individuals and on closer collaboration between epidemiologists and geneticists, in order to fill these gaps in knowledge. It is likely that the individual predisposition to coronary heart disease is due in part to genetic influences which remain to be discovered in the course of such studies. They would help in identifying susceptible person in the population with greater precision than is now possible. The "high-risk strategy" of coronary heart disease prevention will become more efficient as more specific and sensitive tests of disease prediction are developed. In the meantime, preventive programmes must be put into action on the basis of what is already known, on the level of both the high-risk and the community-wide mass strategy.

  9. Bone Marrow Therapies for Chronic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behbahan, Iman Saramipoor; Keating, Armand; Gale, Robert Peter

    2015-11-01

    Chronic heart failure is a leading cause of death. The demand for new therapies and the potential regenerative capacity of bone marrow-derived cells has led to numerous clinical trials. We critically discuss current knowledge of the biology and clinical application of bone marrow cells. It appears unlikely that bone marrow cells can develop into functional cardiomyocyte after infusion but may have favorable paracrine effects. Most, but not all, clinical trials report a modest short- but not long-term benefit of infusing bone marrow-derived cells. Effect size appears to correlate with stringency of study-design: the most stringent trials report the smallest effect-sizes. We conclude there may be short- but not substantial long-term benefit of infusing bone marrow-derived cells into persons with chronic heart failure and any benefit observed is unlikely to result from trans-differentiation of bone marrow-derived cells into functioning cardiomyocytes. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  10. Coronary heart disease after radiotherapy for peptic ulcer disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, Zhanat A.; Land, Charles E.; Kleinerman, Ruth A.; Weinstock, Robert W.; Stovall, Marilyn; Griem, Melvin L.; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and cerebrovascular disease after radiotherapy (RT) for peptic ulcer disease. Methods and materials: Peptic ulcer disease patients treated with RT (n = 1859) or by other means (n = 1860) at the University of Chicago Medical Center between 1936 and 1965, were followed through 1997. The observed numbers of cause-specific deaths were compared with the expected numbers from the general population rates. During RT, 5% of the heart was in the treatment field and the remainder of the heart mostly received scattered radiation. A volume-weighted cardiac dose was computed to describe the average tissue dose to the entire organ. We used Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to analyze the CHD and cerebrovascular disease risk associated with RT, adjusting for confounding factors. Results: Greater than expected CHD mortality was observed among the irradiated patients. The irradiated patients received volume-weighted cardiac doses ranging from 1.6 to 3.9 Gy and the portion of the heart directly in the field received doses of 7.6-18.4 Gy. The CHD risk increased with the cardiac dose (p trend = 0.01). The cerebrovascular disease risk was not associated with the surrogate carotid dose. Conclusion: The excess CHD risk in patients undergoing RT for peptic ulcer disease decades previously indicates the need for long-term follow-up for cardiovascular disease after chest RT

  11. Clinical impact of left ventricular eccentricity index using cardiac MRI in assessment of right ventricular hemodynamics and myocardial fibrosis in congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamasaki, Yuzo; Kamitani, Takeshi; Yamanouchi, Torahiko; Honda, Hiroshi [Kyushu University, Departments of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Nagao, Michinobu; Kawanami, Satoshi [Kyushu University, Molecular Imaging and Diagnosis, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Yamamura, Kenichiro [Kyushu University, Pediatrics, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Sakamoto, Ichiro [Kyushu University, Cardiovascular Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Yabuuchi, Hidetake [Kyushu University, Health SciencesGraduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    To investigate the utility of eccentricity index (EI) using cardiac cine MRI for the assessment of right ventricular (RV) hemodynamics in congenital heart disease (CHD). Fifty-five patients with CHD (32 women; mean age, 40.7 ± 20.9 years) underwent both cardiac MRI and right heart catheterization. EI was defined as the ratio of the distance between the anterior-posterior wall and the septal-lateral wall measured in the short-axis of mid-ventricular cine MRI. Correlations between EIs and RV hemodynamic parameters were analyzed. EIs were compared between patients with and without late gadolinium enhancement (LGE). A strong correlation between mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) and systolic EI (r = 0.81, p < 0.0001) and a moderate negative correlation between diastolic EI and RV ejection fraction (EF) (r = -0.62, p < 0.0001) were observed. Receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed optimal EI thresholds for detecting patients with mean PAP ≥40 mmHg with C-statistics of 0.90 and patients with RVEF <40 % with C-statistics of 0.78. Systolic EIs were significantly greater for patients with LGE (1.45 ± 0.05) than for those without LGE (1.15 ± 0.07; p < 0.001). EI offers a simple, comprehensive index that can predict pulmonary hypertension and RV dysfunction in CHD. (orig.)

  12. Acupuncture in patients with valvular heart disease and prosthetic valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellon, Anthony

    2003-09-01

    Endocarditis has been reported in patients with valvular heart disease who have undergone acupuncture treatment, although most have been associated with the use of semi-permanent needles. This has led reviewers to suggest that acupuncture may not only be contraindicated in such patients but that prophylactic antibiotics should be given. This study investigated the use of acupuncture treatment in patients with proven valvular heart disease and observed whether endocarditis developed in such patients. All patients in a single-handed GP practice with proven valvular heart disease, including those with prosthetic valves, were identified over a ten-year period. Those who had undergone acupuncture treatment underwent a clinical examination and diagnostic tests, which focused on the signs, symptoms and laboratory criteria for the diagnosis of endocarditis and included a transthoracic echocardiogram. Autopsy findings were reviewed in any patient who died. Based on these clinical and laboratory data, using the modified Duke's criteria for the diagnosis of endocarditis, patients were identified as having definite or possible endocarditis, or the diagnosis was rejected. All patients underwent brief acupuncture with no skin disinfectant and no prophylactic antibiotics were given. Semi-permanent needles were avoided. Thirty-six patients with valvular heart disease underwent a total of 479 acupuncture treatments over a ten-year period. The median number of treatments was 9 (range 1-72), with a follow-up after treatment of 5.75 years (range 0.5-10 years). Definite endocarditis was not found in any patient, but two patients had possible endocarditis, eventually discounted by both negative blood cultures and echocardiography. In conclusion, brief acupuncture was safe in this small cohort of valvular heart disease patients and no case of endocarditis was detected over a ten-year period.

  13. Blood pressure level and relation to other cardiovascular risk factors in male hypertensive patients without clinical evidence of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, C T; Sørum, C; Hansen, J F

    2000-01-01

    Arterial hypertension is accompanied by increased morbidity and mortality and constitutes a substantial part of medical care. Antihypertensive intervention reduces the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The aims of the study were to evaluate the relationship between cardiovascular risk factors......, duration of hypertension, cholesterol and triglyceride level, smoking status, information of regular exercise, a family history of ischemic heart disease (IHD) and drug treatment, in 220 men treated for arterial hypertension. In the univariate analyses we found a higher systolic blood pressure (SBP...... with age. A high percentage of the patients do not have a well controlled BP, and a high percentage have additional risk factors such as smoking, hypercholesterolaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia and a family history of IHD. This means that there is room for much improvement in the control of hypertension....

  14. TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE IN REAL CLINICAL PRACTICE ACCORDING TO THE DATA FROM PROGNOZ IBS REGISTER. (Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Tolpygina

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available According to the data from PROGNOZ IBS register drugs with proven efficacy in secondary prevention of cardiovascular complications (antiplatelets, β-blockers, ACE inhibitors, statins were not often prescribed in patients with stable ischemic heart disease prior to hospitalization. Significant improvement of the treatment quality was found during the cardiology hospital stay. The prescription rate of ACE inhibitors increased from 20% to 84.4%, statins - from 10% to 85.5%, β-blockers - from 20% to 91%, acetylsalicylic acid - from 74% to 96%. However, some drugs (statins have been used in inadequate doses. Low-density lipoprotein level <2.5 mmol/L was achieved at discharge only in 6.3% of patients.

  15. TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE IN REAL CLINICAL PRACTICE ACCORDING TO THE DATA FROM PROGNOZ IBS REGISTER. (Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Tolpygina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the data from PROGNOZ IBS register drugs with proven efficacy in secondary prevention of cardiovascular complications (antiplatelets, β-blockers, ACE inhibitors, statins were not often prescribed in patients with stable ischemic heart disease prior to hospitalization. Significant improvement of the treatment quality was found during the cardiology hospital stay. The prescription rate of ACE inhibitors increased from 20% to 84.4%, statins - from 10% to 85.5%, β-blockers - from 20% to 91%, acetylsalicylic acid - from 74% to 96%. However, some drugs (statins have been used in inadequate doses. Low-density lipoprotein level <2.5 mmol/L was achieved at discharge only in 6.3% of patients.

  16. The usefulness of brain natriuretic peptide in simple congenital heart disease-a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Eindhoven (Jannet); A.E. van den Bosch (Annemien); H. Boersma (Eric); J.W. Roos-Hesselink (Jolien)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBrain natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide are two well-established markers for cardiac failure in acquired heart disease. Nevertheless, the clinical utility of these markers in patients with congenital heart disease remains unclear. Therefore, the aim of this

  17. Pregnancy outcomes in women with heart disease: Experience of a tertiary center in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hink, E.; Bolte, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Clinical data of pregnant women with heart disease were obtained with the intention to provide input for local counseling and management guidelines. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective data from all pregnant women with congenital or acquired heart disease between 2000 and 2011 in the VU

  18. Psychological mediators related to clinical outcome in cognitive behavioural therapy for coronary heart disease: A sub-analysis from the SUPRIM trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norlund, Fredrika; Olsson, Erik Mg; Pingel, Ronnie; Held, Claes; Svärdsudd, Kurt; Gulliksson, Mats; Burell, Gunilla

    2017-06-01

    Background The Secondary Prevention in Uppsala Primary Healthcare Project (SUPRIM) was a randomized controlled trial of a group-based cognitive behavioural therapy stress management programme for patients with coronary heart disease. The project was successful in reducing the risk of fatal or non-fatal first recurrent cardiovascular events. The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of cognitive behavioural therapy on self-rated stress, somatic anxiety, vital exhaustion and depression and to study the associations of these factors with the reduction in cardiovascular events. Methods A total of 362 patients were randomly assigned to intervention or usual care groups. The psychological outcomes were assessed five times during 24 months and analysed using linear mixed models. The mediating roles of the outcomes were analysed using joint modelling of the longitudinal and time to event data. Results The intervention had a positive effect on somatic anxiety ( p < 0.05), reflecting a beneficial development over time compared with the controls. Stress, vital exhaustion and depression did not differ between the groups over time. Mediator analysis suggested that somatic anxiety may have mediated the effect of treatment on cardiovascular events. Conclusions The intervention had a small positive effect on somatic anxiety, but did not affect stress, vital exhaustion or depression in patients with coronary heart disease. Somatic anxiety was associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events and might act as a partial mediator in the treatment effect on cardiovascular events. However, the mechanisms between the intervention and the protective cardiovascular outcome remain to be identified.

  19. Indigenous drugs in ischemic heart disease in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Shridhar; Aggarwal, Amitesh

    2009-11-01

    India is currently facing the silent epidemic of ischemic heart disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hypertension, and stroke. Both diabetes and ischemic heart disease appear in Indian people a decade earlier compared to whites. The recent evidence that certain medicinal plants possess hypoglycemic, lipid-lowering, and immunomodulating properties on account of their rich flavonoid and/or other glucose-lowering active constituents merits scientific scrutiny in this regard. The present communication aims to give a brief review of those plants that could be useful in T2DM associated with hypertension, ischemic heart disease, and/or dyslipidemia. Aegle marmelos (bael), Allium sativum (garlic), Curcuma domestica (turmeric), Eugenia jambolana (jamun), Murraya koenigii (curry leaves), Trigonella foenum graecum (fenugreek), and Terminalia arjuna (arjun) have been found to be useful in diabetes associated with ischemic heart disease. Their active biomolecules have been identified. They have also been demonstrated to be safe in long-term use. Further clinical research regarding their potency and efficacy vis-à-vis oral hypoglycemics needs to done.

  20. Hematologic Abnormalities in Cyanotic Congenital Heart Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Chamanian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with cyanotic heart disease may have an acceptable quality of life. However, they are invariably prone to several complications. The aim of this study is search about hematologic abnormalities in cyanotic congenital heart disease patients. Materials and Methods:  In this cross sectional study every cyanotic congenital heart disease patients who was referred to the adult congenital heart disease clinic was selected and asked of any possible hyperviscosity symptoms, gingival bleeding, Epistaxis, hemoptysis, hypermenorrhagia and gouty arthritis irrespective of their age, gender and primary diagnosis in a six-month period. In this regard, 02 saturation was obtained via pulse oximetry, an abdominal ultrasound was done in order to discover any gallstones and lab tests including CBC, coagulation parameters (bleeding time(BT,clotting time(CT, prothrombin time(PT,international ratio( INR, Ferritin, blood urea nitrogen (BUN and creatinine (Cr were provided as well. Results:  A total of 69 patients were enrolled in the present study. The mean age of the patients was 22.44±5.72 with a minimum of 15 and the maximum of 46 years old. Twenty two (34.4% of them were female and 45(65.6% were male. Conclusion: Our patients had less hyperuricemia, there is no correlation between hyperviscosity symptoms and haematocrit level and an inverse correlation between the Ferritin level and hyperviscosity symptoms were seen.  

  1. Coronary Heart Disease and Emotional Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachaki, Chrisanthy; Maridaki Kassotaki, Katerina

    2013-09-23

    Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is associated with emotions, especially negative ones, namely anxiety and depression. Emotional Intelligence (EI) is a psychological model that consists of a variety of emotional skills. The aim of the present study was to examine the relation between different dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and coronary heart disease. A total of 300 participants were studied during a 3-year period in an attempt to partially replicate and further expand a previous study conducted in Greece among CHD patients, which indicated a strong association between certain dimensions of Emotional Intelligence and the incidence of CHD. All participants completed a self-report questionnaire, assessing several aspects of Emotional Intelligence. The results showed that there is a link between the regulation of emotions and the occurrence of CHD. The evidence reported in the present study makes stronger the claim that EI plays a significant role in the occurrence of CHD.

  2. False Heart Rate Feedback and the Perception of Heart Symptoms in Patients with Congenital Heart Disease and Anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsdorp, Petra A.; Kindt, Merel; Rietveld, Simon; Everaerd, Walter; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Little is known about the mechanisms explaining an increased perception of heart symptoms in congenital heart disease (ConHD). In the present study, it was suggested that a combination of high trait anxiety and disease history increases the perception of heart symptoms. Purpose It was

  3. False heart rate feedback and the perception of heart symptoms in patients with congenital heart disease and anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsdorp, P.A.; Kindt, M.; Rietveld, S.; Everaerd, W.; Mulder, B.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the mechanisms explaining an increased perception of heart symptoms in congenital heart disease (ConHD). In the present study, it was suggested that a combination of high trait anxiety and disease history increases the perception of heart symptoms. Purpose: It was

  4. Clinical manifestation of mitochondrial diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magner, Martin; Kolářová, Hana; Honzik, Tomáš; Švandová, Ivana; Zeman, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders (MD) represent a clinically, biochemically and genetically heterogeneous group of diseases associated with dysfunction of the oxidative phosphorylation system and pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. Our aim was to illustrate the most common clinical presentation of MD on the example of selected diseases and syndromes. The minimal prevalence of MD is estimated as 1 to 5,000. MD may manifest at any age since birth until late-adulthood with acute manifestation or as a chronic progressive disease. Virtually any organ may be impaired, but the organs with the highest energetic demands are most frequently involved, including brain, muscle, heart and liver. Some MD may manifest as a characteristic cluster of clinical features (e.g. MELAS syndrome, Kearns-Sayre syndrome). Diagnostics includes detailed history, the comprehensive clinical examination, results of specialized examinations (especially cardiology, visual fundus examination, brain imaging, EMG), laboratory testing of body fluids (lactate, aminoacids, organic acids), and analysis of bioptic samples of muscle, skin, and liver, eventually. Normal lactate level in blood does not exclude the possibility of MD. Although the aimed molecular genetic analyses may be indicated in some of mitochondrial diseases, the methods of next generation sequencing come into focus. Examples of treatment are arginine supplementation in MELAS syndrome, ketogenic diet in pyruvate oxidation disorders or quinone analogs in patients with LHON. Conclusion: The clinical suspicion of a mitochondrial disorder is often delayed, or the disease remains undiagnosed. The correct diagnosis and adequate treatment can improve prognosis of the patient. Access to genetic counseling is also of great importance.

  5. Comparison of cardiovascular magnetic resonance and single-photon emission computed tomography in women with suspected coronary artery disease from the Clinical Evaluation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Coronary Heart Disease (CE-MARC) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, John P; Motwani, Manish; Maredia, Neil; Brown, Julia M; Everett, Colin C; Nixon, Jane; Bijsterveld, Petra; Dickinson, Catherine J; Ball, Stephen G; Plein, Sven

    2014-03-11

    Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of death in women, and underdiagnosis contributes to the high mortality. This study compared the sex-specific diagnostic performance of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). A total of 235 women and 393 men with suspected angina underwent CMR, SPECT, and x-ray angiography as part of the Clinical Evaluation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Coronary Heart Disease (CE-MARC) study. CMR comprised adenosine stress/rest perfusion, cine imaging, late gadolinium enhancement, and magnetic resonance coronary angiography. Gated adenosine stress/rest SPECT was performed with (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin. For CMR, the sensitivity in women and men was similar (88.7% versus 85.6%; P=0.57), as was the specificity (83.5% versus 82.8%; P=0.86). For SPECT, the sensitivity was significantly worse in women than in men (50.9% versus 70.8%; P=0.007), but the specificities were similar (84.1% versus 81.3%; P=0.48). The sensitivity in both the female and male groups was significantly higher with CMR than SPECT (Pwomen (area under the curve, 0.90 versus 0.67; Pmen (area under the curve, 0.89 versus 0.74; Paccuracy was similar in both sexes with perfusion CMR (P=1.00) but was significantly worse in women with SPECT (Pwomen with suspected coronary artery disease. http://www.controlled-trials.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN77246133.

  6. Holography for imaging in structural heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckheimer, Elchanan; Rotschild, Carmel

    2016-05-17

    Three-dimensional imaging modalities for structural heart disease interventions have become a common feature in the procedural workflow. The images acquired are usually presented on 2D displays, thereby restricting their usefulness and the ability to interact with them. Holographic images created in real time from the volumetric data which float in the air during the procedure, in front of the operator and above the patient, could provide an intuitive and interactive display for the interventionalist and improve procedure outcomes.

  7. Prevalence of Heart Disease Demonstrated in 60 Years of the Arquivos Brasileiros de Cardiologia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evora, Paulo Roberto Barbosa; Nather, Julio Cesar; Rodrigues, Alfredo José

    2014-01-01

    Considering the historical and academic relevance of the Brazilian Archives of Cardiology (ABC), as its MEDLINE indexing began in 1950, it was assumed as a hypothesis that the analysis of the publications over the last 60 years could reflect the changing trends of heart disease in Brazil. The study data were collected using a program developed for this purpose, allowing the automatic extraction of information from the MEDLINE database. The study information were collected by searching 'Brazilian Archives of Cardiology AND selected parameter in English'. Four observational groups were determined: (1) major groups of heart diseases (coronary artery disease, valvular heart disease, congenital heart disease and cardiomyopathies); (2) relevant diseases in clinical practice (cardiac arrhythmias, cor pulmonale, myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure); (3) cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis); and (4) group determined due to the growing trend of publications on congestive heart failure seen in previous groups (congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, rheumatic heart disease and Chagasic heart disease) All publications within the established groups were described, highlighting the increasing importance of heart failure and diabetes as risk factors. A relatively easy search was carried out, using the computer program developed for literature search covering six decades. Emphasizing the limitations of the study, we suggest the existence of an epidemiological link between cardiac diseases that are prevalent in Brazil and the publications of the Brazilian Archives of Cardiology

  8. Prevalence of Heart Disease Demonstrated in 60 Years of the Arquivos Brasileiros de Cardiologia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evora, Paulo Roberto Barbosa, E-mail: prbevora@cardiol.br; Nather, Julio Cesar; Rodrigues, Alfredo José [Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia da Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo (USP), Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-01-15

    Considering the historical and academic relevance of the Brazilian Archives of Cardiology (ABC), as its MEDLINE indexing began in 1950, it was assumed as a hypothesis that the analysis of the publications over the last 60 years could reflect the changing trends of heart disease in Brazil. The study data were collected using a program developed for this purpose, allowing the automatic extraction of information from the MEDLINE database. The study information were collected by searching 'Brazilian Archives of Cardiology AND selected parameter in English'. Four observational groups were determined: (1) major groups of heart diseases (coronary artery disease, valvular heart disease, congenital heart disease and cardiomyopathies); (2) relevant diseases in clinical practice (cardiac arrhythmias, cor pulmonale, myocardial infarction and congestive heart failure); (3) cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis); and (4) group determined due to the growing trend of publications on congestive heart failure seen in previous groups (congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, rheumatic heart disease and Chagasic heart disease) All publications within the established groups were described, highlighting the increasing importance of heart failure and diabetes as risk factors. A relatively easy search was carried out, using the computer program developed for literature search covering six decades. Emphasizing the limitations of the study, we suggest the existence of an epidemiological link between cardiac diseases that are prevalent in Brazil and the publications of the Brazilian Archives of Cardiology.

  9. Pompe disease: clinical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabello JF

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Juan Francisco Cabello,1 Deborah Marsden21Genetics and Metabolic Disease Laboratory, Nutrition and Food Technology Institute (INTA, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile; 2Division of Genetics and Genomics, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Pompe disease (acid alpha-glucosidase deficiency, OMIM 232300 is a rare lysosomal storage disorder due to autosomal recessive mutations in the GAA gene. It has also been called acid maltase deficiency and glycogen storage disease type II. There is a broad clinical presentation: the most severe form that presents in the first few months of life with cardiomyopathy and generalized muscle weakness that rapidly progresses to death from cardio-respiratory failure in the first year of life (infant-onset Pompe disease. A more slowly progressive disease, with little or no cardiac involvement, presents with proximal myopathy and/or pulmonary insufficiency, from the second year of life to late adulthood (late-onset Pompe disease. The recent development and introduction of enzyme replacement therapy with intravenous infusion of recombinant human acid alpha-glucosidase have made a major improvement in the morbidity and mortality of this disease. New therapies are also in development. With the availability of treatment, diagnostic methods have also improved, allowing for earlier recognition and potential early therapeutic intervention. The advent of newborn screening for Pompe disease may identify patients who can be treated before significant irreversible disease has occurred. Keywords: Pompe disease, glycogen storage disease, lysosomal storage disease, enzyme replacement therapy, gene therapy, chaperone therapy, genotype/phenotype, newborn screening

  10. Making sense of chromogranin A in heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, Jens Peter; Alehagen, Urban; Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2013-01-01

    Chromogranin A is an acidic protein present in secretory granules of neuroendocrine cells. In plasma, chromogranin A is an important marker of neuroendocrine tumours. Chromogranin A measurement has gained interest in cardiovascular disease, because increased plasma concentrations are associated...... with risk of clinical deterioration and death in patients with acute coronary syndromes or chronic heart failure. Cardiac chromogranin A is stored in atrial granules with cardiac natriuretic peptides—the principal cardiac hormones associated with systemic homoeostasis of water and blood pressure. Expression...

