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Sample records for clinical governance implementation

  1. Hospitals’ Readiness to Implement Clinical Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farbod Ebadi Fardazar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Quality of health services is one of the most important factors for delivery of these services. Regarding the importance and vital role of quality in the health sector, a concept known as “Clinical Governance” (CG has been introduced into the health area which aims to enhance quality of health services. Thus, this study aimed to assess private and public hospitals’ readiness to implement CG in Iran. Methods This descriptive and cross-sectional study was carried out in 2012. Four hundred thirty participants including doctors, nurses, diagnostic departments personnel, and support staff were chosen randomly from four hospitals (equally divided into private and public hospitals. Clinical Governance Climate Questionnaire (CGCQ was used for data collection. Finally, data were entered into the SPSS 18 and were analyzed using statistical methods. Results Among the CG dimensions, “organizational learning” and “planned and integrated quality improvement program” scored the highest and the lowest respectively for both types of hospitals. Hospitals demonstrated the worst condition with regard to the latter dimension. Furthermore, both types of hospitals had positive picture regarding “training and development opportunities”. Private hospitals scored better than public ones in all dimensions but there was only a significant difference in “proactive risk management” dimension between both types of hospitals (P< 0.05. Conclusion Hospitals’ readiness for CG implementation was “average or weak”. In order to implement CG successfully, it is essential to have a quality-centered culture, a culture specified by less paperwork, more selfsufficiency, and flexibility in hospitals’ affairs as well as centring on shared vision and goals with an emphasis on continuous improvement and innovation.

  2. Challenges in implementing clinical governance: A qualitative study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design: A qualitative study. Setting: Hospitals affiliated to Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in Yazd, Iran. Subjects: Thirteen participants selected among clinical governance executives of under study hospitals and members of clinical governance office in curative deputy of the University. Results: Eight major ...

  3. Implementing clinical governance in Isfahan hospitals: Barriers and solutions, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdosi, Masoud; Ziyari, Farhad Bahman; Ollahi, Mehran Nemat; Salmani, Amaneh Rahim; Niknam, Noureddin

    2016-01-01

    In the new approach, all health care providers have been obligated to maintain and improve the quality and have been accountable for it. One of the ways is the implementation of clinical governance (CG). More accurate understanding of its challenges can help to improve its performance. In this study, barriers of CG implementation are investigated from the perspective of the hospitals involved. Besides, some solutions are suggested based on stakeholders' opinions. This study used combined method (qualitative content analysis and questionnaire) in hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2014. First, experts, and stakeholders talked about CG implementation obstacles in a semi-structured interview. Interviews were confirmed by the interviewee (double check). After analyzing the interviews using reduction coding the questionnaire was drawn up. The questionnaire "validity was confirmed by Cronbach's alpha (0/891)" and its reliability was obtained using experts confirmation. Data analyzing was performed using SPSS (18) software. According to results staffing and management factors were the main obstacles. After them, were factors related to organizational culture, infrastructure elements, information, sociocultural and then process factors. The learning barriers were in final rank. Thirty-four solutions was proposed by experts and divided into subset of eight major barriers. Most solutions were offered on modifying processes and minimal solutions about modifying of organizational culture, sociocultural, and educational factors. Removing the obstacles, especially management and human resource factors can be effective by facilitating and accelerating CG. Furthermore, use of experts and stakeholders opinions can help to remove CG barriers.

  4. Implementing clinical governance in English primary care groups/trusts: reconciling quality improvement and quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, S M; Sheaff, R; Sibbald, B; Marshall, M N; Pickard, S; Gask, L; Halliwell, S; Rogers, A; Roland, M O

    2002-03-01

    To investigate the concept of clinical governance being advocated by primary care groups/trusts (PCG/Ts), approaches being used to implement clinical governance, and potential barriers to its successful implementation in primary care. Qualitative case studies using semi-structured interviews and documentation review. Twelve purposively sampled PCG/Ts in England. Fifty senior staff including chief executives, clinical governance leads, mental health leads, and lay board members. Participants' perceptions of the role of clinical governance in PCG/Ts. PCG/Ts recognise that the successful implementation of clinical governance in general practice will require cultural as well as organisational changes, and the support of practices. They are focusing their energies on supporting practices and getting them involved in quality improvement activities. These activities include, but move beyond, conventional approaches to quality assessment (audit, incentives) to incorporate approaches which emphasise corporate and shared learning. PCG/Ts are also engaged in setting up systems for monitoring quality and for dealing with poor performance. Barriers include structural barriers (weak contractual levers to influence general practices), resource barriers (perceived lack of staff or money), and cultural barriers (suspicion by practice staff or problems overcoming the perceived blame culture associated with quality assessment). PCG/Ts are focusing on setting up systems for implementing clinical governance which seek to emphasise developmental and supportive approaches which will engage health professionals. Progress is intentionally incremental but formidable challenges lie ahead, not least reconciling the dual role of supporting practices while monitoring (and dealing with poor) performance.

  5. Implementation of clinical governance in hospitals: challenges and the keys for success.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Hadi Mousavi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a number of models and strategies for improving the quality of care such as total quality management, continuous quality improvement and clinical governance. The policy of clinical governance is part of the governments overall strategy for monitoring, assuring and improving in the national health services organization. Clinical governance has been introduced as a bridge between managerial and clinical approaches to quality. For successful implementing of clinical governance, it is necessary to pay attention to firm foundations of the structure, including equipment, staffing arrangement, supporting specialties, and staff training. Therefore, as clinical governance improves safety and quality in health care services, the current situation in hospitals should be evaluated before any intervention while barriers and blocks on structure and process should be determined to select a method for changing them. Considering these points could guarantee success in implementation of clinical governance; otherwise there would be a little chance to achieve the desired results despite consumption of plenty of time and huge paper works.

  6. Clinical governance implementation in a selected teaching emergency department: a systems approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical governance (CG) is among the different frameworks proposed to improve the quality of healthcare. Iran, like many other countries, has put healthcare quality improvement in its top health policy priorities. In November 2009, implementation of CG became a task for all hospitals across the country. However, it has been a challenge to clarify the notion of CG and the way to implement it in Iran. The purpose of this action research study is to understand how CG can be defined and implemented in a selected teaching emergency department (ED). Methods/design We will use Soft Systems Methodology for both designing the study and inquiring into its content. As we considered a complex problem situation regarding the quality of care in the selected ED, we initially conceptualized CG as a cyclic set of purposeful activities designed to explore the situation and find relevant changes to improve the quality of care. Then, implementation of CG will conceptually be to carry out that set of purposeful activities. The activities will be about: understanding the situation and finding out relevant issues concerning the quality of care; exploring different stakeholders’ views and ideas about the situation and how it can be improved; and defining actions to improve the quality of care through structured debates and development of accommodations among stakeholders. We will flexibly use qualitative methods of data collection and analysis in the course of the study. To ensure the study rigor, we will use different strategies. Discussion Successful implementation of CG, like other quality improvement frameworks, requires special consideration of underlying complexities. We believe that addressing the complex situation and reflections on involvement in this action research will make it possible to understand the concept of CG and its implementation in the selected setting. By describing the context and executed flexible methods of implementation, the results of this study

  7. Data governance implementation concept

    OpenAIRE

    Ullrichová, Jana

    2016-01-01

    This master´s thesis discusses concept of implementation for data governance. The theoretical part of this thesis is about data governance. It explains why data are important for company, describes definitoons of data governance, its history, its components, its principles and processes and fitting in company. Theoretical part is amended with examples of data governance failures and banking specifics. The main goal of this thesis is to create a concept for implementing data governance and its...

  8. Clinical governance implementation in a selected teaching emergency department: a systems approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heyrani Ali

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical governance (CG is among the different frameworks proposed to improve the quality of healthcare. Iran, like many other countries, has put healthcare quality improvement in its top health policy priorities. In November 2009, implementation of CG became a task for all hospitals across the country. However, it has been a challenge to clarify the notion of CG and the way to implement it in Iran. The purpose of this action research study is to understand how CG can be defined and implemented in a selected teaching emergency department (ED. Methods/design We will use Soft Systems Methodology for both designing the study and inquiring into its content. As we considered a complex problem situation regarding the quality of care in the selected ED, we initially conceptualized CG as a cyclic set of purposeful activities designed to explore the situation and find relevant changes to improve the quality of care. Then, implementation of CG will conceptually be to carry out that set of purposeful activities. The activities will be about: understanding the situation and finding out relevant issues concerning the quality of care; exploring different stakeholders’ views and ideas about the situation and how it can be improved; and defining actions to improve the quality of care through structured debates and development of accommodations among stakeholders. We will flexibly use qualitative methods of data collection and analysis in the course of the study. To ensure the study rigor, we will use different strategies. Discussion Successful implementation of CG, like other quality improvement frameworks, requires special consideration of underlying complexities. We believe that addressing the complex situation and reflections on involvement in this action research will make it possible to understand the concept of CG and its implementation in the selected setting. By describing the context and executed flexible methods of implementation

  9. Facilitators and Barriers to Implementing Clinical Governance: A Qualitative Study among Senior Managers in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravaghi, Hamid; Rafiei, Sima; Heidarpour, Peigham; Mohseni, Maryam

    2014-09-01

    Health care systems should assign quality improvement as their main mission. Clinical governance (CG) is a key strategy to improve quality of health care services. The Iranian Ministry of Health and Medical Education (MOHME) has promoted CG as a framework for safeguarding quality and safety in all hospitals since 2009. The purpose of this study was to explore perceived facilitators and barriers to implementing CG by deputies for curative affairs of Iranian medical universities. A qualitative study was conducted using face to face interviews with a purposeful sample of 43 deputies for curative affairs of Iranian Medical Universities and documents review. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data. Five themes were explored including: knowledge and attitude toward CG, culture, organizational factors, managerial factors and barriers. The main perceived facilitating factors were adequate knowledge and positive attitude toward CG, supporting culture, managers' commitment, effective communication and well designed incentives. Pe rceived barriers were the reverse of facilitators noted above in addition to insufficient resources, legal challenges, workload and parallel quality programs. Successful implementation of CG in Iran will require identifying barriers and challenges existing in the way of CG implementation and try to mitigate them by using appropriate facilitators.

  10. OPTIGOV - A new methodology for evaluating Clinical Governance implementation by health providers

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    Nardella Pierangela

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of Clinical Governance (CG is to the pursuit of quality in health care through the integration of all the activities impacting on the patient into a single strategy. OPTIGOV (Optimizing Health Care Governance is a methodology for the assessment of the level of implementation of CG within healthcare organizations. The aim of this paper is to explain the process underlying the development of OPTIGOV, and describe its characteristics and steps. Methods OPTIGOV was developed in 2006 by the Institute of Hygiene of the Catholic University of the Sacred Heart and Eurogroup Consulting Alliance. The main steps of the process were: choice of areas for analysis and questionnaire development, based on a review of scientific literature; assignment of scores and weights to individual questions and areas; implementation of a software interfaceable with Microsoft Office. Results OPTIGOV consists of: a a hospital audit with a structured approach; b development of an improvement operational plan. A questionnaire divided into 13 areas of analysis is used. For each area there is a form with a variable number of questions and "closed" answers. A score is assigned to each answer, area of analysis, healthcare department and unit. The single scores can be gathered for the organization as a whole. The software application allows for collation of data, calculation of scores and development of benchmarks to allow comparisons between healthcare organizations. Implementation consists of three stages: the preparation phase includes a kick off meeting, selection of interviewees and development of a survey plan. The registration phase includes hospital audits, reviewing of hospital documentation, data collection and score processing. Lastly, results are processed, inserted into a final report, and discussed in a meeting with the Hospital Board and in a final workshop. Conclusions The OPTIGOV methodology for the evaluation of CG implementation was

  11. Multi-professional audit supports clinical governance in projecting and implementing a new stroke care area

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    Marco Masina

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients with acute stroke have better outcomes in terms of survival or regaining independence if they receive organized inpatient care in a specific setting (Stroke Unit, SU where a coordinated multidisciplinary team can ensure the best level of care. The clinical governance of an SU requires a systematic monitoring of diagnostic, clinical and therapeutic processes through a structured audit. The entire project and set up of a new SU in Bentivoglio, Italy, were based on a model that focused on multidisciplinary teamwork and clinical governance. An audit based on the Benjamin audit cycle followed every step of the set up of the new SU. Markers from national and international guidelines and from the Italian Regional Audit, together with a specific database were used. The audit showed a high level of care and a significant improvement in the majority of clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic parameters. Only a few markers (i.e. waiting times for ultrasound tomography and prescription of oral anticoagulation therapy required specific projects in order to improve the results. Our experience confirmed that a structured audit can support clinical governance of an SU by monitoring clinical processes and quality of care. Such an audit involves the whole professional team and shows the effects of any single actions. It also helps integration and co-operation among staff. Furthermore, a structured audit is a useful instrument for professional accountability for both qualitative and quantitative aspects of care.

  12. Success rate evaluation of clinical governance implementation in teaching hospitals in Kerman (Iran) based on nine steps of Karsh's model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vali, Leila; Mastaneh, Zahra; Mouseli, Ali; Kardanmoghadam, Vida; Kamali, Sodabeh

    2017-07-01

    One of the ways to improve the quality of services in the health system is through clinical governance. This method aims to create a framework for clinical services providers to be accountable in return for continuing improvement of quality and maintaining standards of services. To evaluate the success rate of clinical governance implementation in Kerman teaching hospitals based on 9 steps of Karsh's Model. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015 on 94 people including chief executive officers (CEOs), nursing managers, clinical governance managers and experts, head nurses and nurses. The required data were collected through a researcher-made questionnaire containing 38 questions with three-point Likert Scale (good, moderate, and weak). The Karsh's Model consists of nine steps including top management commitment to change, accountability for change, creating a structured approach for change, training, pilot implementation, communication, feedback, simulation, and end-user participation. Data analysis using descriptive statistics and Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test was done by SPSS software version 16. About 81.9 % of respondents were female and 74.5 have a Bachelor of Nursing (BN) degree. In general, the status of clinical governance implementation in studied hospitals based on 9 steps of the model was 44 % (moderate). A significant relationship was observed among accountability and organizational position (p=0.0012) and field of study (p=0.000). Also, there were significant relationships between structure-based approach and organizational position (p=0.007), communication and demographic characteristics (p=0.000), and end-user participation with organizational position (p=0.03). Clinical governance should be implemented by correct needs assessment and participation of all stakeholders, to ensure its enforcement in practice, and to enhance the quality of services.

  13. Validating and Determining the Weight of Items Used for Evaluating Clinical Governance Implementation Based on Analytic Hierarchy Process Model

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    Elaheh Hooshmand

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background The purpose of implementing a system such as Clinical Governance (CG is to integrate, establish and globalize distinct policies in order to improve quality through increasing professional knowledge and the accountability of healthcare professional toward providing clinical excellence. Since CG is related to change, and change requires money and time, CG implementation has to be focused on priority areas that are in more dire need of change. The purpose of the present study was to validate and determine the significance of items used for evaluating CG implementation. Methods The present study was descriptive-quantitative in method and design. Items used for evaluating CG implementation were first validated by the Delphi method and then compared with one another and ranked based on the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP model. Results The items that were validated for evaluating CG implementation in Iran include performance evaluation, training and development, personnel motivation, clinical audit, clinical effectiveness, risk management, resource allocation, policies and strategies, external audit, information system management, research and development, CG structure, implementation prerequisites, the management of patients’ non-medical needs, complaints and patients’ participation in the treatment process. The most important items based on their degree of significance were training and development, performance evaluation, and risk management. The least important items included the management of patients’ non-medical needs, patients’ participation in the treatment process and research and development. Conclusion The fundamental requirements of CG implementation included having an effective policy at national level, avoiding perfectionism, using the expertise and potentials of the entire country and the coordination of this model with other models of quality improvement such as accreditation and patient safety.

  14. Validating and determining the weight of items used for evaluating clinical governance implementation based on analytic hierarchy process model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshmand, Elaheh; Tourani, Sogand; Ravaghi, Hamid; Vafaee Najar, Ali; Meraji, Marziye; Ebrahimipour, Hossein

    2015-04-08

    The purpose of implementing a system such as Clinical Governance (CG) is to integrate, establish and globalize distinct policies in order to improve quality through increasing professional knowledge and the accountability of healthcare professional toward providing clinical excellence. Since CG is related to change, and change requires money and time, CG implementation has to be focused on priority areas that are in more dire need of change. The purpose of the present study was to validate and determine the significance of items used for evaluating CG implementation. The present study was descriptive-quantitative in method and design. Items used for evaluating CG implementation were first validated by the Delphi method and then compared with one another and ranked based on the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) model. The items that were validated for evaluating CG implementation in Iran include performance evaluation, training and development, personnel motivation, clinical audit, clinical effectiveness, risk management, resource allocation, policies and strategies, external audit, information system management, research and development, CG structure, implementation prerequisites, the management of patients' non-medical needs, complaints and patients' participation in the treatment process. The most important items based on their degree of significance were training and development, performance evaluation, and risk management. The least important items included the management of patients' non-medical needs, patients' participation in the treatment process and research and development. The fundamental requirements of CG implementation included having an effective policy at national level, avoiding perfectionism, using the expertise and potentials of the entire country and the coordination of this model with other models of quality improvement such as accreditation and patient safety. © 2015 by Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

  15. Clinical professional governance for detailed clinical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossen, William; Goossen-Baremans, Anneke

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes the need for Detailed Clinical Models for contemporary Electronic Health Systems, data exchange and data reuse. It starts with an explanation of the components related to Detailed Clinical Models with a brief summary of knowledge representation, including terminologies representing clinic relevant "things" in the real world, and information models that abstract these in order to let computers process data about these things. Next, Detailed Clinical Models are defined and their purpose is described. It builds on existing developments around the world and accumulates in current work to create a technical specification at the level of the International Standards Organization. The core components of properly expressed Detailed Clinical Models are illustrated, including clinical knowledge and context, data element specification, code bindings to terminologies and meta-information about authors, versioning among others. Detailed Clinical Models to date are heavily based on user requirements and specify the conceptual and logical levels of modelling. It is not precise enough for specific implementations, which requires an additional step. However, this allows Detailed Clinical Models to serve as specifications for many different kinds of implementations. Examples of Detailed Clinical Models are presented both in text and in Unified Modelling Language. Detailed Clinical Models can be positioned in health information architectures, where they serve at the most detailed granular level. The chapter ends with examples of projects that create and deploy Detailed Clinical Models. All have in common that they can often reuse materials from earlier projects, and that strict governance of these models is essential to use them safely in health care information and communication technology. Clinical validation is one point of such governance, and model testing another. The Plan Do Check Act cycle can be applied for governance of Detailed Clinical Models

  16. Implementing a new governance model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley-Clarke, Nicky; Sanders, Jackie; Munford, Robyn

    2016-05-16

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to discuss the lessons learnt from the process of implementing a new model of governance within Living Well, a New Zealand statutory mental health agency. Design/methodology/approach - It presents the findings from an organisational case study that involved qualitative interviews, meeting observations and document analysis. Archetype theory provided the analytical framework for the research enabling an analysis of both the formal structures and informal value systems that influenced the implementation of the governance model. Findings - The research found that the move to a new governance model did not proceed as planned. It highlighted the importance of staff commitment, the complexity of adopting a new philosophical approach and the undue influence of key personalities as key determining factors in the implementation process. The findings suggest that planners and managers within statutory mental health agencies need to consider the implications of any proposed governance change on existing roles and relationships, thinking strategically about how to secure professional commitment to change. Practical implications - There are ongoing pressures within statutory mental health agencies to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of organisational structures and systems. This paper has implications for how planners and managers think about the process of implementing new governance models within the statutory mental health environment in order to increase the likelihood of sustaining and embedding new approaches to service delivery. Originality/value - The paper presents insights into the process of implementing new governance models within a statutory mental health agency in New Zealand that has relevance for other jurisdictions.

  17. Clinical governance and external audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazebrook, S G; Buchanan, J G

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a model of clinical governance that was developed at South Auckland Health during the period 1995 to 2000. Clinical quality and safety are core objectives. A multidisciplinary Clinical Board is responsible for the development and publicising of sound clinical policies together with monitoring the effects of their implementation on quality and safety. The Clinical Board has several committees, including an organization-wide Continuous Quality Improvement Committee to enhance the explicit nature of the quality system in terms of structure, staff awareness and involvement, and to develop the internal audit system. The second stream stems from the Chief Medical Officer and clinical directors in a clinical management sense. The Audit Committee of the Board of Directors covers both clinical and financial audit. The reporting lines back to that committee are described and the role of the external auditor of clinical standards is explained. The aim has been to create a supportive culture where quality initiatives and innovation can flourish, and where the emphasis is not on censure but improvement.

  18. Shared governance in a clinic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Michelle M; Costanzo, Cindy

    2015-01-01

    Shared governance in health care empowers nurses to share in the decision-making process, which results in decentralized management and collective accountability. Share governance practices have been present in hospitals since the late 1970s. However, shared governance in ambulatory care clinics has not been well established. The subjects of this quality project included staff and administrative nurses in a clinic system. The stakeholder committee chose what model of shared governance to implement and educated clinic staff. The Index of Professional Nursing Governance measured a shared governance score pre- and postimplementation of the Clinic Nursing Council. The Clinic Nursing Council met bimonthly for 3 months during this project to discuss issues and make decisions related to nursing staff. The Index of Professional Nursing Governance scores indicated traditional governance pre- and postimplementation of the Clinic Nursing Council, which is to be expected. The stakeholder committee was beneficial to the initial implementation process and facilitated staff nurse involvement. Shared governance is an evolutionary process that develops empowered nurses and nurse leaders.

  19. Oracle SOA Governance 11g implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Weir, Luis Augusto

    2013-01-01

    This book is a practical tutorial, with lots of step-by-step instructions for achieving SOA Governance by implementing the component Oracle products.This book is written for SOA architects and project managers who want to learn how to implement Oracle SOA Governance.

  20. Difficulties in the dissemination and implementation of clinical guidelines in government neonatal intensive care units in Brazil: how managers, medical and nursing, position themselves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magluta, Cynthia; Gomes, Maria A de Sousa Mendes; Wuillaume, Susana M

    2011-08-01

    Clinical guidelines are tools that systematize scientific evidence and help to achieve proper care. Several difficulties are reported regarding the effective use, such as the shortcomings in the level of knowledge and attitudes by the professionals, the service structure and the preferences appointed by patients. An analysis of these difficulties was the objective of this study in the context of government Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU) in Brazil. A semi-structured survey was carried out with 53 managers (medical and nursing) of the 15 NICU in a convenient sample of two groups of government units in Brazil. The managers chose their answers from a list of difficulties to implement the guidelines based on the analytical model of Cabana and graded the difficulties found on a 5-point scale with no reference to quality. Respondents have reported several difficulties with the following priority: lack of professionals to provide care, being perceived as more critical within the nursing and physiotherapy crews, minor participation of professionals in the discussion process and inadequate infrastructure. The lack of acquaintance with the guidelines by the professionals has been reported by few of the surveyed. These findings show some common ground to literature pointing the importance of adequate infrastructure. Managers showed a low valuation of both the level of knowledge and the professionals' adhesion to the guidelines. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Implementation of corporate governance principles in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona Iulia Țarțavulea (Dieaconescu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to conduct a study regarding the manner in which corporate governance principles are applied in Romania, in both public and private sector. In the first part of the paper, the corporate governance principles are presented as they are defined in Romania, in comparison with the main international sources of interest in the domain (OECD corporate governance principles, UE legal framework. The corporate governance (CG principles refer to issues regarding board composition, transparency of scope, objectives and policies; they define the relations between directors and managers, shareholders and stakeholders. The research methodology is based on both fundamental research and empirical study on the implementation of corporate governance principles in companies from Romania. The main instrument of research is a corporate governance index, calculated based on a framework proposed by the author. The corporate governance principles are transposed in criteria that compose the framework for the CG index. The results of the study consist of scores for each CG principles and calculation of CG index for seven companies selected from the public and private sector in Romania. The results are analyzed and discussed in order to formulate general and particular recommendations. The main conclusion of this study is that that a legal framework in the area of corporate governance regulation is needed in Romania. I consider that the main CG principles should be enforced by developing a mandatory legal framework.

  2. Clinical implementation of pharmacogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-González, Xandra; Cabaleiro, Teresa; Herrero, María José; McLeod, Howard; López-Fernández, Luis A

    2016-03-01

    In the last decade, pharmacogenetic research has been performed in different fields. However, the application of pharmacogenetic findings to clinical practice has not been as fast as desirable. The current situation of clinical implementation of pharmacogenetics is discussed. This review focuses on the advances of pharmacogenomics to individualize cancer treatments, the relationship between pharmacogenetics and pharmacodynamics in the clinical course of transplant patients receiving a combination of immunosuppressive therapy, the needs and barriers facing pharmacogenetic clinical application, and the situation of pharmacogenetic testing in Spain. It is based on lectures presented by speakers of the Clinical Implementation of Pharmacogenetics Symposium at the VII Conference of the Spanish Pharmacogenetics and Pharmacogenomics Society, held in April 20, 2015.

  3. Policy Implementation Decentralization Government in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kardin M. Simanjuntak

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Decentralization in Indonesia is that reforms not completed and until the current implementation is not maximized or have not been successful. The essence of decentralization is internalising cost and benefit' for the people and how the government closer to the people. That's the most important essence of essence 'decentralization’. However, the implementation of decentralization in Indonesia is still far from the expectations. It is shown that only benefits of decentralization elite and local authorities, decentralization is a neo-liberal octopus, decentralization of public services are lacking in character, decentralization without institutional efficiency, decentralization fosters corruption in the area, and quasi-fiscal decentralization.

  4. Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas: clinical governance issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, P A; Goldstone, A H

    2002-09-01

    Every patient in every part of the world has the right to expect the best possible quality of care from health care providers. Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) are an extremely heterogeneous group of conditions which require important decisions to be taken at many points along the treatment pathway. To get this right every time requires that high-quality standards are instituted and adhered to, so that the best possible outcome is achieved. In the past this has not always been the case because of the failure of clinicians sometimes to adhere to an optimal management plan. In 1995, the UK government commissioned an inquiry into the running of cancer services in the United Kingdom, which culminated in a series of recommendations to improve them. Subsequently, these recommendations were implemented as objectives of the NHS Cancer Plan which is the framework by which the UK government wishes to improve cancer services. Concurrently another general concept has emerged which is designed to ensure that the highest quality standards may be achieved for all patients across the whole National Health Service (NHS). This concept, termed 'clinical governance', brings together a corporate responsibility of all health care workers to deliver high quality standards, in the hope that this will translate into better long-term survival of patients with malignant disease. This chapter focuses on the issues surrounding clinical governance and how the principles of this concept relate to non-Hodgkin's lymphomas.

  5. Quality improvement in clinical documentation: does clinical governance work?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dehghan M

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Mahlegha Dehghan,1 Dorsa Dehghan,2 Akbar Sheikhrabori,3 Masoume Sadeghi,4 Mehrdad Jalalian5 1Department of Medical Surgical Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, 2Department of Pediatric Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Islamic Azad University Kerman Branch, Kerman, 3Department of Medical Surgical Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, 4Research Center for Modeling in Health, Institute of Futures Studies in Health, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, 5Electronic Physician Journal, Mashhad, Iran Introduction: The quality of nursing documentation is still a challenge in the nursing profession and, thus, in the health care industry. One major quality improvement program is clinical governance, whose mission is to continuously improve the quality of patient care and overcome service quality problems. The aim of this study was to identify whether clinical governance improves the quality of nursing documentation. Methods: A quasi-experimental method was used to show nursing documentation quality improvement after a 2-year clinical governance implementation. Two hundred twenty random nursing documents were assessed structurally and by content using a valid and reliable researcher made checklist. Results: There were no differences between a nurse's demographic data before and after 2 years (P>0.05 and the nursing documentation score did not improve after a 2-year clinical governance program. Conclusion: Although some efforts were made to improve nursing documentation through clinical governance, these were not sufficient and more attempts are needed. Keywords: nursing documentation, clinical governance, quality improvement, nursing record

  6. Implementering af ITIL® IT-governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salling, Allan

    The IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL) fremhæves ofte som et IT-governance best practice framework, men det er tilsyneladende vanskeligt at implementere. ”Many organizations that decide to implement ITIL fail completely [...]” (Pereira og da Silva 2010). Dette vurderes som et væsentligt IS-forsknin......The IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL) fremhæves ofte som et IT-governance best practice framework, men det er tilsyneladende vanskeligt at implementere. ”Many organizations that decide to implement ITIL fail completely [...]” (Pereira og da Silva 2010). Dette vurderes som et væsentligt IS......-forskningsproblem. ITIL-litteraturen anviser bl.a. Critical Success Factors (CSF) som en løsning. Baseret på et identificeret litteraturgap blev det besluttet at undersøge, om kendte CSF kunne løse problemet. På den baggrund er der gennemført et aktionsforskningsprojekt, hvor ITILimplementeringsproblemet søges løs ved......, at kulturen delvist kunne forklare problemerne, og på den baggrund blev der opstillet handleanvisninger for diagnosticering og ændring af kulturen. ITIL-implementeringen var kun delvist en succes, men under aktionsforskningen blev der alligevel etableret en række holdbare rutiner, der stadig bruges flere år...

  7. Maintaining clinical governance when giving telephone advice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alazawi, William; Agarwal, Kosh; Suddle, Abid; Aluvihare, Varuna; Heneghan, Michael A

    2013-10-01

    Delivering excellent healthcare depends on accurate communication between professionals who may be in different locations. Frequently, the first point of contact with the liver unit at King's College Hospital (KCH) is through a telephone call to a specialist registrar or liver fellow, for whom no case notes are available in which to record information. The aim of this study was to improve the clinical governance of telephone referrals and to generate contemporaneous records that could be easily retrieved and audited. An electronic database for telephone referrals and advice was designed and made securely available to registrars in our unit. Service development in a tertiary liver centre that receives referrals from across the UK and Europe. Demographic and clinical data were recorded prospectively and analysed retrospectively. Data from 350 calls were entered during 5 months. The information included the nature and origin of the call (200 from 75 different institutions), disease burden and severity of disease among the patients discussed with KCH, and outcome of the call. The majority of cases were discussed with consultants or arrangements were made for formal review at KCH. A telephone referrals and advice database provides clinical governance, serves as a quality indicator and forms a contemporaneous record at the referral centre. Activity data and knowledge of disease burden help to tailor services to the needs of referrers and commissioners. We recommend implementation of similar models in other centres that give extramural verbal advice.

  8. Governance of Higher Education--Implementation of Project Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macheridis, Nikos

    2017-01-01

    This article focuses on coordination between governance actors in higher education. The object of the study is a department at a public university, seen as a multi-project environment. The purpose of this article is to illustrate and analyze project governance as a tool that allows departmental management to coordinate with the authorities, the…

  9. A clinical governance framework for blood services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, L M; Benjamin, R J; Devine, D V; Katz, L M; Pink, J

    2015-05-01

    The elements of clinical governance, which ensure excellence in clinical care, can be applied to blood services. In this survey, their application in a range of blood providers was gauged, with the aim of identifying best practice and producing a generalizable framework. The Medical Directors of members of the Alliance of Blood Operators surveyed how different elements of clinical governance operated within their organizations and developed recommendations applicable in the blood service environment. The recommendations that emerged highlighted the importance of an organization's culture, with the delivery of optimal clinical governance being a corporate responsibility. Senior management must agree and promote a set of values to ensure that the system operates with the patient and donor at its heart. All staff should understand how their role fits into the 'journey to the patient', and a culture of openness promoted. Thus, reporting of errors and risks should be actively sought and praised, with penalties applied for concealment. Systems should exist to collect, analyse and escalate clinical outcomes, safety data, clinical risk assessments, incident reports and complaints to inform organizational learning. Clinical governance principles from general health care can be applied within blood services to complement good manufacturing practice. This requires leadership, accountability, an open culture and a drive for continuous improvement and excellence in clinical care. © 2015 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  10. Applying TOGAF for e-government implementation based on service oriented architecture methodology towards good government governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodijah, A.; Sundari, S.; Nugraha, A. C.

    2018-05-01

    As a Local Government Agencies who perform public services, General Government Office already has utilized Reporting Information System of Local Government Implementation (E-LPPD). However, E-LPPD has upgrade limitation for the integration processes that cannot accommodate General Government Offices’ needs in order to achieve Good Government Governance (GGG), while success stories of the ultimate goal of e-government implementation requires good governance practices. Currently, citizen demand public services as private sector do, which needs service innovation by utilizing the legacy system as a service based e-government implementation, while Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) to redefine a business processes as a set of IT enabled services and Enterprise Architecture from the Open Group Architecture Framework (TOGAF) as a comprehensive approach in redefining business processes as service innovation towards GGG. This paper takes a case study on Performance Evaluation of Local Government Implementation (EKPPD) system on General Government Office. The results show that TOGAF will guide the development of integrated business processes of EKPPD system that fits good governance practices to attain GGG with SOA methodology as technical approach.

  11. Corporate Governance Scorecards : Assessing and Promoting the Implementation of Codes of Corporate Governance

    OpenAIRE

    International Finance Corporation

    2014-01-01

    This is a supplement to second IFC's toolkit: developing Corporate Governance codes of best practice. The focus of second toolkit is the development of codes of corporate governance. This supplement focuses narrowly on how to use scorecards to measure the observance and implementation of such codes. It does not cover the full panoply of governance assessment tools. This supplement provides...

  12. Preparedness of Government Owned Dental Clinics for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preparedness of Government Owned Dental Clinics for the Management of Medical Emergencies: A Survey of Government Dental Clinics in Lagos. ... emergencies and the availability of emergency drugs and equipment in government dental ...

  13. The Contextualization of Archetypes: Clinical Template Governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Rune; Ulriksen, Gro-Hilde; Ellingsen, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    This paper is a status report from a large-scale openEHR-based EPR project from the North Norway Regional Health Authority. It concerns the standardization of a regional ICT portfolio and the ongoing development of a new process oriented EPR systems encouraged by the unfolding of a national repository for openEHR archetypes. Subject of interest; the contextualization of clinical templates is governed over multiple national boundaries which is complex due to the dependency of clinical resources. From the outset of this, we are interested in how local, regional, and national organizers maneuver to standardize while applying OpenEHR technology.

  14. Clinical governance; How been understood, what is needed? Nurses' perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homayoun Sadeghi Bazargani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Clinical Governance (CG is an overarching concept, using organizational capacity, safeguards high standards of the health services and provides a safe care for patients.  The aim of this research was to study nurses’ perception about Clinical Governance. Materials and Methods: A qualitative study was done with Focus Group Discussions (FGD. Purposeful Sampling was used to select the objectives including 65 participants. Actually 7 FGD’s were held. Content analysis was used to extract the meaningful themes. Results:Nurses believed that patient centeredness and evidence based practice is the core of the CG concept. Also they mentioned that cultural change, staffs training, adequate financial and human resources are required to successfully implementation of CG in hospitals.  Conclusion: Spreading up a shared vision about CG and providing the required infrastructures in hospitals would be facilitate CG initiatives. Proper commitment of the managers and staff participation could lead an effective CG implementation.

  15. Factors affecting knowledge governance implementation among Malaysian SMEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khong Sin Tan

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge governance is a relatively new discipline in Malaysia with very little research work performed so far. As Malaysian government is actively involved in the implementation of Economic Transformation Program (ETP, Government Transformation Program (GTP and Urban Trans-formation Program (UTP, Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs need to react to the government move by transforming their conventional knowledge management practices to knowledge govern-ance. As of today, there has been very limited study conducted in Malaysia on the extent of the company acceptance of such governance. This research was therefore conducted to measure the SME users' acceptance and identify the pros and cons of knowledge governance. With these findings, recommendations were given to policy makers and industries to increase the company's knowledge governance acceptance. Questionnaire was used for data collection. Systematic random sampling methods was used to select respondents. The questionnaire was developed and adapted based on knowledge management and IT governance frameworks. In this model, the dependent variable was company's intention to adopt knowledge governance. Independent variables included knowledge application needs, knowledge architecture, knowledge infrastructure, knowledge investment and knowledge principles.

  16. Exploring the context for effective clinical governance in infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halton, Kate; Hall, Lisa; Gardner, Anne; MacBeth, Deborough; Mitchell, Brett G

    2017-03-01

    Effective clinical governance is necessary to support improvements in infection control. Historically, the focus has been on ensuring that infection control practice and policy is based on evidence, and that there is use of surveillance and auditing for self-regulation and performance feedback. There has been less exploration of how contextual and organizational factors mediate an infection preventionists (IP's) ability to engage with evidence-based practice and enact good clinical governance. A cross sectional Web-based survey of IPs in Australia and New Zealand was undertaken. Questions focused on engagement in evidence-based practice and perceptions about the context, culture, and leadership within the infection control team and organization. Responses were mapped against dimensions of Scally and Donaldson's clinical governance framework. Three hundred surveys were returned. IPs appear well equipped at an individual level to undertake evidence-based practice. The most serious set of perceived challenges to good clinical governance related to a lack of leadership or active resistance to infection control within the organization. Additional challenges included lack of information technology solutions and poor access to specialist expertise and financial resources. Focusing on strengthening contextual factors at the organizational level that otherwise undermine capacity to implement evidence-based practice is key to sustaining current infection control successes and promoting further practice improvements. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Implementation of Computer Assisted Test Selection System in Local Governments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Azis Basri

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available As an evaluative way of selection of civil servant system in all government areas, Computer Assisted Test selection system was started to apply in 2013. In phase of implementation for first time in all areas in 2014, this system selection had trouble in several areas, such as registration procedure and passing grade. The main objective of this essay was to describe implementation of new selection system for civil servants in the local governments and to seek level of effectiveness of this selection system. This essay used combination of study literature and field survey which data collection was made by interviews, observations, and documentations from various sources, and to analyze the collected data, this essay used reduction, display data and verification for made the conclusion. The result of this essay showed, despite there a few parts that be problem of this system such as in the registration phase but almost all phases of implementation of CAT selection system in local government areas can be said was working clearly likes in preparation, implementation and result processing phase. And also this system was fulfilled two of three criterias of effectiveness for selection system, they were accuracy and trusty. Therefore, this selection system can be said as an effective way to select new civil servant. As suggestion, local governments have to make prime preparation in all phases of test and make a good feedback as evaluation mechanism and together with central government to seek, fix and improve infrastructures as supporting tool and competency of local residents.

  18. Tripartite Governance: Enabling Successful Implementations with Vulnerable Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Margaret Ann

    2016-01-01

    Vulnerable populations are often at a distinct disadvantage when it comes to the implementation of health information systems in an equitable, appropriate, and timely manner. The disadvantages experienced by vulnerable populations are innumerable and include lack of representation, lack of appropriate levels of funding, lack of resources and capacity, and lack of representation. Increasingly, models of representation for complex implementations involve a tripartite project governance model. This tripartite partnership distributes accountability across all partners, and ensures that vulnerable populations have an equitable contribution to the direction of implementation according to their needs. This article shares lessons learned and best practices from complex tripartite partnerships supporting implementations with vulnerable populations in Canada.

  19. Implementation of hospital governing boards: views from the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNatt, Zahirah; Thompson, Jennifer W; Mengistu, Abraham; Tatek, Dawit; Linnander, Erika; Ageze, Leulseged; Lawson, Ruth; Berhanu, Negalign; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2014-04-17

    Decentralization through the establishment of hospital governing boards has been touted as an effective way to improve the quality and efficiency of hospitals in low-income countries. Although several studies have examined the process of decentralization, few have quantitatively assessed the implementation of hospital governing boards and their impact on hospital performance. Therefore, we sought to describe the functioning of governing boards and to determine the association between governing board functioning and hospital performance. We conducted a cross-sectional study with governing board chairpersons to assess board (1) structure, (2) roles and responsibilities and (3) training and orientation practices. Using bivariate analysis and multivariable regression, we examined the association between governing board functioning and hospital performance. Hospital performance indicators: 1) percent of hospital management standards met, measured with the Ethiopian Hospital Reform Implementation Guidelines and 2) patient experience, measured with the Inpatient and Outpatient Assessment of Healthcare surveys. A total of 92 boards responded to the survey (96% response rate). The average percentage of EHRIG standards met was 58.1% (standard deviation (SD) 21.7 percentage points), and the mean overall patient experience score was 7.2 (SD 2.2). Hospitals with greater hospital management standards met had governing boards that paid members, reviewed performance in several domains quarterly or more frequently, developed new revenue sources, determined services to be outsourced, reviewed patient complaints, and had members with knowledge in business and financial management (all P-values outsourced, and reviewed patient complaints (all P-values < 0.05). These cross-sectional data suggest that strengthening governing boards to perform essential responsibilities may result in improved hospital performance.

  20. Clinical governance and operations management methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, C; Walley, P

    2000-01-01

    The clinical governance mechanism, introduced since 1998 in the UK National Health Service (NHS), aims to deliver high quality care with efficient, effective and cost-effective patient services. Scally and Donaldson recognised that new approaches are needed, and operations management techniques comprise potentially powerful methodologies in understanding the process of care, which can be applied both within and across professional boundaries. This paper summarises four studies in hospital Trusts which took approaches to improving process that were different from and less structured than business process re-engineering (BPR). The problems were then amenable to change at a relatively low cost and short timescale, producing significant improvement to patient care. This less structured approach to operations management avoided incurring overhead costs of large scale and costly change such as new information technology (IT) systems. The most successful changes were brought about by formal tools to control quantity, content and timing of changes.

  1. Implementing ABPM into Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinderliter, Alan L; Voora, Raven A; Viera, Anthony J

    2018-02-05

    To review the data supporting the use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM), and to provide practical guidance for practitioners who are establishing an ambulatory monitoring service. ABPM results more accurately reflect the risk of cardiovascular events than do office measurements of blood pressure. Moreover, many patients with high blood pressure in the office have normal blood pressure on ABPM-a pattern known as white coat hypertension-and have a prognosis similar to individuals who are normotensive in both settings. For these reasons, ABPM is recommended by the US Preventive Services Task Force to confirm the diagnosis of hypertension in patients with high office blood pressure before medical therapy is initiated. Similarly, the 2017 ACC/AHA High Blood Pressure Clinical Practice Guideline advocates the use of out-of-office blood pressure measurements to confirm hypertension and evaluate the efficacy of blood pressure-lowering medications. In addition to white coat hypertension, blood pressure phenotypes that are associated with increased cardiovascular risk and that can be recognized by ABPM include masked hypertension-characterized by normal office blood pressure but high values on ABPM-and high nocturnal blood pressure. In this review, best practices for starting a clinical ABPM service, performing an ABPM monitoring session, and interpreting and reporting ABPM data are described. ABPM is a valuable adjunct to careful office blood pressure measurement in diagnosing hypertension and in guiding antihypertensive therapy. Following recommended best practices can facilitate implementation of ABPM into clinical practice.

  2. Mobile government implementation for government service delivery in developing countries: a South Africa context

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ogunleye, OS

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available an opportunity to use of this platform to provide better service delivery to the citizens of the developing countries. This paper identifies major service delivery issues in South Africa. Various m-government systems that have been implemented in other countries...

  3. Groundwater governance in Asia: present state and barriers to implementation of good governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, T.

    2014-09-01

    The present state of groundwater governance in Asia was reviewed. The main problem regarding groundwater resources in each Asian country is overexploitation, causing water level decline, land subsidence and salt water intrusion. For those groundwater hazards, many countries have established regulations such as laws and regulations as countermeasures. However, those laws and regulations are not the basic laws on groundwater resources, but only for countermeasures to prevent groundwater hazards. Common problems and barriers for implementing groundwater governance in Asian countries are that there is more than one institute with different and sometimes overlapping responsibilities in groundwater management. To overcome those conflicts among institutions and establishment of good governance, it is necessary to establish an agency in the government as one coordinate function reinforcing the direct coordination and facilitation of groundwater policy-making and management. As one such framework, the conceptual law called the Water Cycle Basic Law, which is under planning in Japan, is examined in this paper.

  4. IMPLEMENTATION OF WEB GOVERNMENT AS MEDIA INFORMATION POTENTIAL VILLAGE SUKARAJA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedi Irawan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of information technology is so rapid that one of them in the form of the Internet. E-government In village Sukaraja is one of the most exciting sites in Sukaraja, the village of Sukaraja, the governance structure of the village of Sukaraja and all related information in the village of Sukaraja. System development Life Cycle (SDLC approach includes planning stages, analysis, in and system implementation, tools in system development process using DAD (Data Flow Diagram, DFD (Data Flow Diagram, and flowchart. In the making of this website use HTML programming language (Hypertext Markup Language, PHP (Hypertext Preprocessor, CSS (Cascading Style Sheet, JQUERY, Java script and presentation of data in the form of MySQL. With the existence of E-government In the Village Sukaraja aims to provide benefits for the wider community about obtaining Village information in a way easily, quickly, effectively and efficiently without knowing the deadline anytime and anywhere.

  5. Need to implement corporate governance in the Romanian companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin COSNEANU

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Under the background of the current economic realities, characterized by uncertainty and mistrust, of increased complexity of the environment in which they operate, the Romanian companies must demonstrate good organization, flexibility, skills, good risk management and be trustworthy economic and social partners. The answer to many of these challenges is provided by a modern management system, which makes proof of more convincing development possibilities, namely corporate governance.This article is an attempt to summarize the major theoretical and practical issues related to corporate governance models, as well as a vision of the need to apply this management system in the Romanian companies. At the same time, the paper will briefly present the current state of corporate governance system implementation in the Romanian companies.

  6. An overview of clinical governance policies, practices and initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Travaglia, Joanne F

    2008-02-01

    To map the emergence of, and define, clinical governance; to discuss current best practices, and to explore the implications of these for boards of directors and executives wishing to promote a clinical governance approach in their health services. Review and analysis of the published and grey literature on clinical governance from 1966 to 2006. Medline and CINAHL databases, key journals and websites were systematically searched. Central issues were identified in the literature as key to effective clinical governance. These include: ensuring that links are made between health services' clinical and corporate governance; the use of clinical governance to promote quality and safety through a focus on quality assurance and continuous improvement; the creation of clinical governance structures to improve safety and quality and manage risk and performance; the development of strategies to ensure the effective exchange of data, knowledge and expertise; and the sponsoring of a patient-centred approach to service delivery. A comprehensive approach to clinical governance necessarily includes the active participation of boards and executives in sponsoring and promoting clinical governance as a quality and safety strategy. Although this is still a relatively recent development, the signs are promising.

  7. Using clinical governance levers to support change in a cancer care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brault, Isabelle; Denis, Jean-Louis; Sullivan, Terrence James

    2015-01-01

    Introducing change is a difficult issue facing all health care systems. The use of various clinical governance levers can facilitate change in health care systems. The purpose of this paper is to define clinical governance levers, and to illustrate their use in a large-scale transformation. The empirical analysis deals with the in-depth study of a specific case, which is the organizational model for Ontario's cancer sector. The authors used a qualitative research strategy and drew the data from three sources: semi-structured interviews, analysis of documents, and non-participative observations. From the results, the authors identified three phases and several steps in the reform of cancer services in this province. The authors conclude that a combination of clinical governance levers was used to transform the system. These levers operated at different levels of the system to meet the targeted objectives. To exercise clinical governance, managers need to acquire new competencies. Mobilizing clinical governance levers requires in-depth understanding of the role and scope of clinical governance levers. This study provides a better understanding of clinical governance levers. Clinical governance levers are used to implement an organizational environment that is conducive to developing clinical practice, as well as to act directly on practices to improve quality of care.

  8. Rethinking clinical governance : Healthcare professionals' views: a Delphi study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra, Gepke L.; Ahaus, Kees; Welker, Gera A.; Heineman, Erik; van der Laan, Maarten J.; Muntinghe, Friso L. H.

    OBJECTIVE: Although the guiding principle of clinical governance states that healthcare professionals are the leading contributors to quality and safety in healthcare, little is known about what healthcare professionals perceive as important for clinical governance. The aim of this study is to

  9. Implementing shared governance in a patient care support industry: information technology leading the way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Lou Ann

    2014-06-01

    Implementing technology in the clinical setting is not a project but rather a journey in transforming care delivery. As nursing leaders in healthcare and patient care support organizations embrace technology to drive reforms in quality and efficiency, growing opportunities exist to share experiences between these industries. This department submission describes the journey to nursing shared governance from the perspective of an information technology-based company realizing the goal of supporting patient care.

  10. Clinical Governance in Primary Care; Principles, Prerequisites and Barriers: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaafar Sadeq Tabrizi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Primary care organizations are the entities through which clinical governance is developed at local level. To implement clinical governance in primary care, awareness about principles, prerequisites and barriers of this quality improvement paradigm is necessary. The aim of this study is to pool evidence about implementing clinical governance in primary care organizations. Data sources: The literature search was conducted in July 2012. PubMed, Web of Science, Emerald, Springerlink, and MD Consult were searched using the following MESH keywords; “clinical governance” and “primary care” Study selection: The search was limited to English language journals with no time limitation. Articles that were either quantitative or qualitative on concepts of implementing clinical governance in primary care were eligible for this study. Data extraction: From selected articles, data on principles, prerequisites and barriers of clinical governance in primary health care were extracted and classified in the extraction tables. Results: We classified our findings about principles of clinical governance in primary care in four groups; general principles, principles related to staff, patient and communication. Prerequisites were categorized in eight clusters; same as the seven dimensions of National Health System (NHS models of clinical governance. Barriers were sorted out in five categories as structure and organizing, cultural, resource, theoretical and logistical. Conclusion: Primary care organizations must provide budget holding, incentivized programs, data feedback, peer review, education, human relations, health information technology (HIT support, and resources. Key elements include; enrolled populations, an interdisciplinary team approach, HIT interoperability and access between all providers as well as patients, devolution of hospital based services into the community, inter-sectorial integration, blended payments, and a balance of

  11. Theoretical interpretation of e-government implementation challenges in South Africa: A case study of a selected provincial government

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Twum-Darko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses factors influencing e-Government initiatives by African Governments to improve services to their citizens, businesses and their constituent. It further discusses, as a socially constructed phenomenon, the degree of readiness of governments to implement e-Government initiatives to improve services. The discussion uses Actor Network Theory (ANT and in particular the concepts of moments of translation and irreversibility as a lens through which to understand and interpret the social phenomenon. Although a number of e-Government researchers have argued that strong leadership and clear vision is required to implement e-Government initiatives, the view is that Governments have continuously failed to achieve the intended results. E-Government potentials and benefits which are well documented in Information Systems and e-Government research literature have not been realised by governments due to limited capabilities in the administration of the public service. The study applied a deductive approach where semi-structured interviews were used for data collection in a selected Provincial Government in South Africa. The outcome is a general framework to determine the readiness of South Africa government and generally, African governments for e-Government initiatives to achieve the intended results.

  12. Challenges of Clinical Governance in Risk Management: A Qualitative Study of Teaching Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Keshvari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical Governance is a Framework in which health care provider will be responsible for continuous quality improvement. This study aimed to identify implementation challenges of Clinical Governance in the area of risk management. Methods: This is a descriptive-qualitative study. We used Content Analysis method for data analysis. Study environment contained 7 teaching hospitals, and the study population included the hospitals staff engaged in Clinical Governance implementation. Using purposive non-randomised sampling, 18 participants were selected. A semi-structured face-to-face interview was used for data collection. Content Analysis method was used to conceptualize, interpret and analyze the texts and maxQDA software for data analysis. Results: Our research findings presented two main themes as cultural factors and lack of resources. Conclusion: Promoting management as well as empowering health care providers could act as a key factor in addressing problems related to the implementation of risk management in health care environments.

  13. Legal framework for implementation of m-government in Ethiopia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Higher penetration of mobile services in many countries, including Ethiopia, makes m-Government an eminent technological option for delivering government services to public and businesses. Although the Ethiopian government has introduced e-government services to the public, the legal framework to support such ...

  14. The Effectiveness of Social Media Implementation at Local Government Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira NICA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to gain a deeper understanding of the management of social me-dia at the local government level, the availability of opportunities for citizen dialogue on govern-ment websites, and the impact that social net-working applications have on e-government. The results of the current study converge with prior research on the growing awareness amongst government practitioners regarding the relevance of social media, the use of social media for feed-back on service quality, and privacy and security commitments in e-government. The literature on the use of information technology to transform government, the potential for online government information to contribute to citizen engagement, and the rapid growth in local government use of social media is relevant to this discussion.

  15. Implementing geological disposal. A long-term governance challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergmans, Anne [Antwerp Univ. (Belgium). Faculty of Political and Social Sciences and Faculty of Law

    2015-07-01

    Calling geological disposal (GD) a technical and societal challenge and arguing that democratic decision-making on GD requires public and stakeholder engagement (PSE), are statements that will not meet much opposition. A process of 'governance' consists of engaging stakeholder groups in decision making processes and contrasts with more traditional, often technocratic forms of government. As will be argued in other papers in this conference (e.g. Grunwald; Kallenbach-Herbert et al.; Roehlig et al.) it is of fairly recent date, that concerned actors increasingly recognize that PSE should relate to both the societal and technical questions concerning GD. While most people would agree in theory, putting 'technical democracy' (Callon et al. 2001) in practice, often proofs to be less obvious. Opening up the technical 'black box' remains a crucial challenge in discussing the implications of GD for society and for the environment. As findings from the InSOTEC project show, this can be explained because different types of problematization occur, often considered as sequential, rather than intertwined (Barthe et al. 2014). Social problematization of GD, i.e. considering the remaining obstacles for implementation to be in essence social in nature, is often associated with the siting stage, when the technological project meets its social environment (ibidem). Formal participatory processes are often aimed mainly at dealing with socio-economic impacts and adapting life on the surface to the underground technology project, rather than the other way around (Bergmans et al. forthcoming). Still such interactions can, and have indeed proven to, lead to technical problematization, i.e. putting into question the technical project or certain aspects of it (cf. Barthe et al. 2014), by concerned stakeholders. As can be observed in the case of Sweden - for GD of spent fuel, and Belgium - for surface disposal of low- and intermediate level waste, this does not

  16. Implementing geological disposal. A long-term governance challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmans, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Calling geological disposal (GD) a technical and societal challenge and arguing that democratic decision-making on GD requires public and stakeholder engagement (PSE), are statements that will not meet much opposition. A process of 'governance' consists of engaging stakeholder groups in decision making processes and contrasts with more traditional, often technocratic forms of government. As will be argued in other papers in this conference (e.g. Grunwald; Kallenbach-Herbert et al.; Roehlig et al.) it is of fairly recent date, that concerned actors increasingly recognize that PSE should relate to both the societal and technical questions concerning GD. While most people would agree in theory, putting 'technical democracy' (Callon et al. 2001) in practice, often proofs to be less obvious. Opening up the technical 'black box' remains a crucial challenge in discussing the implications of GD for society and for the environment. As findings from the InSOTEC project show, this can be explained because different types of problematization occur, often considered as sequential, rather than intertwined (Barthe et al. 2014). Social problematization of GD, i.e. considering the remaining obstacles for implementation to be in essence social in nature, is often associated with the siting stage, when the technological project meets its social environment (ibidem). Formal participatory processes are often aimed mainly at dealing with socio-economic impacts and adapting life on the surface to the underground technology project, rather than the other way around (Bergmans et al. forthcoming). Still such interactions can, and have indeed proven to, lead to technical problematization, i.e. putting into question the technical project or certain aspects of it (cf. Barthe et al. 2014), by concerned stakeholders. As can be observed in the case of Sweden - for GD of spent fuel, and Belgium - for surface disposal of low- and intermediate level waste, this does not

  17. An online clinical governance learning package for student radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messer, Simon; Griffiths, Marc

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Clinical governance is a key element of the Government's plan for reform in the National Health Service. As such, it is an essential element for final year undergraduate radiography studies. With Ciris becoming a standard web-based solution for clinical governance within the NHS, a need has been identified for it to be introduced at university to undergraduate radiographers. Methods: A distance learning package for Ciris has therefore been developed that was trialed by third year radiography students whilst on their final clinical placement. The package includes a specifically designed online virtual hospital which the students engaged with interactively using a workbook. The students undertook detailed individual and group exercises aimed at delivering practical experience of the Ciris program and its role in clinical governance. Results: The package was evaluated by the students in terms of their experiential learning and their perceived learning needs for clinical governance. Technical and support issues associated with the delivery of this package online were identified. Conclusion: The combination of a distance online learning environment, supported by a workbook, is an effective method of engaging students and is beneficial in terms of helping achieve learning outcomes in clinical governance for final year radiography studies

  18. Implementing integrated coastal management in a sector-based governance system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Taljaard, Susan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available of cooperative governance early on, ICM implementation still faces the challenge that governance systems remain largely sector-based. In this paper we explore the implementation of ICM within a sector-based governance system in South Africa. First, we draw...

  19. Exploring the success, failure and factors influencing M-government implementation in developing countries

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ogunleye, OS

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available and to provide better services to citizens, businesses, and government agencies through using mobile technology. This research reviews the success, failures and factors influencing m-Government development and implementation in developing countries...

  20. How GPs implement clinical guidelines in everyday clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Videbæk Le, Jette; Hansen, Helle P; Riisgaard, Helle

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical guidelines are considered to be essential for improving quality and safety of health care. However, interventions to promote implementation of guidelines have demonstrated only partial effectiveness and the reasons for this apparent failure are not yet fully understood....... OBJECTIVE: To investigate how GPs implement clinical guidelines in everyday clinical practice and how implementation approaches differ between practices. METHODS: Individual semi-structured open-ended interviews with seven GPs who were purposefully sampled with regard to gender, age and practice form....... Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and then analysed using systematic text condensation. RESULTS: Analysis of the interviews revealed three different approaches to the implementation of guidelines in clinical practice. In some practices the GPs prioritized time and resources on collective...

  1. THE IMPLEMENTATION OF CORPORATE GOVERNANCE INTO BRAND MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia- Cristina PLOSCARU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Integrating corporate governance into brand management is fundamental for protecting shareholders, considering the increasing importance of brands in firms’ performance and the dissociation between shareholders and managers in most large and medium firms. This paper designs a corporate governance system model on a brand level, which takes into account preventive, simultaneous and retroactive governance. Moreover, we highlight the importance of transition management when changes to brand management come into question. Finally, we propose six corporate governance instruments for brand management: performance indicators, the brand marketing plan, periodic reports, the brand council, brand audit, and transition management.

  2. Clinical Knowledge Governance Framework for Nationwide Data Infrastructure Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulff, Antje; Haarbrandt, Birger; Marschollek, Michael

    2018-01-01

    The availability of semantically-enriched and interoperable clinical information models is crucial for reusing once collected data across institutions like aspired in the German HiGHmed project. Funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research, this nationwide data infrastructure project adopts the openEHR approach for semantic modelling. Here, strong governance is required to define high-quality and reusable models. Design of a clinical knowledge governance framework for openEHR modelling in cross-institutional settings like HiGHmed. Analysis of successful practices from international projects, published ideas on archetype governance and own modelling experiences as well as modelling of BPMN processes. We designed a framework by presenting archetype variations, roles and responsibilities, IT support and modelling workflows. Our framework has great potential to make the openEHR modelling efforts manageable. Because practical experiences are rare, prospectively our work will be predestinated to evaluate the benefits of such structured governance approaches.

  3. Clinical pharmacogenetics implementation: approaches, successes, and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzel, Kristin W; Elsey, Amanda R; Langaee, Taimour Y; Burkley, Benjamin; Nessl, David R; Obeng, Aniwaa Owusu; Staley, Benjamin J; Dong, Hui-Jia; Allan, Robert W; Liu, J Felix; Cooper-Dehoff, Rhonda M; Anderson, R David; Conlon, Michael; Clare-Salzler, Michael J; Nelson, David R; Johnson, Julie A

    2014-03-01

    Current challenges exist to widespread clinical implementation of genomic medicine and pharmacogenetics. The University of Florida (UF) Health Personalized Medicine Program (PMP) is a pharmacist-led, multidisciplinary initiative created in 2011 within the UF Clinical Translational Science Institute. Initial efforts focused on pharmacogenetics, with long-term goals to include expansion to disease-risk prediction and disease stratification. Herein we describe the processes for development of the program, the challenges that were encountered and the clinical acceptance by clinicians of the genomic medicine implementation. The initial clinical implementation of the UF PMP began in June 2012 and targeted clopidogrel use and the CYP2C19 genotype in patients undergoing left heart catheterization and percutaneous-coronary intervention (PCI). After 1 year, 1,097 patients undergoing left heart catheterization were genotyped preemptively, and 291 of those underwent subsequent PCI. Genotype results were reported to the medical record for 100% of genotyped patients. Eighty patients who underwent PCI had an actionable genotype, with drug therapy changes implemented in 56 individuals. Average turnaround time from blood draw to genotype result entry in the medical record was 3.5 business days. Seven different third party payors, including Medicare, reimbursed for the test during the first month of billing, with an 85% reimbursement rate for outpatient claims that were submitted in the first month. These data highlight multiple levels of success in clinical implementation of genomic medicine. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Evidence-based health care: its place within clinical governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSherry, R; Haddock, J

    This article explores the principles of evidence-based practice and its role in achieving quality improvements within the clinical governance framework advocated by the recent White Papers 'The New NHS: Modern, Dependable' (Department of Health (DoH), 1997) and 'A First Class Service: Quality in the New NHS' (DoH, 1998a). Within these White Papers there is an emphasis on improving quality of care, treatment and services through employing the principles of clinical governance. A major feature of clinical governance is guaranteeing quality to the public and the NHS, and ensuring that clinical, managerial and educational practice is based on scientific evidence. This article also examines what evidence-based practice is and what processes are required to promote effective healthcare interventions. The authors also look at how clinical governance relates to other methods/systems involved in clinical effectiveness. Finally, the importance for nurses and other healthcare professionals of familiarizing themselves with the development of critical appraisal skills, and their implications for developing evidence-based practice, is emphasized.

  5. Barriers facing local governance in the implementation of sanitation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study aimed at exploring the barriers facing local governance in the ... Methods: A qualitative research method was employed whereby in-depth interviews were ... All interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim and content ...

  6. How Governance Regimes Shape the Implementation of Water Reuse Schemes

    OpenAIRE

    Frijns, Jos; Smith, Heather M.; Brouwer, Stijn; Garnett, Kenisha; Elelman, Richard; Jeffrey, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The governance dimensions of water reuse scheme development and operation, such as policies and regulatory frameworks, and public involvement and stakeholder collaboration, can serve to both facilitate and constrain wider adoption of water reuse practices. This paper explores the significance and underlying structure of the key governance challenges facing the water reuse sector in Europe. It presents empirical evidence from interviews and focus group sessions conducted at four water reuse sc...