  11. [Stress echo and valvular heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monin, J L

    2005-06-01

    Stress echo has already been validated in some forms of valvular heart disease, especially in calcific aortic stenosis with low cardiac output and dynamic mitral regurgitation (MR) of valvular heart disease. Stress Doppler haemodynamics is a term used to differentiate these new indications from that of segmental wall analysis of the left atrium in ischaemic heart disease. In calcific aortic stenosis with low output, the haemodynamics with low dose dobutamine allows assessment of the real severity of the aortic stenosis and identification of the rare cases with mild stenosis: the principal indication remains the assessment of operative risk and long-term prognosis by the study of left ventricular contractile reserve. In cases of ischaemic left ventricular systolic dysfunction, the presence of mild mitral regurgitation (regurgitant surface area >20 mm2 at rest) is a poor prognostic factor. The dynamic character of mitral regurgitation is related to left ventricular remodelling which leads to deformation of the valvular apparatus (mitral tenting). Dynamic mitral regurgitation (regurgitant orifice area >13 mm2 on exercise) is a powerful prognostic factor, the role of which has recently been demonstrated in the genesis of acute pulmonary oedema. the other indications of stress haemodynamics are under validation, mainly the assessment of exercise capacity and valvular compliance in mitral stenosis or asymptomatic aortic stenosis.

  12. [Sports in children with congenital heart diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosser, Gilles; Moulin-Zinsch, Anne; Fischer-Atalla, Reem

    2017-05-01

    The practice of physical activity is one of the essential elements for health in general but also for the well-being and the quality of life. It is highly desirable to encourage physical activities in children with congenital heart diseases, taking into account all the benefits associated with this practice (quality of life, life expectancy) and this especially since these children often have limited capacity (due to their heart disease but also often by relative deconditioning). While there is a transient increase in risk of cardiac complications during intense activity, it would nevertheless be inappropriate to contra-indicate physical activities considering the well-known benefits in the medium and long term. The risks associated with the practice of physical activity must be assessed, on one hand, in terms of the severity of the heart disease, and on the other hand, on the nature and intensity of the activity. The stress test is here an essential tool because it helps to assess the physical capacity and cardiorespiratory adaptations to exercise. The international recommendations for competitive sports generally give an appropriate advice for a specific situation but the practice of moderate activity or leisure sports which are highly desirable should not be neglected and be strongly encouraged. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Arterial hypertension, microalbuminuria, and risk of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J S; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Strandgaard, S

    2000-01-01

    , diabetes mellitus, and renal or urinary tract disease. Untreated arterial hypertension or borderline hypertension was present in 204 subjects, who were followed until 1993 by the National Hospital and Death Certificate Registers with respect to development of ischemic heart disease. During 1978 person...... should be measured regularly in a hypertension clinic, and a rigorous control of blood pressure and of other atherosclerotic risk factors is recommended in hypertensive patients with microalbuminuria....... hypertensive subjects. In 1983 and 1984, blood pressure, urinary albumin/creatinine concentration ratio, plasma total and HDL cholesterol levels, body mass index, and smoking status were obtained in a population-based sample of 2085 subjects, aged 30 to 60 years, who were free from ischemic heart disease...

  14. Atrial fibrillation, ischaemic heart disease, and the risk of death in patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Dyg; Søndergaard, Peter; Nielsen, Tonny

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a risk factor for death in patients with a myocardial infarction, but highly variable results are reported in patients with heart failure. We studied the prognostic impact of AF in heart failure patients with and without ischaemic heart disease. METHODS AND RESULTS...... and without ischaemic heart disease, HR was 1.01 (95% CI: 0.88-1.16) and P=0.88. CONCLUSION: AF is associated with increased risk of death only in patients with ischaemic heart disease. This finding may explain the variable results of studies of the prognosis associated with AF in heart failure....

  15. Women, Loneliness, and Incident Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Rebecca C.; Kubzansky, Laura D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine associations between loneliness and risk of incident coronary heart disease (CHD) over a 19-year follow-up period in a community sample of men and women. Loneliness, the perceived discrepancy between actual and desired social relationships, has been linked to several adverse health outcomes. However, no previous research has prospectively examined the association between loneliness and incident CHD in a community sample of men and women. Methods Hypotheses were examined using data from the First National Health and Nutrition Survey and its follow-up studies (n = 3003). Loneliness, assessed by one item from the Center for Epidemiologic Studies of Depression scale, and covariates were derived from baseline interviews. Incident CHD was derived from hospital records/death certificates over 19 years of follow-up. Hypotheses were evaluated, using Cox proportional hazards models. Results Among women, high loneliness was associated with increased risk of incident CHD (high: hazard ratio = 1.76, 95% Confidence Interval = 1.17â2.63; medium: hazard ratio = 0.98, 95% Confidence Interval = 0.64â1.49; reference: low), controlling for age, race, education, income, marital status, hypertension, diabetes, cholesterol, physical activity, smoking, alcohol use, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and body mass index. Findings persisted additionally controlling for depressive symptoms. No significant associations were observed among men. Conclusions Loneliness was prospectively associated with increased risk of incident CHD, controlling for multiple confounding factors. Loneliness among women may merit clinical attention, not only due to its impact on quality of life but also its potential implications for cardiovascular health. PMID:19661189

  16. Investigation of myocardial receptors by PET in heart diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syrota, A.

    1986-10-01

    Changes in number and/or affinity of cardiac neurotransmitter receptors have been associated with myocardial ischemia and infarction, congestive heart failure, cardiomyopathy, as well as diabetes or thyroid-induced heart muscle disease. These alterations of cardiac receptors have been demonstrated in vitro on membrane homogenates from samples collected mainly during surgery or post mortem. The disadvantage of these in vitro binding techniques is that receptors lose their natural environment and their relationships with the other components of the tissue. With the advent of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) it is now possible to obtain noninvasively quantitative determination of regional biochemical processes in the heart. The feasibility of characterizing muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, beta-adrenergic receptors and α 1 -adrenergic receptors has been shown in animals and in man. The receptor PET technique begins to be applied to clinical investigation

  17. Chronic oral pathology and ischemic heart disease and its complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivaschenko Y.Y.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to establish the relationship of chronic generalized periodontitis, multiple cavities and dentofacial anomalies with various forms of coronary heart disease and its complications. Material and methods. The study included 294 patients with coronary heart disease and its complications. The patients were divided into two groups. Group I included 89 patients with acute Q-myocardial infarction, which was placed in the presence of at least 2 of the following criteria identified on the basis of a comprehensive clinical and instrumental examination: clinical, laboratory confirmation (CK-MB, electrocardiographic signs of damage or myocardial necrosis. The following statistical methods were used: multi-variate and univariate analysis of variance, non-parametric tests, crosstabulation, chi-square test, Fisher»s exact test. As a measure of variability of the normal distribution standard deviation was used. Results. It is noted that in patients with myocardial infarction more likely than in patients without coronary heart attack in history severe generalized periodontitis, dentofacial anomalies and multiple dental caries have appeared. In patients with acute myocardial infarction, severe periodontal disease has been associated with increased fibrinogen levels in the blood and an increase in the dispersion of the interval QT, which are known to be indicators of poor prognosis in acute coronary disease.

  18. Cyanotic congenital heart disease and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarp, Julie Bjerre; Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Engstrøm, Thomas; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Søndergaard, Lars

    2017-06-01

    Improved treatment options in paediatric cardiology and congenital heart surgery have resulted in an ageing population of patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD). The risk of acquired heart disease such as atherosclerosis increases with age.Previous studies have speculated whether patients with CCHD are protected against atherosclerosis. Results have shown that the coronary arteries of patients with CCHD are free from plaques and stenosis. Decreased carotid intima-media thickness and low total plasma cholesterol may indicate a reduced risk of later development of atherosclerosis. However, the evidence is still sparse and questionable, and a reasonable explanation for the decreased risk of developing atherosclerosis in patients with CCHD is still missing.This review provides an overview of what is known about the prevalence and potential causes of the reduced risk of atherosclerosis in patients with CCHD. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  19. Occupational risk factors for congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikkanen, J; Heinonen, O P

    1992-01-01

    To investigate possible associations between cardiovascular malformations and maternal occupational exposure to various factors during the first trimester of pregnancy, 406 cases and 756 controls were studied retrospectively. The cases were taken from all infants diagnosed with cardiovascular malformations born in Finland during 1982 and 1983. The controls were randomly selected from all normal births in the country during the same period. All mothers were interviewed approximately 3 months after delivery by a midwife, using a structured questionnaire. Maternal overall exposure to chemicals at work was more prevalent among the case group (35.8%) than the control group (26.2%, P less than 0.01). Among the specific chemical groups, maternal exposure to dyes, lacquers, or paints was significantly associated with the risk of congenital heart disease. Exposure to organic solvents during the first trimester seemed to increase to risk of ventricular septal defect (P less than 0.05). Work at video display terminals was slightly more prevalent among the case group (6.3%) than among the control group (5.0%). The mothers' education level, regular exposure to passive smoking at work, or temperature at the workplace were not risk factors for congenital heart disease in the offspring, neither was maternal exposure to microwave ovens, disinfectants, pesticides, or anesthetic gases. It is concluded that many maternal exposures at work seem not to have a teratogenic effect on the fetal heart, although the limited power of this investigation needs to be borne in mind.

  20. Perspectives on Trypanosoma cruzi-induced heart disease (Chagas disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanowitz, Herbert B; Machado, Fabiana S; Jelicks, Linda A; Shirani, Jamshid; de Carvalho, Antonio C Campos; Spray, David C; Factor, Stephen M; Kirchhoff, Louis V; Weiss, Louis M

    2009-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. It is a common cause of heart disease in endemic areas of Latin America. The year 2009 marks the 100th anniversary of the discovery of T cruzi infection and Chagas disease by the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas. Chagasic cardiomyopathy develops in from 10% to 30% of persons who are chronically infected with this parasite. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are important modalities in the evaluation and prognostication of individuals with chagasic heart disease. The etiology of chagasic heart disease likely is multifactorial. Parasite persistence, autoimmunity, and microvascular abnormalities have been studied extensively as possible pathogenic mechanisms. Experimental studies suggest that alterations in cardiac gap junctions may be etiologic in the pathogenesis of conduction abnormalities. The diagnosis of chronic Chagas disease is made by serology. The treatment of this infection has shortcomings that need to be addressed. Cardiac transplantation and bone marrow stem cell therapy for persons with Chagas disease have received increasing research attention in recent years.

  1. Serotonin Mechanisms in Heart Valve Disease I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Bo; Xu, Jie; Connolly, Jeanne; Savani, Rashmin C.; Narula, Navneet; Liang, Bruce; Levy, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Clinical disorders associated with increased serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] levels, such as carcinoid syndrome, and the use of serotonin agonists, such as fenfluoramine have been associated with a valvulopathy characterized by hyperplastic valvular and endocardial lesions with increased extracellular matrix. Furthermore, 5-HT has been demonstrated to up-regulate transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in mesangial cells via G-protein signal transduction. We investigated the hypothesis that increased exposure of heart valve interstitial cells to 5-HT may result in increased TGF-β1 expression and activity because of serotonin receptor-mediated signal transduction with activation of Gαq, and subsequently up-regulation of phospholipase C. Thus, in the present study we performed a clinical-pathological investigation of retrieved carcinoid and normal valve cusps using immunohistochemical techniques to detect the presence of TGF-β1 and other proteins associated with TGF-β expression, including TGF-β receptors I and II, latent TGF-β-associated peptide (LAP), and α-smooth muscle actin. Carcinoid valve cusps demonstrated the unusual finding of widespread smooth muscle actin involving the interstitial cells in the periphery of carcinoid nodules; these same cells were also positive for LAP. Normal valve cusps were only focally positive for smooth muscle actin and LAP. In sheep aortic valve interstitial cell cultures 5-HT induced TGF-β1 mRNA production and increased TGF-β1 activity. 5-HT also increased collagen biosynthesis at the dosages studied. Furthermore, TGF-β1 added to SAVIC cultures increased the production of sulfated glycan and hyaluronic acid. In addition, overexpression of Gαq using an adenoviral expression vector for a constitutively active Gαq mutant (Q209L-Gαq) resulted in increased phospholipase C activity as well as up-regulation of TGF-β expression and activity. These results strongly support the view that G-protein-related signal

  2. Review Paper Heart Failure in Small Animals - Advances in Clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rationale for the use of drugs and supportive therapy in the management of heart diseases (HDs) and heart failure (HF), is discussed in the light of contemporary concepts. The in-adequacy of the age-long therapy of heart failure with oxygen supplementation, cardiac glycosides, rest and the withholding of salt in food is ...

  3. Genetics of Dyslipidemia and Ischemic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kavita; Baliga, Ragavendra R

    2017-05-01

    Genetic dyslipidemias contribute to the prevalence of ischemic heart disease. The field of genetic dyslipidemias and their influence on atherosclerotic heart disease is rapidly developing and accumulating increasing evidence. The purpose of this review is to describe the current state of knowledge in regard to inherited atherogenic dyslipidemias. The disorders of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) and elevated lipoprotein(a) will be detailed. Genetic technology has made rapid advancements, leading to new discoveries in inherited atherogenic dyslipidemias, which will be explored in this review, as well as a description of possible future developments. Increasing attention has come upon the genetic disorders of familial hypercholesterolemia and elevated lipoprotein(a). This review includes new knowledge of these disorders including description of these disorders, their method of diagnosis, their prevalence, their genetic underpinnings, and their effect on the development of cardiovascular disease. In addition, it discusses major advances in genetic technology, including the completion of the human genome sequence, next-generation sequencing, and genome-wide association studies. Also discussed are rare variant studies with specific genetic mechanisms involved in inherited dyslipidemias, such as in the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) enzyme. The field of genetics of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease is rapidly growing, which will result in a bright future of novel mechanisms of action and new therapeutics.

  4. The clinical importance of radiological determination of the heart volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaedicke, W.; Ong, T.S.; Barmeyer, J.

    1982-01-01

    The size of the heart is an autonomous, important parameter of its functional state, i.e. in the radiologic heart diagnostics, the measurement of the heart volume is of equal value as the shape analysis. A size determination which must be exact enough for course controls and differentiation from the normal picture makes sense only if the measurement is carriet out in 3 dimensions and not in only one as is done when determining the heart-lung-quotient. The heart volume measurement carried out in lying or sitting position is considerably more reliable than in standing position as too many extracardiac factors influence the heart volume when the patient is standing. The echo cardiogram is a nearly ideal supplement but no competitor of radiological heart volume measurement and can be of the same value as or superior to heart volume measurement for functional diagnostics only in diseases limited to nearly exclusively to the left ventricle as in coronary diseases. (orig.) [de

  5. Congenital Heart Disease: Vascular Risk Factors and Medication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.P.M. Smedts (Dineke)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCongenital heart disease (CHD) is among the most common congenital abnormalities and involves structural anomalies of the heart and/or related major blood vessels. Congenital heart disease arises in the fi rst trimester of pregnancy, occurring often and in many forms. The reported CHD

  6. Echocardiographic patterns of juvenile rheumatic heart disease at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To describe the echocardiographic features of children with rheumatic heart disease seen at the Kenyatta National Hospital. Design: A retrospective study. Setting: The Kenyatta National Hospital Heart Unit. Subjects: Patients aged 20 years and less with echocardiographic diagnosis of rheumatic heart disease.

  7. Evaluation of proinflammatory cytokines and brain natriuretic peptide in patients with rheumatic heart diseases and coronary heart disease complicated by chronic heart insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N A Shoslak

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study proinflammatory cytokines and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP in patients with rheumatic heart diseases (RHD and coronary heart disease (CHD complicated by chronic heart insufficiency (CHI. Material and methods. 54 pts with CHI (among them 16 with RHD and 38 with CHD with signs of CHI ofll-IV functional class according to NYHA that correspond to 11A-III stage according to N.D. Strazesko-V.H. \\frsilenko classification and 30 healthy persons of control group were examined. Besides clinical evaluation common laboratory and instrumental methods were used. Thorough echocardiography analysis, quantitative evaluation of serum TNF a, IL6 and BNP by immuno-enzyme assay was performed. Results. Direct correlation between cytokines and BNP levels and pts with CHI clinical state severity was revealed. These indiccs significantly differed in coronary and non-coronary (RHD CHI. TNF a concentration was minimal in mitral stenosis. Maximal concentrations of IL6 and TNF a were revealed in tricuspid regurgitation. TNF a concentration elevated with increase of heart linear dimensions. BNP showed similar but less prominent tendencies. Conclusion. Significant difference of studied indices in coronary and non-coronary (RHD CHI was shown. Despite of similarity of CHI clinical features levels of inflammation biological indices in RHD was significantly lower than in CHD that requires further discussion.

  8. Women and Ischemic Heart Disease: Recognition, Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong-Mi; Merz, C Noel Bairey

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the most frequent causes of death in both males and females throughout the world. However, women exhibit a greater symptom burden, more functional disability, and a higher prevalence of nonobstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) compared to men when evaluated for signs and symptoms of myocardial ischemia. This paradoxical sex difference appears to be linked to a sex-specific pathophysiology of myocardial ischemia including coronary microvascular dysfunction, a component of the 'Yentl Syndrome'. Accordingly, the term ischemic heart disease (IHD) is more appropriate for a discussion specific to women rather than CAD or coronary heart disease. Following the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Heart Truth/American Heart Association, Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation and guideline campaigns, the cardiovascular mortality in women has been decreased, although significant gender gaps in clinical outcomes still exist. Women less likely undergo testing, yet guidelines indicate that symptomatic women at intermediate to high IHD risk should have further test (e.g. exercise treadmill test or stress imaging) for myocardial ischemia and prognosis. Further, women have suboptimal use of evidence-based guideline therapies compared with men with and without obstructive CAD. Anti-anginal and anti-atherosclerotic strategies are effective for symptom and ischemia management in women with evidence of ischemia and nonobstructive CAD, although more female-specific study is needed. IHD guidelines are not "cardiac catheterization" based but related to evidence of "myocardial ischemia and angina". A simplified approach to IHD management with ABCs (aspirin, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin-renin blockers, beta blockers, cholesterol management and statin) should be used and can help to increases adherence to guidelines.

  9. Iris features-based heart disease diagnosis by computer vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguchu, Benedictor A.; Li, Li

    2017-07-01

    The study takes advantage of several new breakthroughs in computer vision technology to develop a new mid-irisbiomedical platform that processes iris image for early detection of heart-disease. Guaranteeing early detection of heart disease provides a possibility of having non-surgical treatment as suggested by biomedical researchers and associated institutions. However, our observation discovered that, a clinical practicable solution which could be both sensible and specific for early detection is still lacking. Due to this, the rate of majority vulnerable to death is highly increasing. The delayed diagnostic procedures, inefficiency, and complications of available methods are the other reasons for this catastrophe. Therefore, this research proposes the novel IFB (Iris Features Based) method for diagnosis of premature, and early stage heart disease. The method incorporates computer vision and iridology to obtain a robust, non-contact, nonradioactive, and cost-effective diagnostic tool. The method analyzes abnormal inherent weakness in tissues, change in color and patterns, of a specific region of iris that responds to impulses of heart organ as per Bernard Jensen-iris Chart. The changes in iris infer the presence of degenerative abnormalities in heart organ. These changes are precisely detected and analyzed by IFB method that includes, tensor-based-gradient(TBG), multi orientations gabor filters(GF), textural oriented features(TOF), and speed-up robust features(SURF). Kernel and Multi class oriented support vector machines classifiers are used for classifying normal and pathological iris features. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method, not only has better diagnostic performance, but also provides an insight for early detection of other diseases.

  10. Role of nuclear medicine in ischemic heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashida, Kohei; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Uehara, Toshiisa; Naito, Hiroaki; Omine, Hiromi; Kozuka, Takahiro (National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan))

    1982-08-01

    With the progress in gamma camera and computer system, nuclear medicine has been applied for diagnostic tool in ischemic heart disease. There are two devices for cardiac images; (1) Radionuclide angiocardiography (RNA) by in vivo sup(99m)Tc-RBC labeling (2) Myocardial imaging by /sup 201/Tlcl. RNA can evaluate the kinesis of wall motion of left ventricle with gated pool scan and also detect reserve of cardiac function with exercise study. Myocardial imaging at rest can identify myocardial necrosis and the imaging in exercise can detect myocardial ischemia. The elaborateness and reproducibility of cardiac image in nuclear medicine will play the great role to evaluate clinical stage of ischemic heart disease by not only imaging but also functional diagnosis.

  11. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor therapy to induce neovascularization in ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten

    2012-01-01

    Cell based therapy for ischemic heart disease has the potential to reduce post infarct heart failure and chronic ischemia. Treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilizes cells from the bone marrow to the peripheral blood. Some of these cells are putative stem or progenitor...... to improved myocardial perfusion and function in acute or chronic ischemic heart disease. The hypothesis of this thesis is that patient with ischemic heart disease will benefit from G-CSF therapy. We examined this hypothesis in two clinical trials with G-CSF treatment to patients with either acute myocardial...... infarction or severe chronic ischemic heart disease. In addition, we assed a number of factors that could potentially affect the effect of cell based therapy. Finally, we intended to develop a method for in vivo cell tracking in the heart. Our research showed that subcutaneous G-CSF along with gene therapy...

  12. Organization-and-technological model of medical care delivered to patients with coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popova Y.V.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Organization-and-technological model of medical care delivered to patients with coronary heart disease based on IDEF0 methodology and corresponded with clinical guidelines is presented.

  13. Perceived job insecurity as a risk factor for incident coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virtanen, Marianna; Nyberg, Solja T; Batty, George David

    2013-01-01

    . REVIEW METHODS: Prospective cohort studies that reported risk estimates for clinically verified incident coronary heart disease by the level of self reported job insecurity. Two independent reviewers extracted published data. Summary estimates of association were obtained using random effects models...

  14. Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention: Data Trends & Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The CDC Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention's Data Trends & Maps online tool allows searching for and view of health indicators related to Heart...

  15. [Disease management for chronic heart failure patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bläuer, Cornelia; Pfister, Otmar; Bächtold, Christa; Junker, Therese; Spirig, Rebecca

    2011-02-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (HF) are limited in their quality of life, have a poor prognosis and face frequent hospitalisations. Patient self-management was shown to improve quality of life, reduce rehospitalisations and costs in patients with chronic HF. Comprehensive disease management programmes are critical to foster patient self-management. The chronic care model developed by the WHO serves as the basis of such programmes. In order to develop self-management skills a needs orientated training concept is mandatory, as patients need both knowledge of the illness and the ability to use the information to make appropriate decisions according to their individual situation. Switzerland has no established system for the care of patients with chronic diseases in particular those with HF. For this reason a group of Swiss experts for HF designed a model for disease management for HF patients in Switzerland. Since 2009 the Swiss Heart Foundation offers an education programme based on this model. The aim of this programme is to offer education and support for practitioners, patients and families. An initial pilot evaluation of the program showed mixed acceptance by practitioners, whereas patient assessed the program as supportive and in line with their requirements.

  16. Stress echo for evaluation of valvular heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Yavagal, S.T.; Deshpande, Niteen; Admane, Parag

    2014-01-01

    Resting echocardiography is the most important tool for diagnosing valvular heart disease. However, treatment planning in valvular heart diseases may require additional information in some patients, particularly asymptomatic patients with severe valve disease or symptomatic patients with moderate disease. Stress echocardiography provides invaluable information in these situations and aids decision making. Stress echocardiography is performed using either physical stress or dobutamine stress a...

  17. Psychological factors and coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadži-Pešić Marina

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary heart disease (CAD results from an interaction of different somatic, environmental and behavioral risk factors. Commonly, development of CAD is associated with arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, smoking, sedentary life style and the like. Psychological factors in their own sake or in combination with other risk factors are also important for genesis of CAD. In this study, 170 people that were diagnosed with CAD and 170 healthy controls of corresponding sex and age were compared for anxiety, aggressiveness and Eysenck's two personality dimension. The data indicate that patients with CAD have very low level of anxiety and aggressiveness and very high level of neuroticism relative to the controls. .

  18. Tracheal quadrifurcation associated with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Ahmad, Ozaire [Narayana Multispeciality Hospital and Mazumdar Shaw Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Bangalore (India)

    2015-08-15

    Tracheal anomalies are known in association with congenital cardiac defects. Some of the well-described anomalies include accessory (displaced) tracheal bronchus with variants, tracheal trifurcation and accessory cardiac bronchus. Here we describe a case of tracheal quadrifurcation associated with complex congenital heart disease. Illustration of complex airway anatomy was simplified by the use of multidetector CT using a variety of image display options. Awareness of this complex anomaly will expand our knowledge of tracheal anomalies and equip the anesthesia and surgical team for better airway management. (orig.)

  19. Ventricular tachycardia in ischemic heart disease substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olujimi A. Ajijola

    2014-01-01

    This review will discuss the central role of the ischemic heart disease substrate in the development MMVT. Electrophysiologic characterization of the post-infarct myocardium using bipolar electrogram amplitudes to delineate scar border zones will be reviewed. Functional electrogram determinants of reentrant circuits such as isolated late potentials will be discussed. Strategies for catheter ablation of reentrant ventricular tachycardia, including structural and functional targets will also be examined, as will the role of the epicardial mapping and ablation in the management of recurrent MMVT.

  20. Prevalence of Dyslipidemia in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuenmayor, Gabriela; Redondo, Ana Carolina Costa; Shiraishi, Karen Saori [Hospital do Coração - Associação do Sanatório Sírio, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Souza, Rogerio [Hospital do Coração - Associação do Sanatório Sírio, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Instituto do Coração, Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Elias, Patrícia Figueiredo; Jatene, Ieda Biscegli, E-mail: ijatene@hcor.com.br [Hospital do Coração - Associação do Sanatório Sírio, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    Dyslipidemia is one of the main risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases. Few data on the impacts of congenital heart diseases are available with regard to the prevalence of dyslipidemia in children. Our study evaluated the lipid profile in children with congenital heart disease at a referral center. From January 2011 to July 2012, 52 pediatric patients had their lipid, metabolic and clinical profiles traced. The mean age was 10.4 ± 2.8 years and male/female rate of 1.38:1. Our population had 53.8% patients with high levels of total cholesterol and 13.4% (CI 95 %, from 6.6 to 25.2%) of them also presenting LDL levels ≥ 130 mg/dL, which characterizes dyslipidemia. The group of dyslipidemic patients presented only two obese individuals. Our data show that the presence of congenital heart disease does not lead to higher risk associated with the prevalence of dyslipidemia. Therefore, the screening of this specific population should follow the regular pediatric guidelines, which are also independent of the nutritional status of the children tested.

  1. Prevalence of Dyslipidemia in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuenmayor, Gabriela; Redondo, Ana Carolina Costa; Shiraishi, Karen Saori; Souza, Rogerio; Elias, Patrícia Figueiredo; Jatene, Ieda Biscegli

    2013-01-01

    Dyslipidemia is one of the main risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases. Few data on the impacts of congenital heart diseases are available with regard to the prevalence of dyslipidemia in children. Our study evaluated the lipid profile in children with congenital heart disease at a referral center. From January 2011 to July 2012, 52 pediatric patients had their lipid, metabolic and clinical profiles traced. The mean age was 10.4 ± 2.8 years and male/female rate of 1.38:1. Our population had 53.8% patients with high levels of total cholesterol and 13.4% (CI 95 %, from 6.6 to 25.2%) of them also presenting LDL levels ≥ 130 mg/dL, which characterizes dyslipidemia. The group of dyslipidemic patients presented only two obese individuals. Our data show that the presence of congenital heart disease does not lead to higher risk associated with the prevalence of dyslipidemia. Therefore, the screening of this specific population should follow the regular pediatric guidelines, which are also independent of the nutritional status of the children tested

  2. Lipid metabolism in the heart. Contribution of BMIPP to the diseased heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nohara, Ryuji [Tazuke Kofukai Medical Research Inst., Osaka (Japan). Kitano Hospital

    2001-10-01

    Lipid contributes greatly in cardiac metabolism to produce high energy ATPs, and is suggested to be related to the progression and deterioration of heart disease. It is fortunate that the I-123-betamethyliodophenylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) imaging technique is now available in determining heart condition, but we must be cautious about the interpretation of images obtained with new tracer. From the uptake of BMIPP into the cell to breakdown and catabolism of it, there exist so many critical enzymatical pathways relating to the modification of BMIPP imaging. In clinical evaluation, the image will be translated as the integral effects of these pathways. In order words, we must be aware of these critical pathways regulating lipid metabolism and modifying factors in order to correctly understand BMIPP imaging. Lipid transport is affected by the albumin/FFA ratio in the blood, and extraction with membrane transporter proteins. Fatty acid binding protein (FABP) in the cytosole will play an important role in regulating lipid flux and following metabolism. Lipid will be utilized either for oxidation, triglyceride or phospholipid formation. For oxidation, carnitine palmitoil transferase is the key enzyme for the entrance of lipid into mitochondria, and oxidative enzymes such as acyl CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD, LCAD, HAD) will determine lipid use for the TCA cycle. ATPs produced in the mitochondria again limit the TG store. It is well known that BMIPP imaging completely changes in the ischemic condition, and is also shown that lipid metabolical regulation completely differs from normal in the very early phase of cardiac hypertrophy. In the process of deteriorating heart failure, metabolical switching of lipid with glucose will take place. In such a different heart disease conditions, it is clear that lipid metabolical regulation, including many lipid enzymes, works differently from in the healthy condition. These lipid enzymes are regulated by nuclear factor peroxisome

  3. Salud Para Su Corazon (health for your heart) community health worker model: community and clinical approaches for addressing cardiovascular disease risk reduction in Hispanics/Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcazar, H; Alvarado, M; Ortiz, G

    2011-01-01

    This article describes 6 Salud Para Su Corazon (SPSC) family of programs that have addressed cardiovascular disease risk reduction in Hispanic communities facilitated by community health workers (CHWs) or Promotores de Salud (PS). A synopsis of the programs illustrates the designs and methodological approaches that combine community-based participatory research for 2 types of settings: community and clinical. Examples are provided as to how CHWs can serve as agents of change in these settings. A description is presented of a sustainability framework for the SPSC family of programs. Finally, implications are summarized for utilizing the SPSC CHW/PS model to inform ambulatory care management and policy.

  4. Early twentieth century descriptions of the Chagas heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punukollu, Gopikrishna; Gowda, Ramesh M; Khan, Ijaz A

    2004-06-01

    Chagas heart disease is endemic in 21 countries with approximately 100 million people at risk. It is the most common cause of myocarditis in the Americas and is recognized to have existed for more than 4000 years (isolated from mummies). Chagas disease was discovered during the search to find a cause for the overwhelming deaths occurring in Brazil in the late 18th century. Physician Carlos Chagas discovered Trypanosome minasense in 1908 while researching on malaria. Subsequently, the existence of the barbeiro triatomine (insects bites on the face), the isolation of the Trypanosome cruzi in the triatomine and the first human description of a disease in a 9-month-old child depicted the existence of a new human trypanosomiasis. Chagas named the trypanosome species after his colleague and mentor Oswaldo Cruz. In subsequent papers, Chagas described the morphology and evolutionary cycle of the trypanosome and the clinical features of the disease, including involvement of the heart. Never before or since one physician has fully characterized a disease from its grass roots to the clinical forms more or less all by himself.

  5. Genetics of Congenital Heart Disease: Past and Present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntean, Iolanda; Togănel, Rodica; Benedek, Theodora

    2017-04-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital anomaly, representing an important cause of infant morbidity and mortality. Congenital heart disease represents a group of heart anomalies that include septal defects, valve defects, and outflow tract anomalies. The exact genetic, epigenetic, or environmental basis of congenital heart disease remains poorly understood, although the exact mechanism is likely multifactorial. However, the development of new technologies including copy number variants, single-nucleotide polymorphism, next-generation sequencing are accelerating the detection of genetic causes of heart anomalies. Recent studies suggest a role of small non-coding RNAs, micro RNA, in congenital heart disease. The recently described epigenetic factors have also been found to contribute to cardiac morphogenesis. In this review, we present past and recent genetic discoveries in congenital heart disease.

  6. Adult Congenital Heart Disease: Scope of the Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor Dray, Efrat; Marelli, Ariane J

    2015-11-01

    This article reviews the changing epidemiology of congenital heart disease summarizing its impact on the demographics of the congenital heart disease population and the progress made in order to improve outcomes in this patient population. Birth prevalence of congenital heart disease can be modified by many factors. As a result of decreasing mortality and increasing survival in all forms of congenital heart disease, the median age of patients has increased and adults now compose two-thirds of patients with congenital heart disease. Disease burden and resulting health services utilization increase significantly across the lifespan. Bridging the gap between policy and quality of care can be improved by referral to specialized adult congenital heart disease centers and planning delivery of specialized services that are commensurate with population needs, program accreditation criteria and certified training of designated workforce. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Stress management in heart diseases, obesity, nicotine and alcohol use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esterbauer, E; Anders, I; Ladurner, G; Huemer, M; Wranek, U

    2001-12-17

    Heart diseases, obesity, nicotine and alcohol abuse are all relevant stroke risk factors. Some studies refer to stress stimuli and coping strategies as modulators for stroke risk factors. This study investigated differences between stroke prevention patients with heart complaints, obesity, nicotine or alcohol abuse and stroke prevention patients without these risk factors. 5993 stroke prevention patients participated in a medical-psychological stroke risk investigation at the Christian Doppler Clinic in Salzburg. The differences in coping strategies between groups of patients with risk factors and groups without were investigated by means of multivariate analysis of covariance. Significant differences in stress coping were found for every risk factor (split by sex). Men suffering from heart diseases showed higher values in the coping strategy tendency to flee. Women with heart complaints demonstrated significantly lower values in minimising by comparison. Obese/adipose patients performed significantly higher values in the coping strategies vicarious satisfaction and aggression (men). Nicotine abusing prevention patients showed significantly higher values in drug intake and lower scores in continued thoughts. Non-smoking men furthermore reached higher values in vicarious satisfaction and non-smoking women in minimising. Persons not consuming alcohol demonstrated higher drug intake and aggression (men). Wine drinkers showed lower scores of self-pity and increased situation control attempts (women). Prevention patients with risk factors demonstrated significant differences in coping strategies in comparison to those without risk factors. Persons with heart diseases demonstrate a more defensive behaviour. The risk factors obesity, nicotine and alcohol consumption are associated with a risk factor supporting stress coping behaviour. The modification of the coping strategies drug intake and vicarious satisfaction towards a more active confrontation could probably

  8. Psychological Stress, Inflammation, and Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, Petra H; von Känel, Roland

    2017-09-20

    In this review, we summarize evidence on the risk factor psychological stress in the context of coronary heart disease (CHD) in humans and explore the role of inflammation as a potential underlying mechanism. While chronic stress increases the risk of incident CHD and poor cardiovascular prognosis, acute emotional stress can trigger acute CHD events in vulnerable patients. Evidence supporting a potential role for inflammation as a promising biological mechanism comes from population-based studies showing associations between chronic stress and increased inflammation. Similarly, experimental studies demonstrate acute stress-induced increases in inflammatory markers and suggest modulatory potential for pharmacological and biobehavioral interventions. So far, studies investigating patients with cardiovascular disease are few and the full sequence of events from stress to inflammation to CHD remains to be established. Psychological stress is an independent CHD risk factor associated with increased inflammation. Although promising, causality needs to be further explored.

  9. A STUDY ON CLINICAL AND AETIOLOGICAL PROFILE OF HEART FAILURE AT KBN TEACHING AND GENERAL HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrakala Guruprasad Yelwanti

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The heart failure is a worldwide health problem with ever increasing proportion and is a major health problem in elderly persons. It has many aetiological factors. It is one of the most frequently encountered illnesses in day-to-day practice and most common cause of death in patients with cardiac disease. This study was done to determine the age and sex distribution and to evaluate clinical features and aetiological factors in patients admitted with heart failure at Khaja Banda Nawaz Teaching and General Hospital, Gulbarga, on the basis of clinical assessment, electrocardiography and echocardiography. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective study was done in Department of General Medicine at Khaja Banda Nawaz Teaching and General Hospital, Gulbarga, from January 2015 to June 2016 on patients with heart failure to determine the clinical and aetiological profile. A total of 100 cases above the age of 20 years were included in the study. The patients below the age of 20 years and known cases of congenital heart disease were excluded. RESULTS Out of 100 patients, the heart failure was seen more commonly in men than in women between the age groups of 46-65 years of age. Breathlessness was the most common presentation followed by pedal oedema, orthopnoea, etc. In our study, the primary aetiology for heart failure was found to be coronary artery disease (47% followed by dilated cardiomyopathy (20%, hypertension (14%, rheumatic heart disease (7%, anaemia (6%, cor pulmonale (4% and others (2%. Dyslipidaemia was the common risk factor followed by obesity and smoking. CONCLUSION The heart failure commonly occurs in elderly people and the incidence was higher in men than in women. The commonest presentation was breathlessness followed by pedal oedema. The commonest cause of heart failure was coronary artery disease followed by dilated cardiomyopathy and then hypertension combined with ischaemic heart disease.

  10. A comparison of live counseling with a web-based lifestyle and medication intervention to reduce coronary heart disease risk: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyserling, Thomas C; Sheridan, Stacey L; Draeger, Lindy B; Finkelstein, Eric A; Gizlice, Ziya; Kruger, Eliza; Johnston, Larry F; Sloane, Philip D; Samuel-Hodge, Carmen; Evenson, Kelly R; Gross, Myron D; Donahue, Katrina E; Pignone, Michael P; Vu, Maihan B; Steinbacher, Erika A; Weiner, Bryan J; Bangdiwala, Shrikant I; Ammerman, Alice S

    2014-07-01

    Most primary care clinicians lack the skills and resources to offer effective lifestyle and medication (L&M) counseling to reduce coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Thus, effective and feasible CHD prevention programs are needed for typical practice settings. To assess the effectiveness, acceptability, and cost-effectiveness of a combined L&M intervention to reduce CHD risk offered in counselor-delivered and web-based formats. A comparative effectiveness trial in 5 diverse family medicine practices in North Carolina. Participants were established patients, aged 35 to 79 years, with no known cardiovascular disease, and at moderate to high risk for CHD (10-year Framingham Risk Score [FRS], ≥10%). Participants were randomized to counselor-delivered or web-based format, each including 4 intensive and 3 maintenance sessions. After randomization, both formats used a web-based decision aid showing potential CHD risk reduction associated with L&M risk-reducing strategies. Participants chose the risk-reducing strategies they wished to follow. The primary outcome was within-group change in FRS at 4-month follow-up. Other measures included standardized assessments of blood pressure, blood lipid levels, lifestyle behaviors, and medication adherence. Acceptability and cost-effectiveness were also assessed. Outcomes were assessed at 4 and 12 months. Of 2274 screened patients, 385 were randomized (192 counselor; 193 web): mean age, 62 years; 24% African American; and mean FRS, 16.9%. Follow-up at 4 and 12 months included 91% and 87% of the randomized participants, respectively. There was a sustained reduction in FRS at both 4 months (primary outcome) and 12 months for both counselor-based (-2.3% [95% CI, -3.0% to -1.6%] and -1.9% [95% CI, -2.8% to -1.1%], respectively) and web-based groups (-1.5% [95% CI, -2.2% to -0.9%] and -1.7% [95% CI, -2.6% to -0.8%] respectively). At 4 months, the adjusted difference in FRS between groups was -1.0% (95% CI, -1.8% to -0.1%) (P = .03

  11. HeartCare+: A Smart Heart Care Mobile Application for Framingham-Based Early Risk Prediction of Hard Coronary Heart Diseases in Middle East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda Ahmed Galal Elsayed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Healthcare is a challenging, yet so demanding sector that developing countries are paying more attention to recently. Statistics show that rural areas are expected to develop a high rate of heart diseases, which is a leading cause of sudden mortality, in the future. Thus, providing solutions that can assist rural people in detecting the cardiac risks early will be vital for uncovering and even preventing the long-term complications of cardiac diseases. Methodology. Mobile technology can be effectively utilized to limit the cardiac diseases’ prevalence in rural Middle East. This paper proposes a smart mobile solution for early risk detection of hard coronary heart diseases that uses the Framingham scoring model. Results. Smart HeartCare+ mobile app estimates accurately coronary heart diseases’ risk over 10 years based on clinical and nonclinical data and classifies the patient risk to low, moderate, or high. HeartCare+ also directs the patients to further treatment recommendations. Conclusion. This work attempts to investigate the effectiveness of the mobile technology in the early risk detection of coronary heart diseases. HeartCare+ app intensifies the communication channel between the lab workers and patients residing in rural areas and cardiologists and specialist residing in urban places.

  12. Dietary cholesterol, heart disease risk and cognitive dissonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Donald J

    2014-05-01

    In the 1960s, the thesis that dietary cholesterol contributes to blood cholesterol and heart disease risk was a rational conclusion based on the available science at that time. Fifty years later the research evidence no longer supports this hypothesis yet changing the dietary recommendation to limit dietary cholesterol has been a slow and at times contentious process. The preponderance of the clinical and epidemiological data accumulated since the original dietary cholesterol restrictions were formulated indicate that: (1) dietary cholesterol has a small effect on the plasma cholesterol levels with an increase in the cholesterol content of the LDL particle and an increase in HDL cholesterol, with little effect on the LDL:HDL ratio, a significant indicator of heart disease risk, and (2) the lack of a significant relationship between cholesterol intake and heart disease incidence reported from numerous epidemiological surveys. Over the last decade, many countries and health promotion groups have modified their dietary recommendations to reflect the current evidence and to address a now recognised negative consequence of ineffective dietary cholesterol restrictions (such as inadequate choline intake). In contrast, health promotion groups in some countries appear to suffer from cognitive dissonance and continue to promote an outdated and potentially hazardous dietary recommendation based on an invalidated hypothesis. This review evaluates the evidence for and against dietary cholesterol restrictions and the potential consequences of such restrictions.

  13. Biochemical markers of myocardial remodelling in hypertensive heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Arantxa; López, Begoña; Ravassa, Susana; Beaumont, Javier; Arias, Teresa; Hermida, Nerea; Zudaire, Amaia; Díez, Javier

    2009-02-15

    The intricate mechanisms responsible for the structural remodelling of the myocardium that facilitates the evolution to heart failure in hypertensive patients, namely in those with left ventricular hypertrophy, requires from clinicians the utilization of a multibiomarker approach for short-term and long-term stratification as well as prognostication of patients. Biochemical markers may also help to identify patients with no clinical evidence of hypertensive heart disease, and provide information about the need for more aggressive therapy during different stages of the disease, and potentially provide valuable biochemical data for the specialist. Although there is a continuous and complex interplay between biochemical and imaging markers, perhaps their use will also have the potential to modify the medical management of patients with hypertensive heart disease and therapeutic decision-making by tailoring a targeted therapy according to the predominant mechanism of myocardial remodelling. This article will review in brief the most relevant information on a panel of circulating molecules that may accomplish the criteria required to be considered as biochemical markers of the cardiomyocyte and non-cardiomyocyte structural changes that occur in the hypertensive myocardium.

  14. Ventricular Tachycardia in the Absence of Structural Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis R. P. Scott

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available In up to 10% of patients who present with ventricular tachycardia (VT, obvious structural heart disease is not identified. In such patients, causes of ventricular arrhythmia include right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT VT, extrasystoles, idiopathic left ventricular tachycardia (ILVT, idiopathic propranolol-sensitive VT (IPVT, catecholaminergic polymorphic VT (CPVT, Brugada syndrome, and long QT syndrome (LQTS. RVOT VT, ILVT, and IPVT are referred to as idiopathic VT and generally do not have a familial basis. RVOT VT and ILVT are monomorphic, whereas IPVT may be monomorphic or polymorphic. The idiopathic VTs are classified by the ventricle of origin, the response to pharmacologic agents, catecholamine dependence, and the specific morphologic features of the arrhythmia. CPVT, Brugada syndrome, and LQTS are inherited ion channelopathies. CPVT may present as bidirectional VT, polymorphic VT, or catecholaminergic ventricular fibrillation. Syncope and sudden death in Brugada syndrome are usually due to polymorphic VT. The characteristic arrhythmia of LQTS is torsades de pointes. Overall, patients with idiopathic VT have a better prognosis than do patients with ventricular arrhythmias and structural heart disease. Initial treatment approach is pharmacologic and radiofrequency ablation is curative in most patients. However, radiofrequency ablation is not useful in the management of inherited ion channelopathies. Prognosis for patients with VT secondary to ion channelopathies is variable. High-risk patients (recurrent syncope and sudden cardiac death survivors with inherited ion channelopathies benefit from implantable cardioverter-defibrillator placement. This paper reviews the mechanism, clinical presentation, and management of VT in the absence of structural heart disease.

  15. Structural heart disease as the cause of syncope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, R.B.; Essebag, V.; Furlanetto, M.; Yanez, J.P.G.; Farina, M.G.; Garcia, D.; Almeida, E.D.; Stephan, L.; Lima, G.G.; Leiria, T.L.L.

    2018-01-01

    We described the clinical evolution of patients with structural heart disease presenting at the emergency room with syncope. Patients were stratified according to their syncope etiology and available scores for syncope prognostication. Cox proportional hazard models were used to investigate the relationship between etiology of the syncope and event-free survival. Of the 82,678 emergency visits during the study period, 160 (0.16%) patients were there due to syncope, having a previous diagnosis of structural heart disease. During the median follow-up of 33.8±13.8 months, mean age at the qualifying syncope event was 68.3 years and 40.6% of patients were male. Syncope was vasovagal in 32%, cardiogenic in 57%, orthostatic hypotension in 6%, and of unknown causes in 5% of patients. The primary composite endpoint death, readmission, and emergency visit in 30 days was 39.4% in vasovagal syncope and 60.6% cardiogenic syncope (Psyncope (HR=2.97, 95%CI=1.94-4.55; Psyncope causes in patients with structural heart disease is important, because vasovagal and postural hypotension have better survival and less probability of emergency room or hospital readmission. The available scores are not reliable tools for prognosis in this specific patient population. PMID:29513795

  16. Women's Heart Disease: Join the Heart Truth Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... has held a Red Dress runway event during Fashion Week in New York City. The event is ... African American and Hispanic women, in particular, have high rates of the major risk factors for heart ...