  7. Pilot project for implementing corporate governance of IT

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández Martínez, Antonio; Gumbau Mezquita, José Pascual; Llorens Largo, Faraón

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the results of the IT Governance Enhancement Project (ITGEP) carried out in three Spanish universities (the University of Murcia, Jaume I University and the Polytechnic University of Cartagena) on the initiative of the IT Commission of the Spanish Association of University Rectors (CRUE). The aim of the project was to apply the reference framework of Governance of IT for Universities (GTI4U) in order to determine the best practices currently carried out in the three univ...

  8. [Clinical governance and patient safety culture in clinical laboratories in the Spanish National Health System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez-Marín, Á; Rivas-Ruiz, F

    To conduct a situational analysis of patient safety culture in public laboratories in the Spanish National Health System and to determine the clinical governance variables that most strongly influence patient safety. A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out, in which a Survey of Patient Safety in Clinical Laboratories was addressed to workers in 26 participating laboratories. In this survey, which consisted of 45 items grouped into 6 areas, scores were assigned on a scale from 0 to 100 (where 0 is the lowest perception of patient safety). Laboratory managers were asked specific questions about quality management systems and technology. The mean scores for the 26 participating hospitals were evaluated, and the following results observed: in 4of the 6areas, the mean score was higher than 70 points. In the third area (equipment and resources) and the fourth area (working conditions), the scores were lower than 60 points. Every hospital had a digital medical record system. This 100% level of provision was followed by that of an electronic request management system, which was implemented in 82.6% of the hospitals. The results obtained show that the culture of security is homogeneous and of high quality in health service laboratories, probably due to the steady improvement observed. However, in terms of clinical governance, there is still some way to go, as shown by the presence of weaknesses in crucial dimensions of safety culture, together with variable levels of implementation of fail-safe technologies and quality management systems. Copyright © 2017 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Implementing human factors in clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmons, Stephen; Baxendale, Bryn; Buttery, Andrew; Miles, Giulia; Roe, Bridget; Browes, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To understand whether aviation-derived human factors training is acceptable and useful to healthcare professionals. To understand whether and how healthcare professionals have been able to implement human factors approaches to patient safety in their own area of clinical practice. Methods Qualitative, longitudinal study using semi-structured interviews and focus groups, of a multiprofessional group of UK NHS staff (from the emergency department and operating theatres) who have received aviation-derived human factors training. Results The human factors training was evaluated positively, and thought to be both acceptable and relevant to practice. However, the staff found it harder to implement what they had learned in their own clinical areas, and this was principally attributed to features of the informal organisational cultures. Conclusions In order to successfully apply human factors approaches in hospital, careful consideration needs to be given to the local context and informal culture of clinical practice. PMID:24631959

  10. E-government Policy and its Implementation in the Czech Republic: Selected Shortcomings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Špaček David

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarizes the specifics and challenges of e-government policy, and then discusses the apparent shortcomings of policy implementation and challenges for further development in the Czech Republic. It draws attention to problems in national e-government policy and in practical policy implementation (instability of governance, low quality of evaluation, low involvement of stakeholders in project design, and public procurement issues.

  11. Framework for local government to implement integrated water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Water Services Act (No. 8 of 1997) of South Africa states that water service delivery is the responsibility of local government as Water Services Authorities. The principal legal responsibility is to complete a Water Services Development Plan (WSDP) every 5 years with annual review. The WSDP encapsulates all the ...

  12. Good governance in national solid waste management policy (NSWMP) implementation: A case study of Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Seow Ta; Abas, Muhamad Azahar; Mohamed, Sulzakimin; Chen, Goh Kai; Zainal, Rozlin

    2017-10-01

    The National Solid Waste Management Policy (NSWMP) was introduced in 2007 under the Act 672. The execution of NSWMP involves stakeholders from various government agencies and a collaboration with the private sectors. Despite the initiatives taken by the stakeholders, the objectives of NSWMP failed to materialise. One of the major constraints is weak governance among stakeholders with regards to the NSWMP implementation. This paper will explore the good governance practices implemented by the stakeholders. Identifying the current good governance practices implemented by the stakeholders is crucial as it will serve as a guideline to improve good governance practice in the future. An exploratory research approach is applied in this study through in-depth interviews with several government agencies and concessionaires involved in the NSWMP implementation. A total of six respondents took part in this study. The findings of this study show that there are several good governance practices implemented in policy promotion, participation of stakeholders, and capacity enhancement programme for the staff. This study also proposed some points on good governance practices in the context of policy promotion and staff development. A paradigm shift by the stakeholders is imperative so as to enhance the good governance practice in NSWMP implementation towards an efficient solid waste management in Malaysia.

  13. How Governance Regimes Shape the Implementation of Water Reuse Schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jos Frijns

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The governance dimensions of water reuse scheme development and operation, such as policies and regulatory frameworks, and public involvement and stakeholder collaboration, can serve to both facilitate and constrain wider adoption of water reuse practices. This paper explores the significance and underlying structure of the key governance challenges facing the water reuse sector in Europe. It presents empirical evidence from interviews and focus group sessions conducted at four water reuse schemes: an indirect potable reuse scheme at Torreele (Belgium, the urban reuse of treated municipal wastewater at the London Olympic Park (United Kingdom and at Sabadell (Spain, and the reuse of agro-industrial effluent for irrigation at Capitanata (Italy. The findings underscore the importance of clarity in policy arrangements around water reuse, as well as of the financial competitiveness of reuse projects compared to alternative water supply options. Operators of water reuse schemes expressed a preference for water quality standards, which focus on appropriateness for use rather than over-emphasise the waters’ origin so that unnecessary treatment and costs can be avoided. Positive public support was widely acknowledged as an important factor in the success or failure of water reuse schemes. We conclude that constructive institutional relationships underpin many of the challenges faced by reuse scheme operators and that greater emphasis should be given to building confidence and gaining trust in water service providers through early identification of how governance regimes shape the viability of new schemes.

  14. Joined up Clinical Governance: Learning from Our Mistakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pam Mosedale

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This session will be a practical demonstration, with group discussion of how a significant event can lead to the practice examining what happened, looking at the evidence base, revising protocols & auditing implementation of the new protocols.A significant event is an event thought by anyone in the team to be significant in the care of patients or the conduct of the practice.Significant Event Audit is a qualitative rather than quantitative form of Audit but still needs a structured framework to be successful.SEA involves gathering information in the form of a timeline of the event, clinical records & accounts of individuals involved.Scenarios around significant events will be discussed and analysed by the group as if they were conducting a non-threatening, open, fair & honest SEA meeting.During the meeting the incident will be analysed to see what happened, why it happened, any underlying reasons, what has been learned & what needs to change. This meeting is not to apportion blame.When looking at what needs to change the group should consider whether it is necessary to go away & look at the evidence base & then make changes to practice protocols. Any need for training or CPD for individuals or the whole team should be identified.A timescale for changes should be agreed.An audit can then be carried out to monitor the improvements and assess the impact of these changes. The group will consider what audits are appropriate, whether process or outcome audits are useful in the circumstances. They will also discuss how these audits can be carried out.SEA is a very useful tool in veterinary practice & a very good way to get all team members engaged with clinical governance & evidence based veterinary medicine in a joined up way which demonstrates the potential improvements to practice systems of work and patient care and safety.This session would be designed to appeal to all team members whether vets, nurses, receptionists or practice managers.

  15. Synthesized Mammography: Clinical Evidence, Appearance, and Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A. Durand

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT has improved conventional mammography by increasing cancer detection while reducing recall rates. However, these benefits come at the cost of increased radiation dose. Synthesized mammography (s2D has been developed to provide the advantages of DBT with nearly half the radiation dose. Since its F.D.A. approval, multiple studies have evaluated the clinical performance of s2D. In clinical practice, s2D images are not identical to conventional 2D images and are designed for interpretation with DBT as a complement. This article reviews the present literature to assess whether s2D is a practical alternative to conventional 2D, addresses the differences in mammographic appearance of findings, and provides suggestions for implementation into clinical practice.

  16. Synthesized Mammography: Clinical Evidence, Appearance, and Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Melissa A

    2018-04-04

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has improved conventional mammography by increasing cancer detection while reducing recall rates. However, these benefits come at the cost of increased radiation dose. Synthesized mammography (s2D) has been developed to provide the advantages of DBT with nearly half the radiation dose. Since its F.D.A. approval, multiple studies have evaluated the clinical performance of s2D. In clinical practice, s2D images are not identical to conventional 2D images and are designed for interpretation with DBT as a complement. This article reviews the present literature to assess whether s2D is a practical alternative to conventional 2D, addresses the differences in mammographic appearance of findings, and provides suggestions for implementation into clinical practice.

  17. Change Management as a Critical Success Factor in e-Government Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janja Nograšek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Change management in e-government implementation is a very complex issue. E-government services are frequently distributed over different IT systems and organizations. There are also events from outside the public administration that cause changes such as government policies and legislation, public-private partnership, etc., and finally a huge resistance to change exists in public administration proverbial. Another problem is that the e-government is predominantly seen only as a technology mission and not as an organizational transformation issue. Those are probably the main reasons that the existing literature about change management in e-government is still missing at large. There are articles dealing with some aspects of changes affected by the new technology implementation, however, there is no comprehensive framework that would identify changes that have to be managed in e-government implementation. Therefore, the main aim of the paper is to identify a comprehensive set of changes that have to be considered in e-government implementation and the role of leadership in such processes. Finally, the paper proposes a conceptual model of change management in e-government implementation.

  18. Implementing human factors in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmons, Stephen; Baxendale, Bryn; Buttery, Andrew; Miles, Giulia; Roe, Bridget; Browes, Simon

    2015-05-01

    To understand whether aviation-derived human factors training is acceptable and useful to healthcare professionals. To understand whether and how healthcare professionals have been able to implement human factors approaches to patient safety in their own area of clinical practice. Qualitative, longitudinal study using semi-structured interviews and focus groups, of a multiprofessional group of UK NHS staff (from the emergency department and operating theatres) who have received aviation-derived human factors training. The human factors training was evaluated positively, and thought to be both acceptable and relevant to practice. However, the staff found it harder to implement what they had learned in their own clinical areas, and this was principally attributed to features of the informal organisational cultures. In order to successfully apply human factors approaches in hospital, careful consideration needs to be given to the local context and informal culture of clinical practice. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Content validity of critical success factors for e-Government implementation in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napitupulu, D.; Syafrullah, M.; Rahim, R.; Amar, A.; Sucahyo, YG

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this research is to validate the Critical Success Factors (CSFs) of e-Government implementation in Indonesia. The e-Government initiative conducted only to obey the regulation but ignoring the quality. Defining CSFs will help government agencies to avoid failure of e-Government projects. A survey with the questionnaire was used to validate the item of CSF based on expert judgment through two round of Delphi. The result showed from 67 subjects in instrument tested; there are 11 invalid items deleted and remain only 56 items that had good content validity and internal reliability. Therefore, all 56 CSFs should be adopted by government agencies in Indonesia to support e-Government implementation.

  20. Implementing Home Health Standards in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Lisa A

    2016-02-01

    In 1986, the American Nurses Association (ANA) published the first Standards of Home Health Practice. Revised in 1992 and expanded in 1999 to become Home Health Nursing: Scope and Standards of Practice, it was revised in 2008 and again in 2014. In the 2014 edition, there are 6 standards of home healthcare nursing practice and 10 standards of professional performance for home healthcare nursing. The focus of this article is to describe the home healthcare standards and to provide guidance for implementation in clinical practice. It is strongly encouraged that home healthcare administrators, educators, and staff obtain a copy of the standards and fully read this essential home healthcare resource.

  1. A Preliminary Evaluation of Instructional Effectiveness of Online Training Implemented at a Government Agency in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supanakorn-Davila, Supawan; Bolliger, Doris U.

    2012-01-01

    Online training has become popular in the professional development of government employees in Thailand. One large government agency developed an online program to provide training to its employees across the country using two systems: an Internet and Intranet-based system. With the new program implemented, the evaluation of the instructional…

  2. An Adaptive Approach for Implementing e-Government in I. R. Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Hossein; Zarei, Behrouz

    2004-01-01

    Acknowledging the necessity of utilizing the new electronics, information, and communication technologies, the movement toward implementation of e-government in Iran has recently received the attention of the authorities and policy makers. The premise of the work is set around the fact that the e-enabled government is a momentous opportunity for…

  3. Curriculum Policy Implementation: How Schools Respond to Government's "Soft" Policy in the Curriculum Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jacqueline K. S.

    2012-01-01

    "Soft" policy has newly emerged as a policy implementation concept in relation to governance. Non-binding in character, "soft" policy is designed for multi-level systems of governance in which there is relative autonomy at different levels of collective decision-making. "Soft" policy has gained attention since the…

  4. Critical Success Factor for Implementing Km in Government Human Capital Management: Case Study Badan Kepegawaian Negara

    OpenAIRE

    Cahyaningsih, Elin; Sensuse, Dana Indra

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, knowledge management in organization became a trend strategy in order to improve organization performance. But unfortunately, it's a big challenge to implementing knowledge management in organization, because it's relatively new and not many people knew about this. This research is done in order to realize bureaucratic reform in government service improvement according to PERMENPAN No. 14 Tahun 2011 is about knowledge management (KM) implementation in government. Knowledge managemen...

  5. Energy summit Hessen. Implementation concept of the state government Hessen; Hessischer Energiegipfel. Umsetzungskonzept der Hessischen Landesregierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-02-15

    By means of the concept under consideration, the state government of Hessen (Federal Republic of Germany) has pursued the possible and realistic course for the implementation of the targets of the energy summit. The main aspects of this contribution are the implementation of the energy policy of Hessen into the European and national framework; Status quo of the energy consumption in Hessen; Areas of action and measures of the state government of Hessen; Actors of the energy policy turnaround; Monitoring.

  6. Assessing the Knowledge and Attitudes of Medical Students and Graduates about Clinical Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Gholamzadeh nikjoo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives : In order to implement clinical governance successfully, it should be perceived positively and there must be a positive attitude towards it. The current policy of the Ministry of Health and Medical Education about clinical governance requires assessing the knowledge and attitudes of medical students to identify their educational needs and the necessary steps needed to be taken in educational planning, designing and modification of the courses. This study aimed to evaluate the knowledge and attitudes of medical students and graduates about clinical governance in 1391. Materials and Methods : This is a descriptive–analytic study. This research was conducted on 159 students from different medical fields simple random sampling method. For data collecting, a researcher-made questionnaire was used which its validity was confirmed by using content validity and construct validity. To determine the reliability of the questionnaire, internal consistency and Cronbach's Alpha were used for field of knowledge (0.78 and attitude (0.68. For data analysis, SPSS version 11.5 software was applied using exploratory factor analysis method. Results : 64% of the participants were female and 36% were male. 71% of the participants were in the health care management field and 29% from other medical fields. Mean and standard deviation of knowledge and attitude scores were 64.2 ± 5.8 and 13.06 ± 3.02 respectively. Comparing the students' and graduates’ knowledge and attitudes with their educational level showed no significant correlation. (P> 0.05 Although, there was a significant correlation between educational level and attitude (P = 0.001. In higher levels of education, students' attitude towards clinical governance reduced. Conclusion : The knowledge of medical students and graduates was estimated average to high about clinical governance but their attitude was very poor. This reflects negative views of medical students despite the

  7. E-Governance and Its Implementation Challenges in the Nigerian Public Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugochukwu David ABASILIM

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available E-governance has become one of the reform tools geared towards effective public service delivery, which is premised on the assumption that the appreciable use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT method in the day to day activities of government will bring effective service delivery. However, there are lots of challenges that hamper the effective implementation of e-governance in Nigerian public service. It is based on this, that this article identifies some of the challenges to e-governance implementation in Nigerian public service. Although, no robust statistical analysis was done, as the article relied on archival analysis of relevant literature on the subject matter and inferences drawn from it. Based on its findings, it was concluded that e-governance remain the best in encouraging transparency and accountability in government business. The paper therefore, recommends that, government should be more committed to the implementation e-governance as well as embark on adequate enlightenment about the concept.

  8. Bridge management system for the Western Cape provincial government, South Africa: implementation and utilization

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nell, AJ

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the implementation and utilization of the bridge management system (BMS) of the Department of Transport and Public Works of the Western Cape Provincial Government. The implementation of the BMS as well as the visual assessment...

  9. Implementing plant clinics in the maelstrom of policy reform in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Solveig; Matsiko, F.B.; Kjær, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    government commitment and a growing demand for this new type of farmer service, effective implementation of plant clinics turned out to be a challenge.We examine how agricultural policies and institutional setups, and their political context, influenced the implementation of plant clinics from 2010 to 2011...... services. Implementation of plant clinics was further affected by a new district reform and the national elections taking place during the study period. The dual purpose of the plant clinics created uncertainty about their organisational belonging. They fell through the cracks of extension and disease...... the policy and institutional frameworks in which plant clinics operate, but also the effects of political imperatives and donors on policy implementation. This study provides a basis for institutional and policy analysis related to the implementation of plant clinics elsewhere....

  10. How change management can prevent the failure of information systems implementation among Malaysian government hospitals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ChePa, Noraziah; Jasin, Noorhayati Md; Bakar, Nur Azzah Abu

    2017-10-01

    Fail to prevent or control challenges of Information System (IS) implementation have led to the failure of its implementation. Successful implementation of IS has been a challenging task to any organization including government hospitals. Government has invested a big amount of money on information system (IS) projects to improve service delivery in healthcare. However, several of them failed to be implemented successfully due to several factors. This article proposes a prevention model which incorporated Change Management (CM) concepts to avoid the failure of IS implementation, hence ensuring the success of it. Challenges of IS implementation in government hospitals have been discovered. Extensive literature review and deep interview approaches were employed to discover these challenges. A prevention model has been designed to cater the challenges. The model caters three main phases of implementation; pre-implementation, during implementation, and post-implementation by adopting CM practices of Lewin's, Kotter's and Prosci's CM model. Six elements of CM comprising thirteen sub-elements adopted from the three CM models have been used to handle CFFs of Human and Support issues; guiding team, resistance avoidance, IS adoption, enforcement, monitoring, and IS sustainability. Successful practice of the proposed mapping is expected to prevent CFFs to occur, hence ensuring a successful implementation of IS in the hospitals. The proposed model has been presented and successfully evaluated by the domain experts from the selected hospitals. The proposed model is believed to be beneficial for top management, IT practitioners and medical practitioners in preventing IS implementation failure among government hospitals towards ensuring the success implementation.

  11. Improving the implementation of health workforce policies through governance: a review of case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieleman, Marjolein; Shaw, Daniel Mp; Zwanikken, Prisca

    2011-04-12

    Responsible governance is crucial to national development and a catalyst for achieving the Millennium Development Goals. To date, governance seems to have been a neglected issue in the field of human resources for health (HRH), which could be an important reason why HRH policy formulation and implementation is often poor. This article aims to describe how governance issues have influenced HRH policy development and to identify governance strategies that have been used, successfully or not, to improve HRH policy implementation in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). We performed a descriptive literature review of HRH case studies which describe or evaluate a governance-related intervention at country or district level in LMIC. In order to systematically address the term 'governance' a framework was developed and governance aspects were regrouped into four dimensions: 'performance', 'equity and equality', 'partnership and participation' and 'oversight'. In total 16 case studies were included in the review and most of the selected studies covered several governance dimensions. The dimension 'performance' covered several elements at the core of governance of HRH, decentralization being particularly prominent. Although improved equity and/or equality was, in a number of interventions, a goal, inclusiveness in policy development and fairness and transparency in policy implementation did often not seem adequate to guarantee the corresponding desirable health workforce scenario. Forms of partnership and participation described in the case studies are numerous and offer different lessons. Strikingly, in none of the articles was 'partnerships' a core focus. A common theme in the dimension of 'oversight' is local-level corruption, affecting, amongst other things, accountability and local-level trust in governance, and its cultural guises. Experiences with accountability mechanisms for HRH policy development and implementation were lacking. This review shows that the term

  12. The Implementation of Government Regulation No 19/2008 about Sub District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasoloan Nadeak

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine and analyze the implementation of the policy of districts in the city of Bogor; to determine and analyze the technical and operational guidelines support the tasks assigned to the sub-district and the districts in the city of Bogor; and to determine and analyze the performance of the policy after the implementation of the district and sub-district in each region. Implementation of Government Regulation Number 19 Year 2008 concerning the sub-district is a must, because of government regulation in question is the implementing regulations that apply nationally and mandated by Law No. 32 of 2004 on Regional Government. The approach used to look at the problem in question is descriptive qualitative content analysis or document analysis. Based approach is known that the City Government has implemented PP No. 19 of 2008 in the form of Mayor Regulation No. 54 Year 2010 on Main Duties, Functions, Duties Work Procedures and structural positions within the District and No. 10 of 2010 on Delegation of Authority. The implementation of policy shall include: (1 Common Tasks Government, and (2 Some tasks are delegated by the Mayor of the District Head in terms of regional autonomy.

  13. Clinical implementation of enhanced dynamic wedge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Eric E.; Zhu Xiaorong; Low, Daniel A.; Drzymala, Robert E.; Harms, William B.; Purdy, James A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Our clinic has been using dynamic wedge since 1993. We appreciate the customized wedge shaped distributions (independent of field size) and the positive aspects of replacing filters with dynamic jaw motion. Varian recently introduced enhanced dynamic wedge (EDW) software. The EDW can be delivered over; a 30 cm field, asymmetric fields (in both wedged and non-wedged directions), and additional wedge angles (10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 45, 60). The EDW software creates customized segmented treatment tables (STTs) for the desired wedge angle and field size. The STT is created from a 'golden' fluence profile of 60 deg. over 30 cm. The wedge STT is derived using ratio-of-tangents and the truncated field segment extracted from the 'golden' table. A review of our dosimetric studies will be presented as well as a discussion of clinical implementation issues including treatment planning and quality assurance. Methods and Materials: We tested a set of angle and field size combinations chosen to encompass clinical needs. The wedge factor (WF) was measured using an ionization chamber along central axis for symmetric fields ranging from 4 to 20 cm, and asymmetric fields to 30 cm. The non-wedged field dimension was found to be inconsequential. An algorithm was developed to predict the wedge factor for any angle and field dimension. Isodoses were measured with film and used for profile evaluation and treatment planning development. The 'golden' fluence table was used to create a universal 60 deg. 'physical' wedge for planning. The universal wedge is combined with an open field (to derive intermediate wedge angles) and blocked according to the treatment field segment. A quality assurance program was developed that relies on multi-point diode measurements. Results: We found the WF is a function of wedge angle and field settings of the final sweep position. There is a nearly linear dependence of WF vs. field size thus allowing a minimal WF table. This eliminates a

  14. Development of clinical pharmacy in Belgian hospitals through pilot projects funded by the government.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, A; Spinewine, A; Spriet, I; Steurbaut, S; Tulkens, P; Hecq, J D; Willems, L; Robays, H; Dhoore, M; Yaras, H; Vanden Bremt, I; Haelterman, M

    2018-04-30

    Objectives The goal is to develop clinical pharmacy in the Belgian hospitals to improve drug efficacy and to reduce drug-related problems. Methods From 2007 to 2014, financial support was provided by the Belgian federal government for the development of clinical pharmacy in Belgian hospitals. This project was guided by a national Advisory Working Group. Each funded hospital was obliged to describe yearly its clinical pharmacy activities. Results In 2007, 20 pharmacists were funded in 28 pilot hospitals; this number was doubled in 2009 to 40 pharmacists over 54 institutions, representing more than half of all acute Belgian hospitals. Most projects (72%) considered patient-related activities, whereas some projects (28%) had a hospital-wide approach. The projects targeted patients at admission (30%), during hospital stay (52%) or at discharge (18%). During hospital stay, actions were mainly focused on geriatric patients (20%), surgical patients (15%), and oncology patients (9%). Experiences, methods, and tools were shared during meetings and workshops. Structure, process, and outcome indicators were reported and strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats were described. The yearly reports revealed that the hospital board was engaged in the project in 87% of the cases, and developed a vision on clinical pharmacy in 75% of the hospitals. In 2014, the pilot phase was replaced by structural financing for clinical pharmacy in all acute Belgian hospitals. Conclusion The pilot projects in clinical pharmacy funded by the federal government provided a unique opportunity to launch clinical pharmacy activities on a broad scale in Belgium. The results of the pilot projects showed clear implementation through case reports, time registrations, and indicators. Tools for clinical pharmacy activities were developed to overcome identified barriers. The engagement of hospital boards and the results of clinical pharmacy activities persuaded the government to start structural

  15. Implementation of molecular karyotyping in clinical genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Lovrecic

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Rapid development of technologies for the study of the human genome is an expected step after the discovery and sequencing of the entire human genome. Chromosomal microarrays, which allow us to perform tens of thousands of previously individual experiments simultaneously, are being utilized in all areas of human genetics and genomics. Initially, this was applicable only for research purposes, but in the last few years their clinical diagnostic purposes are becoming more and more relevant. Using molecular karyotyping (also chromosomal microarray, comparative genomic hybridization with microarray, aCGH, one can analyze microdeletions / microduplications in the whole human genome at once. It is a first-tier cytogenetic diagnostic test instead of G-banded karyotyping in patients with developmental delay and/or congenital anomalies. Molecular karyotyping is used as a diagnostic test in patients with unexplained developmental delay and/or idiopathic intellectual disability and/or dysmorphic features and/or multiple congenital anomalies (DD/ID/DF/MCA. In addition, the method is used in prenatal diagnostics and in some centres also in preimplantation genetic diagnosis.The aim of this paper is to inform the professional community in the field about this new diagnostic method and its implementation in Slovenia, and to define the clinical situations where the method is appropriate.

  16. Avoiding Implementation Failure in Catchment Landscapes: A Case Study in Governance of the Great Barrier Reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Allan P; Vella, Karen; Gooch, Margaret; Potts, Ruth; Pressey, Robert L; Brodie, Jon; Eberhard, Rachel

    2017-10-04

    Water quality outcomes affecting Australia's Great Barrier Reef (GBR) are governed by multi-level and multi-party decision-making that influences forested and agricultural landscapes. With international concern about the GBR's declining ecological health, this paper identifies and focuses on implementation failure (primarily at catchment scale) as a systemic risk within the overall GBR governance system. There has been limited integrated analysis of the full suite of governance subdomains that often envelop defined policies, programs and delivery activities that influence water quality in the GBR. We consider how the implementation of separate purpose-specific policies and programs at catchment scale operate against well-known, robust design concepts for integrated catchment governance. We find design concerns within ten important governance subdomains that operate within GBR catchments. At a whole-of-GBR scale, we find a weak policy focus on strengthening these delivery-oriented subdomains and on effort integration across these subdomains within catchments. These governance problems when combined may contribute to failure in the implementation of major national, state and local government policies focused on improving water quality in the GBR, a lesson relevant to landscapes globally.

  17. Dosimetry and clinical implementation of dynamic wedge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Eric E.; Low, Daniel A.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Purdy, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Wedge-shaped isodoses are desired in a number of clinical situations. Physical wedge filters have provided nominal angled isodoses with dosimetric consequences of beam hardening, increased peripheral dosing, nonidealized gradients at deep depths, along with the practical consequences of filter handling and placement problems. Dynamic wedging uses a combination of a moving jaw and changing dose rate to achieve angled isodoses. The clinical implementation of dynamic wedge and an accompanying quality assurance program are discussed in detail. Methods and Materials: The accelerator at our facility has two photon energies (6 MV and 18 MV), currently with dynamic wedge angles of 15 deg. , 30 deg. , 45 deg. , and 60 deg. . The segmented treatment tables (STT) that drive the jaw in concert with a changing dose rate are unique for field sizes ranging from 4.0 cm to 20.0 cm in 05 cm steps, resulting in 256 STTs. Transmission wedge factors were measured for each STT with an ion chamber. Isodose profiles were accumulated with film after dose conversion. For treatment-planning purposes, d max orthogonal dose profiles were measured for open and dynamic fields. Physical filters were assigned empirically via the ratio of open and wedge profiles. Results: A nonlinear relationship with wedge factor and field size was found. The factors were found to be independent of the stationary field setting or second order blocking. Dynamic wedging provided more consistent gradients across the field compared with physical filters. Percent depth doses were found to be closer to open field. The created physical filters provided planned isodoses that closely resembled measured isodoses. Comparative isodose plans show improvement with dynamic wedging. Conclusions: Dynamic weding has practical and dosimetric advantages over physical filters. Table collisions with physical filters are alleviated. Treatment planning has been solved with an empirical solution. Dynamic wedge is a positive

  18. Studying citizen-centred implementation networks in the age of governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobi, Claus Brygger

    This paper is suggesting pathways on how to investigate and analyze the implementation of public policies at a time where the idea of governance is leaving no public policy process untouched in any advanced liberal democracy. But due to the bewildering variety of ways in which the concept......, it is suggested that manifestations of hierarchical governance can be studied by using insights from network management combined with Pierre Bourdieu’s concept of the political and administrative fields. This gives the added value of enabling to the analyst to identify hierarchical forms of governance...

  19. Beyond Ambiguity: A Practical Framework for Developing and Implementing Open Government Reforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merlin Chatwin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The broad idea of ‘Open Government’ is widely accepted as a facilitator for rebuilding trust and validation in governments around the world. The Open Government Partnership is a significant driver of this movement with over 75 member nations, 15 subnational government participants and many others local governments implementing reforms within their national frameworks. The central tenets of transparency, accountability, participation, and collaboration are well understood within scholarly works and practitioner publications. However, open government is yet to be attributed with a universally acknowledged definition. This leads to questions of adaptability and salience of the concept of open government across diverse contexts. This paper addresses these questions by utilizing a human systems framework called the Dialogue Boxes. To develop an understanding of how open government is currently positioned within scholarly works and practitioner publications, an extensive literature search was conducted. The search utilized major search engines, often-cited references, direct journal searches and colleague provided references. Using existing definitions and descriptions, this paper populates the framework with available information and allow for context specific content to be populated by future users. Ultimately, the aim of the paper is to support the development of open government action plans that maximize the direct positive impact on people’s lives.

  20. PLANNING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF QUALITY THROUGH STRATEGY FORMULATION AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Stefanović

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Planning the implementation of quality is a complex process that depends on many different internal and external factors. Planning the implementation is defined by the capabilities of management to visualize the market position of the company and to evaluate the company's strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats. Serving to the company's purposes, planning the implementation of quality must be integrated into the company's strategic objectives and then transferred to other parts of the organization utilizing the corporate governance system. Planning the implementation, as a part of strategy formulation, should be reflected in: 1 company's vision and mission development, 2 goals setting, 3 strategy development aimed at achieving goals, 4 implementation and execution of the strategy, and 4 monitoring, evaluation, control, and readjustment of the strategy. Finally, planning must account for all possible implementation barriers.

  1. Regional cooperation for European seas: Governance models in support of the implementation of the MSFD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tatenhove, van J.P.M.; Raakjaer, J.; Leeuwen, van J.; Hoof, van L.J.W.

    2014-01-01

    During the implementation process of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD), Member States are expected to cooperate and coordinate at the regional sea level as wells as arrange stakeholder involvement. However, the MSFD does not specify any governing structures to do so. The aim of this

  2. The Essence Of Government Shares Subscription A Review The Implementation Of State-Owned Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urbanisasi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine and explain the mechanisms and the implementation of government share subscription in the implementation of SOEs legal standing of the government shares subscription in the implementation of the state budget that separated in the implementation of SOEs and its legal implications of state loss or not and also legal accountability for losses arising out of shares subscription of SOE. In this study the authors use normative legal research. The data obtained in this study will be analyzed using qualitative normative method with inductive logic. Results from the study indicate that state shares subscription in the establishment of SOE or limited company with funds derived from State Budget are separated. Thus the government no longer has any authority in the field of civil law as a business entity. A clear separation of the status of country as business and as government organizer carries consequences. With the separation then there is clarity about the concept of the state financial losses. SOE as one form of business entity that aim to make a profit is a separate legal entity and has responsibilities that are separately anyway though formed and capital originating from the state finances and the loss of one transaction or in legal entity cannot be categorized as a state finance loss because the state has functioned as a private legal entity.

  3. Governance Strengths and Weaknesses to implement the Marine Strategy Framework Directive in European Waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freire-Gibb, L. Carlos; Koss, Rebecca; Piotr, Margonski

    2014-01-01

    addresses the Strengths, Weakness, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT) of the current European marine governance structures and its relationship to implement the MSFD. Results of the SWOT analysis were acquired through a combination of approaches with MSFD experts and stakeholders including: 30 face......-to-face interviews, an online survey with 264 stakeholder respondents and focus groups within each European marine region. The SWOT analysis concurrently identifies common strengths and weakness and key governance issues for implementing the MSFD for European marine regions. This paper forms one assessment within...... the governance component of the Options for Delivering Ecosystem Based Marine Management (ODEMM) project and presents timely issues that can be of benefit to national and European Union policy makers....

  4. Implementing a clinical pharmacy service in hematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, Tatiane Fernandes; Aguiar, Karina da Silva; Rotta, Inajara; Belletti, Klezia Morais da Silva; Carlotto, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    To implement a clinical pharmacy service focused on the comprehensive review of antineoplastic drugs used in therapy of hematological diseases. An interventional study was conducted in a Brazilian tertiary teaching hospital in two different periods, with and without a clinical pharmacy service, respectively. This service consisted of an antineoplastic prescription validation (analysis of patients' characteristics, laboratory tests, compliance with the therapeutic protocol and with pharmacotechnical parameters). When problems were detected, the pharmacist intervened with the physician or another health professional responsible for the patient. Inpatients and outpatients with hematological diseases were included. We found an increased detection of drug-related problem by 106.5% after implementing the service. Comparing the two periods, an increase in patients' age (26.7 years versus 17.6 years), a predominance of outpatients (54% versus 38%), and an increase in multiple myeloma (13% versus 4%) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (16% versus 3%) was noted. The most commonly found problems were related to dose (33% versus 25%) and cycle day (14% versus 30%). With regard to clinical impact, the majority had a significant impact (71% versus 58%), and in one patient from the second period could have been fatal. The main pharmaceutical interventions were dose adjustment (35% versus 25%) and drug withdrawal (33% versus 40%). The pharmacy service contributed to increase the detection and resolution of drug-related problems, and it was an effective method to promote the safe and rational use of antineoplastic drugs. Implementar um serviço farmacêutico clínico centrado na revisão completa dos antineoplásicos utilizados no tratamento de doenças hematológicas. Estudo intervencional conduzido em um hospital universitário terciário brasileiro em dois períodos distintos, com base na ausência e na presença do serviço farmacêutico clínico, respectivamente. O referido servi

  5. Clinical dosimetry in molecular radiotherapy: protocol optimization and clinical implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrer, Ludovic

    2011-01-01

    Molecular radiotherapy (mrt) consists in destructing tumour targets by radiolabelled vectors. This nuclear medicine specialty is being considered with increasing interest for example via the success achieved in the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphomas by radioimmunotherapy. One of the keys of mrt optimization relies on the personalising of absorbed doses delivered to the patient: This is required to ascertain that irradiation is focused on tumour cells while keeping surrounding healthy tissue irradiation at an acceptable - non-toxic - level. Radiation dose evaluation in mrt requires in one hand, the spatial and temporal localization of injected radioactive sources by scintigraphic imaging, and on a second hand, the knowledge of the emitted radiation propagating media, given by CT imaging. Global accuracy relies on the accuracy of each of the steps that contribute to clinical dosimetry. There is no reference, standardized dosimetric protocol to date. Due to heterogeneous implementations, evaluation of the accuracy of the absorbed dose is a difficult task. In this thesis, we developed and evaluated different dosimetric approaches that allow us to find a relationship between the absorbed dose to the bone marrow and haematological toxicity. Besides, we built a scientific project, called DosiTest, which aims at evaluating the impact of the various step that contribute to the realization of a dosimetric study, by means of a virtual multicentric comparison based on Monte-Carlo modelling. (author) [fr

  6. Clinical governance breakdown: Australian cases of wilful blindness and whistleblowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Sonja; Duke, Maxine

    2017-01-01

    After their attempts to have patient safety concerns addressed internally were ignored by wilfully blind managers, nurses from Bundaberg Base Hospital and Macarthur Health Service felt compelled to 'blow the whistle'. Wilful blindness is the human desire to prefer ignorance to knowledge; the responsibility to be informed is shirked. To provide an account of instances of wilful blindness identified in two high-profile cases of nurse whistleblowing in Australia. Critical case study methodology using Fay's Critical Social Theory to examine, analyse and interpret existing data generated by the Commissions of Inquiry held into Bundaberg Base Hospital and Macarthur Health Service patient safety breaches. All data was publicly available and assessed according to the requirements of unobtrusive research methods and secondary data analysis. Ethical considerations: Data collection for the case studies relied entirely on publicly available documentary sources recounting and detailing past events. Data from both cases reveal managers demonstrating wilful blindness towards patient safety concerns. Concerns were unaddressed; nurses, instead, experienced retaliatory responses leading to a 'social crisis' in the organisation and to whistleblowing. Managers tasked with clinical governance must be aware of mechanisms with the potential to blind them. The human tendency to favour positive news and avoid conflict is powerful. Understanding wilful blindness can assist managers' awareness of the competing emotions occurring in response to ethical challenges, such as whistleblowing.

  7. Policy Implementation of Government Affairs Devolution Scope of the Ministry of Home Affairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Halik

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Deconcentration policies held because not all authority/government affairs can be done by using the principle of decentralization. The intent of this policy is to synergize the central and local relations. However, in reality not all of the activities of these policies can produce output in accordance with the plans and policy objectives, including those carried out by the Ministry of the Interior. Such conditions occur because of the policy implementation process has not been going well. This study uses naturalistic methods or qualitative descriptive explanation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the process of policy implementation, identify the factors that influence, as well as the results of policy implementation devolution of government affairs deconcentration scope of the Ministry of the Interior in the province of West Java. The results of this study indicate that in general the result of the implementation of deconcentration policy in West Java province is relatively accordance with the objectives of the implementation of deconcentration policy. Similarly, the output of the implementation of deconcentration program targets as predetermined. Nevertheless, there are still many shortcomings in the implementation process.

  8. CODES AND PRACTICES OF IMPLEMENTATION OF CORPORATE GOVERNANCE IN ROMANIA AND RESULTS REPORTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GROSU MARIA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Corporate governance refers to the manner in which companies are directed and controlled. Business management was always guided by certain principles, but the current meaning of corporate governance concerns and the contribution that companies must have the overall development of modern society. Romania used quite late in adopting a code of good practice in corporate governance, being driven, in particular, the privatization process, but also the transfer of control and surveillance of political organizations by the Board of Directors (BD. Adoption of codes of corporate governance is necessary to harmonize internal business requirements of a functioning market economy. In addition, the CEE countries, the European Commission adopted an action plan announcing measures to modernize company law and enhance corporate governance. Romania takes steps in this direction by amending the Company Law, and other regulations, although the practice does not necessarily keep pace with the requirements. This study aims on the one hand, an analysis of the evolution of corporate governance codes adopted in Romania, but also an empirical research of the implementation of corporate governance principles of a representative sample of companies listed on the Bucharest Stock Exchange (BSE. Consider relevant research methodology, because the issuer of the Codes of CG in Romania is BSE listed companies requesting their voluntary implementation. Implementation results are summarized and interpreted at the expense of public reports of the companies studied. Most studies undertaken in this direction have been made on multinational companies which respects the rule of corporate governance codes of countries of origin. In addition, many studies also emphasize the fair treatment of stakeholders rather than on models of governance adopted (monist/dualist with implications for optimizing economic objectives but also social. Undertaken research attempts to highlight on the one

  9. Financial and clinical governance implications of clinical coding accuracy in neurosurgery: a multidisciplinary audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haliasos, N; Rezajooi, K; O'neill, K S; Van Dellen, J; Hudovsky, Anita; Nouraei, Sar

    2010-04-01

    Clinical coding is the translation of documented clinical activities during an admission to a codified language. Healthcare Resource Groupings (HRGs) are derived from coding data and are used to calculate payment to hospitals in England, Wales and Scotland and to conduct national audit and benchmarking exercises. Coding is an error-prone process and an understanding of its accuracy within neurosurgery is critical for financial, organizational and clinical governance purposes. We undertook a multidisciplinary audit of neurosurgical clinical coding accuracy. Neurosurgeons trained in coding assessed the accuracy of 386 patient episodes. Where clinicians felt a coding error was present, the case was discussed with an experienced clinical coder. Concordance between the initial coder-only clinical coding and the final clinician-coder multidisciplinary coding was assessed. At least one coding error occurred in 71/386 patients (18.4%). There were 36 diagnosis and 93 procedure errors and in 40 cases, the initial HRG changed (10.4%). Financially, this translated to pound111 revenue-loss per patient episode and projected to pound171,452 of annual loss to the department. 85% of all coding errors were due to accumulation of coding changes that occurred only once in the whole data set. Neurosurgical clinical coding is error-prone. This is financially disadvantageous and with the coding data being the source of comparisons within and between departments, coding inaccuracies paint a distorted picture of departmental activity and subspecialism in audit and benchmarking. Clinical engagement improves accuracy and is encouraged within a clinical governance framework.

  10. Do regulators pay attention? An assessment of IT governance implementation in systemically important banks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Sepahvand

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The large size and complexity of Information Technology systems in systematically important banks raise the need for creating an IT governance architecture that could make IT strategy aligned with business strategy and delivers value while it effectively identifies and manages IT risk. This study traces the links between IT governance and two more applied risk management frameworks, COSO and BCBS’s principles for managing IT risk. Then it argues due to the magnitude of potential losses caused by any weakness in IT governance in D-SIBs, the assessment of IT governance in these banks should be one of the main concerns of local regulators and supervisors. As a case study, it assesses the relative rank of D-SIBs in Iranian banking system to see where these banks would stand in an ordered list of the banks including both private and public banks in terms of IT governance implementation. The application of the Fuzzy AHP technique shows that IT governance practice in Iranian D-SIBs is not as good as the private banks while it outperforms some state-owned banks.

  11. Content validity of governing in Building Information Modelling (BIM) implementation assessment instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzaman, N. A. H.; Takim, R.; Nawawi, A. H.; Mohamad Yusuwan, N.

    2018-04-01

    BIM governance assessment instrument is a process of analysing the importance in developing BIM governance solution to tackle the existing problems during team collaboration in BIM-based projects. Despite the deployment of integrative technologies in construction industry particularly BIM, it is still insufficient compare to other sectors. Several studies have been established the requirements of BIM implementation concerning all technical and non-technical BIM adoption issues. However, the data are regarded as inadequate to develop a BIM governance framework. Hence, the objective of the paper is to evaluate the content validity of the BIM governance instrument prior to the main data collection. Two methods were employed in the form of literature review and questionnaire survey. Based on the literature review, 273 items with six main constructs are suggested to be incorporated in the BIM governance instrument. The Content Validity Ratio (CVR) scores revealed that 202 out of 273 items are considered as the utmost critical by the content experts. The findings for Item Level Content Validity Index (I-CVI) and Modified Kappa Coefficient however revealed that 257 items in BIM governance instrument are appropriate and excellent. The instrument is highly reliable for future strategies and the development of BIM projects in Malaysia.

  12. THEORETIC INCURSION IN THE IDENTIFICATION OF DETERMINANTS AND E-GOVERNMENT STRATEGY. EMPIRIC STUDY OVER THE GRADE OF IMPLEMENTATION OF E-GOVERNMENT IN BIHOR COUNTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pop Cohut Ioana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We are currently witnessing an unprecedented development of new technologies, that offers great opportunities for the modernization of the society, it changes radically the way governments, businesses and citizens have the opportunity to obtain goods and services, the way in which public services are provided that become increasingly important for citizens, the way of obtaining and transmitting information, the way in which business connections are done, the interaction between different communities, etc.. From this point of view we research the way in which public strategies of achievement and implementation of model of e-government are shaped, model which can exploit the opportunities offered by new technologies and can implement roles for the citizen and public policy makers and implicitly of local and regional development. How the public sector should support the implementation of strategies of e-government, to polarize at the highest level all communities of interest, to provide a framework for planning and action across the board, covering local administration, institutions, organizations and government agencies, to empower appropriate training for implementation of IT strategies, can lead to stimulation of generators factors of local and regional development. We also, intend to identify, from carrying out an empirical study in Bihor county, by analysis of 30 public institutions, the degree of implementation of new technologies in public administration, human resources readiness for appropriate use of IT facilities and what level of implementation of e-government in these institutions, in order to outline the main characteristics and determinants of e-government implementation. The present paper is of interest to policy-makers, researchers, local communities through analysis how the introduction of new technology development in developing and implementing public policies, particularly by networking government and e-government, can cause

  13. Perspectives of rural and remote primary healthcare services on the meaning and goals of clinical governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwedza, Ruyamuro K; Larkins, Sarah; Johnson, Julie K; Zwar, Nicholas

    2017-10-01

    Definitions of clinical governance are varied and there is no one agreed model. This paper explored the perspectives of rural and remote primary healthcare services, located in North Queensland, Australia, on the meaning and goals of clinical governance. The study followed an embedded multiple case study design with semi-structured interviews, document analysis and non-participant observation. Participants included clinicians, non-clinical support staff, managers and executives. Similarities and differences in the understanding of clinical governance between health centre and committee case studies were evident. Almost one-third of participants were unfamiliar with the term or were unsure of its meaning; alongside limited documentation of a definition. Although most cases linked the concept of clinical governance to key terms, many lacked a comprehensive understanding. Similarities between cases included viewing clinical governance as a management and administrative function. Differences included committee members' alignment of clinical governance with corporate governance and frontline staff associating clinical governance with staff safety. Document analysis offered further insight into these perspectives. Clinical governance is well-documented as an expected organisational requirement, including in rural and remote areas where geographic, workforce and demographic factors pose additional challenges to quality and safety. However, in reality, it is not clearly, similarly or comprehensively understood by all participants.

  14. Governments should implement energy-efficiency standards and labels--cautiously

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiel, Stephen; McMahon, James E.

    2003-01-01

    Energy-efficiency standards and labels can be the most effective long-term energy-efficiency policy any government can implement. This paper describes: (1) the benefits that can be obtained through this policy, (2) which countries are implementing standards and labels and for which products, (3) the processes they are using at each step along the way including the reasons why each step must be done carefully and thoroughly, and (4) the relationship of standard-setting and labeling to other energy-efficiency policies

  15. Challenges in Evaluating Clinical Governance Systems in Iran: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshmand, Elaheh; Tourani, Sogand; Ravaghi, Hamid; Ebrahimipour, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Background: In spite of the pivotal role of clinical governance in enhancing quality of services provided by hospitals across the country, a scientific framework with specific criteria for evaluating hospitals has not been developed so far. Objectives: This study was conducted with the aim to identify the challenges involved in evaluating systems of clinical governance in Iran. Materials and Methods: For the purposes of this qualitative study, 15 semi-structured interviews with experts in the field were conducted in 2011 and the data were analyzed using framework analysis method. Results: Five major challenges in evaluating clinical governance include managing human resources, improving clinical quality, managing development, organizing clinical governance, and providing patient-oriented healthcare system. Conclusions: Healthcare system in Iran requires a clinical governance program which has a patient-oriented approach in philosophy, operation, and effectiveness in order to meet the challenges ahead. PMID:24910799

  16. The constraints of good governance practice in national solid waste management policy (NSWMP) implementation: A case study of Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Seow Ta; Abas, Muhamad Azahar; Chen, Goh Kai; Mohamed, Sulzakimin

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays, international donors have emphasised on the adoption of good governance practices in solid waste management which include policy implementation. In Malaysia, the National Solid Waste Management Policy (NSWMP) was introduced as the main guideline for its solid waste management and the Malaysian government has adopted good governance practice in the NSMWP implementation. However, the good governance practices implemented by the Malaysian government encountered several challenges. This study was conducted to explore the good governance constraints experienced by stakeholders in the NSWMP implementation. An exploratory research approach is applied in this study through in-depth interviews with several government agencies and concessionaires that involved in the NSWMP implementation in Malaysia. A total of six respondents took part in this study. The findings revealed three main good governance constraints in the NSWMP implementation, namely inadequate fund, poor staff's competency, and ambiguity of policy implementation system. Moreover, this study also disclosed that the main constraint influenced the other constraints. Hence, it is crucial to identify the main constraint in order to minimise its impact on the other constraints.

  17. Clinical implementation of stereotaxic brain implant optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenow, U.F.; Wojcicka, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    This optimization method for stereotaxic brain implants is based on seed/strand configurations of the basic type developed for the National Cancer Institute (NCI) atlas of regular brain implants. Irregular target volume shapes are determined from delineation in a stack of contrast enhanced computed tomography scans. The neurosurgeon may then select up to ten directions, or entry points, of surgical approach of which the program finds the optimal one under the criterion of smallest target volume diameter. Target volume cross sections are then reconstructed in 5-mm-spaced planes perpendicular to the implantation direction defined by the entry point and the target volume center. This information is used to define a closed line in an implant cross section along which peripheral seed strands are positioned and which has now an irregular shape. Optimization points are defined opposite peripheral seeds on the target volume surface to which the treatment dose rate is prescribed. Three different optimization algorithms are available: linear least-squares programming, quadratic programming with constraints, and a simplex method. The optimization routine is implemented into a commercial treatment planning system. It generates coordinate and source strength information of the optimized seed configurations for further dose rate distribution calculation with the treatment planning system, and also the coordinate settings for the stereotaxic Brown-Roberts-Wells (BRW) implantation device

  18. From Target to Implementation: Perspectives for the International Governance of Forest Landscape Restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till Pistorius

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Continuing depletion of forest resources, particularly in tropical developing countries, has turned vast areas of intact ecosystems into urbanized and agricultural lands. The degree of degradation varies, but in most cases, the ecosystem functions and the ability to provide a variety of ecosystem services are severely impaired. In addition to many other challenges, successful forest restoration of these lands requires considerable resources and funding, but the ecological, economic and social benefits have the potential to outweigh the investment. As a consequence, at the international policy level, restoration is seen as a field of land use activities that provides significant contributions to simultaneously achieving different environmental and social policy objectives. Accordingly, different policy processes at the international policy level have made ecological landscape restoration a global priority, in particular the Convention on Biological Diversity with the Aichi Target 15 agreed upon in 2010, which aims at restoring 15% of all degraded land areas by 2020. While such ambitious policy targets are important for recognizing and agreeing upon solutions for environmental problems, they are unlikely to be further substantiated or governed. The objective of this paper is thus to develop a complementary governance approach to the top-down implementation of the Aichi target. Drawing on collaborative and network governance theories, we discuss the potential of a collaborative networked governance approach and perspectives for overcoming the inherent challenges facing a rapid large-scale restoration of degraded lands.

  19. The IT - Information Technology Governance and points to be considered in its practical implementation in Corporations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altino José Mentzingen de Moraes

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a Case Study (Issues and Answers, applied in a major industry located in Brazil´s Central Region, related to rise up checkpoints linked to IT Governance. As one of its result, is presented a graph of how the IT Governance was approached in researched Industry, in which, it is possible to see which areas this method of working was active and in which this was not applied. Also a Timeline describes the steps that were undertaken for the implementation of this Case Study, which, can be reused for the resubmission – in a future moment – in the same industry, to evaluate if there was a change of scenery, or in other Organization with the same characteristics of this studied one.

  20. Foreign practice of introducing conventional communicative strategy in the implementation of the functions of government

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Zarytska

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the role of conventional communicative strategy from the standpoint of foreign practice. Depending on scientific approaches to communications, business and management strategies based conventional communicative strategy implementation functions of government. It has certain methodological features and differences in different countries: UK, Germany, Australia, USA, Spain, Holland, Finland, New Zealand. Generalization showed that each state produces its conventional communicative strategy depending on the overall state objectives. However joint is considered important not only communication, but also the ability to communicate effectively, understand how to implement the vision of an opinion on relations between the state and society. Purpose conventional communicative strategy determined by the impact on the optimization of the authorities at the national and regional level, the processes of globalization, the experience of other states, its implementation in practical activities as well as their lack of predictive scenarios of the process of optimizing the functions of government. Demonstrated the appropriateness of existing methodologies to use in domestic practice of public administration.

  1. Implementation of E-Government in Mexico: The Case of Infonavit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Lizbeth; Gil-Garcia, J. Ramon

    The implementation of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in the public sector is a strategy for administrative reform that has grown in ­importance in recent years. The use of ICT in government can help to improve the ­efficiency, quality, and transparency of public services and reduce the operating costs of bureaucracy. ICTs have also opened a new communication channel for government to provide public services to citizens without intermediaries. However, the ­implementation of an ICT initiative is not a simple process. Organizations ­frequently invest a great amount of resources into ICT initiatives, but the results they obtain often do not meet expectations. This observation is particularly true in some developing countries. Based on a case study of a Mexican federal agency, this ­chapter analyzes a successful strategy involving three ICT projects, taking into consideration institutional, organizational, and managerial aspects. Overall, the results of this study show that having a strategic plan that aligns the ICT project objectives with the overarching organizational goals leads to successful implementation because the technical, organizational, and institutional resources are ­managed in an integrated fashion. The chapter also reports on specific factors that had an impact on the characteristics and success of the three ICT projects.

  2. Implementation of a clinical pathway may improve alcohol treatment outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anette Søgaard; Nielsen, Bent

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the design, implementation, and evaluation of a clinical pathway system in a two-cohort quasi-experimental study before and after implementation, controlling for confounders. The main outcome measures were retention in care and sensible alcohol use (defined as abstinent...

  3. Reduction in Unnecessary Clinical Laboratory Testing Through Utilization Management at a US Government Veterans Affairs Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konger, Raymond L; Ndekwe, Paul; Jones, Genea; Schmidt, Ronald P; Trey, Marty; Baty, Eric J; Wilhite, Denise; Munshi, Imtiaz A; Sutter, Bradley M; Rao, Maddamsetti; Bashir, Chowdry M

    2016-03-01

    To implement an electronic laboratory utilization management system (laboratory expert system [LES]) to provide safe and effective reductions in unnecessary clinical laboratory testing. The LES is a set of frequency filter subroutines within the Veterans Affairs hospital and laboratory information system that was formulated by an interdisciplinary medical team. Since implementing the LES, total test volume has decreased by a mean of 11.18% per year compared with our pre-LES test volume. This change was not attributable to fluctuations in outpatient visits or inpatient days of care. Laboratory cost savings were estimated at $151,184 and $163,751 for 2012 and 2013, respectively. A significant portion of these cost savings was attributable to reductions in high-volume, large panel testing. No adverse effects on patient care were reported, and mean length of stay for patients remained unchanged. Electronic laboratory utilization systems can effectively reduce unnecessary laboratory testing without compromising patient care. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  4. Teaching Case: Initial Public Offering and Implementation of a Corporate Governance System in a Family Business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Gezer Silva de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prime Hospitality Group (PHG is a family-owned company, which was founded 17 years ago by Mr. Milton Albuquerque, with hotels and resorts scattered in different regions of Brazil. Recently, the company decided to go public in BM&FBOVESPA. Conducting an IPO, however, requires many changes in the company’s structure. These changes generate costs and change the view of family members and different stakeholders involved in the process. This case proposes an assessment of the impact caused by the implementation of a corporate governance mechanism after the completion of an IPO of a family-run company.

  5. Accounting for Lean Implementation in Government Enterprise: Intended and Unintended Consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Chester S. Labedz; John R. Gray

    2013-01-01

    This research explores the effects of implementing a lean production system in a government facility. The organization’s formal accounting practices delay recognition of production savings, but informally the facility promotes its lean efforts through attention-getting, off-the-books, “innovative†accounting. The authors state three propositions relating to customer effects of the lean improvements and the financial approaches. They then state four hypotheses relating to the measures’ ...

  6. The relationship between senior management team culture and clinical governance: Empirical investigation and managerial implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenestini, Anna; Calciolari, Stefano; Lega, Federico; Grilli, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Health care organizations are pressured to improve the cost-effectiveness of service delivery. Clinical governance is an important trigger to improve care quality and safety and rank high in the reform agenda of health systems. The senior management team culture plays a major role in establishing clinical governance practices, because it strongly influences the values, attitudes, and behaviors of the members of an organization. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between senior management team culture and clinical governance in the public health care organizations of three Italian regions. The assessment of senior management culture was conducted using the Competing Values Framework and a corresponding instrument adapted for the Italian context. Clinical governance was assessed using an ad hoc instrument focused on the senior management team's perception and attitude toward clinical governance. The survey achieved a 54% response rate. The results of four different models demonstrate that organizations characterized by different dominant cultures are associated with significant differences in attitudes toward clinical governance. In particular, on average, dominant cultures with a prevailing external focus are associated with a more positive attitude toward clinical governance. The selection and appointments of top managers should consider the style of leadership that is most apt to facilitate the growth of rational and developmental cultures. Furthermore, the training of top managers and leading doctors should reinforce leadership aptitude and approaches that are consistent with the desired organizational cultures.

  7. The spirit of democracy in the implementation of public information policy at the provincial government of West Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjoraida, D. F.; Asmawi, A.; Anwar, R. K.

    2018-03-01

    This article analyses the implementation of Law Number 14/2008 on Public Information Disclosure on the Provincial Government of West Java. This descriptive-qualitative study presents a discussion of the spirit of democracy in the implementation of the abovem-entioned policy in West Java Province. With the theory of policy implementation and democratization, data obtains that the element of democratic spirit in the implementation of public information policy in the government of West Java is quite thick. Therefore, there must be a massification of the implementation of the law in West Java, especially its socialization to districts/cities and society in general. It was found that the democratization of the West Java Provincial Government in implementing the Act has been well received in the community. However, the lack of publicity about this Law can reduce the strength of moral messages that exist in the law to the public.

  8. Democratic governance and political rationalities in the implementation of the water framework directive in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behagel, J.H.; Arts, B.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-level governance, network governance, and, more recently, experimentalist governance are important analytical frameworks through which to understand democratic governance in the EU. However, these analytical frameworks carry normative assumptions that build on functionalist roots and

  9. Democratic governance and political rationalities in the implementation of the water framework directive in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behagel, J.H.; Arts, B.

    2013-01-01

    Multi-level governance, network governance, and, more recently, experimentalist governance are important analytical frameworks through which to understand democratic governance in the EU. However, these analytical frameworks carry normative assumptions that build on functionalist roots and

  10. A multidisciplinary audit of clinical coding accuracy in otolaryngology: financial, managerial and clinical governance considerations under payment-by-results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouraei, S A R; O'Hanlon, S; Butler, C R; Hadovsky, A; Donald, E; Benjamin, E; Sandhu, G S

    2009-02-01

    To audit the accuracy of otolaryngology clinical coding and identify ways of improving it. Prospective multidisciplinary audit, using the 'national standard clinical coding audit' methodology supplemented by 'double-reading and arbitration'. Teaching-hospital otolaryngology and clinical coding departments. Otolaryngology inpatient and day-surgery cases. Concordance between initial coding performed by a coder (first cycle) and final coding by a clinician-coder multidisciplinary team (MDT; second cycle) for primary and secondary diagnoses and procedures, and Health Resource Groupings (HRG) assignment. 1250 randomly-selected cases were studied. Coding errors occurred in 24.1% of cases (301/1250). The clinician-coder MDT reassigned 48 primary diagnoses and 186 primary procedures and identified a further 209 initially-missed secondary diagnoses and procedures. In 203 cases, patient's initial HRG changed. Incorrect coding caused an average revenue loss of 174.90 pounds per patient (14.7%) of which 60% of the total income variance was due to miscoding of a eight highly-complex head and neck cancer cases. The 'HRG drift' created the appearance of disproportionate resource utilisation when treating 'simple' cases. At our institution the total cost of maintaining a clinician-coder MDT was 4.8 times lower than the income regained through the double-reading process. This large audit of otolaryngology practice identifies a large degree of error in coding on discharge. This leads to significant loss of departmental revenue, and given that the same data is used for benchmarking and for making decisions about resource allocation, it distorts the picture of clinical practice. These can be rectified through implementing a cost-effective clinician-coder double-reading multidisciplinary team as part of a data-assurance clinical governance framework which we recommend should be established in hospitals.

  11. Joined up Clinical Governance: Learning from Our Mistakes

    OpenAIRE

    Pam Mosedale

    2017-01-01

    This session will be a practical demonstration, with group discussion of how a significant event can lead to the practice examining what happened, looking at the evidence base, revising protocols & auditing implementation of the new protocols.A significant event is an event thought by anyone in the team to be significant in the care of patients or the conduct of the practice.Significant Event Audit is a qualitative rather than quantitative form of Audit but still needs a structured framew...

  12. Development and implementation of a Bridge Management System for the Provincial Government of the Western Cape, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nordengen, Paul A

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development and implementation of a bridge management system for the Provincial Government Western Cape (PGWC). During the first phase of the project, the inventory and inspection modules were customised to meet the needs...

  13. Conditions That Support the Implementation of E-Government through the Digital Towpath Project: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyksinski, Deborah J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the social environmental conditions perceived by local government representatives as relatively important for their implementation of e-government using the Digital Towpath Project (DTP) content management system, referred to as "websites". The survey population included individuals who administered the municipal websites for…

  14. “Future Directions”: m-government computer systems accessed via cloud computing – advantages and possible implementations

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela LIŢAN

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the activities of companies and Public Administration had been automated and adapted to the current information system. Therefore, in this paper, I will present and exemplify the benefits of m-government computer systems development and implementation (which can be accessed from mobile devices and which are specific to the workflow of Public Administrations) starting from the “experience” of e-government systems implementation in the context of their access and usage through ...

  15. Modeling the relations of ethical leadership and clinical governance with psychological empowerment in nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goona Fathi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ethical leadership appeared as a new approach in the leadership perspective and provided the ground for promoting individual and organizational efficiency by giving priorities to ethics in organizations. In this regard, the present study was conducted with the aim of modeling the relations of ethical leadership and clinical governance with psychological empowerment among nurses of public hospitals in Kermanshah in 2014. Methods: the research method was descriptive survey. The study sample consisted of all nurses (n=550 working in public hospitals of Kermanshah University of Medical Science for whom 163 nurses were selected using simple random sampling. The tools for data collection were ethical leadership, clinical governance and psychology empowerment questionnaires whose validity and reliability were confirmed. The structural equation modeling was used to analyze the data. Results: The results showed a significant relationship between ethical leadership and clinical governance (P<0.01 and psychological empowerment (P<0.01. Moreover, there was a significant correlation between clinical governance and psychological empowerment (P<0.05. Based on the results of the research, ethical leadership directly and through clinical governance affected the nurses’ psychological empowerment (P<0.05. Conclusion: reliance on ethics and ethical leadership in hospitals, in addition to providing the space and ground for improving the effectiveness of clinical governance approach, can promote the feeling of psychological empowerment in nurses. Accordingly, the ethical issues are required to be taken into consideration in hospitals.

  16. Automatic generation of computable implementation guides from clinical information models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscá, Diego; Maldonado, José Alberto; Moner, David; Robles, Montserrat

    2015-06-01

    Clinical information models are increasingly used to describe the contents of Electronic Health Records. Implementation guides are a common specification mechanism used to define such models. They contain, among other reference materials, all the constraints and rules that clinical information must obey. However, these implementation guides typically are oriented to human-readability, and thus cannot be processed by computers. As a consequence, they must be reinterpreted and transformed manually into an executable language such as Schematron or Object Constraint Language (OCL). This task can be difficult and error prone due to the big gap between both representations. The challenge is to develop a methodology for the specification of implementation guides in such a way that humans can read and understand easily and at the same time can be processed by computers. In this paper, we propose and describe a novel methodology that uses archetypes as basis for generation of implementation guides. We use archetypes to generate formal rules expressed in Natural Rule Language (NRL) and other reference materials usually included in implementation guides such as sample XML instances. We also generate Schematron rules from NRL rules to be used for the validation of data instances. We have implemented these methods in LinkEHR, an archetype editing platform, and exemplify our approach by generating NRL rules and implementation guides from EN ISO 13606, openEHR, and HL7 CDA archetypes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Good governance and the implementation of national health insurance in the public health sector: A case of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody Brauns

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available For years it has been argued that implementation failure is one of the main reasons why policies do not yield the results expected. In South Africa, a version of this argument, which often features, is that good policies are drawn up but then not implemented. Government failure is a reality. Just as corporations survive according to whether they make good decisions, so to governments fall or are re-elected on whether they make good decisions. General argument in governance literature is that a wide variety of developments have undermined the capacity of governments to control events within the nation state. As a consequence the state can no longer assume a monopoly of expertise or of the resources to govern.

  18. Local Government Implementation of Long-Term Stewardship at Two DOE Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Pendergrass; Roman Czebiniak; Kelly Mott; Seth Kirshenberg; Audrey Eidelman; Zachary Lamb; Erica Pencak; Wendy Sandoz

    2003-08-13

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for cleaning up the radioactive and chemical contamination that resulted from the production of nuclear weapons. At more than one hundred sites throughout the country DOE will leave some contamination in place after the cleanup is complete. In order to protect human health and the environment from the remaining contamination DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), state environmental regulatory agencies, local governments, citizens and other entities will need to undertake long-term stewardship of such sites. Long-term stewardship includes a wide range of actions needed to protect human health in the environment for as long as the risk from the contamination remains above acceptable levels, such as barriers, caps, and other engineering controls and land use controls, signs, notices, records, and other institutional controls. In this report the Environmental Law Institute (ELI) and the Energy Communities Alliance (ECA) examine how local governments, state environmental agencies, and real property professionals implement long-term stewardship at two DOE facilities, Losa Alamos National Laboratory and Oak Ridge Reservation.

  19. An analysis of Cobit 5 as a framework for the implementation of it governance with reference to King III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maseko, L.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Owing to the complexity and general lack of understanding of information technology (“IT”, the management of IT is often treated as a separately managed value-providing asset. This has resulted in IT rarely receiving the necessary attention of the board, thus creating a disconnect between the board and IT. The King Code of Governance for South Africa 2009 (hereafter referred to as “King III” provides principles and recommended practices for effective IT governance in order to create a greater awareness at board level. King III, however, provides no detailed guidance with regard to the practical implementation of these principles and practices. It is worth noting that numerous international guidelines are recommended within King III that can be adopted as frameworks to assist in the effective implementation of IT governance. COBIT 5 provides, as part of its governance process practices, related guidance activities linking it to the seven IT governance principles of King III, thus making it a practical framework for the implementation of King III recommendations. This study sought to establish the extent to which the governance processes, practices and activities of COBIT 5 are mapped to the recommended practices of IT governance as highlighted in King III in order to resolve COBIT 5 as the de facto framework for IT governance in terms of King III. The study found that though King III principles and practices may be interpreted as vague with regard to how to implement IT governance principles, COBIT 5 succeeds in bridging the gap between control requirements, technical issues, information systems and business risk, which consequently results in a better facilitation of IT governance. The study also revealed that COBIT 5 contains additional activities to assist the board in more transparent reporting of IT performance and conformance management to stakeholders as well activities which enable the connection of resource management with human

  20. Development, Validation, and Implementation of a Clinic Nurse Staffing Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeken, Debra Jean; Wakefield, Douglas; Kite, Cora; Linebaugh, Jeanette; Mitchell, Blair; Parkinson, Deidre; Misra, Madhukar

    2017-10-01

    Ensuring that the level of nurse staffing used to care for patients is appropriate to the setting and service intensity is essential for high-quality and cost-effective care. This article describes the development, validation, and implementation of the clinic technical skills permission list developed specifically to guide nurse staffing decisions in physician clinics of an academic medical center. Results and lessons learned in using this staffing guideline are presented.

  1. The Value of Clinical Teachers for EMR Implementations and Conversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaleoni, J.L.; Longhurst, C.A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Effective physician training is an essential aspect of EMR implementation. However, it can be challenging to find instructors who can present the material in a clinically relevant manner. The authors describe a unique physician-training program, utilizing medical students as course instructors. This approach resulted in high learner satisfaction rates and provided significant cost-savings compared to alternative options. PMID:25848414

  2. [Hospital governance: between crisis management and implementation of public health policy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bréchat, Pierre-Henri; Antoine, Leenhardt; Mathieu-Grenouilleau, Marie-Christine; Rymer, Roland; Matisse, François; Baraille, Denis; Beaufils, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    The implementation of the recent act to amend the law on hospitals, patient health and territories (HPST Law) completes the reform of the organization and governance of health facilities, which was announced in 2002 by the "Hospital 2007" plan. What kind of assessments and perspectives can be considered and envisaged for these Hospital Activity Poles? We compared our experience with a review of the professional and scientific literature in order to stimulate answers to these questions for advocacy purposes prior to the Act's implementation. The hospital's cluster of activities should reinforce--not call into question the core activities and the financial stability of the facility, while respecting the contract on agreed objectives and the necessary means and resources to meet the health needs of the catchment population as well as national priorities. Although significant, but limited, successes exist, five obstacles to hospital reorganization can be identified. These include, for example: lack of delegation of management and centralization of decisions, the heterogeneity of numerous Hospital Activity Poles or problems related to timing. These obstacles may cause strain, or put the Hospital Activity Poles and the health facilities in a difficult situation with respect to their dynamics. This may show that the State and social health insurance should steer and direct public health policy and that the delegation of management roles and responsibilities to the Hospital Activity Poles should be addressed.

  3. Contextual Factors Affecting E-Government Strategy Implementation and Its Impact on Public Sector Performance in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. James Gathungu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses the contextual factors affecting the implementation of e-government strategy and its impact on the performance of the public sector in Kenya using the Wing Lam, (2005 E-government Integration Model. Electronic government (E-government is viewed in this study as the utilization of Information Communication Technologies (ICTs to transform the efficiency, effectiveness, transparency and accountability of exchanges within government, between government and citizens and businesses locally and abroad; and to empower citizens through access and use of information. Although e-government is a rapidly growing concept in both developing and developed countries very few e-government initiatives progress to maturity. Different countries are faced with different contextual circumstances and environments in the realization of e-government initiatives. This study attempts to address the gap between theory and rhetoric about the potential of e-government and the reality of its application on the ground in Kenya. The study attempts to analyze the philosophy, theories and paradigms of e-government. The development of the commercial concept as a new paradigm in public administration replacing the traditional bureaucratic systems of government is highlighted in the study. A detailed conceptual discussion anchors the study on the Wing Lam, (2005 E-government Integration Model (EGI basing it on the Kenyan perspective. The study also reviews relevant e-government studies from an international, regional and local perspective anchoring the study on the configuration school of management thought. These discussions are used to develop new insights in view of the emerging issues and their relevance to the public sector in Kenya.

  4. Contextual Factors Affecting E-Government Strategy Implementation and Its Impact on Public Sector Performance in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. James Gathungu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses the contextual factors affecting the implementation of e-government strategy and its impact on the performance of the public sector in Kenya using the Wing Lam, (2005 E-government Integration Model. Electronic government (E-government is viewed in this study as the utilization of Information Communication Technologies (ICTs to transform the efficiency, effectiveness, transparency and accountability of exchanges within government, between government and citizens and businesses locally and abroad; and to empower citizens through access and use of information. Although e-government is a rapidly growing concept in both developing and developed countries very few e-government initiatives progress to maturity. Different countries are faced with different contextual circumstances and environments in the realization of e-government initiatives. This study attempts to address the gap between theory and rhetoric about the potential of e-government and the reality of its application on the ground in Kenya. The study attempts to analyze the philosophy, theories and paradigms of e-government. The development of the commercial concept as a new paradigm in public administration replacing the traditional bureaucratic systems of government is highlighted in the study. A detailed conceptual discussion anchors the study on the Wing Lam, (2005 E-government Integration Model (EGI basing it on the Kenyan perspective. The study also reviews relevant e-government studies from an international, regional and local perspective anchoring the study on the configuration school of management thought. These discussions are used to develop new insights in view of the emerging issues and their relevance to the public sector in Kenya.  

  5. Critical success factors in implementing clinical pathways/case management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, J

    2001-07-01

    With the advent of casemix reimbursement implementation, rapid technological changes, an ageing population and changing consumer behaviour, the Singapore health care industry is faced with the impetus to provide a cost-effective and efficient care delivery system. One ubiquitous tool used is the establishment of a clinical pathway/case management programme within the hospital. As the concept of clinical pathway for patient care is a relatively new concept in Singapore, several critical factors must be considered to ensure successful implementation of clinical pathway/case management programme. One key success factor lies in continued clinician support and acceptance. Other factors include top management leadership and support and a dedicated team of case managers, nurses and paramedical professionals.

  6. Enacting localist health policy in the English NHS: the 'governing assemblage' of Clinical Commissioning Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Jonathan; Coleman, Anna; Checkland, Kath

    2018-01-01

    Objectives The Health and Social Care Act 2012 introduced Clinical Commissioning Groups to take responsibility for commissioning (i.e. planning and purchasing) the majority of services for local populations in the English NHS. Constituted as 'membership organizations', with membership compulsory for all GP practices, Clinical Commissioning Groups are overseen by, and are accountable to, a new arm's-length body, NHS England. This paper critically engages with the content and policy narrative of the 2012 Act and explores this in relation to the reality of local policy enactment. Methods Set against a careful review of the 2012 Act, a case study of a nascent Clinical Commissioning Groups was conducted. The research included observations of Clinical Commissioning Group meetings and events (87 h), and in-depth interviews (16) with clinical commissioners, GPs, and managers. Results The 2012 Act was presented as part of a broader government agenda of decentralization and localism. Clinical Commissioning Group membership organizations were framed as a means of better meeting the needs and preferences of local patients and realizing a desirable increase in localism. The policy delineated the 'governing body' and 'the membership', with the former elected from/by the latter to oversee the organization. 'The membership' was duty bound to be 'good', engaged members and to represent their patients' interests. Fieldwork with Notchcroft Clinical Commissioning Group revealed that Clinical Commissioning Groups' statutory duty to NHS England to 'ensure the continuous improvement' of GP practice members involved performance scrutiny of GP practices. These governance processes were carried out by a varied cast of individuals, many of whom did not fit into the binary categorization of membership and governing body constructed in the policy. A concept, the governing assemblage, was developed to describe the dynamic cast of people involved in shaping the work and direction of the Clinical

  7. How GPs implement clinical guidelines in everyday clinical practice--a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Jette V; Hansen, Helle P; Riisgaard, Helle; Lykkegaard, Jesper; Nexøe, Jørgen; Bro, Flemming; Søndergaard, Jens

    2015-12-01

    Clinical guidelines are considered to be essential for improving quality and safety of health care. However, interventions to promote implementation of guidelines have demonstrated only partial effectiveness and the reasons for this apparent failure are not yet fully understood. To investigate how GPs implement clinical guidelines in everyday clinical practice and how implementation approaches differ between practices. Individual semi-structured open-ended interviews with seven GPs who were purposefully sampled with regard to gender, age and practice form. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and then analysed using systematic text condensation. Analysis of the interviews revealed three different approaches to the implementation of guidelines in clinical practice. In some practices the GPs prioritized time and resources on collective implementation activities and organized their everyday practice to support these activities. In other practices GPs discussed guidelines collectively but left the application up to the individual GP whilst others again saw no need for discussion or collective activities depending entirely on the individual GP's decision on whether and how to manage implementation. Approaches to implementation of clinical guidelines vary substantially between practices. Supporting activities should take this into account. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Implementation of an Electronic Health Records System in a Small Clinic: The Viewpoint of Clinic Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carayon, Pascale; Smith, Paul; Hundt, Ann Schoofs; Kuruchittham, Vipat; Li, Qian

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we examined the implementation of an electronic health records (EHR) system in a small family practice clinic. We used three data collection instruments to evaluate user experience, work pattern changes, and organisational changes related to the implementation and use of the EHR system: (1) an EHR user survey, (2) interviews with…

  9. Clinical implementation and quality assurance for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C.-M.; Price, R.; McNeeley, S.; Chen, L.; Li, J.S.; Wang, L.; Ding, M.; Fourkal, E.; Qin, L.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the clinical implementation and quality assurance (QA) for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) based on the experience at Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, USA. We will review our procedures for the clinical implementation of the IMRT technique and the requirements for patient immobilization, target delineation, treatment optimization, beam delivery and system administration. We will discuss the dosimetric requirements and measurement procedures for beam commissioning and dosimetry verification for IMRT. We will examine the details of model-based dose calculation for IMRT treatment planning and the potential problems with such dose calculation algorithms. We will discuss the effect of beam delivery systems on the actual dose distributions received by the patients and the methods to incorporate such effects in the treatment optimization process. We will investigate the use of the Monte Carlo method for dose calculation and treatment verification for IMRT

  10. Clinical and financial considerations for implementing an ICU telemedicine program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruklitis, Robert J; Tracy, Joseph A; McCambridge, Matthew M

    2014-06-01

    As the population in the United States increases and ages, the need to provide high-quality, safe, and cost-effective care to the most critically ill patients will be of great importance. With the projected shortage of intensivists, innovative changes to improve efficiency and increase productivity will be necessary. Telemedicine programs in the ICUs (tele-ICUs) are a successful strategy to improve intensivist access to critically ill patients. Although significant capital and maintenance costs are associated with tele-ICUs, these costs can be offset by indirect financial benefits, such as decreased length of stay. To achieve the positive clinical outcomes desired, tele-ICUs must be carefully designed and implemented. In this article, we discuss the clinical benefits of tele-ICUs. We review the financial considerations, including direct and indirect reimbursement and development and maintenance costs. Finally, we review design and implementation considerations for tele-ICUs.

  11. Implementing an Assessment Clinic in a Residential PTSD Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan McDowell

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Creating useful treatment plans can help improve services to consumers of mental health services. As more evidence-based practices are implemented, deciding what treatment, at what time, for whom becomes an important factor in facilitating positive outcomes. Readiness for trauma-focused treatments for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD such as Cognitive Processing Therapy or Prolonged Exposure Therapy may influence whether an individual can successfully complete either protocol. In addition, components of adjunctive therapies such as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy or Dialectical Behavior Therapy may be useful in moving a particular patient toward readiness and successful completion of treatment. Psychological assessment adds valuable data to inform these types of treatment decisions. This paper describes the implementation of a psychological assessment clinic in a residential PTSD treatment setting. Barriers to implementation, use of the data, and Veterans’ reactions to the feedback provided to them are included.

  12. Looking good or doing better? Patterns of decoupling in the implementation of clinical directorates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascia, Daniele; Morandi, Federica; Cicchetti, Americo

    2014-01-01

    The interest toward hospital restructuring has risen significantly in recent years. In spite of its potential benefits, often organizational restructuring in health care produces unexpected consequences. Extant research suggests that institutional theory provides a powerful theoretical lens through which hospital restructuring can be described and explained. According to this perspective, the effectiveness of change is strongly related to the extent to which innovative arrangements, tools, or practices are adopted and implemented within hospitals. Whenever these new arrangements require a substantial modification of internal processes and practices, resistance to implementation emerges and organizational change is likely to become neutralized. This study analyzes how hospital organizations engage in decoupling by adopting but not implementing a new organizational model named clinical directorate. We collected primary data on the diffusion of the clinical directorate model, which was mandated by law in the Italian National Health Service to improve hospital services. We surveyed the adoption and implementation of the clinical directorate model by monitoring the presence of clinical governance tools (measures for the quality improvement of hospital services) within single directorates. In particular, we compared hospitals that adopted the model before (early adopters) or after (later adopters) the mandate was introduced. Hospitals were engaged in decoupling by adopting the new arrangement but not implementing internal practices and tools for quality improvement. The introduction of the law significantly affected the decoupling, with late-adopter hospitals being less likely to implement the adopted model. The present research shows that changes in quality improvement processes may vary in relation to policy makers' interventions aimed at boosting the adoption of new hospital arrangements. Hospital administrators need to be aware and identify the institutional changes

  13. Clinical guideline implementation strategies for common mental health disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Eliana María; Moriana, Juan Antonio

    2016-01-01

    There has been a considerable proliferation of clinical guidelines recently, but their practical application is low, and organisations do not always implement their own ones. The aim of this study is to analyse and describe key elements of strategies and resources designed by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence for the implementation of guidelines for common mental health disorders in adults, which are some of the most prevalent worldwide. A systematic review was performed following PRISMA model. Resources, tools and implementation materials where included and categorised considering type, objectives, target and scope. A total of 212 elements were analysed, of which 33.5 and 24.5% are related to the implementation of generalized anxiety and depression guidelines, respectively. Applied tools designed to estimate costs and assess the feasibility of the setting up at local level are the most frequent type of resource. The study highlights the important variety of available materials, classified into 3 main strategies: tools targeting the professionals (30.6%), structural (26.4%), and organizational (24%). Developing guidelines is not enough; it is also necessary to promote their implementation in order to encourage their application. The resources and strategies described in this study may be potentially applicable to other contexts, and helpful to public health managers and professionals in the design of programmes and in the process of informed decision making to help increase access to efficient treatments. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier España.

  14. Clinical governance in practice: closing the loop with integrated audit systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, L; Jones, S

    2006-04-01

    Clinical governance has been acknowledged as the driving force behind National Health Service (NHS) reform since the government white paper outlined a new style of NHS in the UK in 1997. The framework of clinical governance ensures that NHS organizations are accountable for continually improving the quality of their services and safeguarding high standards of care by creating an environment in which excellence in clinical care will develop. A major component of a clinical governance framework requires utilizing audit procedures, which assess the effectiveness of current systems and ultimately direct continual quality improvement. This paper describes the audit component of a local clinical governance framework designed for a unit based within an NHS trust, which has utilized a multidisciplinary approach to assess the effectiveness of a newly commissioned service and its impact on the residents and staff. The unit is a 12-bedded, low-secure-intensive rehabilitation unit for clients with severe and enduring mental illness. Using recognized and standardized psychometric outcome measures, information was collected on clinical symptoms, social functioning, social behaviour, quality of life, relationship quality with named nurses and medication side-effects. Additionally, confidential staff measures were included to assess levels of burnout, identify expressed emotion and assess staff perception of models of illness. The paper includes a comprehensive account of how managerial commitment, teaching processes and application of technology ensured prompt data collection and maintained the momentum through the audit timescale. Data analysis and presentation of data in both clinical reviews and in senior management meetings within the unit are discussed. Findings highlight the full integration of the audit system into the processes of the unit. Clinically, the paper highlights the enhancement of the knowledge base of the client group and the influence on clinical decision

  15. Exploring the nature of governance at the level of implementation for health system strengthening: the DIALHS experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Vera; Schaay, Nikki; Olckers, Patti; Nqana, Nomsa; Lehmann, Uta; Gilson, Lucy

    2014-09-01

    Health system governance has been recognized as a critical element of the health system strengthening agenda. To date, health governance research often focuses at national or global levels, adopting a macro-perspective that deals with governance structures, forms and principles. Little attention has been given to a micro-perspective which recognizes the role of health system actors in governance, or to considering the operational level of the health system. This article presents a South African case study of an intervention to address conflict in roles and responsibilities between multiple actors supporting service delivery at the local level, and explores the broader insights this experience generates about the nature of local health system governance. In an embedded case study, action learning and reflection theory were used to design and implement the intervention. Data in this article were drawn from minutes, observations and recorded reflections of the meetings and workshops that comprised the intervention. A theoretical governance framework was used both to understand the context of the intervention and to analyse the dimensions of governance relevant in the experience. The study shows how, through action learning and reflection, local managers in two organizations came to understand how the higher level misalignment of organizational structures and processes imposed governance constraints on them, and to see the impact this had on their organizational relationships. By re-framing the conflict as organizational, they were then able to create opportunities for staff to understand their context and participate in negotiating principles for communication and collaborative work. The result reduced conflict between staff in the two organizations, leading to improved implementation of programme support. Strengthening relationships among those working at local level by building collaborative norms and values is an important part of local health system governance for

  16. Implementation of energy-saving policies in China: How local governments assisted industrial enterprises in achieving energy-saving targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Xiaofan; Li, Huimin; Wu, Liang; Qi, Ye

    2014-01-01

    Local governments have replaced the national ministries that are in charge of various industries to become the primary implementer of energy-saving policies in China since 2000. This paper employs a case study-based approach to demonstrate the significance of local governments’ policy measures in assisting industrial enterprises with energy-saving activities in China. Based on the longitudinal case of the Jasmine Thermal Electric Power Company, this paper hypothesizes that sub-national governments have played a major role in implementing energy-saving policies in China since the 11th Five-year-plan period. A wide range of provincial and municipal agencies collaborated in implementing five types of policy measures – informational policy, skill building, improved enforcement of central directives, price adjustment, and funding – that reduced barriers to energy saving and motivated active pursuit of energy-saving activities at industrial enterprises. The case study demonstrates how an enterprise and local governments work together to achieve the enterprise's energy-saving target. The authors will investigate the hypothesis of this paper in the context of multiple case studies that they plan to undertake in the future. - Highlights: • We employ a case study-based approach to study policy implementation in China. • Local governments have played a major role in implementing energy-saving policies. • Local public agencies collaborated in implementing five types of policy measures. • Local policy measures reduced barriers to energy saving at industrial enterprises. • Enterprises and local governments work together to achieve energy-saving targets

  17. Government-to-private sector energy programs: Identification of common elements leading to successful implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockton, Keith M.

    This dissertation examines six distinct government energy programs implemented in the United States during the last three decades. A common element within these programs is an attempt by government to drive commercialization of energy technologies leading to changes in energy production or consumptive behavior. We seek to understand the factors that lead to success or failure of these programs with two goals in mind. The first is theoretical in that we test a hypothesis that market-based energy programs have substantially higher success rates than command-and-control programs. The second goal is operational in nature, in which we desire to identify common factors within energy programs that lead either to program success or to failure. We investigate and evaluate three market-based and three command-and-control energy programs. The market-based programs include the federal Corporate Average Fuel Economy and Sulfur Dioxide Emissions Control programs as well as Colorado's Amendment 37. The command-and-control programs include the federal Synthetic Fuels Corporation and Corn Based Ethanol programs as well as Colorado's Solar Electric Power program. We conduct the analysis of each program based on composite methodology derived from leading academics within the Policy Sciences. From our research findings, we conclude that both market-based and command-and-control programs can achieve their legislative goals and objectives, resulting in permanent changes in energy production or consumptive behavior. However, we also find that the economic efficiency is the differentiator between market-based and command-and-control programs. Market-based programs, because of the inherent flexibility, allow participants to react to changing economic and/or technical conditions. In contrast, command-and-control programs lack such flexibility and often result in economic inefficiency when economic conditions change. The financial incentives incorporated in the three command

  18. The governing body nurse as a clinical commissioning group nurse leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Angela; Minogue, Virginia

    2017-02-22

    Aim The aim of this study was to understand governing body nurses' perspective of their effect on, and leadership of, clinical commissioning groups (CCGs). Method Semi-structured face-to-face and telephone interviews were conducted with a sample of governing body nurses, CCG chairs and regional chief nurses. A total of 23 individuals were interviewed. Findings Governing body nurses were overwhelmingly positive about their role and believed they had a positive effect on the CCG governing body. Specifically, they provided leadership for the quality agenda and compassionate practice. Challenges experienced by some governing body nurses related to their capacity to undertake the role where this was on a part-time basis, time restraints and difficulties working with colleagues. Conclusion The role of the governing body nurse was not well defined when it was introduced, and as a result its development across CCGs has varied. Governing body nurses have used their leadership skills to advance important agendas for their profession, such as workforce redesign, new integrated care pathways and co-commissioned services.

  19. Organizing and implementing a multidisciplinary fast track oncology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basta, Y L; Tytgat, K M A J; Greuter, H H; Klinkenbijl, J H G; Fockens, P; Strikwerda, J

    2017-11-01

    Patients with gastrointestinal malignancies often need multiple appointments with different medical specialists, causing waiting times to accrue. In our hospital, care is organized in a sequential manner, causing long waiting times. To reduce this, a fast track outpatient clinic (FTC) was implemented. The FTC was organized within the hospital's existing structure. Patient centered care was achieved by ensuring that the medical specialists visit the patient, implementing nurse coordinators and considering patient wishes and co-morbidities when formulating a treatment plan. A mandate from the board (Top-down), ensured cooperation between different medical departments and a change in resource allocation (i.e. medical staff); a horizontal clinic across a vertical departmental structure. Brainstorm sessions between the departments led by two physicians who were going to work at the FTC (Bottom-up), assured a swift implementation of the FTC. Since implementation in 2009, patient influx has tripled. Waiting time for an appointment and start of treatment was reduced from 2-4 weeks to 6 working days and from 12-14 weeks to 17 working days, respectively. This was achieved by re-allocating recourses, but without increasing existing resources. The combination of a top-down and bottom-up strategy ensured participation from all involved departments, a strong foundation and a shared vision on patient centered care. The FTC facilitates sharing information between different medical specialists through both proximity and a shared electronic patient record. The implementation of the FTC comprises a change in organization, but not a change in structure. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  20. Pediatric eMental healthcare technologies: a systematic review of implementation foci in research studies, and government and organizational documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehring, Nicole D; McGrath, Patrick; Wozney, Lori; Soleimani, Amir; Bennett, Kathryn; Hartling, Lisa; Huguet, Anna; Dyson, Michele P; Newton, Amanda S

    2017-06-21

    Researchers, healthcare planners, and policymakers convey a sense of urgency in using eMental healthcare technologies to improve pediatric mental healthcare availability and access. Yet, different stakeholders may focus on different aspects of implementation. We conducted a systematic review to identify implementation foci in research studies and government/organizational documents for eMental healthcare technologies for pediatric mental healthcare. A search of eleven electronic databases and grey literature was conducted. We included research studies and documents from organization and government websites if the focus included eMental healthcare technology for children/adolescents (0-18 years), and implementation was studied and reported (research studies) or goals/recommendations regarding implementation were made (documents). We assessed study quality using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool and document quality using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research & Evaluation II. Implementation information was grouped according to Proctor and colleagues' implementation outcomes-acceptability, adoption, appropriateness, cost, feasibility, fidelity, penetration, and sustainability-and grouped separately for studies and documents. Twenty research studies and nine government/organizational documents met eligibility criteria. These articles represented implementation of eMental healthcare technologies in the USA (14 studies), United Kingdom (2 documents, 3 studies), Canada (2 documents, 1 study), Australia (4 documents, 1 study), New Zealand (1 study), and the Netherlands (1 document). The quality of research studies was excellent (n = 11), good (n = 6), and poor (n = 1). These eMental health studies focused on the acceptability (70%, n = 14) and appropriateness (50%, n = 10) of eMental healthcare technologies to users and mental healthcare professionals. The quality of government and organizational documents was high (n = 2), medium (n = 6

  1. Use of RSS feeds for the implementation of clinical reminder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Wen-Chou; Wen, Chia-Hsien; Lin, Chih-Yu; Poon, Sek-Kwong; Huang, Shih-Che

    2012-06-01

    A computer-based reminder system can help physicians get right information and make right decisions in daily clinical work in time. This study presents a RSS-based Clinical Reminding System (RCRS) designed for reminding clinicians to deal with their varied unfinished clinical works. The RCRS was implemented in a hospital to automatically generate messages for every clinician on the basis of clinical information gathered from the hospital information system (HIS) and send them by RSS feed. In order to allow all physicians to participate in the project, the RCRS was integrated with the Computerized Physician Order Entry (COPE) system to provide messages whenever a clinician logs in the HIS; the connection on screen lets the clinician easily make some response. The system can help clinicians focus on patient care without keeping track of the schedule of clinical chores stored in various systems. Two physicians, also directors from Clinical Informatics Research & Development Center (CIRD) who were appointed as project leaders of the RCRS project who went through the entire development process were chosen as interviewees to obtain a preliminary evaluation of the system. The results show the "Information Content" of this system was suggested to be modified, and "Information Accuracy", "Formats", "Ease of use" and "Timeliness" of the system were appropriate to meet the system design purposes.

  2. Development of a framework towards successful implementation of e-governance initiatives in health sector in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Subhasis; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the route map for employing efficient e-governance so that at least existing resource and infrastructure are better utilized and deficiencies are tracked for future planning. National health is one of the most important factors in a country's economic growth. India seems to be a victim of the vicious cycle around poor economy and poor health conditions. A detailed study was carried out to find out India's healthcare infrastructure and its standing in e-governance initiatives. After consolidating the fact that effective e-governance can enhance the quality of healthcare service even within limited resources, authors explored success and failure factors of many e-governance initiatives in India and abroad. Finally, an e-governance framework is suggested based on the above factors together with the authors' own experience of implementing e-governance projects in India and abroad. The suggested framework is based on a phased implementation approach. The first phase "Information Dissemination" is more geared towards breaking the "digital divide" across three dimensions: G2Business; G2Citizen; and G2Agent. The most advanced stage is aimed towards joining up healthcare information across the above three dimensions and drawing meaningful analytics out of it. The recommendations also include management of Policies, Scope, Process Reform, Infrastructure, Technology, Finance, Partnership and People for efficient implementation of such e-governance initiatives. The paper provides measures for continuous evaluation of systems as one passes through various stages of implementation. However, the framework can be tested on real or simulated environment to prove its worthiness. This paper can be a potential frame of reference for nation-wide e-healthcare projects not only in India but also in other developing countries. The paper also describes challenges that are most likely to be faced during implementation. Since the paper is practical in

  3. Content and implementation of new legislation governing atomic safety and radiation protection in the GDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ifflaender, G.

    1987-01-01

    In the regulatory framework of the GDR all measures aiming to ensure the safe use of atomic energy are defined by the term Atomic Safety and Radiation Protection, where atomic safety includes nuclear safety, physical protection and nuclear material control. In 1984, a new Atomic Energy Act went into effect followed, in 1985, by the new Ordinance on the Assurance of Atomic Safety and Radiation Protection and the pertaining Executory Provision. Section 2 of the Ordinance defines the following goals for the safe use of atomic energy: (1) the protection of life and health of man, and, from the genetic point of view, also of future generations from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation; (2) the protection of the environment from radioactive contamination, in particular by the careful handling of radioactive materials and safe disposal of radioactive wastes; (3) the protection of workers in nuclear facilities and of members of the public in their surroundings, and of material assets by strict observance and implementation of nuclear safety and radiation protection measures; (4) the protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities from any criminal attacks and unauthorized interference; and (5) the fulfilment of the Safeguards Agreement concluded between the Government of the GDR and the IAEA by accounting for the use of nuclear material exclusively for peaceful purposes. Under Section 6 of the Atomic Energy Act, the National Board for Atomic Safety and Radiation Protection (SAAS) is the competent authority for the state control in the field of protection against the risks from the use of atomic energy, which is exercised by licensing and surveillance as described in this report. Other topics also dealt with in more detail are the in-plant organization of atomic safety and radiation protection and the powers of the regulatory body to impose enforcement measures and sanctions in the event of non-compliance with the pertinent provisions. (author)

  4. Factors Influencing the Selection of the Systems Integration Organizational Model Type for Planning and Implementing Government High-Technology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Leann; Utley, Dawn

    2006-01-01

    While there has been extensive research in defining project organizational structures for traditional projects, little research exists to support high technology government project s organizational structure definition. High-Technology Government projects differ from traditional projects in that they are non-profit, span across Government-Industry organizations, typically require significant integration effort, and are strongly susceptible to a volatile external environment. Systems Integration implementation has been identified as a major contributor to both project success and failure. The literature research bridges program management organizational planning, systems integration, organizational theory, and independent project reports, in order to assess Systems Integration (SI) organizational structure selection for improving the high-technology government project s probability of success. This paper will describe the methodology used to 1) Identify and assess SI organizational structures and their success rate, and 2) Identify key factors to be used in the selection of these SI organizational structures during the acquisition strategy process.

  5. Key performance indicators for government and non profit agencies: implementing winning KPIs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parmenter, David

    2012-01-01

    "Winning techniques and strategies for nonprofits and government agencies in creating successful and critical key performance indicatorsBy exploring measures that have transformed businesses, David...

  6. Implementation of Clinical Quality Management for Rehabilitation in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engkasan, Julia Patrick; Stucki, Gerold; Ali, Sadeeq; Yusof, Yusniza Mohd; Hussain, Hafez; Latif, Lydia Abdul

    2018-04-18

    In February 2017, the World Health Organization (WHO) launched its historic "Rehabilitation 2030: A Call for Action". Scaling up rehabilitation in health systems requires concerted action across all 6 components of WHO's Health Systems Framework. For rehabilitation, information about functioning is essential, as it is required for effective rehabilitation at all levels of the health system. What is missing is a countrywide demonstration project involving the implementation of a clinical quality management system for the continuous improvement of rehabilitation, both at the level of clinical care for individual patients and at the level of rehabilitation service provision. Consequently, the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at the University of Malaya and University Malaya Medical Centre, together with the Cheras Rehabilitation Hospital of the Ministry of Health, and the Social Security Organisation (SOCSO) Rehabilitation Centre in Malacca, Malaysia, initiated a project to develop a Malaysian-wide clinical quality management system for rehabilitation (CQM-R Malaysia). The objective of this paper is to describe CQM-R Malaysia. First, a conceptual description of a CQM-R based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) is set out. The methods, results and conclusions of a situation analysis conducted in January 2017 are then reported. Finally, the building blocks and implementation action plan developed for CQM-R Malaysia are presented.

  7. Implementation of Clinical Quality Management for Rehabilitation in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Patrick Engkasan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In February 2017, the World Health Organization (WHO launched its historic ”Rehabilitation 2030: A Call for Action”. Scaling up rehabilitation in health systems requires concerted action across all 6 components of WHO’s Health Systems Framework. For rehabilitation, information about functioning is essential, as it is required for effective rehabilitation at all levels of the health system. What is missing is a countrywide demonstration project involving the implementation of a clinical quality management system for the continuous improvement of rehabilitation, both at the level of clinical care for individual patients and at the level of rehabilitation service provision. Consequently, the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at the University of Malaya and University Malaya Medical Centre, together with the Cheras Rehabilitation Hospital of the Ministry of Health, and the Social Security Organisation (SOCSO Rehabilitation Centre in Malacca, Malaysia, initiated a project to develop a Malaysian-wide clinical quality management system for rehabilitation (CQM-R Malaysia. The objective of this paper is to describe CQM-R Malaysia. First, a conceptual description of a CQM-R based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF is set out. The methods, results and conclusions of a situation analysis conducted in January 2017 are then reported. Finally, the building blocks and implementation action plan developed for CQM-R Malaysia are presented.

  8. Implementation of collaborative governance in cross-sector innovation and education networks: evidence from the National Health Service in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovseiko, Pavel V; O'Sullivan, Catherine; Powell, Susan C; Davies, Stephen M; Buchan, Alastair M

    2014-11-08

    Increasingly, health policy-makers and managers all over the world look for alternative forms of organisation and governance in order to add more value and quality to their health systems. In recent years, the central government in England mandated several cross-sector health initiatives based on collaborative governance arrangements. However, there is little empirical evidence that examines local implementation responses to such centrally-mandated collaborations. Data from the national study of Health Innovation and Education Clusters (HIECs) are used to provide comprehensive empirical evidence about the implementation of collaborative governance arrangements in cross-sector health networks in England. The study employed a mixed-methods approach, integrating both quantitative and qualitative data from a national survey of the entire population of HIEC directors (N = 17; response rate = 100%), a group discussion with 7 HIEC directors, and 15 in-depth interviews with HIEC directors and chairs. The study provides a description and analysis of local implementation responses to the central government mandate to establish HIECs. The latter represent cross-sector health networks characterised by a vague mandate with the provision of a small amount of new resources. Our findings indicate that in the case of HIECs such a mandate resulted in the creation of rather fluid and informal partnerships, which over the period of three years made partial-to-full progress on governance activities and, in most cases, did not become self-sustaining without government funding. This study has produced valuable insights into the implementation responses in HIECs and possibly other cross-sector collaborations characterised by a vague mandate with the provision of a small amount of new resources. There is little evidence that local dominant coalitions appropriated the central HIEC mandate to their own ends. On the other hand, there is evidence of interpretation and implementation of the

  9. Implementation of landslide susceptibility maps in Lower Austria as part of risk governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Rainer; Petschko, Helene; Bauer, Christian; Glade, Thomas; Granica, Klaus; Heiss, Gerhard; Leopold, Philip; Pomaroli, Gilbert; Proske, Herwig; Schweigl, Joachim

    2013-04-01

    Landslides frequently cause damage to agricultural land and infrastructure in Lower Austria - a province of Austria. Also settlements and people are threatened by landslides. To reduce landslide risks and to prevent the establishment of new settlements in highly landslide prone areas, the project "MoNOE" (Method development for landslide susceptibility modeling in Lower Austria) was set up by the provincial government. The main aim of the project is the development of methods to model rock fall and slide susceptibility for an area of approx. 15,900 km2 and to implement the resulting susceptibility maps into the spatial planning strategies of the state. Right from the beginning of the project a close cooperation between the involved scientists and the stakeholders from the Geological Survey of Lower Austria and the Department of Spatial Planning and Regional Policy of Lower Austria was established to ensure that method development and final susceptibility maps meet exactly the needs and demands of the stakeholders. This posed huge challenges, together with its realization in the large study area and a (heterogeneous) complex geological situation,. Limitations were given by restricted data availability (e.g. for geology or landslide inventories) in such a large study area. Rock fall susceptibility was modeled by a combined approach of determining rock fall release areas by empirical slope thresholds (dependent on geology) followed by empirical run-out modeling. Slide susceptibility was modeled based on the statistical approaches of weights of evidence (WofE) and generalized additive models (GAM) by two different research groups. Huge efforts were spent on the validation of all susceptibility models. In a later stage of the project we found that the best scientific maps are not necessarily the best maps to be implemented in spatial planning strategies. Thus, in close cooperation with the stakeholders, decisions had to be taken to find the best resolution of the maps

  10. Improving the implementation of health workforce policies through governance : a review of case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieleman, Marjolein; Shaw, Daniel Mp; Zwanikken, Prisca A C

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Responsible governance is crucial to national development and a catalyst for achieving the Millennium Development Goals. To date, governance seems to have been a neglected issue in the field of human resources for health (HRH), which could be an important reason why HRH policy

  11. Improving the implementation of health workforce policies through governance: a review of case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieleman, M.; Shaw, D.M.P.; Zwanikken, P.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Responsible governance is crucial to national development and a catalyst for achieving the Millennium Development Goals. To date, governance seems to have been a neglected issue in the field of human resources for health (HRH), which could be an important reason why HRH policy

  12. Study and implementation of foreign experience of professional competence increase of governing bodies officials in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Cherchatyi

    2014-06-01

    The authors accentuate, that the professional competence increase of governing bodies officials and officials of local self-government should be organized in the accordance with principles of system and practical directivity in the conditions of wide innovative technologies use, corresponding to up-to-datedness.

  13. The research and implementation of a unified identity authentication in e-government network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhou

    Current problem existing in e-government network is that the applications of information system are developed independently by various departments, and each has its own specific set of authentication and access control mechanism. To build a comprehensive information system in favor of sharing and exchanging information, a sound and secure unified e-government authentication system is firstly needed. The paper, combining with practical development of e-government network, carries out a thorough discussion on how to achieve data synchronization between unified authentication system and related application systems.

  14. Performance assessment, social accountability and sustainability governance in Hangzhou: Leveraging the implementation gap?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delman, Jørgen

    This is an explorative case study that examines how ideas and concepts relating to sustainable development are factored into new approaches to urban governance in Hangzhou. The proposition is that traditional performance assessment procedures combined with innovative surveys of the city government......’s social accountability and with various forms of social participation have created a new framework for urban governance, both conceptually and as a series of practical measures. More specifically, the study examines a dramatic redesign of the performance assessment system in Hangzhou aimed at developing...

  15. Government management and implementation of national real-time energy monitoring system for China large-scale public building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na Wei; Wu Yong; Song Yan; Dong Zhongcheng

    2009-01-01

    The supervision of energy efficiency in government office buildings and large-scale public buildings (GOBLPB) is the main embodiment for government implementation of Public Administration in the fields of resource saving and environmental protection. It is significant for China government to achieve the target: reducing building energy consumption by 11 million ton standard coal before 2010. In the framework of a national demonstration project concerning the energy management system, Shenzhen Municipality has been selected for the implementation of the system. A data acquisition system and a methodology concerning the energy consumption of the GOBLPB have been developed. This paper summarizes the various features of the system incorporated into identifying the building consumes and energy saving potential. This paper also defines the methods to achieve the real-time monitoring and diagnosis: the meters installed at each building, the data transmitted through internet to a center server, the analysis and unification at the center server and the publication through web. Furthermore, this paper introduces the plans to implement the system and to extend countrywide. Finally, this paper presents some measurements to achieve a common benefit community in implementation of building energy efficiency supervisory system on GOBLPB in its construction, reconstruction or operation stages.

  16. Commissioning and clinical implementation of HDR brachytherapy in El Salvador

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales Lopez, Jorge Luis; Castillo, Luis Frank; Castillo Bahi, Ramon del

    2009-01-01

    The Gynecologic Cancer is one of the best known malignancies in different countries of the world, with a high incidence in developing countries. In the treatment of this disease have been used multiple treatment arms among which is the high rate brachytherapy (HDR). The IAEA has put much emphasis on supporting all programs to treat this disease and in this context within the project 'Human Resource Development and Nuclear Technology Support', collaborated with the dispatch of experts on mission ELS0006 01 'Assistance to the ICES in HDR brachytherapy initiating Treatments at the Cancer Institute of El Salvador 'Dr. Narciso Diaz Bazan' in San Salvador, El Salvador. The process of commissioning and implementing clinical service Brachytherapy High Dose Rate (HDR BT) is a relatively complex process that begins with the formation of functional and technical service, based on flow patients to be treated, availability of local technological capability to install, and culminates with the preparation and implementation of protocols. Experts involved in the implementation of this service divided this task in stages organized chronologically: 1st. Study of existing infrastructure and level of training of technical personnel available, 2nd. Proposal and application of amendments in order to adapt the facility to the planned patient flow and optimal use of technological infrastructure, 3rd. Establishment of the process of securing the disposable waste materials and not required, 4th. Performance of tests of physical commissioning clinical dosimetry and instrumentation unit, surgical and therapeutic, 5th. Training of technical personnel, 6th. Preparation of clinical protocol and 7th. Initiation and development of treatment for patients. All these steps are carried out with the integration and consensus of the entire multidisciplinary team that makes up the service and with the support of the administration as a prerequisite. Within two weeks the service was modified according to

  17. Local governments and climate change: sustainable energy planning and implementation in small and medium sized communities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Van Staden, Maryke; Musco, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    The focus of 'Local governments and climate change' is on how small and medium-sized communities in Europe are effectively responding to climate change, with a particular focus on different approaches...

  18. The status of vaccine availability and associated factors in Tshwane government clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngcobo, Ntombenhle Judith; Kamupira, Mercy G

    2017-05-24

    Vaccines have greatly contributed to the control of vaccine-preventable diseases and to human development. Efforts by many countries to introduce new vaccines are a significant move towards achieving the sustainable development goal for health. However, effective vaccine supply chains that ensure an uninterrupted supply of vaccines are pivotal to attaining universal access to life-saving vaccines and sustainable development. The introduction of new vaccines puts a strain on supply chains; South Africa (SA) is no exception, as there are indications of vaccine stock-outs in clinics. To establish the status of vaccine availability and associated factors in government health facilities of Tshwane Health District in Gauteng Province, SA. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of randomly selected government clinics in the Tshwane health district of Gauteng Province. Data were collected using a structured measurement instrument in participating clinics. Data were analysed using Excel-based software (Microsoft, USA). A total of 31 clinics participated. In the preceding 12 months, clinics had experienced vaccine stock-outs, especially of the three newer vaccines: pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, rotavirus and Pentaxim. These were also out of stock for a long duration; for over 2 weeks in a majority of clinics. The causes of vaccine stock-outs were: poor management of stock, district depot out of stock, unreliable deliveries, lack of pharmacy assistants and limited fridge capacity. Further burdening the situation is the ineffective emergency-ordering system. Significant shortages of vaccines, which are essential drugs, occur in Tshwane government clinics. Vaccine supply chain issues and vaccine shortages should be treated as a priority at all levels of the healthcare system; therefore, a similar study should be conducted at national level. It is recommended that the vaccine supply chain should be restructured and overhauled with the use of advances in technology

  19. The status of vaccine availability and associated factors in Tshwane government clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ntombenhle Judith Ngcobo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Vaccines have greatly contributed to the control of vaccine-preventable diseases and to human development. Efforts by many countries to introduce new vaccines are a significant move towards achieving the sustainable development goal for health. However, effective vaccine supply chains that ensure an uninterrupted supply of vaccines are pivotal to attaining universal access to life-saving vaccines and sustainable development. The introduction of new vaccines puts a strain on supply chains; South Africa (SA is no exception, as there are indications of vaccine stock-outs in clinics. Objective. To establish the status of vaccine availability and associated factors in government health facilities of Tshwane Health District in Gauteng Province, SA. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of randomly selected government clinics in the Tshwane health district of Gauteng Province. Data were collected using a structured measurement instrument in participating clinics. Data were analysed using Excel-based software (Microsoft, USA. Results. A total of 31 clinics participated. In the preceding 12 months, clinics had experienced vaccine stock-outs, especially of the three newer vaccines: pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, rotavirus and Pentaxim. These were also out of stock for a long duration; for over 2 weeks in a majority of clinics. The causes of vaccine stock-outs were: poor management of stock, district depot out of stock, unreliable deliveries, lack of pharmacy assistants and limited fridge capacity. Further burdening the situation is the ineffective emergency-ordering system. Conclusion. Significant shortages of vaccines, which are essential drugs, occur in Tshwane government clinics. Vaccine supply chain issues and vaccine shortages should be treated as a priority at all levels of the healthcare system; therefore, a similar study should be conducted at national level. It is recommended that the vaccine supply chain should

  20. MRI for clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis: an implemented program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Michael M.; Gustas, Cristy N.; Choudhary, Arabinda K.; Methratta, Sosamma T.; Hulse, Michael A.; Eggli, Kathleen D.; Boal, Danielle K.B. [Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Mail Code H066, 500 University Drive, P.O. Box 850, Hershey, PA (United States); Geeting, Glenn [Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine, Hershey, PA (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Emergent MRI is now a viable alternative to CT for evaluating appendicitis while avoiding the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation. However, primary employment of MRI in the setting of clinically suspected pediatric appendicitis has remained significantly underutilized. To describe our institution's development and the results of a fully implemented clinical program using MRI as the primary imaging evaluation for children with suspected appendicitis. A four-sequence MRI protocol consisting of coronal and axial single-shot turbo spin-echo (SS-TSE) T2, coronal spectral adiabatic inversion recovery (SPAIR), and axial SS-TSE T2 with fat saturation was performed on 208 children, ages 3 to 17 years, with clinically suspected appendicitis. No intravenous or oral contrast material was administered. No sedation was administered. Data collection includes two separate areas: time parameter analysis and MRI diagnostic results. Diagnostic accuracy of MRI for pediatric appendicitis indicated a sensitivity of 97.6% (CI: 87.1-99.9%), specificity 97.0% (CI: 93.2-99.0%), positive predictive value 88.9% (CI: 76.0-96.3%), and negative predictive value 99.4% (CI: 96.6-99.9%). Time parameter analysis indicated clinical feasibility, with time requested to first sequence obtained mean of 78.7 +/- 52.5 min, median 65 min; first-to-last sequence time stamp mean 14.2 +/- 8.8 min, median 12 min; last sequence to report mean 57.4 +/- 35.2 min, median 46 min. Mean age was 11.2 +/- 3.6 years old. Girls represented 57% of patients. MRI is an effective and efficient method of imaging children with clinically suspected appendicitis. Using an expedited four-sequence protocol, sensitivity and specificity are comparable to CT while avoiding the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  1. Clinical implementation of RNA signatures for pharmacogenomic decision-making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang W

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Weihua Tang1, Zhiyuan Hu2, Hind Muallem1, Margaret L Gulley1,21Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, 2Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina, NC, USAAbstract: RNA profiling is increasingly used to predict drug response, dose, or toxicity based on analysis of drug pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic pathways. Before implementing multiplexed RNA arrays in clinical practice, validation studies are carried out to demonstrate sufficient evidence of analytic and clinical performance, and to establish an assay protocol with quality assurance measures. Pathologists assure quality by selecting input tissue and by interpreting results in the context of the input tissue as well as the technologies that were used and the clinical setting in which the test was ordered. A strength of RNA profiling is the array-based measurement of tens to thousands of RNAs at once, including redundant tests for critical analytes or pathways to promote confidence in test results. Instrument and reagent manufacturers are crucial for supplying reliable components of the test system. Strategies for quality assurance include careful attention to RNA preservation and quality checks at pertinent steps in the assay protocol, beginning with specimen collection and proceeding through the various phases of transport, processing, storage, analysis, interpretation, and reporting. Specimen quality is checked by probing housekeeping transcripts, while spiked and exogenous controls serve as a check on analytic performance of the test system. Software is required to manipulate abundant array data and present it for interpretation by a laboratory physician who reports results in a manner facilitating therapeutic decision-making. Maintenance of the assay requires periodic documentation of personnel competency and laboratory proficiency. These strategies are shepherding genomic arrays into clinical settings to provide added

  2. Need for revisiting the role of sexually transmitted disease clinics in government hospitals in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhulekha Bhattacharya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Government of India provides treatment for sexually transmitted infections (STIs through government's sexually transmitted disease (STD clinics with the mandate of providing curative and preventive services for clients in the context of STIs. However, besides the patients suffering from STDs, other clients with problems related to reproductive and sexual health also attend these clinics. This study aimed to assess the profile and treatment-seeking behavior of clients attending STD clinics in government hospitals in India. Materials and Methods: This multicentric, cross-sectional study with 5098 participants was conducted over 2 months in identified 19 Indian states. Chi–square test was used for statistical analysis. Results: The percentage with STDs (62.98% was nearly double than those with non-STDs (37.1%. Around 8.2% of patients had an STD and were also HIV positive. Compared to the total STD cases, only 9% of the partners had turned up for screening. Of significance were the non-STD cases who presented with both physical and psychological symptoms including infertility. Among males, it was mainly sexual dysfunction and balanoposthitis, and in females, lower abdominal pain and bacterial vaginosis. Only 27.3% reported that they had come directly to the government facility/clinic. Nearly 38% of males and 30% of females had tried home remedies before coming to the government clinic. Majority (77.9% of the clients reported that they had never been counseled on any aspect of STD or HIV. Conclusion: The profile of clients in the various clinics across the country indicates that the name “STD Clinic” is a misnomer since the presenting complaints of clients are varied, and related not only to STDs but also to other reproductive tract problems. Furthermore, the average new patient load observed in our study is low and this was attributed to the name “STDs” given to these clinics. Renaming them as “Reproductive Health

  3. Clinical audit and quality systems - practical implementation in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaervinen, H.

    2003-01-01

    Clinical audit is a new concept of significant importance for the quality of radiological practices, introduced by the EC Medical Exposure Directive (MED, 97/43/EURATOM). By definition, clinical audit means 'a systematic examination or review of medical radiological procedures which seeks to improve the quality and the outcome of patient care, through structured review whereby radiological practices, procedures, and results are examined against agreed standards for good medical radiological procedures, with modifications of the practices where indicated and the application of new standards if necessary'. In its most profound meaning, being introduced in the medical exposure directive, clinical audit can be seen as a review of the success in implementing the justification and optimization principles, and therefore, it is to a large extent an issue of radiation safety for the patient. According to the directive, clinical audits shall be 'carried out in accordance with national procedures'. For the last few years, parallel to the development of the MED in Europe, there has been a worldwide tendency to implement appropriate quality systems (QS) in the health care organizations, in accordance with the international quality standards (ISO 9000 series etc). Such quality systems have been applied for a long time and very widely by the industry. It is a strong belief that the development of quality systems for health care would result in equal benefits as trusted in industry, in terms of efficiency and safety of health care services. For radiological practices, the quality systems are expected to become a framework for improving the optimization of practices and for maintaining good radiation safety, as well as providing a mechanism to prevent mistakes and accidents. In some countries, like the UK and The Netherlands, there are legal requirements to establish and maintain quality systems at certain type of radiological units. In some countries and some radiological units

  4. THE RISK OF FRAUD WITHOUT IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PILLARS OF CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AT THE LEVEL OF CREDIT INSTITUTIONS IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLAD MARIANA

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the authors seek to emphasize the risk factors that may occur due to not implementing or faultyimplementation of corporate governance for credit institutions, and its role in fraud prevention and detection. To avoidinappropriate governance, top management should have special preoccupations for the development of strategies,developing internal control policies by which to determine and evaluate the risks of the organization. Corporategovernance starts with a broad range of beneficiaries (stakeholders who contribute with resources to an organization(investments, taxes, charitable contributions, etc. Those members are the direct and indirect beneficiaries of theorganizational unit to be regulated. Corporate governance involving several parties: the leadership board, the internalauditors or those of the external environment. In some cases, regulatory authorities or professional associations,contribute to this process.

  5. Effectiveness-implementation hybrid designs: combining elements of clinical effectiveness and implementation research to enhance public health impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Geoffrey M; Bauer, Mark; Mittman, Brian; Pyne, Jeffrey M; Stetler, Cheryl

    2012-03-01

    This study proposes methods for blending design components of clinical effectiveness and implementation research. Such blending can provide benefits over pursuing these lines of research independently; for example, more rapid translational gains, more effective implementation strategies, and more useful information for decision makers. This study proposes a "hybrid effectiveness-implementation" typology, describes a rationale for their use, outlines the design decisions that must be faced, and provides several real-world examples. An effectiveness-implementation hybrid design is one that takes a dual focus a priori in assessing clinical effectiveness and implementation. We propose 3 hybrid types: (1) testing effects of a clinical intervention on relevant outcomes while observing and gathering information on implementation; (2) dual testing of clinical and implementation interventions/strategies; and (3) testing of an implementation strategy while observing and gathering information on the clinical intervention's impact on relevant outcomes. The hybrid typology proposed herein must be considered a construct still in evolution. Although traditional clinical effectiveness and implementation trials are likely to remain the most common approach to moving a clinical intervention through from efficacy research to public health impact, judicious use of the proposed hybrid designs could speed the translation of research findings into routine practice.

  6. Challenges of implementing fibromyalgia treatment guidelines in current clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Lesley M; Clauw, Daniel J

    2017-09-01

    The current diagnostic and treatment pathway for patients with fibromyalgia (FM) is lengthy, complex, and characterized by multiple physician visits with an average 2-year wait until diagnosis. It is clear that effective identification and appropriate treatment of FM remain a challenge in current clinical practice. Ideally, FM management involves a multidisciplinary approach with the preferable patient pathway originating in primary care but supported by a range of health care providers, including referral to specialist care when necessary. After the publication of individual clinical studies, high-quality reviews, and meta-analyses, recently published FM treatment guidelines have transitioned from an expert consensus to an evidence-based approach. Evidence-based guidelines provide a framework for ensuring early diagnosis and timely adoption of appropriate treatment. However, for successful outcomes, FM treatments must adopt a more holistic approach, which addresses more than just pain. Impact on the associated symptoms of fatigue and cognitive problems, sleep and mood disturbances, and lowered functional status are also important in judging the success of FM therapy. Recently published guidelines recommend the adoption of a symptom-based approach to guide pharmacologic treatment. Emerging treatment options for FM may be best differentiated on the basis of their effect on comorbid symptoms that are often associated with pain (e.g. sleep disturbance, mood, fatigue). The current review discusses the most recently published Canadian guidelines and the implications of the recent European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations, with a focus on the challenges of implementing these guidelines in current clinical practice.

  7. Poster - 34: Clinical Implementation of Prone Breast Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Runqing; Fleming, Katrina; Kobeleva, Sofya; Osei, Ernest [Grand River Regional Cancer Centre (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: Prone breast treatment is used to reduce acute and late toxicities for large or pendulous breast patients. This study developed and implemented the clinical workflow of prone breast radiotherapy treatment. Methods: Varian kVue Access360™ Prone Breast Couchtop was used as prone breast board. The treatment planning (TP)is performed in Eclipse TP system. TP comparisons between supine deep inspiration breathing hold (DIBH) and prone breast; prone forward field-in-field (FinF) planning and inverse IMRT planning were performed and discussed. For the daily setup, breast coverage was assessed in the room using light field and MV imaging was used at day 1 and weekly. Results: The first ten patients are CT scanned and planned both supine and prone. The coverage was all excellent for supine DIBH plan and prone breast plan. The plan in the prone position demonstrated improvements in lung sparing comparing to the DIBH plan. Both forward FinF plan and inverse IMRT plan achieved acceptable coverage of the breast, and heart dose is comparable. Considering the daily setup variations and MLC leakage, forward FinF plan was recommended for routine clinical use. The procedure has been tested in phantom and patients were treated clinically. Conclusions: Prone breast irradiation has been advocated for women with large pendulous breasts in order to decrease acute and late toxicities. The workflow for prone breast radiation therapy has been developed and the technique is ready to treat patients.

  8. Second inter-association evaluation of the PNLCC implementation. PNLCC 2000-2003: The Government economizes its energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-11-01

    A group of associations (RAC-F, FNE, WWF, ''les amis de la terre'', CLER, Greenpeace, Helio international, Hespul, ''energies et territoires'', Detente, ''sortir du nucleaire'') realized its own 2002 evaluation of the PNLCC implementation. For each chapters of the Plan (industry, transports, buildings, agriculture and forests, wastes, energy production and conservation and cooling gases, the document takes stock on the actions decided and realized and shows the deficiencies of the government management. (A.L.B.)

  9. ISSUES ON BUILDING KAZAKHSTAN GEOSPATIAL PORTAL TO IMPLEMENT E-GOVERNMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sagadiyev

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A main issue in developing e-government is about how to integrate and organize many complicated processes and different stakeholders. Interestingly geospatial information provides an efficient framework to integrate and organized them. In particular, it is very useful to integrate the process of land management in e-government with geospatial information framework, since most of land management tasks are related with geospatial properties. In this paper, we present a use-case on the e-government project in Kazakhstan for land management. We develop a geoportal to connect many tasks and different users via geospatial information framework. This geoportal is based on open source geospatial software including GeoServer, PostGIS, and OpenLayers. With this geoportal, we expect three achievements as follows. First we establish a transparent governmental process, which is one of main goal of e-government. Every stakeholder monitors what is happening in land management process. Second, we can significantly reduce the time and efforts in the government process. For example, a grant procedure for a building construction has taken more than one year with more than 50 steps. It is expected that this procedure would be reduced to 2 weeks by the geoportal framework. Third we provide a collaborative environment between different governmental structures via the geoportal, while many conflicts and mismatches have been a critical issue of governmental administration processes.

  10. Issues on Building Kazakhstan Geospatial Portal to Implement E-Government

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagadiyev, K.; Kang, H. K.; Li, K. J.

    2016-06-01

    A main issue in developing e-government is about how to integrate and organize many complicated processes and different stakeholders. Interestingly geospatial information provides an efficient framework to integrate and organized them. In particular, it is very useful to integrate the process of land management in e-government with geospatial information framework, since most of land management tasks are related with geospatial properties. In this paper, we present a use-case on the e-government project in Kazakhstan for land management. We develop a geoportal to connect many tasks and different users via geospatial information framework. This geoportal is based on open source geospatial software including GeoServer, PostGIS, and OpenLayers. With this geoportal, we expect three achievements as follows. First we establish a transparent governmental process, which is one of main goal of e-government. Every stakeholder monitors what is happening in land management process. Second, we can significantly reduce the time and efforts in the government process. For example, a grant procedure for a building construction has taken more than one year with more than 50 steps. It is expected that this procedure would be reduced to 2 weeks by the geoportal framework. Third we provide a collaborative environment between different governmental structures via the geoportal, while many conflicts and mismatches have been a critical issue of governmental administration processes.

  11. Using an International Medical Advisory Board to guide clinical governance in a corporate refractive surgery model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukich, John A

    2009-07-01

    To describe the role played by the International Medical Advisory Board (IMAB) in clinical and corporate governance at Optical Express, a corporate provider of refractive surgery. A review of goals, objectives, and actions of the IMAB. The IMAB has contributed to study design, data analysis, and selection of instruments and procedures. Through interactions with Optical Express corporate and clinical staff, the IMAB has supported management's effort to craft a corporate culture focused on continuous improvement in the safety and visual outcomes of refractive surgery. The IMAB has fashioned significant changes in corporate policies and procedures and has had an impact on corporate culture at Optical Express.

  12. Implementing apportionment strategy to identify costs in a multidisciplinary clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Renato Ribeiro Nogueira; Neri, Anna Sofia Costa; Barbosa, Estela Capelas; Silva, Marcus Vinícius Cesso da

    2017-01-01

    To present the implementation of an apportionment strategy proportional to the productive areas of a multidisciplinary clinic, defining the minimum values to be passed monthly to health professionals who work there. A study of the clinic structure was carried out, in which the area of occupation of each service was defined. Later the cost was prorated, allocating a value to each room, proportional to the space occupied. The apportionment implementation allowed the clinic managers to visualize the cost of each room, providing a value base for formation of a minimum amount necessary to be passed monthly to each professional, as a form of payment for rent of using their facilities. The risk of financial loss of the clinic was minimized due to variation of its productivity, as well as the conditions of transference at the time of hiring by professionals were clear, promoting greater confidence and safety in contract relations. Apresentar a implantação de uma estratégia de rateio proporcional às áreas produtivas de uma clínica multidisciplinar, definindo valores mínimos a serem repassados mensalmente aos profissionais de saúde que as ocupam. Estudo da estrutura da clínica, no qual foi definida, em metros quadrados, a área de ocupação de cada serviço. Em seguida, o custo foi rateado, alocando um valor a cada sala, proporcional ao espaço ocupado. A implantação do rateio possibilitou aos gestores da clínica estudada visualizar o custo de cada sala, fornecendo uma base de valor para formação de um valor mínimo necessário a ser repassado mensalmente para cada profissional, como forma de pagamento pelo aluguel de utilização de suas instalações. Minimizou-se o risco de prejuízo da clínica pela variação de sua produtividade, bem como ficaram claras as condições de repasse no momento de contratação do aluguel pelos profissionais, promovendo maior confiança e segurança na relação contratual.