  17. Illness understanding in children and adolescents with heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Veldtman, G; Matley, S; Kendall, L; Quirk, J; Gibbs, J; Parsons, J; Hewison, J

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To evaluate illness knowledge and understanding in children and adolescents with congenital and acquired heart disease, and whether the degree of understanding is related to age, sex, or complexity of the heart disease.
DESIGN—Prospective cohort study.
SETTING—Tertiary paediatric cardiac centre.
METHODS—Patients' understanding of their congenital heart disease was assessed in a representative sample of volunteers aged between 7-18 years using semistructured interviews based upon Leventha...

  18. Illness understanding in children and adolescents with heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Veldtman, G R; Matley, S L; Kendall, L; Quirk, J; Gibbs, J L; Parsons, J M; Hewison, J

    2001-01-01

    Aims To evaluate illness knowledge and understanding in children and adolescents with congenital and acquired heart disease and to assess whether the degree of understanding is related to age, sex, or complexity of the heart disease. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Tertiary pediatric cardiac center. Methods Patients' understanding of their congenital heart disease was assessed in a representative sample of volunteers aged between 7 and 18 years using semistructured interviews based o...

  19. Pulmonary hypertension associated with left-sided heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeder, Micha Tobias; Schoch, Otto D; Kleiner, Rebekka; Joerg, Lucas; Weilenmann, Daniel; Swiss Society For Pulmonary Hypertension

    2017-01-19

    Pulmonary hypertension associated with left-sided heart disease (PH-LHD) is the most common type of pulmonary hypertension. In patients with left-sided heart disease, the presence of pulmonary hypertension is typically a marker of more advanced disease, more severe symptoms, and worse prognosis. In contrast to pulmonary arterial hypertension, PH-LHD is characterised by an elevated pulmonary artery wedge pressure (postcapillary pulmonary hypertension) without or with an additional precapillary component (isolated postcapillary versus combined postcapillary and precapillary pulmonary hypertension). Transthoracic echocardiography is the primary nonin-vasive imaging tool to estimate the probability of pulmonary hypertension and to establish a working diagnosis on the mechanism of pulmonary hyperten-sion. However, right heart catheterisation is always required if significant pulmonary hypertension is sus-pected and exact knowledge of the haemodynamic constellation is necessary. The haemodynamic con-stellation (mean pulmonary artery pressure, mean pulmonary artery wedge pressure, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure) in combination with clinical infor-mation and imaging findings (mainly echocardiog-raphy, coronary angiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging) will usually allow the exact mech-anism underlying PH-LHD to be defined, which is a prerequisite for appropriate treatment. The general principle for the management of PH-LHD is to treat the underlying left-sided heart disease in an optimal man-ner using drugs and/or interventional or surgical ther-apy. There is currently no established indication for pulmonary arterial hypertension-specific therapies in PH-LHD, and specific therapies may even cause harm in patients with PH-LHD.

  20. Associations between DSM-IV mental disorders and subsequent heart disease onset: beyond depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kate M.; de Jonge, Peter; Alonso, Jordi; Viana, Maria Carmen; Liu, Zhaorui; O’Neill, Siobhan; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Caldas-de-Almeida, Jose Miguel; Stein, Dan J.; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Florescu, Silvia E.; Hu, Chiyi; Taib, Nezar Ismet; Lépine, Jean-Pierre; Levinson, Daphna; Matschinger, Herbert; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Piazza, Marina; Posada-Villa, José A.; Uda, Hidenori; Wojtyniak, Bogdan J.; Lim, Carmen C. W.; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prior studies on the depression-heart disease association have not usually used diagnostic measures of depression, nor taken other mental disorders into consideration. As a result, it is not clear whether the association between depression and heart disease onset reflects a specific association, or the comorbidity between depression and other mental disorders. Additionally, the relative magnitude of associations of a range of mental disorders with heart disease onset is unknown. Methods Face-to-face household surveys were conducted in 19 countries (n=52,095; person years=2,141,194). The Composite International Diagnostic Interview retrospectively assessed lifetime prevalence and age at onset of 16 DSM-IV mental disorders. Heart disease was indicated by self-report of physician’s diagnosis, or self-report of heart attack, together with their timing (year). Survival analyses estimated associations between first onset of mental disorders and subsequent heart disease onset. Results After comorbidity adjustment, depression, panic disorder, specific phobia, post-traumatic stress disorder and alcohol use disorders were associated with heart disease onset (ORs 1.3–1.6). Increasing number of mental disorders was associated with heart disease in a dose-response fashion. Mood disorders and alcohol abuse were more strongly associated with earlier onset than later onset heart disease. Associations did not vary by gender. Conclusions Depression, anxiety and alcohol use disorders were significantly associated with heart disease onset; depression was the weakest predictor. If confirmed in future prospective studies, the breadth of psychopathology’s links with heart disease onset has substantial clinical and public health implications. PMID:23993321

  1. Pulmonary Hypertension in Congenital Heart Disease: Beyond Eisenmenger Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Eric V; Leary, Peter J; Opotowsky, Alexander R

    2015-11-01

    Patients with adult congenital heart disease have an increased risk of developing pulmonary hypertension. There are several mechanisms of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease, and understanding them requires a systematic approach to define the patient's hemodynamics and physiology. This article reviews the updated classification of pulmonary hypertension in patients with adult congenital heart disease with a focus on pathophysiology, diagnostics, and the evaluation of pulmonary hypertension in special adult congenital heart disease populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The genetics of congenital heart disease… understanding and improving long-term outcomes in congenital heart disease: a review for the general cardiologist and primary care physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, M Abigail; Brueckner, Martina

    2017-10-01

    This review has two purposes: to provide an updated review of the genetic causes of congenital heart disease (CHD) and the clinical implications of these genetic mutations, and to provide a clinical algorithm for clinicians considering a genetics evaluation of a CHD patient. A large portion of congenital heart disease is thought to have a significant genetic contribution, and at this time a genetic cause can be identified in approximately 35% of patients. Through the advances made possible by next generation sequencing, many of the comorbidities that are frequently seen in patients with genetic congenital heart disease patients can be attributed to the genetic mutation that caused the congenital heart disease. These comorbidities are both cardiac and noncardiac and include: neurodevelopmental disability, pulmonary disease, heart failure, renal dysfunction, arrhythmia and an increased risk of malignancy. Identification of the genetic cause of congenital heart disease helps reduce patient morbidity and mortality by improving preventive and early intervention therapies to address these comorbidities. Through an understanding of the clinical implications of the genetic underpinning of congenital heart disease, clinicians can provide care tailored to an individual patient and continue to improve the outcomes of congenital heart disease patients.

  3. The fractal heart — embracing mathematics in the cardiology clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Captur, Gabriella; Karperien, Audrey L.; Hughes, Alun D.; Francis, Darrel P.; Moon, James C.

    2017-01-01

    For clinicians grappling with quantifying the complex spatial and temporal patterns of cardiac structure and function (such as myocardial trabeculae, coronary microvascular anatomy, tissue perfusion, myocyte histology, electrical conduction, heart rate, and blood-pressure variability), fractal analysis is a powerful, but still underused, mathematical tool. In this Perspectives article, we explain some fundamental principles of fractal geometry and place it in a familiar medical setting. We summarize studies in the cardiovascular sciences in which fractal methods have successfully been used to investigate disease mechanisms, and suggest potential future clinical roles in cardiac imaging and time series measurements. We believe that clinical researchers can deploy innovative fractal solutions to common cardiac problems that might ultimately translate into advancements for patient care. PMID:27708281

  4. Characteristics and outcomes of heart failure-related hospitalization in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Nidhal Ben; Karsenty, Clement; Pontnau, Florence; Malekzadeh-Milani, Sophie; Boudjemline, Younes; Legendre, Antoine; Bonnet, Damien; Iserin, Laurence; Ladouceur, Magalie

    2017-05-01

    Heart failure (HF) is the main cause of death in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD). We aimed to characterize HF-related hospitalization of patients with ACHD, and to determine HF risk factors and prognosis in this population. We prospectively included 471 patients with ACHD admitted to our unit over 24 months. Clinical and biological data and HF management were recorded. Major cardiovascular events were recorded for ACHD with HF. HF was the main reason for hospitalization in 13% of cases (76/583 hospitalizations). Patients with HF were significantly older (median age 44±14 years vs. 37±15 years; Pcongenital heart disease (P=0.04). In the multivariable analysis, pulmonary arterial hypertension (odds ratio [OR] 6.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.5-10.7), history of HF (OR 9.8, 95% CI 5.7-16.8) and history of atrial arrhythmia (OR 3.6, 95% CI 2.2-5.9) were significant risk factors for HF-related admissions (Pheart transplantation during the median follow-up of 18 months (95% CI 14-20 months). The risk of cardiovascular events was 19-fold higher after HF-related hospitalization. HF is emerging as a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the ACHD population. Earlier diagnosis and more active management are required to improve outcomes of HF in ACHD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Ocular pathology in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, A M; Bitar, F F; Traboulsi, E I; Kassak, K M; Obeid, M Y; Megarbane, A; Salti, H I

    2005-01-01

    To describe the ocular findings in subjects with congenital heart disease (CHD). In a prospective study, the same observer examined 240 consecutive patients with CHD admitted to the medical centre. Two independent geneticists performed identification of syndromes. The commonest anatomic cardiac anomalies were ventricular or atrial septal defects (62), tetralogy of Fallot (39), pulmonary stenosis (25), and transposition of the great arteries (24). The heart lesions were divided physiologically into volume overload (90), cyanotic (87), and obstructive (63). In all, 105 syndromic subjects included the velocardiofacial syndrome (18), Down's syndrome (17), CHARGE association (6), DiGeorge syndrome (5), Williams syndrome (3), Edwards syndrome (3), Noonan syndrome (3), VACTERL association (2), and Patau syndrome (trisomy 13) (2). The paediatric team recognized 51 patients as syndromic. Two independent geneticists recognized additional 54 patients as syndromic. Positive eye findings were present in 55% (132) and included retinal vascular tortuosity (46), optic disc hypoplasia (30), trichomegaly (15), congenital ptosis (12), strabismus (11), retinal haemorrhages (8), prominent eyes (7), and congenital cataract (6). There was a strong correlation between the retinal vascular tortuosity and both a low haematocrit (P=0.000) and a low arterial oxygen saturation (P=0.002). Patients with CHD are at a high risk for ocular pathology and need screening for various ocular abnormalities.

  6. Rheumatic heart disease screening: Current concepts and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Dougherty

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatic heart disease (RHD is a disease of poverty, is almost entirely preventable, and is the most common cardiovascular disease worldwide in those under 25 years. RHD is caused by acute rheumatic fever (ARF which typically results in cumulative valvular lesions that may present clinically after a number of years of subclinical disease. Therapeutic interventions, therefore, typically focus on preventing subsequent ARF episodes (with penicillin prophylaxis. However, not all patients with ARF develop symptoms and not all symptomatic cases present to a physician or are correctly diagnosed. Therefore, if we hope to control ARF and RHD at the population level, we need a more reliable discriminator of subclinical disease. Recent studies have examined the utility of echocardiographic screening, which is far superior to auscultation at detecting RHD. However, there are many concerns surrounding this approach. Despite the introduction of the World Heart Federation diagnostic criteria in 2012, we still do not really know what constitutes the most subtle changes of RHD by echocardiography. This poses serious problems regarding whom to treat and what to do with the rest, both important decisions with widespread implications for already stretched health-care systems. In addition, issues ranging from improving the uptake of penicillin prophylaxis in ARF/RHD-positive patients, improving portable echocardiographic equipment, understanding the natural history of subclinical RHD and how it might respond to penicillin, and developing simplified diagnostic criteria that can be applied by nonexperts, all need to be effectively tackled before routine widespread screening for RHD can be endorsed.

  7. Congenital heart disease in the newborn requiring early intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sin Weon Yun

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Although antenatal diagnostic technique has considerably improved, precise detection and proper management of the neonate with congenital heart disease (CHD is always a great concern to pediatricians. Congenital cardiac malformations vary from benign to serious conditions such as complete transposition of the great arteries (TGA, critical pulmonary and aortic valvular stenosis/atresia, hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS, obstructed total anomalous pulmonary venous return (TAPVR, which the baby needs immediate diagnosis and management for survival. Unfortunately, these life threatening heart diseases may not have obvious evidence early after birth, most of the clinical and physical findings are nonspecific and vague, which makes the diagnosis difficult. High index of suspicion and astute acumen are essential to decision making. When patent ductus arteriosus (PDA is opened widely, many serious malformations may not be noticed easily in the early life, but would progress as severe acidosis/shock/cyanosis or even death as PDA constricts after few hours to days. Ductus dependent congenital cardiac lesions can be divided into the ductus dependent systemic or pulmonary disease, but physiologically quite different from each other and treatment strategy has to be tailored to the clinical status and cardiac malformations. Inevitably early presentation is often regarded as a medical emergency. Differential diagnosis with inborn error metabolic disorders, neonatal sepsis, persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN and other pulmonary conditions are necessary. Urgent identification of the newborn at such high risk requires timely referral to a pediatric cardiologist, and timely intervention is the key in reducing mortality and morbidity. This following review deals with the clinical presentations, investigative modalities and approach to management of congenital cardiac malformations presenting in the early life.

  8. Spectrum of Congenital Heart Diseases in Eastern Nepal: A tertiary care hospital experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Shah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Congenital heart diseases are neglected especially in world’s poorest nations and appear to be ignored and unexplored dimension of health. The exact prevalence and spectrum of congenital heart diseases in Nepal is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to describe the local experience on the magnitude and the pattern of congenital heart disease in order to increase the awareness of the public and health policy makers on its burden in Nepal.Materials & Methods: This is an observational hospital based study carried out in a tertiary care hospital in Eastern Nepal. The duration of this study was from April 2015 to July 2016. The echocardiography reports of all patients clinically suspected of having congenital heart disease were retrieved, and their diagnostic details were extracted. Only patients of day one of life to 14 years of age were included. Congenital heart diseases like bicuspid aortic valve, mitral valve prolapse and various inherited cardiomyopathies were excluded.Results: A total of 330 echocardiograms were performed for clinically suspected congenital heart disease.  The mean age of study population was 22.31±34.08 months with male to female ratio of 1.2:1. 23% of clinically suspected congenital heart disease cases turned out to have normal echocardiography. Acyanotic congenital heart disease was most common (81.5% followed by cyanotic congenital heart disease (14.2% and obstructive congenital heart disease (4.3%. Atrial septal defect was found to be the most common form of acyanotic congenital heart disease (52% which was followed by ventricular septal defect (28.8% and patent ductus arteriosus (14.8%. Tetralogy of Fallot and double outlet right ventricle were the most common form of cyanotic CHD representing 44.4% of all cyanotic patients. Pulmonary stenosis was the most common obstructive congenital heart disease observed in this study population (63.6%. Rarer entities, like d-transposition of great

  9. BRUGADA SYNDROME: FROM PRIMARY ELECTRIC HEART DISEASE TO MORPHOLOGICAL SUBSTRATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Pavlenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays interest in channelopathies is growing, and developing diagnostic capabilities make Brugada syndrome much more actual problem than ever. Conception of «primary electric heart disease», which earlier was so popular, now couldn’t explain the absence of single genetic syndromes’ substrate, its’ common combinations with another arrhythmias and the presence of Brugada phenocopy. Conjunction of Brugada syndrome with morphological changes in myocardium , especially myocarditis, is an area of special interest. Infl ammation associates with clinical manifestation of the syndrome, and this situation forces to think about channelopathies’ primacy and to look for another possible mechanisms of Brugada syndrome.

  10. FISH CONSUMPTION, METHYLMERCURY, AND HUMAN HEART DISEASE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LIPFERT, F.W.; SULLIVAN, T.M.

    2005-09-21

    Environmental mercury continues to be of concern to public health advocates, both in the U.S. and abroad, and new research continues to be published. A recent analysis of potential health benefits of reduced mercury emissions has opened a new area of public health concern: adverse effects on the cardiovascular system, which could account for the bulk of the potential economic benefits. The authors were careful to include caveats about the uncertainties of such impacts, but they cited only a fraction of the applicable health effects literature. That literature includes studies of the potentially harmful ingredient (methylmercury, MeHg) in fish, as well as of a beneficial ingredient, omega-3 fatty acids or ''fish oils''. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently certified that some of these fat compounds that are primarily found in fish ''may be beneficial in reducing coronary heart disease''. This paper briefly summarizes and categorizes the extensive literature on both adverse and beneficial links between fish consumption and cardiovascular health, which are typically based on studies of selected groups of individuals (cohorts). Such studies tend to comprise the ''gold standard'' of epidemiology, but cohorts tend to exhibit a great deal of variability, in part because of the limited numbers of individuals involved and in part because of interactions with other dietary and lifestyle considerations. Note that eating fish will involve exposure to both the beneficial effects of fatty acids and the potentially harmful effects of contaminants like Hg or PCBs, all of which depend on the type of fish but tend to be correlated within a population. As a group, the cohort studies show that eating fish tends to reduce mortality, especially due to heart disease, for consumption rates up to about twice weekly, above which the benefits tend to level off. A Finnish cohort study showed increased mortality risks

  11. Remnant cholesterol and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varbo, Anette; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review recent advances in the field of remnant cholesterol as a contributor to the development of ischemic heart disease (IHD). RECENT FINDINGS: Epidemiologic, mechanistic, and genetic studies all support a role for elevated remnant cholesterol (=cholesterol in triglyceride......-rich lipoproteins) as a contributor to the development of atherosclerosis and IHD. Observational studies show association between elevated remnant cholesterol and IHD, and mechanistic studies show remnant cholesterol accumulation in the arterial wall like LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) accumulation. Furthermore, large...... genetic studies show evidence of remnant cholesterol as a causal risk factor for IHD independent of HDL-cholesterol levels. Genetic studies also show that elevated remnant cholesterol is associated with low-grade inflammation, whereas elevated LDL-C is not. There are several pharmacologic ways of lowering...

  12. Antioxidant vitamins and coronary heart disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knekt, Paul; Ritz, John; Pereira, Mark A

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies have suggested a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) at higher intakes of fruit, vegetables, and whole grain. Whether this association is due to antioxidant vitamins or some other factors remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: We studied the relation between the intake...... of antioxidant vitamins and CHD risk. DESIGN: A cohort study pooling 9 prospective studies that included information on intakes of vitamin E, carotenoids, and vitamin C and that met specific criteria was carried out. During a 10-y follow-up, 4647 major incident CHD events occurred in 293 172 subjects who were...... free of CHD at baseline. RESULTS: Dietary intake of antioxidant vitamins was only weakly related to a reduced CHD risk after adjustment for potential nondietary and dietary confounding factors. Compared with subjects in the lowest dietary intake quintiles for vitamins E and C, those in the highest...

  13. Chronic heart disease caused by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horimoto, Masashi; Matsuhashi, Hironobu; Nakano, Hiroshi; Honda, Hajime; Sekiguchi, Morie.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis was made of 5 patients who had chronic heart disease 18 months to 13 years after radiation therapy for breast cancer or rib osteoblastoma. A total dose of X-ray or electron beam was ≥50 Gy for each patient. Computed tomography of the chest and cardiac catheterization led to the diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis with chronic pericardial effusion in one patient and chronic effusive pericarditis in the other three patients. Complete or incomplete right bundle branch block was observed on ECG in 3 patients. Endomyocardial biopsy of the right ventricle for 4 patients revealed nonspecific pathological findings, such as hypertrophy, disarray of cardiac muscle cells, various sized cell nuclei, rarefaction of myofibrils, and slight interstitial fibrosis with infrequent cellular infiltration. The results may implicate radiation-induced myocardial disturbance. Long-term follow-up is mandatory for the management of patients treated with radiation. (Namekawa, K.)

  14. In vino veritas: alcohol and heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Joseph A

    2005-03-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies, numbering nearly 100, have documented an inverse association between alcohol consumption and vascular risk. The preponderance of evidence supports an independent beneficial effect of mild-to-moderate alcoholic beverage consumption on risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, it is important to remember that observational data cannot prove causation; unmeasured or incompletely controlled confounding factors cannot be excluded. That said, most authorities now attribute a causal role to the relationship: moderate alcohol consumption reduces the risk of CHD, and current research centers on the mechanistic underpinnings and whether patterns of drinking are important. Here, I review the association between alcohol use and CHD risk, explore putative mechanisms, and make recommendations.

  15. Congenital heart disease in the dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matic, S.E.

    1988-01-01

    The clinical findings and investigation of dogs with congenital cardiac disease is described and the role of diagnostic aids including radiography, electrocardiography and echocardiography is outlined. The physical findings, prognosis and therapy of the common defects are reviewed and their aetiology is briefly discussed

  16. Vitamin D deficiency and heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pilz, Stefan; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Drechsler, Christiane; de Boer, Rudolf A.

    Vitamin D deficiency is present in the vast majority of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and correcting a poor vitamin D status is recommended as a treatment of CKD-mineral and bone disorders. In this review, we summarize the molecular and clinical data on the role of vitamin D status for

  17. CLINICAL AND ANGIOGRAPHIC PROFILE OF PATIENTS WITH COMPLETE HEART BLOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavya Pingali

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The angiographic findings and prognosis of patients with Complete Heart Block (CHB remain unclear. Thus, we aimed to study the clinical profile, risk factors, angiographic distribution and in-hospital outcomes of patients with complete heart block. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a prospective, single-centred study which included 100 patients who came to the emergency department with CHB. Routine blood investigations including serum electrolytes were done. Coronary angiogram was done and lesions were assessed. Temporary pacemaker was implanted followed by permanent pacemakers in required patients, and in-hospital complications were noted down. RESULTS Commonest age group was above 60 years (75%. The patients were predominantly males. Most common presentation was chest pain (60%; there was regional wall motion abnormality in 30% patients. Degenerative complete heart block was seen in 34% patients, diphtheric myocarditis in 15%, hypokalaemic in 15%, dilated cardiomyopathy in 2%. Of total 53 patients had AV block, 14 had bifascicular block, 23 had LBBB, 6 had RBBB, 3 had Mobitz I and 1 had Mobitz II. Inferior wall myocardial infarction (MI was pervasively present in patients. Temporary pacemakers were implanted in 6 patients and permanent pacemakers in 43 patients. In-hospital outcomes constituted of complication like cardiogenic shock (10% and death (26%. The patients who died either had 80% -90% stenosis in RCA, triple vessel disease, ostioproximal LAD occlusion or diphtheric myocarditis. CONCLUSION Complete heart block was majorly associated with advanced age and inferior wall MI, virtually caused by dominant RCA occlusion. The in-hospital mortality was significantly higher in the patients with CHB.

  18. [Resting heart rate and cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito Díaz, Buenaventura; Alemán Sánchez, José Juan; Cabrera de León, Antonio

    2014-07-07

    Heart rate reflects autonomic nervous system activity. Numerous studies have demonstrated that an increased heart rate at rest is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as an independent risk factor. It has been shown a link between cardiac autonomic balance and inflammation. Thus, an elevated heart rate produces a micro-inflammatory response and is involved in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction. In turn, decrease in heart rate produces benefits in congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, obesity, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and atherosclerosis. Alteration of other heart rate-related parameters, such as their variability and recovery after exercise, is associated with risk of cardiovascular events. Drugs reducing the heart rate (beta-blockers, calcium antagonists and inhibitors of If channels) have the potential to reduce cardiovascular events. Although not recommended in healthy subjects, interventions for reducing heart rate constitute a reasonable therapeutic goal in certain pathologies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  19. What Are Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... worse. Heart-healthy lifestyle changes include: Heart-healthy eating Aiming for a healthy weight Managing stress Physical activity Quitting smoking Many lifestyle habits begin during childhood. Thus, parents and families should ...