  13. Implementation of a companion diagnostic in the clinical laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mancini, Irene; Pinzani, Pamela; Simi, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    A companion diagnostic test provides information that is essential for the safe and effective use of a corresponding therapeutic product as indicated in the drug instructions. The implementation of a companion diagnostic follows the rules of a molecular test for somatic mutations in a routine...... clinical laboratory environment and needs guidance on practical aspects, including the choice of the proper analytical method and the procedures for internal and external quality controls. Selection of the appropriate assay for detection of genetic alterations depends on several factors: the type...... on restrictions of the method used. In relation to these aspects herein we report an opinion paper of the Working Group Personalized Laboratory Medicine jointly constituted by the European Federation of Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) and by the European Society of Pharmacogenomics and Theranostics (ESPT) using...

  14. Using information management to implement a clinical resource management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstein, A H

    1997-12-01

    This article provides a consultant's account of a 250-bed community hospital's experience in implementing the Clinical Resource Management (CRM) program, a four-stage process of using information to identify opportunities for improvement, developing an effective resource management team, implementing process improvement activities, and measuring the impact on outcomes of care. CASE STUDY EXAMPLE--CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE: The chair of the departments of internal medicine and family practice selected congestive heart failure for in-depth study. A task force focused on treatment and patient disposition in the emergency room (ER), where most of the nonelective admissions originated. A set of standardized ER orders was developed that emphasized rapid and effective diuresis through the initiation of a progressive diuretic dosing schedule directly linked to patient response. Factors critical to the success of the CRM program included allocating adequate time to promote and sell the value and importance of the program, as well as securing the support of both information systems and physicians. The main barriers to success involved limitations in the information system infrastructure and delays attributable to committee review. Short-term results from the CRM program were encouraging, with average lengths of stay reduced by 0.5 days and average costs of care reduced by 12% for the ten diagnoses studied with no adverse results. Nonstudy diagnoses showed no notable improvement. Recognizing the growing importance of information management not only for clinical decision support but for accommodating all the necessary internal and external reporting requirements will require a significant commitment and investment in technology and personnel resources.

  15. Implementation of renal key performance indicators: promoting improved clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Nigel D; McMahon, Lawrence P; Dowling, Gregory; Soding, Jenny; Safe, Maria; Knight, Richard; Fair, Kathleen; Linehan, Leanne; Walker, Rowan G; Power, David A

    2015-03-01

    In the Australian state of Victoria, the Renal Health Clinical Network (RHCN) of the Department of Health Victoria established a Renal Key Performance Indicator (KPI) Working Group in 2011. The group developed four KPIs related to chronic kidney disease and dialysis. A transplant working group of the RHCN developed two additional KPIs. The aim was to develop clinical indicators to measure performance of renal services to drive service improvement. A data collection and benchmarking programme was established, with data provided monthly to the Department using a purpose-designed website portal. The KPI Working Group is responsible for analysing data each quarter and ensuring indicators remain accurate and relevant. Each indicator has clear definitions and targets, and assess (i) patient education, (ii) timely creation of vascular access for haemodialysis, (iii) proportion of patients dialysing at home, (iv) incidence of dialysis-related peritonitis, (v) incidence of pre-emptive renal transplantation, and (vi) timely listing of patients for deceased donor transplantation. Most KPIs have demonstrated improved performance over time with limited gains notably in two: the proportion of patients dialysing at home (KPI 3) and timely listing patients for transplantation (KPI 6). KPI implementation has been established in Victoria for 2 years, providing performance data without additional funding. The six Victorian KPIs are measurable, relevant and modifiable, and implementation relies on enthusiasm and goodwill of physicians and nurses involved in collecting data. The KPIs require further evaluation, but adoption of a similar programme by other jurisdictions could lead to improved national outcomes. © 2014 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  16. Understanding implementation processes of clinical pathways and clinical practice guidelines in pediatric contexts: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Shannon D

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Canada is among the most prosperous nations in the world, yet the health and wellness outcomes of Canadian children are surprisingly poor. There is some evidence to suggest that these poor health outcomes are partly due to clinical practice variation, which can stem from failure to apply the best available research evidence in clinical practice, otherwise known as knowledge translation (KT. Surprisingly, clinical practice variation, even for common acute paediatric conditions, is pervasive. Clinical practice variation results in unnecessary medical treatments, increased suffering, and increased healthcare costs. This study focuses on improving health outcomes for common paediatric acute health concerns by evaluating strategies that improve KT and reduce clinical practice variation. Design/Methods Using a multiple case study design, qualitative and quantitative data will be collected from four emergency departments in western Canada. Data sources will include: pre- and post-implementation focus group data from multidisciplinary healthcare professionals; individual interviews with the local champions, KT intervention providers, and unit/site leaders/managers; Alberta Context Tool (ACT survey data; and aggregated patient outcome data. Qualitative and quantitative data will be systematically triangulated, and matrices will be built to do cross-case comparison. Explanations will be built about the success or lack of success of the clinical practice guidelines (CPG and clinical pathways (CPs uptake based upon the cross-case comparisons. Significance This study will generate new knowledge about the potential causal mechanisms and factors which shape implementation. Future studies will track the impact of the CPG/CPs implementation on children's health outcome, and healthcare costs.

  17. The Process of Implementing HRM Practices : A Case Study in the Dutch Federal Government

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mierlo, Jorrit; Bondarouk, Tatiana

    2018-01-01

    Yearly, organisations create and implemented new HRM practices. To make those HRM practices work in an effective way, their implementation is of great importance. The goal of this paper is to uncover the mechanisms in which new HRM practices develop in federal governmental organisations. We do so by

  18. Institutional effectiveness of REDD+ MRV: Countries progress in implementing technical guidelines and good governance requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ochieng, R.M.; Visseren-Hamakers, Ingrid; Arts, B.; Brockhaus, M.; Herold, M.

    2016-01-01

    The UNFCCC requires REDD+ countries wishing to receive results-based payments to measure, report and verify (MRV) REDD+ impacts; and outlines technical guidelines and good governance requirements for MRV. This article examines institutional effectiveness of REDD+ MRV by assessing countries’ progress

  19. Good governance and virtue in South Africa's cyber security policy implementation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Burmeister, O

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Good governance from an ethical perspective in cyberdefence policy has been seen in terms of duty and consequentialism. Yet the negotiated view of virtue ethics can also address how nation states mitigate the risks of a cyber attack...

  20. Implementing information technology in government: An empirical assessment of the role of local partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Toole, Laurence J.; Brown, Mary Maureen; Brudney, Jeffrey L.

    1998-01-01

    As managers have turned to advanced technologies to promote service delivery, partnership arrangements have attracted great attention. Given the struggle between limited fiscal capacities and rising public expectations, the use of partnerships has emerged as a strategy of government leaders who wish

  1. An assessment of the implemention of e-governance in Adamawa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information Communication Technology (ICT) has made things easier be it in education, health, business, information delivery ,governance and so on. Information communication Technology (ICT) is acceptable as a tool for meaningful industrial development all over the world. A sound egovernance relates to how efficiently ...

  2. Leadership and governance of community health worker programmes at scale: a cross case analysis of provincial implementation in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Helen; Nxumalo, Nonhlanhla

    2017-09-15

    National community health worker (CHW) programmes are returning to favour as an integral part of primary health care systems, often on the back of pre-existing community based initiatives. There are significant challenges to the integration and support of such programmes, and they require coordination and stewardship at all levels of the health system. This paper explores the leadership and governance tasks of large-scale CHW programmes at sub-national level, through the case of national reforms to South Africa's community based sector, referred to as the Ward Based Outreach Team (WBOT) strategy. A cross case analysis of leadership and governance roles, drawing on three case studies of adoption and implementation of the WBOTs strategy at provincial level (Western Cape, North West and Gauteng) was conducted. The primary case studies mapped system components and assessed implementation processes and contexts. They involved teams of researchers and over 200 interviews with stakeholders from senior to frontline, document reviews and analyses of routine data. The secondary, cross case analysis specifically focused on the issues and challenges facing, and strategies adopted by provincial and district policy makers and managers, as they engaged with the new national mandate. From this key sub-national leadership and governance roles were formulated. Four key roles are identified and discussed: 1. Negotiating a fit between national mandates and provincial and district histories and strategies of community based services 2. Defining new organisational and accountability relationships between CHWs, local health services, communities and NGOs 3. Revising and developing new aligned and integrated planning, human resource, financing and information systems 4. Leading change by building new collective visions, mobilising political, including budgetary, support and designing implementation strategies. This analysis, from real-life systems, adds to understanding of the processes

  3. Knowledge, perceptions and clinical application of the shortened dental arch concept among Malaysian government dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasim, Siti Kamilah Mohd; Razak, Ishak Abdul; Yusof, Zamros Yuzadi Mohd

    2018-02-01

    To assess the knowledge and perceptions of Malaysian government dentists regarding the shortened dental arch (SDA) concept and its application in clinical practice. The SDA concept refers to a specific type of dentition with intact anterior teeth and a reduction in posterior occlusal pairs. Dentists' knowledge and perceptions of the SDA concept can influence its application in clinical practice. A self-administered questionnaire on the SDA concept was distributed to 326 government dentists in the states of Selangor and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The data were analysed using SPSS version 22 software. The response rate was 84.0%. The majority of respondents had good knowledge on five of six knowledge items and good attitudes towards 10 of 17 perception items. However, only one-fifth (20.4%) reported having applied the SDA concept in the clinic. A larger number of participants who graduated locally than who graduated abroad perceived that patients 5 years of work experience perceived that the SDA concept enables simpler treatment planning (P concept, it is not widely applied in the clinic. Concerted efforts in SDA training of dentists are needed to help to shorten denture waiting lists and reduce costs. © 2017 FDI World Dental Federation.

  4. How to implement live video recording in the clinical environment: A practical guide for clinical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Adam; Dewar, Alistair; Edgar, Simon; Caesar, Dave; Gowens, Paul; Clegg, Gareth

    2017-06-01

    The use of video in healthcare is becoming more common, particularly in simulation and educational settings. However, video recording live episodes of clinical care is far less routine. To provide a practical guide for clinical services to embed live video recording. Using Kotter's 8-step process for leading change, we provide a 'how to' guide to navigate the challenges required to implement a continuous video-audit system based on our experience of video recording in our emergency department resuscitation rooms. The most significant hurdles in installing continuous video audit in a busy clinical area involve change management rather than equipment. Clinicians are faced with considerable ethical, legal and data protection challenges which are the primary barriers for services that pursue video recording of patient care. Existing accounts of video use rarely acknowledge the organisational and cultural dimensions that are key to the success of establishing a video system. This article outlines core implementation issues that need to be addressed if video is to become part of routine care delivery. By focussing on issues such as staff acceptability, departmental culture and organisational readiness, we provide a roadmap that can be pragmatically adapted by all clinical environments, locally and internationally, that seek to utilise video recording as an approach to improving clinical care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Province wide clinical governance network for clinical audit for quality improvement in endometrial cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandato, Vincenzo Dario; Formisano, Debora; Pirillo, Debora; Ciarlini, Gino; Cerami, Lillo Bruno; Ventura, Alessandro; Spreafico, Lorenzo; Palmieri, Tamara; La Sala, Giovanni Battista; Abrate, Martino

    2012-01-01

    According to the hub-and-spoke model introduced in the Provincial Healthcare System of Reggio Emilia, early endometrial cancer is treated in peripheral low-volume hospitals (spokes) by general gynecologist, whereas more complex cancers are treated by gynecological oncologists at the main hospital (hub). To guarantee a uniformly high standard of care to all patients with endometrial cancer treated in hub and spoke hospitals of Reggio Emilia Province. The specialists of the 5 hospitals of Reggio Emilia Province instituted an inter hospital and multidisciplinary oncology group to write common and shared guidelines based on evidence-based medicine through the use of clinical audit. They valued the process indicators before and after guidelines introduction identifying the site of improvement and verifying the standard achievement. Diagnostic hysteroscopy use increased significantly from preguideline period, 53%, to postguideline period, 74%. Magnetic resonance use and accuracy increased significantly from preguideline to postguideline periods: 8.1% to 35.3% and 37.3% to 74.7%, respectively. Laparoscopy use increased from 1.6% (preguideline) to 18.6 (postguideline). Early surgical complications decreased from 16% (preguideline) to 9% (postguideline). Radiotherapy use increased from 14.% (preguideline) to 32.3% (postguideline). It is possible for a provincial oncology group to build an oncology network providing an improvement in the assistance of patients with endometrial cancer through the use of clinical audit. Clinical audit made it possible to obtain the full attendance of specialists of various disciplines involved in the treatment of endometrial cancer to optimize response time schematizing process.

  6. Implementing a solar energy technology in Canada: The costs, benefits, and role of government

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkowitz, M K

    1978-01-01

    Canadian studies on the cost of solar energy to the user are described. Realistic estimates are developed of the initial capital cost and comparative lifetime costs of solar and conventional heating systems. Interfacing solar home heating with electric utilities is also discussed, along with the social benefits of solar space and water heating. Results are presented of a Canada-wide survey of public attitudes to the energy situation in general and to solar energy in particular. A computer simulation was used to examine the cost to the government and effects on the lifetime cost to the user of various incentive schemes to encourage solar use. Optimal government strategy is suggested and recommendations implied by the analyses in this study are made. It was found that not only is a package-designed solar heating system cost-effective when compared with conventional systems, but the public is eager and receptive to large-scale solar use. 14 refs.

  7. Using a best-practice perioperative governance structure to implement better block scheduling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiser, Randy

    2013-01-01

    Achieving, developing, and maintaining a well-functioning OR scheduling system requires a well-designed perioperative governance structure. Traditional OR/surgery committees, consisting mainly of surgeons, have tried to provide this function but often have not succeeded. An OR governance model should be led by an OR executive committee that functions as a board of directors for the surgery program and works closely with the surgery department medical director and an OR advisory committee. Ideally, the OR executive committee should develop a block schedule that includes a mix of block, open, and urgent or emergent OR access, because this combination is most effective for improving OR use and adapting to changes in surgical procedure volume. Copyright © 2013 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Clarification of Safe Delivery by Iranian Experts Based on Clinical Governance: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forozun Olfati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To clarify the principles of a safe delivery based on Clinical Governance Criteria, as recommended by the pertinent experts.Materials and methods:The current study was part of a qualitative research conducted by content analysis method in 2013 and purposive sampling, performing 24 in-depth interviews based on semi-structured questions and analyzed using thematic content analysis. The participants in this research included midwives, obstetricians, managers, and hospital doctors. The data were under continuous consideration and comparative analysis in order to achieve data saturation.Results:The main concepts derived from interpretations of the pertinent experts include: Patient & Public involvement; Risk Management; Education; Clinical efficiency; Clinical audit; Personnel & Management.Conclusion:In a safe delivery, there is a vicious cycle of causes the elimination of which is only possible through benchmarking patterns that attend to most aspects of a safe delivery.Changes to services require utilization of appropriate change management strategies.

  9. [Implementing strategies to improve the institutional governance of the Spanish National Health System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repullo, José Ramón; Freire, José Manuel

    2016-11-01

    The 2008 economic crisis made the issue of good governance more present and visible, but the debate risks stalling in an academic and political discourse that barely exceeds the declarative. We acknowledge the existence of noteworthy documents from scientific medical societies and some institutional proposals that point towards promising changes. Viewing good governance as accountability, participation, transparency, intelligence and integrity, our objective is to identify the determinants of inaction and remove the barriers that prevent the adoption of rational and widely agreed-upon proposals. This led us: 1) to allocate the proposals to their appropriate governance level (macro, meso, micro and system environment) so as to more directly engage the agents of change; and 2) to highlight some decision nodes that can act as levers to catalyse selective transformations and to initiate the change processes. Taking into account the diversity of actors and scenarios, a top-down rational, integrated and reformist strategy for the whole Spanish National Health System does not seem likely or viable. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to promote changes, setting a targeted and reasoned agenda to visualise key issues and to enable multilevel and multidimensional thinking and advocacy of health-sector and society stakeholders. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Implementing effect of energy efficiency supervision system for government office buildings and large-scale public buildings in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jing; Wu Yong; Zhu Neng

    2009-01-01

    The Chinese central government released a document to initiate a task of energy efficiency supervision system construction for government office buildings and large-scale public buildings in 2007, which marks the overall start of existing buildings energy efficiency management in China with the government office buildings and large-scale public buildings as a breakthrough. This paper focused on the implementing effect in the demonstration region all over China for less than one year, firstly introduced the target and path of energy efficiency supervision system, then described the achievements and problems during the implementing process in the first demonstration provinces and cities. A certain data from the energy efficiency public notice in some typical demonstration provinces and cities were analyzed statistically. It can be concluded that different functional buildings have different energy consumption and the average energy consumption of large-scale public buildings is too high in China compared with the common public buildings and residential buildings. The obstacles need to be overcome afterward were summarized and the prospects for the future work were also put forward in the end.

  11. Implementing effect of energy efficiency supervision system for government office buildings and large-scale public buildings in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Jing [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)], E-mail: zhaojing@tju.edu.cn; Wu Yong [Department of Science and Technology, Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development of the People' s Republic of China, Beijing 100835 (China); Zhu Neng [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2009-06-15

    The Chinese central government released a document to initiate a task of energy efficiency supervision system construction for government office buildings and large-scale public buildings in 2007, which marks the overall start of existing buildings energy efficiency management in China with the government office buildings and large-scale public buildings as a breakthrough. This paper focused on the implementing effect in the demonstration region all over China for less than one year, firstly introduced the target and path of energy efficiency supervision system, then described the achievements and problems during the implementing process in the first demonstration provinces and cities. A certain data from the energy efficiency public notice in some typical demonstration provinces and cities were analyzed statistically. It can be concluded that different functional buildings have different energy consumption and the average energy consumption of large-scale public buildings is too high in China compared with the common public buildings and residential buildings. The obstacles need to be overcome afterward were summarized and the prospects for the future work were also put forward in the end.

  12. Implementing effect of energy efficiency supervision system for government office buildings and large-scale public buildings in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jing; Zhu, Neng [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Wu, Yong [Department of Science and Technology, Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development of the People' s Republic of China, Beijing 100835 (China)

    2009-06-15

    The Chinese central government released a document to initiate a task of energy efficiency supervision system construction for government office buildings and large-scale public buildings in 2007, which marks the overall start of existing buildings energy efficiency management in China with the government office buildings and large-scale public buildings as a breakthrough. This paper focused on the implementing effect in the demonstration region all over China for less than one year, firstly introduced the target and path of energy efficiency supervision system, then described the achievements and problems during the implementing process in the first demonstration provinces and cities. A certain data from the energy efficiency public notice in some typical demonstration provinces and cities were analyzed statistically. It can be concluded that different functional buildings have different energy consumption and the average energy consumption of large-scale public buildings is too high in China compared with the common public buildings and residential buildings. The obstacles need to be overcome afterward were summarized and the prospects for the future work were also put forward in the end. (author)

  13. How Russia and other BRICS Countries as well as Indonesia Implement the G20/OECD Principles of Corporate Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Lanshina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the implementation of the G20/OECD Principles of Corporate Governance by Russia in comparison to other BRICS countries and Indonesia. Originally, this document was adopted by OECD in 1999. The last (third version of the document was developed in 2014–2015, with an active involvement of G20 countries, and was adopted at the G20 Summit in Antalya (Turkey in November 2015. Dramatic changes are absent in the new document, however, it contains several new recommendations, which became necessary after the global economic crisis of 2008–2009. The article is focused on the actions of six countries that were chosen for the analysis, as well as on the real changes in these countries. The author takes into account OECD recommendations on the assessment of implementation of G20/OECD principles. According to these recommendations, researchers should not pay too much attention to the quantitative analysis, since many important issues are unobservable for them. Considering this, the author accentuates qualitative research methods and comparative analysis. The results of the study show that Brazil, Indonesia and Russia were most active in implementation, while South Africa and China lacked any actions, and India achieved only partial implementation. Despite the large number of facts documenting formal implementation of corporate governance principles in Russia during the last years, Russia definitely lacks real improvements. This is true for information disclosure (including data on the management remuneration, gender diversity on corporate boards, the share of independent directors, etc. Moreover, Russian companies are characterized by high concentration of capital, and the role of boards is often reduced to formalities. According to the results of the research, similar limitations are found in the systems of corporate governance of other countries covered by this study. Taking into account the limited accessibility of information on

  14. Implementation Command Media Manual And Internal Auditor Role In Achieving The Rules Of Good Corporate Governance The Case Of Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syafdinal

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Command Media Manual includes the provision implementation procedures and instructions relating to the management and handling of command media is used by an organization to provide trace archives and uniformity of action operations. The contributions Internal Auditor IA in applying the principles of Good Corporate Governance GCG in the formation of company image and in the improvement of the integrated control function ensure that the operations have been run well and can increase the value added to the organization. Testing the hypothesis first tested the validity and reliability testing. Analysis of data was using path analysis path analysis. Generally not maximum awareness and common understanding among all management and staff that the application of the Manual Command Media is very important for the companys operations in their objective to fulfill the standards of corporate governance.

  15. Difficulties of Accrual Accounting Implementation in Indonesian Government: a Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie Pratama

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The research aims to compare the condition in Indonesia and other country that apply accrual accounting. The research method employed is qualitative descriptive. Data collected by the literary study, and interview. The research was conducted from November 2008 until January 2009. Analysis methods used were qualitative for data that was collected using literary study as well as content analysis for data that was collected using interview. The conclusions of this research are: the Human Resources Competencies, Public Finance Practice, and Regulation are factors that determined diffi culties in the implementation of accrual accounting in Indonesia and also in other country which implement the accrual accounting.

  16. Geological storage of radioactive wastes: governance and practical implementation of the reversibility concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2011-01-01

    This document comments the different issues associated with the concept of reversibility in the case of geological disposal of radioactive wastes: adopted approach for investigations on the practical implementation of reversibility, decision and assessment process related to the practical implementation of reversibility, role of local actors in decision and monitoring process on a middle and long term, control and vigilance during the reversibility period, memory preservation and its inter-generational transmission, modalities of financing reversibility and the radioactive waste management system, development of a citizen ability and expertise sharing, and perspectives

  17. Case Study: Clinical Governance as an Approach to Improve Maternal and Newborn Health in 22 Hospitals in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelia, Dwirani; Suhowatsky, Stephanie; Baharuddin, Mohammad; Tholandi, Maya; Hyre, Anne; Sethi, Reena

    Clinical governance is a concept used to improve management, accountability and the provision of quality healthcare. An approach to strengthen clinical governance as a means to improve the quality of maternal and newborn care in Indonesia was developed by the Expanding Maternal and Neonatal Survival (EMAS) Program. This case study presents findings and lessons learned from EMAS program experience in 22 hospitals where peer-to-peer mentoring supported staff in strengthening clinical governance from 2012-2015. Efforts resulted in improved hospital preparedness and significantly increased the odds of facility-level coverage for three evidence-based maternal and newborn healthcare interventions.

  18. Implementation of psychological clinical trials in epilepsy: Review and guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Avani C; Wagner, Janelle; Smith, Aimee W; Kellermann, Tanja S; Michaelis, Rosa

    2017-09-01

    The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Neuropsychiatry commission and United States Institute of Medicine report both identified cognitive and psychological comorbidities as a significant issue for individuals with epilepsy, with rates as high as 60%. However, there is a paucity of evidence-based treatments for many psychological conditions (e.g., learning disorders, cognitive disorders, behavioral disorders). Because of inherent challenges in the implementation of psychological therapy trials and specific considerations for the population with epilepsy, the focus of the current review was to provide guidance and recommendations to conduct psychological trials for individuals with epilepsy. Several key areas will be discussed, including selection of patients, trial design, psychological intervention considerations, outcomes and evaluation of results, publication of trial results, and special issues related to pediatric clinical trials. Rigorously designed psychological therapy trials will set the stage for evidence-based practice in the care of individuals with epilepsy, with the goal of improving seizures, side effects, and HRQOL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Realigning Shared Governance With Magnet® and the Organization's Operating System to Achieve Clinical Excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Janette V; Girard, Anita S; Foad, Wendy

    2018-03-01

    In 2012, an academic medical center successfully overhauled a 15-year-old shared governance to align 6 house-wide and 30 unit-based councils with the new Magnet Recognition Program® and the organization's operating system, using the processes of LEAN methodology. The redesign improved cross-council communication structures, facilitated effective shared decision-making processes, increased staff engagement, and improved clinical outcomes. The innovative structural and process elements of the new model are replicable in other health institutions.

  20. Key performance indicators for government and non profit agencies: implementing winning KPIs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parmenter, David

    2012-01-01

    ... Team Can Achieve Success while Continuing with Their Other Duties Myth 4: By Tying KPIs to Pay You Will Increase Performance Myth 5: Most Measures Lead to Better Performance 13 13 14 14 14 15 viiviii Contents Myth 6: Performance Measures Are Mainly Used to Help Manage Implementation of Strategic Initiatives Myth 7: The Bala...

  1. The Private Tutoring Industry in Taiwan: Government Policies and Their Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Shengli

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies show that attending private tutoring has become a necessity to many primary and secondary students in East Asia. Educational policies and their effective implementation are crucial to guarantee the healthy development of the private tutoring industry and thus protect the rights of students and their families. Under the framework…

  2. Is medical perspective on clinical governance practices associated with clinical units’ performance and mortality? A cross-sectional study through a record-linkage procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Sarchielli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Assessment of the knowledge and application as well as perceived utility by doctors of clinical governance tools in order to explore their impact on clinical units’ performance measured through mortality rates and efficiency indicators. Methods: This research is a cross-sectional study with a deterministic record-linkage procedure. The sample includes n = 1250 doctors (n = 249 chiefs of clinical units; n = 1001 physicians working in six public hospitals located in the Emilia-Romagna Region in Italy. Survey instruments include a checklist and a research-made questionnaire which were used for data collection about doctors’ knowledge and application as well as perceived utility of clinical governance tools. The analysis was based on clinical units’ performance indicators which include patients’ mortality, extra-region active mobility rate, average hospital stay, bed occupancy, rotation and turnover rates, and the comparative performance index as efficiency indicators. Results: The clinical governance tools are known and applied differently in all the considered clinical units. Significant differences emerged between roles and organizational levels at which the medical leadership is carried out. The levels of knowledge and application of clinical governance practices are correlated with the clinical units’ efficiency indicators (bed occupancy rate, bed turnover interval, and extra-region mobility. These multiple linear regression analyses highlighted that the clinical governance knowledge and application is correlated with clinical units’ mortality rates (odds ratio, −8.677; 95% confidence interval, −16.654, −0.700. Conclusion: The knowledge and application, as well as perceived utility by medical professionals of clinical governance tools, are associated with the mortality rates of their units and with some efficiency indicators. However, the medical frontline staff seems to not consider homogeneously useful

  3. Implementation of the recommendations of the Inquiry Commission 'Prevention for the protection of the earth atmosphere' by the Federal Government

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The Inquiry Commission intended to pass on the draft legislation for CO 2 reduction to the German Bundestag by 1 July 1992. This was unrealistic as the district and laender authorities concerned have to be considered, and the many measures of the complex CO 2 reduction programme must be optimized step by step. The Federal Government has already initiated important CO 2 reduction measures. The status of implementation of the various measures, especially the elaboration of draft legislation, is described in detail in the answers. (orig./HP) [de

  4. How and Why to Implement HACCP in Food Businesses in Developing Countries? Suggestions to Afghan Government and Private Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Mohammad Naim Khalid

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In Afghanistan food safety is managed by several ministries including Ministry of Public Health, Ministry of Agriculture, Ministry of Commerce and municipalities. There is no food law but multiple ministerial decrees which ensure if GMP is implemented well. There is no legal requirement to get food safety certification. Hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP is recognized as a key part of food safety management practice in the global food industry and can be applied at any stage of the food supply chain. This article discusses accepted approaches to the application of HACCP principles for the development, implementation, and maintenance of HACCP plan. It is intended as an introduction to food safety system in Afghanistan, giving propositions to government on how to apply the principles in a stepwise approach, and showing how HACCP benefit public and private sector and also suggesting ways how to adapt this approach in the food businesses.

  5. A Mapmark method of standard setting as implemented for the National Assessment Governing Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, E Matthew; Mitzel, Howard C

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a Mapmark standard setting procedure, developed under contract with the National Assessment Governing Board (NAGB). The procedure enhances the bookmark method with spatially representative item maps, holistic feedback, and an emphasis on independent judgment. A rationale for these enhancements, and the bookmark method, is presented, followed by a detailed description of the materials and procedures used in a meeting to set standards for the 2005 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) in Grade 12 mathematics. The use of difficulty-ordered content domains to provide holistic feedback is a particularly novel feature of the method. Process evaluation results comparing Mapmark to Anghoff-based methods previously used for NAEP standard setting are also presented.

  6. Aspects of governance in the practical implementation of the concept of reversibility for deep geological disposal. Report no. 308

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reaud, C.; Schieber, C.; Schneider, T.; Gadbois, S.; Heriard Dubreuil, G.

    2010-01-01

    The European project COWAM in Practice (CIP) was aimed to lead for three years (2007-2009) a process of monitoring, analyzing and evaluating the governance linked with radioactive waste management. This project, in cooperation with a research group and stakeholders, was conducted in parallel in 5 European countries (Spain, France, United Kingdom, Romania, Slovenia). In France, the issue of reversibility for a deep geological disposal was introduced in the Act of December 30, 1991 on the possible options to manage radioactive waste. The Act of June 28, 2006 relative to sustainable management of materials and radioactive waste confirmed the option, by calling for a reversible waste disposal facility in a deep geological formation to be designed. The main issue is no longer to justify the adoption of reversibility, but to investigate the practical procedures for its implementation. The French stakeholder Group 4 involved in the European project COWAM In Practice (CIP) had identified several subjects for investigation: - The different aspects associated with the practical implementation of reversible disposal: technical aspects, and aspects relative to monitoring, safety and expertise, in terms of legal, financial, administrative and political, etc. responsibility related to the notion of reversibility. - The stakes of governance related to the processes of assessment and decision-making - The roles of local stakeholders in these processes. The analysis conducted by CEPN in cooperation with the French stakeholder group, facilitated by Mutadis, showed that the practical implementation of reversibility aims to maintain a capacity of choice between three options: to continue to maintain the reversibility, to retrieve packages or to initiate the closure of all or part the disposal facility. Maintaining this choice in the long term implies setting up specific institutional, financial and decision-making systems,etc,. that need to be jointly developed in advance by all the

  7. Implementation of an advanced clinical and administrative hospital information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vegoda, P R; Dyro, J F

    1986-01-01

    Over the last six years since University Hospital opened, the University Hospital Information System (UHIS) has continued to evolve to what is today an advanced administrative and clinical information system. At University Hospital UHIS is the way of conducting business. A wide range of patient care applications are operational including Patient Registration, ADT for Inpatient/Outpatient/Emergency Room visits, Advanced Order Entry/Result Reporting, Medical Records, Lab Automated Data Acquisition/Quality Control, Pharmacy, Radiology, Dietary, Respiratory Therapy, ECG, EEG, Cardiology, Physical/Occupational Therapy and Nursing. These systems and numerous financial systems have been installed in a highly tuned, efficient computer system. All applications are real-time, on-line, and data base oriented. Each system is provided with multiple data security levels, forward file recovery, and dynamic transaction backout of in-flight tasks. Sensitive medical information is safeguarded by job function passwords, identification codes, need-to-know master screens and terminal keylocks. University Hospital has an IBM 3083 CPU with five 3380 disk drives, four dual density tape drives, and a 3705 network controller. The network of 300 terminals and 100 printers is connected to the computer center by an RF broadband cable. The software is configured around the IBM/MVS operating system using CICS as the telecommunication monitor, IMS as the data base management system and PCS/ADS as the application enabling tool. The most extensive clinical system added to UHIS is the Physiological Monitoring/Patient Data Management System with serves 92 critical care beds. In keeping with the Hospital's philosophy of integrated computing, the PMS/PDMS with its network of minicomputers was linked to the UHIS system. In a pilot program, remote access to UHIS through the IBM personal computer has been implemented in several physician offices in the local community, further extending the communications

  8. Transforming (perceived rigidity in environmental law through adaptive governance: a case of Endangered Species Act implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Gosnell

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Endangered Species Act (ESA is often portrayed as a major source of instability and crisis in river basins of the U.S. West, where the needs of listed fish species frequently clash with agriculture dependent on federal irrigation projects subject to ESA Section 7 prohibitions on federal agency actions likely to jeopardize listed species or adversely modify critical habitat. Scholarship on Section 7 characterizes the process as unwaveringly rigid, the legal "hammer" forcing federal agencies to consider endangered species' needs when proposing operations and management plans for federally funded irrigation. In this paper, we identify barriers to an integrated approach to Section 7 implementation and characterize a set of strategies for overcoming its rigidity that may have broader applicability. We draw on lessons derived from the Klamath Basin along the Oregon-California border, where cross-scale processes and venues involving interagency collaboration among leaders in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation supported efforts to replace an ecologically and socially fragmented Upper Basin/Lower Basin approach to ESA implementation fraught with conflict. The result was the nation's first joint biological opinion (BiOp, which effectively institutionalized an adaptive, flexible, integrated approach to water sharing among competing interests. Keys to success included existing collaborative capacity related to shifting stakeholder networks, trust, and relationships and a shift in local agency culture facilitated by empathic leadership leading to a greater sense of shared responsibility for Section 7 compliance. A collaborative hydrologic modeling process enhanced participatory capacity, facilitated transformative social and technical learning, and cultivated greater understanding of the social-ecological system among key stakeholders. The 2013 joint BiOp exemplifies both

  9. Doing implementation research on health governance: a frontline researcher's reflexive account of field-level challenges and their management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Gupteswar; Garimella, Surekha; Scott, Kerry; Mondal, Shinjini; George, Asha; Sheikh, Kabir

    2017-11-15

    Implementation Research (IR) in and around health systems comes with unique challenges for researchers including implementation, multi-layer governance, and ethical issues. Partnerships between researchers, implementers, policy makers and community members are central to IR and come with additional challenges. In this paper, we elaborate on the challenges faced by frontline field researchers, drawing from experience with an IR study on Village Health Sanitation and Nutrition Committees (VHSNCs). The IR on VHSNC took place in one state/province in India over an 18-month research period. The IR study had twin components; intervention and in-depth research. The intervention sought to strengthen the VHSNC functioning, and concurrently the research arm sought to understand the contextual factors, pathways and mechanism affecting VHSNC functions. Frontline researchers were employed for data collection and a research assistant was living in the study sites. The frontline research assistant experienced a range of challenges, while collecting data from the study sites, which were documented as field memos and analysed using inductive content analysis approach. Due to the relational nature of IR, the challenges coalesced around two sets of relationships (a) between the community and frontline researchers and (b) between implementers and frontline researchers. In the community, the frontline researcher was viewed as the supervisor of the intervention and was perceived by the community to have power to bring about beneficial changes with public services and facilities. Implementers expected help from the frontline researcher in problem-solving in VHSNCs, and feedback on community mobilization to improve their approaches. A concerted effort was undertaken by the whole research team to clarify and dispel concerns among the community and implementers through careful and constant communication. The strategies employed were both managerial, relational and reflexive in nature

  10. How education for sustainable development is implemented in Germany: Looking through the lens of educational governance theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormann, Inka; Nikel, Jutta

    2017-12-01

    The United Nations (UN) Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) aimed to integrate the principles, values and practices of sustainable development into all aspects of education and learning around the world. The authors of this article address the implementation process of ESD in Germany during the UN Decade (2005-2014). By undertaking a meta-analysis of the findings of four related sub-studies they carried out during a three-year project funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research, the authors contribute to the understanding of the process of transferring the concept of ESD within a multi-level education system. They investigated this process at two levels - the federal state (a sub-national entity in Germany) and the communal level. Drawing on educational governance theory, the authors unveil principles, norms, rules and procedures in the coordination of action within constellations of heterogeneous actors contributing to the implementation of ESD in their social entities. The outcome of the meta-analysis describes an emerging governance regime in ESD, taking into consideration the following features impacting the coordination of action being carried out by the actors involved: (1) the understanding of the normative concept of ESD as content of negotiation; (2) the perceived opportunity for actors to gain and increase appreciation within the field of ESD as an incentive for and driver of engagement; and (3) the dynamic quality of the set-up, rules and principles of the coordination of action, which renders these subject to situative changes. In the final part of the paper, the findings are discussed from the perspectives of the theory of transfer and the current empirical basis of ESD policy and governance.

  11. Investigating the congruence of crowdsourced information with official government data: the case of pediatric clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minki; Jung, Yuchul; Jung, Dain; Hur, Cinyoung

    2014-02-03

    Health 2.0 is a benefit to society by helping patients acquire knowledge about health care by harnessing collective intelligence. However, any misleading information can directly affect patients' choices of hospitals and drugs, and potentially exacerbate their health condition. This study investigates the congruence between crowdsourced information and official government data in the health care domain and identifies the determinants of low congruence where it exists. In-line with infodemiology, we suggest measures to help the patients in the regions vulnerable to inaccurate health information. We text-mined multiple online health communities in South Korea to construct the data for crowdsourced information on public health services (173,748 messages). Kendall tau and Spearman rank order correlation coefficients were used to compute the differences in 2 ranking systems of health care quality: actual government evaluations of 779 hospitals and mining results of geospecific online health communities. Then we estimated the effect of sociodemographic characteristics on the level of congruence by using an ordinary least squares regression. The regression results indicated that the standard deviation of married women's education (P=.046), population density (P=.01), number of doctors per pediatric clinic (P=.048), and birthrate (P=.002) have a significant effect on the congruence of crowdsourced data (adjusted R²=.33). Specifically, (1) the higher the birthrate in a given region, (2) the larger the variance in educational attainment, (3) the higher the population density, and (4) the greater the number of doctors per clinic, the more likely that crowdsourced information from online communities is congruent with official government data. To investigate the cause of the spread of misleading health information in the online world, we adopted a unique approach by associating mining results on hospitals from geospecific online health communities with the sociodemographic

  12. The impact on nurses and nurse managers of introducing PEPFAR clinical services in urban government clinics in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyegombe Nambusi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improving provider performance is central to strengthening health services in developing countries. Because of critical shortages of physicians, many clinics in sub-Saharan Africa are led by nurses. In addition to clinical skills, nurse managers need practical managerial skills and adequate resources to ensure procurement of essential supplies, quality assurance implementation, and productive work environment. Giving nurses more autonomy in their work empowers them in the workplace and has shown to create positive influence on work attitudes and behaviors. The Infectious Disease Institute, an affiliate of Makerere University College of Health Science, in an effort to expand the needed HIV services in the Ugandan capital, established a community-university partnership with the Ministry of Health to implement an innovative model to build capacity in HIV service delivery. This paper evaluates the impact on the nurses from this innovative program to provide more health care in six nurse managed Kampala City Council (KCC Clinics. Methods A mixed method approach was used. The descriptive study collected key informant interviews from the six nurse managers, and administered a questionnaire to 20 staff nurses between September and December 2009. Key themes were manually identified from the interviews, and the questionnaire data were analyzed using SPSS. Results Introducing new HIV services into six KCC clinics was positive for the nurses. They identified the project as successful because of perceived improved environment, increase in useful in-service training, new competence to manage patients and staff, improved physical infrastructure, provision of more direct patient care, motivation to improve the clinic because the project acted on their suggestions, and involvement in role expansion. All of these helped empower the nurses, improving quality of care and increasing job satisfaction. Conclusions This community-university HIV

  13. The impact on nurses and nurse managers of introducing PEPFAR clinical services in urban government clinics in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nankumbi, Joyce; Groves, Sara; Leontsini, Elli; Kyegombe, Nambusi; Coutinho, Alex; Manabe, Yuka

    2011-03-09

    Improving provider performance is central to strengthening health services in developing countries. Because of critical shortages of physicians, many clinics in sub-Saharan Africa are led by nurses. In addition to clinical skills, nurse managers need practical managerial skills and adequate resources to ensure procurement of essential supplies, quality assurance implementation, and productive work environment. Giving nurses more autonomy in their work empowers them in the workplace and has shown to create positive influence on work attitudes and behaviors. The Infectious Disease Institute, an affiliate of Makerere University College of Health Science, in an effort to expand the needed HIV services in the Ugandan capital, established a community-university partnership with the Ministry of Health to implement an innovative model to build capacity in HIV service delivery. This paper evaluates the impact on the nurses from this innovative program to provide more health care in six nurse managed Kampala City Council (KCC) Clinics. A mixed method approach was used. The descriptive study collected key informant interviews from the six nurse managers, and administered a questionnaire to 20 staff nurses between September and December 2009. Key themes were manually identified from the interviews, and the questionnaire data were analyzed using SPSS. Introducing new HIV services into six KCC clinics was positive for the nurses. They identified the project as successful because of perceived improved environment, increase in useful in-service training, new competence to manage patients and staff, improved physical infrastructure, provision of more direct patient care, motivation to improve the clinic because the project acted on their suggestions, and involvement in role expansion. All of these helped empower the nurses, improving quality of care and increasing job satisfaction. This community-university HIV innovative model was successful from the point of view of the nurses

  14. Data governance requirements for distributed clinical research networks: triangulating perspectives of diverse stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Katherine K; Browe, Dennis K; Logan, Holly C; Holm, Roberta; Hack, Lori; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2014-01-01

    There is currently limited information on best practices for the development of governance requirements for distributed research networks (DRNs), an emerging model that promotes clinical data reuse and improves timeliness of comparative effectiveness research. Much of the existing information is based on a single type of stakeholder such as researchers or administrators. This paper reports on a triangulated approach to developing DRN data governance requirements based on a combination of policy analysis with experts, interviews with institutional leaders, and patient focus groups. This approach is illustrated with an example from the Scalable National Network for Effectiveness Research, which resulted in 91 requirements. These requirements were analyzed against the Fair Information Practice Principles (FIPPs) and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) protected versus non-protected health information. The requirements addressed all FIPPs, showing how a DRN's technical infrastructure is able to fulfill HIPAA regulations, protect privacy, and provide a trustworthy platform for research. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Practice, science and governance in interaction: European effort for the system-wide implementation of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucki, Gerold; Zampolini, Mauro; Juocevicius, Alvydas; Negrini, Stefano; Christodoulou, Nicolas

    2017-04-01

    Since its launch in 2001, relevant international, regional and national PRM bodies have aimed to implement the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (PRM), whereby contributing to the development of suitable practical tools. These tools are available for implementing the ICF in day-to-day clinical practice, standardized reporting of functioning outcomes in quality management and research, and guiding evidence-informed policy. Educational efforts have reinforced PRM physicians' and other rehabilitation professionals' ICF knowledge, and numerous implementation projects have explored how the ICF is applied in clinical practice, research and policy. Largely lacking though is the system-wide implementation of ICF in day-to-day practice across all rehabilitation services of national health systems. In Europe, system-wide implementation of ICF requires the interaction between practice, science and governance. Considering its mandate, the UEMS PRM Section and Board have decided to lead a European effort towards system-wide ICF implementation in PRM, rehabilitation and health care at large, in interaction with governments, non-governmental actors and the private sector, and aligned with ISPRM's collaboration plan with WHO. In this paper we present the current PRM internal and external policy agenda towards system-wide ICF implementation and the corresponding implementation action plan, while highlighting priority action steps - promotion of ICF-based standardized reporting in national quality management and assurance programs, development of unambiguous rehabilitation service descriptions using the International Classification System for Service Organization in Health-related Rehabilitation, development of Clinical Assessment Schedules, qualitative linkage and quantitative mapping of data to the ICF, and the cultural adaptation of the ICF Clinical Data Collection Tool in European languages.

  16. The fear factor of risk - clinical governance and midwifery talk and practice in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scamell, Mandie

    2016-07-01

    Through the critical application of social theory, this paper will scrutinise how the operations of risk management help to constitute midwives׳ understandings of childbirth in a particular way. Drawing from rich ethnographic data, collected in the southeast of England, the paper presents empirical evidence to critically explore how institutional concerns around risk and risk management impact upon the way midwives can legitimately imagine and manage labour and childbirth. Observational field notes, transcribed interviews with various midwives, along with material culture in the form of documentary evidence will be used to explore the unintended consequences of clinical governance and its risk management technologies. Through this analysis the fear factor of risk in midwifery talk and practice will be introduced to provide an insight into how risk management impacts midwifery practice in the UK. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Acute Clinically Mastitic Animals in villages of Assiut Governance: Diagnosis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sayed and Ahmed Abdel Rady

    Full Text Available This investigation was run in some villages in Assiut governance during summer 2007 to diagnose acute clinical mastitis in different animal species and to apply different lines of treatment for evaluating which treatment line of choice giving cure, aiming to another goal by preventing the conversion of acute mastitis towards the chronic one which is difficult to be treated and the dairy animal will be excluded. Therefore, 2150 animals were clinically examined in 5 villages located north to Assiut city, Egypt, including 400 cows, 950 ewes and 800 she goats, and the incidence of acute clinical mastitis was 22.50%, 2.63% and 4.63%, respectively. Milk samples were collected from all clinically mastitic cows for bacteriological examination to identify the causative agents of the intra-mammary infection (IMI. It was found the major causative agents isolated were Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium pyogenes, causing either single or mixed type of infection. When applying different lines of treatment, all diseased animals were classified into 3 groups: 1st group received local treatment by intra-mammary infusion antibiotic. 2nd group received systematic treatment by intra-muscular (I/M injection of both antibiotic and anti-inflammatory drugs. While, 3rd group received combination of both local and systematic treatment lines together. Cure% was achieved as 50% for 1st group, 90% for 2nd group, while 3rd group gave complete cure by 100%. It was noticed that the incidence of acute clinical mastitis among examined cows was worrisome and can be considered as indicator of the epidemiology of the disease. While, spreading of the disease among ewes and she goats was somewhat low in comparison with that of cows. In conclusion, combination of both local and systematic treatment lines together should be advised in treatment of acute clinical mastitis to ensure complete cure. The obtained results highlighted the

  18. Rol del estado en los ensayos clínicos Role of government in clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Mazzetti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available La regulación de los ensayos clínicos por el Estado es un proceso en constante cambio y adecuación, cuyo reto actual consiste en salvaguardar la seguridad de los participantes y equilibrar la carga administrativa. El desarrollo y la regulación de los ensayos clínicos en los distintos países varían según la realidad, el contexto, su ejecución nacional o multinacional, condicionando que la regulación puramente nacional resulte insuficiente y se precise conocer parte de la regulación internacional. El objetivo de esta publicación es mostrar una visión global del rol de Estado en la regulación de los ensayos clínicos en distintas realidades. Para ello, se ha realizado una revisión de la regulación en la Unión Europea, Estados Unidos de Norteamérica y algunos países de Latinoamérica, para llegar finalmente al Perú. La tendencia actual en la regulación de los ensayos clínicos, se caracteriza por el incremento en los estándares de calidad, el garantizar la seguridad de los participantes, promover la transparencia, la disminución de los procesos burocráticos y el fortalecimiento de los comités de ética, en el marco de procesos democráticos abiertos, que convoquen e integren a todos los interesados en procesos dinámicos basados en el conocimiento actual y los cambios que se suceden. El reto actual es promover el desarrollo de ensayos clínicos desde el Estado (universidades, centros de investigación, institutos especializados, hospitales, etc. para los aspectos que el país necesita, incluidos medicamentos huérfanos, enfermedades prevalentes y abandonadas, y el uso terapéutico de los principios activos originarios.The regulation of clinical trials by the Government is a process of continuous change and adaptation, current challenge is to ensure the safety of participants and get balance of administrative procedures. Development and regulation of clinical trials in different countries vary according to the situation

  19. Strengthening Government Leadership in Family Planning Programming in Senegal: From Proof of Concept to Proof of Implementation in 2 Districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichatou, Barry; Seck, Cheikh; Baal Anne, Thierno Souleymane; Deguenovo, Gabrielle Clémentine; Ntabona, Alexis; Simmons, Ruth

    2016-12-23

    Given Senegal's limited resources, the country receives substantial support from externally funded partner organizations to provide family planning and maternal and child health services. These organizations often take a strong and sometimes independent role in implementing interventions with their own structures and personnel, thereby bypassing the government district health system. This article presents findings from the Initiative Sénégalaise de Santé Urbaine (ISSU) (Senegal Urban Health Initiative) that assessed in 2 districts, Diamniadio and Rufisque, the extent to which it was feasible to create stronger government ownership and leadership in implementing a simplified package of family planning interventions from among those previously tested in other districts. The simplified package consisted of both supply- and demand-side interventions, introduced in October 2014 and concluding at the end of 2015. The interventions included ensuring adequate human resources and contraceptive supplies, contraceptive technology updates for providers, special free family planning service days to bring services closer to where people live, family planning integration into other routine services, household visits for family planning education, religious sermons to clarify Islam's position on family planning, and radio broadcasts. District leadership in Diamniadio and Rufisque were actively involved in guiding and implementing interventions, and they also contributed some of their own resources to the project. However, reliance on external funding continued because district budgets were extremely limited. Monitoring data on the number of contraceptive methods provided by district facilities supported by a sister project, the Informed Push Model project, indicate overall improvement in contraceptive provision during the intervention period. In Diamniadio, contraceptive provision increased by 43% between the 6-month period prior to the ISSU interventions (November 2013 through

  20. Implementing the United Kingdom Government's 10-Year Teenage Pregnancy Strategy for England (1999-2010): Applicable Lessons for Other Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Alison; Chandra-Mouli, Venkatraman; Ingham, Roger

    2016-07-01

    Teenage pregnancy is an issue of inequality affecting the health, well-being, and life chances of young women, young men, and their children. Consequently, high levels of teenage pregnancy are of concern to an increasing number of developing and developed countries. The UK Labour Government's Teenage Pregnancy Strategy for England was one of the very few examples of a nationally led, locally implemented evidence-based strategy, resourced over a long duration, with an associated reduction of 51% in the under-18 conception rate. This article seeks to identify the lessons applicable to other countries. The article focuses on the prevention program. Drawing on the detailed documentation of the 10-year strategy, it analyzes the factors that helped and hindered implementation against the World Health Organization (WHO) ExpandNet Framework. The Framework strives to improve the planning and management of the process of scaling-up of successful pilot programs with a focus on sexual and reproductive health, making it particularly suited for an analysis of England's teenage pregnancy strategy. The development and implementation of the strategy matches the Framework's key attributes for successful planning and scaling up of sexual and reproductive health programs. It also matched the attributes identified by the Centre for Global Development for scaled up approaches to complex public health issues. Although the strategy was implemented in a high-income country, analysis against the WHO-ExpandNet Framework identifies many lessons which are transferable to low- and medium-income countries seeking to address high teenage pregnancy rates. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Towards implementation of optimum nutrition and better clinical nutrition support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, C. F.; Prins, F.; van Kempen, A.; Tepaske, R.; Sauerwein, H. P.

    2001-01-01

    Clinical Nutrition Support--defined as nutrition for hospitalized patients suffering from metabolic stress--plays a limited role in the therapeutic routine of the physician. This is not surprising as most research in the field of clinical nutrition is disappointing with regard to the objective

  2. Implementing effective and sustainable multidisciplinary clinical thoracic oncology programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osarogiagbon, Raymond U; Freeman, Richard K; Krasna, Mark J

    2015-08-01

    Three models of care are described, including two models of multidisciplinary care for thoracic malignancies. The pros and cons of each model are discussed, the evidence supporting each is reviewed, and the need for more (and better) research into care delivery models is highlighted. Key stakeholders in thoracic oncology care delivery outcomes are identified, and the need to consider stakeholder perspectives in designing, validating and implementing multidisciplinary programs as a vehicle for quality improvement in thoracic oncology is emphasized. The importance of reconciling stakeholder perspectives, and identify meaningful stakeholder-relevant benchmarks is also emphasized. Metrics for measuring program implementation and overall success are proposed.

  3. Audit, guidelines and standards: clinical governance for hip fracture care in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Colin T; Hutchison, James D

    To report on experience of national-level audit, guidelines and standards for hip fracture care in Scotland. Scottish Hip Fracture Audit (from 1993) documents case-mix, process and outcomes of hip fracture care in Scotland. Evidence-based national guidelines on hip fracture care are available (1997, updated 2002). Hip fracture serves as a tracer condition by the health quality assurance authority for its work on older people, which reported in 2004. Audit data are used locally to document care and support and monitor service developments. Synergy between the guidelines and the audit provides a means of improving care locally and monitoring care nationally. External review by the quality assurance body shows to what extent guideline-based standards relating to A&E care, pre-operative delay, multidisciplinary care and audit participation are met. Three national-level initiatives on hip fracture care have delivered: Reliable and large-scale comparative information on case-mix, care and outcomes; evidence-based recommendations on care; and nationally accountable standards inspected and reported by the national health quality assurance authority. These developments are linked and synergistic, and enjoy both clinical and managerial support. They provide an evolving framework for clinical governance, with casemix-adjusted outcome assessment for hip fracture care as a next step.

  4. Changing Professional Practice: Theory and Practice of Clinical Guidelines Implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Thorkil; Mäkelä, M.

    1999-01-01

    implementering af klinisk vejledninger Forskningsdesign og statistiske spørgsmål i implementeringsforskningØkonomisk evaluering Kvalitative metoderMetoder til at identificere barrierer for brug af kliniske vejledninger Planlægning og monitorering af implementeringsforløbMåling af holdninger til kliniske...

  5. Implementing Clinical Research Using Factorial Designs: A Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Timothy B; Smith, Stevens S; Bolt, Daniel M; Loh, Wei-Yin; Mermelstein, Robin; Fiore, Michael C; Piper, Megan E; Collins, Linda M

    2017-07-01

    Factorial experiments have rarely been used in the development or evaluation of clinical interventions. However, factorial designs offer advantages over randomized controlled trial designs, the latter being much more frequently used in such research. Factorial designs are highly efficient (permitting evaluation of multiple intervention components with good statistical power) and present the opportunity to detect interactions amongst intervention components. Such advantages have led methodologists to advocate for the greater use of factorial designs in research on clinical interventions (Collins, Dziak, & Li, 2009). However, researchers considering the use of such designs in clinical research face a series of choices that have consequential implications for the interpretability and value of the experimental results. These choices include: whether to use a factorial design, selection of the number and type of factors to include, how to address the compatibility of the different factors included, whether and how to avoid confounds between the type and number of interventions a participant receives, and how to interpret interactions. The use of factorial designs in clinical intervention research poses choices that differ from those typically considered in randomized clinical trial designs. However, the great information yield of the former encourages clinical researchers' increased and careful execution of such designs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Shared care and implementation of a pediatric clinical pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langfrits, Mette Sørensen; Thomsen, RW; Rubak, Jens Mørck

    with uncontrolled asthma should be followed at the pediatrics department. Study 2) An increased overall proportion of children with well-controlled asthma. Study 3) Favorable changes in the use of asthma medication. Study 4) Self-reported higher quality of life among children with asthma Material and methods...... specialist out-patient clinic at the pediatrics department at Viborg hospital or at one of 100 GPs in the Viborg area. At baseline the involved health care professionals participated in an introduction to the clinical pathway and treatment guide. Furthermore the clinical pathway and treatment guide...... Midten. We sincerely thank Lars G. Hansen (Head of Department of Pediatrics, Viborg Hospital) for his help and participation....

  7. Implementing clinical guidelines in psychiatry: a qualitative study of perceived facilitators and barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wistedt Anna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Translating scientific evidence into daily practice is complex. Clinical guidelines can improve health care delivery, but there are a number of challenges in guideline adoption and implementation. Factors influencing the effective implementation of guidelines remain poorly understood. Understanding of barriers and facilitators is important for development of effective implementation strategies. The aim of this study was to determine perceived facilitators and barriers to guideline implementation and clinical compliance to guidelines for depression in psychiatric care. Methods This qualitative study was conducted at two psychiatric clinics in Stockholm, Sweden. The implementation activities at one of the clinics included local implementation teams, seminars, regular feedback and academic detailing. The other clinic served as a control and only received guidelines by post. Data were collected from three focus groups and 28 individual, semi-structured interviews. Content analysis was used to identify themes emerging from the interview data. Results The identified barriers to, and facilitators of, the implementation of guidelines could be classified into three major categories: (1 organizational resources, (2 health care professionals' individual characteristics and (3 perception of guidelines and implementation strategies. The practitioners in the implementation team and at control clinics differed in three main areas: (1 concerns about control over professional practice, (2 beliefs about evidence-based practice and (3 suspicions about financial motives for guideline introduction. Conclusions Identifying the barriers to, and facilitators of, the adoption of recommendations is an important way of achieving efficient implementation strategies. The findings of this study suggest that the adoption of guidelines may be improved if local health professionals actively participate in an ongoing implementation process and identify

  8. Personalised mobile services supporting the implementation of clinical guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, Valerie M.; Gay, Valerie; Leijdekkers, Peter; Rienks, Rienk; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Grasso, F; Paris, C

    2009-01-01

    Telemonitoring is emerging as a compelling application of Body Area Networks (BANs). We describe two health BAN systems developed respectively by a European team and an Australian team and discuss some issues encountered relating to formalization of clinical knowledge to support real-time analysis

  9. Role and Function Sub District in the Implementation of Local Government in Semarang City and District of Semarang Central Java Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunawan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sub district in performing common functions government implementation and administration functions of the tasks that have been submitted by District City in accordance with the Law No. 32 Year 2004 on Regional Government and Government Regulation No. 19 Year 2008 on the District experienced a bottleneck in its application in the form of authority, institutional, resource human resources and management districts, the study used a qualitative approach, purposive sampling areas that have been submitted and have not been handed over authority to the districts, the results showed that the authority has submitted both the mayor and the regent was not fully submitted, institution or organization not adjust districts Government Regulation No. 19 in 2008, the quality and quantity of human resources become a bottleneck in the implementation of tasks and discretionary attributive.

  10. CLINICAL PROFILE OF DENGUE FEVER IN KANYAKUMARI GOVERNMENT MEDICAL COLLEGE- A STUDY FROM KANYAKUMARI, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinda J

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Dengue infection is viral infection with different clinical presentation. This study was conducted in Kanyakumari Government Medical College Hospital, Asaripallam, Tamil Nadu, to study the various clinical profile and polyserositis involvement in dengue. MATERIALS AND METHODS The clinical profile and polyserositis involvement in dengue infection were determined by the retrospective study of all dengue infection in Kanyakumari Government Medical College Hospital, Asaripallam, Nagercoil, Tamilnadu. It was a retrospective study. All probable cases that had high-grade fever, lymphadenopathy, hepatomegaly, features of hock or haemorrhage and so forth and were admitted with provisional diagnosis of dengue fever were taken into account. All patients with positive dengue tests, either NS1 antigen, IgM, IgG antibody rapid serological test kit or ELISA were taken into the study group. As the duration of history of fever might be fallacious, the patients were subjected to all three serological tests. Patients who were positive for malaria, meningitis and enteric fever were excluded from the study. The whole number of patients included in our study was 40 (=40. RESULTS In this study, it was found that the bleeding manifestation had no correlation with thrombocytopenia, hepatomegaly and raised SGOT. All 40 patients had fever and they were treated with antipyretics (paracetamol in appropriate doses. Patients who presented with warning signs and stable vital signs were initially encouraged to take oral fluids; if they were not tolerated, intravenous fluids were started according to the WHO guidelines. CONCLUSION Dengue is an important arboviral infection in tropical countries. 1 Global incidence of dengue fever has increased dramatically in the recent decades. There are very few studies based on the revised new dengue classification. In our study, the total number of cases analysed was 40, out of which 28 (70% were categorised as cases of non

  11. Planned change or emergent change implementation approach and nurses' professional clinical autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luiking, Marie-Louise; Aarts, Leon; Bras, Leo; Grypdonck, Maria; van Linge, Roland

    2017-11-01

    Nurses' clinical autonomy is considered important for patients' outcome and influenced by the implementation approach of innovations. Emergent change approach with participation in the implementation process is thought to increase clinical autonomy. Planned change approach without this participation is thought not to increase clinical autonomy. Evidence of these effects on clinical autonomy is however limited. To examine the changes in clinical autonomy and in personal norms and values for a planned change and emergent change implementation of an innovation, e.g. intensive insulin therapy. Prospective comparative study with two geographically separated nurses' teams on one intensive care unit (ICU), randomly assigned to the experimental conditions. Data were collected from March 2008 to January 2009. Pre-existing differences in perception of team and innovation characteristics were excluded using instruments based on the innovation contingency model. The Nursing Activity Scale was used to measure clinical autonomy. The Personal Values and Norms instrument was used to assess orientation towards nursing activities and the Team Learning Processes instrument to assess learning as a team. Pre-implementation the measurements did not differ. Post-implementation, clinical autonomy was increased in the emergent change team and decreased in the planned change team. The Personal Values and Norms instrument showed in the emergent change team a decreased hierarchic score and increased developmental and rational scores. In the planned change team the hierarchical and group scores were increased. Learning as a team did not differ between the teams. In both teams there was a change in clinical autonomy and orientation towards nursing activities, in line with the experimental conditions. Emergent change implementation resulted in more clinical autonomy than planned change implementation. If an innovation requires the nurses to make their own clinical decisions, an emergent change

  12. Do inquiries into health system failures lead to change in clinical governance systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluyas, Heather; Alliex, Selma; Morrison, Paul

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the first part of a case study investigation to examine the changes at King Edward Memorial Hospital (KEMH) following an inquiry established to review the quality of obstetric and gynaecological services. Common findings from a range of health inquiries in recent times include that there have been inadequate adverse event reporting systems, the absence of transparent systems for staff and patients to report concerns about quality of patient care, and an ineffective medical credentialing and performance review system. The similarity of findings from many health inquiries raises the question of whether an inquiry does lead to changes to improve patient care and safety. There has been very little reported in the literature about this. Using a case study strategy the areas of medical credentialing, performance review and involvement of consumers in care were chosen as the KEMH clinical governance processes to be examined for changes post inquiry. Documents, archives and interviews were used as data sources for this case study. Documents were examined using a normative analytic approach and the Miles and Huberman framework was used for data analysis of the interviews. There were significant changes in the area of credentialing and performance review evident in analysis of all sources of data. There were some improvements in the processes of involving consumers in care, but deficits were identified in regard to the provision of training and upskilling for clinicians to improve their communication skills and interactions with patients and families.

  13. IT-benchmarking of clinical workflows: concept, implementation, and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thye, Johannes; Straede, Matthias-Christopher; Liebe, Jan-David; Hübner, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Due to the emerging evidence of health IT as opportunity and risk for clinical workflows, health IT must undergo a continuous measurement of its efficacy and efficiency. IT-benchmarks are a proven means for providing this information. The aim of this study was to enhance the methodology of an existing benchmarking procedure by including, in particular, new indicators of clinical workflows and by proposing new types of visualisation. Drawing on the concept of information logistics, we propose four workflow descriptors that were applied to four clinical processes. General and specific indicators were derived from these descriptors and processes. 199 chief information officers (CIOs) took part in the benchmarking. These hospitals were assigned to reference groups of a similar size and ownership from a total of 259 hospitals. Stepwise and comprehensive feedback was given to the CIOs. Most participants who evaluated the benchmark rated the procedure as very good, good, or rather good (98.4%). Benchmark information was used by CIOs for getting a general overview, advancing IT, preparing negotiations with board members, and arguing for a new IT project.

  14. Clinical research data warehouse governance for distributed research networks in the USA: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, John H; Elliott, Thomas E; Brown, Jeffrey S; Raebel, Marsha A; Davidson, Arthur; Nelson, Andrew F; Chung, Annie; La Chance, Pierre; Steiner, John F

    2014-01-01

    To review the published, peer-reviewed literature on clinical research data warehouse governance in distributed research networks (DRNs). Medline, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, and INSPEC were searched for relevant documents published through July 31, 2013 using a systematic approach. Only documents relating to DRNs in the USA were included. Documents were analyzed using a classification framework consisting of 10 facets to identify themes. 6641 documents were retrieved. After screening for duplicates and relevance, 38 were included in the final review. A peer-reviewed literature on data warehouse governance is emerging, but is still sparse. Peer-reviewed publications on UK research network governance were more prevalent, although not reviewed for this analysis. All 10 classification facets were used, with some documents falling into two or more classifications. No document addressed costs associated with governance. Even though DRNs are emerging as vehicles for research and public health surveillance, understanding of DRN data governance policies and procedures is limited. This is expected to change as more DRN projects disseminate their governance approaches as publicly available toolkits and peer-reviewed publications. While peer-reviewed, US-based DRN data warehouse governance publications have increased, DRN developers and administrators are encouraged to publish information about these programs. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Glocal clinical registries: pacemaker registry design and implementation for global and local integration--methodology and case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Regina da Silva

    Full Text Available The ability to apply standard and interoperable solutions for implementing and managing medical registries as well as aggregate, reproduce, and access data sets from legacy formats and platforms to advanced standard formats and operating systems are crucial for both clinical healthcare and biomedical research settings.Our study describes a reproducible, highly scalable, standard framework for a device registry implementation addressing both local data quality components and global linking problems.We developed a device registry framework involving the following steps: (1 Data standards definition and representation of the research workflow, (2 Development of electronic case report forms using REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture, (3 Data collection according to the clinical research workflow and, (4 Data augmentation by enriching the registry database with local electronic health records, governmental database and linked open data collections, (5 Data quality control and (6 Data dissemination through the registry Web site. Our registry adopted all applicable standardized data elements proposed by American College Cardiology / American Heart Association Clinical Data Standards, as well as variables derived from cardiac devices randomized trials and Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium. Local interoperability was performed between REDCap and data derived from Electronic Health Record system. The original data set was also augmented by incorporating the reimbursed values paid by the Brazilian government during a hospitalization for pacemaker implantation. By linking our registry to the open data collection repository Linked Clinical Trials (LinkedCT we found 130 clinical trials which are potentially correlated with our pacemaker registry.This study demonstrates how standard and reproducible solutions can be applied in the implementation of medical registries to constitute a re-usable framework. Such approach has the potential to

  16. Glocal Clinical Registries: Pacemaker Registry Design and Implementation for Global and Local Integration – Methodology and Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Kátia Regina; Costa, Roberto; Crevelari, Elizabeth Sartori; Lacerda, Marianna Sobral; de Moraes Albertini, Caio Marcos; Filho, Martino Martinelli; Santana, José Eduardo; Vissoci, João Ricardo Nickenig; Pietrobon, Ricardo; Barros, Jacson V.

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability to apply standard and interoperable solutions for implementing and managing medical registries as well as aggregate, reproduce, and access data sets from legacy formats and platforms to advanced standard formats and operating systems are crucial for both clinical healthcare and biomedical research settings. Purpose Our study describes a reproducible, highly scalable, standard framework for a device registry implementation addressing both local data quality components and global linking problems. Methods and Results We developed a device registry framework involving the following steps: (1) Data standards definition and representation of the research workflow, (2) Development of electronic case report forms using REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture), (3) Data collection according to the clinical research workflow and, (4) Data augmentation by enriching the registry database with local electronic health records, governmental database and linked open data collections, (5) Data quality control and (6) Data dissemination through the registry Web site. Our registry adopted all applicable standardized data elements proposed by American College Cardiology / American Heart Association Clinical Data Standards, as well as variables derived from cardiac devices randomized trials and Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium. Local interoperability was performed between REDCap and data derived from Electronic Health Record system. The original data set was also augmented by incorporating the reimbursed values paid by the Brazilian government during a hospitalization for pacemaker implantation. By linking our registry to the open data collection repository Linked Clinical Trials (LinkedCT) we found 130 clinical trials which are potentially correlated with our pacemaker registry. Conclusion This study demonstrates how standard and reproducible solutions can be applied in the implementation of medical registries to constitute a re-usable framework

  17. Clinical implementation and evaluation of the Acuros dose calculation algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chenyu; Combine, Anthony G; Bednarz, Greg; Lalonde, Ronald J; Hu, Bin; Dickens, Kathy; Wynn, Raymond; Pavord, Daniel C; Saiful Huq, M

    2017-09-01

    The main aim of this study is to validate the Acuros XB dose calculation algorithm for a Varian Clinac iX linac in our clinics, and subsequently compare it with the wildely used AAA algorithm. The source models for both Acuros XB and AAA were configured by importing the same measured beam data into Eclipse treatment planning system. Both algorithms were validated by comparing calculated dose with measured dose on a homogeneous water phantom for field sizes ranging from 6 cm × 6 cm to 40 cm × 40 cm. Central axis and off-axis points with different depths were chosen for the comparison. In addition, the accuracy of Acuros was evaluated for wedge fields with wedge angles from 15 to 60°. Similarly, variable field sizes for an inhomogeneous phantom were chosen to validate the Acuros algorithm. In addition, doses calculated by Acuros and AAA at the center of lung equivalent tissue from three different VMAT plans were compared to the ion chamber measured doses in QUASAR phantom, and the calculated dose distributions by the two algorithms and their differences on patients were compared. Computation time on VMAT plans was also evaluated for Acuros and AAA. Differences between dose-to-water (calculated by AAA and Acuros XB) and dose-to-medium (calculated by Acuros XB) on patient plans were compared and evaluated. For open 6 MV photon beams on the homogeneous water phantom, both Acuros XB and AAA calculations were within 1% of measurements. For 23 MV photon beams, the calculated doses were within 1.5% of measured doses for Acuros XB and 2% for AAA. Testing on the inhomogeneous phantom demonstrated that AAA overestimated doses by up to 8.96% at a point close to lung/solid water interface, while Acuros XB reduced that to 1.64%. The test on QUASAR phantom showed that Acuros achieved better agreement in lung equivalent tissue while AAA underestimated dose for all VMAT plans by up to 2.7%. Acuros XB computation time was about three times faster than AAA for VMAT plans, and

  18. Implementation of Targeted Next Generation Sequencing in Clinical Diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Jakob; Burton, Mark; Thomassen, Mads

    Accurate mutation detection is essential in clinical genetic diagnostics of monogenic hereditary diseases. Targeted next generation sequencing (NGS) provides a promising and cost-effective alternative to Sanger sequencing and MLPA analysis currently used in most diagnostic laboratories. One...... of mutation positive controls previously characterized by Sanger/MLPA analysis. Agilent SureSelect Target-Enrichment kits were used for capturing a set of genes associated with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome and a compilation of genes involved in multiple rare single gene disorders......, respectively. For diagnostics, the sequencing coverage is essential, wherefore a minimum coverage of 30x per nucleotide in the coding regions was used as our primary quality criterion. For the majority of the included genes, we obtained adequate gene coverage, in which we were able to detect 100% of the known...

  19. Insights into implementation of sacubitril/valsartan into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Pieter; Beliën, Hanne; Dupont, Matthias; Mullens, Wilfried

    2018-06-01

    Sacubitril/valsartan significantly reduced heart failure hospitalization and mortality in PARADIGM-HF (Prospective Comparison of Angiotensin Receptor-Neprilysin Inhibitor With an Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and Morbidity in Heart Failure). However, real-world data from its use are lacking. We retrospectively assessed all baseline and follow-up data of consecutive heart failure patients with reduced ejection fraction receiving therapy with sacubitril/valsartan for Class I recommendation between December 2016 and July 2017. Baseline characteristics and dose titration of sacubitril/valsartan were compared between patients in clinical practice and in PARADIGM-HF. A total of 120 patients (81% male) were switched from angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker to sacubitril/valsartan. A total of 20.1% of patients received dose uptitration. Patients were treated with an equipotential dose of renin-angiotensin system blockers before and after uptitration of sacubitril/valsartan (57 ± 29% vs. 53 ± 29% of target dose indicated by European Society of Cardiology guidelines; P = 0.286). However, they received a lower dose of sacubitril/valsartan in comparison with those in the PARADIGM-HF (219 ± 12 vs. 375 ± 75 mg; P sacubitril/valsartan in PARADIGM-HF, patients in clinical practice were older and had a higher serum creatinine, higher New York Heart Association functional classification, and lower left ventricular ejection fraction (all P-value sacubitril/valsartan, New York Heart Association class significantly improved (P sacubitril/valsartan therapy to reduce the risk of heart failure hospitalization and all-cause mortality. © 2018 The Authors. ESC Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  20. Technical experiences of implementing a wireless tracking and facial biometric verification system for a clinical environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Brent; Lee, Jasper; Documet, Jorge; Guo, Bing; King, Nelson; Huang, H. K.

    2006-03-01

    By implementing a tracking and verification system, clinical facilities can effectively monitor workflow and heighten information security in today's growing demand towards digital imaging informatics. This paper presents the technical design and implementation experiences encountered during the development of a Location Tracking and Verification System (LTVS) for a clinical environment. LTVS integrates facial biometrics with wireless tracking so that administrators can manage and monitor patient and staff through a web-based application. Implementation challenges fall into three main areas: 1) Development and Integration, 2) Calibration and Optimization of Wi-Fi Tracking System, and 3) Clinical Implementation. An initial prototype LTVS has been implemented within USC's Healthcare Consultation Center II Outpatient Facility, which currently has a fully digital imaging department environment with integrated HIS/RIS/PACS/VR (Voice Recognition).

  1. Quality assurance for the clinical implementation of kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring for prostate cancer VMAT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ng, J. A.; Booth, J. T.; O'Brien, R. T.

    2014-01-01

    is being piloted in a clinical trial for prostate cancer patients treated with VMAT (NCT01742403). The purpose of this work was to develop clinical process and quality assurance (QA) practices for the clinical implementation of KIM. Methods: Informed by and adapting existing guideline documents from other...... real-time monitoring systems, KIM-specific QA practices were developed. The following five KIM-specific QA tests were included: (1) static localization accuracy, (2) dynamic localization accuracy, (3) treatment interruption accuracy, (4) latency measurement, and (5) clinical conditions accuracy. Tests...... developed and implemented for prostate cancer VMAT....

  2. Barriers to implementing the clinical guideline on borderline personality disorder in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermens, M.L.M.; van Splunteren, P.T.; van den Bosch, A.; Verheul, R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study determined the gap between actual care and optimal care (recommended in the clinical guideline) for patients with borderline personality disorder in the Netherlands. Factors that affected guideline implementation were identified. Methods: Ten specialized mental health

  3. Rational pharmacotherapy and clinical practice guidelines - Theories and perspectives on implementing pharmacotherapeutic treatment guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fijn, R; Brouwers, JRBJ; Timmer, JW; de Jong-van den Berg, LTW

    Several theories behind implementing clinical guidelines have been described within the literature. At first sight, these may seem different. However, there are similarities and eventually they are rather complementary than mutually exclusive. This article integrates several theoretical views on

  4. Implementation of an Ebola virus disease vaccine clinical trial during the Ebola epidemic in Liberia: Design, procedures, and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Stephen B; Neaton, James D; Lane, H Clifford; Kieh, Mark W S; Massaquoi, Moses B F; Touchette, Nancy A; Nason, Martha C; Follmann, Dean A; Boley, Fatorma K; Johnson, Melvin P; Larson, Gregg; Kateh, Francis N; Nyenswah, Tolbert G

    2016-02-01

    The index case of the Ebola virus disease epidemic in West Africa is believed to have originated in Guinea. By June 2014, Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone were in the midst of a full-blown and complex global health emergency. The devastating effects of this Ebola epidemic in West Africa put the global health response in acute focus for urgent international interventions. Accordingly, in October 2014, a World Health Organization high-level meeting endorsed the concept of a phase 2/3 clinical trial in Liberia to study Ebola vaccines. As a follow-up to the global response, in November 2014, the Government of Liberia and the US Government signed an agreement to form a research partnership to investigate Ebola and to assess intervention strategies for treating, controlling, and preventing the disease in Liberia. This agreement led to the establishment of the Joint Liberia-US Partnership for Research on Ebola Virus in Liberia as the beginning of a long-term collaborative partnership in clinical research between the two countries. In this article, we discuss the methodology and related challenges associated with the implementation of the Ebola vaccines clinical trial, based on a double-blinded randomized controlled trial, in Liberia. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Implementing self sustained quality control procedures in a clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Roshan; K C, Sanjay; Shrestha, Prabodh; Sinha, J N

    2013-01-01

    Quality control is an essential component in every clinical laboratory which maintains the excellence of laboratory standards, supplementing to proper disease diagnosis, patient care and resulting in overall strengthening of health care system. Numerous quality control schemes are available, with combinations of procedures, most of which are tedious, time consuming and can be "too technical" whereas commercially available quality control materials can be expensive especially for laboratories in developing nations like Nepal. Here, we present a procedure performed at our centre with self prepared control serum and use of simple statistical tools for quality assurance. The pooled serum was prepared as per guidelines for preparation of stabilized liquid quality control serum from human sera. Internal Quality Assessment was performed on this sample, on a daily basis which included measurement of 12 routine biochemical parameters. The results were plotted on Levey-Jennings charts and analysed with quality control rules, for a period of one month. The mean levels of biochemical analytes in self prepared control serum were within normal physiological range. This serum was evaluated every day along with patients' samples. The results obtained were plotted on control charts and analysed using common quality control rules to identify possible systematic and random errors. Immediate mitigation measures were taken and the dispatch of erroneous reports was avoided. In this study we try to highlight on a simple internal quality control procedure which can be performed by laboratories, with minimum technology, expenditure, and expertise and improve reliability and validity of the test reports.

  6. Implementation aspects of image management, archiving, and communication systems in routine clinical use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haar Romenij, ter B.M.

    1991-01-01

    Implementation of a digital imaging network in routine clinical use is a difficult task. Not only the high technical requirements, but especially the complexity of the organization of the diagnostic information flow in a hospital makes commitment essential in PACS implementation. The application of

  7. Health care networks implementation and regional governance challenges in the Legal Amazon Region: an analysis of the QualiSUS-Rede Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Angela Oliveira; Cruz, Marly Marques; Giovanella, Ligia; Alves, Glaydes Dos Reis; Cardoso, Gisela Cordeiro Pereira

    2017-04-01

    This paper aims to analyze the potential, limits and challenges of regional governance in the implementation process of health care networks in three Brazilian regions: Alto Solimões (Amazonas), Belém (Pará) and an interstate region comprising Tocantins, Pará and Maranhão states (Topama). The study is based on the evaluation study on the implementation of the Quality Health Care Network Development and Improvement Project (QualiSUS-Rede). This is a qualitative multiple case study with the analysis of official documents and use of semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders conducted from July to December 2014. Governance review encompassed three components: stakeholders involved, especially local steering groups and their regional coordination capacity; strategies used for strengthening regional governance, anchored on the intervention's modeling; and implementation of local health care networks. Results point that the regional managing commissions were the main governance strategy and that the QualiSUS-Rede Project strengthened regional governance and integration differently in every case, depending on stakeholders' administration and consensus capacity on regional and political priorities.

  8. Energy Efficiency Programs in K-12 Schools: A Guide to Developing and Implementing Greenhouse Gas Reduction Programs. Local Government Climate and Energy Strategy Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Environmental Protection Agency, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Saving energy through energy efficiency improvements can cost less than generating, transmitting, and distributing energy from power plants, and provides multiple economic and environmental benefits. Local governments can promote energy efficiency in their jurisdictions by developing and implementing strategies that improve the efficiency of…

  9. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology policy on the application for, and implementation of, clinical practice guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harminder; Leontiadis, Grigorios I; Hookey, Lawrence; Enns, Robert; Bistritz, Lana; Rioux, Louis-Charles; Hope, Louise; Sinclair, Paul

    2014-01-01

    An important mandate of the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology (CAG), as documented in the Association’s governance policies, is to optimize the care of patients with digestive disorders. Clinical practice guidelines are one means of achieving this goal. The benefits of timely, high-quality and evidenced-based recommendations include: Enhancing the professional development of clinical members through education and dissemination of synthesized clinical research;Improving patient care provided by members by providing focus on quality and evidence;Creating legislative environments that favour effective clinical practice;Enhancing the clinical care provided to patients with digestive disease by nongastroenterologists; andIdentifying areas that require further information or research to improve clinical care.The present document provides the foundation required to ensure that clinical practice guidelines produced by the CAG are necessary, appropriate, credible and applicable. These recommendations should be adhered to as closely as possible to obtain CAG endorsement. PMID:25314352

  10. Transitioning couple's voluntary HIV counseling and testing (CVCT from stand-alone weekend services into routine antenatal and VCT services in government clinics in Zambia's two largest cities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mubiana Inambao

    Full Text Available Most HIV infections in Africa are acquired by married/cohabiting adults and WHO recommends couple's voluntary HIV counseling and testing (CVCT for prevention. The handover from NGO-sponsored weekend CVCT to government-sponsored services in routine weekday antenatal care (ANC and individual voluntary testing and counseling (VCT services in Zambia's two largest cities from 2009-2015 is described.Government clinic counselors were trained to provide CVCT, and along with community health workers they promoted CVCT services in their clinic and surrounding areas. When client volume exceeded the capacity of on-duty staff in ANC and VCT, non-governmental organization (NGO subsidies were offered for overtime pay.Implementation of routine CVCT services varied greatly by clinic and city. The 12 highest volume clinics were examined further, while 13 clinics had CVCT numbers that were too low to warrant further investigation. In Lusaka, the proportion of pregnant women whose partners were tested rose from 2.6% in 2009 to a peak of 26.2% in 2012 and 24.8% in 2015. Corresponding reports in Ndola were 2.0% in 2009, 17.0% in 2012 and 14.5% in 2015. Obstacles to CVCT included: limited space and staffing, competing priorities, record keeping not adapted for couples, and few resources for promotion and increasing male involvement. Conflicting training models for 'partner testing' with men and women separately vs. CVCT with joint post-test counseling led to confusion in reporting to district health authorities.A focused and sustained effort will be required to reach a meaningful number of couples with CVCT to prevent heterosexual and perinatal HIV transmission. Establishing targets and timelines, funding for dedicated and appropriately trained staff, adoption of standardized data recording instruments with couple-level indicators, and expansion of community and clinic-based promotions using proven models are recommended.

  11. Examining dog owners' beliefs regarding rabies vaccination during government-funded vaccine clinics in Grenada to improve vaccine coverage rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D; Delgado, A; Louison, B; Lefrancois, T; Shaw, J

    2013-07-01

    Vaccination of domestic pets is an important component of rabies control and prevention in countries where the disease is maintained in a wildlife reservoir. In Grenada, vaccine coverage rates were low, despite extensive public education and advertising of government-sponsored vaccine clinics where rabies vaccine is administered to animals at no cost to animal owners. Information was needed on reasons for decreased dog owner participation in government-funded rabies vaccination clinics. A total of 120 dog owners from 6 different parishes were asked to complete a questionnaire assessing their currently held beliefs about rabies vaccination and perception of the risk posed by rabies. Over 70% of respondents believed that problems in the organization and management of clinic sites could allow for fighting between dogs or disease spread among dogs, while 35% of owners did not believe that they had the ability or adequate help to bring their dogs to the clinic sites. Recommendations for improving vaccine coverage rates included: improved scheduling of clinic sites and dates; increased biosecurity at clinic locations; focused advertising on the availability of home visits, particularly for aggressive dogs or dogs with visible skin-related diseases such as mange; and the recruitment of community volunteers to assist with bringing dogs to the clinic sites. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Clinical Decision Support to Implement CYP2D6 Drug-Gene Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraballo, Pedro J; Parkulo, Mark; Blair, David; Elliott, Michelle; Schultz, Cloann; Sutton, Joseph; Rao, Padma; Bruflat, Jamie; Bleimeyer, Robert; Crooks, John; Gabrielson, Donald; Nicholson, Wayne; Rohrer Vitek, Carolyn; Wix, Kelly; Bielinski, Suzette J; Pathak, Jyotishman; Kullo, Iftikhar

    2015-01-01

    The level of CYP2D6 metabolic activity can be predicted by pharmacogenomic testing, and concomitant use of clinical decision support has the potential to prevent adverse effects from those drugs metabolized by this enzyme. Our initial findings after implementation of clinical decision support alerts integrated in the electronic health records suggest high feasibility, but also identify important challenges.

  13. Preemptive clinical pharmacogenetics implementation: current programs in five US medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnenberger, Henry M; Crews, Kristine R; Hoffman, James M; Caudle, Kelly E; Broeckel, Ulrich; Howard, Scott C; Hunkler, Robert J; Klein, Teri E; Evans, William E; Relling, Mary V

    2015-01-01

    Although the field of pharmacogenetics has existed for decades, practioners have been slow to implement pharmacogenetic testing in clinical care. Numerous publications describe the barriers to clinical implementation of pharmacogenetics. Recently, several freely available resources have been developed to help address these barriers. In this review, we discuss current programs that use preemptive genotyping to optimize the pharmacotherapy of patients. Array-based preemptive testing includes a large number of relevant pharmacogenes that impact multiple high-risk drugs. Using a preemptive approach allows genotyping results to be available prior to any prescribing decision so that genomic variation may be considered as an inherent patient characteristic in the planning of therapy. This review describes the common elements among programs that have implemented preemptive genotyping and highlights key processes for implementation, including clinical decision support.

  14. Preemptive Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation: Current programs in five United States medical centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnenberger, Henry M.; Crews, Kristine R.; Hoffman, James M.; Caudle, Kelly E.; Broeckel, Ulrich; Howard, Scott C.; Hunkler, Robert J.; Klein, Teri E.; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.

    2015-01-01

    Although the field of pharmacogenetics has existed for decades, the implementation of, pharmacogenetic testing in clinical care has been slow. There are numerous publications, describing the barriers to clinical implementation of pharmacogenetics. Recently, several freely, available resources have been developed to help address these barriers. In this review we, discuss current programs that use preemptive genotyping to optimize the pharmacotherapy of, patients. Array-based preemptive testing includes a large number of relevant pharmacogenes, that impact multiple high-risk drugs. Using a preemptive approach allows genotyping results to, be available prior to any prescribing decision so that genomic variation may be considered as, an inherent patient characteristic in the planning of therapy. This review describes the common, elements among programs that have implemented preemptive genotyping and highlights key, processes for implementation, including clinical decision support. PMID:25292429

  15. Systematic implementation of clinical risk management in a large university hospital: the impact of risk managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendlhofer, Gerald; Brunner, Gernot; Tax, Christa; Falzberger, Gebhard; Smolle, Josef; Leitgeb, Karina; Kober, Brigitte; Kamolz, Lars Peter

    2015-01-01

    For health care systems in recent years, patient safety has increasingly become a priority issue. National and international strategies have been considered to attempt to overcome the most prominent hazards while patients are receiving health care. Thereby, clinical risk management (CRM) plays a dominant role in enabling the identification, analysis, and management of potential risks. CRM implementation into routine procedures within complex hospital organizations is challenging, as in the past, organizational change strategies using a top-down approach have often failed. Therefore, one of our main objectives was to educate a certain number of risk managers in facilitating CRM using a bottom-up approach. To achieve our primary purpose, five project strands were developed, and consequently followed, introducing CRM: corporate governance, risk management (RM) training, CRM process, information, and involvement. The core part of the CRM process involved the education of risk managers within each organizational unit. To account for the size of the existing organization, we assumed that a minimum of 1 % of the workforce had to be trained in RM to disseminate the continuous improvement of quality and safety. Following a roll-out plan, CRM was introduced in each unit and potential risks were identified. Alongside the changes in the corporate governance, a hospital-wide CRM process was introduced resulting in 158 trained risk managers correlating to 2.0 % of the total workforce. Currently, risk managers are present in every unit and have identified 360 operational risks. Among those, 176 risks were scored as strategic and clustered together into top risks. Effective meeting structures and opportunities to share information and knowledge were introduced. Thus far, 31 units have been externally audited in CRM. The CRM approach is unique with respect to its dimension; members of all health care professions were trained to be able to identify potential risks. A network of risk

  16. Impact of Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) on the treatment profile in pilot government dental clinics in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikwilu, Emil Namakuka; Frencken, Jo; Mulder, Jan

    2009-06-08

    The predominant mode of treatment in government dental clinics in Tanzania has been tooth extraction because the economy could not support the conventional restorative care which depends on expensive equipment, electricity and piped water systems. Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) was perceived as a suitable alternative. A 3.5-year study was designed to document the changes in the treatment profiles ascribed to the systematic introduction of ART in pilot government dental clinics. Dental practitioners who were working in 13 government dental clinics underwent a 7-day ART training. Treatment record data on teeth extracted and teeth restored by the conventional and ART approaches were collected from these clinics for the three study periods. The mean percentage of ART restorations to total treatment, ART restorations to total restorations, and total restorations to total treatments rendered were computed. Differences between variables were determined by ANOVA, t-test and Chi-square. The mean percentage of ART restorations to total treatment rendered was 0.4 (SE = 0.5) and 11.9 (SE = 1.1) during the baseline and second follow-up period respectively (ANOVA mixed model; P ART restorations to total restorations rendered at baseline and 2nd follow-up period was 8.4% and 88.9% respectively (ANOVA mixed model; P ART restorations, 96.6% willing to receive ART restoration again in future, and 94.9% willing to recommend ART treatment to their close relatives. ART introduction in pilot government dental clinics raised the number of teeth saved by restorative care. Countrywide introduction of the ART approach in Tanzania is recommended.

  17. Experience with the Implementation of Clinical Pharmacy Services and Processes in a University Hospital in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Annemie; Claus, Barbara; Vandewoude, Koen; Petrovic, Mirko

    2016-03-01

    This article summarizes the experience with the development of clinical pharmacy services in the Ghent University Hospital in Belgium. Implementation of clinical pharmacy services in Belgian hospitals has not been evident because these activities were initially not structurally financed. The aim is to describe the strengths and weaknesses of the clinical pharmacy development process, and the milestones that enhanced the progress. Furthermore, the organisation of clinical pharmacy in the Ghent University Hospital is explained, including back- and front-office activities, seamless pharmaceutical care and medication safety improvement. Some working methods, procedures and tools are explained for different clinical pharmacy services. In particular, the clinical pharmacy projects for geriatric patients as well as the preparation of clinical pharmacy services for the accreditation process are explained. We also reflect on the organisation model and the future development of clinical pharmacy, taking into consideration facilitators and potential barriers.

  18. Implementation of quality management for clinical bacteriology in low-resource settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbé, B; Yansouni, C P; Affolabi, D; Jacobs, J

    2017-07-01

    The declining trend of malaria and the recent prioritization of containment of antimicrobial resistance have created a momentum to implement clinical bacteriology in low-resource settings. Successful implementation relies on guidance by a quality management system (QMS). Over the past decade international initiatives were launched towards implementation of QMS in HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. To describe the progress towards accreditation of medical laboratories and to identify the challenges and best practices for implementation of QMS in clinical bacteriology in low-resource settings. Published literature, online reports and websites related to the implementation of laboratory QMS, accreditation of medical laboratories and initiatives for containment of antimicrobial resistance. Apart from the limitations of infrastructure, equipment, consumables and staff, QMS are challenged with the complexity of clinical bacteriology and the healthcare context in low-resource settings (small-scale laboratories, attitudes and perception of staff, absence of laboratory information systems). Likewise, most international initiatives addressing laboratory health strengthening have focused on public health and outbreak management rather than on hospital based patient care. Best practices to implement quality-assured clinical bacteriology in low-resource settings include alignment with national regulations and public health reference laboratories, participating in external quality assurance programmes, support from the hospital's management, starting with attainable projects, conducting error review and daily bench-side supervision, looking for locally adapted solutions, stimulating ownership and extending existing training programmes to clinical bacteriology. The implementation of QMS in clinical bacteriology in hospital settings will ultimately boost a culture of quality to all sectors of healthcare in low-resource settings. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by

  19. Patient engagement in clinical trials: The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative's leadership from theory to practical implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick-Lake, Bray

    2018-02-01

    Patient engagement is an increasingly important aspect of successful clinical trials. Over the past decade, as patient group involvement in clinical trials has continued to increase and diversify, the Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative has not only recognized the crucial role patients play in improving the clinical trial enterprise but also made a deep commitment to help grow and shape the emerging field of patient engagement. This article describes the evolution of patient engagement including the origins of the patient engagement movement; barriers to successful engagement and remaining challenges to full and valuable collaboration between patient groups and trial sponsors; and Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative's role in influencing the field through organizational practices, formal project work and resulting recommendations, and external advocacy efforts.

  20. Improving outcomes in veterans with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma through implementation of a multidisciplinary clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Tyler; Rassi, Edward El; Maggiore, Ronald J; Holland, John; Reed, Julie; Suriano, Kathleen; Stooksbury, Marcelle; Tobin, Nora; Gross, Neil; Clayburgh, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    Treatment of head and neck cancer is complex, and a multidisciplinary clinic may improve the coordination of care. The value of a head and neck multidisciplinary clinic has not yet been established in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). A retrospective review was conducted of Veterans Affairs patients with oropharyngeal SCC undergoing concurrent chemoradiation before and after implementation of the head and neck multidisciplinary clinic. Fifty-two patients before and 54 patients after multidisciplinary clinic were included in this study. Age, tobacco use, and p16+ status were similar between groups. With multidisciplinary clinic, time to treatment decreased, and utilization of supportive services, including speech pathology, dentistry, and nutrition increased. The 5-year disease-specific survival rate increased from 63% to 81% (p = .043) after implementation of the multidisciplinary clinic. Multivariate analysis showed that disease stage (p = .016), p16 status (p = .006), and multidisciplinary clinic participation (p = .042) were predictors of disease-specific survival. Implementation of a multidisciplinary clinic improved care coordination and disease-specific survival in patients with oropharyngeal SCC. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 39: 1106-1112, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Implementation of workflow engine technology to deliver basic clinical decision support functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huser, Vojtech; Rasmussen, Luke V; Oberg, Ryan; Starren, Justin B

    2011-04-10

    Workflow engine technology represents a new class of software with the ability to graphically model step-based knowledge. We present application of this novel technology to the domain of clinical decision support. Successful implementation of decision support within an electronic health record (EHR) remains an unsolved research challenge. Previous research efforts were mostly based on healthcare-specific representation standards and execution engines and did not reach wide adoption. We focus on two challenges in decision support systems: the ability to test decision logic on retrospective data prior prospective deployment and the challenge of user-friendly representation of clinical logic. We present our implementation of a workflow engine technology that addresses the two above-described challenges in delivering clinical decision support. Our system is based on a cross-industry standard of XML (extensible markup language) process definition language (XPDL). The core components of the system are a workflow editor for modeling clinical scenarios and a workflow engine for execution of those scenarios. We demonstrate, with an open-source and publicly available workflow suite, that clinical decision support logic can be executed on retrospective data. The same flowchart-based representation can also function in a prospective mode where the system can be integrated with an EHR system and respond to real-time clinical events. We limit the scope of our implementation to decision support content generation (which can be EHR system vendor independent). We do not focus on supporting complex decision support content delivery mechanisms due to lack of standardization of EHR systems in this area. We present results of our evaluation of the flowchart-based graphical notation as well as architectural evaluation of our implementation using an established evaluation framework for clinical decision support architecture. We describe an implementation of a free workflow technology

  2. Implementation of workflow engine technology to deliver basic clinical decision support functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Workflow engine technology represents a new class of software with the ability to graphically model step-based knowledge. We present application of this novel technology to the domain of clinical decision support. Successful implementation of decision support within an electronic health record (EHR) remains an unsolved research challenge. Previous research efforts were mostly based on healthcare-specific representation standards and execution engines and did not reach wide adoption. We focus on two challenges in decision support systems: the ability to test decision logic on retrospective data prior prospective deployment and the challenge of user-friendly representation of clinical logic. Results We present our implementation of a workflow engine technology that addresses the two above-described challenges in delivering clinical decision support. Our system is based on a cross-industry standard of XML (extensible markup language) process definition language (XPDL). The core components of the system are a workflow editor for modeling clinical scenarios and a workflow engine for execution of those scenarios. We demonstrate, with an open-source and publicly available workflow suite, that clinical decision support logic can be executed on retrospective data. The same flowchart-based representation can also function in a prospective mode where the system can be integrated with an EHR system and respond to real-time clinical events. We limit the scope of our implementation to decision support content generation (which can be EHR system vendor independent). We do not focus on supporting complex decision support content delivery mechanisms due to lack of standardization of EHR systems in this area. We present results of our evaluation of the flowchart-based graphical notation as well as architectural evaluation of our implementation using an established evaluation framework for clinical decision support architecture. Conclusions We describe an implementation of

  3. The cost of implementing rapid HIV testing in sexually transmitted disease clinics in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggman, Ashley A; Feaster, Daniel J; Leff, Jared A; Golden, Matthew R; Castellon, Pedro C; Gooden, Lauren; Matheson, Tim; Colfax, Grant N; Metsch, Lisa R; Schackman, Bruce R

    2014-09-01

    Rapid HIV testing in high-risk populations can increase the number of persons who learn their HIV status and avoid spending clinic resources to locate persons identified as HIV infected. We determined the cost to sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics of point-of-care rapid HIV testing using data from 7 public clinics that participated in a randomized trial of rapid testing with and without brief patient-centered risk reduction counseling in 2010. Costs included counselor and trainer time, supplies, and clinic overhead. We applied national labor rates and test costs. We calculated median clinic start-up costs and mean cost per patient tested, and projected incremental annual costs of implementing universal rapid HIV testing compared with current testing practices. Criteria for offering rapid HIV testing and methods for delivering nonrapid test results varied among clinics before the trial. Rapid HIV testing cost an average of US $22/patient without brief risk reduction counseling and US $46/patient with counseling in these 7 clinics. Median start-up costs per clinic were US $1100 and US $16,100 without and with counseling, respectively. Estimated incremental annual costs per clinic of implementing universal rapid HIV testing varied by whether or not brief counseling is conducted and by current clinic testing practices, ranging from a savings of US $19,500 to a cost of US $40,700 without counseling and a cost of US $98,000 to US $153,900 with counseling. Universal rapid HIV testing in STD clinics with same-day results can be implemented at relatively low cost to STD clinics, if brief risk reduction counseling is not offered.

  4. Matrix-oriented implementation for the numerical solution of the partial differential equations governing flows and transport in porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Shuyu; Salama, Amgad; El-Amin, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new technique for the numerical solution of the various partial differential equations governing flow and transport phenomena in porous media. This method is proposed to be used in high level programming languages like

  5. Tracking planning and implementation interventions across regions and institutional boundaries: Failure to establish a uniform reporting language across government

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Brits, A

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available delivery by government. Disparate information flows and a lack of alignment in semantic meaning that is differences in opinion of what constitutes a programme or project between established systems imply that information across organizations cannot...

  6. Developing a questionnaire to identify perceived barriers for implementing the Dutch physical therapy COPD clinical practice guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wees, P.J. van der; Zagers, C.A.; Die, S.E. de; Hendriks, E.J.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.G.; Bie, R.A. de

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical practice guidelines have been developed to assist healthcare practitioners in clinical decision making. Publication of clinical practice guidelines does not automatically lead to their uptake and barrier identification has been recognized as an important step in implementation

  7. Implementation and evaluation of Parkinson disease management in an outpatient clinical pharmacist-run neurology telephone clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, Teodora Cristina; Elharar, Nicole; Garcia, Guadalupe

    2018-05-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive, debilitating neurodegenerative disease that often requires complex pharmacologic treatment regimens. Prior to this clinic, there was no involvement of a clinical pharmacy specialist (CPS) in the outpatient neurology clinic at the West Palm Beach Veterans Affairs Medical Center. This was a prospective, quality-improvement project to develop a clinical pharmacist-run neurology telephone clinic and evaluate pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions in an effort to improve the quality of care for patients with PD. Additionally, the CPS conducted medication education groups to 24 patients with PD and their caregivers, if applicable, at this medical center with the purpose of promoting patient knowledge and medication awareness. Medication management was performed via telephone rather than face to face. Only patients with a concomitant mental health diagnosis for which they were receiving at least one psychotropic medication were included for individual visits due to the established scope of practice of the CPS being limited to mental health and primary care medications. Data collection included patient and clinic demographics as well as pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions made for patients enrolled from January 6, 2017, through March 31, 2017. A total of 49 pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions were made for 10 patients. We successfully implemented and evaluated a clinical pharmacist-run neurology telephone clinic for patients with PD. Expansion of this clinic to patients with various neurological disorders may improve access to care using an innovative method of medication management expertise by a CPS.

  8. Towards meaningful medication-related clinical decision support: recommendations for an initial implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phansalkar, S; Wright, A; Kuperman, G J; Vaida, A J; Bobb, A M; Jenders, R A; Payne, T H; Halamka, J; Bloomrosen, M; Bates, D W

    2011-01-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) can improve safety, quality, and cost-effectiveness of patient care, especially when implemented in computerized provider order entry (CPOE) applications. Medication-related decision support logic forms a large component of the CDS logic in any CPOE system. However, organizations wishing to implement CDS must either purchase the computable clinical content or develop it themselves. Content provided by vendors does not always meet local expectations. Most organizations lack the resources to customize the clinical content and the expertise to implement it effectively. In this paper, we describe the recommendations of a national expert panel on two basic medication-related CDS areas, specifically, drug-drug interaction (DDI) checking and duplicate therapy checking. The goals of this study were to define a starter set of medication-related alerts that healthcare organizations can implement in their clinical information systems. We also draw on the experiences of diverse institutions to highlight the realities of implementing medication decision support. These findings represent the experiences of institutions with a long history in the domain of medication decision support, and the hope is that this guidance may improve the feasibility and efficiency CDS adoption across healthcare settings.

  9. Economic analysis of three interventions of different intensity in improving school implementation of a government healthy canteen policy in Australia: costs, incremental and relative cost effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Kathryn L; Reeves, Penny; Deeming, Simon; Yoong, Sze Lin; Wolfenden, Luke; Nathan, Nicole; Wiggers, John

    2018-03-20

    No evaluations of the cost or cost effectiveness of interventions to increase school implementation of food availability policies have been reported. Government and non-government agency decisions regarding the extent of investment required to enhance school implementation of such policies are unsupported by such evidence. This study sought to i) Determine cost and cost-effectiveness of three interventions in improving school implementation of an Australian government healthy canteen policy and; ii) Determine the relative cost-effectiveness of the interventions in improving school implementation of such a policy. An analysis of the cost and cost-effectiveness of three implementation interventions of varying support intensity, relative to usual implementation support conducted during 2013-2015 was undertaken. Secondly, an indirect comparison of the trials was undertaken to determine the most cost-effective of the three strategies. The economic analysis was based on the cost of delivering the interventions by health service delivery staff to increase the proportion of schools 'adherent' with the policy. The total costs per school were $166,971, $70,926 and $75,682 for the high, medium and low intensity interventions respectively. Compared to usual support, the cost effectiveness ratios for each of the three interventions were: A$2982 (high intensity), A$2627 (medium intensity) and A$4730 (low intensity) per percent increase in proportion of schools reporting 'adherence'). Indirect comparison between the 'high' and 'medium intensity' interventions showed no statistically significant difference in cost-effectiveness. The results indicate that while the cost profiles of the interventions varied substantially, the cost-effectiveness did not. This result is valuable to policy makers seeking cost-effective solutions that can be delivered within budget.

  10. [Radiation protection. Implications for clinical practice on the new regulations governing roentgen ray irradiation and radioprotection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestle, U; Berlich, J

    2006-08-01

    In 2001 or 2002, the legislator made substantial alterations to the "Röntgenverordnung" [regulations governing use of roentgen ray radiation] and "Strahlenschutzverordnung" [regulations governing radiation protection]. This was done to bring German law in line with EU Directives 96/29/Euratom (basic safety standards for the protection of the health of workers and the general public against the dangers arising from ionizing radiation) and 97/43/Euratom (health protection of individuals against the dangers of ionizing radiation in relation to medical exposure). Proper use of radiation in medicine requires that those involved in its application are aware of the biological effect of radiation. When staff and others are protected good organization and appropriate technology at the workplace can achieve a great deal. In the new directives, the radiation protection for the patient is quantified and the responsibility of the physician is clearly pointed out. The most important aim is uniform quality throughout Europe in radiological diagnosis and radiation protection.

  11. Effect Of Implementation Of Good Corporate Governance And Internal Audit Of The Quality Of Financial Reporting And Implications Of Return Of Shares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erlynda Y. Kasim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The quality of financial reporting produced by the company are expected to meet the quality characteristics to Achieve the objective of the conceptual framework of financial reporting. Good implementation of adequate corporate governance in a company is one of the factors that Determine the quality of financial reporting. Similarly the internal implementation of audit firm certainly factors Affect the quality of financial reporting. Quality financial reporting will certainly get a market response that can be seen from the level of the stock return. The paper examines two independent variables items namely Good Corporate Governance and Internal Audit and its influence on the quality of financial reporting and its implications to Return Shares. In the design of this study will be performed on companies listed in the Indonesia Stock Exchange with multiple linear regression method.

  12. Governing China’s Clean Energy Transition: Policy Reforms, Flexible Implementation and the Need for Empirical Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Lo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the ten years since committing to clean energy transition, China has formulated a large number of policies and programs to achieve some very ambitious targets. This paper argues that the dearth of empirical studies concerning the implementation of these new policies and programs has created a knowledge gap between official policy documents, which are vague and lacking in specifics, and official policy outcomes, which are unreliable. In particular, the merits and limitations of flexible implementation with regard to desirable outcomes need to be debated and clarified. This paper calls for more empirical investigation in four areas as a starting point: (1 the nature and extent of flexibility in the implementation; (2 implementation strategies and their impacts; (3 factors that shape the behavior of local officials responsible for implementation; and (4 the relationship between the central-local relation and policy implementation.

  13. Implementing Peer Learning in Clinical Education: A Framework to Address Challenges In the "Real World".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Joanna Hong Meng; Canny, Benedict J; Haines, Terry P; Molloy, Elizabeth K

    2017-01-01

    Phenomenon: Peer learning has many benefits and can assist students in gaining the educational skills required in future years when they become teachers themselves. Peer learning may be particularly useful in clinical learning environments, where students report feeling marginalized, overwhelmed, and unsupported. Educational interventions often fail in the workplace environment, as they are often conceived in the "ideal" rather than the complex, messy real world. This work sought to explore barriers and facilitators to implementing peer learning activities in a clinical curriculum. Previous peer learning research results and a matrix of empirically derived peer learning activities were presented to local clinical education experts to generate discussion around the realities of implementing such activities. Potential barriers and limitations of and strategies for implementing peer learning in clinical education were the focus of the individual interviews. Thematic analysis of the data identified three key considerations for real-world implementation of peer learning: culture, epistemic authority, and the primacy of patient-centered care. Strategies for peer learning implementation were also developed from themes within the data, focusing on developing a culture of safety in which peer learning could be undertaken, engaging both educators and students, and establishing expectations for the use of peer learning. Insights: This study identified considerations and strategies for the implementation of peer learning activities, which took into account both educator and student roles. Reported challenges were reflective of those identified within the literature. The resultant framework may aid others in anticipating implementation challenges. Further work is required to test the framework's application in other contexts and its effect on learner outcomes.

  14. Implementation of a pharmacist-managed heart failure medication titration clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Amanda S; Saef, Jerold; Paszczuk, Anna; Bhatt-Chugani, Hetal

    2013-06-15

    The development, implementation, and initial results of a pharmacist-managed heart failure (HF) medication titration clinic are described. In a quality-improvement initiative at a Veterans Affairs health care system, clinical pharmacists were incorporated into the hospital system's interprofessional outpatient HF clinic. In addition, a separate pharmacist-managed HF medication titration clinic was established, in which pharmacists were granted an advanced scope of practice and prescribing privileges, enabling them to initiate and adjust medication dosages under specific protocols jointly established by cardiology and pharmacy staff. Pharmacists involved in the titration clinic tracked patients' daily body weight, vital signs, and volume status using telephone-monitoring technology and via patient interviews. A retrospective chart review comparing achievement of target doses of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI), angiotensin-receptor blocker (ARB), and β-blocker therapies in a group of patients (n = 28) whose dosage titrations were carried out by nurses or physicians prior to implementation of the pharmacist-managed HF medication titration clinic and a group of patients (n = 27) enrolled in the medication titration clinic during its first six months of operation indicated that target ACEI and ARB doses were achieved in a significantly higher percentage of pharmacist-managed titration clinic enrollees (52.9% versus 31%, p = 0.007). Patients enrolled in the pharmacist-managed HF medication titration clinic also had a significantly higher rate of attainment of optimal β-blocker doses (49% versus 24.7%, p = 0.012). Implementation of a pharmacist-managed HF medication titration clinic increased the percentage of patients achieving optimal ACEI, ARB, and β-blocker dosages.

  15. Which factors are important for the successful development and implementation of clinical pathways? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Allegri, Manuela; Schwarzbach, Matthias; Loerbroks, Adrian; Ronellenfitsch, Ulrich

    2011-03-01

    Clinical pathways (CPs) are detailed longitudinal care plans delineating measures to be conducted during a patient's treatment. Although positive effects on resource consumption and quality of care have been shown, CPs are still underutilised in many clinical settings because their development and implementation are difficult. Evidence underpinning successful development and implementation is sparse. The authors conducted semistructured face-to-face interviews with key staff members involved in the design and implementation of CPs in a large surgery department. Interviewees were asked to provide opinions on various issues, which were previously identified as potentially important in CP development and implementation. The transcribed text was read and coded independently by two researchers. Respondents highlighted the importance of a multidisciplinary participatory approach for CP design and implementation. There was a strong initial fear of losing individual freedom of treatment, which subsided after people worked with CPs in clinical everyday life. It was appreciated that the project originated from people at different levels of the department's hierarchy. Likewise, it was felt that CP implementation granted more autonomy to lower-level staff. The structured qualitative approach of this study provides information on what issues are considered important by staff members for CP design and implementation. Whereas some concepts such as the importance of a multidisciplinary approach or continuous feedback of results are known from theories, others such as strengthening the authority especially of lower-level health professionals through CPs have not been described so far. Many of the findings point towards strong interactions between factors important for CP implementation and a department's organisational structure.

  16. E-Government Partnerships Across Levels of Government

    OpenAIRE

    Charbit, Claire; Michalun, Varinia

    2009-01-01

    E-government Partnerships across Levels of Government, is an overview of the challenges and approaches to creating a collaborative and cooperative partnership across levels of government for e-government development and implementation.

  17. An analysis of Cobit 5 as a framework for the implementation of it governance with reference to King III

    OpenAIRE

    Maseko, L.; Marx, B.

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the complexity and general lack of understanding of information technology (“IT”), the management of IT is often treated as a separately managed value-providing asset. This has resulted in IT rarely receiving the necessary attention of the board, thus creating a disconnect between the board and IT. The King Code of Governance for South Africa 2009 (hereafter referred to as “King III”) provides principles and recommended practices for effective IT governance in order to create a great...

  18. How Taxes Can Contribute to The Implementation of The Public Governance Strategy? – An Analysis for Eastern European Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlad Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper begins with a short literature review regarding the public governance concept in the EU approach and its methods for establishing a common way to manage different situations for all member states; we discovered that the problems they confront with have to do with good governance and qualitative public administration. In the second part, we developed an econometric model for three Eastern European countries and we found a strong correlation between the total revenues from taxes and social contributions and total gross debt in 2002-2014 period. We ended the paper by emphasizing the conclusions obtained.

  19. Can the theoretical domains framework account for the implementation of clinical quality interventions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipworth, Wendy; Taylor, Natalie; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2013-12-21

    The health care quality improvement movement is a complex enterprise. Implementing clinical quality initiatives requires attitude and behaviour change on the part of clinicians, but this has proven to be difficult. In an attempt to solve this kind of behavioural challenge, the theoretical domains framework (TDF) has been developed. The TDF consists of 14 domains from psychological and organisational theory said to influence behaviour change. No systematic research has been conducted into the ways in which clinical quality initiatives map on to the domains of the framework. We therefore conducted a qualitative mapping experiment to determine to what extent, and in what ways, the TDF is relevant to the implementation of clinical quality interventions. We conducted a thematic synthesis of the qualitative literature exploring clinicians' perceptions of various clinical quality interventions. We analysed and synthesised 50 studies in total, in five domains of clinical quality interventions: clinical quality interventions in general, structural interventions, audit-type interventions, interventions aimed at making practice more evidence-based, and risk management interventions. Data were analysed thematically, followed by synthesis of these themes into categories and concepts, which were then mapped to the domains of the TDF. Our results suggest that the TDF is highly relevant to the implementation of clinical quality interventions. It can be used to map most, if not all, of the attitudinal and behavioural barriers and facilitators of uptake of clinical quality interventions. Each of these 14 domains appeared to be relevant to many different types of clinical quality interventions. One possible additional domain might relate to perceived trustworthiness of those instituting clinical quality interventions. The TDF can be usefully applied to a wide range of clinical quality interventions. Because all 14 of the domains emerged as relevant, and we did not identify any

  20. Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Portal Implementation Toolkit for Ambulatory Clinics: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahm, Eun-Shim; Diblasi, Catherine; Gonzales, Eva; Silver, Kristi; Zhu, Shijun; Sagherian, Knar; Kongs, Katherine

    2017-04-01

    Personal health records and patient portals have been shown to be effective in managing chronic illnesses. Despite recent nationwide implementation efforts, the personal health record and patient portal adoption rates among patients are low, and the lack of support for patients using the programs remains a critical gap in most implementation processes. In this study, we implemented the Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit in a large diabetes/endocrinology center and assessed its preliminary impact on personal health record and patient portal knowledge, self-efficacy, patient-provider communication, and adherence to treatment plans. Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit is composed of Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit-General, clinic-level resources for clinicians, staff, and patients, and Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit Plus, an optional 4-week online resource program for patients ("MyHealthPortal"). First, Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit-General was implemented, and all clinicians and staff were educated about the center's personal health record and patient portal. Then general patient education was initiated, while a randomized controlled trial was conducted to test the preliminary effects of "MyHealthPortal" using a small sample (n = 74) with three observations (baseline and 4 and 12 weeks). The intervention group showed significantly greater improvement than the control group in patient-provider communication at 4 weeks (t56 = 3.00, P = .004). For other variables, the intervention group tended to show greater improvement; however, the differences were not significant. In this preliminary study, Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit showed potential for filling the gap in the current

  1. Implementation of a Mobile Clinical Decision Support Application to Augment Local Antimicrobial Stewardship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Brian M; Ford, Diana C; Ince, Dilek; Ernst, Erika J; Livorsi, Daniel J; Heintz, Brett H; Masse, Vincent; Brownlee, Michael J; Ford, Bradley A

    2018-01-01

    Medical applications for mobile devices allow clinicians to leverage microbiological data and standardized guidelines to treat patients with infectious diseases. We report the implementation of a mobile clinical decision support (CDS) application to augment local antimicrobial stewardship. We detail the implementation of our mobile CDS application over 20 months. Application utilization data were collected and evaluated using descriptive statistics to quantify the impact of our implementation. Project initiation focused on engaging key stakeholders, developing a business case, and selecting a mobile platform. The preimplementation phase included content development, creation of a pathway for content approval within the hospital committee structure, engaging clinical leaders, and formatting the first version of the guide. Implementation involved a media campaign, staff education, and integration within the electronic medical record and hospital mobile devices. The postimplementation phase required ongoing quality improvement, revision of outdated content, and repeated staff education. The evaluation phase included a guide utilization analysis, reporting to hospital leadership, and sustainability and innovation planning. The mobile application was downloaded 3056 times and accessed 9259 times during the study period. The companion web viewer was accessed 8214 times. Successful implementation of a customizable mobile CDS tool enabled our team to expand beyond microbiological data to clinical diagnosis, treatment, and antimicrobial stewardship, broadening our influence on antimicrobial prescribing and incorporating utilization data to inspire new quality and safety initiatives. Further studies are needed to assess the impact on antimicrobial utilization, infection control measures, and patient care outcomes.

  2. Relationships between the implementation of quality management strategies and clinical outcomes in European hospitals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suñol, R.; Arah, O.A.; Wagner, C.; Groene, O.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Considerable resources are spent on implementing hospital and departmental quality management strategies. Yet, the evidence on the factors associated with the uptake of hospitals of quality management and the impact of quality management systems on clinical outcomes is limited. We

  3. Factors influencing the implementation of clinical guidelines for health care professionals: a systematic meta-review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francke, A.L.; Smit, M.C.; Veer, A.J.E. de; Mistiaen, P.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nowadays more and more clinical guidelines for health care professionals are being developed. However, this does not automatically mean that these guidelines are actually implemented. The aim of this meta-review is twofold: firstly, to gain a better understanding of which factors affect

  4. Designing and Implementing a Mentoring Program to Support Clinically-Based Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, John E.; Gut, Dianne; Beam, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    This article describes one teacher preparation program's approach to designing and implementing a mentoring program to support clinically-based teacher education. The design for the program is based on an interview study that compared the mentoring experiences of 18 teachers across three different contexts: student teaching, early field…

  5. A Method to Evaluate Critical Factors for Successful Implementation of Clinical Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, W; Huang, Z

    2015-01-01

    Clinical pathways (CPs) have been viewed as a multidisciplinary tool to improve the quality and efficiency of evidence-based care. Despite widespread enthusiasm for CPs, research has shown that many CP initiatives are unsuccessful. To this end, this study provides a methodology to evaluate critical success factors (CSFs) that can aid healthcare organizations to achieve successful CP implementation. This study presents a new approach to evaluate CP implementation CSFs, with the aims being: (1) to identify CSFs for implementation of CPs through a comprehensive literature review and interviews with collaborative experts; (2) to use a filed study data with a robust fuzzy DEMATEL (the decision making trial and evaluation laboratory) approach to visualize the structure of complicated causal relationships between CSFs and obtain the influence level of these factors. The filed study data is provided by ten clinical experts of a Chinese hospital. 23 identified CSF factors which are initially identified through a review of the literature and interviews with collaborative experts. Then, a number of direct and indirect relationships are derived from the data such that different perceptions can be integrated into a compromised cause and effect model of CP implementation. The results indicate that the proposed approach can systematically evaluate CSFs and realize the importance of each factor such that the most common causes of failure of CP implementation could be eliminated or avoided. Therefore, the tool proposed would help healthcare organizations to manage CP implementation in a more effective and proactive way.

  6. Employing external facilitation to implement cognitive behavioral therapy in VA clinics: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blevins Dean

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although for more than a decade healthcare systems have attempted to provide evidence-based mental health treatments, the availability and use of psychotherapies remains low. A significant need exists to identify simple but effective implementation strategies to adopt complex practices within complex systems of care. Emerging evidence suggests that facilitation may be an effective integrative implementation strategy for adoption of complex practices. The current pilot examined the use of external facilitation for adoption of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT in 20 Department of Veteran Affairs (VA clinics. Methods The 20 clinics were paired on facility characteristics, and 23 clinicians from these were trained in CBT. A clinic in each pair was randomly selected to receive external facilitation. Quantitative methods were used to examine the extent of CBT implementation in 10 clinics that received external facilitation compared with 10 clinics that did not, and to better understand the relationship between individual providers' characteristics and attitudes and their CBT use. Costs of external facilitation were assessed by tracking the time spent by the facilitator and therapists in activities related to implementing CBT. Qualitative methods were used to explore contextual and other factors thought to influence implementation. Results Examination of change scores showed that facilitated therapists averaged an increase of 19% [95% CI: (2, 36] in self-reported CBT use from baseline, while control therapists averaged a 4% [95% CI: (-14, 21] increase. Therapists in the facilitated condition who were not providing CBT at baseline showed the greatest increase (35% compared to a control therapist who was not providing CBT at baseline (10% or to therapists in either condition who were providing CBT at baseline (average 3%. Increased CBT use was unrelated to prior CBT training. Barriers to CBT implementation were therapists' lack of

  7. Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) Guideline for Pharmacogenetics-Guided Warfarin Dosing: 2017 Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J A; Caudle, K E; Gong, L; Whirl-Carrillo, M; Stein, C M; Scott, S A; Lee, M T; Gage, B F; Kimmel, S E; Perera, M A; Anderson, J L; Pirmohamed, M; Klein, T E; Limdi, N A; Cavallari, L H; Wadelius, M

    2017-09-01

    This document is an update to the 2011 Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) guideline for CYP2C9 and VKORC1 genotypes and warfarin dosing. Evidence from the published literature is presented for CYP2C9, VKORC1, CYP4F2, and rs12777823 genotype-guided warfarin dosing to achieve a target international normalized ratio of 2-3 when clinical genotype results are available. In addition, this updated guideline incorporates recommendations for adult and pediatric patients that are specific to continental ancestry. © 2017 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  8. Pharmacists' Perceptions of the Barriers and Facilitators to the Implementation of Clinical Pharmacy Key Performance Indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minard, Laura V; Deal, Heidi; Harrison, Megan E; Toombs, Kent; Neville, Heather; Meade, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    In hospitals around the world, there has been no consensus regarding which clinical activities a pharmacist should focus on until recently. In 2011, a Canadian clinical pharmacy key performance indicator (cpKPI) collaborative was formed. The goal of the collaborative was to advance pharmacy practice in order to improve patient outcomes and enhance the quality of care provided to patients by hospital pharmacists. Following a literature review, which indicated that pharmacists can improve patient outcomes by carrying out specific activities, and an evidence-informed consensus process, a final set of eight cpKPIs were established. Canadian hospitals leading the cpKPI initiative are currently in the early stages of implementing these indicators. To explore pharmacists' perceptions of the barriers and facilitators to the implementation of cpKPIs. Clinical pharmacists employed by the Nova Scotia Health Authority were invited to participate in focus groups. Focus group discussions were audio-recorded and transcribed, and data was analyzed using thematic analysis. Three focus groups, including 26 pharmacists, were conducted in February 2015. Three major themes were identified. Resisting the change was comprised of documentation challenges, increased workload, practice environment constraints, and competing priorities. Embracing cpKPIs was composed of seeing the benefit, demonstrating value, and existing supports. Navigating the unknown was made up of quality versus quantity battle, and insights into the future. Although pharmacists were challenged by documentation and other changes associated with the implementation of cpKPIs, they demonstrated significant support for cpKPIs and were able to see benefits of the implementation. Pharmacists came up with suggestions for overcoming resistance associated with the implementation of cpKPIs and provided insights into the future of pharmacy practice. The identification of barriers and facilitators to cpKPI implementation will be

  9. Implementation and evaluation of a clinical data management programme in a primary care centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweeney, J

    2014-11-01

    Electronic health records (EHR) support clinical management, administration, quality assurance, research, and service planning. The aim of this study was to evaluate a clinical data management programme to improve consistency, completeness and accuracy of EHR information in a large primary care centre with 10 General Practitioners (GPs). A Clinical Data Manager was appointed to implement a Data Management Strategy which involved coding consultations using ICPC-2 coding, tailored support and ongoing individualised feedback to clinicians. Over an eighteen month period there were improvements in engagement with and level of coding. Prior to implementation (August 2011) 4 of the 10 GPs engaged in regular coding and 69% of their consultation notes were coded. After 12 months, all 10 GPs and 6 nurses were ICPC-2 coding their consultations and monthly coding levels had increased to 98%. This structured Data Management Strategy provides a feasible sustainable way to improve information management in primary care.