  20. Update for 2014 on clinical cardiology, geriatric cardiology, and heart failure and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; López Díaz, Javier; Martín Santana, Antonio; García Pinilla, José Manuel; Gómez Doblas, Juan José; Gómez Bueno, Manuel; Barrios Alonso, Vivencio; Lambert, José Luis

    2015-04-01

    In the present article, we review publications from the previous year in the following 3 areas: clinical cardiology, geriatric cardiology, and heart failure and transplantation. Among the new developments in clinical cardiology are several contributions from Spanish groups on tricuspid and aortic regurgitation, developments in atrial fibrillation, syncope, and the clinical characteristics of heart disease, as well as various studies on familial heart disease and chronic ischemic heart disease. In geriatric cardiology, the most relevant studies published in 2014 involve heart failure, degenerative aortic stenosis, and data on atrial fibrillation in the geriatric population. In heart failure and transplantation, the most noteworthy developments concern the importance of multidisciplinary units and patients with preserved systolic function. Other notable publications were those related to iron deficiency, new drugs, and new devices and biomarkers. Finally, we review studies on acute heart failure and transplantation, such as inotropic drugs and ventricular assist devices. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical characteristics and causes of heart failure, adherence to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mechanical ventilation and dobutamine were used ..... Comparison of CAD risk factors in the present study with HF studies from SSA and other parts of the world ... CAD = coronary artery disease; HF = heart failure; SSA = sub-Saharan Africa; SA = South Africa; THESUS-HF = The Sub-Saharan Africa Survey of Heart Failure; ...

  2. Psychological interventions for coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Suzanne H; Anderson, Lindsey; Jenkinson, Caroline E; Whalley, Ben; Rees, Karen; Davies, Philippa; Bennett, Paul; Liu, Zulian; West, Robert; Thompson, David R; Taylor, Rod S

    2017-04-28

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common cause of death globally, although mortality rates are falling. Psychological symptoms are prevalent for people with CHD, and many psychological treatments are offered following cardiac events or procedures with the aim of improving health and outcomes. This is an update of a Cochrane systematic review previously published in 2011. To assess the effectiveness of psychological interventions (alone or with cardiac rehabilitation) compared with usual care (including cardiac rehabilitation where available) for people with CHD on total mortality and cardiac mortality; cardiac morbidity; and participant-reported psychological outcomes of levels of depression, anxiety, and stress; and to explore potential study-level predictors of the effectiveness of psychological interventions in this population. We updated the previous Cochrane Review searches by searching the following databases on 27 April 2016: CENTRAL in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (Ovid), Embase (Ovid), PsycINFO (Ovid), and CINAHL (EBSCO). We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of psychological interventions compared to usual care, administered by trained staff, and delivered to adults with a specific diagnosis of CHD. We selected only studies estimating the independent effect of the psychological component, and with a minimum follow-up of six months. The study population comprised of adults after: a myocardial infarction (MI), a revascularisation procedure (coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)), and adults with angina or angiographically defined coronary artery disease (CAD). RCTs had to report at least one of the following outcomes: mortality (total- or cardiac-related); cardiac morbidity (MI, revascularisation procedures); or participant-reported levels of depression, anxiety, or stress. Two review authors independently screened titles and abstracts of all references for eligibility. A lead review author

  3. Role of modern 3D echocardiography in valvular heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography has been conceived as one of the most promising methods for the diagnosis of valvular heart disease, and recently has become an integral clinical tool thanks to the development of high quality real-time transesophageal echocardiography (TEE). In particular, for mitral valve diseases, this new approach has proven to be the most unique, powerful, and convincing method for understanding the complicated anatomy of the mitral valve and its dynamism. The method has been useful for surgical management, including robotic mitral valve repair. Moreover, this method has become indispensable for nonsurgical mitral procedures such as edge to edge mitral repair and transcatheter closure of paravaluvular leaks. In addition, color Doppler 3D echo has been valuable to identify the location of the regurgitant orifice and the severity of the mitral regurgitation. For aortic and tricuspid valve diseases, this method may not be quite as valuable as for the mitral valve. However, the necessity of 3D echo is recognized for certain situations even for these valves, such as for evaluating the aortic annulus for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. It is now clear that this method, especially with the continued development of real-time 3D TEE technology, will enhance the diagnosis and management of patients with these valvular heart diseases. PMID:25378966

  4. Sadness and broken hearts: neurohumoral mechanisms and co-morbidity of ischemic heart disease and psychological depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A K; Grippo, A J

    2006-11-01

    Heart disease and depression are highly co-morbid. Clinical and experimental research over the past 70 years has led to several neurohumoral hypotheses of causative factors present under the conditions of either heart failure or of psychological depression. Some of these hypothesized factors are common to both disorders and are therefore attractive candidates to account for the high incidence of co-occurrence of depression and heart disease. One experimental approach to study the co-morbidity of heart failure and depression has been to study the behavioral, biochemical and physiological changes in a chronic mild stress model of depression and in heart failure induced by experimental myocardial infarction. Our studies have led us to focus on the pro-inflammatory cytokines, in particular tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Both of these families of humoral factors are elevated in human heart failure and in depression and the two experimental models we have studied. The demonstrated validity of each of these models will be of great value in elucidating the nature of the actions and interactions of these humoral agents as they contribute to the co-morbid conditions of heart failure and depression.

  5. Clinical characteristics and causes of heart failure, adherence to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. There is limited information on acute heart failure (AHF) and its treatment in sub-Saharan Africa. Objective. To describe the clinical characteristics and causes of heart failure (HF), adherence to HF treatment guidelines, and mortality of patients with AHF presenting to Groote Schuur Hospital (GSH), Cape Town, ...

  6. Clinical characteristics and prognosis of heart failure in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Braña, Lucía; Mateo-Mosquera, Lara; Bermúdez-Ramos, María; Valcárcel García, María de los Ángeles; Fernández Hernández, Lorena; Hermida Ameijeiras, Álvaro; Lado Lado, Francisco Luis

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess prevalence, clinical characteristics, and prognosis in elderly patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) compared to patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFREF) who were followed in an internal medicine unit. In this retrospective observational study, the sample consisted of 301 patients followed in an internal medicine referral unit between January 2007 and December 2010. All patients were checked to determine their vital status on 31 December 2012. Survival was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier curves, and compared using the log-rank test. Of the 301 patients, 165 (54.8%) were women. In the 263 cases (87.4%) who underwent echocardiographic assessment, 190 (72.2%) had HFPEF and 73 (27.8%) had HFREF. Mean age was similar in the two groups (80.1 and 79.9 years; p=0.905), with a predominance of women in the HFPEF group (60.5% women, 42.5% men; p=0.025). The main etiology was hypertensive heart disease in the HFPEF group. Regarding treatment, more beta-blockers were administered in the HFREF group. No statistically significant differences were observed between the groups in terms of cardiovascular risk factors, comorbidities, NYHA functional class, or mortality. Clinical characteristics were similar for both HFPEF and HFREF patients. Women were predominant in the HFPEF group, as was hypertensive etiology. No significant differences in mortality were observed between the groups. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of hepatic resection for patients with carcinoid heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernheim, A.M.; Connolly, H.M.; Rubin, J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of resection of hepatic carcinoid metastases on progression and prognosis of carcinoid heart disease. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From our database of 265 consecutive patients diagnosed as having carcinoid heart disease from January 1, 1980, through December 31, 2005,...

  8. The trace elements in congenital cyanotic heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ali Hegazi

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: Congenital cyanotic heart disease were associated with a highly significant decrease in the mean serum selenium and zinc levels, when compared with control group and non significant increase the mean serum copper levels. Changes in these trace elements suggested to play an important role in the pathogenesis of myocardial damage in congenital cyanotic heart disease.

  9. Heart Disease in Women: Understand Symptoms and Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Some research has found that if you had pregnancy complications such as high blood pressure or diabetes your children may also have an increased risk of heart disease in the future. Women with inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis or lupus, may also have a higher risk of heart ...

  10. status, risk factors disease Socio-economic and coronary heart

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-07-21

    Jul 21, 1990 ... status, risk factors disease. Socio-economic and coronary heart. The CORIS baseline study. J. E. ROSSOUW, P. L. JOOSTE, H. J. STEENKAMP, M. L. THOMPSON, ... and coronary risk factors (RFs) with coronary heart disease .... definition, was decided upon after exploration of their strength of association ...

  11. Job strain as a risk factor for coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Nyberg, Solja T; Batty, G David

    2012-01-01

    Published work assessing psychosocial stress (job strain) as a risk factor for coronary heart disease is inconsistent and subject to publication bias and reverse causation bias. We analysed the relation between job strain and coronary heart disease with a meta-analysis of published and unpublishe...

  12. DNA methylation abnormalities in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Juhé, Clara; Cuscó, Ivon; Homs, Aïda; Flores, Raquel; Torán, Núria; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects represent the most common malformation at birth, occurring also in ∼50% of individuals with Down syndrome. Congenital heart defects are thought to have multifactorial etiology, but the main causes are largely unknown. We have explored the global methylation profile of fetal heart DNA in comparison to blood DNA from control subjects: an absolute correlation with the type of tissue was detected. Pathway analysis revealed a significant enrichment of differential methylation at genes related to muscle contraction and cardiomyopathies in the developing heart DNA. We have also searched for abnormal methylation profiles on developing heart-tissue DNA of syndromic and non-syndromic congenital heart defects. On average, 3 regions with aberrant methylation were detected per sample and 18 regions were found differentially methylated between groups. Several epimutations were detected in candidate genes involved in growth regulation, apoptosis and folate pathway. A likely pathogenic hypermethylation of several intragenic sites at the MSX1 gene, involved in outflow tract morphogenesis, was found in a fetus with isolated heart malformation. In addition, hypermethylation of the GATA4 gene was present in fetuses with Down syndrome with or without congenital heart defects, as well as in fetuses with isolated heart malformations. Expression deregulation of the abnormally methylated genes was detected. Our data indicate that epigenetic alterations of relevant genes are present in developing heart DNA in fetuses with both isolated and syndromic heart malformations. These epimutations likely contribute to the pathogenesis of the malformation by cis-acting effects on gene expression.

  13. Plasma microvesicle analysis identifies microRNA 129-5p as a biomarker of heart failure in univentricular heart disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweta Ramachandran

    Full Text Available Biomarkers of heart failure in adults have been extensively studied. However, biomarkers to monitor the progression of heart failure in children with univentricular physiology are less well understood. We proposed that as mediators of diverse pathophysiology, miRNAs contained within circulating microvesicles could serve as biomarkers for the presence and progression of heart failure in univentricular patients. To test this, we studied the association of heart failure with elevations in specific miRNAs isolated from circulating microvesicles in a cohort of children with univentricular heart disease and heart failure. We conducted a single site cross-sectional observational study of 71 children aged 1 month-7 years with univentricular heart disease and heart failure. We demonstrated that levels of miR129-5p isolated from plasma microvesicles were inversely related to the degree of clinical heart failure as assessed by Ross score. We then showed that miR129-5p levels are downregulated in HL1 cells and human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes exposed to oxidative stress. We demonstrated that bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2, which has been implicated in the development of pulmonary vascular disease, is a target of miR129-5p, and conversely regulated in response to oxidative stress in cell culture. Levels of miR129-5p were inversely related to the degree of clinical heart failure in patients with univentricular heart disease. This study demonstrates that miR129-5p is a sensitive and specific biomarker for heart failure in univentricular heart disease independent of ventricular morphology or stage of palliation. Further study is warranted to understand the targets affected by miR129-5p with the development of heart failure in patients with univentricular physiology.

  14. Heart disease and gender in mass print media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Juanne

    2008-03-01

    Heart disease is a major cause of death, disease and disability in the developed world for both men and women. Nevertheless, the evidence suggests that women are under-diagnosed both because they fail to visit the doctor with relevant symptoms and because doctors tend to dismiss the seriousness of women's symptoms of heart disease. This study examines the way that popular mass print media present the possible links between gender and heart disease. The findings suggest that the 'usual candidates' for heart disease are considered to be high achieving and active men for whom the 'heart attack' is sometimes seen as a 'badge of honour' and a symbol of their success. In contrast, women are less often seen as likely to succumb, but they are portrayed as if they are and ought to be worried about their husbands. Women's own bodies are described as so problematic as to be perhaps useless to diagnose, because they are so difficult to understand and treat.

  15. Clinical study of Whole Heart MRCA. Comparison with MDCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Soji; Tateishi, Toshiki; Iwai, Mitsuhiro; Hayashi, Ryuji

    2005-01-01

    MR coronary angiography (MRCA) and CT coronary angiography (CTCA) are noninvasive imaging methods in the coronary arteries. We have been using Whole Heart MRCA since November 2003 and CTCA since April 2004, and Whole Heart MRCA and CTCA have been performed on patients in September 2004, 200 and 100, respectively. In 42 patients in whom Whole Heart MRCA and CTCA were performed with the aim of establishing a reliable examination for screening for ischemic heart disease (IHD) at the same period, the ability of both examinations to depict the coronary arteries was good. Whole Heart examination is the first selection of the screening examinations in terms of X-ray exposure and total volume of contrast medium used for other examinations. However, CTCA is suitable as the first examination in the early postoperative stage. We can expect that Whole Heart MRCA is established as noninvasive methods for screening for IHD. (author)

  16. Increased arterial stiffness in children with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häcker, Anna-Luisa; Reiner, Barbara; Oberhoffer, Renate; Hager, Alfred; Ewert, Peter; Müller, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Objective Central systolic blood pressure (SBP) is a measure of arterial stiffness and strongly associated with atherosclerosis and end-organ damage. It is a stronger predictor of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality than peripheral SBP. In particular, for children with congenital heart disease, a higher central SBP might impose a greater threat of cardiac damage. The aim of the study was to analyse and compare central SBP in children with congenital heart disease and in healthy counterparts. Patients and methods Central SBP was measured using an oscillometric method in 417 children (38.9% girls, 13.0 ± 3.2 years) with various congenital heart diseases between July 2014 and February 2017. The test results were compared with a recent healthy reference cohort of 1466 children (49.5% girls, 12.9 ± 2.5 years). Results After correction for several covariates in a general linear model, central SBP of children with congenital heart disease was significantly increased (congenital heart disease: 102.1 ± 10.2 vs. healthy reference cohort: 100.4 ± 8.6, p congenital heart disease subgroups revealed higher central SBP in children with left heart obstructions (mean difference: 3.6 mmHg, p hearts after total cavopulmonary connection (mean difference: 2.1 mmHg, p = .015) compared with the reference. Conclusion Children with congenital heart disease have significantly higher central SBP compared with healthy peers, predisposing them to premature heart failure. Screening and long-term observations of central SBP in children with congenital heart disease seems warranted in order to evaluate the need for treatment.

  17. Mortality by Heart Failure and Ischemic Heart Disease in Brazil from 1996 to 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Nagib Gaui

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Circulatory system diseases are the first cause of death in Brazil. Objective: To analyze the evolution of mortality caused by heart failure, by ischemic heart diseases and by ill-defined causes, as well as their possible relations, in Brazil and in the geoeconomic regions of the country (North, Northeast, Center-West, South and Southeast, from 1996 to 2011. Methods: Data were obtained from DATASUS and death declaration records with codes I20 and I24 for acute ischemic diseases, I25 for chronic ischemic diseases, and I50 for heart failure, and codes in chapter XIII for ill-defined causes, according to geoeconomic regions of Brazil, from 1996 to 2011. Results: Mortality rates due to heart failure declined in Brazil and its regions, except for the North and the Northeast. Mortality rates due to acute ischemic heart diseases increased in the North and Northeast regions, especially from 2005 on; they remained stable in the Center-West region; and decreased in the South and in the Southeast. Mortality due to chronic ischemic heart diseases decreased in Brazil and in the Center-West, South and Southeast regions, and had little variation in the North and in the Northeast. The highest mortality rates due to ill-defined causes occurred in the Northeast until 2005. Conclusions: Mortality due to heart failure is decreasing in Brazil and in all of its geoeconomic regions. The temporal evolution of mortality caused by ischemic heart diseases was similar to that of heart failure. The decreasing number of deaths due to ill-defined causes may represent the improvement in the quality of information about mortality in Brazil. The evolution of acute ischemic heart diseases ranged according to regions, being possibly confused with the differential evolution of ill-defined causes.

  18. Mortality by Heart Failure and Ischemic Heart Disease in Brazil from 1996 to 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaui, Eduardo Nagib; Oliveira, Gláucia Maria Moraes de; Klein, Carlos Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Circulatory system diseases are the first cause of death in Brazil. To analyze the evolution of mortality caused by heart failure, by ischemic heart diseases and by ill-defined causes, as well as their possible relations, in Brazil and in the geoeconomic regions of the country (North, Northeast, Center-West, South and Southeast), from 1996 to 2011. Data were obtained from DATASUS and death declaration records with codes I20 and I24 for acute ischemic diseases, I25 for chronic ischemic diseases, and I50 for heart failure, and codes in chapter XIII for ill-defined causes, according to geoeconomic regions of Brazil, from 1996 to 2011. Mortality rates due to heart failure declined in Brazil and its regions, except for the North and the Northeast. Mortality rates due to acute ischemic heart diseases increased in the North and Northeast regions, especially from 2005 on; they remained stable in the Center-West region; and decreased in the South and in the Southeast. Mortality due to chronic ischemic heart diseases decreased in Brazil and in the Center-West, South and Southeast regions, and had little variation in the North and in the Northeast. The highest mortality rates due to ill-defined causes occurred in the Northeast until 2005. Mortality due to heart failure is decreasing in Brazil and in all of its geoeconomic regions. The temporal evolution of mortality caused by ischemic heart diseases was similar to that of heart failure. The decreasing number of deaths due to ill-defined causes may represent the improvement in the quality of information about mortality in Brazil. The evolution of acute ischemic heart diseases ranged according to regions, being possibly confused with the differential evolution of ill-defined causes

  19. Mortality by Heart Failure and Ischemic Heart Disease in Brazil from 1996 to 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaui, Eduardo Nagib, E-mail: engaui@cardiol.br; Oliveira, Gláucia Maria Moraes de [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Klein, Carlos Henrique [Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública Sérgio Arouca da Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-06-15

    Circulatory system diseases are the first cause of death in Brazil. To analyze the evolution of mortality caused by heart failure, by ischemic heart diseases and by ill-defined causes, as well as their possible relations, in Brazil and in the geoeconomic regions of the country (North, Northeast, Center-West, South and Southeast), from 1996 to 2011. Data were obtained from DATASUS and death declaration records with codes I20 and I24 for acute ischemic diseases, I25 for chronic ischemic diseases, and I50 for heart failure, and codes in chapter XIII for ill-defined causes, according to geoeconomic regions of Brazil, from 1996 to 2011. Mortality rates due to heart failure declined in Brazil and its regions, except for the North and the Northeast. Mortality rates due to acute ischemic heart diseases increased in the North and Northeast regions, especially from 2005 on; they remained stable in the Center-West region; and decreased in the South and in the Southeast. Mortality due to chronic ischemic heart diseases decreased in Brazil and in the Center-West, South and Southeast regions, and had little variation in the North and in the Northeast. The highest mortality rates due to ill-defined causes occurred in the Northeast until 2005. Mortality due to heart failure is decreasing in Brazil and in all of its geoeconomic regions. The temporal evolution of mortality caused by ischemic heart diseases was similar to that of heart failure. The decreasing number of deaths due to ill-defined causes may represent the improvement in the quality of information about mortality in Brazil. The evolution of acute ischemic heart diseases ranged according to regions, being possibly confused with the differential evolution of ill-defined causes.

  20. Surveillance study for creating the national clinical database relating to ECG-gated myocardial perfusion SPECT of asymptomatic ischemic heart disease in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus. J-ACCESS 2 study design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusuoka, Hideo; Yamasaki, Yoshimitsu; Izumi, Tohru; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Shimamoto, Kazuaki; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor for acute myocardial infarction. Thus, a surveillance study was conducted as part of studies to create a national database related to electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of ischemic heart disease. Single-photon emission computed tomography was conducted in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and their prognoses will be followed for 3 years, stratified by patients' clinical background and SPECT findings. A total of 513 patients from 50 institutions were enrolled in this study, 297 of whom were men (age 66.2±0.4 years, mean±standard error of the mean (SEM)) and 261 women (age 67.8±0.5 years). They have a history of retinopathy (25.3%), neuropathy (19.9%), cerebrovascular disorder, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and photocoagulation. Major risk factors for present disease were hypertension (82.3%) and hyperlipidemia (79.7%). In 244 patients (129 men and 115 women), body mass index (BMI) was 25 or more. Fifty-two of them (10.1%) underwent coronary angiography; of these, 26 (50.0%) had no coronary artery lesions with 75% or more stenosis, and only 1 (1.9%) had a left main trunk with 50% or more stenosis. An overwhelming majority of patients (94.3%) underwent SPECT imaging by a 1-day stress-followed-by-rest procedure. Stress procedure was exercise in most (70.8%) patients, followed by dipyridamole infusion in 14.6%, adenosine infusion in 6.6%, and adenosine triphosphate infusion in 5.7%. Endpoint of stress examination was most often fatigue in lower limbs (40.7%), followed by completion of pharmacological stress protocol (28.7%), and achievement of target heart rate (26.3%). The largest number of patients (198, 38.6%) received 99m Tc-tetrofosmin at an initial dosage of 200-300 MBq (mean 331±3 MBq) followed by a second dosage of 700-800 MBq (mean 748±8 MBq). Among them, 491 (95.7%) received some kind of therapeutic drug: hypoglycemic drugs were

  1. Pulmonary Hypertension and Right Heart Dysfunction in Chronic Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirmasoud Zangiabadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Group 3 pulmonary hypertension (PH is a common complication of chronic lung disease (CLD, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, interstitial lung disease, and sleep-disordered breathing. Development of PH is associated with poor prognosis and may progress to right heart failure, however, in the majority of the patients with CLD, PH is mild to moderate and only a small number of patients develop severe PH. The pathophysiology of PH in CLD is multifactorial and includes hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, pulmonary vascular remodeling, small vessel destruction, and fibrosis. The effects of PH on the right ventricle (RV range between early RV remodeling, hypertrophy, dilatation, and eventual failure with associated increased mortality. The golden standard for diagnosis of PH is right heart catheterization, however, evidence of PH can be appreciated on clinical examination, serology, radiological imaging, and Doppler echocardiography. Treatment of PH in CLD focuses on management of the underlying lung disorder and hypoxia. There is, however, limited evidence to suggest that PH-specific vasodilators such as phosphodiesterase-type 5 inhibitors, endothelin receptor antagonists, and prostanoids may have a role in the treatment of patients with CLD and moderate-to-severe PH.