  10. Development and Implementation of a Pharmacist-Managed Clinical Pharmacogenetics Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, Kristine R.; Cross, Shane J.; McCormick, John N.; Baker, Donald K.; Molinelli, Alejandro R.; Mullins, Richard; Relling, Mary V.; Hoffman, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The development and implementation of a pharmacist-managed Clinical Pharmacogenetics service is described. Summary Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is a well-accepted role of the pharmacist. Pharmacogenetics, the study of genetic factors that influence the variability in drug response among patients, is a rapidly evolving discipline that integrates knowledge of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics with modern advances in genetic testing. There is growing evidence for the clinical utility of pharmacogenetics, and pharmacists can play an essential role in the thoughtful application of pharmacogenetics to patient care. A pharmacist-managed Clinical Pharmacogenetics service was designed and implemented. The goal of the service is to provide clinical pharmacogenetic testing for gene products important to the pharmacodynamics of medications used in our patients. The service is modeled after and integrated with an already established Clinical Pharmacokinetics service. All clinical pharmacogenetic test results are first reported to one of the pharmacists, who reviews the result and provides a written consult. The consult includes an interpretation of the result and recommendations for any indicated changes to therapy. In 2009, 136 clinical pharmacogenetic tests were performed, consisting of 66 TPMT tests, 65 CYP2D6 tests, and 5 UGT1A1 tests. Our service has been met with positive clinician feedback. Conclusion Our experience demonstrates the feasibility of the design and function of a pharmacist-managed Clinical Pharmacogenetics service at an academic specialty hospital. The successful implementation of this service highlights the leadership role that pharmacists can take in moving pharmacogenetics from research to patient care, thereby potentially improving patient outcomes. PMID:21200062

  11. PG4KDS: a model for the clinical implementation of pre-emptive pharmacogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, James M; Haidar, Cyrine E; Wilkinson, Mark R; Crews, Kristine R; Baker, Donald K; Kornegay, Nancy M; Yang, Wenjian; Pui, Ching-Hon; Reiss, Ulrike M; Gaur, Aditya H; Howard, Scott C; Evans, William E; Broeckel, Ulrich; Relling, Mary V

    2014-03-01

    Pharmacogenetics is frequently cited as an area for initial focus of the clinical implementation of genomics. Through the PG4KDS protocol, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital pre-emptively genotypes patients for 230 genes using the Affymetrix Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters (DMET) Plus array supplemented with a CYP2D6 copy number assay. The PG4KDS protocol provides a rational, stepwise process for implementing gene/drug pairs, organizing data, and obtaining consent from patients and families. Through August 2013, 1,559 patients have been enrolled, and four gene tests have been released into the electronic health record (EHR) for clinical implementation: TPMT, CYP2D6, SLCO1B1, and CYP2C19. These genes are coupled to 12 high-risk drugs. Of the 1,016 patients with genotype test results available, 78% of them had at least one high-risk (i.e., actionable) genotype result placed in their EHR. Each diplotype result released to the EHR is coupled with an interpretive consult that is created in a concise, standardized format. To support-gene based prescribing at the point of care, 55 interruptive clinical decision support (CDS) alerts were developed. Patients are informed of their genotyping result and its relevance to their medication use through a letter. Key elements necessary for our successful implementation have included strong institutional support, a knowledgeable clinical laboratory, a process to manage any incidental findings, a strategy to educate clinicians and patients, a process to return results, and extensive use of informatics, especially CDS. Our approach to pre-emptive clinical pharmacogenetics has proven feasible, clinically useful, and scalable. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Best strategies to implement clinical pathways in an emergency department setting: study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Mona; Curran, Janet; Scott, Shannon D; Guttman, Astrid; Rotter, Thomas; Ducharme, Francine M; Lougheed, M Diane; McNaughton-Filion, M Louise; Newton, Amanda; Shafir, Mark; Paprica, Alison; Klassen, Terry; Taljaard, Monica; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Johnson, David W

    2013-05-22

    The clinical pathway is a tool that operationalizes best evidence recommendations and clinical practice guidelines in an accessible format for 'point of care' management by multidisciplinary health teams in hospital settings. While high-quality, expert-developed clinical pathways have many potential benefits, their impact has been limited by variable implementation strategies and suboptimal research designs. Best strategies for implementing pathways into hospital settings remain unknown. This study will seek to develop and comprehensively evaluate best strategies for effective local implementation of externally developed expert clinical pathways. We will develop a theory-based and knowledge user-informed intervention strategy to implement two pediatric clinical pathways: asthma and gastroenteritis. Using a balanced incomplete block design, we will randomize 16 community emergency departments to receive the intervention for one clinical pathway and serve as control for the alternate clinical pathway, thus conducting two cluster randomized controlled trials to evaluate this implementation intervention. A minimization procedure will be used to randomize sites. Intervention sites will receive a tailored strategy to support full clinical pathway implementation. We will evaluate implementation strategy effectiveness through measurement of relevant process and clinical outcomes. The primary process outcome will be the presence of an appropriately completed clinical pathway on the chart for relevant patients. Primary clinical outcomes for each clinical pathway include the following: Asthma--the proportion of asthmatic patients treated appropriately with corticosteroids in the emergency department and at discharge; and Gastroenteritis--the proportion of relevant patients appropriately treated with oral rehydration therapy. Data sources include chart audits, administrative databases, environmental scans, and qualitative interviews. We will also conduct an overall process

  13. For the France evolution of the Government role in the definition and the implementing of an energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-12-01

    The working group aims to realize a cartography of the State intervention in the energy policy, to evaluate its organization and its tools facing the today challenges and to identify propositions axis. The first part is devoted to the energy model in the new landscape of the energy. The second part deals with the redefinition of the Government competences and missions, as the last part defines the long term management. (A.L.B.)

  14. [Implementation of bedside training and advanced objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) trial to learn and confirm about pharmacy clinical skills].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Jin; Takamura, Norito; Ogata, Kenji; Setoguchi, Nao; Sato, Keizo

    2013-01-01

    Bedside training for fourth-year students, as well as seminars in hospital pharmacy (vital sign seminars) for fifth-year students at the Department of Pharmacy of Kyushu University of Health and Welfare have been implemented using patient training models and various patient simulators. The introduction of simulation-based pharmaceutical education, where no patients are present, promotes visually, aurally, and tactilely simulated learning regarding the evaluation of vital signs and implementation of physical assessment when disease symptoms are present or adverse effects occur. A patient simulator also promotes the creation of training programs for emergency and critical care, with which basic as well as advanced life support can be practiced. In addition, an advanced objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) trial has been implemented to evaluate skills regarding vital signs and physical assessments. Pharmacists are required to examine vital signs and conduct physical assessment from a pharmaceutical point of view. The introduction of these pharmacy clinical skills will improve the efficacy of drugs, work for the prevention or early detection of adverse effects, and promote the appropriate use of drugs. It is considered that simulation-based pharmaceutical education is essential to understand physical assessment, and such education will ideally be applied and developed according to on-site practices.

  15. PREVALENCE OF SOME DISEASES OF DOGS AND CATS AT THE STATE GOVERNMENT VETERINARY CLINIC IN MAIDUGURI (NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. William, S.U.R. Chaudhari1 and N.N. Atsandac2

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available A 3-year (retrospective study was conducted to determine the prevalence of diseases; clinical conditions of dogs and cats presented at the Government Veterinary Clinic, Maiduguri from January 1995 to December 1997. The prevalent diseases; conditions of dogs included helminthosis (19.19%, accidental injury (18.18%, tick infestation ( 15.15% , canine distemper (8.42% , diarrhoea ( 6.73%, mange ( 7.41%, rabies (5.05% and babesiosis (4.71%, Prevalent diseases/conditions of cats included helminthosis (26.67%. tick infestation ( 8.89%. diarrhea ( 16.67%, nutritional deficiencies ( 15.56% and respiratory infections ( 12.22%. Of highest prevalence in both dogs and cats was helminthosis (20.93%, followed by tick infestation (13. 70% and diarrhea (9.04% suggesting a poor husbandy of these pets in Maiduguri area. Cases of automobile accidental injury of dogs were also high, probably due to the same factors of poor husbandry.

  16. Obstacles to Successful Implementation of eHealth Applications into Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voogt, Marianne P; Opmeer, Brent C; Kastelein, Arnoud W; Jaspers, Monique W M; Peute, Linda W

    2018-01-01

    eHealth can improve healthcare worldwide, and scientific research should provide evidence on the efficacy, safety and added value of such interventions. For successful implementation of eHealth interventions into clinical practice, barriers need to be anticipated. We identified seven barriers by interviewing health professionals in the Dutch healthcare system. These barriers covered three topics: financing, human factors and organizational factors. This paper discusses their potential impact on eHealth uptake. Bridging the gap between studies to assess effective eHealth interventions and their value-based implementation in healthcare is much needed.

  17. Implementing genomics and pharmacogenomics in the clinic: The National Human Genome Research Institute's genomic medicine portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolio, Teri A

    2016-10-01

    Increasing knowledge about the influence of genetic variation on human health and growing availability of reliable, cost-effective genetic testing have spurred the implementation of genomic medicine in the clinic. As defined by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), genomic medicine uses an individual's genetic information in his or her clinical care, and has begun to be applied effectively in areas such as cancer genomics, pharmacogenomics, and rare and undiagnosed diseases. In 2011 NHGRI published its strategic vision for the future of genomic research, including an ambitious research agenda to facilitate and promote the implementation of genomic medicine. To realize this agenda, NHGRI is consulting and facilitating collaborations with the external research community through a series of "Genomic Medicine Meetings," under the guidance and leadership of the National Advisory Council on Human Genome Research. These meetings have identified and begun to address significant obstacles to implementation, such as lack of evidence of efficacy, limited availability of genomics expertise and testing, lack of standards, and difficulties in integrating genomic results into electronic medical records. The six research and dissemination initiatives comprising NHGRI's genomic research portfolio are designed to speed the evaluation and incorporation, where appropriate, of genomic technologies and findings into routine clinical care. Actual adoption of successful approaches in clinical care will depend upon the willingness, interest, and energy of professional societies, practitioners, patients, and payers to promote their responsible use and share their experiences in doing so. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. [Atosiban treatment for preterm labor--financial considerations and savings by implementing clinical guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadar, Eran; Mansur, Nariman; Ambar, Irit; Hod, Moshe

    2011-06-01

    Preterm delivery is a significant cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. Pregnant women, with symptoms and signs consistent with preterm labor, can be treated with various tocolytic drugs. Atosiban is one of many drugs indicated to arrest imminent preterm labor. Various studies show that the efficacy of atosiban is similar to other tocolytic drugs. The main advantage of atosiban is a relativeLy low incidence of adverse maternal reactions. Its considerable shortcoming is the financial cost, compared to other available drugs. In view of its cost, we have decided to implement a strict protocol to direct the use of atosiban, with the intent to reduce costs, without hampering quality of care. The protocol was implemented from July 2009, and it outlines the medical and procedural terms to use atosiban. We compared similar time periods before and after implementation of the protocol. The outcomes compared included: treatment success, rates of preterm deliveries and financial costs. Within the timeframe that the protocol was implemented, we have been able to demonstrate a 40% reduction in atosiban related costs, compared to a parallel period, when the clinical guidelines were not implemented. This translates into savings of about NIS 40,000 (New Israeli Shekel) (approximately $10,000). This was achieved without an increase in the rate of preterm deliveries. Implementing and enforcing a simple protocol of supervision on the use of atosiban enables a considerable reduction of financial costs related to atosiban, without hampering medical care.

  19. A Model for Good Governance of Healthcare Technology Management in the Public Sector: Learning from Evidence-Informed Policy Development and Implementation in Benin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Th Houngbo

    Full Text Available Good governance (GG is an important concept that has evolved as a set of normative principles for low- and middle-income countries (LMICs to strengthen the functional capacity of their public bodies, and as a conditional prerequisite to receive donor funding. Although much is written on good governance, very little is known on how to implement it. This paper documents the process of developing a strategy to implement a GG model for Health Technology Management (HTM in the public health sector, based on lessons learned from twenty years of experience in policy development and implementation in Benin. The model comprises six phases: (i preparatory analysis, assessing the effects of previous policies and characterizing the HTM system; (ii stakeholder identification and problem analysis, making explicit the perceptions of problems by a diverse range of actors, and assessing their ability to solve these problems; (iii shared analysis and visioning, delineating the root causes of problems and hypothesizing solutions; (iv development of policy instruments for pilot testing, based on quick-win solutions to understand the system's responses to change; (v policy development and validation, translating the consensus solutions identified by stakeholders into a policy; and (vi policy implementation and evaluation, implementing the policy through a cycle of planning, action, observation and reflection. The policy development process can be characterized as bottom-up, with a central focus on the participation of diverse stakeholders groups. Interactive and analytical tools of action research were used to integrate knowledge amongst actor groups, identify consensus solutions and develop the policy in a way that satisfies criteria of GG. This model could be useful for other LMICs where resources are constrained and the majority of healthcare technologies are imported.

  20. Development and implementation of a local government survey to measure community supports for healthy eating and active living

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latetia V Moore

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability to make healthy choices is influenced by where one lives, works, shops, and plays. Locally enacted policies and standards can influence these surroundings but little is known about the prevalence of such policies and standards that support healthier behaviors. In this paper, we describe the development of a survey questionnaire designed to capture local level policy supports for healthy eating and active living and findings and lessons learned from a 2012 pilot in two states, Minnesota and California, including respondent burden, survey sampling and administration methods, and survey item feasibility issues. A 38-item, web-based, self-administered survey and sampling frame were developed to assess the prevalence of 22 types of healthy eating and active living policies in a representative sample of local governments in the two states. The majority of respondents indicated the survey required minimal effort to complete with half taking <20 min to complete the survey. A non-response follow-up plan including emails and phone calls was required to achieve a 68% response rate (versus a 37% response rate for email only reminders. Local governments with larger residential populations reported having healthy eating and active living policies and standards more often than smaller governments. Policies that support active living were more common than those that support healthy eating and varied within the two states. The methods we developed are a feasible data collection tool for estimating the prevalence of municipal healthy eating and active living policies and standards at the state and national level.

  1. Job evaluation for clinical nursing jobs by implementing the NHS JE system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahya, Emin; Oral, Nurten

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this paper was to evaluate locally all the clinical nursing jobs implementing the NHS JE system in four hospitals. The NHS JE was developed by the Department of Health in the UK in 2003-2004. A job analysis questionnaire was designed to gather current job descriptions. It was distributed to each of 158 clinical nurses and supervisor nurses in 31 variety clinics at four hospitals in one city. The questionnaires were analysed to evaluate locally all the identified 94 nursing jobs. Fourteen of 19 nursing jobs in the medical and surgical clinics can be matched to the nurse national job in the NHS JE system. The results indicated that two new nursing jobs titled nurse B and nurse advanced B should be added to the list of national nursing jobs in the NHS JE system.

  2. Implementation of the corporate governance code as a measure of an efficiency increasing process in corporate management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana SPÎNU

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The majority of leaders of economic entities in Moldova should recognize the role of effective corporate management for the proper development of their activities. Therefore, to ensure obtaining competitive advantage, the leaders must accept the fact that the policy of improvement of corporate management becomes a major component of enterprise development, and using the principles and best practices of corporate governance are already highlighted both at the level of their enterprises and at international level. Therefore, the authors of the article present some measures to streamline corporate management.

  3. Augmenting Predictive Modeling Tools with Clinical Insights for Care Coordination Program Design and Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tracy L; Brewer, Daniel; Estacio, Raymond; Vlasimsky, Tara; Durfee, Michael J; Thompson, Kathy R; Everhart, Rachel M; Rinehart, Deborath J; Batal, Holly

    2015-01-01

    The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) awarded Denver Health's (DH) integrated, safety net health care system $19.8 million to implement a "population health" approach into the delivery of primary care. This major practice transformation builds on the Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) and Wagner's Chronic Care Model (CCM) to achieve the "Triple Aim": improved health for populations, care to individuals, and lower per capita costs. This paper presents a case study of how DH integrated published predictive models and front-line clinical judgment to implement a clinically actionable, risk stratification of patients. This population segmentation approach was used to deploy enhanced care team staff resources and to tailor care-management services to patient need, especially for patients at high risk of avoidable hospitalization. Developing, implementing, and gaining clinical acceptance of the Health Information Technology (HIT) solution for patient risk stratification was a major grant objective. In addition to describing the Information Technology (IT) solution itself, we focus on the leadership and organizational processes that facilitated its multidisciplinary development and ongoing iterative refinement, including the following: team composition, target population definition, algorithm rule development, performance assessment, and clinical-workflow optimization. We provide examples of how dynamic business intelligence tools facilitated clinical accessibility for program design decisions by enabling real-time data views from a population perspective down to patient-specific variables. We conclude that population segmentation approaches that integrate clinical perspectives with predictive modeling results can better identify high opportunity patients amenable to medical home-based, enhanced care team interventions.

  4. Introduction to the special issue: toward implementing physiological measures in clinical child and adolescent assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Los Reyes, Andres; Aldao, Amelia

    2015-01-01

    The National Institute of Mental Health recently launched the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC). The RDoC is an initiative to improve classification of mental health concerns by promoting research on the brain mechanisms underlying these concerns, with the ultimate goal of developing interventions that target these brain mechanisms. A key focus of RDoC involves opening new lines of research examining patients' responses on biological measures. The RDoC presents unique challenges to mental health professionals who work with children and adolescents. Indeed, mental health professionals rarely integrate biological measures into clinical assessments. Thus, RDoC's ability to improve patient care rests, in part, on the development of strategies for implementing biological measures within mental health assessments. Further, mental health professionals already carry out comprehensive assessments that frequently yield inconsistent findings. These inconsistencies have historically posed challenges to interpreting research findings as well as assessment outcomes in practice settings. In this introductory article, we review key issues that informed the development of a special issue of articles demonstrating methods for implementing low-cost measures of physiological functioning in clinical child and adolescent assessments. We also outline a conceptual framework, informed by theoretical work on using and interpreting multiple informants' clinical reports (De Los Reyes, Thomas, Goodman, & Kundey, 2013 ), to guide hypothesis testing when using physiological measures within clinical child and adolescent assessments. This special issue and the conceptual model described in this article may open up new lines of research testing paradigms for implementing clinically feasible physiological measures in clinical child and adolescent assessments.

  5. Renewing governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loos, Gregory P

    2003-01-01

    Globalization's profound influence on social and political institutions need not be negative. Critics of globalization have often referred to the "Impossible Trinity" because decision-making must 1. respect national sovereignty, 2. develop and implement firm regulation, and 3. allow capital markets to be as free as possible. To many, such goals are mutually exclusive because history conditions us to view policy-making and governance in traditional molds. Thus, transnational governance merely appears impossible because current forms of governance were not designed to provide it. The world needs new tools for governing, and its citizens must seize the opportunity to help develop them. The rise of a global society requires a greater level of generality and inclusion than is found in most policy bodies today. Politicians need to re-examine key assumptions about government. States must develop ways to discharge their regulatory responsibilities across borders and collaborate with neighboring jurisdictions, multilateral bodies, and business. Concepts such as multilateralism and tripartism show great promise. Governments must engage civil society in the spirit of shared responsibility and democratic decision-making. Such changes will result in a renewal of the state's purpose and better use of international resources and expertise in governance.

  6. Implementation strategies of Systems Medicine in clinical research and home care for cardiovascular disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montecucco, Fabrizio; Carbone, Federico; Dini, Frank Lloyd; Fiuza, Manuela; Pinto, Fausto J; Martelli, Antonietta; Palombo, Domenico; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Mach, François; De Caterina, Raffaele

    2014-11-01

    Insights from the "-omics" science have recently emphasized the need to implement an overall strategy in medical research. Here, the development of Systems Medicine has been indicated as a potential tool for clinical translation of basic research discoveries. Systems Medicine also gives the opportunity of improving different steps in medical practice, from diagnosis to healthcare management, including clinical research. The development of Systems Medicine is still hampered however by several challenges, the main one being the development of computational tools adequate to record, analyze and share a large amount of disparate data. In addition, available informatics tools appear not yet fully suitable for the challenge because they are not standardized, not universally available, or with ethical/legal concerns. Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are a very promising area for translating Systems Medicine into clinical practice. By developing clinically applied technologies, the collection and analysis of data may improve CV risk stratification and prediction. Standardized models for data recording and analysis can also greatly broaden data exchange, thus promoting a uniform management of CVD patients also useful for clinical research. This advance however requires a great organizational effort by both physicians and health institutions, as well as the overcoming of ethical problems. This narrative review aims at providing an update on the state-of-art knowledge in the area of Systems Medicine as applied to CVD, focusing on current critical issues, providing a road map for its practical implementation. Copyright © 2014 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Advanced musculoskeletal physiotherapists in post arthroplasty review clinics: a state wide implementation program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Paula; Burge, Angela; Walter, Kerrie; Shaw, Bridget; Page, Carolyn; Phan, Uyen; Terrill, Desiree; Liew, Susan

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate outcomes following a state-wide implementation of post arthroplasty review (PAR) clinics for patients following total hip and knee arthroplasty, led by advanced musculoskeletal physiotherapists in collaboration with orthopaedic specialists. A prospective observational study analysed data collected by 10 implementation sites (five metropolitan and five regional/rural centres) between September 2014 and June 2015. The Victorian Innovation and Reform Impact Assessment Framework was used to assess efficiency, effectiveness (access to care, safety and quality, workforce capacity, utilisation of skill sets, patient and workforce satisfaction) and sustainability (stakeholder engagement, succession planning and availability of ongoing funding). 2362 planned occasions of service (OOS) were provided for 2057 patients. Reduced patient wait times from referral to appointment were recorded and no adverse events occurred. Average cost savings across 10 sites was AUD$38 per OOS (Baseline $63, PAR clinic $35), representing a reduced pathway cost of 44%. Average annual predicted total value of increased orthopaedic specialist capacity was $11,950 per PAR clinic (range $6149 to $23,400). The Australian Orthopaedic Association review guidelines were met (8/10 sites, 80%) and patient-reported outcome measures were introduced as routine clinical care. High workforce and patient satisfaction were expressed. Eighteen physiotherapists were trained creating a sustainable workforce. Eight sites secured ongoing funding. The PAR clinics delivered a safe, cost-efficient model of care that improved patient access and quality of care compared to traditional specialist-led workforce models. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Iterative Reconstruction Techniques in Abdominopelvic CT: Technical Concepts and Clinical Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Manuel; Fuentes, Jorge M; Singh, Sarabjeet; Hahn, Peter F; Sahani, Dushyant V

    2015-07-01

    This article discusses the clinical challenge of low-radiation-dose examinations, the commonly used approaches for dose optimization, and their effect on image quality. We emphasize practical aspects of the different iterative reconstruction techniques, along with their benefits, pitfalls, and clinical implementation. The widespread use of CT has raised concerns about potential radiation risks, motivating diverse strategies to reduce the radiation dose associated with CT. CT manufacturers have developed alternative reconstruction algorithms intended to improve image quality on dose-optimized CT studies, mainly through noise and artifact reduction. Iterative reconstruction techniques take unique approaches to noise reduction and provide distinct strength levels or settings.

  9. Oxytocin augmentation during labor: how to implement medical guidelines into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, Stina; Silfver, Kristina Gren; Lind, Cecilia; Nordström, Lennart

    2011-11-01

    To describe an extensive process to implement guidelines for oxytocin use during labor and to report its effects on compliance to clinical practice guidelines after 1 year. A multifaceted strategy was developed to involve all obstetric staff and identify possible local barriers to change in advance. The process lasted for more than 1 year. To describe the implementation of oxytocin use according to the new guidelines, and to compare management in clinical practice with guideline recommendations from audits performed before and after the project. Identification of possible barriers to change, academic detailing, audits with feedback, and local opinion leaders were important factors for a successful process. Documentation of the indication for oxytocin use increased from 54% before, to 86% after the completion of the project (Pcheck list to monitor oxytocin use. However, audits with feedback need to continue for medical safety, and have been planned to take place every 6 months. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Broad support for regulating the clinical implementation of future reproductive techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, S; Vliegenthart, R; Repping, S; Dancet, E A F

    2018-01-01

    Do gynaecologists, infertile patients and the general public, consider that regulation of the clinical implementation of stem cell-based fertility treatments is required? There is broad support from gynaecologists, patients and the general public for regulating the clinical implementation of future stem cell-based fertility treatments. There is debate on the need to regulate the clinical implementation of novel techniques. Regulation may hinder their swift adoption and delay benefits for patients, but may prevent the implementation of ineffective or harmful techniques. Stem cell-based fertility treatments, which involve creating oocytes or spermatozoa by manipulating stem cells, are likely to be implemented in clinical practice in the near future and will probably impact future generations as well as the current one. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among gynaecologists working in fertility clinics (n = 179), patients with severe infertility (n = 348) and a representative sample of the general public (n = 1250). The questionnaire was disseminated in the Netherlands in the winter of 2015-2016. The newly developed questionnaire was reviewed by experts and tested among the general public. The questionnaire assessed whether participants wanted each of nine potential negative consequences of the clinical implementation of stem cell-based fertility treatments to be regulated. In addition, the importance of all negative and positive potential consequences, the appropriate regulatory body and its need to consult with advisors from various backgrounds was questioned. In total, 958 respondents completed the questionnaire (response rate: 54%). A large majority of each participant group (>85%) wanted regulation, for at least one potential negative consequence of the clinical implementation of stem cell-based fertility treatments. The majority of all participant groups wanted regulation for serious health risks for intended parents, serious health risks for children and

  11. Implementation of a clinical dementia guideline. A controlled study on the effect of a multifaceted strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldorff, Frans Boch; Almind, Gert; Mäkelä, Marjukka

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of a multifaceted implementation strategy aiming to improve GP adherence to a clinical guideline on dementia. DESIGN: Controlled before and after study using data records from regional laboratories. The guideline was mailed to all GPs. The multifaceted implementation...... strategy was planned with local GPs, and consisted of seminars, outreach visits, reminders and continuing medical education (CME) small group training. SETTING: Primary health care. SUBJECTS: 535 GP practices with 727 physicians in Denmark. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The diffusion and use of the guideline...... of dementia in general practice. CONCLUSION: Although GPs regarded the guideline applicable in primary care, no change in practice adherence to guideline recommendations was detected after a multifaceted implementation....

  12. Effects of performance measure implementation on clinical manager and provider motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damschroder, Laura J; Robinson, Claire H; Francis, Joseph; Bentley, Douglas R; Krein, Sarah L; Rosland, Ann-Marie; Hofer, Timothy P; Kerr, Eve A

    2014-12-01

    Clinical performance measurement has been a key element of efforts to transform the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). However, there are a number of signs that current performance measurement systems used within and outside the VHA may be reaching the point of maximum benefit to care and in some settings, may be resulting in negative consequences to care, including overtreatment and diminished attention to patient needs and preferences. Our research group has been involved in a long-standing partnership with the office responsible for clinical performance measurement in the VHA to understand and develop potential strategies to mitigate the unintended consequences of measurement. Our aim was to understand how the implementation of diabetes performance measures (PMs) influences management actions and day-to-day clinical practice. This is a mixed methods study design based on quantitative administrative data to select study facilities and quantitative data from semi-structured interviews. Sixty-two network-level and facility-level executives, managers, front-line providers and staff participated in the study. Qualitative content analyses were guided by a team-based consensus approach using verbatim interview transcripts. A published interpretive motivation theory framework is used to describe potential contributions of local implementation strategies to unintended consequences of PMs. Implementation strategies used by management affect providers' response to PMs, which in turn potentially undermines provision of high-quality patient-centered care. These include: 1) feedback reports to providers that are dissociated from a realistic capability to address performance gaps; 2) evaluative criteria set by managers that are at odds with patient-centered care; and 3) pressure created by managers' narrow focus on gaps in PMs that is viewed as more punitive than motivating. Next steps include working with VHA leaders to develop and test implementation approaches to help

  13. Integrating interdisciplinary pain management into primary care: development and implementation of a novel clinical program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorflinger, Lindsey M; Ruser, Christopher; Sellinger, John; Edens, Ellen L; Kerns, Robert D; Becker, William C

    2014-12-01

    The aims of this study were to develop and implement an interdisciplinary pain program integrated in primary care to address stakeholder-identified gaps. Program development and evaluation project utilizing a Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) approach to address the identified problem of insufficient pain management resources within primary care. A large Healthcare System within the Veterans Health Administration, consisting of two academically affiliated medical centers and six community-based outpatients clinics. An interprofessional group of stakeholders participated in a Rapid Process Improvement Workshop (RPIW), a consensus-building process to identify systems-level gaps and feasible solutions and obtain buy-in. Changes were implemented in 2012, and in a 1-year follow-up, we examined indicators of engagement in specialty and multimodal pain care services as well as patient and provider satisfaction. In response to identified barriers, RPIW participants proposed and outlined two readily implementable, interdisciplinary clinics embedded within primary care: 1) the Integrated Pain Clinic, providing in-depth assessment and triage to targeted resources; and 2) the Opioid Reassessment Clinic, providing assessment and structured monitoring of patients with evidence of safety, efficacy, or misuse problems with opioids. Implementation of these programs led to higher rates of engagement in specialty and multimodal pain care services; patients and providers reported satisfaction with these services. Our PDSA cycle engaged an interprofessional group of stakeholders that recommended introduction of new systems-based interventions to better integrate pain resources into primary care to address reported barriers. Early data suggest improved outcomes; examination of additional outcomes is planned. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Process-based quality management for clinical implementation of adaptive radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel, Camille E.; Santanam, Lakshmi; Parikh, Parag J.; Mutic, Sasa, E-mail: smutic@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated adaptive radiotherapy (ART) has been the focus of considerable research and developmental work due to its potential therapeutic benefits. However, in light of its unique quality assurance (QA) challenges, no one has described a robust framework for its clinical implementation. In fact, recent position papers by ASTRO and AAPM have firmly endorsed pretreatment patient-specific IMRT QA, which limits the feasibility of online ART. The authors aim to address these obstacles by applying failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) to identify high-priority errors and appropriate risk-mitigation strategies for clinical implementation of intensity-modulated ART. Methods: An experienced team of two clinical medical physicists, one clinical engineer, and one radiation oncologist was assembled to perform a standard FMEA for intensity-modulated ART. A set of 216 potential radiotherapy failures composed by the forthcoming AAPM task group 100 (TG-100) was used as the basis. Of the 216 failures, 127 were identified as most relevant to an ART scheme. Using the associated TG-100 FMEA values as a baseline, the team considered how the likeliness of occurrence (O), outcome severity (S), and likeliness of failure being undetected (D) would change for ART. New risk priority numbers (RPN) were calculated. Failures characterized by RPN ≥ 200 were identified as potentially critical. Results: FMEA revealed that ART RPN increased for 38% (n = 48/127) of potential failures, with 75% (n = 36/48) attributed to failures in the segmentation and treatment planning processes. Forty-three of 127 failures were identified as potentially critical. Risk-mitigation strategies include implementing a suite of quality control and decision support software, specialty QA software/hardware tools, and an increase in specially trained personnel. Conclusions: Results of the FMEA-based risk assessment demonstrate that intensity-modulated ART introduces different (but not necessarily

  15. Process-based quality management for clinical implementation of adaptive radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noel, Camille E.; Santanam, Lakshmi; Parikh, Parag J.; Mutic, Sasa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated adaptive radiotherapy (ART) has been the focus of considerable research and developmental work due to its potential therapeutic benefits. However, in light of its unique quality assurance (QA) challenges, no one has described a robust framework for its clinical implementation. In fact, recent position papers by ASTRO and AAPM have firmly endorsed pretreatment patient-specific IMRT QA, which limits the feasibility of online ART. The authors aim to address these obstacles by applying failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) to identify high-priority errors and appropriate risk-mitigation strategies for clinical implementation of intensity-modulated ART. Methods: An experienced team of two clinical medical physicists, one clinical engineer, and one radiation oncologist was assembled to perform a standard FMEA for intensity-modulated ART. A set of 216 potential radiotherapy failures composed by the forthcoming AAPM task group 100 (TG-100) was used as the basis. Of the 216 failures, 127 were identified as most relevant to an ART scheme. Using the associated TG-100 FMEA values as a baseline, the team considered how the likeliness of occurrence (O), outcome severity (S), and likeliness of failure being undetected (D) would change for ART. New risk priority numbers (RPN) were calculated. Failures characterized by RPN ≥ 200 were identified as potentially critical. Results: FMEA revealed that ART RPN increased for 38% (n = 48/127) of potential failures, with 75% (n = 36/48) attributed to failures in the segmentation and treatment planning processes. Forty-three of 127 failures were identified as potentially critical. Risk-mitigation strategies include implementing a suite of quality control and decision support software, specialty QA software/hardware tools, and an increase in specially trained personnel. Conclusions: Results of the FMEA-based risk assessment demonstrate that intensity-modulated ART introduces different (but not necessarily

  16. Are Protected Forests of Bangladesh Prepared for the Implementation of REDD+? A Forest Governance Analysis from Rema-Kalenga Wildlife Sanctuary

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    Md. Habibur Rahman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the forest governance structure for REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation implementation in a protected forest of Bangladesh, namely Rema-Kalenga Wildlife Sanctuary (RKWS. The study analyses the key aspects of forest governance, focusing on drivers of deforestation and forest degradation, governance deficit, institutions and social networks, co-benefits, and opportunities and challenges of REDD+ in RKWS. Focus group discussions and key informant interviews were used for primary data collection from different forest stakeholders, including forest-dependent communities, Forest Department (FD and co-management project staffs. The survey revealed that REDD+ not only on technical issues but even more on how the evolving mechanism is governed on various levels, ranging from local to international. Although a majority (69.5% of the respondents were motivated to engage in REDD+, indigenous communities were less interested in fear of loss of access to and use of land and forest resources, ownership and rights, and traditional customs and knowledge. There remained a degree of ambiguity of FD, community and co-management projects in field operations, which conflicted with the notions of cooperation, transparency, and accountability of the overall initiatives. Moreover, there is a strong local power structure that has major control over the community, locality and even over a local administration that is a crucial issue to the RKWS authority. However, REDD+ will open up the opportunity to manage the RKWS’s forest resources in a sustainable way, increase the level of protection, and expand the area protected, hence REDD+ must align with the interests of all stakeholders to fulfil its goal. Further research is necessary to inform the governance of REDD+ in Bangladesh to better understand the interplay, interactions and linkages between existing institutions, actors and policy processes.

  17. Influence of food intake and eating habits on hypertension control among outpatients at a government health clinic in the Klang Valley, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzana, S; Azlinda, A; Hin, S L; Khor, W H; Zahara, Z; Sa'ida, Munira J; Norliza, M

    2011-08-01

    In Malaysia, hypertension prevalence has increased from 13% in 1996 to 43% in 2006 based on the Third National Health and Morbidity Survey. Recognising the importance of hypertension control to prevent cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, a cross-sectional study was carried out to assess factors influencing blood pressure among 74 hypertensive adults (22 men, 52 women, mean age 61.1 +/- 8.8 years old) attending an outpatient clinic of a government health clinic in Klang Valley. Subjects were interviewed to obtain information on social and health, physical activity level and food intake using Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ) and Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ). Anthropometric measurements including weight, height, waist circumference and percentage of body fat were also conducted. The majority of the subjects (71.6%) had poor hypertension control as determined using blood pressure. Women aged 30-59 years old had a higher mean diastolic blood pressure (87.3 +/- 11.6 mmHg) than women aged 60 years old (78.5 +/- 9.5 mmHg) (p diet, coffee consumption and inadequate milk intake were unsatisfactory. There is a need to implement a nutrition intervention programme based on MNT to achieve good hypertensive control among subjects.

  18. The German clinical risk management survey for hospitals: Implementation levels and areas for improvement in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manser, Tanja; Frings, Janina; Heuser, Gregory; Mc Dermott, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Despite the growing recognition of the need to implement systematic approaches for managing the risks associated with healthcare, few studies have investigated the level of implementation for clinical risk management (CRM) at a national level. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the current level of CRM implementation in German hospitals and to explore differences across hospital types. From March to June 2015, persons responsible for CRM in 2,617 hospitals and rehabilitation clinics in Germany were invited to participate in a voluntary online survey assessing the level of implementation for various aspects of CRM: CRM strategy, structures and processes; risk assessment (risk identification, risk analysis, risk evaluation) with a focus on incident reporting systems; risk mitigation measures; and risk monitoring and reporting. 572 hospitals participated in the survey (response rate 22 %). Most of these hospitals had a formalised, binding CRM strategy (72 %). 66 % had a centralised and 34 % a decentralised CRM structure. We also found that, despite a broad range of risk assessment methods being applied, there was a lack of integration of risk information from different data sources. Hospitals also reported a high level of implementation of critical incident reporting systems with a strong preference for local (74 %) over transorganisational systems. This study provides relevant data to inform targeted interventions concerning CRM implementation at a national level and to consider the specific context of different types of hospitals more carefully in this process. The approach to CRM assessment illustrated in this article could be the basis of a system for monitoring CRM over time and, thus, for evaluating the impact of strategy decisions at the policy level on CRM development. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  19. Implementation of Epic Beaker Clinical Pathology at an academic medical center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Krasowski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epic Beaker Clinical Pathology (CP is a relatively new laboratory information system (LIS operating within the Epic suite of software applications. To date, there have not been any publications describing implementation of Beaker CP. In this report, we describe our experience in implementing Beaker CP version 2012 at a state academic medical center with a go-live of August 2014 and a subsequent upgrade to Beaker version 2014 in May 2015. The implementation of Beaker CP was concurrent with implementations of Epic modules for revenue cycle, patient scheduling, and patient registration. Methods: Our analysis covers approximately 3 years of time (2 years preimplementation of Beaker CP and roughly 1 year after using data summarized from pre- and post-implementation meetings, debriefings, and the closure document for the project. Results: We summarize positive aspects of, and key factors leading to, a successful implementation of Beaker CP. The early inclusion of subject matter experts in the design and validation of Beaker workflows was very helpful. Since Beaker CP does not directly interface with laboratory instrumentation, the clinical laboratories spent extensive preimplementation effort establishing middleware interfaces. Immediate challenges postimplementation included bar code scanning and nursing adaptation to Beaker CP specimen collection. The most substantial changes in laboratory workflow occurred with microbiology orders. This posed a considerable challenge with microbiology orders from the operating rooms and required intensive interventions in the weeks following go-live. In postimplementation surveys, pathology staff, informatics staff, and end-users expressed satisfaction with the new LIS. Conclusions: Beaker CP can serve as an effective LIS for an academic medical center. Careful planning and preparation aid the transition to this LIS.

  20. Implementing a sustainable clinical supervision model for Isles nurses in Orkney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Ian

    2018-03-02

    The Isles Network of Care (INOC) community nurses work at the extreme of the remote and rural continuum, working mostly as lone practitioners. Following the development of sustainable clinical supervision model for Isles nurses in Orkney, clinical supervision was found to improve both peer support and governance for this group of isolated staff. A literature overview identified the transition of clinical supervision in general nursing over 24 years from 'carrot' to 'stick'. The study included a questionnaire survey that was sent to the 2017 Queen's Nursing Institute Scotland cohort to elicit information about the nurses' experience of clinical supervision. The survey found that 55% provide supervision and 40% receive it. Health board encouragement of its use was found to be disappointingly low at 40%. The INOC nurses were surveyed about the new peer-support (restorative) model, which relies on video-conference contact to allow face to face interaction between isolated isles nurses. Feedback prompted a review of clinical supervision pairings, and the frequency and methods of meeting. The need for supervisor training led to agreement with the Remote and Rural Health Education Alliance to provide relevant support. The perceived benefits of supervision included increased support and reflection, and improved relationships with isolated colleagues.

  1. [Evidence-based clinical oral healthcare guidelines 4. Adherence requires an implementation strategy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braspenning, J C C; Mettes, T G P H; van der Sanden, W J M; Wensing, M J P

    2015-03-01

    Adherence to clinical guidelines requires support in practice. However, systematic implementation of evidence-based guidelines is not common practice in oral healthcare. The Knowledge Institute Oral Care (KiMo) offers the opportunity to take into account potential barriers and facilitators during the development of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. These factors which are relevant to the guideline and the oral healthcare practice provide the ingredients for a tailor-made programme of implementation that has a scientific basis. Elements of any implementation programme are the quality indicators derived from the oral healthcare guidelines. These indicators should fit, on the one hand, the specific goals of the guidelines (patient safety, effectiveness, efficiency, patient-centred, timeliness, accessibility) and, onthe other hand, the various perspectives of the different stakeholders, such as patients, caregivers, health insurers and inspectorate. These quality indicators provide information on adherence to the guidelines, the results of a certain treatment and the success of the implementation strategy, all with the aim to improve the quality of oral healthcare.

  2. Implementing tobacco use treatment guidelines in public health dental clinics in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, Donna; Anno, Jaime; Tseng, Tuo-Yen; Calip, Greg; Wedeles, John; Lloyd, Madeleine; Wolff, Mark S

    2011-04-01

    In this study we evaluated the effect of a multicomponent intervention to implement the Public Health Service (PHS) guideline Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence in six randomly selected dental clinics in New York University's College of Dentistry. The main outcome measure-provider adherence to tobacco use treatment guidelines-was assessed by auditing a random selection of patient charts pre (698) and post (641) intervention. The intervention components included a chart reminder and referral system, free nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), and provider training and feedback. The results showed that rates of screening for tobacco use did not change between pre and post test chart audits. However, providers were significantly more likely to offer advice (28.4 percent pre, 49 percent post), assess readiness to quit (17.8 percent pre, 29.9 percent post), and offer assistance (6.5 percent pre and 15.6 percent post) in the post test period. Increases in NRT distribution were associated with booster training sessions but declined in the time periods between those trainings. Research is needed to further define sustainable strategies for implementing tobacco use treatment in dental clinics. The results of this study suggest the feasibility and effectiveness of using a tailored multicomponent approach to implement tobacco use treatment guidelines in dental clinics.

  3. Implementing clinical guidelines in stroke: a qualitative study of perceived facilitators and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnellan, Claire; Sweetman, S; Shelley, E

    2013-08-01

    Clinical guidelines are frequently used as a mechanism for implementing evidence-based practice. However research indicates that health professionals vary in the extent to which they adhere to these guidelines. This study aimed to study the perceptions of stakeholders and health professionals on the facilitators and barriers to implementing national stroke guidelines in Ireland. Qualitative interviews using focus groups were conducted with stakeholders (n=3) and multidisciplinary team members from hospitals involved in stroke care (n=7). All focus group interviews were semi-structured, using open-ended questions. Data was managed and analysed using NVivo 9 software. The main themes to emerge from the focus groups with stakeholders and hospital multidisciplinary teams were very similar in terms of topics discussed. These were resources, national stroke guidelines as a tool for change, characteristics of national stroke guidelines, advocacy at local level and community stroke care challenges. Facilitators perceived by stakeholders and health professionals included having dedicated resources, user-friendly guidelines relevant at local level and having supportive advocates on the ground. Barriers were inadequate resources, poor guideline characteristics and insufficient training and education. This study highlights health professionals' perspectives regarding many key concepts which may affect the implementation of stroke care guidelines. The introduction of stroke clinical guidelines at a national level is not sufficient to improve health care quality as they should be incorporated in a quality assurance cycle with education programmes and feedback from surveys of clinical practice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. On the practice of the clinical implementation of enhanced dynamic wedges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koken, Phil W.; Heukelom, Stan; Cuijpers, Johan P.

    2003-01-01

    Practical aspects of the clinical implementation of enhanced dynamic wedges (EDW) replacing manual wedges are presented and discussed extensively. A comparison between measured and calculated data is also presented. Relative dose distributions and wedge factors were calculated with a commercially available treatment planning system and measured in a water-phantom and with an ionization chamber. Wedge factor calculations and measurements were also compared with an independent method of wedge factor calculations available from the literature. Aspects of the clinical implementation, such as safety and quality assurance, were evaluated. Measurements and calculations agreed very well and were slightly better than results of previous studies. Profiles and percentage depth doses (PDDs) agreed within 1% to 1.5% and within 0.5%, respectively. Measured and calculated wedge factors ratios agreed within 0.5% to 1%. Calculated and measured EDW dose distributions showed excellent agreement, both relative and absolute. However, for safe and practical use, specific aspects need to be taken into consideration. Once the treatment planning system is commissioned properly, the clinical implementation of EDW is rather straightforward

  5. Implementing Trauma-Informed Partner Violence Assessment in Family Planning Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Michele R; Flessa, Sarah; Pillai, Ruchita V; Dick, Rebecca N; Quam, Jamie; Cheng, Diana; McDonald-Mosley, Raegan; Alexander, Kamila A; Holliday, Charvonne N; Miller, Elizabeth

    2017-09-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) and reproductive coercion (RC) are associated with poor reproductive health. Little is known about how family planning clinics implement brief IPV/RC assessment interventions in practice. We describe the uptake and impact of a brief, trauma-informed, universal IPV/RC assessment and education intervention. Intervention implementation was evaluated via a mixed methods study among women ages 18 and up receiving care at one of two family planning clinics in greater Baltimore, MD. This mixed methods study entailed a quasi-experimental, single group pretest-posttest study with family planning clinic patients (baseline and exit survey n = 132; 3-month retention n = 68; retention rate = 52%), coupled with qualitative interviews with providers and patients (total n = 35). Two thirds (65%) of women reported receiving at least one element of the intervention on their exit survey immediately following the clinic-visit. Patients reported that clinic-based IPV assessment is helpful, irrespective of IPV history. Relative to those who reported neither, participants who received either intervention element reported greater perceived caring from providers, confidence in provider response to abusive relationships, and knowledge of IPV-related resources at follow-up. Providers and patients alike described the educational card as a valuable tool. Participants described trade-offs of paper versus in-person, electronic medical record-facilitated screening, and patient reluctance to disclose current situations of abuse. In real-world family planning clinic settings, a brief assessment and support intervention was successful in communicating provider caring and increasing knowledge of violence-related resources, endpoints previously deemed valuable by IPV survivors. Results emphasize the merit of universal education in IPV/RC clinical interventions over seeking IPV disclosure.

  6. Strategies to overcome clinical, regulatory, and financial challenges in the implementation of personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimberidou, Apostolia M; Ringborg, Ulrik; Schilsky, Richard L

    2013-01-01

    This article highlights major developments over the last decade in personalized medicine in cancer. Emerging data from clinical studies demonstrate that the use of targeted agents in patients with targetable molecular aberrations improves clinical outcomes. Despite a surge of studies, however, significant gaps in knowledge remain, especially in identifying driver molecular aberrations in patients with multiple aberrations, understanding molecular networks that control carcinogenesis and metastasis, and most importantly, discovering effective targeted agents. Implementation of personalized medicine requires continued scientific and technological breakthroughs; standardization of tumor tissue acquisition and molecular testing; changes in oncology practice and regulatory standards for drug and device access and approval; modification of reimbursement policies by health care payers; and innovative ways to collect and analyze electronic patient information that are linked to prospective clinical registries and rapid learning systems. Informatics systems that integrate clinical, laboratory, radiologic, molecular, and economic data will improve clinical care and will provide infrastructure to enable clinical research. The initiative of the EurocanPlatform aims to overcome the challenges of implementing personalized medicine in Europe by sharing patients, biologic materials, and technological resources across borders. The EurocanPlatform establishes a complete translational cancer research program covering the drug development process and strengthening collaborations among academic centers, pharmaceutical companies, regulatory authorities, health technology assessment organizations, and health care systems. The CancerLinQ rapid learning system being developed by ASCO has the potential to revolutionize how all stakeholders in the cancer community assemble and use information obtained from patients treated in real-world settings to guide clinical practice, regulatory

  7. Experiences with developing and implementing a virtual clinic for glaucoma care in an NHS setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotecha A

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aachal Kotecha,1,2 Alex Baldwin,1 John Brookes,1 Paul J Foster1,2 1Glaucoma Service, Moorfields Eye Hospital National Health Service Foundation Trust, 2NIHR BRC, Moorfields Eye Hospital, NHS Foundation Trust and UCL Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London, London, UK Background: This article describes the development of a virtual glaucoma clinic, whereby technicians collect information for remote review by a consultant specialist.Design and Methods: This was a hospital-based service evaluation study. Patients suitable for the stable monitoring service (SMS were low-risk patients with “suspect”, “early”-to-“moderate” glaucoma who were deemed stable by their consultant care team. Three technicians and one health care assistant ran the service. Patients underwent tests in a streamlined manner in a dedicated clinical facility, with virtual review of data by a consultant specialist through an electronic patient record.Main outcome measure: Feasibility of developing a novel service within a UK National Health Service setting and improvement of patient journey time within the service were studied.Results: Challenges to implementation of virtual clinic include staffing issues and use of information technology. Patient journey time within the SMS averaged 51 minutes, compared with 92 minutes in the glaucoma outpatient department. Patient satisfaction with the new service was high.Conclusion: Implementing innovation into existing services of the National Health Service is challenging. However, the virtual clinic showed an improved patient journey time compared with that experienced within the general glaucoma outpatient department. There exists a discrepancy between patient management decisions of reviewers, suggesting that some may be more risk averse than others when managing patients seen within this model. Future work will assess the ability to detect progression of disease in this model compared with the general

  8. Translation of New Molecular Imaging Approaches to the Clinical Setting: Bridging the Gap to Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Es, Suzanne C; Venema, Clasina M; Glaudemans, Andor W J M; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N; Elias, Sjoerd G; Boellaard, Ronald; Hospers, Geke A P; Schröder, Carolina P; de Vries, Elisabeth G E

    2016-02-01

    Molecular imaging with PET is a rapidly emerging technique. In breast cancer patients, more than 45 different PET tracers have been or are presently being tested. With a good rationale, after development of the tracer and proven feasibility, it is of interest to evaluate whether there is a potential meaningful role for the tracer in the clinical setting-such as in staging, in the (early) prediction of a treatment response, or in supporting drug choices. So far, only (18)F-FDG PET has been incorporated into breast cancer guidelines. For proof of the clinical relevance of tracers, especially for analysis in a multicenter setting, standardization of the technology and access to the novel PET tracer are required. However, resources for PET implementation research are limited. Therefore, next to randomized studies, novel approaches are required for proving the clinical value of PET tracers with the smallest possible number of patients. The aim of this review is to describe the process of the development of PET tracers and the level of evidence needed for the use of these tracers in breast cancer. Several breast cancer trials have been performed with the PET tracers (18)F-FDG, 3'-deoxy-3'-(18)F-fluorothymidine ((18)F-FLT), and (18)F-fluoroestradiol ((18)F-FES). We studied them to learn lessons for the implementation of novel tracers. After defining the gap between a good rationale for a tracer and implementation in the clinical setting, we propose solutions to fill the gap to try to bring more PET tracers to daily clinical practice. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  9. Structural and Process Factors That Influence Clinical Nurse Specialist Role Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Kelley; Tchouaket, Eric; Carter, Nancy; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; DiCenso, Alba

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the influence of structure and process on clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role implementation. We conducted a secondary analysis of cross-sectional survey data. The study was performed in Canada. The authors included 445 of 471 questionnaires (94.5%) of graduate-prepared CNSs. Based on Donabedian's framework, we conducted a secondary analysis of CNS responses using hierarchical regression. The internal consistency of the 6 CNS role dimensions and team dynamics subscales was excellent. The use of a framework to guide CNS role implementation influences all the role dimensions. Employer understanding of the CNS role, working in an urban catchment area, specialty certification, and more years in a CNS role had a direct positive influence on team dynamics. Full-time employment exerted a direct negative influence on this dimension. Furthermore, team dynamics (as a mediator variable), seeing patients in practice, and having an office in the clinical unit exerted a direct positive influence on the clinical dimension. Having an annual performance appraisal and a job description exerted a direct negative influence on the clinical dimension. Employer understanding, working in an urban area, full-time employment, and specialty certification had an indirect effect on the clinical dimension. Accountability to a nonnurse manager exerted a direct negative influence on the education dimension. The research and scholarly/professional development dimensions were influenced by more years in a CNS role. Accountability to a nurse manager exerted a direct positive influence on the organizational leadership dimension; unionization and seeing patients in practice had a direct negative influence on this dimension. Seeing patients in practice and full-time employment exerted a direct positive influence on the consultation dimension. The identification of structures and processes that influence CNS role implementation may inform strategies used by

  10. Development and Implementation of an Electronic Clinical Formative Assessment: Dental Faculty and Student Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkup, Michele L; Adams, Brooke N; Meadows, Melinda L; Jackson, Richard

    2016-06-01

    A traditional summative grading structure, used at Indiana University School of Dentistry (IUSD) for more than 30 years, was identified by faculty as outdated for assessing students' clinical performance. In an effort to change the status quo, a feedback-driven assessment was implemented in 2012 to provide a constructive assessment tool acceptable to both faculty and students. Building on the successful non-graded clinical evaluation employed at Baylor College of Dentistry, IUSD implemented a streamlined electronic formative feedback model (FFM) to assess students' daily clinical performance. An important addition to this evaluation tool was the inclusion of routine student self-assessment opportunities. The aim of this study was to determine faculty and student response to the new assessment instrument. Following training sessions, anonymous satisfaction surveys were examined for the three user groups: clinical faculty (60% response rate), third-year (D3) students (72% response rate), and fourth-year (D4) students (57% response rate). In the results, 70% of the responding faculty members preferred the FFM over the summative model; however, 61.8% of the D4 respondents preferred the summative model, reporting insufficient assessment time and low faculty participation. The two groups of students had different responses to the self-assessment component: 70.2% of the D4 respondents appreciated clinical self-assessment compared to 46% of the D3 respondents. Overall, while some components of the FFM assessment were well received, a phased approach to implementation may have facilitated a transition more acceptable to both faculty and students. Improvements are being made in an attempt to increase overall satisfaction.

  11. ZAKAT MANAGEMENT IN MEDAN: THE IMPLEMENTATION OF GOVERNMENT REGULATION NO. 23/2011 ON MANAGEMENT OF ZAKAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armia

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Along with the transformation of the spirit of Islamic law into the National Legal System which can be seen with the birth of the Law on the Development Badan Amil Zakat and Sadaqah Infaq Given the institutional team of zakat, namely Badan Amil Zakat (BAZ and the Institute Amil Zakat (LAZ then by itself have been of a wide space to the public, outside the participating government agencies to develop resources zakat Medan municipality, as one of the biggest cities in Indonesia is one of the parameters of how the regulation of zakat as stated by the law of zakat can run effectively or not. The qualitative research was conducted in Medan City, adopting normative, sociological and anthropological jurisdiction approaches, The source of data included field data as a primary source and documents as a secondary one. Data were collected with non participant observations, a series of struktured interviews with selectedinformants, and document analysis as suggested by Miles and Huberman (1992 which include data reduction, data display and conclusion drawing. In responding to the issue of guardian, I applied the theories analysis deskriptif with use methods of analysis. This study concludes Management of Zakat city of Medan after the enactment of Law Number 23 of 2011 has not been significant. problem that is taking place in the city of Medan is a data base that is still weak both within the community and the institution, Management, Human resources zakat manager unprofessional attitude of a lack of public trust in zakat management institutions, lack of exemplary government officials and village leaders, strict sanctions is not yet clear who is responsible for carrying out or take action against violations set forth in Law Number 23 of 2011 For the deficiencies of this institution also led to public institutions is not tithe but they tithe directly to recipients.

  12. Implementation of internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy within community mental health clinics: a process evaluation using the consolidated framework for implementation research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjistavropoulos, H D; Nugent, M M; Dirkse, D; Pugh, N

    2017-09-12

    Depression and anxiety are prevalent and under treated conditions that create enormous burden for the patient and the health system. Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) improves patient access to treatment by providing therapeutic information via the Internet, presented in sequential lessons, accompanied by brief weekly therapist support. While there is growing research supporting ICBT, use of ICBT within community mental health clinics is limited. In a recent trial, an external unit specializing in ICBT facilitated use of ICBT in community mental health clinics in one Canadian province (ISRCTN42729166; registered November 5, 2013). Patient outcomes were very promising and uptake was encouraging. This paper reports on a parallel process evaluation designed to understand facilitators and barriers impacting the uptake and implementation of ICBT. Therapists (n = 22) and managers (n = 11) from seven community mental health clinics dispersed across one Canadian province who were involved in implementing ICBT over ~2 years completed an online survey (including open and closed-ended questions) about ICBT experiences. The questions were based on the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR), which outlines diverse constructs that have the potential to impact program implementation. Analyses suggested ICBT implementation was perceived to be most prominently facilitated by intervention characteristics (namely the relative advantages of ICBT compared to face-to-face therapy, the quality of the ICBT program that was delivered, and evidence supporting ICBT) and implementation processes (namely the use of an external facilitation unit that aided with engaging patients, therapists, and managers and ICBT implementation). The inner setting was identified as the most significant barrier to implementation as a result of limited resources for ICBT combined with greater priority given to face-to-face care. The results contribute to understanding

  13. Experiences with developing and implementing a virtual clinic for glaucoma care in an NHS setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotecha, Aachal; Baldwin, Alex; Brookes, John; Foster, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the development of a virtual glaucoma clinic, whereby technicians collect information for remote review by a consultant specialist. This was a hospital-based service evaluation study. Patients suitable for the stable monitoring service (SMS) were low-risk patients with "suspect", "early"-to-"moderate" glaucoma who were deemed stable by their consultant care team. Three technicians and one health care assistant ran the service. Patients underwent tests in a streamlined manner in a dedicated clinical facility, with virtual review of data by a consultant specialist through an electronic patient record. Feasibility of developing a novel service within a UK National Health Service setting and improvement of patient journey time within the service were studied. Challenges to implementation of virtual clinic include staffing issues and use of information technology. Patient journey time within the SMS averaged 51 minutes, compared with 92 minutes in the glaucoma outpatient department. Patient satisfaction with the new service was high. Implementing innovation into existing services of the National Health Service is challenging. However, the virtual clinic showed an improved patient journey time compared with that experienced within the general glaucoma outpatient department. There exists a discrepancy between patient management decisions of reviewers, suggesting that some may be more risk averse than others when managing patients seen within this model. Future work will assess the ability to detect progression of disease in this model compared with the general outpatient model of care.

  14. A review of human factors principles for the design and implementation of medication safety alerts in clinical information systems

    OpenAIRE

    Phansalkar, Shobha; Edworthy, Judy; Hellier, Elizabeth; Seger, Diane L; Schedlbauer, Angela; Avery, Anthony J; Bates, David W

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this review is to describe the implementation of human factors principles for the design of alerts in clinical information systems. First, we conduct a review of alarm systems to identify human factors principles that are employed in the design and implementation of alerts. Second, we review the medical informatics literature to provide examples of the implementation of human factors principles in current clinical information systems using alerts to provide medication decisio...

  15. Quality assurance for the clinical implementation of kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring for prostate cancer VMAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, J. A.; Booth, J. T.; O’Brien, R. T.; Huang, C.-Y.; Keall, P. J.; Colvill, E.; Poulsen, P. R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring (KIM) is a real-time 3D tumor monitoring system for cancer radiotherapy. KIM uses the commonly available gantry-mounted x-ray imager as input, making this method potentially more widely available than dedicated real-time 3D tumor monitoring systems. KIM is being piloted in a clinical trial for prostate cancer patients treated with VMAT (NCT01742403). The purpose of this work was to develop clinical process and quality assurance (QA) practices for the clinical implementation of KIM. Methods: Informed by and adapting existing guideline documents from other real-time monitoring systems, KIM-specific QA practices were developed. The following five KIM-specific QA tests were included: (1) static localization accuracy, (2) dynamic localization accuracy, (3) treatment interruption accuracy, (4) latency measurement, and (5) clinical conditions accuracy. Tests (1)–(4) were performed using KIM to measure static and representative patient-derived prostate motion trajectories using a 3D programmable motion stage supporting an anthropomorphic phantom with implanted gold markers to represent the clinical treatment scenario. The threshold for system tolerable latency is <1 s. The tolerances for all other tests are that both the mean and standard deviation of the difference between the programmed trajectory and the measured data are <1 mm. The (5) clinical conditions accuracy test compared the KIM measured positions with those measured by kV/megavoltage (MV) triangulation from five treatment fractions acquired in a previous pilot study. Results: For the (1) static localization, (2) dynamic localization, and (3) treatment interruption accuracy tests, the mean and standard deviation of the difference are <1.0 mm. (4) The measured latency is 350 ms. (5) For the tests with previously acquired patient data, the mean and standard deviation of the difference between KIM and kV/MV triangulation are <1.0 mm. Conclusions: Clinical process and

  16. [Implementation of a Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Adults With Schizophrenia in Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Díaz, Natalia; Duarte Osorio, Andrés; Gómez Restrepo, Carlos; Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana Patricia

    2016-01-01

    To present overall strategies and activities for the implementation process of the recommendations contained in the clinical practice guideline for the management of adults with schizophrenia (GPC_E) published by the Colombian Ministry of Health and Welfare (MSPS). Prioritize the proposed recommendations, identify barriers and solving strategies to implement the GPC_E, and develop a monitoring and evaluation system for the key recommendations. The Guideline Developer Group (GDG) included professionals with primary dedication to implementation issues that accompanied the entire process. During the GDG meetings implementation topics were identified and discussed, and later complemented by literature reviews concerning the experience of mental health guidelines implementation at national and international level. Additionally, feedback from the discussions raised during the socialization meetings, and joint meetings with the MSPS and the Institute of Technology Assessment in Health (IETS) were included. The prioritization of recommendations was made in conjunction with the GDG, following the proposed steps in the methodological guide for the development of Clinical Practice Guidelines with Economic Evaluation in the General System of Social Security in Colombian Health (GMEGPC) using the tools 13 and 14. the conclusions and final adjustments were discussed with the GPC_E leaders. The implementation chapter includes a description of the potential barriers, solution strategies, facilitators and monitoring indicators. The identified barriers were categorized in the following 3 groups: Cultural context, health system and proposed interventions. The issues related to solving strategies and facilitating education programs include community mental health, mental health training for health workers in primary care, decentralization and integration of mental health services at the primary care level, use of technologies information and communication and telemedicine. To monitor

  17. Towards a Risk Governance Culture in Flood Policy—Findings from the Implementation of the “Floods Directive” in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Wagner

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The European Directive on the Assessment and Management of Flood Risks is likely to cause changes to flood policy in Germany and other member states. With its risk governance approach, it introduces a holistic and catchment-oriented flood risk management and tries to overcome shortcomings of the past, such as the event-driven construction of mainly structural measures. However, there is leeway for interpretation in implementing the directive. The present paper gives an overview on the implementation of the floods directive in Germany and is divided into two qualitative empirical case studies. Case Study I investigates the level of acceptance of the floods directive among decision-makers in the German part of the Rhine river basin. Findings show that the federal states respond differently to the impulse given by the floods directive. Whereas some decision-makers opt for a pro-forma implementation, others take it as a starting point to systematically improve their flood policy. Case Study II presents recommendations for a successful implementation of flood risk management plans that have been developed within a project for the water authority in Bavaria and might be interesting for other federal/member states. For a participation of the interested parties on the level of shared decision-making, the planning process has to work on sub-management-plan level (15–20 communities. The water resources authority has to adopt a multi-faceted role (expert, responsible or interested party depending on the discussed topics.

  18. Barriers to the implementation of advanced clinical pharmacy services at Portuguese hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazinha, Isabel; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando

    2014-10-01

    In some countries, such as Portugal, clinical pharmacy services in the hospital setting may be implemented to a lower extent than desirable. Several studies have analysed the perceived barriers to pharmacy service implementation in community pharmacy. To identify the barriers towards the implementation of advanced clinical pharmacy services at a hospital level in Portugal, using medication follow-up as an example. Hospital pharmacies in Portugal. A qualitative study based on 20 face-to-face semi-structured interviews of strategists and hospital pharmacists. The interview guide was based on two theoretical frameworks, the Borum's theory of organisational change and the Social Network Theory, and then adapted for the Portuguese reality and hospital environments. A constant comparison process with previously analysed interviews, using an inductive approach, was carried out to allow themes to emerge. Themes were organised following the Leavitt's Organizational Model: functions and objectives; hospital pharmacist; structure of pharmacy services; environment; technology; and medication follow-up based on the study topic. Barriers towards practice change. Medication follow-up appeared not to be a well-known service in Portuguese hospital pharmacies. The major barriers at the pharmacist level were their mind-set, resistance to change, and lack of readiness. Lack of time, excessive bureaucratic and administrative workload, reduced workforce, and lack of support from the head of the service and other colleagues were identified as structural barriers. Lack of access to patients' clinical records and cumbersome procedures to implement medication follow-up were recognised as technological barriers. Poor communication with other healthcare professionals, and lack of support from professional associations were the major environmental barriers. Few of the barriers identified by Portuguese hospital pharmacists were consistent with previous reports from community pharmacy. The mind

  19. SU-E-T-181: Clinical Implementation of Task Group 176

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgdorf, B [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Yeager, C; Zhou, F; Hand, C [Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The implementation of TG-176 with regards to immobilization devices and couch tops as they effect dosimetric treatment planning. Methods: The external devices used clinically were scanned to measure their HU values. Plans were created in the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) using these devices, one that accounted for the correct HU value of the each device and another that did not include the device as a structure. A dose subtraction was performed between the two plans to evaluate the dosimetric differences. The metrics used for evaluation included attenuation and surface dose. Plan parameters were varied to evaluate the impact of the devices in different clinical scenarios. Results: While the exact HU values of our results are clinic-dependent, the protocol being implemented is widely applicable. We recommend a four step process for implementing this task group. First, physics should scan each treatment device to determine accurate HU values. Second, CT therapists should include in the setup note which table top was used during patient CT simulation and are asked to make immobilization devices as uniform in thickness as possible. Therapists should also index the devices whenever possible so beam will traverse the same area of the device. Third, the dosimetrist should manually correct the HU value for any external device, including the couch. For H&N cases, the rails must be removed from the couch structure. When rails are used during treatments, it is important to make note of their exact position in the setup notes. Finally, physicians should be made aware that there could be changes in surface doses depending on whether or not immobilization devices or couch tops are in the beam path. Conclusion: The protocol outlined above was implemented to reduce the errors that arise from ignoring effects of external devices, thus ensuring safer, more accurate patient treatments.

  20. Community-based interventions to improve HPV vaccination coverage among 13- to 15-year-old females: measures implemented by local governments in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Fujiwara

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of various community-based interventions in support of HPV vaccination implemented by cities and towns within Tochigi prefecture, Japan with a view to identifying useful indicators which might guide future interventions to improve HPV vaccination coverage in the prefecture. A postal questionnaire survey of all 27 local governments in Tochigi Prefecture was conducted in December 2010. All 27 responded, and 22 provided the exact numbers of the targeted and vaccinated populations of 13- to 15-year-old girls from April to December 2010. The local governments also answered questions on the type of interventions implemented including public subsidies, school-based programs, direct mail, free tickets and recalls. Local governments that conducted a school-based vaccination program reported 96.8% coverage for the 1(st dose, 96.2% for the 2(nd dose, and 91.2% for the 3(rd dose. Those that provided subsidies without school-based programs reported a wide range of vaccination rates: 45.7%-95.0% for the 1(st dose, 41.1%-93.7% for the 2(nd dose and 3.1%-90.1% for the 3(rd dose. Among this group, the combination of a free ticket, direct mail and recall was most effective, with 95.0% coverage for the 1(st dose, 93.7% for the 2(nd dose, and 90.1% for the 3(rd dose. The governments that did not offer a subsidy had the lowest vaccination coverage, with 0.8%-1.4% for the 1(st dose, 0.0%-0.8% for the 2(nd dose, and 0.1%-0.1% for the 3(rd dose. The results of this survey indicate that school-based vaccinations and public subsidies are the most effective method to improve HPV vaccination coverage; however, the combination of a free ticket, direct mail, and recalls with public subsidies are also important measures in increasing the vaccination rate. These data may afford important indicators for the successful implementation of future HPV vaccination programs.

  1. Clinical governance and research ethics as barriers to UK low-risk population-based health research?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Flora

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the Helsinki Declaration was introduced in 1964 as a code of practice for clinical research, it has generally been agreed that research governance is also needed in the field of public health and health promotion research. Recently, a range of factors led to the development of more stringent bureaucratic procedures, governing the conduct of low-risk population-based health research in the United Kingdom. Methods Our paper highlights a case study of the application process to medical research ethics committees in the United Kingdom for a study of the promotion of physical activity by health care providers. The case study presented here is an illustration of the challenges in conducting low-risk population-based health research. Results Our mixed-methods approach involved a questionnaire survey of and semi-structured interviews with health professionals (who were all healthy volunteers. Since our study does not involve the participation of either patients or the general population, one would expect the application to the relevant research ethics committees to be a formality. This proved not to be the case! Conclusion Research ethics committees could be counter-productive, rather than protecting the vulnerable in the research process, they can stifle low-risk population-based health research. Research ethics in health services research is first and foremost the responsibility of the researcher(s, and we need to learn to trust health service researchers again. The burden of current research governance regulation to address the perceived ethical problems is neither appropriate nor adequate. Senior researchers/academics need to educate and train students and junior researchers in the area of research ethics, whilst at the same time reducing pressures on them that lead to unethical research, such as commercial funding, inappropriate government interference and the pressure to publish. We propose that non-invasive low

  2. Program Implementation of Option B+ at a President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief-Supported HIV Clinic Improves Clinical Indicators But Not Retention in Care in Mbarara, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kathleen; Muyindike, Winnie; Matthews, Lynn T; Kanyesigye, Michael; Siedner, Mark J

    2017-08-01

    2013 WHO guidelines for prevention of mother to child transmission recommend combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) for all pregnant women, regardless of CD4 count (Option B/B+). We conducted a retrospective analysis of data from a government-operated HIV clinic in Mbarara, Uganda before and after implementation of Option B+ to assess the impact on retention in care. We limited our analysis to women not on ART at the time of their first reported pregnancy with CD4 count >350. We fit regression models to estimate relationships between calendar period (Option A vs. Option B+) and the primary outcome of interest, retention in care. One thousand and sixty-two women were included in the analysis. Women were more likely to start ART within 6 months of pregnancy in the Option B+ period (68% vs. 7%, p Option B+ was associated with a nonsignificant 30% increased odds of retention in care at 1 year [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.30, 95% CI 0.98-1.73, p = 0.06]. After transition to an Option B+ program, pregnant women with CD4 count >350 were more likely to initiate combination therapy; however, interventions to mitigate losses from HIV care during pregnancy are needed to improve the health of women, children, and families.

  3. Matrix-oriented implementation for the numerical solution of the partial differential equations governing flows and transport in porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Shuyu

    2012-09-01

    In this paper we introduce a new technique for the numerical solution of the various partial differential equations governing flow and transport phenomena in porous media. This method is proposed to be used in high level programming languages like MATLAB, Python, etc., which show to be more efficient for certain mathematical operations than for others. The proposed technique utilizes those operations in which these programming languages are efficient the most and keeps away as much as possible from those inefficient, time-consuming operations. In particular, this technique is based on the minimization of using multiple indices looping operations by reshaping the unknown variables into one-dimensional column vectors and performing the numerical operations using shifting matrices. The cell-centered information as well as the face-centered information are shifted to the adjacent face-center and cell-center, respectively. This enables the difference equations to be done for all the cells at once using matrix operations rather than within loops. Furthermore, for results post-processing, the face-center information can further be mapped to the physical grid nodes for contour plotting and stream lines constructions. In this work we apply this technique to flow and transport phenomena in porous media. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. 'Good Governance' dan 'Governability'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    - Pratikno

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The article endeavors to trace the outset of governance concept, its dominant meanings and discourse, and its implication towards governability. The central role of government in the governing processes has predominantly been adopted. The concept of governance was emerged precisely in the context of the failure of government as key player in regulation, economic redistribution and political participation. Governance is therefore aimed to emphasize pattern of governing which are based both on democratic mechanism and sound development management. However, practices of such good governance concept –which are mainly adopted and promoted by donor states and agencies– tend to degrade state and/or government authority and legitimacy. Traditional function of the state as sole facilitator of equal societal, political and legal membership among citizens has been diminished. The logic of fair competition has been substituted almost completely by the logic of free competition in nearly all sectors of public life. The concept and practices of good governance have resulted in decayed state authority and failed state which in turn created a condition for "ungovernability". By promoting democratic and humane governance, the article accordingly encourages discourse to reinstall and bring the idea of accountable state back in.

  5. Barriers and facilitators to the implementation of orthodontic mini implants in clinical practice: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meursinge Reynders, Reint; Ronchi, Laura; Ladu, Luisa; Di Girolamo, Nicola; de Lange, Jan; Roberts, Nia; Mickan, Sharon

    2016-09-23

    Numerous surveys have shown that orthodontic mini implants (OMIs) are underused in clinical practice. To investigate this implementation issue, we conducted a systematic review to (1) identify barriers and facilitators to the implementation of OMIs for all potential stakeholders and (2) quantify these implementation constructs, i.e., record their prevalence. We also recorded the prevalence of clinicians in the eligible studies that do not use OMIs. Methods were based on our published protocol. Broad-spectrum eligibility criteria were defined. A barrier was defined as any variable that impedes or obstructs the use of OMIs and a facilitator as any variable that eases and promotes their use. Over 30 databases including gray literature were searched until 15 January 2016. The Joanna Briggs Institute tool for studies reporting prevalence and incidence data was used to critically appraise the included studies. Outcomes were qualitatively synthesized, and meta-analyses were only conducted when pre-set criteria were fulfilled. Three reviewers conducted all research procedures independently. We also contacted authors of eligible studies to obtain additional information. Three surveys fulfilled the eligibility criteria. Seventeen implementation constructs were identified in these studies and were extracted from a total of 165 patients and 1391 clinicians. Eight of the 17 constructs were scored by more than 50 % of the pertinent stakeholders. Three of these constructs overlapped between studies. Contacting of authors clarified various uncertainties but was not always successful. Limitations of the eligible studies included (1) the small number of studies; (2) not defining the research questions, i.e., the primary outcomes; (3) the research design (surveys) of the studies and the exclusive use of closed-ended questions; (4) not consulting standards for identifying implementation constructs; (5) the lack of pilot testing; (6) high heterogeneity; (7) the risk of reporting bias

  6. Implementing the new clinical nurse leader role while gleaning insights from the past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Linda Weaver; Leahy, Cathy

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the experiences of clinical nurse leaders (CNLs) as they implemented this new role. Twenty-four CNLs participated. Data were collected via an e-mail-distributed questionnaire. Data from open-ended questions were used to conduct a qualitative content analysis. Data were categorized according to question, key thoughts and phrases were established, and themes were determined. Findings revealed that nonsystematic role introduction was common. Two challenges to role implementation included role confusion and being overworked. The most positive aspect of the role was remaining close to the point of care. Participants noted that the overall response of the health care team to the role was positive despite participants' belief that the greatest roadblock to role success was the lack of support by nurse administrators. The support of nurse administrators and clear role expectations were viewed as essential for role sustain-ability. Understanding the experiences of CNLs as they launch this new role can provide insights for educators, administrators, CNLs, and other health care providers regarding the success and sustainability of the role. In addition, understanding the similarities between the clinical nurse specialist (CNS) role initiation in the past and the CNL role initiation today can foster the development of strategies for confronting the challenges of new role implementation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Active implementation strategy of CONSORT adherence by a dental specialty journal improved randomized clinical trial reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandis, Nikolaos; Shamseer, Larissa; Kokich, Vincent G; Fleming, Padhraig S; Moher, David

    2014-09-01

    To describe a novel CONsolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) adherence strategy implemented by the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (AJO-DO) and to report its impact on the completeness of reporting of published trials. The AJO-DO CONSORT adherence strategy, initiated in June 2011, involves active assessment of randomized clinical trial (RCT) reporting during the editorial process. The completeness of reporting CONSORT items was compared between trials submitted and published during the implementation period (July 2011 to September 2013) and trials published between August 2007 and July 2009. Of the 42 RCTs submitted (July 2011 to September 2013), 23 were considered for publication and assessed for completeness of reporting, seven of which were eventually published. For all published RCTs between 2007 and 2009 (n = 20), completeness of reporting by CONSORT item ranged from 0% to 100% (Median = 40%, interquartile range = 60%). All published trials in 2011-2013, reported 33 of 37 CONSORT (sub) items. Four CONSORT 2010 checklist items remained problematic even after implementation of the adherence strategy: changes to methods (3b), changes to outcomes (6b) after the trial commenced, interim analysis (7b), and trial stopping (14b), which are typically only reported when applicable. Trials published following implementation of the AJO-DO CONSORT adherence strategy completely reported more CONSORT items than those published or submitted previously. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Facilitators and barriers to implementing a local policy to reduce sodium consumption in the County of Los Angeles government, California, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gase, Lauren N; Kuo, Tony; Dunet, Diane O; Simon, Paul A

    2011-03-01

    This qualitative study explores facilitators and barriers to a proposed food procurement policy that would require food purchasers, distributors, and vendors of food service in the County of Los Angeles government to meet specified nutrition standards, including limits on sodium content. We conducted 30 key informant interviews. Interviewees represented 18 organizations from the County of Los Angeles government departments that purchased, distributed, or sold food; public and private non-County entities that had previously implemented food procurement policies in their organizations; and large organizations that catered food to the County. Study participants reported 3 key facilitators: their organization's authority to impose nutrition standards, their organization's desire to provide nutritious food, and the opportunity to build on existing nutrition policies. Eight key barriers were identified: 1) unique features among food service settings, 2) costs and unavailability of low-sodium foods, 3) complexity of food service arrangements, 4) lack of consumer demand for low-sodium foods, 5) undesirable taste of low-sodium foods, 6) preference for prepackaged products, 7) lack of knowledge and experience in operationalizing sodium standards, and 8) existing multiyear contracts that are difficult to change. Despite perceived barriers, several participants indicated that their organizations have successfully implemented nutritional standards that include limits on sodium. Developing or changing policies for procuring food represents a potentially feasible strategy for reducing sodium consumption in food service venues controlled by the County of Los Angeles. The facilitators and barriers identified here can inform the formulation, adoption, implementation, and evaluation of sodium reduction policies in other jurisdictions.

  9. Tax Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Karen; Brehm Johansen, Mette

    to wider international trends within tax administration, especially concerning the development of risk assessments and internal control in the corporations and a greater focus on monitoring of these elements by the tax authorities. Overall, the working paper concludes that Tax Governance as a model......This working paper presents an analysis of the experiences of Cooperative Compliance in Denmark. Cooperative Compliance denotes a specific kind of collaborative program for the regulation of large corporate taxpayers by the tax authorities. Cooperative Compliance programs have been implemented...... in several countries worldwide. In Denmark the program is called Tax Governance. Tax Governance has been studied using qualitative method and the analyses of the working paper build on an extensive base of in-depth interviews – primarily with tax directors from corporations participating in the program...

  10. Clinical implementation of AXB from AAA for breast: Plan quality and subvolume analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guebert, Alexandra; Conroy, Leigh; Weppler, Sarah; Alghamdi, Majed; Conway, Jessica; Harper, Lindsay; Phan, Tien; Olivotto, Ivo A; Smith, Wendy L; Quirk, Sarah

    2018-04-25

    Two dose calculation algorithms are available in Varian Eclipse software: Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) and Acuros External Beam (AXB). Many Varian Eclipse-based centers have access to AXB; however, a thorough understanding of how it will affect plan characteristics and, subsequently, clinical practice is necessary prior to implementation. We characterized the difference in breast plan quality between AXB and AAA for dissemination to clinicians during implementation. Locoregional irradiation plans were created with AAA for 30 breast cancer patients with a prescription dose of 50 Gy to the breast and 45 Gy to the regional node, in 25 fractions. The internal mammary chain (IMC CTV ) nodes were covered by 80% of the breast dose. AXB, both dose-to-water and dose-to-medium reporting, was used to recalculate plans while maintaining constant monitor units. Target coverage and organ-at-risk doses were compared between the two algorithms using dose-volume parameters. An analysis to assess location-specific changes was performed by dividing the breast into nine subvolumes in the superior-inferior and left-right directions. There were minimal differences found between the AXB and AAA calculated plans. The median difference between AXB and AAA for breast CTV V 95% , was AAA for breast radiotherapy is not expected to result in changes in clinical practice for prescribing or planning breast radiotherapy. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  11. Design and implementation of a radiotherapy programme: Clinical, medical physics, radiation protection and safety aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    It is widely acknowledged that the clinical aspects (diagnosis, decision, indication for treatment, follow-up) as well as the procedures related to the physical and technical aspects of patient treatment must be subjected to careful control and planning in order to ensure safe, high quality radiotherapy. Whilst it has long been recognized that the physical aspects of quality assurance in radiotherapy are vital to achieve and effective and safe treatment, it has been increasingly acknowledged only recently that a systematic approach is absolutely necessary to all steps within clinical and technical aspects of a radiotherapy programme as well. The need to establish general guidelines at the IAEA, taking into account clinical medical physics, radiation protection and safety considerations, for designing and implementing radiotherapy programmes in Member States has been identified through the Member States' increased interest in the efficient and safe application of radiation in health care. Several consultants and advisory group meetings were convened to prepare a report providing a basis for establishing a programme in radiotherapy. The present TECDOC is addressed to all professionals and administrators involved in the development, implementation and management of a radiotherapy programme in order to establish a common and consistent framework where all steps and procedures in radiotherapy are taken into account

  12. Implementation of a clinical dementia guideline. A controlled study on the effect of a multifaceted strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldorff, Frans Boch; Almind, Gert; Mäkelä, Marjukka

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of a multifaceted implementation strategy aiming to improve GP adherence to a clinical guideline on dementia. DESIGN: Controlled before and after study using data records from regional laboratories. The guideline was mailed to all GPs. The multifaceted implementation...... strategy was planned with local GPs, and consisted of seminars, outreach visits, reminders and continuing medical education (CME) small group training. SETTING: Primary health care. SUBJECTS: 535 GP practices with 727 physicians in Denmark. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The diffusion and use of the guideline...... was measured by a mailed survey. Adherence to guideline recommendations was monitored by data on laboratory tests from general practice in patient's > or = 65 years: thyroid stimulating hormone requested with vitamin B12 or methylmalonate. The use of these tests as part of a diagnostic evaluation of dementia...

  13. Molecular markers for urothelial bladder cancer prognosis: toward implementation in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rhijn, Bas W G; Catto, James W; Goebell, Peter J; Knüchel, Ruth; Shariat, Shahrokh F; van der Poel, Henk G; Sanchez-Carbayo, Marta; Thalmann, George N; Schmitz-Dräger, Bernd J; Kiemeney, Lambertus A

    2014-10-01

    To summarize the current status of clinicopathological and molecular markers for the prediction of recurrence or progression or both in non-muscle-invasive and survival in muscle-invasive urothelial bladder cancer, to address the reproducibility of pathology and molecular markers, and to provide directions toward implementation of molecular markers in future clinical decision making. Immunohistochemistry, gene signatures, and FGFR3-based molecular grading were used as molecular examples focussing on prognostics and issues related to robustness of pathological and molecular assays. The role of molecular markers to predict recurrence is limited, as clinical variables are currently more important. The prediction of progression and survival using molecular markers holds considerable promise. Despite a plethora of prognostic (clinical and molecular) marker studies, reproducibility of pathology and molecular assays has been understudied, and lack of reproducibility is probably the main reason that individual prediction of disease outcome is currently not reliable. Molecular markers are promising to predict progression and survival, but not recurrence. However, none of these are used in the daily clinical routine because of reproducibility issues. Future studies should focus on reproducibility of marker assessment and consistency of study results by incorporating scoring systems to reduce heterogeneity of reporting. This may ultimately lead to incorporation of molecular markers in clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [A clinical audit on the use of medications for pressure sores, after the implementation of guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiari, Paolo; Fontana, Mirella; Bianchi, Tommaso; Bonzagni, Cristina; Galetti, Caterina

    2006-01-01

    Although guidelines for the management of pressure sores are widely available, their implementation is not always easy and sometimes does not produce the desired changes. To describe the results of a clinical audit aiming at assessing the appropriate use of medications for pressure sores, after the implementation of guidelines. The audit group, with an expert in assessment, a nurse expert in pressure sores, a microbiologist, a dermatologist and a chemist analysed the clinical and nursing records of all the patients with a pressure sore, discharged during the first trimester of 2005 and 2006, after the implementation of the guidelines, from wards with higher prevalence of pressure sores: geriatric, medical, intensive care, rehabilitation and post acute wards. Each documented treatment was classified as appropriate, not appropriate or "grey area", treatments inappropriate according to guidelines but not according to expert or current knowledge (e.g. poliurethane medications for heel pressure sores). After each stage, the results were returned and discussed with the involved wards. One hundred 74 patients were surveyed in 2005 and 199 in 2006, with a total of respectively 287 and 326 sores. The percentage of inappropriate treatments was 20% in 2005 and 12.8% in 2006 (OR 1.79 I.C. 95% 1.10- 2.91), while an increase of treatments considered grey area (from 7% to 13.5%) was observed. The medium number of medications used was 17.3 per lesion, in 2005 and 16.4 in 2006 with a cost respectively of 83.6 and 67.35 per lesion, but the two populations were not strictly comparable. Clinical audit is a strategy that involving doctors and nurses, may promote positive changes. The rate of inappropriate treatments (higher in areas with high turnover of nurses) can be improved with educational interventions. The identification of treatments of the grey area highlights the need of periodically revising guidelines to update their contents according to new knowledge and technologies.

  15. MO-E-BRC-01: Online Adaptive MR-Guided RT: Workflow and Clinical Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashani, R.

    2016-01-01

    Online adaptive radiation therapy has the potential to ensure delivery of optimal treatment to the patient by accounting for anatomical and potentially functional changes that occur from one fraction to the next and over the course of treatment. While on-line adaptive RT (ART) has been a topic of many publications, discussions, and research, it has until very recently remained largely a concept and not a practical implementation. However, recent advances in on-table imaging, use of deformable image registration for contour generation and dose tracking, faster and more efficient plan optimization, as well as fast quality assurance method has enabled the implementation of ART in the clinic in the past couple of years. The introduction of these tools into routine clinical use requires many considerations and progressive knowledge to understand how processes that have historically taken hours/days to complete can now be done in less than 30 minutes. This session will discuss considerations to perform real time contouring, planning and patient specific QA, as well as a practical workflow and the required resources. Learning Objectives: To understand the difficulties, challenges and available technologies for online adaptive RT. To understand how to implement online adaptive therapy in a clinical environment and to understand the workflow and resources required. To understand the limitations and sources of uncertainty in the online adaptive process I have research funding from ViewRay Inc. and Philips Medical Systems.; R. Kashani, I have research funding from ViewRay Inc. and Philips Medical Systems.; X. Li, Research supported by Elekta Inc.

  16. MO-E-BRC-00: Online Adaptive Radiotherapy - Considerations for Practical Clinical Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Online adaptive radiation therapy has the potential to ensure delivery of optimal treatment to the patient by accounting for anatomical and potentially functional changes that occur from one fraction to the next and over the course of treatment. While on-line adaptive RT (ART) has been a topic of many publications, discussions, and research, it has until very recently remained largely a concept and not a practical implementation. However, recent advances in on-table imaging, use of deformable image registration for contour generation and dose tracking, faster and more efficient plan optimization, as well as fast quality assurance method has enabled the implementation of ART in the clinic in the past couple of years. The introduction of these tools into routine clinical use requires many considerations and progressive knowledge to understand how processes that have historically taken hours/days to complete can now be done in less than 30 minutes. This session will discuss considerations to perform real time contouring, planning and patient specific QA, as well as a practical workflow and the required resources. Learning Objectives: To understand the difficulties, challenges and available technologies for online adaptive RT. To understand how to implement online adaptive therapy in a clinical environment and to understand the workflow and resources required. To understand the limitations and sources of uncertainty in the online adaptive process I have research funding from ViewRay Inc. and Philips Medical Systems.; R. Kashani, I have research funding from ViewRay Inc. and Philips Medical Systems.; X. Li, Research supported by Elekta Inc.

  17. MO-E-BRC-00: Online Adaptive Radiotherapy - Considerations for Practical Clinical Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    Online adaptive radiation therapy has the potential to ensure delivery of optimal treatment to the patient by accounting for anatomical and potentially functional changes that occur from one fraction to the next and over the course of treatment. While on-line adaptive RT (ART) has been a topic of many publications, discussions, and research, it has until very recently remained largely a concept and not a practical implementation. However, recent advances in on-table imaging, use of deformable image registration for contour generation and dose tracking, faster and more efficient plan optimization, as well as fast quality assurance method has enabled the implementation of ART in the clinic in the past couple of years. The introduction of these tools into routine clinical use requires many considerations and progressive knowledge to understand how processes that have historically taken hours/days to complete can now be done in less than 30 minutes. This session will discuss considerations to perform real time contouring, planning and patient specific QA, as well as a practical workflow and the required resources. Learning Objectives: To understand the difficulties, challenges and available technologies for online adaptive RT. To understand how to implement online adaptive therapy in a clinical environment and to understand the workflow and resources required. To understand the limitations and sources of uncertainty in the online adaptive process I have research funding from ViewRay Inc. and Philips Medical Systems.; R. Kashani, I have research funding from ViewRay Inc. and Philips Medical Systems.; X. Li, Research supported by Elekta Inc.

  18. MO-E-BRC-01: Online Adaptive MR-Guided RT: Workflow and Clinical Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashani, R. [Washington University School of Medicine (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Online adaptive radiation therapy has the potential to ensure delivery of optimal treatment to the patient by accounting for anatomical and potentially functional changes that occur from one fraction to the next and over the course of treatment. While on-line adaptive RT (ART) has been a topic of many publications, discussions, and research, it has until very recently remained largely a concept and not a practical implementation. However, recent advances in on-table imaging, use of deformable image registration for contour generation and dose tracking, faster and more efficient plan optimization, as well as fast quality assurance method has enabled the implementation of ART in the clinic in the past couple of years. The introduction of these tools into routine clinical use requires many considerations and progressive knowledge to understand how processes that have historically taken hours/days to complete can now be done in less than 30 minutes. This session will discuss considerations to perform real time contouring, planning and patient specific QA, as well as a practical workflow and the required resources. Learning Objectives: To understand the difficulties, challenges and available technologies for online adaptive RT. To understand how to implement online adaptive therapy in a clinical environment and to understand the workflow and resources required. To understand the limitations and sources of uncertainty in the online adaptive process I have research funding from ViewRay Inc. and Philips Medical Systems.; R. Kashani, I have research funding from ViewRay Inc. and Philips Medical Systems.; X. Li, Research supported by Elekta Inc.

  19. Implementation of a quality improvement initiative in Belgian diabetic foot clinics: feasibility and initial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doggen, Kris; Van Acker, Kristien; Beele, Hilde; Dumont, Isabelle; Félix, Patricia; Lauwers, Patrick; Lavens, Astrid; Matricali, Giovanni A; Randon, Caren; Weber, Eric; Van Casteren, Viviane; Nobels, Frank

    2014-07-01

    This article aims to describe the implementation and initial results of an audit-feedback quality improvement initiative in Belgian diabetic foot clinics. Using self-developed software and questionnaires, diabetic foot clinics collected data in 2005, 2008 and 2011, covering characteristics, history and ulcer severity, management and outcome of the first 52 patients presenting with a Wagner grade ≥ 2 diabetic foot ulcer or acute neuropathic osteoarthropathy that year. Quality improvement was encouraged by meetings and by anonymous benchmarking of diabetic foot clinics. The first audit-feedback cycle was a pilot study. Subsequent audits, with a modified methodology, had increasing rates of participation and data completeness. Over 85% of diabetic foot clinics participated and 3372 unique patients were sampled between 2005 and 2011 (3312 with a diabetic foot ulcer and 111 with acute neuropathic osteoarthropathy). Median age was 70 years, median diabetes duration was 14 years and 64% were men. Of all diabetic foot ulcers, 51% were plantar and 29% were both ischaemic and deeply infected. Ulcer healing rate at 6 months significantly increased from 49% to 54% between 2008 and 2011. Management of diabetic foot ulcers varied between diabetic foot clinics: 88% of plantar mid-foot ulcers were off-loaded (P10-P90: 64-100%), and 42% of ischaemic limbs were revascularized (P10-P90: 22-69%) in 2011. A unique, nationwide quality improvement initiative was established among diabetic foot clinics, covering ulcer healing, lower limb amputation and many other aspects of diabetic foot care. Data completeness increased, thanks in part to questionnaire revision. Benchmarking remains challenging, given the many possible indicators and limited sample size. The optimized questionnaire allows future quality of care monitoring in diabetic foot clinics. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Assessing transgastric Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery prior to clinical implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donatsky, Anders Meller

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to investigate whether transgastric Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES) could be implemented safely in clinical practice. The experimental studies proved ultrasonography guided access through the stomach to be feasible and safe without iatrogenic complications......-abdominal abscess formation as a result of contamination from the access route was still present. To reduce this contamination, mouthwash with chlorhexidine was effective in a human randomised study. The same study also found significant higher bacterial load in the stomach of patients using proton pump inhibitor...

  1. Successful Implementation of a Clinical Care Pathway for Management of Epistaxis at a Tertiary Care Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosler, Peter S; Kass, Jason I; Wang, Eric W; Snyderman, Carl H

    2016-11-01

    We compare the management of patients with severe epistaxis before and after the implementation a clinical care pathway (CCP) to standardize care, minimize hospital stay, and decrease cost. Single prospective analysis with historical control. Tertiary academic hospital. Patients treated for epistaxis between October 2012 to December 2013 were compared with a prospective analysis of patients treated for severe epistaxis after implementation of a CCP from June 2014 to February 2015. Severe epistaxis was defined as nasal bleeding not able to be controlled with local pressure, topical vasoconstrictors, or simple anterior packing. Severe epistaxis was similar in the pre- and post-CCP cohorts: 24.7% (n = 42) vs 18.9% (n = 22), respectively. Implementation of early sphenopalatine artery ligation resulted in decreased number of days packed (3.2 ± 1.6 to 1.4 ± 1.6; P = .001), decreased hospital stay (5.2 ± 3.9 to 2.1 ± 1.3 days; P vs 54.5%; P = .035), admission to an appropriate hospital location with access to key resources (41.7% vs 83.3%; P = .007), and decreased overall cost of hospitalization by 66% ($9435 saved). No patients received embolization after the CCP was implemented. Implementation of a CCP decreased hospital stay and days of packing, facilitated definitive care in patients with severe epistaxis, improved patient safety, and decreased cost. The results of this study can serve as a model for the management of severe epistaxis and for future quality improvement measures. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  2. Implementing the clinical nurse leader role using the Virginia Mason Production System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Charleen; Nelson-Peterson, Dana L

    2007-11-01

    More than 90 members of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing and 190 practice sites have partnered to develop the clinical nurse leader (CNL) role. The partnership has created synergy between education and practice and nurtured innovation and diffusion of learning on a national basis. In this ongoing department, the editor, Jolene Tornabeni, MA, RN, FAAN, FACHE, showcases a variety of nurse leaders who discuss their new patient care delivery models in preparation for the CNL role and CNLs who highlight partnerships with their clinical colleagues to improve patient care. In this article, the authors discuss the needs for changes in the nursing care delivery model, the implementation of the role of the CNL using the tools of the Virginia Mason Production System, as well as early outcomes and future opportunities for the expansion of the CNL role.

  3. Implementation of a Monte Carlo based inverse planning model for clinical IMRT with MCNP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Tongming Tony

    2003-01-01

    Inaccurate dose calculations and limitations of optimization algorithms in inverse planning introduce systematic and convergence errors to treatment plans. This work was to implement a Monte Carlo based inverse planning model for clinical IMRT aiming to minimize the aforementioned errors. The strategy was to precalculate the dose matrices of beamlets in a Monte Carlo based method followed by the optimization of beamlet intensities. The MCNP 4B (Monte Carlo N-Particle version 4B) code was modified to implement selective particle transport and dose tallying in voxels and efficient estimation of statistical uncertainties. The resulting performance gain was over eleven thousand times. Due to concurrent calculation of multiple beamlets of individual ports, hundreds of beamlets in an IMRT plan could be calculated within a practical length of time. A finite-sized point source model provided a simple and accurate modeling of treatment beams. The dose matrix calculations were validated through measurements in phantoms. Agreements were better than 1.5% or 0.2 cm. The beamlet intensities were optimized using a parallel platform based optimization algorithm that was capable of escape from local minima and preventing premature convergence. The Monte Carlo based inverse planning model was applied to clinical cases. The feasibility and capability of Monte Carlo based inverse planning for clinical IMRT was demonstrated. Systematic errors in treatment plans of a commercial inverse planning system were assessed in comparison with the Monte Carlo based calculations. Discrepancies in tumor doses and critical structure doses were up to 12% and 17%, respectively. The clinical importance of Monte Carlo based inverse planning for IMRT was demonstrated

  4. Diabetic and Obese Patient Clinical Outcomes Improve During a Care Management Implementation in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtrop, Jodi Summers; Luo, Zhehui; Piatt, Gretchen; Green, Lee A; Chen, Qiaoling; Piette, John

    2017-10-01

    To address the increasing burden of chronic disease, many primary care practices are turning to care management and the hiring of care managers to help patients coordinate their care and self-manage their conditions. Care management is often, but not always, proving effective at improving patient outcomes, but more evidence is needed. In this pair-matched cluster randomized trial, 5 practices implemented care management and were compared with 5 comparison practices within the same practice organization. Targeted patients included diabetic patients with a hemoglobin A1c >9% and nondiabetic obese patients. Clinical values tracked were A1c, blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein, microalbumin, and weight. Clinically important improvements were demonstrated in the intervention versus comparison practices, with diabetic patients improving A1c control and obese patients experiencing weight loss. There was a 12% relative increase in the proportion of patients meeting the clinical target of A1c management practices lost 5% or more of their body weight as compared with 10% of comparison patients (adjusted relative improvement, 15%; CI, 2%-28%). These findings add to the growing evidence-base for the effectiveness of care management as an effective clinical practice with regard to improving diabetes- and obesity-related outcomes.

  5. Implementing Local Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation Actions: The Role of Various Policy Instruments in a Multi-Level Governance Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Carina H. Keskitalo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, considerable focus, e.g., in the fifth IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Assessment Report (2014 has been trained on why adaptation and mitigation have not been developed more than at present, with relatively few local government actions taken compared with, for example, more discursive policy agreement on the importance of the issue of climate change. Going beyond a focus on general limits and barriers, this comment suggests that one important issue is that climate change has not yet been sufficiently integrated into the state regulative structure of legislation and policy-making. A comparison between three cases suggests that local developments that are not supported in particular by binding regulation are unlikely to achieve the same general level of implementation as issues for which such regulative demands (and thereby also requirements for prioritization exist. This constitutes an important consideration for the development of adaptation and mitigation as policy areas, including on the local level.

  6. Governance and Strategy Implementation in Local Clusters to Improve the PerformanceHttp://Dx.Doi.Org/10.5585/Riae.V9i2.1672

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Fischer Günther

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Micro, small and medium enterprises (MSME are designed to operate in networks, cooperatively, in order to obtain benefits that would not occur through the alone action, and encourage the development of local productive arrangements (LPA. Emerge the need for synergy between the actors, operationalized by the mechanisms of integration, which must be managed for efficiency. These characteristics of cooperation and interaction impact the achievement of the objectives and strategies, and administrative functions and plans. Therein appear one of the challenges of present time: how to implement the strategies, plans, and how to make the strategy works? Governance emerges, then, as a medium to achieve the objectives and, so, talk about it in the LPA extends the focus on developing management methods to maintain the idiosyncrasies, to the same extent as they contribute to the effectiveness and improvement in performance.

  7. Barriers to implementing evidence-based clinical guidelines: A survey of early adopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spallek, Heiko; Song, Mei; Polk, Deborah E; Bekhuis, Tanja; Frantsve-Hawley, Julie; Aravamudhan, Krishna

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to identify barriers that early-adopting dentists perceive as common and challenging when implementing recommendations from evidence-based (EB) clinical guidelines. Method This is a cross-sectional study. Dentists who attended the 2008 Evidence-based Dentistry Champion Conference were eligible for inclusion. Forty-three dentists (34%) responded to a 22-item questionnaire administered online. Two investigators independently coded and categorized responses to open-ended items. Descriptive statistics were computed to assess the frequency of barriers and perceived challenges. Results The most common barriers to implementation are difficulty in changing current practice model, resistance and criticism from colleagues, and lack of trust in evidence or research. Barriers perceived as serious problems have to do with lack of up-to-date evidence, lack of clear answers to clinical questions, and contradictory information in the scientific literature. Conclusions Knowledge of barriers will help improve translation of biomedical research for dentists. Information in guidelines needs to be current, clear, and simplified for use at chairside; dentists’ fears need to be addressed. PMID:21093800

  8. Hurdles in clinical implementation of academic advanced therapy medicinal products: A national evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wilde, Sofieke; Veltrop-Duits, Louise; Hoozemans-Strik, Merel; Ras, Thirza; Blom-Veenman, Janine; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; Zandvliet, Maarten; Meij, Pauline

    2016-06-01

    Since the implementation of the European Union (EU) regulation for advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) in 2009, only six ATMPs achieved marketing authorization approval in the EU. Recognizing the major developments in the ATMP field, starting mostly in academic institutions, we investigated which hurdles were experienced in the whole pathway of ATMP development towards clinical care. Quality interviews were executed with different stakeholders in The Netherlands involved in the ATMP development field, e.g. academic research groups, national authorities and patient organizations. Based on the hurdles mentioned in the interviews, questionnaires were subsequently sent to the academic principal investigators (PIs) and ATMP good manufacturing practice (GMP) facility managers to quantify these hurdles. Besides the familiar regulatory routes of marketing authorization (MA) and hospital exemption (HE), a part of the academic PIs perceived that ATMPs should become available by the Tissues and Cells Directive or did not anticipate on the next development steps towards implementation of their ATMP towards regular clinical care. The main hurdles identified were: inadequate financial support, rapidly evolving field, study-related problems, lacking regulatory knowledge, lack of collaborations and responsibility issues. Creating an academic environment stimulating and planning ATMP development and licensing as well as investing in expanding the relevant regulatory knowledge in academic institutions seems a prerequisite to develop ATMPs from bench to patient. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical implementation of full Monte Carlo dose calculation in proton beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paganetti, Harald; Jiang, Hongyu; Parodi, Katia; Slopsema, Roelf; Engelsman, Martijn

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this work was to facilitate the clinical use of Monte Carlo proton dose calculation to support routine treatment planning and delivery. The Monte Carlo code Geant4 was used to simulate the treatment head setup, including a time-dependent simulation of modulator wheels (for broad beam modulation) and magnetic field settings (for beam scanning). Any patient-field-specific setup can be modeled according to the treatment control system of the facility. The code was benchmarked against phantom measurements. Using a simulation of the ionization chamber reading in the treatment head allows the Monte Carlo dose to be specified in absolute units (Gy per ionization chamber reading). Next, the capability of reading CT data information was implemented into the Monte Carlo code to model patient anatomy. To allow time-efficient dose calculation, the standard Geant4 tracking algorithm was modified. Finally, a software link of the Monte Carlo dose engine to the patient database and the commercial planning system was established to allow data exchange, thus completing the implementation of the proton Monte Carlo dose calculation engine ('DoC++'). Monte Carlo re-calculated plans are a valuable tool to revisit decisions in the planning process. Identification of clinically significant differences between Monte Carlo and pencil-beam-based dose calculations may also drive improvements of current pencil-beam methods. As an example, four patients (29 fields in total) with tumors in the head and neck regions were analyzed. Differences between the pencil-beam algorithm and Monte Carlo were identified in particular near the end of range, both due to dose degradation and overall differences in range prediction due to bony anatomy in the beam path. Further, the Monte Carlo reports dose-to-tissue as compared to dose-to-water by the planning system. Our implementation is tailored to a specific Monte Carlo code and the treatment planning system XiO (Computerized Medical Systems Inc

  10. A required course in the development, implementation, and evaluation of clinical pharmacy services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skomo, Monica L; Kamal, Khalid M; Berdine, Hildegarde J

    2008-10-15

    To develop, implement, and assess a required pharmacy practice course to prepare pharmacy students to develop, implement, and evaluate clinical pharmacy services using a business plan model. Course content centered around the process of business planning and pharmacoeconomic evaluations. Selected business planning topics included literature evaluation, mission statement development, market evaluation, policy and procedure development, and marketing strategy. Selected pharmacoeconomic topics included cost-minimization analysis, cost-benefit analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis, cost-utility analysis, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Assessment methods included objective examinations, student participation, performance on a group project, and peer evaluation. One hundred fifty-three students were enrolled in the course. The mean scores on the objective examinations (100 points per examination) ranged from 82 to 85 points, with 25%-35% of students in the class scoring over 90, and 40%-50% of students scoring from 80 to 89. The mean scores on the group project (200 points) and classroom participation (50 points) were 183.5 and 46.1, respectively. The mean score on the peer evaluation was 30.8, with scores ranging from 27.5 to 31.7. The course provided pharmacy students with the framework necessary to develop and implement evidence-based disease management programs and to assure efficient, cost-effective utilization of pertinent resources in the provision of patient care.

  11. Clinical implementation of a new HDR brachytherapy device for partial breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanderbeg, Daniel J.; Yashar, Catheryn; Rice, Roger; Pawlicki, Todd

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To present the clinical implementation of a new HDR device for partial breast irradiation, the Strut-Adjusted Volume Implant (SAVI), at the University of California, San Diego. Methods and materials: The SAVI device has multiple peripheral struts that can be differentially loaded with the HDR source. Planning criteria used for evaluation of the treatment plans included the following dose volume histogram (DVH) criteria: V90 >90%, V150 <50 cc and V200 <20 cc. Results: SAVI has been used on 20 patients to date at UC San Diego. In each case, the dose was modulated according to patient-specific anatomy to cover the tumor bed, while sparing normal tissues. The dosimetric data show that we can achieve greater than 90% coverage with respect to V90 (median of 95.3%) and also keep a low V150 and V200 dose at 24.5 and 11.2 cc, respectively. Complete treatment can be done within a 30-min time slot, which includes implant verification, setup, and irradiation time as well as wound dressing. Conclusion: SAVI has been implemented at UC San Diego for accelerated partial breast irradiation with excellent tumor bed conformance and minimal normal tissue exposure. Patient positioning is the key to identifying any inter-fraction device motion. Device asymmetry or tissue conformance has been shown to resolve itself 24 h after the device implantation. The device can be implemented into an existing HDR program with minimal effort

  12. TU-C-201-02: Clinical Implementation of HDR: Afterloader and Applicator Selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esthappan, J. [Washington University School of Medicine (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Recent use of HDR has increased while planning has become more complex often necessitating 3D image-based planning. While many guidelines for the use of HDR exist, they have not kept pace with the increased complexity of 3D image-based planning. Furthermore, no comprehensive document exists to describe the wide variety of current HDR clinical indications. This educational session aims to summarize existing national and international guidelines for the safe implementation of an HDR program. A summary of HDR afterloaders available on the market and their existing applicators will be provided, with guidance on how to select the best fit for each institution’s needs. Finally, the use of checklists will be discussed as a means to implement a safe and efficient HDR program and as a method by which to verify the quality of an existing HDR program. This session will provide the perspective of expert HDR physicists as well as the perspective of a new HDR user. Learning Objectives: Summarize national and international safety and staffing guidelines for HDR implementation Discuss the process of afterloader and applicator selection for gynecologic, prostate, breast, interstitial, surface treatments Learn about the use of an audit checklist tool to measure of quality control of a new or existing HDR program Describe the evolving use of checklists within an HDR program.

  13. TU-C-201-00: Clinical Implementation of HDR Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    Recent use of HDR has increased while planning has become more complex often necessitating 3D image-based planning. While many guidelines for the use of HDR exist, they have not kept pace with the increased complexity of 3D image-based planning. Furthermore, no comprehensive document exists to describe the wide variety of current HDR clinical indications. This educational session aims to summarize existing national and international guidelines for the safe implementation of an HDR program. A summary of HDR afterloaders available on the market and their existing applicators will be provided, with guidance on how to select the best fit for each institution’s needs. Finally, the use of checklists will be discussed as a means to implement a safe and efficient HDR program and as a method by which to verify the quality of an existing HDR program. This session will provide the perspective of expert HDR physicists as well as the perspective of a new HDR user. Learning Objectives: Summarize national and international safety and staffing guidelines for HDR implementation Discuss the process of afterloader and applicator selection for gynecologic, prostate, breast, interstitial, surface treatments Learn about the use of an audit checklist tool to measure of quality control of a new or existing HDR program Describe the evolving use of checklists within an HDR program.

  14. Knowledge of complications of diabetes mellitus among patients visiting the diabetes clinic at Sampa Government Hospital, Ghana: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaa Obirikorang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes mellitus (DM appears to be a global epidemic and an increasingly major non-communicable disease threatening both affluent and non-affluent society. The study aimed to determine the knowledge of diabetic complications among diabetes mellitus clients visiting the Diabetic Clinical at Sampa Government Hospital, Ghana. Method This questionnaire-based descriptive study recruited a total 630 patients visiting the Diabetes Clinic at the Sampa Government Hospital. Structured questionnaire was used to obtain information such as socio-demographic and knowledge on complications of diabetes. Results Out of a total of 630 participants, 325 (51.5 % knew diabetic foot as the most common complication followed by hypertension 223(35.4 %, neuropathy 184 (29.2 %, hypoactive sexual arousal 160(25.4 %, arousal disorder 135(21.5 %, eye diseases 112(17.7 %, heart disease 58(9.2 %, and renal disease 34(5.4 %. Comprehensive assessment of level of knowledge on the complications showed that majority 378(60.0 % of T2D patients did not have knowledge on diabetes complications, 169(26.9 % had inadequate knowledge on diabetics complication while 82(13.1 % had adequate knowledge. The risk factors associated with the level of knowledge of diabetic complications were female gender adjusted odd ratio (AOR =2.31 (1.56–3.41 married participants AOR = 3.37 (1.44–7.93, widowed AOR = 2.98 (1.10–8.08, basic level of education AOR =0.18 (0.082–0.50, Junior High School (JHS and above of education level AOR = 0.035(0.017–0.75, 5–9 years of T2D duration AOR = 0.31(0.018–0.57, ≥10 years T2D duration AOR = 0.042 (0.02–0.10 and urban dwellers AOR = 0.36 (0.22–0.68 respectively. Conclusion Participants knew the individual complication of diabetic mellitus but lack an in-depth knowledge on the complications. Further expansion of diabetic educative programs like using mass media and involving national curriculum

  15. Knowledge of complications of diabetes mellitus among patients visiting the diabetes clinic at Sampa Government Hospital, Ghana: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obirikorang, Yaa; Obirikorang, Christian; Anto, Enoch Odame; Acheampong, Emmanuel; Batu, Emmanuella Nsenbah; Stella, Agyemang Duah; Constance, Omerige; Brenya, Peter Kojo

    2016-07-26

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) appears to be a global epidemic and an increasingly major non-communicable disease threatening both affluent and non-affluent society. The study aimed to determine the knowledge of diabetic complications among diabetes mellitus clients visiting the Diabetic Clinical at Sampa Government Hospital, Ghana. This questionnaire-based descriptive study recruited a total 630 patients visiting the Diabetes Clinic at the Sampa Government Hospital. Structured questionnaire was used to obtain information such as socio-demographic and knowledge on complications of diabetes. Out of a total of 630 participants, 325 (51.5 %) knew diabetic foot as the most common complication followed by hypertension 223(35.4 %), neuropathy 184 (29.2 %), hypoactive sexual arousal 160(25.4 %), arousal disorder 135(21.5 %), eye diseases 112(17.7 %), heart disease 58(9.2 %), and renal disease 34(5.4 %). Comprehensive assessment of level of knowledge on the complications showed that majority 378(60.0 %) of T2D patients did not have knowledge on diabetes complications, 169(26.9 %) had inadequate knowledge on diabetics complication while 82(13.1 %) had adequate knowledge. The risk factors associated with the level of knowledge of diabetic complications were female gender adjusted odd ratio (AOR) =2.31 (1.56-3.41) married participants AOR = 3.37 (1.44-7.93), widowed AOR = 2.98 (1.10-8.08), basic level of education AOR =0.18 (0.082-0.50), Junior High School (JHS) and above of education level AOR = 0.035(0.017-0.75), 5-9 years of T2D duration AOR = 0.31(0.018-0.57), ≥10 years T2D duration AOR = 0.042 (0.02-0.10) and urban dwellers AOR = 0.36 (0.22-0.68) respectively. Participants knew the individual complication of diabetic mellitus but lack an in-depth knowledge on the complications. Further expansion of diabetic educative programs like using mass media and involving national curriculum of education can improve self-regulatory awareness of

  16. The governance challenge for implementing effective market-based climate policies: A case study of The New South Wales Greenhouse Gas Reduction Scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passey, Robert; MacGill, Iain; Outhred, Hugh

    2008-01-01

    The New South Wales (NSW) Greenhouse Gas Reduction Scheme (GGAS) in Australia is a baseline and credit emissions trading scheme with the stated aim of reducing the per-capita greenhouse emissions associated with electricity consumption in the state of NSW. Here we provide a detailed assessment of the GGAS design and operation, with a particular emphasis on its effectiveness in delivering physical emissions reductions that would not have occurred in its absence. We find that a number of design features mean a significant proportion of the tradeable 'abatement' certificates are unlikely to correspond to the claimed emissions reductions. While some of these adverse design choices might be corrected, others would seem inherent to the underlying scheme design. Our analysis highlights the major governance challenges with emissions trading approaches and hence the importance of good policy implementation processes including the need for separation of powers through a scheme development process that involves design, assessment and revision. These GGAS lessons would seem relevant for governance with all emissions trading schemes, and has particular implications for cap and trade schemes that incorporate baseline and credit offset schemes, as well as to the 'White Certificate' schemes increasingly being seen as a means of fostering enhanced end-use energy efficiency

  17. Implementation of a ferromagnetic detection system in a clinical MRI setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orchard, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the implementation of a ferromagnetic detection system (FMDS) into a clinical MRI setting. Materials and methods: One thousand patients were considered for MRI safety screening using an FMDS. Equipment used was a Ferroguard ® Screener (Metrasens Ltd, Malvern, Worcestershire, UK). Fully gowned patients rotated 360° in front of the FMDS in a standardized manner following traditional MRI screening methods (the use of a written questionnaire (Fig. B.1) and verbal interview. Results: Final results included 1032 individual screening events performed in 977 patients. There were 922 (94%) initial passes using the FMDS; 34 (4%) failed initial screens but passed a subsequent screen; 21 (2%) failed the initial and subsequent screens. Thus, including all screening events (n = 1032), there were 956 (93%) true negatives (TN); 21 (2%) false positives (FP) and 55 (5%) true positives (TP). No false negatives (FN) were recorded. Therefore, sensitivity was 100% and specificity was 98%. Conclusion: Implementation and correct usage of an FMDS proved to increase safety within a clinical MRI environment by alerting staff to ferromagnetic items or implants not identified using traditional MRI screening methods. An FMDS should be used as an adjunct to these methods. The information in this study pertains to the specific equipment used in this investigation. - Highlights: • Ferromagnetic detection system sensitivity in this study was 100%. • Ferromagnetic detection system specificity in this study was 98%. • The additional screening procedure had little impact on throughput ie additional time taken was minimal. • Staff training, technique and compliance is important in implementing the screening procedures. • The ferromagnetic detection system identified objects that may have demonstrated projectile, heating or artefact effects

  18. Revision and Implementation of "Clinical Guideline for Tuberculosis and HIV in Prisons", Great Tehran Prison, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhoudi, Behnam; SeyedAlinaghi, SeyedAhmad; Tabarsi, Payam; Mohraz, Minoo; Golrokhy, Raheleh; Farnia, Marzieh; Shahbazi, Mohammad; Alasvand, Ramin; Ebrahimi, Bahman; Esfehani, Jafar; Tashakoriyan, Mehrzad

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of the revised "Clinical Guideline for HIV and TB" in the Great Tehran Prison during October 2013 to June 2014. The guideline includes all aspects of HIV/TB diagnosis based on active case finding (ACF), treatment and care services. Before the implementation, a focus group discussion was conducted, and attended by experts on prison health. The objective was to identify defects and limitations of the guideline. After the discussion, the guideline was revised. The Great Tehran Prison contains three separate units; all prisoners are taken first to "reception and identification unit (quarantine)" and then send to two housing units according to their legal status. An HIV ACF strategy was employed in the quarantine, and two units through a voluntary provider-initiated HIV testing. Three staff of the triangular clinic trained the prisoners about common routes of HIV transmission and the symptoms of TB in the units. In the quarantine, all prisoners were examined for all HIV-risk factors, HIV testing and symptoms of TB. In unit one, healthcare staff continued the ACF process, while in unit two, the peers of prisoners were assigned as the healthcare communicators to proceed with the strategy. At this caring process, when the test result was positive, then the process of care, treatment and follow ups was initiated. Moreover, the use of directly observed therapy (DOT) for antiretroviral therapy (ART) and TB was applied to the sick prisoners. There was also a follow-up caring for released prisoner to refer them to care and treatment services outside the prison. The guideline was implemented in the prison successfully. Regarding feasibility of the guideline, the investigators of this study suggest that the guideline should be implemented in other prisons across the country. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. In-situ medical simulation for pre-implementation testing of clinical service in a regional hospital in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P P; Tsui, N Tk; Fung, A Sw; Chiu, A Hf; Wong, W Cw; Leong, H T; Lee, P Sf; Lau, J Yw

    2017-08-01

    The implementation of a new clinical service is associated with anxiety and challenges that may prevent smooth and safe execution of the service. Unexpected issues may not be apparent until the actual clinical service commences. We present a novel approach to test the new clinical setting before actual implementation of our endovascular aortic repair service. In-situ simulation at the new clinical location would enable identification of potential process and system issues prior to implementation of the service. After preliminary planning, a simulation test utilising a case scenario with actual simulation of the entire care process was carried out to identify any logistic, equipment, settings or clinical workflow issues, and to trial a contingency plan for a surgical complication. All patient care including anaesthetic, surgical, and nursing procedures and processes were simulated and tested. Overall, 17 vital process and system issues were identified during the simulation as potential clinical concerns. They included difficult patient positioning, draping pattern, unsatisfactory equipment setup, inadequate critical surgical instruments, blood products logistics, and inadequate nursing support during crisis. In-situ simulation provides an innovative method to identify critical deficiencies and unexpected issues before implementation of a new clinical service. Life-threatening and serious practical issues can be identified and corrected before formal service commences. This article describes our experience with the use of simulation in pre-implementation testing of a clinical process or service. We found the method useful and would recommend it to others.

  20. Factors influencing the implementation of clinical guidelines for health care professionals: a systematic meta-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francke, Anneke L; Smit, Marieke C; de Veer, Anke J E; Mistiaen, Patriek

    2008-09-12

    Nowadays more and more clinical guidelines for health care professionals are being developed. However, this does not automatically mean that these guidelines are actually implemented. The aim of this meta-review is twofold: firstly, to gain a better understanding of which factors affect the implementation of guidelines, and secondly, to provide insight into the "state-of-the-art" regarding research within this field. A search of five literature databases and one website was performed to find relevant existing systematic reviews or meta-reviews. Subsequently, a two-step inclusion process was conducted: (1) screening on the basis of references and abstracts and (2) screening based on full-text papers. After that, relevant data from the included reviews were extracted and the methodological quality of the reviews was assessed by using the Quality Assessment Checklist for Reviews. Twelve systematic reviews met our inclusion criteria. No previous systematic meta-reviews meeting all our inclusion criteria were found. Two of the twelve reviews scored high on the checklist used, indicating only "minimal" or "minor flaws". The other ten reviews scored in the lowest of middle ranges, indicating "extensive" or "major" flaws. A substantial proportion (although not all) of the reviews indicates that effective strategies often have multiple components and that the use of one single strategy, such as reminders only or an educational intervention, is less effective. Besides, characteristics of the guidelines themselves affect actual use. For instance, guidelines that are easy to understand, can easily be tried out, and do not require specific resources, have a greater chance of implementation. In addition, characteristics of professionals - e.g., awareness of the existence of the guideline and familiarity with its content - likewise affect implementation. Furthermore, patient characteristics appear to exert influence: for instance, co-morbidity reduces the chance that guidelines

  1. Factors influencing the implementation of clinical guidelines for health care professionals: A systematic meta-review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Veer Anke JE

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nowadays more and more clinical guidelines for health care professionals are being developed. However, this does not automatically mean that these guidelines are actually implemented. The aim of this meta-review is twofold: firstly, to gain a better understanding of which factors affect the implementation of guidelines, and secondly, to provide insight into the "state-of-the-art" regarding research within this field. Methods A search of five literature databases and one website was performed to find relevant existing systematic reviews or meta-reviews. Subsequently, a two-step inclusion process was conducted: (1 screening on the basis of references and abstracts and (2 screening based on full-text papers. After that, relevant data from the included reviews were extracted and the methodological quality of the reviews was assessed by using the Quality Assessment Checklist for Reviews. Results Twelve systematic reviews met our inclusion criteria. No previous systematic meta-reviews meeting all our inclusion criteria were found. Two of the twelve reviews scored high on the checklist used, indicating only "minimal" or "minor flaws". The other ten reviews scored in the lowest of middle ranges, indicating "extensive" or "major" flaws. A substantial proportion (although not all of the reviews indicates that effective strategies often have multiple components and that the use of one single strategy, such as reminders only or an educational intervention, is less effective. Besides, characteristics of the guidelines themselves affect actual use. For instance, guidelines that are easy to understand, can easily be tried out, and do not require specific resources, have a greater chance of implementation. In addition, characteristics of professionals – e.g., awareness of the existence of the guideline and familiarity with its content – likewise affect implementation. Furthermore, patient characteristics appear to exert influence: for

  2. Do knowledge brokers facilitate implementation of the stroke guideline in clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Mia; Schröder, Carin; Post, Marcel; van der Weijden, Trudy; Visser-Meily, Anne

    2013-10-23

    The implementation of clinical practice guidelines in rehabilitation practice is often troublesome and incomplete. An intervention to enhance the implementation of guidelines is the knowledge transfer program built around the activities of a knowledge broker (KB).This study investigates the use of KBs to implement guideline recommendations for intensive therapy and physical activity for patients post-stroke in 22 stroke units in hospitals and rehabilitation centers in The Netherlands. This study includes a quantitative evaluation with a non controlled pre-post intervention design and a mixed methods process evaluation. From each stroke unit, enterprising nurses and therapists will be recruited and trained as KB. The KB will work for one year on the implementation of the guideline recommendations in their team. To evaluate the effectiveness of the KB, a questionnaire will be administered to patients, health professionals and KBs at baseline (T0) and after one year (T1). Furthermore, semi structured interviews with 5 KBs will be performed at T1.The primary outcome of this implementation project will be the support health professionals give patients to exercise and be physically active, as reported by patients and health professionals themselves. The support immediately after the intervention is compared with the support at the start of the intervention.Additionally we will explore the influence of socio-demographic characteristics of health professionals and determinants identified in the Theory of Planned Behavior (intention, attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioral control) on the change of supportive behavior of health professionals. Finally, KBs will complete a questionnaire on their own psychological and social demographic characteristics and on organizational conditions needed for health-care improvement such as time, workforce, sponsoring and support from management. With this study we will gain insight in when and why knowledge brokers seem to be

  3. Implementing PGD/PGD-A in IVF clinics: considerations for the best laboratory approach and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capalbo, Antonio; Romanelli, Valeria; Cimadomo, Danilo; Girardi, Laura; Stoppa, Marta; Dovere, Lisa; Dell'Edera, Domenico; Ubaldi, Filippo Maria; Rienzi, Laura

    2016-10-01

    For an IVF clinic that wishes to implement preimplantation genetic diagnosis for monogenic diseases (PGD) and for aneuploidy testing (PGD-A), a global improvement is required through all the steps of an IVF treatment and patient care. At present, CCS (Comprehensive Chromosome Screening)-based trophectoderm (TE) biopsy has been demonstrated as a safe, accurate and reproducible approach to conduct PGD-A and possibly also PGD from the same biopsy. Key challenges in PGD/PGD-A implementation cover genetic and reproductive counselling, selection of the most efficient approach for blastocyst biopsy as well as of the best performing molecular technique to conduct CCS and monogenic disease analysis. Three different approaches for TE biopsy can be compared. However, among them, the application of TE biopsy approaches, entailing the zona opening when the expanded blastocyst stage is reached, represent the only biopsy methods suited with a totally undisturbed embryo culture strategy (time lapse-based incubation in a single media). Moreover, contemporary CCS technologies show a different spectrum of capabilities and limits that potentially impact the clinical outcomes, the management and the applicability of the PGD-A itself. In general, CCS approaches that avoid the use of whole genome amplification (WGA) can provide higher reliability of results with lower costs and turnaround time of analysis. The future perspectives are focused on the scrupulous and rigorous clinical validations of novel CCS methods based on targeted approaches that avoid the use of WGA, such as targeted next-generation sequencing technology, to further improve the throughput of analysis and the overall cost-effectiveness of PGD/PGD-A.