  2. Carcinoid Heart Disease without Severe Tricuspid Valve Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killu, Ammar M; Newman, Darrell B; Miranda, William R; Maleszewski, Joseph J; Pellikka, Patricia; Schaff, Hartzell V; Connolly, Heidi M

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid syndrome causes a rare form of acquired valvular heart disease which typically occurs in the setting of liver metastases. In carcinoid-induced valvular heart disease, the tricuspid valve is almost universally affected; left-sided valve disease occurs infrequently in affected patients. Herein, we report 2 cases of carcinoid-induced valvular heart disease; one case had no evidence of tricuspid valve involvement despite severe involvement of all other valves, while the other case was without severe tricuspid valve involvement. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Terapia gênica para cardiopatia isquêmica: revisão de ensaios clínicos Gene therapy for ischemic heart disease: review of clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Eibel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopatia isquêmica grave com angina refratária a formas convencionais de tratamento apresenta-se em uma crescente incidência. Para tratar angina refratária, terapias alternativas na tentativa de redução da isquemia miocárdica e alívio de sintomas têm sido estudadas. Neste contexto, a terapia gênica representa uma opção, pela possibilidade de induzir angiogênese, estabelecer circulação colateral e reperfundir miocárdio isquêmico. Diversos ensaios clínicos têm sido conduzidos e, com exceção de casos isolados e específicos de efeitos adversos, há indicação de segurança, viabilidade e potencial eficácia da terapia. O benefício clínico não está bem definido. Neste artigo, revisamos os ensaios clínicos que utilizaram terapia gênica para tratamento de pacientes cardiopatas isquêmicos. A abordagem inclui: (1 isquemia miocárdica e angiogênese, sobre os aspectos fisiopatológicos envolvidos; (2 fatores de crescimento, tratando sobre aspectos específicos e justificando a utilização em pacientes cardiopatas isquêmicos sem opções pela terapêutica convencional; (3 ensaios clínicos controlados, onde é apresentado um resumo dos principais estudos envolvendo terapia gênica para tratamento da cardiopatia isquêmica grave; (4 nossa experiência, especialmente sobre resultados preliminares do primeiro ensaio clínico de terapia gênica do Brasil e (5 perspectivas.Severe ischemic heart disease with refractory angina, occurs in increasing incidence. Alternative forms of treatment, in an attempt to reduce myocardial ischemia and relief of symptoms has been studied. In this context, gene therapy is an option, for the possibility of inducing angiogenesis, establish collateral circulation and reperfuse ischemic myocardium. Several clinical trials have been conducted and, except for specific cases of adverse effects, there is indication of safety, feasibility and potential effectiveness of therapy. The clinical benefit

  4. Congestive heart failure in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poskurica Mileta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disorders are the most frequent cause of death (46-60% among patients with advanced chronic renal failure (CRF, and on dialysis treatment. Uremic cardiomyopathy is the basic pathophysiologic substrate, whereas ischemic heart disease (IHD and anemia are the most important contributing factors. Associated with well-know risk factors and specific disorders for terminal kidney failure and dialysis, the aforementioned factors instigate congestive heart failure (CHF. Suspected CHF is based on the anamnesis, clinical examination and ECG, while it is confirmed and defined more precisely on the basis of echocardiography and radiology examination. Biohumoral data (BNP, NT-proBNP are not sufficiently reliable because of specific volemic fluctuation and reduced natural clearance. Therapy approach is similar to the one for the general population: ACEI, ARBs, β-blockers, inotropic drugs and diuretics. Hypervolemia and most of the related symptoms can be kept under control effectively by the isolated or ultrafiltation, in conjunction with dialysis, during the standard bicarbonate hemodialysis or hemodiafiltration. In the same respect peritoneal dialysis is efficient for the control of hypervolemia symptoms, mainly during the first years of its application and in case of the lower NYHA class (II°/III°. In general, heart support therapy, surgical interventions of the myocardium and valve replacement are rarely used in patients on dialysis, whereas revascularization procedures are beneficial for associated IHD. In selected cases the application of cardiac resynchronization and/or implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator are advisable.

  5. A statistical analysis based recommender model for heart disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustaqeem, Anam; Anwar, Syed Muhammad; Khan, Abdul Rashid; Majid, Muhammad

    2017-12-01

    An intelligent information technology based system could have a positive impact on the life-style of patients suffering from chronic diseases by providing useful health recommendations. In this paper, we have proposed a hybrid model that provides disease prediction and medical recommendations to cardiac patients. The first part aims at implementing a prediction model, that can identify the disease of a patient and classify it into one of the four output classes i.e., non-cardiac chest pain, silent ischemia, angina, and myocardial infarction. Following the disease prediction, the second part of the model provides general medical recommendations to patients. The recommendations are generated by assessing the severity of clinical features of patients, estimating the risk associated with clinical features and disease, and calculating the probability of occurrence of disease. The purpose of this model is to build an intelligent and adaptive recommender system for heart disease patients. The experiments for the proposed recommender system are conducted on a clinical data set collected and labelled in consultation with medical experts from a known hospital. The performance of the proposed prediction model is evaluated using accuracy and kappa statistics as evaluation measures. The medical recommendations are generated based on information collected from a knowledge base created with the help of physicians. The results of the recommendation model are evaluated using confusion matrix and gives an accuracy of 97.8%. The proposed system exhibits good prediction and recommendation accuracies and promises to be a useful contribution in the field of e-health and medical informatics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Right Ventricular Adaptation in Congenital Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrijs Bartelds

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the last four decades, enormous progress has been made in the treatment of congenital heart diseases (CHD; most patients now survive into adulthood, albeit with residual lesions. As a consequence, the focus has shifted from initial treatment to long-term morbidity and mortality. An important predictor for long-term outcome is right ventricular (RV dysfunction, but knowledge on the mechanisms of RV adaptation and dysfunction is still scarce. This review will summarize the main features of RV adaptation to CHD, focusing on recent knowledge obtained in experimental models of the most prevalent abnormal loading conditions, i.e., pressure load and volume load. Models of increased pressure load for the RV have shown a similar pattern of responses, i.e., increased contractility, RV dilatation and hypertrophy. Evidence is accumulating that RV failure in response to increased pressure load is marked by progressive diastolic dysfunction. The mechanisms of this progressive dysfunction are insufficiently known. The RV response to pressure load shares similarities with that of the LV, but also has specific features, e.g., capillary rarefaction, oxidative stress and inflammation. The contribution of these pathways to the development of failure needs further exploration. The RV adaptation to increased volume load is an understudied area, but becomes increasingly important in the growing groups of survivors of CHD, especially with tetralogy of Fallot. Recently developed animal models may add to the investigation of the mechanisms of RV adaptation and failure, leading to the development of new RV-specific therapies.

  7. Diet and cancer and heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    The modern Western diet bears little resemblance to the diet which forged the human genome over many million years. The change in basic food structure is operating to distort biology even before conception and into late years, with the epidemic of obesity and diabetes likely to lead to stroke, heart disease, and now dementia, being flagged as a consequence. In addition, mental ill health is overtaking all other burdens of ill health, and almost certainly has its roots in early disturbance of brain development. Whilst lifestyle will be playing its part, there can be little doubt that the common denominator is the aberrations in food development, predominantly in the last century. It seems it is time to reassess food policy. The principle of food production should be nutrition and human health. The globalisation of a food structure linked to such disorders and their appearance globally in response asks that steps be taken to protect other countries from making the same mistakes. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Coronary heart disease: dietary links and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, S; Lanzmann-Petithory, D

    2001-04-01

    For decades it has been postulated that the main environmental factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) was the intake of saturated fatty acids (SFA). Nevertheless, confirmation of the role of SFA in CHD through intervention trials has been disappointing. It was only when the diet was enriched in n-3 fatty acids that CHD was significantly prevented, especially cardiac death. In addition to n-3 fatty acids, many other foodstuffs or nutrients such as fibers, antioxidants, folic acid, calcium and even alcohol contribute to prevent CHD. Thus the relationship between diet and CHD morbidity and mortality appears to be much more complex than formerly suspected considering as key factors only SFA, linoleic acid, cholesterol and atherosclerosis. Some of the mechanisms are briefly described, but many additional nutrients (or non nutrients) may also play an important role in the pathogenesis of CHD. Finally, as a result of the most recent epidemiologic studies the ideal diet may comprise: 8% energy from SFA, 5% from polyunsaturated fatty acids with a ratio 5/1 of linoleic/alpha-linolenic acid+longer chains n-3, oleic acid as desired, large intake of cereals, vegetables, legumes and fruits, fish twice a week, cheese and yogurt as dairy products, rapeseed and olive oils as edible fat. Without side effects, such a diet can be highly palatable, easily enjoyed by many populations and may prevent effectively and rapidly (within a few weeks or months) CHD.

  9. ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION IN ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. E. Zakirova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the role of endothelial vasodilating, vasoconstrictive and adhesive dysfunction in the development of angina pectoris (AP in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD.Material and methods. 83 patients with IHD were included in the study. 30 patients had AP of functional class (FC-II, 27 patients - FC-III and 26 patients - FC-IV. The control group consisted of 25 healthy persons. Bicycle ergometry, daily ECG monitoring and echocardiography were used for verification of IHD. Endothelial vasodilating function was assessed by endothelium-dependent (EDVD and endothelium-independent vasodilatation (EIDVD of brachial artery. Vasoconstrictive function was assessed by the level of endothelin (ET-1. Endothelial adhesive function was evaluated by plasma concentration of intracellular adhesion molecules – JCAM-1, VCAM-1 and Е-selectin.Results. Normal EDVD and EIDVD were observed in patients with AP of FC-II. The more severe FC of AP the more prominent endothelial vasodilating dysfunction was revealed as well as the higher levels of ET-1 and intracellular adhesion molecules. Patients with AP of FC-IV had hyperexpression of JCAM-1, VCAM-1, Е-selectin and ET-1 and low levels of EDVD and EIDVD.Conclusion. Progression of IHD related with growing endothelial vasodilating, vasoconstrictive and adhesive dysfunction.

  10. Structural heart disease as the cause of syncope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.B. Guimarães

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We described the clinical evolution of patients with structural heart disease presenting at the emergency room with syncope. Patients were stratified according to their syncope etiology and available scores for syncope prognostication. Cox proportional hazard models were used to investigate the relationship between etiology of the syncope and event-free survival. Of the 82,678 emergency visits during the study period, 160 (0.16% patients were there due to syncope, having a previous diagnosis of structural heart disease. During the median follow-up of 33.8±13.8 months, mean age at the qualifying syncope event was 68.3 years and 40.6% of patients were male. Syncope was vasovagal in 32%, cardiogenic in 57%, orthostatic hypotension in 6%, and of unknown causes in 5% of patients. The primary composite endpoint death, readmission, and emergency visit in 30 days was 39.4% in vasovagal syncope and 60.6% cardiogenic syncope (P<0.001. Primary endpoint-free survival was lower for patients with cardiogenic syncope (HR=2.97, 95%CI=1.94-4.55; P<0.001. The scores were analyzed for diagnostic performance with area under the curve (AUC and did not help differentiate patients with an increased risk of adverse events. The differential diagnosis of syncope causes in patients with structural heart disease is important, because vasovagal and postural hypotension have better survival and less probability of emergency room or hospital readmission. The available scores are not reliable tools for prognosis in this specific patient population.

  11. Prolonged ischemic heart disease and coronary artery bypass - relation to contractile reserve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Klaus F; Bangsgaard, Regitze; Carstensen, Steen

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A major effect of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in patients with ischemic heart disease and impaired left ventricular (LV) contractile function is believed to be an improvement in LV function due to recovery of dysfunctional, but viable myocardium. However, recent studies have...... indicated a time limit for such a recovery. We therefore investigated the extent of viable myocardium in patients with impaired LV function due to ischemic heart disease after a prolonged strategy of medical treatment and its relation to changes in clinical variables after CABG. METHODS: Forty......-five consecutive patients with a mean duration of ischemic heart symptoms of 9 years and LV ejection fraction (EF) stress...

  12. Pathogenesis and clinical presentation of acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponikowski, Piotr; Jankowska, Ewa A

    2015-04-01

    Acute heart failure constitutes a heterogeneous clinical syndrome, whose pathophysiology is complex and not completely understood. Given the diversity of clinical presentations, several different pathophysiological mechanisms along with factors triggering circulatory decompensation are involved. This article discusses the available evidence on the pathophysiological phenomena attributed or/and associated with episodes of acute heart failure and describes different clinical profiles, which, from a clinical perspective, constitute a key element for therapeutic decision-making. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Parental reactions to children with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garson, A; Benson, R S; Ivler, L; Patton, C

    1978-01-01

    Informal discussions with 260 families of children with congenital heart disease are reported. Parents raised questions concerning etiology, timing of the diagnosis, pathophysiology and symptomatology, and need for restriction. Depending upon the stage and seriousness of the disease, common parental behavior was observed. A psychological process similar to mourning is required at the time of diagnosis and at the time of corrective surgery in order to promote the family's adaptation to the child with congenital heart disease. Management suggestions are included.

  14. Pandora's Box: mitochondrial defects in ischaemic heart disease and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andalib, Sasan; Divani, Afshin A; Michel, Tanja M; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul F; Vafaee, Manouchehr S; Gjedde, Albert

    2017-04-05

    Ischaemic heart disease and stroke are vascular events with serious health consequences worldwide. Recent genetic and epigenetic techniques have revealed many genetic determinants of these vascular events and simplified the approaches to research focused on ischaemic heart disease and stroke. The pathogenetic mechanisms of ischaemic heart disease and stroke are complex, with mitochondrial involvement (partially or entirely) recently gaining substantial support. Not only can mitochondrial reactive oxygen species give rise to ischaemic heart disease and stroke by production of oxidised low-density lipoprotein and induction of apoptosis, but the impact on pericytes contributes directly to the pathogenesis. Over the past two decades, publications implicate the causative role of nuclear genes in the development of ischaemic heart disease and stroke, in contrast to the potential role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the pathophysiology of the disorders, which is much less understood, although recent studies do demonstrate that the involvement of mitochondria and mtDNA in the development of ischaemic heart disease and stroke is likely to be larger than originally thought, with the novel discovery of links among mitochondria, mtDNA and vascular events. Here we explore the molecular events and mtDNA alterations in relation to the role of mitochondria in ischaemic heart disease and stroke.

  15. Baseline Depressive Symptoms Predict Subsequent Heart Disease; A 20-Year Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Moghani Lankarani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Depression is common among patients with heart disease. Depression is also associated with worse outcomes among patients with heart disease. Fewer studies have shown whether or not baseline depressive symptoms predict subsequent heart disease in general population.

  16. Acquired heart conditions in adults with congenital heart disease: a growing problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutarel, Oktay

    2014-09-01

    The number of adults with congenital heart disease is increasing due to the great achievements in the field of paediatric cardiology, congenital heart surgery and intensive care medicine over the last decades. Mortality has shifted away from the infant and childhood period towards adulthood. As congenital heart disease patients get older, a high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors is encountered similar to the general population. Consequently, the contribution of acquired morbidities, especially acquired heart conditions to patient outcome, is becoming increasingly important. Therefore, to continue the success story of the last decades in the treatment of congenital heart disease and to further improve the outcome of these patients, more attention has to be given to the prevention, detection and adequate therapy of acquired heart conditions. The aim of this review is to give an overview about acquired heart conditions that may be encountered in adults with congenital heart disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. State of the Art Coronary Heart Disease Risk Estimation based on the Framingham Heart Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reissigová, Jindra; Tomečková, Marie

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 4 (2005), s. 180-186 ISSN 0022-1732 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : Framingham heart study * coronary heart disease * risk validation study * calibration * discrimination Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  18. Stress-induced heart symptoms and perceptual biases in patients with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsdorp, Petra A.; Kindt, Merel; Rietveld, Simon; Everaerd, Walter; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the present study is to clarify whether biased symptom perception towards heart symptoms may explain a reduced quality of life in patients with congenital heart disease (ConHD). The present study tested the hypothesis that the combination of ConHD and high trait anxiety

  19. The renin–angiotensin–aldosterone-system and right heart failure in congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stine Andersen

    2016-06-01

    To conclude, existing studies do not support the use of RAAS inhibitory treatments in right heart failure due to congenital heart disease but contain important limitations. Hence, there is a need for new well-designed trials including higher numbers of patients and validated endpoints to optimize and guide future treatment of this patient group.

  20. REVIEW OF HEART DISEASE PREDICTION SYSTEM USING DATA MINING AND HYBRID INTELLIGENT TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Chitra

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Healthcare industry generally clinical diagnosis is done mostly by doctor’s expertise and experience. Computer Aided Decision Support System plays a major role in medical field. With the growing research on heart disease predicting system, it has become important to categories the research outcomes and provides readers with an overview of the existing heart disease prediction techniques in each category. Neural Networks are one of many data mining analytical tools that can be utilized to make predictions for medical data. From the study it is observed that Hybrid Intelligent Algorithm improves the accuracy of the heart disease prediction system. The commonly used techniques for Heart Disease Prediction and their complexities are summarized in this paper.

  1. Heart Rate Variability in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels with Different Degree of Myxomatous Mitral Valve Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Caroline Elisabeth; Falk, Bo Torkel; Zois, Nora Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    Heart Rate Variability in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels with Different Degree of Myxomatous Mitral Valve Disease Rasmussen, C.E. 1, Falk, T. 1, Zois, N.E. 1, Moesgaard, S.G. 1, Häggström, J. 2, Pedersen, H.D. 3 and Olsen, L.H1. 1Department of Basic Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Life...... Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark, 2Department of Clinical Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden; and 3Novo Nordic A/S, Maaloev, Denmark. Introduction: Modulation of heart rate by the autonomic nervous system can indirectly be measured by heart rate...... variability (HRV). Reduced HRV is seen in dogs with heart failure secondary to myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD). However, HRV is suggested to increase with disease progression in dogs with early stages of MMVD. Comparable results are found in people with primary mitral valve prolapse, a disease...

  2. Prenatal chromosomal microarray analysis in fetuses with congenital heart disease: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Cao, Li; Liang, Dong; Meng, Lulu; Wu, Yun; Qiao, Fengchang; Ji, Xiuqing; Luo, Chunyu; Zhang, Jingjing; Xu, Tianhui; Yu, Bin; Wang, Leilei; Wang, Ting; Pan, Qiong; Ma, Dingyuan; Hu, Ping; Xu, Zhengfeng

    2018-02-01

    Currently, chromosomal microarray analysis is considered the first-tier test in pediatric care and prenatal diagnosis. However, the diagnostic yield of chromosomal microarray analysis for prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease has not been evaluated based on a large cohort. Our aim was to evaluate the clinical utility of chromosomal microarray as the first-tier test for chromosomal abnormalities in fetuses with congenital heart disease. In this prospective study, 602 prenatal cases of congenital heart disease were investigated using single nucleotide polymorphism array over a 5-year period. Overall, pathogenic chromosomal abnormalities were identified in 125 (20.8%) of 602 prenatal cases of congenital heart disease, with 52.0% of them being numerical chromosomal abnormalities. The detection rates of likely pathogenic copy number variations and variants of uncertain significance were 1.3% and 6.0%, respectively. The detection rate of pathogenic chromosomal abnormalities in congenital heart disease plus additional structural anomalies (48.9% vs 14.3%, P microarray analysis is a reliable and high-resolution technology and should be used as the first-tier test for prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease in clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Global research priorities in rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carapetis, Jonathan R; Zühlke, Liesl J

    2011-01-01

    We now stand at a critical juncture for rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) control. In recent years, we have seen a surge of interest in these diseases in regions of the world where RF/RHD mostly occur. This brings real opportunities to make dramatic progress in the next few years, but also real risks if we miss these opportunities. Most public health and clinical approaches in RF/RHD arose directly from programmes of research. Many unanswered questions remain, including those around how to implement what we know will work, so research will continue to be essential in our efforts to bring a global solution to this disease. Here we outline our proposed research priorities in RF/RHD for the coming decade, grouped under the following four challenges: Translating what we know already into practical RHD control; How to identify people with RHD earlier, so that preventive measures have a higher chance of success; Better understanding of disease pathogenesis, with a view to improved diagnosis and treatment of ARF and RHD; and Finding an effective approach to primary prevention. We propose a mixture of basic, applied, and implementation science. With concerted efforts, strong links to clinical and public health infrastructure, and advocacy and funding support from the international community, there are good prospects for controlling these RF and RHD over the next decade

  4. Myocardial scintigraphy with I-123 heptadecanoic acid as a test for coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have evaluated 123 I-heptadecanoic acid for myocardial scintigraphy in the diagnosis of coronary heart disease by comparing the results obtained with it in subject groups with high and low probabilities of disease. We conclude that although some patients in the former group can be identified, the test is neither sufficiently sensitive nor specific for routine clinical use. (orig.)

  5. Myocardial scintigraphy with I-123 heptadecanoic acid as a test for coronary heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Railton, R.; Small, D.R.; Rodger, J.C.; Harrower, A.D.B.

    1987-05-01

    We have evaluated /sup 123/I-heptadecanoic acid for myocardial scintigraphy in the diagnosis of coronary heart disease by comparing the results obtained with it in subject groups with high and low probabilities of disease. We conclude that although some patients in the former group can be identified, the test is neither sufficiently sensitive nor specific for routine clinical use.

  6. Good interobserver agreement was attainable on outcome adjudication in patients with stable coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjoller, Erik; Hilden, Jørgen; Winkel, Per

    2012-01-01

    In clinical trials, agreement on outcomes is of utmost importance for valid estimation of intervention effects. As there is limited knowledge about adjudicator agreement in cardiology, we examined the level of agreement among three cardiology specialists adjudicating all possible events in a rand...... in a randomized controlled clinical trial of patients with stable coronary heart disease....

  7. Pathogenetic relationship between coronary heart disease and osteopenic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Mykhailovskaya

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the comorbidity problem of coronary heart disease and osteoporosis is caused by the rising prevalence, lack of early detection, prevention, severe complications and significant impact on the quality of life of the patients. Aim. In order to compile and submit a current point of view on the pathogenetic relationship between the coronary heart disease and the osteopenic syndrome we reviewed specialized literature. Conclusion. We established that coronary heart disease and osteoporosis have common mechanisms of progression involving a cascade of proinflammatory cytokines, osteoprotegerin, endothelial dysfunction, estrogen, calcium deficiency, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and sympathetic nervous system.

  8. Methodology of clinical measures of healthcare quality delivered to patients with cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Posnenkova O.M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The results of implementation the methodology proposed by American Colleague of Cardiology and American Heart Association (ACC/AHA for development of Russian clinical quality measures for patients with arterial hypertension, coronary heart disease and chronic heart failure. Created quality measures cover the key elements of medical care influencing directly on clinical outcomes of treatment.

  9. Hypoalbuminaemia predicts outcome in adult patients with congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempny, Aleksander; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Alonso-Gonzalez, Rafael; Uebing, Anselm; Rafiq, Isma; Li, Wei; Swan, Lorna; Hooper, James; Donovan, Jackie; Wort, Stephen J; Gatzoulis, Michael A; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Background In patients with acquired heart failure, hypoalbuminaemia is associated with increased risk of death. The prevalence of hypoproteinaemia and hypoalbuminaemia and their relation to outcome in adult patients with congenital heart disease (ACHD) remains, however, unknown. Methods Data on patients with ACHD who underwent blood testing in our centre within the last 14 years were collected. The relation between laboratory, clinical or demographic parameters at baseline and mortality was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Results A total of 2886 patients with ACHD were included. Mean age was 33.3 years (23.6–44.7) and 50.1% patients were men. Median plasma albumin concentration was 41.0 g/L (38.0–44.0), whereas hypoalbuminaemia (disease complexity, hypoalbuminaemia remained a significant predictor of death. Conclusions Hypoalbuminaemia is common in patients with ACHD and is associated with a threefold increased risk of risk of death. Hypoalbuminaemia, therefore, should be included in risk-stratification algorithms as it may assist management decisions and timing of interventions in the growing ACHD population. PMID:25736048

  10. Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele D'Alto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a common complication of congenital heart disease (CHD, with most cases occurring in patients with congenital cardiac shunts. In patients with an uncorrected left-to-right shunt, increased pulmonary pressure leads to vascular remodelling and dysfunction, resulting in a progressive rise in pulmonary vascular resistance and increased pressures in the right heart. Eventually, reversal of the shunt may arise, with the development of Eisenmenger's syndrome, the most advanced form of PAH-CHD. The prevalence of PAH-CHD has fallen in developed countries over recent years and the number of patients surviving into adulthood has increased markedly. Today, the majority of PAH-CHD patients seen in clinical practice are adults, and many of these individuals have complex disease or received a late diagnosis of their defect. While there have been advances in the management and therapy in recent years, PAH-CHD is a heterogeneous condition and some subgroups, such as those with Down's syndrome, present particular challenges. This article gives an overview of the demographics, pathophysiology and treatment of PAH-CHD and focuses on individuals with Down's syndrome as an important and challenging patient group.

  11. Impact on clinical events and healthcare costs of adding telemedicine to multidisciplinary disease management programmes for heart failure: Results of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comín-Colet, Josep; Enjuanes, Cristina; Verdú-Rotellar, José M; Linas, Anna; Ruiz-Rodriguez, Pilar; González-Robledo, Gina; Farré, Núria; Moliner-Borja, Pedro; Ruiz-Bustillo, Sonia; Bruguera, Jordi

    2016-07-01

    The role of telemedicine in the management of patients with chronic heart failure (HF) has not been fully elucidated. We hypothesized that multidisciplinary comprehensive HF care could achieve better results when it is delivered using telemedicine. In this study, 178 eligible patients with HF were randomized to either structured follow-up on the basis of face-to-face encounters (control group, 97 patients) or delivering health care using telemedicine (81 patients). Telemedicine included daily signs and symptoms based on telemonitoring and structured follow-up by means of video or audio-conference. The primary end-point was non-fatal HF events after six months of follow-up. The median age of the patients was 77 years, 41% were female, and 25% were frail patients. The hazard ratio for the primary end-point was 0.35 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.20-0.59; p-value  0.05). The telemedicine group experienced a significant mean net reduction in direct hospital costs of €3546 per patient per six months of follow-up. Among patients managed in the setting of a comprehensive HF programme, the addition of telemedicine may result in better outcomes and reduction of costs. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Exercise testing and stress imaging in valvular heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henri, Christine; Piérard, Luc A; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Mongeon, François-Pierre; Pibarot, Philippe; Basmadjian, Arsène J

    2014-09-01

    The role of exercise testing and stress imaging in the management of patients with valvular heart disease (VHD) is reviewed in this article. The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association and the European Society of Cardiology/European Association of Cardiothoracic Surgery have recently put emphasis on the role of exercise testing to clarify symptom status and the use of stress imaging to assess the dynamic component of valvular abnormalities and unmask subclinical myocardial dysfunction that could be missed at rest. Recent studies have demonstrated the incremental prognostic value of exercise echocardiography for asymptomatic patients with severe aortic stenosis, moderate-severe mitral stenosis, and severe primary mitral regurgitation. In patients with low-flow, low-gradient aortic stenosis, dobutamine stress echocardiography is recommended to differentiate true severe from pseudosevere aortic stenosis. Data on the prognostic value of stress echocardiography in aortic regurgitation and functional mitral regurgitation are less robust. Data are sparse on the use of stress imaging in right-sided VHD, however recent studies using stress cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging offer some prognostic information. Although the strongest recommendations for surgical treatment continue to be based on symptom status and resting left ventricular repercussions, stress imaging can be useful to optimize risk stratification and timing of surgery in VHD. Randomized clinical trials are required to confirm that clinical decision-making based on stress imaging can lead to improved outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Serum zinc values in children with congenital heart disease | Sadoh ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Some children with congenital heart diseases (CHD) may have increased pulmonary blood flow that causes recurrent bronchopneumonia and congestive heart failure. Serum zinc is reduced in children with pneumonia and patients on diuretics. Objective: To evaluate the serum zinc level of children with CHD ...

  14. Heartbeat sensitivity in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietveld, Simon; Karsdorp, Petra A.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2004-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that patients with a congenital heart disease are sensitive regarding heartbeat perception, reflected in enhanced attention for heartbeat, estimation of own heart rate, and a vulnerability to become anxious by listening to heartbeat sounds. Twenty adults with a

  15. [Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia is a rare inherited heart disease.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Anders Gaarsdal; Tfelt-Hansen, 1jacob; Olesen, Morten S

    2010-01-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia is a rare inherited heart disease, which can lead to life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias in patients with a structurally normal heart. The age of onset is usually between two and 12 years and the initial symptom is frequently syncope...

  16. How Does Heart Disease Affect Women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic influences and prevent or delay heart problems. Preeclampsia Preeclampsia (pre-e-KLAMP-se-ah) is a ... for a Healthy Weight Web site. Stress and Depression Research shows that getting upset or angry can ...

  17. CT coronary angiography in patients with suspected angina due to coronary heart disease (SCOT-HEART): an open-label, parallel-group, multicentre trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-13

    The benefit of CT coronary angiography (CTCA) in patients presenting with stable chest pain has not been systematically studied. We aimed to assess the effect of CTCA on the diagnosis, management, and outcome of patients referred to the cardiology clinic with suspected angina due to coronary heart disease. In this prospective open-label, parallel-group, multicentre trial, we recruited patients aged 18-75 years referred for the assessment of suspected angina due to coronary heart disease from 12 cardiology chest pain clinics across Scotland. We randomly assigned (1:1) participants to standard care plus CTCA or standard care alone. Randomisation was done with a web-based service to ensure allocation concealment. The primary endpoint was certainty of the diagnosis of angina secondary to coronary heart disease at 6 weeks. All analyses were intention to treat, and patients were analysed in the group they were allocated to, irrespective of compliance with scanning. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01149590. Between Nov 18, 2010, and Sept 24, 2014, we randomly assigned 4146 (42%) of 9849 patients who had been referred for assessment of suspected angina due to coronary heart disease. 47% of participants had a baseline clinic diagnosis of coronary heart disease and 36% had angina due to coronary heart disease. At 6 weeks, CTCA reclassified the diagnosis of coronary heart disease in 558 (27%) patients and the diagnosis of angina due to coronary heart disease in 481 (23%) patients (standard care 22 [1%] and 23 [1%]; pcoronary heart disease increased (1·09, 1·02-1·17; p=0·0172), the certainty increased (1·79, 1·62-1·96; pcoronary heart disease. This changed planned investigations (15% vs 1%; pcoronary heart disease, CTCA clarifies the diagnosis, enables targeting of interventions, and might reduce the future risk of myocardial infarction. The Chief Scientist Office of the Scottish Government Health and Social Care Directorates funded the trial

  18. Direct myocardial perfusion imaging in valvular heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto, R.C.; Durante, M.L.; Villacorta, E.V.; Torres, J.F.; Monzon, O.P.

    1981-01-01

    Twenty two patients with rheumatic valvular heart disease - 21 having a history of heart failure - were studied using direct coronary injection of sup(99m)Tc labelled MAA particles during the course of hemodynamic and arteriographic studies. Myocardial perfusion deficit patterns have been shown to be consistent or indicative of either patchy, regional or gross ischemia. In patients with history of documented heart failure 90% (18 cases) had ischemic perfusion deficit in the involved ventricle. We conclude that diminished myocardial blood flow is an important mechanism contributing to the development of heart failure. (orig.) [de

  19. Childhood Heart Disease - A partnership model of integrated care

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Holly; Brooke, Mark

    2018-01-01

    HeartKids is a national charity supporting infants, children, young people and adults living with or impacted by congenital / childhood heart disease. For over 20 years HeartKids has worked in partnership with Lady Cilento Children's Hospital to deliver services and support to families.HeartKids supports families in hosptial and in the commuity with a suite of support programs lead by both health profesisonals and volunteers.  Critical to our model of care is a partnership with Lady Cilento C...

  20. Prevalence and correlates of heart disease among adults in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picco, Louisa; Subramaniam, Mythily; Abdin, Edimansyah; Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit; Chong, Siow Ann

    2016-02-01

    Heart disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide and it has been well established that it is associated with both mental and physical conditions. This paper describes the prevalence of heart disease with mental disorders and other chronic physical conditions among the Singapore resident population. Data were from the Singapore Mental Health Study which was a representative, cross-sectional epidemiological survey undertaken with 6616 Singapore residents, between December 2009 and December 2010. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview Version 3.0 was used to establish the diagnosis of mental disorders, while a chronic medical conditions checklist was used to gather information on 15 physical conditions, including various forms of heart disease. Health-related quality of life was measured using the Euro-Quality of Life Scale (EQ-5D). The lifetime prevalence of heart disease was 2.8%. Socio-demographic correlates of heart disease included older age, Indian ethnicity, secondary education (vs. tertiary) and being economically inactive. After adjusting for socio-demographic variables and other comorbid physical and mental disorders, the prevalence of major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder were significantly higher among those with heart disease, as were diabetes, arthritis, kidney failure and lung disease. These findings highlight important associations between heart disease and various socio-demographic correlates, mental disorders and physical conditions. Given the high prevalence of mood disorders among heart disease patients, timely and appropriate screening and treatment of mental disorders among this group is essential. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevalence of coronary heart disease in Scotland: Scottish Heart Health Study.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, W C; Kenicer, M B; Tunstall-Pedoe, H; Clark, E C; Crombie, I K

    1990-01-01

    Data from 10,359 men and women aged 40-59 years from 22 districts in the Scottish Heart Health Study were used to describe the prevalence rates of coronary heart disease in Scotland in 1984-1986 and their relation to the geographical variation in mortality in these districts. Prevalence was measured by previous history, Rose chest pain questionnaire, and the Minnesota code of a 12 lead resting electrocardiogram. The prevalence of coronary heart disease in Scotland was high compared with studi...

  2. Abnormal ankle brachial indices may predict cardiovascular disease among diabetic patients without known heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Jeffrey J; Hopkins, Christie B; Hall, Patrick Ax

    2005-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the primary cause of diabetes-associated morbidity and mortality. Previous studies have failed to provide accurate, inexpensive, screening techniques to detect cardiovascular disease in diabetics. Ankle brachial indices (ABI) testing may be an effective screening technique for diabetics. The aim of this 100-subject clinical study was to determine cardiovascular disease prevalence, via perfusion stress testing, in diabetic patients having abnormal ABI (<0.90) and without known heart disease who were referred to the South Carolina Heart Center, Columbia, SC for nuclear perfusion stress testing. Study data were analyzed using frequency and descriptive statistics and 2-sample T-testing. Mean subject age was 62+/-11 years, ABI 0.76+/-13, and ejection fraction 60+/-12%. Perfusion stress testing detected 49 abnormal electrocardiograms, 36 subjects with coronary ischemia, 20 with diminished left ventricular function, and 26 subjects having significant thinning of the myocardium. There were 71 subjects who tested positive for at least one form of cardiovascular disease. The sole predictive variable reaching significance for the presence of cardiovascular disease was an ABI score <0.90 (p< or =0.0001). Cardiovascular disease may be predicted among diabetic patients via ABI scores and confirmed by nuclear perfusion testing.

  3. Heart and/or soul : reality and fiction in the association between the two strongest contributors to the global burden of disease - ischemic heart disease and depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, Peter

    Depression and heart disease are the strongest contributors to the global burden of disease and are often intertwined: depression is a risk factor for heart disease and vice versa. Moreover, depression in patients with established heart disease is associated with cardiovascular disease progression.

  4. Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: Overweight and Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Women Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease Overweight and Obesity A healthy weight is important for a long, vigorous life. Yet overweight and obesity (extreme overweight) have reached epidemic levels ...

  5. Genetically elevated bilirubin and risk of ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Stefan; Frikke-Schmidt, R; Nordestgaard, B G

    2013-01-01

    Elevated plasma levels of bilirubin, an endogenous antioxidant, have been associated with reduced risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI). Whether this is a causal relationship remains unclear....

  6. heart disease in southern africa with special reference to ischaemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-06-12

    arteriosclerotic and degenera- tive heart disease' appears to be the highest in the world. If serum cholesterol levels bear any relationship to the development of atherosclerosis, the observations of Du. Plessis et al." are of special ...

  7. Recognizing the Symptoms of Worsening Heart Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... become short of breath? Is it walking three miles? Or has that three mile distance gotten shorter and shorter over time so ... her life depended on it. This content was last reviewed May 2016. Heart Valve Problems and Disease • ...

  8. Telehealth solutions to enable global collaboration in rheumatic heart disease screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Eduardo Lv; Beaton, Andrea Z; Nascimento, Bruno R; Tompsett, Alison; Dos Santos, Julia Pa; Perlman, Lindsay; Diamantino, Adriana C; Oliveira, Kaciane Kb; Oliveira, Cassio M; Nunes, Maria do Carmo P; Bonisson, Leonardo; Ribeiro, Antônio Lp; Sable, Craig

    2018-02-01

    Background The global burden of rheumatic heart disease is nearly 33 million people. Telemedicine, using cloud-server technology, provides an ideal solution for sharing images performed by non-physicians with cardiologists who are experts in rheumatic heart disease. Objective We describe our experience in using telemedicine to support a large rheumatic heart disease outreach screening programme in the Brazilian state of Minas Gerais. Methods The Programa de Rastreamento da Valvopatia Reumática (PROVAR) is a prospective cross-sectional study aimed at gathering epidemiological data on the burden of rheumatic heart disease in Minas Gerais and testing of a non-expert, telemedicine-supported model of outreach rheumatic heart disease screening. The primary goal is to enable expert support of remote rheumatic heart disease outreach through cloud-based sharing of echocardiographic images between Minas Gerais and Washington. Secondary goals include (a) developing and sharing online training modules for non-physicians in echocardiography performance and interpretation and (b) utilising a secure web-based system to share clinical and research data. Results PROVAR included 4615 studies that were performed by non-experts at 21 schools and shared via cloud-telemedicine technology. Latent rheumatic heart disease was found in 251 subjects (4.2% of subjects: 3.7% borderline and 0.5% definite disease). Of the studies, 50% were preformed on full functional echocardiography machines and transmitted via Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) and 50% were performed on handheld echocardiography machines and transferred via a secure Dropbox connection. The average time between study performance date and interpretation was 10 days. There was 100% success in initial image transfer. Less than 1% of studies performed by non-experts could not be interpreted. Discussion A sustainable, low-cost telehealth model, using task-shifting with non-medical personal in low and middle

  9. Medical compliance to evidence-based clinical guidelines on secondary prevention of coronary heart disease in a hospital from Lima, Peru: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaira Castañeda-Amado

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen INTRODUCCIÓN La enfermedad cardiovascular constituye la principal causa de mortalidad a nivel mundial. Cuando se presenta un infarto agudo de miocardio se deben instaurar medidas en prevención secundaria, las cuales pueden disminuir la mortalidad en 50%. Las guías de práctica clínica establecen que un tratamiento médico óptimo se basa en cuatro grupos de fármacos: antiagregantes plaquetarios, estatinas, β-bloqueadores e inhibidores de la enzima convertidora de angiotensina o antagonistas de los receptores de la angiotensina II. OBJETIVO Determinar la adherencia a las recomendaciones de las guías de práctica clínica basadas en evidencia, sobre prevención secundaria en enfermedad coronaria establecida. MÉTODOS Se realizó un estudio observacional, tipo cohorte retrospectiva, en el Hospital Cayetano Heredia en Lima, Perú. Se incluyeron pacientes con diagnóstico confirmado de síndrome coronario agudo desde el 1 de febrero de 2011 hasta el 28 de febrero de 2013. Los datos que se recolectaron incluyeron anamnesis, examen físico, exámenes auxiliares y terapia médica al alta. Además, las prescripciones médicas fueron seguidas al primer, tercer y sexto mes posterior al alta. Se compararon las prescripciones médicas con las recomendaciones tipo I, nivel de evidencia A, de la guía de práctica clínica de la American Heart Association. RESULTADOS Se estudiaron 143 pacientes. De estos, 54 (37,8% tuvieron infarto de miocardio con ST elevado y 89 (62,2% pacientes tuvieron un infarto de miocardio con ST no elevado o angina inestable. Las cuatro estrategias terapéuticas seleccionadas para la prevención secundaria en enfermedad coronaria fueron indicadas en 40 (28% pacientes al alta y solo en 12,6%, 7% y 3,5% en el primer, tercer y sexto mes de seguimiento, respectivamente. Además, se describió la adherencia del paciente a asistir a la consulta en el servicio de cardiología al primer, tercer y sexto mes, observándose una

  10. Ivabradine, coronary artery disease, and heart failure: beyond rhythm control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scicchitano, Pietro; Cortese, Francesca; Ricci, Gabriella; Carbonara, Santa; Moncelli, Michele; Iacoviello, Massimo; Cecere, Annagrazia; Gesualdo, Michele; Zito, Annapaola; Caldarola, Pasquale; Scrutinio, Domenico; Lagioia, Rocco; Riccioni, Graziano; Ciccone, Marco Matteo

    2014-01-01

    Elevated heart rate could negatively influence cardiovascular risk in the general population. It can induce and promote the atherosclerotic process by means of several mechanisms involving endothelial shear stress and biochemical activities. Furthermore, elevated heart rate can directly increase heart ischemic conditions because of its skill in unbalancing demand/supply of oxygen and decreasing the diastolic period. Thus, many pharmacological treatments have been proposed in order to reduce heart rate and ameliorate the cardiovascular risk profile of individuals, especially those suffering from coronary artery diseases (CAD) and chronic heart failure (CHF). Ivabradine is the first pure heart rate reductive drug approved and currently used in humans, created in order to selectively reduce sinus node function and to overcome the many side effects of similar pharmacological tools (ie, β-blockers or calcium channel antagonists). The aim of our review is to evaluate the role and the safety of this molecule on CAD and CHF therapeutic strategies. PMID:24940047

  11. Clinical patterns in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooden, Stephanie Maria van

    2012-01-01

    The clinical heterogeneity of Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients may reflect the existence of subtypes of the disease. PD subtypes have often been defined by a classification according to researcher-specified criteria, such as age-at-onset or predominant clinical motor features. The general objective

  12. The Adolescent and Adult with congenital heart disease: When is the Magnetic Resonance Useful?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, Jorge Andres; Abad, Pedro; Llano, Juan Fernando; Pulgarin, Luis German

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) plays an important and growing role in the morphologic and functional assessment of the adolescent and adult patient with congenital heart disease and their post surgical sequelae. CMR allows a comprehensive noninvasive evaluation of the heart and chest without the limited acoustic window and field of view of trans thoracic echocardiography. This paper reviews the CMR technique and its clinical indications, followed by several representative teaching cases.

  13. Prolonged ischemic heart disease and coronary artery bypass - relation to contractile reserve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Klaus F; Bangsgaard, Regitze; Carstensen, Steen

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A major effect of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in patients with ischemic heart disease and impaired left ventricular (LV) contractile function is believed to be an improvement in LV function due to recovery of dysfunctional, but viable myocardium. However, recent studies have...... was correlated to the LV extent of myocardial metabolism--blood flow reverse mismatch. Most of the patients experienced an improvement in their angina pectoris, heart failure symptoms and exercise capacity after CABG; the overall 3-year survival was 77%. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with chronic ischemic heart disease...... indicated a time limit for such a recovery. We therefore investigated the extent of viable myocardium in patients with impaired LV function due to ischemic heart disease after a prolonged strategy of medical treatment and its relation to changes in clinical variables after CABG. METHODS: Forty...

  14. A Fuzzy Petri Nets System for Heart Disease Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussin Attya Lafta

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we have proposed a Fuzzy Petri Nets Expert System for heart disease diagnosis. The aim of the proposed system is simulating experience of experts in Diagnosis Heart Disease stage, based on Fuzzy Rule System and modeling reasoning operation by using Fuzzy Petri Nets. The database taken from Machine Learning Repository Center for machine learning and intelligent system. The system has 11 input fields and one output field. The accuracy of proposed system is 75%.

  15. The association of congenital neuroblastoma and congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellah, R.; D'Andrea, A.; Children's Hospital, Boston, MA; Darillis, E.; Fellows, K.E.

    1989-01-01

    Several authors have reported an association between neuroblastoma and congenital heart disease; others contend that, unlike specific wellknown associations between malignancy and congenital defects (Wilm's tumor and aniridia, leukemia and Down's syndrome), no real relationship exists. We present three cases of cyanotic congenital heart disease in which subclinical neuroblastoma was found. We speculate that abnormal neural crest cell migration and development may be a common link between cardiac malformations and congenital neuroblastoma. (orig.)

  16. Evaluation of the grading and disorder assessment of congenital heart disease with pulmonary arterial hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Zhongru; Qin Yongwen

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is one of the most common and serious complications in congenital heart disease. Identification of whether the pulmonary, arterial hypertension is dynamic or resistance remains as the great importance for deciding to transfer for surgery, intervention or conservative therapy and directly concerning with the prognosis and choice of treatment. This review mainly deals with the problems such as grading, staging, pathophysiology and the correlative mechanism with clinical assessment of pulmonary. arterial hypertension in congenital heart disease and furthermore providing comprehensive informations for clinical diagnosis and treatment. (authors)

  17. Determinants of clinical right ventricular failure after congenital heart surgery in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuuring, Mark J.; van Gulik, E. Charlotte; Koolbergen, Dave R.; Hazekamp, Mark G.; Lagrand, Wim K.; Backx, Ad P. C. M.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Bouma, Berto J.