  4. The clinical implementation of respiratory-gated intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keall, Paul; Vedam, Sastry; George, Rohini; Bartee, Chris; Siebers, Jeffrey; Lerma, Fritz; Weiss, Elisabeth; Chung, Theodore

    2006-01-01

    The clinical use of respiratory-gated radiotherapy and the application of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) are 2 relatively new innovations to the treatment of lung cancer. Respiratory gating can reduce the deleterious effects of intrafraction motion, and IMRT can concurrently increase tumor dose homogeneity and reduce dose to critical structures including the lungs, spinal cord, esophagus, and heart. The aim of this work is to describe the clinical implementation of respiratory-gated IMRT for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. Documented clinical procedures were developed to include a tumor motion study, gated CT imaging, IMRT treatment planning, and gated IMRT delivery. Treatment planning procedures for respiratory-gated IMRT including beam arrangements and dose-volume constraints were developed. Quality assurance procedures were designed to quantify both the dosimetric and positional accuracy of respiratory-gated IMRT, including film dosimetry dose measurements and Monte Carlo dose calculations for verification and validation of individual patient treatments. Respiratory-gated IMRT is accepted by both treatment staff and patients. The dosimetric and positional quality assurance test results indicate that respiratory-gated IMRT can be delivered accurately. If carefully implemented, respiratory-gated IMRT is a practical alternative to conventional thoracic radiotherapy. For mobile tumors, respiratory-gated radiotherapy is used as the standard of care at our institution. Due to the increased workload, the choice of IMRT is taken on a case-by-case basis, with approximately half of the non-small cell lung cancer patients receiving respiratory-gated IMRT. We are currently evaluating whether superior tumor coverage and limited normal tissue dosing will lead to improvements in local control and survival in non-small cell lung cancer

  5. Implementation of medical retina virtual clinics in a tertiary eye care referral centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortuem, Karsten; Fasler, Katrin; Charnley, Amanda; Khambati, Hussain; Fasolo, Sandro; Katz, Menachem; Balaskas, Konstantinos; Rajendram, Ranjan; Hamilton, Robin; Keane, Pearse A; Sim, Dawn A

    2018-01-06

    The increasing incidence of medical retinal diseases has created capacity issues across UK. In this study, we describe the implementation and outcomes of virtual medical retina clinics (VMRCs) at Moorfields Eye Hospital, South Division, London. It represents a promising solution to ensure that patients are seen and treated in a timely fashion METHODS: First attendances in the VMRC (September 2016-May 2017) were included. It was open to non-urgent external referrals and to existing patients in a face-to-face clinic (F2FC). All patients received visual acuity testing, dilated fundus photography and optical coherence tomography scans. Grading was performed by consultants, fellows and allied healthcare professionals. Outcomes of these virtual consultations and reasons for F2FC referrals were assessed. A total number of 1729 patients were included (1543 were internal and 186 external referrals). The majority were diagnosed with diabetic retinopathy (75.1% of internal and 46.8% of external referrals). Of the internal referrals, 14.6% were discharged, 54.5% continued in VMRC and 30.9% were brought to a F2FC. Of the external referrals, 45.5% were discharged, 37.1% continued in VMRC and 17.4% were brought to a F2FC. The main reason for F2FC referrals was image quality (34.7%), followed by detection of potentially treatable disease (20.2%). VMRC can be implemented successfully using existing resources within a hospital eye service. It may also serve as a first-line rapid-access clinic for low-risk referrals. This would enable medical retinal services to cope with increasing demand and efficiently allocate resources to those who require treatment. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Implementation of depression screening in antenatal clinics through tablet computers: results of a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcano-Belisario, José S; Gupta, Ajay K; O'Donoghue, John; Ramchandani, Paul; Morrison, Cecily; Car, Josip

    2017-05-10

    Mobile devices may facilitate depression screening in the waiting area of antenatal clinics. This can present implementation challenges, of which we focused on survey layout and technology deployment. We assessed the feasibility of using tablet computers to administer a socio-demographic survey, the Whooley questions and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) to 530 pregnant women attending National Health Service (NHS) antenatal clinics across England. We randomised participants to one of two layout versions of these surveys: (i) a scrolling layout where each survey was presented on a single screen; or (ii) a paging layout where only one question appeared on the screen at any given time. Overall, 85.10% of eligible pregnant women agreed to take part. Of these, 90.95% completed the study procedures. Approximately 23% of participants answered Yes to at least one Whooley question, and approximately 13% of them scored 10 points of more on the EPDS. We observed no association between survey layout and the responses given to the Whooley questions, the median EPDS scores, the number of participants at increased risk of self-harm, and the number of participants asking for technical assistance. However, we observed a difference in the number of participants at each EPDS scoring interval (p = 0.008), which provide an indication of a woman's risk of depression. A scrolling layout resulted in faster completion times (median = 4 min 46 s) than a paging layout (median = 5 min 33 s) (p = 0.024). However, the clinical significance of this difference (47.5 s) is yet to be determined. Tablet computers can be used for depression screening in the waiting area of antenatal clinics. This requires the careful consideration of clinical workflows, and technology-related issues such as connectivity and security. An association between survey layout and EPDS scoring intervals needs to be explored further to determine if it corresponds to a survey layout effect

  7. Increasing clinical relevance in oral radiology: Benefits and challenges when implementing digital assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, T; Møystad, A; Torgersen, G R

    2018-02-13

    The aims of the study were to investigate benefits and challenges in implementing a digital examination and study the clinical relevance of the digital examination in relation to clinical training and practice. The study was based on semi-structured focus-group interviews from two distinct student populations (2016 and 2017) in a bachelor programme in dental hygiene. In addition, conversational data from a plenary discussion from the whole second student population (2017) were collected and analysed. The data were approached on basis of content analysis. A benefit experienced in the digital examination was the ease in typing and editing answers on the computer. This suggests an increased effectiveness in computer-based compared to analogue examinations. An additional advantage was the experienced relevance of the examination related to the clinic. This finding refers not only to the digital presentations of images, but also to the entire setting in the clinic and dental practice. The limitations reported by the students were non-optimal viewing conditions for presenting radiographic images and difficulties in obtaining an overview of the assignments compared to paper-based examinations due to the linear digital examination format. The last finding on lacking overview revealed an influence on student performances which should be taken seriously in designing digital examinations. In conclusion, the digital layout increases efficiency and clinical relevance of examinations to a certain extent. Obstacles were found in limitations related to image presentation and lack of overview of the examination. The latter challenge raises questions related to developing suitable assessment software. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Clinical implementation of KRAS testing in metastatic colorectal carcinoma: the pathologist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jeffrey S

    2012-10-01

    Mutation status of the KRAS gene identifies a distinct disease subtype of metastatic colorectal carcinoma that does not respond to antibody therapeutics targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor. This is currently the only validated marker in metastatic colorectal carcinoma with a clear implication in treatment selection. KRAS testing is widely accepted in clinical practice to guide metastatic colorectal carcinoma therapeutic decisions, and there are many commercially available platforms to perform the test. To evaluate the critical role of pathologists in the full implementation of KRAS testing by optimizing tumor tissue collection and fixation procedures and by choosing testing technologies and reliable Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988-certified laboratories to perform the tests. Prospective clinical trials, retrospective studies, and quality assessment and survey reports were identified in the following databases: PubMed, American Society of Clinical Oncology Proceedings (American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting and Gastrointestinal Cancer Symposium) and European Society for Medical Oncology Proceedings (Annals of Oncology European Society for Medical Oncology Congress and Annals of Oncology World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancers). More bona fide standards are needed to address the variety of available test methods, which have different performance characteristics including speed, sensitivity to detect rare mutations, and technical requirements. Refined standards addressing timing of KRAS testing, laboratory performance and accuracy, quality assurance and control, proper tissue collection, and appropriate result reporting would also be greatly beneficial. Pathologists should be aware that the amount of information they need to manage will increase, because future trends and technological advances will enhance the predictive power of diagnostic tests or the scope of the biomarker panels tested routinely across tumor types.

  9. Knowledge and perception regarding clinical trials among doctors of government medical colleges: A questionnaire-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriyo Choudhury

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: By virtue of being a specialized field by itself, the science of clinical trials (CTs may not be well understood by doctors who are not specifically trained in it. A lack of knowledge may translate to a negative perception toward CT. With the idea of getting a situational snapshot, we estimated the knowledge and perception of CTs among doctors from government medical colleges of West Bengal who are not trained on CT in their postgraduate curriculum. Several determinants of knowledge and perception regarding CT were also evaluated. Methods: We have quantified the knowledge and perception of CTs by a structured validated questionnaire. Development and validation of the questionnaire was performed prior to the study. Results: Among 133 participants, 7.5% received focused training on CT and 16.5% participated in CTs as investigators. Majority of the doctors were unfamiliar with the basic terminologies such as, “adverse event” and “good clinical practice.” Encouragingly, 93.3% doctors advised that a detailed discussion of CT methodology should be incorporated in the under graduate medical science curriculum. They had an overall positive attitude toward CTs conducted in India, with a mean score that is 72.6% of the maximum positive score. However, a large number of the doctors were skeptical about the primary motivation and operations of pharmaceutical industry sponsored CTs, with 45% of them believing that patients are exploited in these sponsored CTs. Conclusion: Participant doctors had a basic knowledge of CT methodology. The study has revealed specific areas of deficient knowledge, which might be emphasized while designing focused training on CT methodology.

  10. Implementing a Measurement Feedback System in Community Mental Health Clinics: A Case Study of Multilevel Barriers and Facilitators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleacher, Alissa A; Olin, Serene S; Nadeem, Erum; Pollock, Michele; Ringle, Vanesa; Bickman, Leonard; Douglas, Susan; Hoagwood, Kimberly

    2016-05-01

    Measurement feedback systems (MFSs) have been proposed as a means of improving practice. The present study examined the implementation of a MFS, the Contextualized Feedback System (CFS), in two community-based clinic sites. Significant implementation differences across sites provided a basis for examining factors that influenced clinician uptake of CFS. Following the theoretical implementation framework of Aarons et al. (Adm Policy Mental Health Mental Health Serv Res 38(1):4-23, 2011), we coded qualitative data collected from eighteen clinicians (13 from Clinic U and 5 from Clinic R) who participated in semi-structured interviews about their experience with CFS implementation. Results suggest that clinicians at both clinics perceived more barriers than facilitators to CFS implementation. Interestingly, clinicians at the higher implementing clinic reported a higher proportion of barriers to facilitators (3:1 vs. 2:1); however, these clinicians also reported a significantly higher level of organizational and leadership supports for CFS implementation. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  11. Implementation of clinical guidelines on physical therapy for patients with low back pain: randomized trial comparing patient outcomes after a standard and active implementation strategy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkering, Geertruida E; van Tulder, Maurits W; Hendriks, Erik J M; Koopmanschap, Marc a; Knol, Dirk L; Bouter, Lex M; Oostendorp, Rob a B

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: An active strategy was developed for the implementation of the clinical guidelines on physical therapy for patients with low back pain. The effect of this strategy on patients' physical functioning, coping strategy, and beliefs regarding their low back pain was studied.

  12. Systematic implementation of evidence-based practice in a clinical nursing setting : a participatory action research project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandra van der Loo; Gerrie Bours; Anna Beurskens; Albine Moser; Jolanda Friesen-Storms

    2015-01-01

    Aims and objectives: To describe the process of implementing evidence-based practice (EBP) in a clinical nursing setting. Background: EBP has become a major issue in nursing, it is insufficiently integrated in daily practice and its implementation is complex. Design: Participatory action

  13. Implementation of Cloud based next generation sequencing data analysis in a clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onsongo, Getiria; Erdmann, Jesse; Spears, Michael D; Chilton, John; Beckman, Kenneth B; Hauge, Adam; Yohe, Sophia; Schomaker, Matthew; Bower, Matthew; Silverstein, Kevin A T; Thyagarajan, Bharat

    2014-05-23

    The introduction of next generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized molecular diagnostics, though several challenges remain limiting the widespread adoption of NGS testing into clinical practice. One such difficulty includes the development of a robust bioinformatics pipeline that can handle the volume of data generated by high-throughput sequencing in a cost-effective manner. Analysis of sequencing data typically requires a substantial level of computing power that is often cost-prohibitive to most clinical diagnostics laboratories. To address this challenge, our institution has developed a Galaxy-based data analysis pipeline which relies on a web-based, cloud-computing infrastructure to process NGS data and identify genetic variants. It provides additional flexibility, needed to control storage costs, resulting in a pipeline that is cost-effective on a per-sample basis. It does not require the usage of EBS disk to run a sample. We demonstrate the validation and feasibility of implementing this bioinformatics pipeline in a molecular diagnostics laboratory. Four samples were analyzed in duplicate pairs and showed 100% concordance in mutations identified. This pipeline is currently being used in the clinic and all identified pathogenic variants confirmed using Sanger sequencing further validating the software.

  14. PCA safety data review after clinical decision support and smart pump technology implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prewitt, Judy; Schneider, Susan; Horvath, Monica; Hammond, Julia; Jackson, Jason; Ginsberg, Brian

    2013-06-01

    Medication errors account for 20% of medical errors in the United States with the largest risk at prescribing and administration. Analgesics or opioids are frequently used medications that can be associated with patient harm when prescribed or administered improperly. In an effort to decrease medication errors, Duke University Hospital implemented clinical decision support via computer provider order entry (CPOE) and "smart pump" technology, 2/2008, with the goal to decrease patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) adverse events. This project evaluated PCA safety events, reviewing voluntary report system and adverse drug events via surveillance (ADE-S), on intermediate and step-down units preimplementation and postimplementation of clinical decision support via CPOE and PCA smart pumps for the prescribing and administration of opioids therapy in the adult patient requiring analgesia for acute pain. Voluntary report system and ADE-S PCA events decreased based upon 1000 PCA days; ADE-S PCA events per 1000 PCA days decreased 22%, from 5.3 (pre) to 4.2 (post) (P = 0.09). Voluntary report system events decreased 72%, from 2.4/1000 PCA days (pre) to 0.66/1000 PCA days (post) and was statistically significant (P PCA events between time periods in both the ADE-S and voluntary report system data, thus supporting the recommendation of clinical decision support via CPOE and PCA smart pump technology.

  15. Implementation of collaborative depression management at community-based primary care clinics: an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Amy M; Azzone, Vanessa; Goldman, Howard H; Alexander, Laurie; Unützer, Jürgen; Coleman-Beattie, Brenda; Frank, Richard G

    2011-09-01

    This study evaluated a large demonstration project of collaborative care of depression at community health centers by examining the role of clinic site on two measures of quality care (early follow-up and appropriate pharmacotherapy) and on improvement of symptoms (score on Patient Health Questionnaire-9 reduced by 50% or ≤ 5). A quasi-experimental study examined data on the treatment of 2,821 patients aged 18 and older with depression symptoms between 2006 and 2009 at six community health organizations selected in a competitive process to implement a model of collaborative care. The model's key elements were use of a Web-based disease registry to track patients, care management to support primary care providers and offer proactive follow-up of patients, and organized psychiatric consultation. Across all sites, a plurality of patients achieved meaningful improvement in depression, and in many sites, improvement occurred rapidly. After adjustment for patient characteristics, multivariate logistic regression models revealed significant differences across clinics in the probability of receiving early follow-up (range .34-.88) or appropriate pharmacotherapy (range .27-.69) and in experiencing improvement (.36 to .84). Similarly, after adjustment for patient characteristics, Cox proportional hazards models revealed that time elapsed between first evaluation and the occurrence of improvement differed significantly across clinics (pquality indicators and outcomes. Sites that performed better on quality indicators had better outcomes, and the differences were not attributable to patients' characteristics.

  16. Clinical implementation of dose-volume histogram predictions for organs-at-risk in IMRT planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, K L; Appenzoller, L M; Tan, J; Michalski, J M; Thorstad, W L; Mutic, S

    2014-01-01

    True quality control (QC) of the planning process requires quantitative assessments of treatment plan quality itself, and QC in IMRT has been stymied by intra-patient anatomical variability and inherently complex three-dimensional dose distributions. In this work we describe the development of an automated system to reduce clinical IMRT planning variability and improve plan quality using mathematical models that predict achievable OAR DVHs based on individual patient anatomy. These models rely on the correlation of expected dose to the minimum distance from a voxel to the PTV surface, whereby a three-parameter probability distribution function (PDF) was used to model iso-distance OAR subvolume dose distributions. DVH models were obtained by fitting the evolution of the PDF with distance. Initial validation on clinical cohorts of 40 prostate and 24 head-and-neck plans demonstrated highly accurate model-based predictions for achievable DVHs in rectum, bladder, and parotid glands. By quantifying the integrated difference between candidate DVHs and predicted DVHs, the models correctly identified plans with under-spared OARs, validated by replanning all cases and correlating any realized improvements against the predicted gains. Clinical implementation of these predictive models was demonstrated in the PINNACLE treatment planning system by use of existing margin expansion utilities and the scripting functionality inherent to the system. To maintain independence from specific planning software, a system was developed in MATLAB to directly process DICOM-RT data. Both model training and patient-specific analyses were demonstrated with significant computational accelerations from parallelization.

  17. Clinical implementation of a quality assurance program in HDR brachytherapy by in vivo dosimetry with diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alecu, R.; Feldmeier, J.J.; Court, W.S.; Alecu, M.; Orton, C.G.

    1996-01-01

    Despite the possibilities of in vivo dosimetry with diodes (e.g. control of dose to organs at risk, recorded confirmational measurements of the dose actually delivered, check of the whole treatment chain, avoidance of misadministrations, etc.) and the fact that it has proven to be very useful as part of a departmental QA program in external beam therapy, few attempts to implement it for HDR brachytherapy procedures have been reported. The reason for this is probably that there are significant technical challenges that must be met prior to its clinical use. The purpose of this study is to investigate the practicability and usefulness of dose measurements for brachytherapy patients in daily clinical practice. In our clinic a high precision patient dosimetry method has been developed, based on the use of silicon diodes. First, calibration factors have been determined under 'reference' irradiation conditions. Secondly, correction factors have been evaluated for situations deviating from the reference conditions, i.e. for different distances from the implanted sources, tissue heterogeneities, presence of different type of applicators, etc. For certain intracavitary, interstitial and surface mold applications this procedure has proven to be sufficiently accurate to allow dose determinations with diodes to be in good agreement with the expected values, i.e. calculated by the treatment planning system (VariSource unit) and checked by ion chamber measurements. The results of in vivo measurements are discussed along with the possibilities and limitations of the employed techniques

  18. Governing EU employment policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva; Triantafillou, Peter; Damgaard, Bodil

    2015-01-01

    In the European Union (EU), employment policy is a prerogative of the member states. Therefore the EU's ability to govern in this area depends on its capability to involve national governments and relevant stakeholders in a collaborative effort to formulate and implement shared policy objectives....... of collaboration, the implementation phase mainly consists in the less demanding forms of cooperation and coordination....

  19. Negotiating Collaborative Governance Designs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plotnikof, Mie

    2017-01-01

    This chapter addresses the design and implementation issues of collaborative governance, a public management practice aimed at involving stakeholders in problem-solving and public innovation.......This chapter addresses the design and implementation issues of collaborative governance, a public management practice aimed at involving stakeholders in problem-solving and public innovation....

  20. Implementation and Clinical Outcomes of an Employer-Sponsored, Pharmacist-Provided Medication Therapy Management Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theising, Katie M; Fritschle, Traci L; Scholfield, Angelina M; Hicks, Emily L; Schymik, Michelle L

    2015-11-01

    Our objective was to describe the implementation and clinical outcomes of an employer-sponsored, pharmacist-provided medication therapy management (MTM) program for health plan beneficiaries with diabetes mellitus and/or hypertension. We conducted a single-center retrospective medical record review. The setting was a Pharmacy MTM Clinic at a self-insured health system consisting of six hospitals and several ancillary facilities. A total of 161 health plan beneficiaries with diabetes identified during annual wellness screenings for the health plan in 2012 and 225 health plan beneficiaries with diabetes and/or hypertension identified during annual wellness screenings for the health plan in 2013 were referred to the MTM clinic based on specific criteria. In 2012 the health system expanded its existing wellness program by implementing a voluntary diabetes care program for health plan beneficiaries with uncontrolled diabetes (hemoglobin A(1c) [A1C] 7% or higher); a similar program was added for hypertension for the 2013 plan year. All participants' A1C and blood pressure results were tracked from the date of their wellness screening through the end of the plan year. The pharmacists involved had the capability to directly implement drug regimen changes according to hospital protocol or provide recommendations to the physician, as specified by the referring physician. For the 2012-2013 plan year, the mean difference in A1C from baseline to program completion was -0.38% (95% confidence interval [CI] -0.58 to -0.18%, p<0.05). For beneficiaries with a baseline A1C of 7% or higher, the mean difference was -0.69% (95% CI -0.99 to -0.39%, p<0.05). For the 2013-2014 plan year, the mean difference in A1C from baseline to program completion was -0.62% (95% CI -0.81 to -0.44%, p<0.05). In that year, the mean difference in A1C for beneficiaries with A1C 7% or higher was -0.97% (95% CI -1.23 to -0.72%, p<0.05). For those referred for hypertension, a mean difference of -13 mm Hg (95

  1. mHealth Clinic Appointment PC Tablet: Implementation, Challenges and Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carol E.; Spaulding, Ryan; Piamjariyakul, Ubolrat; Werkowitch, Marilyn; Yadrich, Donna Macan; Hooper, Dedrick; Moore, Tyson; Gilroy, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients requiring daily intravenous (IV) home parenteral nutrition (HPN) would benefit from in-home professional observation to improve self-care, to assess, detect and prevent serious complications. Aims The study aims are to assess the viability and utility of conducting mobile healthcare (mHealth) videoconference assessments with patients managing lifelong daily 12-hour IV nutrition infusions in their homes. The challenges and solutions to implementing mobile personal computer (PC) tablet based clinic appointments are described. Methods A wireless Apple iPad Mini™ mobile touch-screen tablet computer with 5 mega-pixel camera was loaned to patients. Each tablet had Polycom RealPresence software and a fourth generation (4G) mobile telecommunications data plan. These supported audio-visual mobile videoconferencing encrypted connections between health professionals in their offices and HPN patients and their family members in their homes. Patients’ and professionals’ evaluations of their mHealth clinic experiences are collected. Results Patients (mean age = 41.9, SD = 2.8 years) had been prescribed 12-hour home parenteral nutrition (HPN) infusions daily due short bowel disorders. Patients had been on HPN from 1 to 10 years (M=4, SD=3.6). Evaluation of clinic appointments revealed that 100% of the patients (n=45) and the professionals (n=6) indicated that they can clearly hear and easily see one another. The mHealth audio-visual interactions were highly rated by patients and family members. Professionals highly rated their ability to obtain a medical history and visual inspection of patients. Several challenges were identified and recommendations for resolutions are described. Discussion All patients and professionals highly rated the iPad mHealth clinic appointments for convenience and ease of communicating between homes and offices. An important challenge for all mHealth visits is the clinical professional’s ability to make clinically accurate

  2. Description of Sanitation Clinic Implementation in Primary Health Care Services in Bukittinggi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vini Jamarin

    2016-01-01

    descriptive study used total sampling, in which all seven PHCS in Bukittinggi are included. This research was done from September to October 2013. Based on quedionaire result, all sanitarians are well-educated, but only two of them had sanitation clinic training. Only one PHCS has a special room, six has posters and leaflets, two allocates special budget for sanitation clinic, and six has all kind of manual books. Based on secondary data, the accumulation of environment-based disease’s cases in all PHCS is variative and fluctuative and the accumulation of clients come to sanitation clinic is still below the expectation. House-visitting activity has not met the expectation yet, while trans-program activity has been running well, trans-sector activity has been running well in almost all PHCS, and evaluation has been running in a variative frequency. All sanitation clinic graded good in implementing sanitation clinic, within the range of 50-100%.Keywords: sanitation clinic, primary health care service

  3. Repeat testing of low-level HIV-1 RNA: assay performance and implementation in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kirsten; Garner, Will; Wei, Lilian; Eron, Joseph J; Zhong, Lijie; Miller, Michael D; Martin, Hal; Plummer, Andrew; Tran-Muchowski, Cecilia; Lindstrom, Kim; Porter, James; Piontkowsky, David; Light, Angela; Reiske, Heinz; Quirk, Erin

    2018-05-15

    Assess the performance of HIV-1 RNA repeat testing of stored samples in cases of low-level viremia during clinical trials. Prospective and retrospective analysis of randomized clinical trial samples and reference standards. To evaluate assay variability of the Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HIV-1 Test, v2.0, three separate sources of samples were utilized: the World Health Organization (WHO) HIV reference standard (assayed using 50 independent measurements at six viral loads <200 copies/ml), retrospective analysis of four to six aliquots of plasma samples from four clinical trial participants, and prospective repeat testing of 120 samples from participants in randomized trials with low-level viremia. The TaqMan assay on the WHO HIV-1 RNA standards at viral loads <200 copies/ml performed within the expected variability according to assay specifications. However, standards with low viral loads of 36 and 18 copies/ml reported values of ≥ 50 copies/ml in 66 and 18% of tests, respectively. In participants treated with antiretrovirals who had unexpected viremia of 50-200 copies/ml after achieving <50 copies/ml, retesting of multiple aliquots of stored plasma found <50 copies/ml in nearly all cases upon retesting (14/15; 93%). Repeat testing was prospectively implemented in four clinical trials for all samples with virologic rebound of 50-200 copies/ml (n = 120 samples from 92 participants) from which 42% (50/120) had a retest result of less than 50 copies/ml and 58% (70/120) retested ≥ 50 copies/ml. The TaqMan HIV-1 RNA assay shows variability around 50 copies/ml that affects clinical trial results and may impact clinical practice. In participants with a history of viral load suppression, unexpected low-level viremia may be because of assay variability rather than low drug adherence or true virologic failure. Retesting a stored aliquot of the same sample may differentiate between assay variability and virologic failure as the source of viremia

  4. Review of the Reported Measures of Clinical Validity and Clinical Utility as Arguments for the Implementation of Pharmacogenetic Testing: A Case Study of Statin-Induced Muscle Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleen E. Jansen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Advances from pharmacogenetics (PGx have not been implemented into health care to the expected extent. One gap that will be addressed in this study is a lack of reporting on clinical validity and clinical utility of PGx-tests. A systematic review of current reporting in scientific literature was conducted on publications addressing PGx in the context of statins and muscle toxicity. Eighty-nine publications were included and information was selected on reported measures of effect, arguments, and accompanying conclusions. Most authors report associations to quantify the relationship between a genetic variation an outcome, such as adverse drug responses. Conclusions on the implementation of a PGx-test are generally based on these associations, without explicit mention of other measures relevant to evaluate the test's clinical validity and clinical utility. To gain insight in the clinical impact and select useful tests, additional outcomes are needed to estimate the clinical validity and utility, such as cost-effectiveness.

  5. Electronically implemented clinical indicators based on a data warehouse in a tertiary hospital: its clinical benefit and effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sooyoung; Kim, Seok; Lee, Kee-Hyuck; Jeong, Chang Wook; Youn, Sang Woong; Park, Kyoung Un; Moon, So Young; Hwang, Hee

    2014-07-01

    Assessing and monitoring care and service using clinical indicators (CIs) can allow the measurement of and lead to improvements in the quality of care. However, the management and maintenance of CI data has been shown to be difficult because the data are usually collected and provided manually. In this study, for the purpose of efficient managing quality indicators, a data warehouse (DW)-based CI monitoring system was developed. The clinical effectiveness and efficiency of a DW-based CI monitoring was investigated through several case studies of the system's operation at a tertiary hospital. This study analyzed the CIs that have been developed over the past 8 years at a 1340-bed tertiary general university hospital in South Korea to improve and monitor the quality of care and patient safety. The hospital was opened as a fully digital hospital in 2003, and the CIs were computerized in 2005 by implementing a DW-based CI monitoring system. We classified the computerized CIs and evaluated the monitoring results for several representative CIs, such as the optimal prescribing of preventive antibiotics, the average length of stay, the mortality rate, and the rehospitalization rate. During the development of the system in 2005, 12 of 19 CIs were computerized, and this number gradually increased until 299 of 335 CIs were computerized by 2012. In addition, among the CIs built computationally through the CI task force team, focal CIs subject to monitoring were selected annually, and the results of this monitoring were shared with all of the staff or the related department and its staff. By providing some examples of our CI monitoring results, we showed the feasibility of improving the quality of care, and maintaining the optimum level of patient care with less labor. The results of this study provide evidence regarding the clinical effectiveness and efficiency as well as the systems operation experience of a DW-based CI monitoring system. These findings may aid medical

  6. Analgesia and Opioids: A Pharmacogenetics Shortlist for Implementation in Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matic, Maja; de Wildt, Saskia N; Tibboel, Dick; van Schaik, Ron H N

    2017-07-01

    The use of opioids to alleviate pain is complicated by the risk of severe adverse events and the large variability in dose requirements. Pharmacogenetics (PGx) could possibly be used to tailor pain medication based on an individual's genetic background. Many potential genetic markers have been described, and the importance of genetic predisposition in opioid efficacy and toxicity has been demonstrated in knockout mouse models and human twin studies. Such predictors are especially of value for neonates and young children, in whom the assessment of efficacy or side effects is complicated by the inability of the patient to communicate this properly. The current problem is determining which of the many potential candidates to focus on for clinical implementation. We systematically searched publications on PGx for opioids in 5 databases, aiming to identify PGx markers with sufficient robust data and high enough occurrence for potential clinical application. The initial search yielded 4257 unique citations, eventually resulting in 852 relevant articles covering 24 genes. From these genes, we evaluated the evidence and selected the most promising 10 markers: cytochrome P450 family 2 subfamily D member 6 ( CYP2D6 ), cytochrome P450 family 3 subfamily A member 4 ( CYP3A4 ), cytochrome P450 family 3 subfamily A member 5 ( CYP3A5 ), UDP glucuronosyltransferase family 2 member B7 ( UGT2B7 ), ATP binding cassette subfamily B member 1 ( ABCB1 ), ATP binding cassette subfamily C member 3 ( ABCC3 ), solute carrier family 22 member 1 ( SLC22A1 ), opioid receptor kappa 1 ( OPRM1 ), catechol- O -methyltransferase ( COMT ), and potassium voltage-gated channel subfamily J member 6 ( KCNJ6 ). Treatment guidelines based on genotype are already available only for CYP2D6 . The application of PGx in the management of pain with opioids has the potential to improve therapy. We provide a shortlist of 10 genes that are the most promising markers for clinical use in this context. © 2016

  7. Implementation of a consent for chart review and contact and its impact in one clinical centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druce, Irena; Ooi, T C; McGuire, Debbie; Sorisky, Alexander; Malcolm, Janine

    2015-05-01

    Informed consent and protection of patient confidentiality are central to the conduction of clinical research. Consent for chart review and contact (CCRC) allows a patient chart to be screened for research by persons outside the direct circle-of-care and for the patient to be contacted regarding potential studies. This study describes the process of implementation and benefits of such a consent. We present a descriptive report of a CCRC document that was created and presented to patients over a 3.5-year period at a tertiary care Endocrinology and Metabolism centre. To assess the potential impact of such a document on patient recruitment, the basic demographics of patients who did and did not consent were compared. In addition, we compared the recruitment rate at our centre, using our novel approach, with that at other centres for an ongoing study of patients with type 1 diabetes. A large proportion (6501/8025, or 81%) of patients gave their consent for chart review. Patients who denied consent were more likely to be women and older. Compared with other centres, our centre recruited at the highest rate for a known study of patients with type 1 diabetes. The majority (46/60, or 76.7%) of patients were recruited via the novel approach. Consent for chart review and contact addresses several important ethical issues regarding the use of patient clinical information for research purposes. Our study demonstrated how such a process can be implemented. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Development and implementation of a clinical and business intelligence system for the Florida health data warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlHazme, Raed H; Rana, Arif M; De Lucca, Michael

    2014-01-01

    To develop and implement a Clinical and Business Intelligence (CBI) system for the Florida Health Data Warehouse (FHDW) in order to bridge the gap between Florida's healthcare stakeholders and the health data archived in FHWD. A gap analysis study has been conducted to evaluate the technological divide between the relevant users and FHWD health data, which is maintained by the Broward Regional Health Planning Council (BRHPC). The study revealed a gap between the health care data and the decision makers that utilize the FHDW data. To bridge the gap, a CBI system was proposed, developed and implemented by BRHPC as a viable solution to address this issue, using the System Development Life Cycle methodology. The CBI system was successfully implemented and yielded a number of positive outcomes. In addition to significantly shortening the time required to analyze the health data for decision-making processes, the solution also provided end-users with the ability to automatically track public health parameters. A large amount of data is collected and stored by various health care organizations at the local, state, and national levels. If utilized properly, such data can go a long way in optimizing health care services. CBI systems provide health care organizations with valuable insights for improving patient care, tracking trends for medical research, and for controlling costs. The CBI system has been found quite effective in bridging the gap between Florida's healthcare stake holders and FHDW health data. Consequently, the solution has improved in the planning and coordination of health care services for the state of Florida.

  9. A systematic review of team formulation in clinical psychology practice: Definition, implementation, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geach, Nicole; Moghaddam, Nima G; De Boos, Danielle

    2017-10-03

    Team formulation is promoted by professional practice guidelines for clinical psychologists. However, it is unclear whether team formulation is understood/implemented in consistent ways - or whether there is outcome evidence to support the promotion of this practice. This systematic review aimed to (1) synthesize how team formulation practice is defined and implemented by practitioner psychologists and (2) analyse the range of team formulation outcomes in the peer-reviewed literature. Seven electronic bibliographic databases were searched in June 2016. Eleven articles met inclusion criteria and were quality assessed. Extracted data were synthesized using content analysis. Descriptions of team formulation revealed three main forms of instantiation: (1) a structured, consultation approach; (2) semi-structured, reflective practice meetings; and (3) unstructured/informal sharing of ideas through routine interactions. Outcome evidence linked team formulation to a range of outcomes for staff teams and service users, including some negative outcomes. Quality appraisal identified significant issues with evaluation methods; such that, overall, outcomes were not well-supported. There is weak evidence to support the claimed beneficial outcomes of team formulation in practice. There is a need for greater specification and standardization of 'team formulation' practices, to enable a clearer understanding of any relationships with outcomes and implications for best-practice implementations. Under the umbrella term of 'team formulation', three types of practice are reported: (1) highly structured consultation; (2) reflective practice meetings; and (3) informal sharing of ideas. Outcomes linked to team formulation, including some negative outcomes, were not well evidenced. Research using robust study designs is required to investigate the process and outcomes of team formulation practice. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  10. Clinical Social Work. State Laws Governing Independent Practice and Reimbursement of Services. Fact Sheet for the Honorable Daniel K. Inouye, United States Senate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    This fact sheet on state laws governing the independent practice and reimbursement of services for clinical social workers contains information from questionnaires sent to the state agencies responsible for health insurance regulations and Medicaid and licensing activities. Information on Ohio, the only state which did not respond, is not…

  11. Development and implementation of intranasal naloxone opioid overdose response protocol at a homeless health clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlem, Chin Hwa Y; Horstman, Molly J; Williams, Brent C

    2016-01-01

    To describe the development, implementation, and preliminary evaluation of Opioid Overdose Response Protocol using intranasal (IN) naloxone in a homeless shelter. Opioid Overdose Response Protocol and training curriculum were developed using the Massachusetts Department of Public Health Opioid Overdose Education and Naloxone Distribution (OEND) flow chart, the American Heart Association (AHA) simplified adult basic life support algorithm, and resources through Harms Reduction Coalition. Intranasal naloxone offers a safe and effective method for opioid reversal. To combat the rising incidence of opioid overdose, IN naloxone should be made available at homeless shelters and other facilities with high frequency of opioid overdose, including the training of appropriate staff. This project has demonstrated the effective training and implementation of an Opioid Overdose Response Protocol, based on feedback received from cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) trained nonhealthcare staff. Nurse practitioners (NPs), with our focus on patient care, prevention, and education, are well suited to the deployment of this life-saving protocol. NPs are in critical positions to integrate opioid overdose prevention education and provide naloxone rescue kits in clinical practices. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  12. Implementation outcomes of evidence-based quality improvement for depression in VA community based outpatient clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fortney John

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Collaborative-care management is an evidence-based practice for improving depression outcomes in primary care. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA has mandated the implementation of collaborative-care management in its satellite clinics, known as Community Based Outpatient Clinics (CBOCs. However, the organizational characteristics of CBOCs present added challenges to implementation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of evidence-based quality improvement (EBQI as a strategy to facilitate the adoption of collaborative-care management in CBOCs. Methods This nonrandomized, small-scale, multisite evaluation of EBQI was conducted at three VA Medical Centers and 11 of their affiliated CBOCs. The Plan phase of the EBQI process involved the localized tailoring of the collaborative-care management program to each CBOC. Researchers ensured that the adaptations were evidence based. Clinical and administrative staff were responsible for adapting the collaborative-care management program for local needs, priorities, preferences and resources. Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles were used to refine the program over time. The evaluation was based on the RE-AIM (Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, Maintenance Framework and used data from multiple sources: administrative records, web-based decision-support systems, surveys, and key-informant interviews. Results Adoption: 69.0% (58/84 of primary care providers referred patients to the program. Reach: 9.0% (298/3,296 of primary care patients diagnosed with depression who were not already receiving specialty care were enrolled in the program. Fidelity: During baseline care manager encounters, education/activation was provided to 100% (298/298 of patients, barriers were assessed and addressed for 100% (298/298 of patients, and depression severity was monitored for 100% (298/298 of patients. Less than half (42.5%, 681/1603 of follow-up encounters during the acute

  13. Technology transfer for the implementation of a clinical trials network on drug abuse and mental health treatment in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horigian, Viviana E; Marín-Navarrete, Rodrigo A; Verdeja, Rosa E; Alonso, Elizabeth; Perez, María A; Fernández-Mondragón, José; Berlanga, Carlos; Medina-Mora, María Elena; Szapocznik, José

    2015-09-01

    Low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) lack the research infrastructure and capacity to conduct rigorous substance abuse and mental health effectiveness clinical trials to guide clinical practice. A partnership between the Florida Node Alliance of the United States National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network and the National Institute of Psychiatry in Mexico was established in 2011 to improve substance abuse practice in Mexico. The purpose of this partnership was to develop a Mexican national clinical trials network of substance abuse researchers and providers capable of implementing effectiveness randomized clinical trials in community-based settings. A technology transfer model was implemented and ran from 2011-2013. The Florida Node Alliance shared the "know how" for the development of the research infrastructure to implement randomized clinical trials in community programs through core and specific training modules, role-specific coaching, pairings, modeling, monitoring, and feedback. The technology transfer process was bi-directional in nature in that it was informed by feedback on feasibility and cultural appropriateness for the context in which practices were implemented. The Institute, in turn, led the effort to create the national network of researchers and practitioners in Mexico and the implementation of the first trial. A collaborative model of technology transfer was useful in creating a Mexican researcher-provider network that is capable of changing national practice in substance abuse research and treatment. Key considerations for transnational technology transfer are presented.

  14. Aligning clinical compensation with clinical productivity: design and implementation of the financial value unit (FVU) system in an academic department of internal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stites, Steven; Steffen, Patrick; Turner, Scott; Pingleton, Susan

    2013-07-01

    A new metric was developed and implemented at the University of Kansas School of Medicine Department of Internal Medicine, the financial value unit (FVU). This metric analyzes faculty clinical compensation compared with clinical work productivity as a transparent means to decrease the physician compensation variability and compensate faculty equitably for clinical work.The FVU is the ratio of individual faculty clinical compensation compared with their total work relative value units (wRVUs) generated divided by Medical Group Management Association (MGMA) salary to wRVUs of a similar MGMA physician.The closer the FVU ratio is to 1.0, the closer clinical compensation is to that of an MGMA physician with similar clinical productivity. Using FVU metrics to calculate a faculty salary gap compared with MGMA median salary and wRVU productivity, a divisional production payment was established annually.From FY 2006 to FY 2011, both total faculty numbers and overall clinical activity increased. With the implementation of the FVU, both clinical productivity and compensation increased while, at the same time, physician retention rates remained high. Variability in physician compensation decreased. Dramatic clinical growth was associated with the alignment of clinical work and clinical compensation in a transparent and equable process.

  15. A CLINICAL STUDY OF 100 CASES OF ACUTE OLEANDER SEED POISONING IN KANYAKUMARI GOVERNMENT MEDICAL COLLEGE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankar Selvaraj

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Yellow oleander (Cascabela thevetia is a poisonous plant that is widely found in India. All parts of the C. thevetia plant are toxic to humans as they contain cardiac glycosides. MATERIALS AND METHODS 100 patients with alleged history of yellow oleander seed poisoning who came to Kanyakumari Government Medical College Hospital during the period of 2013-16 were enrolled in this study. Patients presenting with multiple poison consumption and those with previous history of heart disease were excluded from the study. A detailed history of the number of seeds consumed, the time of consumption, detailed clinical assessment, routine blood investigations and a 12-lead ECG were recorded. ECG was recorded at the time of admission and every 12th hourly to detect any cardiac arrhythmias. RESULTS Most symptomatic patients had conduction defects affecting the SA node, the AV node or both. Patients showing cardiac arrhythmias had significantly higher mean serum potassium concentrations ranging from 4.5-5.2 mEq/L. Yellow oleander seed poisoning is common among young females (56%. There is a poor correlation between the number of seeds ingested and the severity of cardiotoxicity. Arrhythmias has occurred after ingestion of one or two seeds; some patients are asymptomatic even after consuming five or more seeds without requiring specialised treatments. This could be explained on the basis that crushed seeds are more dangerous than whole seeds. CONCLUSION Most of these young previously healthy patients had conduction defects affecting the SA or AV nodes. Relatively, few had the atrial tachyarrhythmias or ventricular ectopic beats that are typical of digoxin poisoning. Yellow oleander induced arrhythmias were associated with high serum potassium levels when compared to patient without arrhythmias.

  16. A review of human factors principles for the design and implementation of medication safety alerts in clinical information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phansalkar, Shobha; Edworthy, Judy; Hellier, Elizabeth; Seger, Diane L; Schedlbauer, Angela; Avery, Anthony J; Bates, David W

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this review is to describe the implementation of human factors principles for the design of alerts in clinical information systems. First, we conduct a review of alarm systems to identify human factors principles that are employed in the design and implementation of alerts. Second, we review the medical informatics literature to provide examples of the implementation of human factors principles in current clinical information systems using alerts to provide medication decision support. Last, we suggest actionable recommendations for delivering effective clinical decision support using alerts. A review of studies from the medical informatics literature suggests that many basic human factors principles are not followed, possibly contributing to the lack of acceptance of alerts in clinical information systems. We evaluate the limitations of current alerting philosophies and provide recommendations for improving acceptance of alerts by incorporating human factors principles in their design.

  17. Framework for the impact analysis and implementation of Clinical Prediction Rules (CPRs)

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wallace, Emma

    2011-10-14

    Abstract Clinical Prediction Rules (CPRs) are tools that quantify the contribution of symptoms, clinical signs and available diagnostic tests, and in doing so stratify patients according to the probability of having a target outcome or need for a specified treatment. Most focus on the derivation stage with only a minority progressing to validation and very few undergoing impact analysis. Impact analysis studies remain the most efficient way of assessing whether incorporating CPRs into a decision making process improves patient care. However there is a lack of clear methodology for the design of high quality impact analysis studies. We have developed a sequential four-phased framework based on the literature and the collective experience of our international working group to help researchers identify and overcome the specific challenges in designing and conducting an impact analysis of a CPR. There is a need to shift emphasis from deriving new CPRs to validating and implementing existing CPRs. The proposed framework provides a structured approach to this topical and complex area of research.

  18. Job sharing in clinical nutrition management: a plan for successful implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visocan, B J; Herold, L S; Mulcahy, M J; Schlosser, M F

    1993-10-01

    While women continue to enter the American work force in record numbers; many experience difficulty in juggling career and family obligations. Flexible scheduling is one option used to ease work and family pressures. Women's changing work roles have potentially noteworthy implications for clinical nutrition management, a traditionally female-dominated profession where the recruitment and retention of valued, experienced registered dietitians can prove to be a human resources challenge. Job sharing, one type of flexible scheduling, is applicable to the nutrition management arena. This article describes and offers a plan for overcoming obstacles to job sharing, including determining feasibility, gaining support of top management, establishing program design, announcing the job share program, and using implementation, monitoring, and fine-tuning strategies. Benefits that can be derived from a successful job share are reduced absenteeism, decreased turnover, enhanced recruitment, improved morale, increased productivity, improved job coverage, and enhanced skills and knowledge base. A case study illustrates one method for achieving job sharing success in clinical nutrition management.

  19. Clinical implementation of intraoperative cone-beam CT in head and neck surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, M. J.; Chan, H.; Nithiananthan, S.; Qiu, J.; Barker, E.; Bachar, G.; Dixon, B. J.; Irish, J. C.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2011-03-01

    A prototype mobile C-arm for cone-beam CT (CBCT) has been translated to a prospective clinical trial in head and neck surgery. The flat-panel CBCT C-arm was developed in collaboration with Siemens Healthcare, and demonstrates both sub-mm spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility at low radiation dose (e.g., software based on the open-source Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK). The CBCT C-arm has been successfully deployed in 15 head and neck cases and streamlined into the surgical environment using human factors engineering methods and expert feedback from surgeons, nurses, and anesthetists. Intraoperative imaging is implemented in a manner that maintains operating field sterility, reduces image artifacts (e.g., carbon fiber OR table) and minimizes radiation exposure. Image reviews conducted with surgical staff indicate bony detail and soft-tissue visualization sufficient for intraoperative guidance, with additional artifact management (e.g., metal, scatter) promising further improvements. Clinical trial deployment suggests a role for intraoperative CBCT in guiding complex head and neck surgical tasks, including planning mandible and maxilla resection margins, guiding subcranial and endonasal approaches to skull base tumours, and verifying maxillofacial reconstruction alignment. Ongoing translational research into complimentary image-guidance subsystems include novel methods for real-time tool tracking, fusion of endoscopic video and CBCT, and deformable registration of preoperative volumes and planning contours with intraoperative CBCT.

  20. Leading clinical handover improvement: a change strategy to implement best practices in the acute care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Christina M; Persaud, Drepaul David

    2011-03-01

    Many contemporary acute care facilities lack safe and effective clinical handover practices resulting in patient transitions that are vulnerable to discontinuities in care, medical errors, and adverse patient safety events. This article is intended to supplement existing handover improvement literature by providing practical guidance for leaders and managers who are seeking to improve the safety and the effectiveness of clinical handovers in the acute care setting. A 4-stage change model has been applied to guide the application of strategies for handover improvement. Change management and quality improvement principles, as well as concepts drawn from safety science and high-reliability organizations, were applied to inform strategies. A model for handover improvement respecting handover complexity is presented. Strategies targeted to stages of change include the following: 1. Enhancing awareness of handover problems and opportunities with the support of strategic directions, accountability, end user involvement, and problem complexity recognition. 2. Identifying solutions by applying and adapting best practices in local contexts. 3. Implementing locally adapted best practices supported by communication, documentation, and training. 4. Institutionalizing practice changes through integration, monitoring, and active dissemination. Finally, continued evaluation at every stage is essential. Although gaps in handover process and function knowledge remain, efforts to improve handover safety and effectiveness are still possible. Continued evaluation is critical in building this understanding and to ensure that practice changes lead to improvements in patient safety, organizational effectiveness, and patient and provider satisfaction. Through handover knowledge building, fundamental changes in handover policies and practices may be possible.

  1. Implementation of clinical research trials using web-based and mobile devices: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Eagleson

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the increasing implementation of web-based, mobile health interventions in clinical trials, it is crucial for researchers to address the security and privacy concerns of patient information according to high ethical standards. The full process of meeting these standards is often made more complicated due to the use of internet-based technology and smartphones for treatment, telecommunication, and data collection; however, this process is not well-documented in the literature. Results The Smart Heart Trial is a single-arm feasibility study that is currently assessing the effects of a web-based, mobile lifestyle intervention for overweight and obese children and youth with congenital heart disease in Southwestern Ontario. Participants receive telephone counseling regarding nutrition and fitness; and complete goal-setting activities on a web-based application. This paper provides a detailed overview of the challenges the study faced in meeting the high standards of our Research Ethics Board, specifically regarding patient privacy. Conclusion We outline our solutions, successes, limitations, and lessons learned to inform future similar studies; and model much needed transparency in ensuring high quality security and protection of patient privacy when using web-based and mobile devices for telecommunication and data collection in clinical research.

  2. WE-D-207-01: Background and Clinical Implementation of a Screening Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aberle, D.

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, Lung Cancer is responsible for more cancer deaths than the next four cancers combined. In addition, the 5 year survival rate for lung cancer patients has not improved over the past 40 to 50 years. To combat this deadly disease, in 2002 the National Cancer Institute launched a very large Randomized Control Trial called the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST). This trial would randomize subjects who had substantial risk of lung cancer (due to age and smoking history) into either a Chest X-ray arm or a low dose CT arm. In November 2010, the National Cancer Institute announced that the NLST had demonstrated 20% fewer lung cancer deaths among those who were screened with low-dose CT than with chest X-ray. In December 2013, the US Preventive Services Task Force recommended the use of Lung Cancer Screening using low dose CT and a little over a year later (Feb. 2015), CMS announced that Medicare would also cover Lung Cancer Screening using low dose CT. Thus private and public insurers are required to provide Lung Cancer Screening programs using CT to the appropriate population(s). The purpose of this Symposium is to inform medical physicists and prepare them to support the implementation of Lung Screening programs. This Symposium will focus on the clinical aspects of lung cancer screening, requirements of a screening registry for systematically capturing and tracking screening patients and results (such as required Medicare data elements) as well as the role of the medical physicist in screening programs, including the development of low dose CT screening protocols. Learning Objectives: To understand the clinical basis and clinical components of a lung cancer screening program, including eligibility criteria and other requirements. To understand the data collection requirements, workflow, and informatics infrastructure needed to support the tracking and reporting components of a screening program. To understand the role of the medical physicist in

  3. Development and implementation of a clinical pathway approach to simulation-based training for foregut surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, Kiyoyuki W; Buchholz, Joseph; LaMarra, Denise; Karakousis, Giorgos C; Aggarwal, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary demands on resident education call for integration of simulation. We designed and implemented a simulation-based curriculum for Post Graduate Year 1 surgery residents to teach technical and nontechnical skills within a clinical pathway approach for a foregut surgery patient, from outpatient visit through surgery and postoperative follow-up. The 3-day curriculum for groups of 6 residents comprises a combination of standardized patient encounters, didactic sessions, and hands-on training. The curriculum is underpinned by a summative simulation "pathway" repeated on days 1 and 3. The "pathway" is a series of simulated preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative encounters in following up a single patient through a disease process. The resident sees a standardized patient in the clinic presenting with distal gastric cancer and then enters an operating room to perform a gastrojejunostomy on a porcine tissue model. Finally, the resident engages in a simulated postoperative visit. All encounters are rated by faculty members and the residents themselves, using standardized assessment forms endorsed by the American Board of Surgery. A total of 18 first-year residents underwent this curriculum. Faculty ratings of overall operative performance significantly improved following the 3-day module. Ratings of preoperative and postoperative performance were not significantly changed in 3 days. Resident self-ratings significantly improved for all encounters assessed, as did reported confidence in meeting the defined learning objectives. Conventional surgical simulation training focuses on technical skills in isolation. Our novel "pathway" curriculum targets an important gap in training methodologies by placing both technical and nontechnical skills in their clinical context as part of managing a surgical patient. Results indicate consistent improvements in assessments of performance as well as confidence and support its continued usage to educate surgery residents

  4. Implementing the objective structured clinical examination in a geriatrics fellowship program-a 3-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avelino-Silva, Thiago J; Gil, Luiz A; Suemoto, Claudia K; Kikuchi, Elina L; Lin, Sumika M; Farias, Luciana L; Jacob-Filho, Wilson

    2012-07-01

    The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) appears to be an effective alternative for assessing not only medical knowledge, but also clinical skills, including effective communication and physical examination skills. The purpose of the current study was to implement an OSCE model in a geriatrics fellowship program and to compare the instrument with traditional essay examination. Seventy first- and second-year geriatric fellows were initially submitted to a traditional essay examination and scored from 0 to 10 by a faculty member. The same fellows subsequently underwent an OSCE with eight 10-minute stations covering a wide range of essential aspects of geriatric knowledge. Each OSCE station had an examiner responsible for its evaluation according to a predefined checklist. Checklist items were classified for analysis purposes as clinical knowledge items (CKI) and communication skills items (CSI); fellow responses were scored from 0 to 10.Although essay examinations took from 30 to 45 minutes to complete, 180-200 minutes were required to evaluate fellows using the proposed OSCE method. Fellows scored an average of 6.2 ± 1.2 on the traditional essay examination and 6.6 ± 1.0 on the OSCE (P examination was similar to their performance on CKI (P = .13). Second-year fellows performed better than first-year fellows on the essay examination (P geriatrics fellowship program. Combining different testing modalities may provide the best assessment of competence for various domains of knowledge, skills, and behavior. © 2012, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2012, The American Geriatrics Society.

  5. Implementation of a Screening and Management of Overweight and Obesity Clinical Practice Guideline in an Ambulatory Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winik, Connie L; Bonham, C Elizabeth

    2018-01-01

    Obesity is a rapidly growing health problem reaching epidemic levels around the world (World Health Organization, 2014). According to the World Health Organization, the current incident rate of obesity makes it the leading risk for deaths across the globe. The United States (USA) is amidst in this growing global epidemic. The obesity epidemic is a nondiscriminatory health problem affecting millions of individuals from a variety of backgrounds and social status. One group impacted by this disease is the US military. The health-related consequences of overweight and obesity has increased our military health care expenditures and has a direct impact on our nation's military readiness (Veterans Affairs/Department of Defense, 2014). The purpose of this Doctor of Nursing Practice project was to implement the Veterans Affairs/Department of Defense's Clinical Practice Guideline on Screening and Management of Overweight and Obesity at a military treatment facility in the Midwest. The goal of the project was to reduce the incidence rate of overweight and obese active duty military service members assigned to a military installation in the Midwest. With institutional review board approval, project implementation results were analyzed with descriptive and inferential statistics (paired t- tests). The goal to reduce the incident rate of overweight and obese by 5% was not achieved, but in turn the rate of overweight and obese increased by 1.57% over the 6-mo period. There were decreases in the normal with an increase in the overweight and obesity rate. This inverse outcome was unexpected and concerning. Based on the project's finding, there is a need to address the perceived barriers to maintaining healthy behaviors to plan future activities. An in-depth look at whether there is a knowledge deficit, a perceived lack of self-efficacy, competing life priorities preventing engagement in health promotion behaviors, or some other element influencing the motivation to change would be

  6. Building a web-based CAD server for clinical use, evaluation, and incremental learning. Implementation of analysis function based on execution result and clinical feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Yukihiro; Hayashi, Naoto; Masutani, Yoshitaka; Yoshikawa, Takeharu; Nemoto, Mitsutaka; Hanaoka, Shouhei; Maeda, Eriko; Ohtomo, Kuni; Miki, Soichiro

    2010-01-01

    Development of clinical image analysis software such as computer-assisted detection/diagnosis (CAD) involves a cycle of algorithm development, software implementation, clinical use, refinement of algorithm and software based on feedback. This cycle is expected to accelerate development of CAD software. We have been building a web-based CAD server that enables radiologists to use CAD software and to give feedback in clinical environment. The platform has been utilized in our hospital for 16 months, and more than 2,000 cases of feedback data have been accumulated. In this report, we introduce additional functions for performance evaluation based on executed results of CAD software and clinical feedback. (author)

  7. Understanding critical barriers to implementing a clinical information system in a nursing home through the lens of a socio-technical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Or, Calvin; Dohan, Michael; Tan, Joseph

    2014-09-01

    This paper addresses key barriers to implementing a clinical information system (CIS) in a Hong Kong nursing home setting, from a healthcare specific socio-technical perspective. Data was collected through field observations (n = 12) and semi-structured individual interviews (n = 18) of CIS stakeholders in a Hong Kong nursing home, and analyzed using the immersion/crystallization approach. Complex interactions relevant to our case were contextualized and interpreted within the perspective of the Sittig-Singh Healthcare Socio-Technical Framework (HSTF). Three broad clusters of implementation barriers from the eight HSTF dimensions were identified: (a) Infrastructure-based barriers, which relate to conflict between government regulations and system functional needs of users; lack of financial support; inconsistency between workflow, work policy, and procedures; and inadequacy of hardware-software infrastructural and technical support; (b) Process-based barriers, which relate to mismatch between the technology, existing work practice and workflow, and communication; low system speed, accessibility, and stability; deficient computer literacy; more experience in health care profession; clinical content inadequacy and unavailability; as well as poor system usefulness and user interface design; and (c) Outcome-based barriers, which relate to the lack of measurement and monitoring of system effectiveness. Two additional dimensions underlining the importance of the ability of a CIS to change are proposed to extend the Sittig-Singh HSTF. First, advocacy would promote the articulation and influence of changes in the system and subsequent outcomes by CIS stakeholders, and second, adaptability would ensure the ability of the system to adjust to emerging needs. The broad set of discovered implementation shortcomings expands prior research on why CIS can fail in nursing home settings. Moreover, our investigation offers a knowledge base and recommendations that can serve

  8. A survey of blood conservation methods in clinical practice in some urban south-eastern government hospitals in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amucheazi, A O; Ajuzeiogu, V O; Ezike, H A; Odiakosa, M C; Nwoke, O M; Onyia, E

    2011-01-01

    GENERAL OBJECTIVE: To assess the practice of blood conservation. To determine the methods of blood conservation in use, to assess the lower limit for hemoglobin for elective procedures, to determine transfusion trigger point in practice, to find out limitations in practice and ways to improve clinical practice. This was conducted in February 2009. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed among the surgeons and anesthetists in practice at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu State University Teaching Hospital, Ebonyi State University Teaching Hospital and National Orthopaedic Hospital, Enugu. The data gathered was analyzed using the SPSS software. : Of participants who agreed to fill the questionnaires, more than 50% were males. The most prevalent specialty was general surgery (24.2%), followed by orthopedics (22.6%), obstetrics and gynecology (20.7%), and anesthesia (17.7%). The lowest hemoglobin limit before the patient was allowed into the theatre for elective procedures was 10 g/dl while individual transfusion trigger points ranged from hemoglobin of 6 to 10 g/dl. Majority of the doctors would avoid homologous blood transfusion in order to avoid transfusion-related diseases and reaction. Regarding knowledge of blood conservation methods and means of avoiding homologous blood, the use of diathermy was highest (12.33%), followed by preoperative blood donation (11.87%), use of hematinics (10.96%), and tourniquet 10.5%. Also, in practice, diathermy was the most frequently used (18.69%), followed by preoperative blood donation (16.16%), use of tourniquet (15.15%), while the Ovadje cell saver was least with 0.01%. Suggestions from respondents on the ways of limiting transfusion-related problems included optimization of patients (24.5%), improvement of standard of living (17.7%), and personnel training (13.3%). There is an agreement with the global trend geared toward minimizing the use of homologous blood by doctors in these hospitals. However

  9. A survey of blood conservation methods in clinical practice in some urban south-eastern government hospitals in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amucheazi A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available General Objective: To assess the practice of blood conservation. Specific Objectives: To determine the methods of blood conservation in use, to assess the lower limit for hemoglobin for elective procedures, to determine transfusion trigger point in practice, to find out limitations in practice and ways to improve clinical practice. Materials and Methods: This was conducted in February 2009. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed among the surgeons and anesthetists in practice at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu State University Teaching Hospital, Ebonyi State University Teaching Hospital and National Orthopaedic Hospital, Enugu. The data gathered was analyzed using the SPSS software. Results : Of participants who agreed to fill the questionnaires, more than 50% were males. The most prevalent specialty was general surgery (24.2%, followed by orthopedics (22.6%, obstetrics and gynecology (20.7%, and anesthesia (17.7%. The lowest hemoglobin limit before the patient was allowed into the theatre for elective procedures was 10 g/dl while individual transfusion trigger points ranged from hemoglobin of 6 to 10 g/dl. Majority of the doctors would avoid homologous blood transfusion in order to avoid transfusion-related diseases and reaction. Regarding knowledge of blood conservation methods and means of avoiding homologous blood, the use of diathermy was highest (12.33%, followed by preoperative blood donation (11.87%, use of hematinics (10.96%, and tourniquet 10.5%. Also, in practice, diathermy was the most frequently used (18.69%, followed by preoperative blood donation (16.16%, use of tourniquet (15.15%, while the Ovadje cell saver was least with 0.01%. Suggestions from respondents on the ways of limiting transfusion-related problems included optimization of patients (24.5%, improvement of standard of living (17.7%, and personnel training (13.3%. Conclusion: There is an agreement with the global trend geared toward

  10. A systematic review of implementation strategies for assessment, prevention, and management of ICU delirium and their effect on clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trogrlić, Zoran; van der Jagt, Mathieu; Bakker, Jan; Balas, Michele C; Ely, E Wesley; van der Voort, Peter H J; Ista, Erwin

    2015-04-09

    Despite recommendations from professional societies and patient safety organizations, the majority of ICU patients worldwide are not routinely monitored for delirium, thus preventing timely prevention and management. The purpose of this systematic review is to summarize what types of implementation strategies have been tested to improve ICU clinicians' ability to effectively assess, prevent and treat delirium and to evaluate the effect of these strategies on clinical outcomes. We searched PubMed, Embase, PsychINFO, Cochrane and CINAHL (January 2000 and April 2014) for studies on implementation strategies that included delirium-oriented interventions in adult ICU patients. Studies were suitable for inclusion if implementation strategies' efficacy, in terms of a clinical outcome, or process outcome was described. We included 21 studies, all including process measures, while 9 reported both process measures and clinical outcomes. Some individual strategies such as "audit and feedback" and "tailored interventions" may be important to establish clinical outcome improvements, but otherwise robust data on effectiveness of specific implementation strategies were scarce. Successful implementation interventions were frequently reported to change process measures, such as improvements in adherence to delirium screening with up to 92%, but relating process measures to outcome changes was generally not possible. In meta-analyses, reduced mortality and ICU length of stay reduction were statistically more likely with implementation programs that employed more (six or more) rather than less implementation strategies and when a framework was used that either integrated current evidence on pain, agitation and delirium management (PAD) or when a strategy of early awakening, breathing, delirium screening and early exercise (ABCDE bundle) was employed. Using implementation strategies aimed at organizational change, next to behavioral change, was also associated with reduced mortality

  11. Clinical Implementation Of Megavoltage Cone Beam CT As Part Of An IGRT Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Albin; Kinney, Vicki; Crooks, Cheryl; Bauer, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Knowing where the tumor is at all times during treatment is the next challenge in the field of radiation therapy. This issue has become more important because with treatments such as Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), healthy tissue is spared by using very tight margins around the tumor. These tight margins leave very small room for patient setup errors. The use of an imaging modality in the treatment room as a way to localize the tumor for patient set up is generally known as ''Image Guided Radiation Therapy'' or IGRT. This article deals with a form of IGRT known as Megavoltage Cone Beam Computed Tomography (MCBCT) using a Siemens Oncor linear accelerator currently in use at Firelands Regional Medical Center. With MCBCT, we are capable of acquiring CT images right before the treatment of the patient and then use this information to position the patient tumor according to the treatment plan. This article presents the steps followed in order to clinically implement this system, as well as some of the quality assurance tests suggested by the manufacturer and some tests developed in house

  12. SU-E-T-67: Clinical Implementation and Evaluation of the Acuros Dose Calculation Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, C; Combine, T; Dickens, K; Wynn, R; Pavord, D; Huq, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The main aim of the current study is to present a detailed description of the implementation of the Acuros XB Dose Calculation Algorithm, and subsequently evaluate its clinical impacts by comparing it with AAA algorithm. Methods: The source models for both Acuros XB and AAA were configured by importing the same measured beam data into Eclipse treatment planning system. Both algorithms were evaluated by comparing calculated dose with measured dose on a homogeneous water phantom for field sizes ranging from 6cm × 6cm to 40cm × 40cm. Central axis and off-axis points with different depths were chosen for the comparison. Similarly, wedge fields with wedge angles from 15 to 60 degree were used. In addition, variable field sizes for a heterogeneous phantom were used to evaluate the Acuros algorithm. Finally, both Acuros and AAA were tested on VMAT patient plans for various sites. Does distributions and calculation time were compared. Results: On average, computation time is reduced by at least 50% by Acuros XB compared with AAA on single fields and VMAT plans. When used for open 6MV photon beams on homogeneous water phantom, both Acuros XB and AAA calculated doses were within 1% of measurement. For 23 MV photon beams, the calculated doses were within 1.5% of measured doses for Acuros XB and 2% for AAA. When heterogeneous phantom was used, Acuros XB also improved on accuracy. Conclusion: Compared with AAA, Acuros XB can improve accuracy while significantly reduce computation time for VMAT plans

  13. Examining structural and clinical factors associated with implementation of standing orders for adult immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonas, Michael A; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Zimmerman, Richard K; Ahmed, Faruque; Albert, Steven M

    2012-01-01

    A proven method to increase vaccination rates in primary care is a standing orders program (SOP) for nonphysician staff to assess and vaccinate eligible individuals without a specific written physician order. This study describes a mixed methods approach to examining physicians' beliefs and attitudes about and adoption of SOPs for adult immunizations, specifically, influenza and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. Focus groups and in-depth interviews of physicians, nurses, pr