    2013-01-01

    Right ventricular (RV) failure after cardiac surgery is a clinical entity with high morbidity and mortality. Patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) often undergo right-sided cardiac surgery. The authors aimed to identify determinants of RV failure after cardiac surgery to differentiate

  18. Automated identification of wound information in clinical notes of patients with heart diseases: Developing and validating a natural language processing application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topaz, Maxim; Lai, Kenneth; Dowding, Dawn; Lei, Victor J; Zisberg, Anna; Bowles, Kathryn H; Zhou, Li

    2016-12-01

    Electronic health records are being increasingly used by nurses with up to 80% of the health data recorded as free text. However, only a few studies have developed nursing-relevant tools that help busy clinicians to identify information they need at the point of care. This study developed and validated one of the first automated natural language processing applications to extract wound information (wound type, pressure ulcer stage, wound size, anatomic location, and wound treatment) from free text clinical notes. First, two human annotators manually reviewed a purposeful training sample (n=360) and random test sample (n=1100) of clinical notes (including 50% discharge summaries and 50% outpatient notes), identified wound cases, and created a gold standard dataset. We then trained and tested our natural language processing system (known as MTERMS) to process the wound information. Finally, we assessed our automated approach by comparing system-generated findings against the gold standard. We also compared the prevalence of wound cases identified from free-text data with coded diagnoses in the structured data. The testing dataset included 101 notes (9.2%) with wound information. The overall system performance was good (F-measure is a compiled measure of system's accuracy=92.7%), with best results for wound treatment (F-measure=95.7%) and poorest results for wound size (F-measure=81.9%). Only 46.5% of wound notes had a structured code for a wound diagnosis. The natural language processing system achieved good performance on a subset of randomly selected discharge summaries and outpatient notes. In more than half of the wound notes, there were no coded wound diagnoses, which highlight the significance of using natural language processing to enrich clinical decision making. Our future steps will include expansion of the application's information coverage to other relevant wound factors and validation of the model with external data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All

  19. Sexual functioning is impaired in adults with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Opic (Petra); J.W. Roos-Hesselink (Jolien); J.A.A.E. Cuypers (Judith); M. Witsenburg (Maarten); A.E. van den Bosch (Annemien); R.T. van Domburg (Ron); A.J.J.C. Bogers (Ad); E.M.W.J. Utens (Elisabeth)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: To investigate the overall sexual functioning and disease specific sexual problems in congenital heart disease (ConHD) patients, for both genders and different cardiac diagnostic groups, and compare these with Dutch normative data. Also disease specific sexual problems were

  20. Explaining the Decline in Coronary Heart Disease Mortality in the Czech Republic between 1985 and 2007

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bruthans, J.; Cifková, R.; Lánská, V.; O'Flaherty, M.; Critchley, J.A.; Holub, J.; Janský, P.; Zvárová, Jana; Capewell, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 7 (2014), s. 829-839 ISSN 2047-4873 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : coronary heart disease * Czech MONICA and Czech post-MONICA * coronary heart disease management * coronary heart disease mortality * coronary heart disease risk factors Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 3.319, year: 2014

  1. Carcinoid Syndrome and Carcinoid Heart Disease as Manifestations of Non-Metastatic Ovarian Neuroendocrine Tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Simões-Pereira

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The carcinoid syndrome is rare but it is associated with carcinoid heart disease in more than a half of the cases. Carcinoid heart disease is typically characterised by morphological and functional modifications of right-sided valves. Its aetiology is probable multifactorial but serotonin appears to play a key role in the development of this valvular disease. Unlike gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumours, ovarian neuroendocrine tumours can present with carcinoid syndrome and carcinoid heart disease in the absence of liver metastases; such ovarian neuroendocrine tumours are a unique clinical entity. The additional burden of cardiac impairment in these patients represents a significant reduction in survival. Early recognition and surgical valve replacement before advanced heart failure is established may improve the clinical outcome. We report the case of a woman with an ovarian neuroendocrine tumour and highly symptomatic carcinoid heart disease who was submitted to tumour resection followed by valvuloplasty. She demonstrated an outstanding clinical improvement and has remained free of tumour and symptomatology.

  2. Poisson Mixture Regression Models for Heart Disease Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Hamza

    2016-01-01

    Early heart disease control can be achieved by high disease prediction and diagnosis efficiency. This paper focuses on the use of model based clustering techniques to predict and diagnose heart disease via Poisson mixture regression models. Analysis and application of Poisson mixture regression models is here addressed under two different classes: standard and concomitant variable mixture regression models. Results show that a two-component concomitant variable Poisson mixture regression model predicts heart disease better than both the standard Poisson mixture regression model and the ordinary general linear Poisson regression model due to its low Bayesian Information Criteria value. Furthermore, a Zero Inflated Poisson Mixture Regression model turned out to be the best model for heart prediction over all models as it both clusters individuals into high or low risk category and predicts rate to heart disease componentwise given clusters available. It is deduced that heart disease prediction can be effectively done by identifying the major risks componentwise using Poisson mixture regression model. PMID:27999611

  3. Imaging techniques in the diagnosis of coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, H.

    1997-01-01

    Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Coronary angiography makes it possible to visualize coronary artery stenosis and can be used for angioplasty and stent implantation; however, it does not allow the assessment of changes in myocardial microcirculation. The severity of an angiographically evaluated coronary stenosis does not always correspond to the extent of myocardial ischemia. Nonivasive techniques are needed to reexamine our reliance on coronary angiography and to explore the clinical value fo the physiological assessment of coronary artery stenoses. Such noninvasive techniques might become important tools in the future following an overal evaluation of coronary morphology, myocardial function and perfusion ascertained by all available methods. (orig.) [de

  4. Congenital heart disease and chromossomopathies detected by the karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Patrícia; Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M; Koshiyama, Dayane Bohn; Zen, Tatiana Diehl; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G

    2014-06-01

    To review the relationship between congenital heart defects and chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype. Scientific articles were searched in MEDLINE database, using the descriptors "karyotype" OR "chromosomal" OR "chromosome" AND "heart defects, congenital". The research was limited to articles published in English from 1980 on. Congenital heart disease is characterized by an etiologically heterogeneous and not well understood group of lesions. Several researchers have evaluated the presence of chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype in patients with congenital heart disease. However, most of the articles were retrospective studies developed in Europe and only some of the studied patients had a karyotype exam. In this review, only one study was conducted in Latin America, in Brazil. It is known that chromosomal abnormalities are frequent, being present in about one in every ten patients with congenital heart disease. Among the karyotype alterations in these patients, the most important is the trisomy 21 (Down syndrome). These patients often have associated extra-cardiac malformations, with a higher risk of morbidity and mortality, which makes heart surgery even more risky. Despite all the progress made in recent decades in the field of cytogenetic, the karyotype remains an essential tool in order to evaluate patients with congenital heart disease. The detailed dysmorphological physical examination is of great importance to indicate the need of a karyotype.

  5. Congenital heart disease and chromossomopathies detected by the karyotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Trevisan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between congenital heart defects and chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype.DATA SOURCES: Scientific articles were searched in MEDLINE database, using the descriptors "karyotype" OR "chromosomal" OR "chromosome" AND "heart defects, congenital". The research was limited to articles published in English from 1980 on.DATA SYNTHESIS: Congenital heart disease is characterized by an etiologically heterogeneous and not well understood group of lesions. Several researchers have evaluated the presence of chromosomal abnormalities detected by the karyotype in patients with congenital heart disease. However, most of the articles were retrospective studies developed in Europe and only some of the studied patients had a karyotype exam. In this review, only one study was conducted in Latin America, in Brazil. It is known that chromosomal abnormalities are frequent, being present in about one in every ten patients with congenital heart disease. Among the karyotype alterations in these patients, the most important is the trisomy 21 (Down syndrome. These patients often have associated extra-cardiac malformations, with a higher risk of morbidity and mortality, which makes heart surgery even more risky.CONCLUSIONS: Despite all the progress made in recent decades in the field of cytogenetic, the karyotype remains an essential tool in order to evaluate patients with congenital heart disease. The detailed dysmorphological physical examination is of great importance to indicate the need of a karyotype.

  6. Management of Cardiac Involvement Associated With Neuromuscular Diseases: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feingold, Brian; Mahle, William T; Auerbach, Scott; Clemens, Paula; Domenighetti, Andrea A; Jefferies, John L; Judge, Daniel P; Lal, Ashwin K; Markham, Larry W; Parks, W James; Tsuda, Takeshi; Wang, Paul J; Yoo, Shi-Joon

    2017-09-26

    For many neuromuscular diseases (NMDs), cardiac disease represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The management of cardiac disease in NMDs is made challenging by the broad clinical heterogeneity that exists among many NMDs and by limited knowledge about disease-specific cardiovascular pathogenesis and course-modifying interventions. The overlay of compromise in peripheral muscle function and other organ systems, such as the lungs, also makes the simple application of endorsed adult or pediatric heart failure guidelines to the NMD population problematic. In this statement, we provide background on several NMDs in which there is cardiac involvement, highlighting unique features of NMD-associated myocardial disease that require clinicians to tailor their approach to prevention and treatment of heart failure. Undoubtedly, further investigations are required to best inform future guidelines on NMD-specific cardiovascular health risks, treatments, and outcomes. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Cardiac Hemodynamics in the Pathogenesis of Congenital Heart Disease and Aortic Valve Calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Vishal

    2011-11-01

    An improved understanding of the roles of hemodynamic forces play in cardiac development and the pathogenesis of cardiac disease will have significant scientific and clinical impact. I will focus on the role of fluid dynamics in congenital heart disease and aortic valve calcification. Congenital heart defects are the most common form of birth defect. Aortic valve calcification/stenosis is the third leading cause of adult heart disease and the most common form of acquired valvular disease in developed countries. Given the high incidence of these diseases and their associated morbidity and mortality, the potential translational impact of an improved understanding of cardiac hemodynamic forces is very large. Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego

  8. Caracterização clínico-laboratorial de chagásicos hipertensos sem insuficiência cardíaca manifesta Clinical and laboratory characterization of hypertensive Chagas' disease patients without evident heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bertanha

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo avaliou as características de 125 chagásicos, > 25 anos, atendidos no Hospital de Clínicas da Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP, considerando-se: pressão arterial, idade, gênero, cor, cardiopatia, índice de massa corporal, perfil lipídico, glicemia, etilismo, tabagismo, dislipidemia, diabetes, distúrbio de ansiedade e obesidade. Apresentavam hipertensão arterial 69 (55,2% pacientes. Verificou-se que os chagásicos hipertensos eram mais idosos que os não hipertensos (p = 0,028. Entre os hipertensos havia: mais mulheres (p = 0,015; níveis mais elevados de glicemia, LDL-colesterol e colesterol total (p = 0,005; p = 0,024; p = 0,017; mais diabéticos (p = 0,006, dano cardíaco (p = 0,04 e sobrecarga ventricular esquerda (p = 0,003. Apenas a idade mostrou-se mais elevada nos pacientes com dano cardíaco (p = 0,003. Os chagásicos hipertensos apresentaram características clínico-laboratoriais semelhantes à população hipertensa, em geral. Dessa associação pode haver somatória de efeitos deletérios para o aparelho cardiovascular.This study evaluated the characteristics of 125 Chagas disease patients aged > 25 years or over who were attended at the Clinical Hospital of the State University of Campinas, State of São Paulo. Arterial pressure, age, gender, skin color, heart disease, body mass index, lipid profile, blood glucose level, alcohol and tobacco dependence, dyslipidemia, diabetes, anxiety disorders and obesity were investigated. It was found that the hypertensive Chagas disease patients were older than the non-hypertensive ones (p = 0.028. Among the hypertensive patients, there were more women (p = 0.015; higher blood glucose, LDL cholesterol and total cholesterol levels (p = 0.005, p = 0.024 and p = 0.017; more diabetics (p = 0.006; and more cardiac damage (p = 0.04 and left ventricular hypertrophy (p = 0.003. Only the age of patients with cardiac damage was shown to be higher (p = 0.003. The hypertensive

  9. Ivabradine, coronary artery disease, and heart failure: beyond rhythm control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scicchitano P

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pietro Scicchitano,1 Francesca Cortese,1 Gabriella Ricci,1 Santa Carbonara,1 Michele Moncelli,1 Massimo Iacoviello,1 Annagrazia Cecere,1 Michele Gesualdo,1 Annapaola Zito,1 Pasquale Caldarola,2 Domenico Scrutinio,3 Rocco Lagioia,3 Graziano Riccioni,4 Marco Matteo Ciccone1 1Section of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation, University of Bari, School of Medicine, Policlinico, Bari, Italy; 2Section of Cardiovascular Diseases, Policlinic, San Paolo Hospital, Bari, Italy; 3Section of Cardiovascular Diseases, Fondazione Maugeri, Cassano Murge, Italy; 4Intensive Cardiology Care Unit, San Camillo de Lellis Hospital, Manfredonia, Foggia, Italy Abstract: Elevated heart rate could negatively influence cardiovascular risk in the general population. It can induce and promote the atherosclerotic process by means of several mechanisms involving endothelial shear stress and biochemical activities. Furthermore, elevated heart rate can directly increase heart ischemic conditions because of its skill in unbalancing demand/supply of oxygen and decreasing the diastolic period. Thus, many pharmacological treatments have been proposed in order to reduce heart rate and ameliorate the cardiovascular risk profile of individuals, especially those suffering from coronary artery diseases (CAD and chronic heart failure (CHF. Ivabradine is the first pure heart rate reductive drug approved and currently used in humans, created in order to selectively reduce sinus node function and to overcome the many side effects of similar pharmacological tools (ie, β-blockers or calcium channel antagonists. The aim of our review is to evaluate the role and the safety of this molecule on CAD and CHF therapeutic strategies. Keywords: chronic heart failure, heart rate reduction, cardiac ischemic disease, heart-rate lowering drugs, funny current

  10. Time from emerging heart failure symptoms to cardiac resynchronisation therapy: impact on clinical response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbrugge, Frederik Hendrik; Dupont, Matthias; Vercammen, Jan; Jacobs, Linda; Verhaert, David; Vandervoort, Pieter; Tang, W H Wilson; Mullens, Wilfried

    2013-03-01

    To investigate whether time from onset of heart failure signs and/or symptoms (ie, progression to stage C/D heart failure) until implantation affects reverse remodelling and clinical outcome after cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT). Cohort study of consecutive CRT patients, implanted between 1 October 2008 and 30 April 2011. Single tertiary care centre (Ziekenhuis Oost-Limburg, Genk, Belgium). Consecutive CRT patients (n=172; 71±9 years), stratified into tertiles according to the time since first heart failure signs and/or symptoms at implantation. Change in left ventricular dimensions, New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class and freedom from all-cause mortality or heart failure admission. Baseline renal function was better in patients implanted earlier after emerging heart failure symptoms (estimated glomerular filtration rate=73±20 vs 63±23 vs 58±26 ml/min/1.73 m(2) for tertiles, respectively). After 6 months, decreases in left ventricular end-diastolic/systolic diameter and improvement in NYHA functional class were similar among tertiles. Freedom from all-cause mortality or heart failure admission was better in patients with early implantation (p value=0.042). However, this was not the case in patients with preserved renal function (p value=0.794). Death from progressive heart failure was significantly more frequent in patients implanted later in their disease course. Reverse left ventricular remodelling after CRT is not affected by the duration of heart failure. However, clinical outcome is better in patients implanted earlier in their disease course, which probably relates to better renal preservation.

  11. Features of The Heart Remodeling in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases, Combined with Coronary Heart Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Yu. Ryabova

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of heart remodeling in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases ( COPD, associated with coronary heart diseases (CHD were examined. The changes of structural and functional state of myocardium, intracardiac relationships with associated pathology were under study. The role of blood inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, TNF-a and the level of cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1 in exacerbating myocardial dysfunction was clarified.

  12. Clinical outcomes in overweight heart transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalowiec, Anne; Grady, Kathleen L; White-Williams, Connie

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have examined the impact of patient weight on heart transplant (HT) outcomes. Nine outcomes were compared in 2 groups of HT recipients (N = 347) based on their mean body mass index (BMI) during the first 3 years post-HT. Group 1 consisted of 108 non-overweight patients (BMI <25; mean age 52; 29.6% females; 16.7% minorities). Group 2 consisted of 239 overweight patients (BMI ≥25; mean age 52; 15.9% females; 13.8% minorities). Outcomes were: survival, re-hospitalization, rejections, infections, cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV), stroke, renal dysfunction, diabetes, and lymphoma. Non-overweight patients had shorter survival, were re-hospitalized more days after the HT discharge, and had more lymphoma and severe renal dysfunction. Overweight patients had more CAV, steroid-induced diabetes, and acute rejections. Overweight HT patients had better survival, but more rejections, CAV, and diabetes. Non-overweight HT patients had worse survival, plus more re-hospitalization time, lymphoma, and renal dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Emotional distress in elderly people with heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Santamaría, Emilia; Lameiras Fernández, María; González Lorenzo, Manuel; Rodríguez Castro, Yolanda

    2006-06-30

    To analyse the emotional distress associated with ageing, and its prevalence among elderly people who suffer from heart disease. Personal interviews with elderly people with and without heart problems. Interviews were conducted in public hospitals and old people's homes in the south of Galicia, Spain. The sample was made up of 130 elderly people (65 with heart problems and 65 without). The Inventory of Coping Strategies, of Halroyd and Reynolk (1984); Scheir, Caver, and Bridges Test (1984); the Life Satisfaction Scale of Diener, Emmuns, Larsen, and Griffen (1985); Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale (1965); and an instrument to measure Associated Symptoms (SCL-90; Derogatis, 1975). Elderly people with heart problems experienced greater anxiety and had lower self-esteem than those without such problems. Heart patients also tended to suffer more phobic anxiety and to retreat from social interaction more. With the passing of time, heart patients over 60 showed more anxiety, irritability and psychosomatic disorders. This study clearly shows the existence of emotional distress in elderly heart patients. This makes it particularly important to conduct risk-prevention programmes, since a lot of heart disease is brought on by unhealthy conduct.

  14. Psychocutaneous disease: Clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Helena; Mennella, Constance; Magid, Michelle; Stamu-O'Brien, Caroline; Kroumpouzos, George

    2017-05-01

    Psychocutaneous disease, defined in this review as primary psychiatric disease with skin manifestations, is commonly encountered in dermatology. Dermatologists can play an important role in the management of psychocutaneous disease because patients visit dermatology for treatment of their skin problems but often refuse psychiatric intervention. This review describes common psychocutaneous syndromes, including delusional, factitious, obsessive-compulsive and related, and eating disorders, as well as psychogenic pruritus, cutaneous sensory (pain) syndromes, posttraumatic stress disorder, and sleep-wake disorders. The updated classification of these disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition is included. Strategies for management are reviewed. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Congenital Heart Diseases associated with Identified Syndromes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recognised syndromes were seen in 69(68%) cases. Down syndrome with 54 children contributed 78.3% of those with known syndromes. Other identified syndromes and associations were Marfan's, Noonan's, Edwards, Prune Belly, Apert, Ellis-van creveld syndrome and congenital rubella syndrome. Congenital heart ...

  16. Rheumatic Heart Disease Associated with Secondary Renal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... non-specific chronic inflammatory changes. The patient's secondary amyloidosis was presumed to be related to the long standing RHD after exclusion of other causes of secondary amyloidosis. The patient finally died due to heart failure and acute pulmonary edema. Conclusion: Long standing RHD can lead to secondary ...

  17. Retrospective review of congenital heart disease in 976 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, P; Domenech, O; Silva, J; Vannini, S; Bussadori, R; Bussadori, C

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of epidemiology is important for recognition of cardiovascular malformations. Review the incidence of congenital heart defects in dogs in Italy and assess breed and sex predispositions. Nine hundred and seventy-six dogs diagnosed with congenital heart disease (CHD) of 4,480 dogs presented to Clinica Veterinaria Gran Sasso for cardiovascular examination from 1997 to 2010. A retrospective analysis of medical records regarding signalment, history, clinical examination, radiography, electrocardiography, echocardiography, angiography, and postmortem examination was performed. Breed and sex predisposition were assessed with the odds ratio test. CHD was observed in 21.7% of cases. A total of 1,132 defects were observed with single defects in 832 cases (85%), 2 concurrent defects in 132 cases (14%), and 3 concurrent defects in 12 cases (1%). The most common defects were pulmonic stenosis (PS; 32.1%), subaortic stenosis (SAS; 21.3%), and patent ductus arteriosus (20.9%), followed by ventricular septal defect (VSD; 7.5%), valvular aortic stenosis (AS; 5.7%), and tricuspid dysplasia (3.1%). SAS, PS, and VSD frequently were associated with other defects. Several breed and sex predispositions were identified. The results of this study are in accordance with previous studies, with slight differences. The breed and sex predilections identified may be of value for the diagnosis and screening of CHD in dogs. Additionally, the relatively high percentage of concurrent heart defects emphasizes the importance of accurate and complete examinations for identification. Because these data are from a cardiology referral center, a bias may exist. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  18. Clinical neurogenetics: huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordelon, Yvette M

    2013-11-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant, adult-onset, progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the triad of abnormal movements (typically chorea), cognitive impairment, and psychiatric problems. It is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the gene encoding the protein huntingtin on chromosome 4 and causes progressive atrophy of the striatum as well as cortical and other extrastriatal structures. Genetic testing has been available since 1993 to confirm diagnosis in affected adults and for presymptomatic testing in at-risk individuals. This review covers HD signs, symptoms, and pathophysiology; current genetic testing issues; and current and future treatment strategies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Resveratrol Reverses Functional Chagas Heart Disease in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucia Vilar-Pereira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC develops years after acute infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and does not improve after trypanocidal therapy, despite reduction of parasite burden. During disease, the heart undergoes oxidative stress, a potential causative factor for arrhythmias and contractile dysfunction. Here we tested whether antioxidants/ cardioprotective drugs could improve cardiac function in established Chagas heart disease. We chose a model that resembles B1-B2 stage of human CCC, treated mice with resveratrol and performed electrocardiography and echocardiography studies. Resveratrol reduced the prolonged PR and QTc intervals, increased heart rates and reversed sinus arrhythmia, atrial and atrioventricular conduction disorders; restored a normal left ventricular ejection fraction, improved stroke volume and cardiac output. Resveratrol activated the AMPK-pathway and reduced both ROS production and heart parasite burden, without interfering with vascularization or myocarditis intensity. Resveratrol was even capable of improving heart function of infected mice when treatment was started late after infection, while trypanocidal drug benznidazole failed. We attempted to mimic resveratrol's actions using metformin (AMPK-activator or tempol (SOD-mimetic. Metformin and tempol mimicked the beneficial effects of resveratrol on heart function and decreased lipid peroxidation, but did not alter parasite burden. These results indicate that AMPK activation and ROS neutralization are key strategies to induce tolerance to Chagas heart disease. Despite all tissue damage observed in established Chagas heart disease, we found that a physiological dysfunction can still be reversed by treatment with resveratrol, metformin and tempol, resulting in improved heart function and representing a starting point to develop innovative therapies in CCC.

  20. Resveratrol Reverses Functional Chagas Heart Disease in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Santos, Hilton; Vicentino, Amanda R. R.; Feijó, Daniel F.; Meyer-Fernandes, José R.; Paula-Neto, Heitor A.; Medei, Emiliano; Bozza, Marcelo T.; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Paiva, Claudia N.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) develops years after acute infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and does not improve after trypanocidal therapy, despite reduction of parasite burden. During disease, the heart undergoes oxidative stress, a potential causative factor for arrhythmias and contractile dysfunction. Here we tested whether antioxidants/ cardioprotective drugs could improve cardiac function in established Chagas heart disease. We chose a model that resembles B1-B2 stage of human CCC, treated mice with resveratrol and performed electrocardiography and echocardiography studies. Resveratrol reduced the prolonged PR and QTc intervals, increased heart rates and reversed sinus arrhythmia, atrial and atrioventricular conduction disorders; restored a normal left ventricular ejection fraction, improved stroke volume and cardiac output. Resveratrol activated the AMPK-pathway and reduced both ROS production and heart parasite burden, without interfering with vascularization or myocarditis intensity. Resveratrol was even capable of improving heart function of infected mice when treatment was started late after infection, while trypanocidal drug benznidazole failed. We attempted to mimic resveratrol’s actions using metformin (AMPK-activator) or tempol (SOD-mimetic). Metformin and tempol mimicked the beneficial effects of resveratrol on heart function and decreased lipid peroxidation, but did not alter parasite burden. These results indicate that AMPK activation and ROS neutralization are key strategies to induce tolerance to Chagas heart disease. Despite all tissue damage observed in established Chagas heart disease, we found that a physiological dysfunction can still be reversed by treatment with resveratrol, metformin and tempol, resulting in improved heart function and representing a starting point to develop innovative therapies in CCC. PMID:27788262